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Sample records for international laser radar

  1. Sixteenth International Laser Radar Conference, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. Patrick (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Given here are extended abstracts of papers presented at the 16th International Laser Radar Conference, held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, July 20-24, 1992. Topics discussed include the Mt. Pinatubo volcanic dust laser observations, global change, ozone measurements, Earth mesospheric measurements, wind measurements, imaging, ranging, water vapor measurements, and laser devices and technology.

  2. Nineteenth International Laser Radar Conference. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N. (Editor); Ismail, Syed (Editor); Schwemmer, Geary K. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This publication contains extended abstracts of papers presented at the Nineteenth International Laser Radar Conference, held at Annapolis, Maryland, July 6-10, 1998; 260 papers were presented in both oral and poster sessions. The topics of the conference sessions were Aerosol Clouds, Multiple Scattering; Tropospheric Profiling; Stratospheric/Mesospheric Profiling; Wind Profiling; New Lidar Technology and Techniques; Lidar Applications, including Altimetry and Marine; Space and Future Lidar; and Lidar Commercialization/Eye Safety. This conference reflects the breadth of research activities being conducted in the lidar field. These abstracts address subjects from lidar-based atmospheric investigations, development of new lasers and lidar system technology, and current and future space-based lidar systems.

  3. Nineteenth International Laser Radar Conference. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N. (Editor); Ismail, Syed (Editor); Schwemmer, Geary K. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This publication contains extended abstracts of papers presented at the Nineteenth International Laser Radar Conference, held at Annapolis, Maryland, July 6-10, 1998; 260 papers were presented in both oral and poster sessions. The topics of the conference sessions were Aerosol Clouds, Multiple Scattering; Tropospheric Profiling, Stratospheric/Mesospheric Profiling; Wind Profiling; New Lidar Technology and Techniques; Lidar Applications, Including Altimetry and Marine; Space and Future Lidar; and Lidar Commercialization/Eye Safety. This conference reflects the breadth of research activities being conducted in the lidar field. These abstracts address subjects from lidar-based atmospheric investigations, development of new lasers and lidar system technology, and current and future space-based lidar systems.

  4. Sixteenth International Laser Radar Conference, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. Patrick (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This publication contains extended abstracts of papers presented at the 16th International Laser Radar Conference. One-hundred ninety-five papers were presented in both oral and poster sessions. The topics of the conference sessions were: (1) Mt. Pinatubo Volcanic Dust Layer Observations; (2) Global Change/Ozone Measurements; (3) GLOBE/LAWS/LITE; (4) Mesospheric Measurements and Measurement Systems; (5) Middle Atmosphere; (6) Wind Measurements and Measurement Systems; (7) Imaging and Ranging; (8) Water Vapor Measurements; (9) Systems and Facilities; and (10) Laser Devices and Technology. This conference reflects the breadth of research activities being conducted in the lidar field. These abstracts address subjects from lidar-based atmospheric investigations relating to global change to the development of new lidar systems and technology.

  5. Laser radar in robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Carmer, D.C.; Peterson, L.M.

    1996-02-01

    In this paper the authors describe the basic operating principles of laser radar sensors and the typical algorithms used to process laser radar imagery for robotic applications. The authors review 12 laser radar sensors to illustrate the variety of systems that have been applied to robotic applications wherein information extracted from the laser radar data is used to automatically control a mechanism or process. Next, they describe selected robotic applications in seven areas: autonomous vehicle navigation, walking machine foot placement, automated service vehicles, manufacturing and inspection, automotive, military, and agriculture. They conclude with a discussion of the status of laser radar technology and suggest trends seen in the application of laser radar sensors to robotics. Many new applications are expected as the maturity level progresses and system costs are reduced.

  6. Laser radar improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelalian, A. V.

    1981-11-01

    A short history of the uses of various laser radars is presented, and appropriate applications of laser and microwave radars are discussed. CO2 laser radar, operating at 10.6 microns, is considered for use in aircraft navigation systems, fire-control systems for armored vehicle and aircraft, missile guidance, severe storm research, line-of-sight command of missiles, wind turbine site surveys, clear-air turbulence monitors for aircraft, and satellite tracking. Microwave radar is all-weather, but is subject to multipath inaccuracies, countermeasures, and angular resolution limitations, so hybrid laser microwave systems look promising for microwave target acquisition and laser tracking. Advantages and disadvantages of the use of ruby, YAG, and CO2 lasers in varying atmospheric conditions are discussed. Development of a laser radar pod for obstacle detection, Doppler navigation, automatic terrain following, hover control, weapon delivery, and precision searching is noted.

  7. Laser Radar Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Laser and radar instruments aboard NASA aircraft provide measurements of the snow and ice surface and down to the bedrock under the ice. Lasers, with a shorter wavelength, measure the surface eleva...

  8. CO2 laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D.; Callan, R.; Constant, G.; Davies, P. H.; Foord, R.

    CO2 laser-based radars operating at 10 microns are both highly energy-efficient and eye-safe, as well as compact and rugged; they also furnish covertness-enhancing fine pointing accuracy, and are difficult to jam or otherwise confuse. Two modes of operation are generally employed: incoherent, in which the laser is simply used as a high power illumination source, and in the presently elaborated coherent or heterodyne mode. Applications encompass terrain-following and obstacle avoidance, Doppler discrimination of missile and aircraft targets, pollutant gas detection, wind measurement for weapons-aiming, and global wind field monitoring.

  9. Range imaging laser radar

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Marion W.

    1990-01-01

    A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typicy sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream.

  10. Range imaging laser radar

    DOEpatents

    Scott, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typically sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream. 2 figs.

  11. Micro pulse laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An eye safe, compact, solid state lidar for profiling atmospheric cloud and aerosol scattering is disclosed. The transmitter of the micro pulse lidar is a diode pumped micro-J pulse energy, high repetition rate Nd:YLF laser. Eye safety is obtained through beam expansion. The receiver employs a photon counting solid state Geiger mode avalanche photodiode detector. Data acquisition is by a single card multichannel scaler. Daytime background induced quantum noise is controlled by a narrow receiver field-of-view and a narrow bandwidth temperature controlled interference filter. Dynamic range of the signal is limited to optical geometric signal compression. Signal simulations and initial atmospheric measurements indicate that micropulse lider systems are capable of detecting and profiling all significant cloud and aerosol scattering through the troposphere and into the stratosphere. The intended applications are scientific studies and environmental monitoring which require full time, unattended measurements of the cloud and aerosol height structure.

  12. Underwater probing with laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carswell, A. I.; Sizgoric, S.

    1975-01-01

    Recent advances in laser and electro optics technology have greatly enhanced the feasibility of active optical probing techniques aimed at the remote sensing of water parameters. This paper describes a LIDAR (laser radar) that has been designed and constructed for underwater probing. The influence of the optical properties of water on the general design parameters of a LIDAR system is considered. Discussion of the specific details in the choice of the constructed LIDAR is given. This system utilizes a cavity dumped argon ion laser transmitter capable of 50 watt peak powers, 10 nanosecond pulses and megahertz pulse repetition rates at 10 different wavelengths in the blue green region of the spectrum. The performance of the system, in proving various types of water, is demonstrated by summarizing the results of initial laboratory and field experiments.

  13. Progress in coherent laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Considerable progress with coherent laser radar has been made over the last few years, most notably perhaps in the available range of high performance devices and components and the confidence with which systems may now be taken into the field for prolonged periods of operation. Some of this increasing maturity was evident at the 3rd Topical Meeting on Coherent Laser Radar: Technology and Applications. Topics included in discussions were: mesoscale wind fields, nocturnal valley drainage and clear air down bursts; airborne Doppler lidar studies and comparison of ground and airborne wind measurement; wind measurement over the sea for comparison with satellite borne microwave sensors; transport of wake vortices at airfield; coherent DIAL methods; a newly assembled Nd-YAG coherent lidar system; backscatter profiles in the atmosphere and wavelength dependence over the 9 to 11 micrometer region; beam propagation; rock and soil classification with an airborne 4-laser system; technology of a global wind profiling system; target calibration; ranging and imaging with coherent pulsed and CW system; signal fluctuations and speckle. Some of these activities are briefly reviewed.

  14. Multi-dimensional laser radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molebny, Vasyl; Steinvall, Ove

    2014-06-01

    We introduce the term "multi-dimensional laser radar", where the dimensions mean not only the coordinates of the object in space, but its velocity and orientation, parameters of the media: scattering, refraction, temperature, humidity, wind velocity, etc. The parameters can change in time and can be combined. For example, rendezvous and docking missions, autonomous planetary landing, along with laser ranging, laser altimetry, laser Doppler velocimetry, are thought to have aboard also the 3D ladar imaging. Operating in combinations, they provide more accurate and safer navigation, docking or landing, hazard avoidance capabilities. Combination with Doppler-based measurements provides more accurate navigation for both space and cruise missile applications. Critical is the information identifying the snipers based on combination of polarization and fluctuation parameters with data from other sources. Combination of thermal imaging and vibrometry can unveil the functionality of detected targets. Hyperspectral probing with laser reveals even more parameters. Different algorithms and architectures of ladar-based target acquisition, reconstruction of 3D images from point cloud, information fusion and displaying is discussed with special attention to the technologies of flash illumination and single-photon focal-plane-array detection.

  15. Laser radar for spacecraft guidance applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, C. C.; Abramovici, A.; Bartman, R. K.; Bunker, R. L.; Chapsky, J.; Chu, C. C.; Clouse, D.; Dillon, J. W.; Hausmann, B.; Hemmati, H.; Kornfeld, R. P.; Kwa, C.; Mobasser, S.; Newell, M.; Padgett, C.; Roberts, W. T.; Spiers, G.; Warfield, Z.; Wright, M.

    2003-01-01

    A flight qualified laser radar called LAMP (LAser MaPper) is under development at JPL. LAMP is a guidance and control sensor that can form 3 dimensional images of its field of regard. This paper describes the detailed design of the LAMP sensor.

  16. Miniature laser direct-detection radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharekar, Madhu; Lebeau, Robert

    1992-06-01

    A miniature laser with a total volume less than 15 cu cm and weight less than 100 g has been designed, fabricated, and assembled. The laser uses a composite rod consisting of Nd:Cr:GSGG material rod cladded with an Er:Cr:YSGG tube. The laser provides output at 1 and 3 micron wavelengths. The size and weight reduction is obtained by chemical pumping which eliminates the prime power and the power supply. The laser is used as an illuminator in a direct detection radar.

  17. Integrated laser/radar satellite ranging and tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.

    1974-01-01

    A laser satellite ranging system that is mounted upon and integrated with a microwave tracking radar is reported. The 1-pulse/sec ruby laser transmitter is attached directly to the radar's elevation axis and radiates through a new opening in the radar's parabolic dish. The laser photomultiplier tube receiver utilizes the radar's existing 20-cm diam f/11 boresight telescope and observes through a similar symmetrically located opening in the dish. The laser system possesses separate ranging system electronics but shares the radar's timing, computer, and data handling/recording systems. The basic concept of the laser/radar is outlined together with a listing of the numerous advantages over present singular laser range-finding systems. The developmental laser hardware is described along with preliminary range-finding results and expectations.

  18. Laser Docking System Radar flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erwin, Harry O.

    1986-01-01

    Flight experiments to verify the Laser Docking System Radar are discussed. The docking requirements are summarized, and the breadboarded hardware is described, emphasizing the two major scanning concepts being utilized: a mechanical scanning technique employing galvanometer beamsteerers and an electronic scanning technique using an image dissector. The software simulations used to apply hardware solutions to the docking requirements are briefly discussed, the tracking test bed is described, and the objectives of the flight experiment are reviewed.

  19. Fluxless laser soldering of radar housings

    SciTech Connect

    Keicher, D.M.; Hosking, F.M.

    1990-01-01

    Laser soldering of electronic components is a rapidly maturing technology and has been found to be particularly useful in the attachment of very fine pitch surface mount devices. Conversely, very little progress has been made to extend this technology to other soldering applications. It was the intention of this study to explore the feasibility of utilizing laser soldering to produce hermetic closure joints in radar packages. In producing hermetic joints, several requirements had to be met. It was essential to have a process that would eliminate the potential for entrapment of corrosive flux residues within the radar unit. In addition, it was desirable to create higher strength solder joints than could be produced by conventional step solder techniques which require lower temperature solders to be used in the final closure process. Further, solder mixing of the closure joint solder and solders used on components inside the radar was to be avoided. To fulfill the requirements, the localized heating characteristics of laser soldering made it an obvious choice for this application.

  20. Thirteenth International Laser Radar Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    One hundred fifteen papers were presented in both oral and poster sessions. The topics of the conference sessions were: spaceborne lidar applications; extinction/visibility; differential absorption lidar; winds and tropospheric studies; middle atmosphere; clouds and multiple scattering; pollution studies; and new systems.

  1. Solid-state coherent laser radar wind shear measuring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. Milton

    1992-01-01

    Coherent Technologies, Inc. (CTI) was established in 1984 to engage in the development of coherent laser radar systems and subsystems with applications in atmospheric remote sensing, and in target tracking, ranging and imaging. CTI focuses its capabilities in three major areas: (1) theoretical performance and design of coherent laser radar system; (2) development of coherent laser radar systems for government agencies such as DoD and NASA; and (3) development of coherent laser radar systems for commercial markets. The topics addressed are: (1) 1.06 micron solid-state coherent laser radar system; (2) wind measurement using 1.06 micron system; and flashlamp-pumped 2.09 micron solid-state coherent laser radar system.

  2. Laser radar in a system perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molebny, Vasyl; Kamerman, Gary; Steinvall, Ove

    2011-06-01

    As a result of recent achievements in the field of laser radars, new options are available for their operation as system components. In addition to complementing and cross-checking one another, system components can generate new synergetic values. In this article, we address various roles and functions that laser radar may perform in a complete system context. Special attention is paid to range-gated imaging ladars operating in conjunction with infrared 2D sensors providing target recognition/identification at long distances and under adverse conditions of natural illumination. The multi- or hyper-spectral features of passive IR or visible sensors may be complemented by multispectral, broadband, tunable or switchable 3D imaging ladar in order to exploit the differences in target reflectance and absorption. This option opens another possibility for multi-spectral, mid-IR ladar to differentiate targets of various types, or to enhance the visualization potential and to facilitate the scene description with small targets like mines or mine-like objects. The recently discovered specificity of Raman scattering in the perturbed sea water makes the long-standing efforts in submarine wake detection more viable. Furthermore, the combination of microwave radar and laser radar, when amplified with new achievements in the fourth generation dual-mode imaging sensors, creates the possibility of single payload configurations suitable for small platforms. Emphasis is also made of the efficiency of Doppler velocimetry for precise vehicle navigation, such as for advance cruise missile control or autonomous landing. Finally, recent advances in coherent micro-ladars for optical coherence tomography now permit the reconstruction of time resolved 3D (i.e., 4D) dynamics of blood flow in heart vessels.

  3. Tenth Biennial Coherent Laser Radar Technology and Applications Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The tenth conference on coherent laser radar technology and applications is the latest in a series beginning in 1980 which provides a forum for exchange of information on recent events current status, and future directions of coherent laser radar (or lidar or lader) technology and applications. This conference emphasizes the latest advancement in the coherent laser radar field, including theory, modeling, components, systems, instrumentation, measurements, calibration, data processing techniques, operational uses, and comparisons with other remote sensing technologies.

  4. Color (RGB) imaging laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri De Collibus, M.; Bartolini, L.; Fornetti, G.; Francucci, M.; Guarneri, M.; Nuvoli, M.; Paglia, E.; Ricci, R.

    2008-03-01

    We present a new color (RGB) imaging 3D laser scanner prototype recently developed in ENEA, Italy). The sensor is based on AM range finding technique and uses three distinct beams (650nm, 532nm and 450nm respectively) in monostatic configuration. During a scan the laser beams are simultaneously swept over the target, yielding range and three separated channels (R, G and B) of reflectance information for each sampled point. This information, organized in range and reflectance images, is then elaborated to produce very high definition color pictures and faithful, natively colored 3D models. Notable characteristics of the system are the absence of shadows in the acquired reflectance images - due to the system's monostatic setup and intrinsic self-illumination capability - and high noise rejection, achieved by using a narrow field of view and interferential filters. The system is also very accurate in range determination (accuracy better than 10 -4) at distances up to several meters. These unprecedented features make the system particularly suited to applications in the domain of cultural heritage preservation, where it could be used by conservators for examining in detail the status of degradation of frescoed walls, monuments and paintings, even at several meters of distance and in hardly accessible locations. After providing some theoretical background, we describe the general architecture and operation modes of the color 3D laser scanner, by reporting and discussing first experimental results and comparing high-definition color images produced by the instrument with photographs of the same subjects taken with a Nikon D70 digital camera.

  5. Simulation of automatic gain control method for laser radar receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiping; Shang, Hongbo; Wang, Lina; Yang, Shuang

    2008-12-01

    A receiver with high dynamic response and wide control range are necessary for a laser radar system. In this paper, an automatic gain control scheme for laser radar receiver is proposed. The scheme is based on a closed-loop logarithmic feedback method. Signal models for pulse laser radar system are created and as the input to the AGC model. The signal is supposed to be very weak and with a nanosecond order of pulse width in the light of the property of the laser radar. The method and the simulation for the AGC will be presented in detail.

  6. CO2 laser oscillators for laser radar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the spectral purity, frequency stability, and long-term stabilization of newly developed CO2 isotope lasers. Extremely high spectral purity, and short-term stability of less than 1.5 x 10 to the -13th have been achieved. A brief description on using CO2 isotope lasers as secondary frequency standards and in optical radar is given. The design and output characteristics of a single frequency, TEM00q mode, variable pulse width, hybrid TE CO2 laser system is also described. The frequency chirp in the output has been measured and almost completely eliminated by means of a novel technique.

  7. Coherent mid-IR laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Frank E.; Poirier, Peter M.; Schimitschek, Erhard J.; Arbore, Mark A.

    2001-09-01

    We report the first demonstration of mid-IR coherent laser radar operation near 3.6 micrometers . In many low altitude environments, the wavelength region from 3.5 - 4 micrometers has advantages for laser beam propagation because the detrimental effects of scattering and turbulence are less severe than at shorter wavelengths. In addition, under conditions of high humidity, water vapor absorption in the mid-IR is also significantly lower compared to the long-IR region at 9-11 micrometers . The source in this work is a 100 mW, frequency stable cw-optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based on periodically poled lithium niobate. The frequency stability of the source is discussed and laboratory heterodyne experiments measuring small Doppler shifts from vibrating targets are described.

  8. Coherent Doppler Laser Radar: Technology Development and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has been investigating, developing, and applying coherent Doppler laser radar technology for over 30 years. These efforts have included the first wind measurement in 1967, the first airborne flights in 1972, the first airborne wind field mapping in 1981, and the first measurement of hurricane eyewall winds in 1998. A parallel effort at MSFC since 1982 has been the study, modeling and technology development for a space-based global wind measurement system. These endeavors to date have resulted in compact, robust, eyesafe lidars at 2 micron wavelength based on solid-state laser technology; in a factor of 6 volume reduction in near diffraction limited, space-qualifiable telescopes; in sophisticated airborne scanners with full platform motion subtraction; in local oscillator lasers capable of rapid tuning of 25 GHz for removal of relative laser radar to target velocities over a 25 km/s range; in performance prediction theory and simulations that have been validated experimentally; and in extensive field campaign experience. We have also begun efforts to dramatically improve the fundamental photon efficiency of the laser radar, to demonstrate advanced lower mass laser radar telescopes and scanners; to develop laser and laser radar system alignment maintenance technologies; and to greatly improve the electrical efficiency, cooling technique, and robustness of the pulsed laser. This coherent Doppler laser radar technology is suitable for high resolution, high accuracy wind mapping; for aerosol and cloud measurement; for Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric and trace gases; for hard target range and velocity measurement; and for hard target vibration spectra measurement. It is also suitable for a number of aircraft operations applications such as clear air turbulence (CAT) detection; dangerous wind shear (microburst) detection; airspeed, angle of attack, and sideslip measurement; and fuel savings through

  9. The 3D laser radar vision processor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebok, T. M.

    1990-01-01

    Loral Defense Systems (LDS) developed a 3D Laser Radar Vision Processor system capable of detecting, classifying, and identifying small mobile targets as well as larger fixed targets using three dimensional laser radar imagery for use with a robotic type system. This processor system is designed to interface with the NASA Johnson Space Center in-house Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Retriever robot program and provide to it needed information so it can fetch and grasp targets in a space-type scenario.

  10. Compact multichannel imaging laser radar receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Hoyt N.; Yun, Steven T.; Keltos, Michael L.; Kimmet, James S.

    1999-05-01

    Direct detection imaging Laser Radar (LADAR) produces 3-dimensional range imagery that can be processed to provide target acquisition and precision aimpoint definition in real time. This paper describes the current status of the Parallel Multichannel Imaging LADAR Receiver (PMR), developed under an SBIR Phase II program by the Air Force Research Laboratory, Munitions Directorate (AFRL/MN). The heart of the PMR is the Multichannel Optical Receiver Photonic Hybrid (MORPH), a high performance 16-channel LADAR receiver card which includes fiber-coupled detectors, pulse discrimination, and range counting circuitry on a 3 X 5 inch circuit card. The MORPH provides high downrange resolution (3 inches), multiple-hit (8 per channel) range and reflectance data for each detector. Silicon (Si) and indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) pin diode or avalanche photodiode (APD) detectors are supported. The modular PMR uses an array of MORPH circuit cards to form a compact multichannel imaging LADAR receiver with any multiple of 16 channels. A 32-channel system measures 3 X 5 X 1.4 inches and weighs 1 lb. A prototype PMR system is currently undergoing field-testing. This paper focuses on field test results and applications of the PMR technology.

  11. Laser radar technology and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, Quebec, Canada, June 3-5, 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruickshank, James M.; Harney, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    Various papers on laser radar technology and applications are presented. The topics considered include: eye-safe solid lasers for lidar applications, practical DF laser for ranging applications, ultrafast surface barrier photodetectors, performance analyses for peak-detecting laser radars, multiple scattering for laser beams propagating in a layered atmosphere, laser radar cross section of objects immersed in the earth's atmosphere, measurements of pulse coherence in mode-locked TEA-CO2 lasers, and single longitudinal mode operation of a continuously tunable high pressure TE-CO2. Also discussed are: amplitude-modulated laser system for distance and displacement measurement, minilaser rangefinder, laser docking system radar flight experiment, improved optical resonator for laser radars, design of frequency-stable TEA-CO2 lasers, HgCdTe photodiodes for heterodyne applications, acoustooptic spectrum analyzer for laser radar applications, laser cloud mapper and its applications, scanning lidar bathymeter for water depth measurement, and fluorescence lidar for land and sea remote sensing.

  12. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3d vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.B.; Simonson, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Recent advances in fiber optic component technology and digital processing components have enabled the development of a new 3D vision system based upon a fiber optic FMCW coherent laser radar. The approach includes a compact scanner with no moving parts capable of randomly addressing all pixels. The system maintains the immunity to lighting and surface shading conditions which is characteristic of coherent laser radar. The random pixel addressability allows concentration of scanning and processing on the active areas of a scene, as is done by the human eye-brain system.

  13. Applications of FM-CW laser radar to antenna contour mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slotwinski, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The FM-CW coherent laser radar concept, based on the FM radar principle which makes use of the coherence and lunability of injection laser diodes, is discussed. Laser radar precision/time tradeoffs, block diagrams, system performance, fiber optic system implantation, and receiver improvements are briefly described.

  14. Nonlinearity correction and dispersion analysis in FMCW laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hao; Liu, Bingguo; Liu, Guodong; Chen, Fengdong; Zhuang, Zhitao; Yu, Yahui; Gan, Yu

    2014-12-01

    Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave laser radar is one of the most important ways to measure the large-size targets , combining the advantages of laser with conventional FMCW radar. Dispersion compensation and non-linear calibration are two key aspects in FMCW laser radar measurement. The paper studies the method of frequency-sampling to correct the Nonlinearity and analyzes the importance of dispersion compensation. We set up experimental verification platform, choose 1550nm band continuously tunable external cavity infrared laser as the light source, use all-fiber optical device structures, choose balanced detectors as photoelectric conversion, and finally acquire data with high speed PCI-E data acquisition card, write a measurement software with Labview. We measured the gage block 1 meter away. The experiment results show that the frequency sampling method correct the Nonlinearity well and there is a significant impact on the accuracy because of the fiber dispersion, dispersion must be compensated to obtain high accuracy. The experiment lays the foundation for further research on FMCW Laser radar.

  15. Monitoring internal organ motion with continuous wave radar in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Pfanner, Florian; Maier, Joscha; Allmendinger, Thomas; Flohr, Thomas; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To avoid motion artifacts in medical imaging or to minimize the exposure of healthy tissues in radiation therapy, medical devices are often synchronized with the patient's respiratory motion. Today's respiratory motion monitors require additional effort to prepare the patients, e.g., mounting a motion belt or placing an optical reflector on the patient's breast. Furthermore, they are not able to measure internal organ motion without implanting markers. An interesting alternative to assess the patient's organ motion is continuous wave radar. The aim of this work is to design, implement, and evaluate such a radar system focusing on application in CT.Methods: The authors designed a radar system operating in the 860 MHz band to monitor the patient motion. In the intended application of the radar system, the antennas are located close to the patient's body inside the table of a CT system. One receive and four transmitting antennas are used to avoid the requirement of exact patient positioning. The radar waves propagate into the patient's body and are reflected at tissue boundaries, for example at the borderline between muscle and adipose tissue, or at the boundaries of organs. At present, the authors focus on the detection of respiratory motion. The radar system consists of the hardware mentioned above as well as of dedicated signal processing software to extract the desired information from the radar signal. The system was evaluated using simulations and measurements. To simulate the radar system, a simulation model based on radar and wave field equations was designed and 4D respiratory-gated CT data sets were used as input. The simulated radar signals and the measured data were processed in the same way. The radar system hardware and the signal processing algorithms were tested with data from ten volunteers. As a reference, the respiratory motion signal was recorded using a breast belt simultaneously with the radar measurements.Results: Concerning the

  16. Application of laser radar to autonomous spacecraft landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleichman, Kurt; Tchoryk, Peter, Jr.; Sampson, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the scenario of an autonomous landing like that required for the Mars Rover Sample Return Mission. An application of laser radar for conducting autonomous hazard detection and avoidance is discussed. A trade-study is performed to identify operational and implementation constraints as well as the state of the art in component technology.

  17. Clutter discrimination algorithm simulation in pulse laser radar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-mei; Li, Huan; Guo, Hai-chao; Su, Xuan; Zhu, Fule

    2015-10-01

    Pulse laser radar imaging performance is greatly influenced by different kinds of clutter. Various algorithms are developed to mitigate clutter. However, estimating performance of a new algorithm is difficult. Here, a simulation model for estimating clutter discrimination algorithms is presented. This model consists of laser pulse emission, clutter jamming, laser pulse reception and target image producing. Additionally, a hardware platform is set up gathering clutter data reflected by ground and trees. The data logging is as clutter jamming input in the simulation model. The hardware platform includes a laser diode, a laser detector and a high sample rate data logging circuit. The laser diode transmits short laser pulses (40ns FWHM) at 12.5 kilohertz pulse rate and at 905nm wavelength. An analog-to-digital converter chip integrated in the sample circuit works at 250 mega samples per second. The simulation model and the hardware platform contribute to a clutter discrimination algorithm simulation system. Using this system, after analyzing clutter data logging, a new compound pulse detection algorithm is developed. This new algorithm combines matched filter algorithm and constant fraction discrimination (CFD) algorithm. Firstly, laser echo pulse signal is processed by matched filter algorithm. After the first step, CFD algorithm comes next. Finally, clutter jamming from ground and trees is discriminated and target image is produced. Laser radar images are simulated using CFD algorithm, matched filter algorithm and the new algorithm respectively. Simulation result demonstrates that the new algorithm achieves the best target imaging effect of mitigating clutter reflected by ground and trees.

  18. The design of infrared laser radar for vehicle initiative safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ping; Xu, Xi-ping; Li, Xiao-yu; Li, Tian-zhi; Liu, Yu-long; Wu, Jia-hui

    2013-09-01

    Laser radar for vehicle is mainly used in advanced vehicle on-board active safety systems, such as forward anti-collision systems, active collision warning systems and adaptive cruise control systems, etc. Laser radar for vehicle plays an important role in the improvement of vehicle active safety and the reduction of traffic accidents. The stability of vehicle active anti-collision system in dynamic environment is still one of the most difficult problems to break through nowadays. According to people's driving habit and the existed detecting technique of sensor, combining the infrared laser range and galvanometer scanning technique , design a 3-D infrared laser radar which can be used to assist navigation, obstacle avoidance and the vehicle's speed control for the vehicle initiative safety. The device is fixed to the head of vehicle. Then if an accident happened, the device could give an alarm to remind the driver timely to decelerate or brake down, by which way can people get the purpose of preventing the collision accidents effectively. To accomplish the design, first of all, select the core components. Then apply Zemax to design the transmitting and receiving optical system. Adopt 1550 nm infrared laser transmitter as emission unit in the device, a galvanometer scanning as laser scanning unit and an InGaAs-APD detector as laser echo signal receiving unit. Perform the construction of experimental system using FPGA and ARM as the core controller. The system designed in this paper can not only detect obstacle in front of the vehicle and make the control subsystem to execute command, but also transfer laser data to PC in real time. Lots of experiments using the infrared laser radar prototype are made, and main performance of it is under tested. The results of these experiments show that the imaging speed of the laser radar can reach up to 25 frames per second, the frame resolution of each image can reach 30×30 pixels, the horizontal angle resolution is about 6. 98

  19. Characterizing targets and backgrounds for 3D laser radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinvall, Ove K.; Larsson, Hakan; Gustafsson, Frank; Chevalier, Tomas R.; Persson, Asa; Klasen, Lena M.

    2004-12-01

    Exciting development is taking place in 3 D sensing laser radars. Scanning systems are well established for mapping from airborne and ground sensors. 3 D sensing focal plane arrays (FPAs) enable a full range and intensity image can be captured in one laser shot. Gated viewing systems also produces 3 D target information. Many applications for 3 D laser radars are found in robotics, rapid terrain visualization, augmented vision, reconnaissance and target recognition, weapon guidance including aim point selection and others. The net centric warfare will demand high resolution geo-data for a common description of the environment. At FOI we have a measurement program to collect data relevant for 3 D laser radars using airborne and tripod mounted equipment for data collection. Data collection spans from single pixel waveform collection (1 D) over 2 D using range gated imaging to full 3 D imaging using scanning systems. This paper will describe 3 D laser data from different campaigns with emphasis on range distribution and reflections properties for targets and background during different seasonal conditions. Example of the use of the data for system modeling, performance prediction and algorithm development will be given. Different metrics to characterize the data set will also be discussed.

  20. 3-D laser radar simulation for autonomous spacecraft landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiley, Michael F.; Carmer, Dwayne C.; Pont, W. F.

    1991-01-01

    A sophisticated 3D laser radar sensor simulation, developed and applied to the task of autonomous hazard detection and avoidance, is presented. This simulation includes a backward ray trace to sensor subpixels, incoherent subpixel integration, range dependent noise, sensor point spread function effects, digitization noise, and AM-CW modulation. Specific sensor parameters, spacecraft lander trajectory, and terrain type have been selected to generate simulated sensor data.

  1. Simulation of laser radar tooling ball measurements: focus dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Daniel G.; Slotwinski, Anthony; Hedges, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The Nikon Metrology Laser Radar system focuses a beam from a fiber to a target object and receives the light scattered from the target through the same fiber. The system can, among other things, make highly accurate measurements of the position of a tooling ball by locating the angular position of peak signal quality, which is related to the fiber coupling efficiency. This article explores the relationship between fiber coupling efficiency and focus condition.

  2. Coherent laser radar performance for general atmospheric refractive turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, Rod G.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    A general theory for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a coherent detection laser radar is developed using the path-integral formulation (Fresnel approximation), which is valid for any typical path-integrated atmospheric refractive turbulence. The principal effects of refractive turbulence are discussed, and analytical expressions are presented for the case of untruncated Gaussians for the transmitted field, local oscillator field, and transmitter/receiver optics. The physical mechanisms that reduce heterodyne efficiency are identified.

  3. Beam profile shaping for laser radars that use detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Veldkamp, W B; Kastner, C J

    1982-01-15

    The beam shaper we developed shapes the transmit beam of a CO(2) laser radar that uses a linear detector array. It consists of a diffraction grating and an anamorphic prism beam compressor and produces a stretched profile that efficiently and uniformly illuminates the far-field footprint of the detector array. The diffraction grating phase modulates the near field or the laser beam to generate a far-field flattop intensity profile, whereas the compressor produces the necessary profile eccentricity. We have achieved conversion efficiencies in the 70-90% range. PMID:20372453

  4. Eye-safe coherent laser radar system at 2.1 microns using Tm,Ho:YAG lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Sammy W.; Hale, Charley P.; Magee, James R.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Huffaker, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    An eye-safe pulsed coherent laser radar has been developed by using single-frequency Tm,Ho:YAG lasers and heterodyne detection. Returns from a mountainside located 145 km from the laser radar system and the measurement of wind velocity to ranges exceeding 20 km have been demonstrated with transmitted pulse energies of 22 mJ.

  5. Laser Radar Measurements of Atmospheric Potassium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felix, F.; Keenliside, W.; Kent, G. S.; Sandford, M. C. W.

    1973-01-01

    A dye laser capable of transmitting in the near infra red region of the spectrum has been constructed to be used in conjunction with the large Mark II laser system at present in existence at Kingston, Jamaica. Preliminary measurements have been obtained of concentration of atomic potassium in the 70-100 km region of the atmosphere. The data indicates the likelihood of a double peak in the height distribution. The lower peak, which is the" larger, is at a height of about 82 kIn, the upper peak is at a height of 94 kIn. Although an exact value for the scattering cross-section has not been obtained, a reasonable approximation of this parameter yields a value of about 1-15 x 10(exp 11) m(exp -2) for the column density of atomic potassium, which is in agreement with other data.

  6. Time and wavelength domain algorithms for chemical analysis by laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, David L.; Gillespie, James B.

    1992-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) is a promising technique for laser radar applications. Laser radar using LIF has already been applied to algae blooms and oil slicks. Laser radar using LIF has great potential for remote chemical analysis because LIF spectra are extremely sensitive to chemical composition. However, most samples in the real world contain mixtures of fluorescing components, not merely individual components. Multicomponent analysis of laser radar returns from mixtures is often difficult because LIF spectra from solids and liquids are very broad and devoid of line structure. Therefore, algorithms for interpreting LIF spectra from laser radar returns must be able to analyze spectra that overlap in multicomponent systems. This paper analyzes the possibility of using factor analysis-rank annihilation (FARA) to analyze emission-time matrices (ETM) from laser radar returns instead of excitation-emission matrices (EEM). The authors here define ETM as matrices where the rows (or columns) are emission spectra at fixed times and the columns (or rows) are temporal profiles for fixed emission wavelengths. Laser radar usually uses pulsed lasers for ranging purposes, which are suitable for measuring temporal profiles. Laser radar targets are hard instead of diffuse; that is, a definite surface emits the fluorescence instead of an extended volume. A hard target would not broaden the temporal profiles as would a diffuse target. Both fluorescence lifetimes and emission spectra are sensitive to chemical composition. Therefore, temporal profiles can be used instead of excitation spectra in FARA analysis of laser radar returns. The resulting laser radar returns would be ETM instead of EEM.

  7. Remote intensity fluctuation measurements with a laser Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, L. Z.; Bilbro, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A coaxial focused CW scanning laser Doppler velocimeter (SLDV) radar equipment applying heterodyne detection at 10.6 microns can measure intensity fluctuations under field conditions. The set includes a 20 W CO2 laser, a coaxial Cassegrainian telescope, standard heterodyne equipment, and a SAW spectrum analyzer with 100 kHz signal resolution. Operation of the equipment and techniques for taking remote measurements are described briefly. Applications to remote measurements of transverse component of wind speed, as a complement to the traditional Doppler method of determining axial velocity, are under study. SLDV equipment has been used in detection, tracking, and measurements of atmospheric turbulence associated with aircraft wing-tip vortices or with dust devils, and in measurement of general atmospheric wind profiles.

  8. Off the line-of-sight laser radar.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswami, K; Tilleman, M

    1998-01-20

    The results of field and laboratory experiments of a novel laser radar (ladar) are presented. This ladar was designed to detect objects off the line of sight by deploying a fiber-optic relay between the launch and probe sites by monitoring the retroreflected signals. The apparatus incorporates a pulsed diode laser emitting at 1.55 mum, a wavelength that is ideal for eye safety and bears minimum loss in silica fibers. With its immediate application in transportation safety, the system issues a warning within a millisecond of detecting an obstacle in the path of a vehicle. The results of the field experiments yield signal-to-noise ratios high enough to trigger reliably an alarm with a probability of greater than 0.999 for detecting an obstacle and less than 10(-12) probability of false alarms. PMID:18268627

  9. High range precision laser radar system using a Pockels cell and a quadrant photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Sungeun; Kong, Hong Jin; Bang, Hyochoong; Kim, Jae-Wan; Jeon, Byoung Goo

    2016-05-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a novel technique to measure distance with high range precision. To meet the stringent requirements of a variety of applications, range precision is an important specification for laser radar systems. Range precision in conventional laser radar systems is limited by several factors, namely laser pulse width, the bandwidth of a detector, the timing resolution of the time to digital converter, shot noise and timing jitters generated by electronics. The proposed laser radar system adopts a Pockels cell and a quadrant photodiode and only measures the energy of a laser pulse to obtain range so that the effect of those factors is reduced in comparison to conventional systems. In the proposed system, the measured range precision was 5.7 mm with 100 laser pulses. The proposed method is expected to be an alternative method for laser radar system requiring high range precision in many applications.

  10. Agile beam laser radar using computational imaging for robotic perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Michael A.; Stann, Barry L.; Giza, Mark M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper introduces a new concept that applies computational imaging techniques to laser radar for robotic perception. We observe that nearly all contemporary laser radars for robotic (i.e., autonomous) applications use pixel basis scanning where there is a one-to-one correspondence between world coordinates and the measurements directly produced by the instrument. In such systems this is accomplished through beam scanning and/or the imaging properties of focal-plane optics. While these pixel-basis measurements yield point clouds suitable for straightforward human interpretation, the purpose of robotic perception is the extraction of meaningful features from a scene, making human interpretability and its attendant constraints mostly unnecessary. The imposing size, weight, power and cost of contemporary systems is problematic, and relief from factors that increase these metrics is important to the practicality of robotic systems. We present a system concept free from pixel basis sampling constraints that promotes efficient and adaptable sensing modes. The cornerstone of our approach is agile and arbitrary beam formation that, when combined with a generalized mathematical framework for imaging, is suited to the particular challenges and opportunities of robotic perception systems. Our hardware concept looks toward future systems with optical device technology closely resembling modern electronically-scanned-array radar that may be years away from practicality. We present the design concept and results from a prototype system constructed and tested in a laboratory environment using a combination of developed hardware and surrogate devices for beam formation. The technological status and prognosis for key components in the system is discussed.

  11. Laser induced x-ray `RADAR' particle physics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockley, D.; Deas, R.; Moss, R.; Wilson, L. A.; Rusby, D.; Neely, D.

    2016-05-01

    The technique of high-power laser-induced plasma acceleration can be used to generate a variety of diverse effects including the emission of X-rays, electrons, neutrons, protons and radio-frequency radiation. A compact variable source of this nature could support a wide range of potential applications including single-sided through-barrier imaging, cargo and vehicle screening, infrastructure inspection, oncology and structural failure analysis. This paper presents a verified particle physics simulation which replicates recent results from experiments conducted at the Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Didcot, UK. The RAL experiment demonstrated the generation of backscattered X-rays from test objects via the bremsstrahlung of an incident electron beam, the electron beam itself being produced by Laser Wakefield Acceleration. A key initial objective of the computer simulation was to inform the experimental planning phase on the predicted magnitude of the backscattered X-rays likely from the test objects. This objective was achieved and the computer simulation was used to show the viability of the proposed concept (Laser-induced X-ray `RADAR'). At the more advanced stages of the experimental planning phase, the simulation was used to gain critical knowledge of where it would be technically feasible to locate key diagnostic equipment within the experiment. The experiment successfully demonstrated the concept of X-ray `RADAR' imaging, achieved by using the accurate timing information of the backscattered X-rays relative to the ultra-short laser pulse used to generate the electron beam. By using fast response X-ray detectors it was possible to derive range information for the test objects being scanned. An X-ray radar `image' (equivalent to a RADAR B-scan slice) was produced by combining individual X-ray temporal profiles collected at different points along a horizontal distance line scan. The same image formation process was used to generate

  12. Lidar-radar velocimetry using a pulse-to-pulse coherent rf-modulated Q-switched laser.

    PubMed

    Vallet, M; Barreaux, J; Romanelli, M; Pillet, G; Thévenin, J; Wang, L; Brunel, M

    2013-08-01

    An rf-modulated pulse train from a passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser has been generated using an extra-cavity acousto-optic modulator. The rf modulation reproduces the spectral quality of the local oscillator. It leads to a high pulse-to-pulse phase coherence, i.e., phase memory, over thousands of pulses. The potentialities of this transmitter for lidar-radar are demonstrated by performing Doppler velocimetry on indoor moving targets. The experimental results are in good agreement with a model based on elementary signal processing theory. In particular, we show experimentally and theoretically that lidar-radar is a promising technique that allows discrimination between translation and rotation movements. Being independent of the laser internal dynamics, this scheme can be applied to any Q-switched laser. PMID:23913058

  13. MIMO based optical phased array technology with electronic beam steering for laser radar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Neha; Zmuda, Henry

    2010-04-01

    This paper will address the analysis and design of an electronically scanned phased array laser radar (ladar) system utilizing the techniques of multi-input multi-output (MIMO) array design. MIMO radar is has attracted much attention recently from both researchers and practitioners alike due to its significant potential for advancing the state-of-the-art RF radar technology. The laser radar architecture presented stands to gain significant inroads on the ability to apply RF array processing methods to laser radar systems in several ways. Specifically, using MIMO array design concepts, it is shown that the resolution of the ladar array can substantially exceed the diffraction limited resolution of a conventional array. Additionally, the use of array methods provides the capability to electronically steer the aperture, thus avoiding the mechanical beam scanning methods generally encountered in laser radar systems. Finally, by using an array of radiators, an increase in total radiated power is achieved, relieving the power burden on a single laser. The problems traditionally encountered in applying conventional array techniques to laser/detector arrays, for example, the inability to achieve half-wavelength spacing or the surfacing of source coherence issues, actually work to one's advantage when viewed in the MIMO paradigm. It is anticipated that the successful implementation of this system will significantly advance the state-of-the-art of laser radar capabilities for high speed imaging, target detection, tracking, and signature analysis.

  14. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3D vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.B.; Gallman, P.G.; Slotwinski, A.R.; Wagner, K.; Weaver, S.; Xu, Jieping

    1996-12-31

    This CLVS will provide a substantial advance in high speed computer vision performance to support robotic Environmental Management (EM) operations. This 3D system employs a compact fiber optic based scanner and operator at a 128 x 128 pixel frame at one frame per second with a range resolution of 1 mm over its 1.5 meter working range. Using acousto-optic deflectors, the scanner is completely randomly addressable. This can provide live 3D monitoring for situations where it is necessary to update once per second. This can be used for decontamination and decommissioning operations in which robotic systems are altering the scene such as in waste removal, surface scarafacing, or equipment disassembly and removal. The fiber- optic coherent laser radar based system is immune to variations in lighting, color, or surface shading, which have plagued the reliability of existing 3D vision systems, while providing substantially superior range resolution.

  15. Comparison of retracking algorithms using airborne radar and laser altimeter measurements of the Greenland ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Ellen J.; Swift, Calvin T.

    1995-05-01

    In 1991, NASA conducted a multisensor airborne altimetry experiment over the Greenland ice sheet. The experiment consisted of ten flights. Four types of radar altimeter retracking algorithms which include the Advanced Application Flight Experiment (AAFE) Ku-band altimeter, the NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL), the NASA Airborne Terrain Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) and the NASA Ka-band Surface Contour Radar (SCR) were used. In this paper, these four continental ice sheet radar altimeter tracking algorithms were compared.

  16. Total internal reflection laser tools and methods

    DOEpatents

    Zediker, Mark S.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Kolachalam, Sharath K.; Grubb, Daryl L.

    2016-02-02

    There is provided high power laser tools and laser heads that utilize total internal reflection ("TIR") structures to direct the laser beam along a laser beam path within the TIR structure. The TIR structures may be a TIR prism having its hypotenuse as a TIR surface.

  17. A 16-channel CMOS preamplifier for laser ranging radar receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ru-qing; Zhu, Jing-guo; Jiang, Yan; Li, Meng-lin; Li, Feng

    2015-10-01

    A 16-channal front-end preamplifier array has been design in a 0.18um CMOS process for pulse Laser ranging radar receiver. This front-end preamplifier array incorporates transimpedance amplifiers(TIAs) and differential voltage post-amplifier(PAMP),band gap reference and other interface circuits. In the circuit design, the regulated cascade (RGC) input stage, Cherry-Hooper and active inductor peaking were employed to enhance the bandwidth. And in the layout design, by applying the layout isolation structure combined with P+ guard-ring(PGR), N+ guard-ring(NGR),and deep-n-well(DNW) for amplifier array, the crosstalk and the substrate noise coupling was reduced effectively. The simulations show that a single channel receiver front-end preamplifier achieves 95 dBΩ transimpedance gain and 600MHz bandwidth for 3 PF photodiode capacitance. The total power of 16-channel front-end amplifier array is about 800mW for 1.8V supply.

  18. Registration of partially overlapping laser-radar range images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Dan; Sun, Jian-Feng; Li, Qi; Wang, Qi

    2015-10-01

    To register partially overlapping three-dimensional point sets from different viewpoints, it is necessary to remove spurious corresponding point pairs that are not located in overlapping regions. Most variants of the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm require users to manually select the rejection parameters for discarding spurious point pairs between the registering views. This requirement often results in unreliable and inaccurate registration. To overcome this problem, we present an improved ICP algorithm that can automatically determine the rejection percentage to reliably and accurately align partially overlapping laser-radar (ladar) range images. The similarity of k neighboring features of each nonplanar point is employed to determine reasonable point pairs in nonplanar regions, and the distance measurement method is used to find reasonable point pairs in planar regions. The rejection percentage can be obtained from these two sets of reasonable pairs. The performance of our algorithm is compared with that of five other algorithms using various models with low and high curvatures. The experimental results show that our algorithm is more accurate and robust than the other algorithms.

  19. Internal wave observations made with an airborne synthetic aperture imaging radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Apel, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Synthetic aperture L-band radar flown aboard the NASA CV-990 has observed periodic striations on the ocean surface off the coast of Alaska which have been interpreted as tidally excited oceanic internal waves of less than 500 m length. These radar images are compared to photographic imagery of similar waves taken from Landsat 1. Both the radar and Landsat images reveal variations in reflectivity across each wave in a packet that range from low to high to normal. The variations point to the simultaneous existence of two mechanisms for the surface signatures of internal waves: roughening due to wave-current interactions, and smoothing due to slick formation.

  20. Lasers '92; Proceedings of the International Conference on Lasers and Applications, 15th, Houston, TX, Dec. 7-10, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Charles P. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Papers from the conference are presented, and the topics covered include the following: x-ray lasers, excimer lasers, chemical lasers, high power lasers, blue-green lasers, dye lasers, solid state lasers, semiconductor lasers, gas and discharge lasers, carbon dioxide lasers, ultrafast phenomena, nonlinear optics, quantum optics, dynamic gratings and wave mixing, laser radar, lasers in medicine, optical filters and laser communication, optical techniques and instruments, laser material interaction, and industrial and manufacturing applications.

  1. Ultraviolet lasers. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    Reports cited from the international literature describe various aspects of ultraviolet lasers including laser output, far ultraviolet radiation, electron pumping, optical pumping, and laser materials. Gas lasers, pulsed lasers, dye lasers, CO2 lasers, xenon fluoride lasers, and transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) lasers are considered. This updated bibliography contains 283 citations, 66 of which are new additions to the previous edition.

  2. Terahertz inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging using self-mixing interferometry with a quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Lui, H S; Taimre, T; Bertling, K; Lim, Y L; Dean, P; Khanna, S P; Lachab, M; Valavanis, A; Indjin, D; Linfield, E H; Davies, A G; Rakić, A D

    2014-05-01

    We propose a terahertz (THz)-frequency synthetic aperture radar imaging technique based on self-mixing (SM) interferometry, using a quantum cascade laser. A signal processing method is employed which extracts and exploits the radar-related information contained in the SM signals, enabling the creation of THz images with improved spatial resolution. We demonstrate this by imaging a standard resolution test target, achieving resolution beyond the diffraction limit. PMID:24784063

  3. Three radar imaging methods based on the one-dimensional laser range profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Yuan; Wu, Zhen-sen; Qu, Tan; Liao, Run-gui

    2013-09-01

    One-dimensional range profile is known as a simple radar imaging technology. Based on the imaging mechanism, the laser range profiles (LRPS) of the convex rotators in three different methods, which named as the Beam Scattering Method (BS method), Radar Cross Section Method (RCS method) and Surface Elements Method (SE method),were studied. In detail, BS method, which combined the laser beam pulse scattering theory and radar equation, is the very model that can be applied to the convex quadric rotary bodies, however, it may produce singular solutions in certain incident directions. The RCS method is just an extension of the theory of radar cross section theory and radar equation. According to the definition, the simplest forms of RCS which were then substituted into the radar equation were obtained, finally the one-dimensional range profiles were analytically resolved. The SE Method is a much more comprehensive theory to get the laser range profiles of arbitrary objects. The object should be first divided into numerous small triangle facets, and sum the backscattering power of these facets in the same distance, and in this way the final LRPS were deduced. In the meanwhile, the SE method is the most convenient way to evolve into the three-dimensional range profile. In the paper, the LRPS of a cone based on the three models above were simulated, it was found that the features and shape of each profiles were similar basically, but theoretical correction to SE method was still needed.

  4. High-frequency scannerless imaging laser radar for industrial inspection and measurement applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, R.L.; Williams, R.J.; Matthews, J.D.

    1996-11-01

    This report describes the development and testing of a high-frequency scannerless imaging laser radar system to evaluate its viability as an industrial inspection and measurement sensor. We modified an existing 5.5-Mhz scannerless laser radar to operate at 150 Mhz, and measured its performance including its spatial resolution and range resolution. We also developed new algorithms that allow rapid data reduction with improved range resolution. The resulting 150-Mhz ladar system demonstrated a range resolution of better than 3 mm, which represents nearly a factor-of-100 improvement in range resolution over the existing scannerless laser radar system. Based on this work, we believe that a scannerless range imager with 1- to 2-mm range resolution is feasible. This work was performed as part of a small-business CRADA between Sandia National Laboratories and Perceptron, Inc.

  5. Use of laser radar imagery in optical pattern recognition: the Optical Processor Enhanced Ladar (OPEL) Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Dennis H.; Mills, Stuart A.; Dydyk, Robert B.

    1998-03-01

    The Optical Processor Enhanced Ladar (OPEL) program is designed to evaluate the capabilities of a seeker obtained by integrating two state-of-the-art technologies, laser radar, or ladar, and optical correlation. The program is a thirty-two month effort to build, optimize, and test a breadboard seeker system (the OPEL System) that incorporates these two promising technologies. Laser radars produce both range and intensity image information. Use of this information in an optical correlator is described. A correlator with binary phase input and ternary amplitude and phase filter capability is assumed. Laser radar imagery was collected on five targets over 360 degrees of azimuth from 3 elevation angles. This imagery was then processed to provide training sets in preparation for filter construction. This paper reviews the ladar and optical correlator technologies used, outlines the OPEL program, and describes the OPEL system.

  6. 14th International Conference 'Laser Optics 2010'

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, Artur A

    2010-10-15

    The 14th International Conference 'Laser Optics 2010' in which more than 800 scientists and experts from 35 countries took part, was held from June 28 to July 2, 2010, in St. Petersburg. (information)

  7. Real-time image generation with a pulsed coherent laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Francis J.; Groden, Michael; Dryden, Gordon L.; Kovacs, Mark A.; Pfeiffer, George

    1997-08-01

    A kilowatt class, pulsed CO2 laser radar has been developed at Textron under a joint US Army-Air Force program. It is currently undergoing field trials; and successful coherent imaging and tracking experiments have been conducted over the past two years at the Air Force Maui Space surveillance Site. This paper describes the receiver- processor architecture of the laser radar system, the algorithms and waveforms, and the output products which are high resolution range-Doppler and range-amplitude image. Attention will be paid to the hardware and software methods used to achieve real-time, wideband operations.

  8. Imaging laser radar for high-speed monitoring of the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froehlich, Christoph; Mettenleiter, M.; Haertl, F.

    1998-01-01

    In order to establish mobile robot operations and to realize survey and inspection tasks, robust and precise measurements of the geometry of the 3D environment is the basis sensor technology. For visual inspection, surface classification, and documentation purposes, however, additional information concerning reflectance of measured objects is necessary. High-speed acquisition of both geometric and visual information is achieved by means of an active laser radar, supporting consistent range and reflectance images. The laser radar developed at Zoller + Froehlich (ZF) is an optical-wavelength system measuring the range between sensor and target surface as well as the reflectance of the target surface, which corresponds to the magnitude of the back scattered laser energy. In contrast to other range sensing devices, the ZF system is designed for high-speed and high- performance operation in real indoor and outdoor environments, emitting a minimum of near-IR laser energy. It integrates a single-point laser measurement system and a mechanical deflection system for 3D environmental measurements. This paper reports details of the laser radar which is designed to cover requirements with medium range applications. It outlines the performance requirements and introduces the two-frequency phase-shift measurement principle. The hardware design of the single-point laser measurement system, including the main modulates, such as the laser head, the high frequency unit and the signal processing unit are discussed in detail. The paper focuses on performance data of the laser radar, including noise, drift over time, precision, and accuracy with measurements. It discusses the influences of ambient light, surface material of the target, and ambient temperature for range accuracy and range precision. Furthermore, experimental results from inspection of tunnels, buildings, monuments and industrial environments are presented. The paper concludes by summarizing results and gives a short

  9. Active laser radar (lidar) for measurement of corresponding height and reflectance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froehlich, Christoph; Mettenleiter, M.; Haertl, F.

    1997-08-01

    For the survey and inspection of environmental objects, a non-tactile, robust and precise imaging of height and depth is the basis sensor technology. For visual inspection,surface classification, and documentation purposes, however, additional information concerning reflectance of measured objects is necessary. High-speed acquisition of both geometric and visual information is achieved by means of an active laser radar, supporting consistent 3D height and 2D reflectance images. The laser radar is an optical-wavelength system, and is comparable to devices built by ERIM, Odetics, and Perceptron, measuring the range between sensor and target surfaces as well as the reflectance of the target surface, which corresponds to the magnitude of the back scattered laser energy. In contrast to these range sensing devices, the laser radar under consideration is designed for high speed and precise operation in both indoor and outdoor environments, emitting a minimum of near-IR laser energy. It integrates a laser range measurement system and a mechanical deflection system for 3D environmental measurements. This paper reports on design details of the laser radar for surface inspection tasks. It outlines the performance requirements and introduces the measurement principle. The hardware design, including the main modules, such as the laser head, the high frequency unit, the laser beam deflection system, and the digital signal processing unit are discussed.the signal processing unit consists of dedicated signal processors for real-time sensor data preprocessing as well as a sensor computer for high-level image analysis and feature extraction. The paper focuses on performance data of the system, including noise, drift over time, precision, and accuracy with measurements. It discuses the influences of ambient light, surface material of the target, and ambient temperature for range accuracy and range precision. Furthermore, experimental results from inspection of buildings, monuments

  10. A HWIL test facility of infrared imaging laser radar using direct signal injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Lu, Wei; Wang, Chunhui; Wang, Qi

    2005-01-01

    Laser radar has been widely used these years and the hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing of laser radar become important because of its low cost and high fidelity compare with On-the-Fly testing and whole digital simulation separately. Scene generation and projection two key technologies of hardware-in-the-loop testing of laser radar and is a complicated problem because the 3D images result from time delay. The scene generation process begins with the definition of the target geometry and reflectivity and range. The real-time 3D scene generation computer is a PC based hardware and the 3D target models were modeled using 3dsMAX. The scene generation software was written in C and OpenGL and is executed to extract the Z-buffer from the bit planes to main memory as range image. These pixels contain each target position x, y, z and its respective intensity and range value. Expensive optical injection technologies of scene projection such as LDP array, VCSEL array, DMD and associated scene generation is ongoing. But the optical scene projection is complicated and always unaffordable. In this paper a cheaper test facility was described that uses direct electronic injection to provide rang images for laser radar testing. The electronic delay and pulse shaping circuits inject the scenes directly into the seeker's signal processing unit.

  11. Survey of ULF wave signatures seen in the Tasman International Geospace Environment Radars data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi-Sedeh, L.; Waters, C. L.; Menk, F. W.

    2015-02-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) plasma waves propagate through the magnetosphere and ionosphere where they can alter the Doppler velocity of HF radar echoes. Data from the two Tasman International Geospace Environment Radars and the fluxgate and induction coil magnetometers located on Macquarie Island (54.5°S, 158.95°E geographic) over 2006-2009 show that ULF wave signatures are common. Using coincident radar and magnetometer data selection criteria, 194 events representing a total of 233.4 h were identified. The majority of ULF signatures seen in the radar data were detected between 06 and 12 UT (15 and 21 LT). Using the Maximum Entropy Method, the spectral content showed favored frequencies of 1.6, 2.1, 2.9, and 3.3 mHz but no obvious variation of frequency with latitude. Most of the observed frequencies were in the range 1-4 mHz. A class of Doppler velocity signatures that appeared as a zigzag shape in the radar range:time plots were identified and may be related to the expected plasmapause latitudes. Regularly spaced, favored frequencies appeared in the ground magnetometer data during the afternoon, night, and morning sectors for those days where ULF wave events were observed in the radar data.

  12. Simultaneous rocket and MST radar observation of an internal gravity wave breaking in the mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. A.; Fritts, D. C.; Balsley, B. B.; Philbrick, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    In June, 1983, the Structure and Atmospheric Turbulence Environment (STATE) rocket and Poker Flat Mesophere-Stratosphere-Troposphere radar campaign was conducted to measure the interaction between turbulence, electron density and electron density gradient that has produced unusually strong MST radar echoes from the summer mesosphere over Poker Flat, Alaska. Analysis or radar wind measurements and a concurrent wind and temperature profile obtained from a rocket probe carrying a three-axis accelerometer are given. The two data sets provide a fairly complete (and in some cases, redundant) picture of the breaking (or more correctly, the saturation) of a large-amplitude, low-frequency, long-wavelength internal gravity wave. The data show that small-scale turbulence and small-scale wave intensity is greatest at those altitudes where the large-scale wave-induced temperature lapse rate is most negative or most nearly unstable, but the wind shear due to the large-scale wave is a minimum. A brief review of linear gravity-wave theory is presented as an aid to the identification of the gravity-wave signature in the radar and rocket data. Analysis of the time and height cross sections of wind speed and turbulence intensity observed by the Poker Flat MST radar follows. Then, the vertical profile of temperature and winds measured by a rocket probe examined. Finally, the use of the independent data sets provided by the rocket and the radar are discussed and implications for theories of wave saturation are presented.

  13. [The error analysis and experimental verification of laser radar spectrum detection and terahertz time domain spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Tao; Li, Jing-Wen; Sun, Zhi-Hui

    2010-03-01

    Terahertz waves (THz, T-ray) lie between far-infrared and microwave in electromagnetic spectrum with frequency from 0.1 to 10 THz. Many chemical agent explosives show characteristic spectral features in the terahertz. Compared with conventional methods of detecting a variety of threats, such as weapons and chemical agent, THz radiation is low frequency and non-ionizing, and does not give rise to safety concerns. The present paper summarizes the latest progress in the application of terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to chemical agent explosives. A kind of device on laser radar detecting and real time spectrum measuring was designed which measures the laser spectrum on the bases of Fourier optics and optical signal processing. Wedge interferometer was used as the beam splitter to wipe off the background light and detect the laser and measure the spectrum. The result indicates that 10 ns laser radar pulse can be detected and many factors affecting experiments are also introduced. The combination of laser radar spectrum detecting, THz-TDS, modern pattern recognition and signal processing technology is the developing trend of remote detection for chemical agent explosives. PMID:20496663

  14. Field Tests And Signature Analysis Of An Imaging CO2 Laser Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. Y.; Bartholomew, B. J.; Streiff, M. L.; Starr, E. F.; Pruitt, P. A.

    1983-12-01

    A coherent, imaging CO2 laser radar has been built and tested in the field. This laser radar uses a single-waveguide CO2 laser and heterodyne detection. Two acousto-optic frequency shifters generate the IF frequency. An acousto-optic standing-wave device provides the 15 MHz intensity modulation used for ranging. The sensor includes a two-axis, dual-aperture galvonometer scanner with selectable field of view and depression angles. The optical system fits on an easily transportable 3 ft by 4 ft optical bench. Both reflectance and range images are produced. The range imagery analysis shows a range resolution of approximately one foot. Statistical analysis of the reflectance data from a military truck, the dirt ground, and an asphalt road shows that they are Rayleigh distributed. The reflectivities of these objects are determined to be around two percent through comparison with laboratory reflectometer measurements.

  15. Required energy for a laser radar system incorporating a fiber amplifier or an avalanche photodiode.

    PubMed

    Overbeck, J A; Salisbury, M S; Mark, M B; Watson, E A

    1995-11-20

    The transmitted energy required for an airborne laser radar system to be able to image a target at 20 km is investigated. Because direct detection is being considered, two methods of enhancing the received signal are discussed: (1) using an avalanche photodiode (APD) as the detector and (2) using a commercial fiber amplifier as a preamplifier before a photodetector. For this analysis a specified signal-to-noise ratio was used in conjunction with the radar range equation, which includes the effects of atmospheric transmission and turbulence. Theoretical analysis reveals that a system with a fiber amplifier performs nearly the same as a system incorporating an APD. PMID:21060654

  16. Linear FMCW Laser Radar for Precision Range and Vector Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierrottet, Diego; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Petway, Larry; Barnes, Bruce; Lockhard, George; Rubio, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    An all fiber linear frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) coherent laser radar system is under development with a goal to aide NASA s new Space Exploration initiative for manned and robotic missions to the Moon and Mars. By employing a combination of optical heterodyne and linear frequency modulation techniques and utilizing state-of-the-art fiber optic technologies, highly efficient, compact and reliable laser radar suitable for operation in a space environment is being developed. Linear FMCW lidar has the capability of high-resolution range measurements, and when configured into a multi-channel receiver system it has the capability of obtaining high precision horizontal and vertical velocity measurements. Precision range and vector velocity data are beneficial to navigating planetary landing pods to the preselected site and achieving autonomous, safe soft-landing. The all-fiber coherent laser radar has several important advantages over more conventional pulsed laser altimeters or range finders. One of the advantages of the coherent laser radar is its ability to measure directly the platform velocity by extracting the Doppler shift generated from the motion, as opposed to time of flight range finders where terrain features such as hills, cliffs, or slopes add error to the velocity measurement. Doppler measurements are about two orders of magnitude more accurate than the velocity estimates obtained by pulsed laser altimeters. In addition, most of the components of the device are efficient and reliable commercial off-the-shelf fiber optic telecommunication components. This paper discusses the design and performance of a second-generation brassboard system under development at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance (ALHAT) project.

  17. Frame frequency prediction for Risley-prism-based imaging laser radar.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yafei; Zhou, Yuan; Hei, Mo; Fan, Dapeng

    2014-06-01

    A dual-wedge scanner has potential applications in laser imaging radar. To realize fast scanning imaging without a blind region, the rotation rates of the wedges have to be controlled to perform beam scanning along appropriate track paths. The first-order paraxial approximation method is employed to investigate the 2D scan patterns and path density for different angular frequency ratios of the wedges rotating steadily in the same and opposite directions. The frame rate of no-blind-region scanning imaging is estimated in terms of the imaging coverage requirement. The internal relations between the rotation rates, the instantaneous field of view (IFOV), and the imaging velocity are revealed. The results show that the spiral scanning trace, resulting from co-rotating wedges, is dense in the center and sparse at the edge of the scanning field. The reverse results can be obtained for the rosette scanning trace, resulting from counter-rotating wedges. The denser the scanning trace is, the longer the scan period is. The faster the wedges rotate and the wider the IFOV is, the higher the frame rate is. When the ratio of the width of IFOV to the angular radius of the scanning field is 0.15, the frame rate of no-blind-region spiral scanning imaging can be up to 18 fps for wedge rotation rate of 12000  r/min, and that for rosette scanning imaging can be up to 20 fps. PMID:24922434

  18. Advanced system model for 1574-nm imaging, scannerless, eye-safe laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schael, Ulrich; Rothe, Hendrik

    2002-10-01

    Laser radar based on gated viewing uses narrow laser pulses to illuminate a whole scene for direct (incoherent) detection. Due to the time of flight principle and a very fast shutter with precisely controlled delay time, only light reflected in the range R (range slice ΔR) is detected by a camera. Scattered light which reaches the shutter outside a given exposure time (gate) is suppressed. Hence, it is possible to "look" along the optical axis through changing atmospheric transmissions (rain, haze, fog, snow). For each laser pulse, the grey value image ES(x,y) of the camera is captured by a framegrabber for subsequent evaluation. Image sequences from these laser radar systems are ideally suited to recognize objects, because of the automatic contrast generation of the technology. Difficult object recognition problems, detection, target tracking, or obstacle avoidance at bad weather conditions are favorite applications. In this paper we discuss improvements in the system modelling and simulation of our laser radar system. Formerly the system performance was calculated for the whole system using the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), leading to a general estimation of the maximum range of target detection. Changing to a pixel oriented approach, we are now able to study the system response for targets with arbitrary two and even three dimensional form. We take into account different kinds of target reflectivity and the Gaussian nature of the illuminating laser spot. Hence it is possible to simulate gray value images (range slices) and calculate range images. This will lead to a modulation transfer function for the system in future. Finally, the theoretical considerations are compared with experimental results from indoor measurements.

  19. Maximum detection range limitation of pulse laser radar with Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hanjun; Xu, Benlian; Xu, Huigang; Chen, Jingbo; Fu, Yadan

    2015-05-01

    When designing and evaluating the performance of laser radar system, maximum detection range achievable is an essential parameter. The purpose of this paper is to propose a theoretical model of maximum detection range for simulating the Geiger-mode laser radar's ranging performance. Based on the laser radar equation and the requirement of the minimum acceptable detection probability, and assuming the primary electrons triggered by the echo photons obey Poisson statistics, the maximum range theoretical model is established. By using the system design parameters, the influence of five main factors, namely emitted pulse energy, noise, echo position, atmospheric attenuation coefficient, and target reflectivity on the maximum detection range are investigated. The results show that stronger emitted pulse energy, lower noise level, more front echo position in the range gate, higher atmospheric attenuation coefficient, and higher target reflectivity can result in greater maximum detection range. It is also shown that it's important to select the minimum acceptable detection probability, which is equivalent to the system signal-to-noise ratio for producing greater maximum detection range and lower false-alarm probability.

  20. Measurement of trace stratospheric constituents with a balloon borne laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.; Mcgee, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research was to measure the concentration of the stratospheric hydroxyl radical and related chemical species as a function of altitude, season, and time of day. Although hydroxyl plays a very important role in the chemistry controlling stratospheric ozone, little is known about its behavior because it has been a difficult species to measure. The instrument employed in this program was a laser radar, employing the technique of remote laser induced fluorescence. This instrument offers a number of attractive features including extreme specificity and sensitivity, a straightforward relationship between observed quantity and the desired concentration, and immunity to self-contamination.

  1. Radar 92; Proceedings of the International Conference, Brighton, United Kingdom, Oct. 12, 13, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The present conference discusses topics indicative of the development status of radar simulation and modeling, sea and land clutter effects, multifunction and monopulse radar, radar propagation and target measurement, surveillance and tracking, clutter suppression, antenna designs, and air traffic control applications of radar systems. Also discussed are radar techniques for electronic warfare, antenna-related signal processing, SAR for remote sensing, multifunction signal processing, SAR and ISAR, radar target classification, bistatic radar, signal reconstruction, Doppler weather radar, and electronic warfare countermeasures.

  2. Eighth International Workshop on Laser Ranging Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    The Eighth International Workshop for Laser Ranging Instrumentation was held in Annapolis, Maryland in May 1992, and was sponsored by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The workshop is held once every 2 to 3 years under differing institutional sponsorship and provides a forum for participants to exchange information on the latest developments in satellite and lunar laser ranging hardware, software, science applications, and data analysis techniques. The satellite laser ranging (SLR) technique provides sub-centimeter precision range measurements to artificial satellites and the Moon. The data has application to a wide range of Earth and lunar science issues including precise orbit determination, terrestrial reference frames, geodesy, geodynamics, oceanography, time transfer, lunar dynamics, gravity and relativity.

  3. Transmitter design with alterable view field for airborne laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haiyan; Hu, Yun'an

    2009-10-01

    The variable focus telescope is utilized now in the laser transmitter system design. It changes the telescope's magnifying power in order to adjust the exit beam through moving the inner focus lens. This system has complicated structure and high machining expense. This paper investigates the focusing character of Gaussian beam through misadjust telescope and presents a new method for lidar transmission system design. The laser beam divergence angle and the radius of exit beam are changed through moving the distance between the back focus of object lens and the front focus of ocular. This design can provide a convenient method for calculating the focusing parameters. The restriction of assembly dimension and the effect of fitting and adjusting error which should be considered in engineering application are studied, and then bring a method to choose the right parameters of focusing optic system by the focusing requirement.

  4. High-resolution 3D imaging laser radar flight test experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Richard M.; Davis, W. R.; Rich, G. C.; McLaughlin, J. L.; Lee, E. I.; Stanley, B. M.; Burnside, J. W.; Rowe, G. S.; Hatch, R. E.; Square, T. E.; Skelly, L. J.; O'Brien, M.; Vasile, A.; Heinrichs, R. M.

    2005-05-01

    Situation awareness and accurate Target Identification (TID) are critical requirements for successful battle management. Ground vehicles can be detected, tracked, and in some cases imaged using airborne or space-borne microwave radar. Obscurants such as camouflage net and/or tree canopy foliage can degrade the performance of such radars. Foliage can be penetrated with long wavelength microwave radar, but generally at the expense of imaging resolution. The goals of the DARPA Jigsaw program include the development and demonstration of high-resolution 3-D imaging laser radar (ladar) ensor technology and systems that can be used from airborne platforms to image and identify military ground vehicles that may be hiding under camouflage or foliage such as tree canopy. With DARPA support, MIT Lincoln Laboratory has developed a rugged and compact 3-D imaging ladar system that has successfully demonstrated the feasibility and utility of this application. The sensor system has been integrated into a UH-1 helicopter for winter and summer flight campaigns. The sensor operates day or night and produces high-resolution 3-D spatial images using short laser pulses and a focal plane array of Geiger-mode avalanche photo-diode (APD) detectors with independent digital time-of-flight counting circuits at each pixel. The sensor technology includes Lincoln Laboratory developments of the microchip laser and novel focal plane arrays. The microchip laser is a passively Q-switched solid-state frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser transmitting short laser pulses (300 ps FWHM) at 16 kilohertz pulse rate and at 532 nm wavelength. The single photon detection efficiency has been measured to be > 20 % using these 32x32 Silicon Geiger-mode APDs at room temperature. The APD saturates while providing a gain of typically > 106. The pulse out of the detector is used to stop a 500 MHz digital clock register integrated within the focal-plane array at each pixel. Using the detector in this binary response mode

  5. Getting to the science quickly and effectively: An international collaboration in community radar software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collis, Scott; Helmus, Jonathan; Heistermann, Maik; Michelson, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The science of meteorology is full of duplicated effort. Actions such as reading in data, quality control and performing retrievals is repeated across institutions and while the traditional publication process helps in jumpstarting the development process details can be, some times deliberately, vague. Free and open software, specifically community software projects that are open to new contributions can help to alleviate this problem. This presentation will outline a growing international collaboration on the development of software for the reading, processing, retrieval from and output of weather radar data. Developers of the Python ARM Radar Toolkit, the Wradlib software package and the BALTRAD have been collaborating in order to improve the intercompatibility of the contributed code. This effort, coupled with running courses in open source software and sustainable programming practices is aimed at helping users cut through work that has been done before and get to using weather radar data to improve our understanding of the atmosphere and help decision makers make the best use of radar data. This will be an example driven presentation, code will be shown and examples worked through to give the audience a flavor of how work can be done with the various projects.

  6. Lasers '83. Proceedings of the international conference

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are the development history of the semiconductor diode laser, laser material processing, nonlinear spectroscopy, recent advancements in diode lasers, laser-driven particle accelerators, laser applications in the atmospheric sciences, laser-assisted collisions, novel (garnet and alexandrite) solid state laser materials, IR molecular lasers, devices and components for fiber-optic communications, free-electron lasers and masers, and picosecond optical phenomena. Also covered are laser-stimulated materials surface processes, color center laser developments, blue-green and metal vapor lasers, laser chemistry, nonlinear effects, high energy lasers, excimer lasers, laser trapping of ions, optical cavities and propagation, laser isotope separation, laser trapping of atoms, laser applications in biochemistry, tunable coherent short wavelength radiation, laser spectroscopy, picosecond studies of condensed phase molecular systems, and combustion and plasma diagnostics.

  7. An operational theory of laser-radar selenodesy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildey, R.L.; Schlier, R.E.; Hull, J.A.; Larson, G.

    1967-01-01

    A theory of the utilization of laser techniques for ranging from the Earth to the Moon for the purpose of providing control points on the lunar surface at which the figure of the Moon is measured to an accuracy at least an order of magnitude better than that of the present astrometric measurements is presented. This, in turn, increases the accuracy of the horizontal selenocentric coordinates of topographical features measured by present astrometric methods. The improvement in the vertical and horizontal coordinates of control points in the Apollo landing zone will aid in the analysis of Unmanned Lunar Orbiter photographs for the selection of Apollo landing sites. The present discussion proposes the means of obtaining the ground control upon which the Orbiter photogrammetry is to be fastened. In addition, a technique of combining Goldstone tracking data to show where the resulting lunar figure is positioned relative to the Moon's center of mass is presented. If corner reflectors are placed on the lunar surface, as suggested by many members of the scientific community, or on a lunar orbiting vehicle, one or more Earth-based laser ranging systems are essential. These reflectors will give enough enhancement in return signal to allow for an additional increase in range accuracy of one to two orders of magnitude. In addition to the primary data on the figure of the Moon, a number of other measurements of scientific importance are then readily obtainable. As far as the measurement of control points is concerned, however, the use of corner reflectors is not essential for the success of this project. Questions regarding the influence on the present shape of the Moon of the frozen tide, isostasy, and past impacts of large asteroids appear in large part answerable through the data which are indicated to be obtainable under the present theory. ?? 1967.

  8. Middle Atmosphere Program. Handbook for MAP. Volume 30: International School on Atmospheric Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukao, Shoichiro (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Broad, tutorial coverage is given to the technical and scientific aspects of mesosphere stratosphere troposphere (MST) meteorological radar systems. Control issues, signal processing, atmospheric waves, the historical aspects of radar atmospheric dynamics, incoherent scatter radars, radar echoes, radar targets, and gravity waves are among the topics covered.

  9. Multiple target tracking and target attitude determination with a scanning laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, T.; Coombes, D.

    1974-01-01

    A scanning laser radar that can acquire and track single or multiple targets has recently been developed. Scan patterns have been designed for acquisition and tracking of one or more targets using a narrow laser beam. A synchronously scanned transmitter-receiver is used to acquire and track targets anywhere in a 376 x 376 element raster covering a 30 x 30 deg field. All scan patterns are electronically programmed, and the system automatically acquires and tracks the target or targets without the aid of an operator. The maximum tracking rate is 1.0 deg/sec (10.0 deg/sec) when used with a 1 kHz (10 kHz) scan rate. The estimated free space range against passive cooperative targets (corner cube reflectors) is 30 nautical miles. The laser radar has an accuracy of 10 cm (range) and 0.05 deg (angle). The developmental system is relatively small (1.5 cu ft), lightweight (60 lbs) and low-power-consuming (60 W).

  10. Multihit mode direct-detection laser radar system using a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode.

    PubMed

    Oh, Min Seok; Kong, Hong Jin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Hong, Keun Ho; Kim, Byung Wook; Park, Dong Jo

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, a direct-detection laser radar system that uses a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) of relatively short dead time (45 ns) is described. A passively Q-switched microchip laser is used as a laser source and a compact peripheral component interconnect system, which includes a time-to-digital converter (TDC), is set up for fast signal processing. With both the GAPD and the TDC functioning multistop acquisition, the system operates in a multihit mode. The software for the three-dimensional visualization and an algorithm for the removal of noise are developed. It is shown that the single-shot precision of the system is approximately 10 cm (sigma) and the precision is improved by increasing the number of laser pulses to be averaged so that the precision of approximately 1 cm (sigma) was acquired with more than 150 laser pulses scattered from the target. The accuracy of the system is measured to be 12 cm when the energy of the emitted laser pulse varies with a factor of 7. PMID:20370163

  11. Comparison of Retracking Algorithms Using Airborne Radar and Laser Altimeter Measurements of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferraro, Ellen J.; Swift, Calvin T.

    1995-01-01

    This paper compares four continental ice sheet radar altimeter retracking algorithms using airborne radar and laser altimeter data taken over the Greenland ice sheet in 1991. The refurbished Advanced Application Flight Experiment (AAFE) airborne radar altimeter has a large range window and stores the entire return waveform during flight. Once the return waveforms are retracked, or post-processed to obtain the most accurate altitude measurement possible, they are compared with the high-precision Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) altimeter measurements. The AAFE waveforms show evidence of varying degrees of both surface and volume scattering from different regions of the Greenland ice sheet. The AOL laser altimeter, however, obtains a return only from the surface of the ice sheet. Retracking altimeter waveforms with a surface scattering model results in a good correlation with the laser measurements in the wet and dry-snow zones, but in the percolation region of the ice sheet, the deviation between the two data sets is large due to the effects of subsurface and volume scattering. The Martin et al model results in a lower bias than the surface scattering model, but still shows an increase in the noise level in the percolation zone. Using an Offset Center of Gravity algorithm to retrack altimeter waveforms results in measurements that are only slightly affected by subsurface and volume scattering and, despite a higher bias, this algorithm works well in all regions of the ice sheet. A cubic spline provides retracked altitudes that agree with AOL measurements over all regions of Greenland. This method is not sensitive to changes in the scattering mechanisms of the ice sheet and it has the lowest noise level and bias of all the retracking methods presented.

  12. Predicted performance of a 10.6 micron pulsed coherent laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Kenneth W.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical predictions are made for the S/N ratio effects of atmospheric turbulence, target features, and receiver configuration on the performance of a 10.6-micron pulsed coherent laser radar. The predictions obtained are compared with experimental data for two target types: terrain consisting of soil and trees, and a silage tower. It is predicted that the terrain target should be detectable with a 50-mm aperture at ranges of up to 2.5 km for 50 percent of the time; this performance has been achieved in practice.

  13. The internal structure of the Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica from ice-penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Edward; De Rydt, Jan; Gudmundsson, Hilmar

    2016-04-01

    The Brunt Ice Shelf is a small feature on the Coats Land Coast of the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. It is unusual among Antarctic ice shelves because the ice crossing the grounding line from the ice sheet retains no structural integrity, so the ice shelf comprises icebergs of continental ice cemented together by sea ice, with the whole blanketed by in-situ snowfall. The size and distribution of the icebergs is governed by the thickness profile along the grounding line. Where bedrock troughs discharge thick ice to the ice shelf, the icebergs are large and remain close together with little intervening sea ice. Where bedrock ridges mean the ice crossing the grounding line is thin, the icebergs are small and widely-scattered with large areas of sea ice between them. To better understand the internal structure of the Brunt Ice Shelf and how this might affect the flow dynamics we conducted ice-penetrating radar surveys during December 2015 and January 2016. Three different ground-based radar systems were used, operating at centre frequencies of 400, 50 and 10 MHz respectively. The 400 MHz system gave detailed firn structure and accumulation profiles as well as time-lapse profiles of the active propagation of a crevasse. The 50 MHz system provided intermediate-level detail of iceberg distribution and thickness as well as information on the degree of salt water infiltration into the accumulating snow pack. The 10 MHz system used a high-power transmitter in an attempt to measure ice thickness beneath salt-impregnated ice. In this poster we will present example data from each of the three radar systems which will demonstrate the variability of the internal structure of the ice shelf. We will also present preliminary correlations between the internal structure and the surface topography from satellite data.

  14. Lasers '90; Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Lasers and Applications, San Diego, CA, Dec. 10-14, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Dennis G.; Herbelin, John

    Various papers on lasers are presented. The general topics considered are: X-ray lasers; FELs, solid state lasers; techniques and phenomena of ultrafast lasers; optical filters and free space laser communications, discharge lasers; tunable lasers; application of lasers in medicine and surgery; lasers in materials processing; high power lasers; dynamic gratings, wave mixing, and holography; up-conversion lasers; lidar and laser radar; laser resonators; excimer lasers; laser propagation; nonlinear and quantum optics; blue-green technology; imaging; laser spectroscopy; chemical lasers; dye lasers; lasers in chemistry.

  15. Heterodyne efficiency for a coherent laser radar with diffuse or aerosol targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of a Coherent Laser Radar is determined by the statistics of the coherent Doppler signal. The heterodyne efficiency is an excellent indication of performance because it is an absolute measure of beam alignment and is independent of the transmitter power, the target backscatter coefficient, the atmospheric attenuation, and the detector quantum efficiency and gain. The theoretical calculation of heterodyne efficiency for an optimal monostatic lidar with a circular aperture and Gaussian transmit laser is presented including beam misalignment in the far-field and near-field regimes. The statistical behavior of estimates of the heterodyne efficiency using a calibration hard target are considered. For space based applications, a biased estimate of heterodyne efficiency is proposed that removes the variability due to the random surface return but retains the sensitivity to misalignment. Physical insight is provided by simulation of the fields on the detector surface. The required detector calibration is also discussed.

  16. Laser radar range and detection performance for MEMS corner cube retroreflector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Odhner, Jefferson E.; Stewart, Hamilton; McDaniel, Robert V.

    2004-12-01

    BAE SYSTEMS reports on a program to characterize the performance of MEMS corner cube retroreflector arrays under laser illumination. These arrays have significant military and commercial application in the areas of: 1) target identification; 2) target tracking; 3) target location; 4) identification friend-or-foe (IFF); 5) parcel tracking, and; 6) search and rescue assistance. BAE SYSTEMS has theoretically determined the feasibility of these devices to learn if sufficient signal-to-noise performance exists to permit a cooperative laser radar sensor to be considered for device location and interrogation. Results indicate that modest power-apertures are required to achieve SNR performance consistent with high probability of detection and low false alarm rates.

  17. Laser radar range and detection performance for MEMS corner cube retroreflector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Jost, Steven R.; Smith, M. J.; McDaniel, Robert V.

    2004-01-01

    BAE SYSTEMS reports on a program to characterize the performance of MEMS corner cube retroreflector arrays under laser illumination. These arrays have significant military and commercial application in the areas of: (1) target identification; (2) target tracking; (3) target location; (4) identification friend-or-foe (IFF); (5) parcel tracking, and; (6) search and rescue assistance. BAE SYSTEMS has theoretically determined the feasibility of these devices to learn if sufficient signal-to-noise performance exists to permit a cooperative laser radar sensor to be considered for device location and interrogation. Results indicate that modest power-apertures are required to achieve SNR performance consistent with high probability of detection and low false alarm rates.

  18. Methods for recognition of natural and man-made objects using laser radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenwall, Christina A.; Chevalier, Tomas R.; Persson, Asa; Elmqvist, Magnus; Ahlberg, Simon; Klasen, Lena M.; Andersson, Pierre

    2004-09-01

    Over the years imaging laser radar systems have been developed for both military and civilian (topographic) applications. Among the applications, 3D data is used for environment modeling and object reconstruction and recognition. The data processing methods are mainly developed separately for military or topographic applications, seldom both application areas are in mind. In this paper, an overview of methods from both areas is presented. First, some of the work on ground surface estimation and classification of natural objects, for example trees, is described. Once natural objects have been detected and classified, we review some of the extensive work on reconstruction and recognition of man-made objects. Primarily we address the reconstruction of buildings and recognition of vehicles. Further, some methods for evaluation of measurement systems and algorithms are described. Models of some types of laser radar systems are reviewed, based on both physical and statistical approaches, for analysis and evaluation of measurement systems and algorithms. The combination of methods for reconstruction of natural and man-made objects is also discussed. By combining methods originating from civilian and military applications, we believe that the tools to analyze a whole scene become available. In this paper we show examples where methods from both application fields are used to analyze a scene.

  19. Detection and false-alarm probabilities for laser radars that use Geiger-mode detectors.

    PubMed

    Fouche, Daniel G

    2003-09-20

    For a direct-detection laser radar that uses a Geiger-mode detector, theory shows that the single-pulse detection probability is reduced by a factor exp(-K), where K is the mean number of primary electrons created by noise in the interval t between detector turn-on and arrival of laser photons reflected from the target. The corresponding false-alarm probability is at least 1 - exp(-K). For fixed-rate noise, one can improve the detection and false-alarm probabilities by reducing t. Moreover, when background-light noise is significant and dominates dark-current noise and when the laser signal is of the order of ten photoelectrons or more, the probabilities can be improved by reducing the amount of light falling on the detector, even if the laser signal is reduced by the same factor as the background light is. Additional analytical calculations show that identifying coincidences in data from as few as three pulses canreduce the false-alarm probability by orders of magnitude and, for some conditions, can also improve the detection probability. PMID:14526825

  20. Comparison of Surface Elevation Changes of the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets from Radar and Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Brenner, Anita C.; Barbieri, Kristine; DiMarzio, John P.; Li, Jun; Robbins, John; Saba, Jack L.; Yi, Donghui

    2012-01-01

    A primary purpose of satellite altimeter measurements is determination of the mass balances of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets and changes with time by measurement of changes in the surface elevations. Since the early 1990's, important measurements for this purpose have been made by radar altimeters on ERS-l and 2, Envisat, and CryoSat and a laser altimeter on ICESat. One principal factor limiting direct comparisons between radar and laser measurements is the variable penetration depth of the radar signal and the corresponding location of the effective depth of the radar-measured elevation beneath the surface, in contrast to the laser-measured surface elevation. Although the radar penetration depth varies significantly both spatially and temporally, empirical corrections have been developed to account for this effect. Another limiting factor in direct comparisons is caused by differences in the size of the laser and radar footprints and their respective horizontal locations on the surface. Nevertheless, derived changes in elevation, dHldt, and time-series of elevation, H(t), have been shown to be comparable. For comparisons at different times, corrections for elevation changes caused by variations in the rate offrrn compaction have also been developed. Comparisons between the H(t) and the average dH/dt at some specific locations, such as the Vostok region of East Antarctic, show good agreement among results from ERS-l and 2, Envisat, and ICESat. However, Greenland maps of dHidt from Envisat and ICESat for the same time periods (2003-2008) show some areas of significant differences as well as areas of good agreement. Possible causes of residual differences are investigated and described.

  1. GLACIER MONITORING SYSTEM IN COLOMBIA - complementing glaciological measurements with laser-scanning and ground-penetrating radar surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, Jorge; Micheletti, Natan; Rabatel, Antoine; Mölg, Nico; Zemp, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Colombia (South America) has six small glaciers (total glacierized area of 45 Km2); their geographical location, close to zero latitude, makes them very sensitive to climate changes. An extensive monitoring program is being performed since 2006 on two glaciers, with international cooperation supports. This presentation summarizes the results of glacier changes in Colombia and includes the latest results obtained within the CATCOS Project - Phase 1 (Capacity Building and Twinning for Climate Observing Systems) signed between Colombia and Switzerland, and within the Joint Mixte Laboratory GREAT-ICE (IRD - France), with the application of LiDAR technology and GPR-based ice thickness measurements at Conejeras Glacier. Conejeras Glacier (Lat. N. 4° 48' 56"; Long. W. 75° 22' 22"; Alt. Max. 4915m.; Alt. Min. 4730m. Area 0.2 Km2) is located on the north-western side of Santa Isabel Volcano. This glacier belongs to global glacier monitoring network of the World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS-ID: 2721). The surface mass balance is calculated monthly using the direct glaciological method. Between April 2006 and May 2014, Conejeras Glacier showed a cumulative loss of -21 m w.e. The CATCOS Project allowed to improve the glacier monitoring system in Colombia with two main actions: (1) a terrestrial laser scanner survey (RIEGL VZ-6000 terrestrial laser scanner, property of Universities of Lausanne and Fribourg); and (2) ice thickness measurements (Blue System Integration Ltd. Ice Penetrating Radar of property of IRD). The terrestrial laser-scanning survey allowed to realize an accurate digital terrain model of the glacier surface with 13 million points and a decimetric resolution. Ice thickness measurements showed an average glacier thickness of 22 meters and a maximum of 52 meters.

  2. Laser- and Radar-based Mission Concepts for Suborbital and Spaceborne Monitoring of Seismic Surface Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Foxall, W; Schultz, C A; Tralli, D M

    2004-09-21

    The development of a suborbital or spaceborne system to monitor seismic waves poses an intriguing prospect for advancing the state of seismology. This capability would enable an unprecedented global mapping of the velocity structure of the earth's crust, understanding of earthquake rupture dynamics and wave propagation effects, and event source location, characterization and discrimination that are critical for both fundamental earthquake research and nuclear non-proliferation applications. As part of an ongoing collaboration between LLNL and JPL, an advanced mission concept study assessed architectural considerations and operational and data delivery requirements, extending two prior studies by each organization--a radar-based satellite system (JPL) for earthquake hazard assessment and a feasibility study of space- or UAV-based laser seismometer systems (LLNL) for seismic event monitoring. Seismic wave measurement requirements include lower bounds on detectability of specific seismic sources of interest and wave amplitude accuracy for different levels of analysis, such as source characterization, discrimination and tomography, with a 100 {micro}m wave amplitude resolution for waves nominally traveling 5 km/s, an upper frequency bound based on explosion and earthquake surface displacement spectra, and minimum horizontal resolution (1-5 km) and areal coverage, in general and for targeted observations. For a radar system, corresponding engineering and operational factors include: Radar frequency (dictated by required wave amplitude measurement accuracy and maximizing ranging, Doppler or interferometric sensitivity), time sampling (maximum seismic wave frequency and velocity), and overall system considerations such as mass, power and data rate. Technical challenges include characterization of, and compensation for, phase distortion resulting from atmospheric and ionospheric perturbations and turbulence, and effects of ground scattering characteristics and seismic

  3. Active laser radar systems with stochastic electromagnetic beams in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yangjian; Korotkova, Olga; Eyyuboğlu, Halil T; Baykal, Yahya

    2008-09-29

    Propagation of stochastic electromagnetic beams through paraxial ABCD optical systems operating through turbulent atmosphere is investigated with the help of the ABCD matrices and the generalized Huygens-Fresnel integral. In particular, the analytic formula is derived for the cross-spectral density matrix of an electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model (EGSM) beam. We applied our analysis for the ABCD system with a single lens located on the propagation path, representing, in a particular case, the unfolded double-pass propagation scenario of active laser radar. Through a number of numerical examples we investigated the effect of local turbulence strength and lens' parameters on spectral, coherence and polarization properties of the EGSM beam. PMID:18825220

  4. Multiple-input multiple-output 3D imaging laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunbo; Wu, Chao; Han, Xiang'e.

    2015-10-01

    A 3D (angle-angle-range) imaging laser radar (LADAR) based on multiple-input multiple-output structure is proposed. In the LADAR, multiple coherent beams are randomly phased to form the structured light field and an APD array detector is utilized to receive the echoes from target. The sampled signals from each element of APD are correlated with the referenced light to reconstruct the local 3D images of target. The 3D panorama of target can be obtained by stitching the local images of all the elements. The system composition is described first, then the operation principle is presented and numerical simulations are provided to show the validity of the proposed scheme.

  5. Error Ellipsoid Analysis for the Diameter Measurement of Cylindroid Components Using a Laser Radar Measurement System

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhengchun; Wu, Zhaoyong; Yang, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) data in the industrial measurement field is becoming increasingly popular because of the rapid development of laser scanning techniques based on the time-of-flight principle. However, the accuracy and uncertainty of these types of measurement methods are seldom investigated. In this study, a mathematical uncertainty evaluation model for the diameter measurement of standard cylindroid components has been proposed and applied to a 3D laser radar measurement system (LRMS). First, a single-point error ellipsoid analysis for the LRMS was established. An error ellipsoid model and algorithm for diameter measurement of cylindroid components was then proposed based on the single-point error ellipsoid. Finally, four experiments were conducted using the LRMS to measure the diameter of a standard cylinder in the laboratory. The experimental results of the uncertainty evaluation consistently matched well with the predictions. The proposed uncertainty evaluation model for cylindrical diameters can provide a reliable method for actual measurements and support further accuracy improvement of the LRMS. PMID:27213385

  6. Error Ellipsoid Analysis for the Diameter Measurement of Cylindroid Components Using a Laser Radar Measurement System.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhengchun; Wu, Zhaoyong; Yang, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) data in the industrial measurement field is becoming increasingly popular because of the rapid development of laser scanning techniques based on the time-of-flight principle. However, the accuracy and uncertainty of these types of measurement methods are seldom investigated. In this study, a mathematical uncertainty evaluation model for the diameter measurement of standard cylindroid components has been proposed and applied to a 3D laser radar measurement system (LRMS). First, a single-point error ellipsoid analysis for the LRMS was established. An error ellipsoid model and algorithm for diameter measurement of cylindroid components was then proposed based on the single-point error ellipsoid. Finally, four experiments were conducted using the LRMS to measure the diameter of a standard cylinder in the laboratory. The experimental results of the uncertainty evaluation consistently matched well with the predictions. The proposed uncertainty evaluation model for cylindrical diameters can provide a reliable method for actual measurements and support further accuracy improvement of the LRMS. PMID:27213385

  7. Multiple surface discrimination in three-dimensional FLASH laser radar while minimizing the effects of diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Brian J.; Cain, Stephen C.

    2012-05-01

    The goal of this work is to develop an algorithm to enhance the utility of three-dimensional (3-D) FLASH laser radar sensors through accurate ranging to multiple surfaces per image pixel while minimizing the effects of diffraction. With this algorithm it will be possible to realize numerous enhancements over both traditional Gaussian mixture modeling and single-surface range estimation. While traditional Gaussian mixture modeling can effectively model the received pulse, we know that its shape is likely altered by optical aberrations from the imaging system and the medium through which it is imaging. Additionally, only identifying a single surface per pulse may result in the loss of valuable information about partially obscured surfaces. This algorithm enables multisurface ranging of an entire image with a single laser pulse. Ultimately, improvements realized through this new ranging algorithm when coupled with various other techniques may make 3-D FLASH LADAR more suitable for remote sensing applications. Simulation examples show that the multisurface ranging algorithm derived in this work improves range estimation over standard Gaussian mixture modeling and frame-by-frame deconvolution using the Richardson-Lucy algorithm by up to 91% and 70% respectively.

  8. Research on high precision timing system based on FPGA non scanning imaging laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yanbo; Han, Shaokun; Wang, Liang; Ma, Yayun

    2015-08-01

    The article introduced the system structure and imaging principle of no three-dimensional imaging laser radar. This paper used the XC7K325T XILINX chip of KINTEX 7 series and used temporal interpolation method to measure distance. Rough side used PLL multiplier 400MHZ, which reached 2.5ns time accuracy. This method used a thin chip delay chains carry resources to reach 50ps accuracy and greatly improved the accuracy of the timing of imaging. Application technique used a delay line in APD array imaging system, such that each channel distance accuracy greatly improved. Echo signal by photoelectric conversion is completed by APD array detector, and designed by the impedance amplifier and other analog signal processing circuit. FPGA signal processing circuit is to complete the back-end processing, which is the timing function. FPGA array timer clock is to achieve coarse portion through timing, and delay line technique for measuring the length of time a non-integer multiple of the period of the laser pulse emission and the moment of reception, each stage of the delay units delay accuracy of sub ns magnitude, so as to achieve precision measuring part timers. With the above device was close imaging experiments, obtaining the 5 × 5 pixel imaging test results, presented to further improve system accuracy improved method.

  9. Transmitter and receiver antenna gain analysis for laser radar and communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, B. J.; Degnan, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive and fairly self-contained study of centrally obscured optical transmitting and receiving antennas is presented and is intended for use by the laser radar and communication systems designer. The material is presented in a format which allows the rapid and accurate evaluation of antenna gain. The Fresnel approximation to scalar wave theory is reviewed and the antenna analysis proceeds in terms of the power gain. Conventional range equations may then be used to calculate the power budget. The transmitter calculations, resulting in near and far field antenna gain patterns, assumes the antenna is illuminated by a laser operating in the fundamental cavity mode. A simple equation is derived for matching the incident source distribution to a general antenna configuration for maximum on-axis gain. An interpretation of the resultant gain curves allows a number of auxiliary design curves to be drawn which display the losses in antenna gain due to pointing errors and the cone angle of the outgoing beam as a function of antenna size and central obscuration. The use of telescope defocusing as an approach to spreading the beam for target acquisition is compared to some alternate methods.

  10. Point cloud uncertainty analysis for laser radar measurement system based on error ellipsoid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhengchun, Du; Zhaoyong, Wu; Jianguo, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional laser scanning has become an increasingly popular measurement method in industrial fields as it provides a non-contact means of measuring large objects, whereas the conventional methods are contact-based. However, the data acquisition process is subject to many interference factors, which inevitably cause errors. Therefore, it is necessary to precisely evaluate the accuracy of the measurement results. In this study, an error-ellipsoid-based uncertainty model was applied to 3D laser radar measurement system (LRMS) data. First, a spatial point uncertainty distribution map was constructed according to the error ellipsoid attributes. The single-point uncertainty ellipsoid model was then extended to point-point, point-plane, and plane-plane situations, and the corresponding distance uncertainty models were derived. Finally, verification experiments were performed by using an LRMS to measure the height of a cubic object, and the measurement accuracies were evaluated. The results show that the plane-plane distance uncertainties determined based on the ellipsoid model are comparable to those obtained by actual distance measurements. Thus, this model offers solid theoretical support to enable further LRMS measurement accuracy improvement.

  11. A digital elevation model of the Greenland Ice Sheet derived from combined laser and radar altimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenslund Levinsen, Joanna; Smith, Ben; Sørensen, Louise S.; Forsberg, René

    2014-05-01

    When estimating elevation changes of ice-covered surfaces from radar altimetry, it is important to correct for slope-induced errors. They cause the reflecting point of the pulse to move up-slope and thus return estimates in the wrong coordinates. Slope-induced errors can be corrected for by introducing a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). In this work, such a DEM is developed for the Greenland Ice Sheet using a combination of Envisat radar and ICESat laser altimetry. If time permits, CryoSat radar altimetry will be included as well. The reference year is 2010 and the spatial resolution 2.5 x 2.5 km. This is in accordance with the results obtained in the ESA Ice Sheets CCI project showing that a 5 x 5 km grid spacing is reasonable for ice sheet-wide change detection (Levinsen et al., 2013). Separate DEMs will be created for the given data sets, and the geostatistical spatial interpolation method collocation will be used to merge them, thus adjusting for potential inter-satellite biases. The final DEM is validated with temporally and spatially agreeing airborne lidar data acquired in the NASA IceBridge and ESA CryoVex campaigns. The motivation for developing a new DEM is based on 1) large surface changes presently being observed, and mainly in margin regions, hence necessitating updated topography maps for accurately deriving and correcting surface elevation changes, and 2) although radar altimetry is subject to surface penetration of the signal into the snowpack, data is acquired continuously in time. This is not the case with e.g. ICESat, where laser altimetry data were obtained in periods of active lasers, i.e. three times a year with a 35-day repeat track. Previous DEMs e.g. have 2007 as the nominal reference year, or they are built merely from ICESat data. These have elevation errors as small as 10 cm, which is lower than for Envisat and CryoSat. The advantage of an updated DEM consisting of combined radar and laser altimetry therefore is the possibility of

  12. Thermal lensing and frequency chirp in a heated CdTe modulator crystal and its effects on laser radar performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, R. S.; Kachelmyer, A. L.; Harris, N. W.

    1991-08-01

    The effects of optical and microwave heatings and thermally-induced birefringence in a CdTe modulator crystal on the performance of a linear FM CO2 laser radar are examined. This is conducted in terms of reductions in beam Strehl ratio and dynamic ranges of the Doppler shift and range for given optical and microwave powers. An analysis of the thermal lenses generated by these heatings is presented.

  13. Femtosecond laser internal manufacturing of three-dimensional microstructure devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chong; Hu, Anming; Chen, Tao; Oakes, Ken D.; Liu, Shibing

    2015-10-01

    Potential applications for three-dimensional microstructure devices developed rapidly across numerous fields including microoptics, microfluidics, microelectromechanical systems, and biomedical devices. Benefiting from many unique fabricating advantages, internal manufacturing methods have become the dominant process for three-dimensional microstructure device manufacturing. This paper provides a brief review of the most common techniques of femtosecond laser three-dimensional internal manufacturing (3DIM). The physical mechanisms and representative experimental results of 3D manufacturing technologies based on multiphoton polymerization, laser modification, microexplosion and continuous hollow structure internal manufacturing are provided in details. The important progress in emerging applications based on the 3DIM technologies is introduced as well.

  14. Digital image processing system for a high-powered CO2 laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Francis J.; Groden, Michael; Dryden, Gordon L.; Pfeiffer, George; Boos, Robert; Youmans, Douglas G.

    1996-11-01

    Textron has designed and built a high-powered CO2 laser radar for long range targeting and remote sensing. This is a coherent, multi-wavelength system with a 2D, wide-band image processing capability. The digital processor produces several output products from the transmitter return signals including range, velocity, angle, and 2D range-Doppler images of hard-body targets (LADAR mode). In addition, the processor sorts and reports on data acquired from gaseous targets by wavelength and integrated path absorption (LIDAR mode). The digital processor has been developed from commercial components with a SUN SPARC 20 serving as the operator workstation and display. The digital output products are produced in real time and stored off-line for post-mission analysis and further target enhancements. This LADAR is distinguished from other designs primarily by the waveforms produced by the laser for target interrogation. The digital processing algorithms are designed to extract certain features through operation on each of the two waveforms. The waveforms are a pulse-tone and a pulse-burst designed for target acquisition and track, and 2D imaging respectively. The algorithms are categorized by function as acquisition/track, 2D imaging, integrated absorption for gaseous targets, and post mission enhancements such as tomographic reconstruction for multiple looks at targets from different perspectives. Field tests are now in process and results acquired from Feb.-June '96 will be reported on. The digital imaging system, its architecture, algorithms, simulations, and products will be described.

  15. High-resolution laser radar for 3D imaging in artwork cataloging, reproduction, and restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Roberto; Fantoni, Roberta; Ferri de Collibus, Mario; Fornetti, Giorgio G.; Guarneri, Massimiliano; Poggi, Claudio

    2003-10-01

    A high resolution Amplitude Modulated Laser Radar (AM-LR) sensor has recently been developed, aimed at accurately reconstructing 3D digital models of real targets, either single objects or complex scenes. The sensor sounding beam can be swept linearly across the object or circularly around it, by placing the object on a controlled rotating platform, enabling to obtain respectively linear and cylindrical range maps. Both amplitude and phase shift of the modulating wave of back-scattered light are collected and processed, providing respectively a shade-free, high resolution, photographic-like picture and accurate range data in the form of a range image. The resolution of range measurements depends mainly on the laser modulation frequency, provided that the power of the backscattered light reaching the detector is at least a few nW (current best performances are ~100 μm). The complete object surface can be reconstructed from the sampled points by using specifically developed software tools. The system has been successfully applied to scan different types of real surfaces (stone, wood, alloys, bones), with relevant applications in different fields, ranging from industrial machining to medical diagnostics, to vision in hostile environments. Examples of artwork reconstructed models (pottery, marble statues) are presented and the relevance of this technology for reverse engineering applied to cultural heritage conservation and restoration are discussed. Final 3D models can be passed to numeric control machines for rapid-prototyping, exported in standard formats for CAD/CAM purposes and made available on the Internet by adopting a virtual museum paradigm, thus possibly enabling specialists to perform remote inspections on high resolution digital reproductions of hardly accessible masterpieces.

  16. A Method of Tracking a Forward Vehicle using a Scanning Laser Radar and a Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Noriko; Nakamura, Satoshi; Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Fujimoto, Kazumi; Muro, Hideo

    This paper describes a robust tracking method that combines a scanning laser radar (SLR) with a camera to measure headway distances and lateral positions more accurately. With this method, a preceding vehicle is first detected on the basis of the digital data output by the SLR unit, and the vehicle is then tracked by both SLR and the camera. A variable shape template matching method is used in processing the images taken with the camera. The image recognition technique can track the preceding vehicle despite frequent changes in the headway distance and the direction. Robust and highly accurate tracking is achieved by combining the wide angle, high-resolution measurement obtained by image recognition with the SLR distance measurement. The proposed method has been validated on a driving simulator using data recorded on Japanese roads. The preceding vehicle was successfully tracked and its position was measured as expected on curves and on straight roads in general. The results also confirmed that this method has some advantages over detection by SLR alone in difficult detection situations.

  17. Multi-sensor image interpretation using laser radar and thermal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chen-Chau; Aggarwal, J. K.

    1991-03-01

    A knowledge based system is presented which interprets registered laser radar and thermal images. The object is to detect and recognize man-made objects at kilometer range in outdoor scenes. The multisensor fusion approach is applied to various sensing modalities (range, intensity, velocity, and thermal) to improve both image segmentation and interpretation. The ability to use multiple sensors greatly helps an intelligent platform to understand and interact with its environment. The knowledge-based interpretation system, AIMS, is constructed using KEE and Lisp. Low-level attributes of image segments (regions) are computed by the segmentation modules and then converted into the KEE format. The interpretation system applies forward chaining in a bottom-up fashion to derive object-level interpretations from data bases generated by low-level processing modules. Segments are grouped into objects and then objects are classified into predefined categories. AIMS employs a two tiered software structure. The efficiency of AIMS is enhanced by transferring nonsymbolic processing tasks to a concurrent service manager (program). Therefore, tasks with different characteristics are executed using different software tools and methodologies.

  18. International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) 2003-2004 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Michael (Editor); Noll, Carey (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    The International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) organizes and coordinates Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) to support programs in geodetic, geophysical, and lunar research activities and provides the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) with products important to the maintenance of an accurate International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). This reference frame provides the stability through which systematic measurements of the Earth can be made over thousands of kilometers, decades of time, and evolution of measurement technology. This 2003-2004 ILRS annual report is comprised of individual contributions from ILRS components within the international geodetic community for the years 2003-2004. The report documents changes and progress of the ILRS and is also available on the ILRS Web site at http://ilrs.gsfc.nasa.gov/reports/ilrs_reports/ilrsar_2003.html.

  19. Laser ignition in internal-combustion engines: Sparkless initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronov, A. A.; Gurin, V. A.; Marugin, A. V.; Savikin, A. P.; Svyatoshenko, D. E.; Tukhomirov, A. N.; Utkin, Yu. S.; Khimich, V. L.

    2014-08-01

    Laser ignition has been implemented in a single-cylinder internal combustion engine fueled by gasoline. Indicator diagrams (cylinder pressure versus crank angle) were obtained for laser ignition with nano- and microsecond pulses of an Nd:YAG laser. The maximum power of microsecond pulses was below critical for spark initiation, while the radiation wavelength was outside the spectral range of optical absorption by hydrocarbon fuels. Apparently, the ignition starts due to radiation absorption by the oil residues or carbon deposit in the combustion chamber, so that the ability of engine to operate is retained. This initiation of spark-free ignition shows the possibility of using compact semiconductor quantum-cascade lasers operating at wavelengths of about 3.4 μm (for which the optical absorption by fuel mixtures is high) in ignition systems of internal combustion engines.

  20. Status and future of laser scanning, synthetic aperture radar and hyperspectral remote sensing data for forest biomass assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Barbara

    2010-11-01

    This is a review of the latest developments in different fields of remote sensing for forest biomass mapping. The main fields of research within the last decade have focused on the use of small footprint airborne laser scanning systems, polarimetric synthetic radar interferometry and hyperspectral data. Parallel developments in the field of digital airborne camera systems, digital photogrammetry and very high resolution multispectral data have taken place and have also proven themselves suitable for forest mapping issues. Forest mapping is a wide field and a variety of forest parameters can be mapped or modelled based on remote sensing information alone or combined with field data. The most common information required about a forest is related to its wood production and environmental aspects. In this paper, we will focus on the potential of advanced remote sensing techniques to assess forest biomass. This information is especially required by the REDD (reducing of emission from avoided deforestation and degradation) process. For this reason, new types of remote sensing data such as fullwave laser scanning data, polarimetric radar interferometry (polarimetric systhetic aperture interferometry, PolInSAR) and hyperspectral data are the focus of the research. In recent times, a few state-of-the-art articles in the field of airborne laser scanning for forest applications have been published. The current paper will provide a state-of-the-art review of remote sensing with a particular focus on biomass estimation, including new findings with fullwave airborne laser scanning, hyperspectral and polarimetric synthetic aperture radar interferometry. A synthesis of the actual findings and an outline of future developments will be presented.

  1. Internal structure of Planum Boreum, from Mars advanced radar for subsurface and ionospheric sounding data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvans, M. M.; Plaut, J. J.; Aharonson, O.; Safaeinili, A.

    2010-09-01

    An investigation of the internal structure of the ice-rich Planum Boreum (PB) deposit at the north pole of Mars is presented, using 178 orbits of Mars advanced radar for subsurface and ionospheric sounding data. For each radargram, bright, laterally extensive surface and subsurface reflectors are identified and the time delay between them is converted to unit thicknesses, using a real dielectric constant of 3. Results include maps of unit thickness, for PB and its two constituent units, the stratigraphically older basal unit (BU) and the stratigraphically younger north polar layered deposits (NPLD). Maps of the individual units' surface elevation are also provided. Estimates of water ice volume in each unit are (1.3 ± 0.2) × 106 km3 in PB, (7.8 ± 1.2) × 105 km3 in the NPLD, and (4.5 ± 1.0) × 105 km3 in the BU. No lithospheric deflection is apparent under PB, in agreement with previous findings for only the Gemina Lingula lobe, which suggests that a thick elastic lithosphere has existed at the north pole of Mars since before the emplacement of the BU. The extent of BU material in the Olympia Planum lobe of PB is directly detected, providing a more accurate map of BU extent than previously available from imagery and topography. A problematic area for mapping the BU extent and thickness is in the distal portion of the 290°E-300°E region, where MARSIS data show no subsurface reflectors, even though the BU is inferred to be present from other lines of evidence.

  2. Internal structure of a barrier beach as revealed by ground penetrating radar (GPR): Chesil beach, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Matthew R.; Cassidy, Nigel J.; Pile, Jeremy

    2009-03-01

    Chesil Beach (Dorset) is one of the most famous coastal landforms on the British coast. The gravel beach is over 18 km long and is separated for much of its length from land by a tidal lagoon known as The Fleet. The beach links the Isle of Portland in the east to the mainland in the west. Despite its iconic status there is little available information on its internal geometry and evolutionary history. Here we present a three-fold model for the evolution of Chesil Beach based on a series of nine ground penetrating radar (GPR) traverses located at three sites along its length at Abbotsbury, Langton Herring and at Ferry Bridge. The GPR traverses reveal a remarkably consistent picture of the internal structure of this barrier beach. The first phase of evolution involves the landward transgression of a small sand and gravel beach which closed upon the coast leading to deposition of freshwater peat between 5 and 7 k yr BP. The second evolutionary phase involves the 'bulking-out' of the beach during continued sea level rise, but in the presence of abundant gravel supplied by down-drift erosion of periglacial slope deposits. This episode of growth was associated with a series of washover fans which accumulated on the landward flank of the barrier increasing its breadth and height but without significant landward transgression of the barrier as a whole. The final phase in the evolution of Chesil Beach involves the seaward progradation of the beach crest and upper beach face associated with continued sediment abundance, but during a still-stand or slight fall in relative sea level. This phase may provide further evidence of a slight fall in relative sea level noted elsewhere along the South Coast of Britain and dated to between 1.2 and 2.4 k yr BP. Subsequently the barrier appears to have become largely inactive, except for the reworking of sediment on the beach face during storm events. The case study not only refines the evolutionary picture of Chesil Beach, but

  3. International Laser Ranging Services (ILRS) 2001 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Michael (Editor); Torrence, Mark (Editor); Noll, Carey (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This 2001 Annual Report of the International Laser Ranging Services (ILRS) is comprised of individual contributions from ILRS components within the international geodetic community. This report documents the work of the ILRS components for the year 2001. The report documents changes and progress of the ILRS. This document is also available on the ILRS Web site at http://ilrs.gsfc.nasa.gov/reports/ilrs_reports/ilrsar_2001.html.

  4. International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) 1999 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Michael (Editor); Taggert, Linda (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This 1999 Annual Report of the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) is comprised of individual contributions from ILRS components within the international geodetic community. This report documents the work of the ILRS components from the inception of the Service through December 31,1999. Since the service has only recently been established, the ILRS associates decided to publish this Annual report as a reference to our organization and its components.

  5. Breakthrough in multichannel laser-radar technology providing thousands of high-sensitive lidar receivers on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarte, Rudolf M.

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a new proved multi-channel laser-radar technology which enables several thousands of high-sensitive laser-radar or lidar receivers to be integrated on a fingernail-sized CMOS-chip for fast 3D-perception and, furthermore, to explain the huge number of resulting applications and to estimate the desirable scientific, economic and society impacts. These extraordinary capabilities rely on the revolutionary improvements introduced by a smart inherently-mixing photodiode with two controllable photo-current outputs [1]. We call it PMD (Photonic Mixer Device) because the opto-electronic mixing process is accomplished directly in the photonic state, followed by an integration process to get OE-correlation and the delay of the optical echo and the modulation signal. The PMD-principle provides an unbelievable simplification, size-reduction and improvement in Multi-Channel Light Detecting and Ranging as a MC-PMD-Lidar or 3D-PMD-camera without scanner. Thanks to the competence and merit of the PMDTechnologies GmbH in cooperation with the INV of the University of Siegen finally brought the PMD in big steps to reliability and to large pixel numbers and to products with today about 20.000 lidar receivers in a 120x160 PMD-matrix, which exhibits homogenous and exquisite specifications like very constant mean value and low standard deviation compared with conventional radar receivers. This innovation may be seen as a breakthrough in the history of camera development. The "3D-camera" of today comprises more 3D-pixels in a PMD-array than, about 1970, the first CCD-cameras contained 2D-pixel in a CCD-array. Both are of similar size aside from the modulated sender with integrated LED's or laser diodes required for a homogenous illumination of the field-of-view.

  6. Dual-Wavelength Internal-Optically-Pumped Semiconductor Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Benjamin

    Dual-wavelength laser sources have various existing and potential applications in wavelength division multiplexing, differential techniques in spectroscopy for chemical sensing, multiple-wavelength interferometry, terahertz-wave generation, microelectromechanical systems, and microfluidic lab-on-chip systems. In the drive for ever smaller and increasingly mobile electronic devices, dual-wavelength coherent light output from a single semiconductor laser diode would enable further advances and deployment of these technologies. The output of conventional laser diodes is however limited to a single wavelength band with a few subsequent lasing modes depending on the device design. This thesis investigates a novel semiconductor laser device design with a single cavity waveguide capable of dual-wavelength laser output with large spectral separation. The novel dual-wavelength semiconductor laser diode uses two shorter- and longer-wavelength active regions that have separate electron and hole quasi-Fermi energy levels and carrier distributions. The shorter-wavelength active region is based on electrical injection as in conventional laser diodes, and the longer-wavelength active region is then pumped optically by the internal optical field of the shorter-wavelength laser mode, resulting in stable dual-wavelength laser emission at two different wavelengths quite far apart. Different designs of the device are studied using a theoretical model developed in this work to describe the internal optical pumping scheme. The carrier transport and separation of the quasi-Fermi distributions are then modeled using a software package that solves Poisson's equation and the continuity equations to simulate semiconductor devices. Three different designs are grown using molecular beam epitaxy, and broad-area-contact laser diodes are processed using conventional methods. The modeling and experimental results of the first generation design indicate that the optical confinement factor of the

  7. PREFACE AND CONFERENCE INFORMATION: Eighth International Conference on Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Herman, Peter R.; Bäuerle, Dieter; Koinuma, Hideomi

    2007-04-01

    Laser ablation encompasses a wide range of delicate to extreme light interactions with matter that present considerably challenging problems for scientists to study and understand. At the same time, laser ablation also represents a basic process of significant commercial importance in laser material processing—defining a multi-billion dollar industry today. These topics were widely addressed at the 8th International Conference on Laser Ablation (COLA), held in Banff, Canada on 11-16 September 2005. The meeting took place amongst the majestic and natural beauty of the Canadian Rocky Mountains at The Banff Centre, where delegates enjoyed many inspiring presentations and discussions in a unique campus learning environment. The conference brought together world leading scientists, students and industry representatives to examine the basic science of laser ablation and improve our understanding of the many physical, chemical and/or biological processes driven by the laser. The multi-disciplinary research presented at the meeting underlies some of our most important trends at the forefront of science and technology today that are represented in the papers collected in this volume. Here you will find new processes that are producing novel types of nanostructures and nano-materials with unusual and promising properties. Laser processes are described for delicately manipulating living cells or modifying their internal structure with unprecedented degrees of control and precision. Learn about short-pulse lasers that are driving extreme physical processes on record-fast time scales and opening new directions from material processing applications. The conference papers further highlight forefront application areas in pulsed laser deposition, nanoscience, analytical methods, materials, and microprocessing applications. Laser ablation continues to grow and evolve, touching forefront areas in science and driving new technological trends in laser processing applications. Please

  8. A system for high resolution 3D mapping using laser radar and requiring no beam scanning mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademacher, Paul

    1988-06-01

    The inherently high angular and range resolution capabilities associated with radar systems operating at optical frequencies are at once a blessing and a curse. Standard implementations consist of very narrow field of view optical receivers operating in conjunction with laser transmitters or even narrower illumination beamwidth. While high angular resolution is thus achieved, mechanical scanning is required to gather data over extended fields of view. The many laser pulse transmissions necessary to cover the entire field of view increase the detectability of the system by enemy sensors. A system concept is proposed which, through the use of a single laser transmitter and multiple optical receivers, largely eliminate these deficiencies. Complete 3D data over a broad angular field of view and depth of field can be gathered based upon the reflections from a single transmitted laser pulse. Covert operation is enhanced as a result of the sparse laser transmissions required. The eye safety characteristics of the system are also enhanced. Proprietary coding of optical shutters in each of the multiple optical receivers permits the number of such receivers to be reduced to a very practical few. An alternative configuration of the system reduces the number of receivers required to one, at the expense of increased data acquisition time. The multiple receiver configuration is simply a parallel processing implementation of the single receiver approach. While data rate is reduced by the single receiver configuration, it still greatly exceeds that of scanning systems, and hardware complexity is also reduced significantly.

  9. Linearization of the Frequency Sweep of a Frequency-Modulated Continuous-Wave Semiconductor Laser Radar and the Resulting Ranging Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Christer J.; Olsson, Fredrik Å. A.

    1999-05-01

    The performance of a frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) semiconductor laser radar has been examined. Frequency modulation (linear chirp) has been studied experimentally in detail. To create a linear frequency sweep, we modified the modulating function according to the measured frequency response of the laser, using an arbitrary function generator. The measurements indicate the possibility of achieving a spectral width of the signal peak that is transform limited rather than limited by the frequency modulation response of the laser, which permits the use of a narrow detection bandwidth. The narrow width results in a relatively high signal-to-noise ratio for low output power and thus also in relatively long-range and high-range accuracy. We have performed measurements of a diffuse target to determine the performance of a test laser radar system. The maximum range, range accuracy, and speed accuracy for a semiconductor laser with an output power of 10 mW and a linewidth of 400 kHz are presented. The influence of the laser s output power and coherence length on the performance of a semiconductor-laser-based FMCW laser radar is discussed.

  10. Linearization of the frequency sweep of a frequency-modulated continuous-wave semiconductor laser radar and the resulting ranging performance.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, C J; Olsson, F A

    1999-05-20

    The performance of a frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) semiconductor laser radar has been examined. Frequency modulation (linear chirp) has been studied experimentally in detail. To create a linear frequency sweep, we modified the modulating function according to the measured frequency response of the laser, using an arbitrary function generator. The measurements indicate the possibility of achieving a spectral width of the signal peak that is transform limited rather than limited by the frequency modulation response of the laser, which permits the use of a narrow detection bandwidth. The narrow width results in a relatively high signal-to-noise ratio for low output power and thus also in relatively long-range and high-range accuracy. We have performed measurements of a diffuse target to determine the performance of a test laser radar system. The maximum range, range accuracy, and speed accuracy for a semiconductor laser with an output power of 10 mW and a linewidth of 400 kHz are presented. The influence of the laser's output power and coherence length on the performance of a semiconductor-laser-based FMCW laser radar is discussed. PMID:18319935

  11. Jigsaw phase III: a miniaturized airborne 3-D imaging laser radar with photon-counting sensitivity for foliage penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidyanathan, Mohan; Blask, Steven; Higgins, Thomas; Clifton, William; Davidsohn, Daniel; Carson, Ryan; Reynolds, Van; Pfannenstiel, Joanne; Cannata, Richard; Marino, Richard; Drover, John; Hatch, Robert; Schue, David; Freehart, Robert; Rowe, Greg; Mooney, James; Hart, Carl; Stanley, Byron; McLaughlin, Joseph; Lee, Eui-In; Berenholtz, Jack; Aull, Brian; Zayhowski, John; Vasile, Alex; Ramaswami, Prem; Ingersoll, Kevin; Amoruso, Thomas; Khan, Imran; Davis, William; Heinrichs, Richard

    2007-04-01

    Jigsaw three-dimensional (3D) imaging laser radar is a compact, light-weight system for imaging highly obscured targets through dense foliage semi-autonomously from an unmanned aircraft. The Jigsaw system uses a gimbaled sensor operating in a spot light mode to laser illuminate a cued target, and autonomously capture and produce the 3D image of hidden targets under trees at high 3D voxel resolution. With our MIT Lincoln Laboratory team members, the sensor system has been integrated into a geo-referenced 12-inch gimbal, and used in airborne data collections from a UH-1 manned helicopter, which served as a surrogate platform for the purpose of data collection and system validation. In this paper, we discuss the results from the ground integration and testing of the system, and the results from UH-1 flight data collections. We also discuss the performance results of the system obtained using ladar calibration targets.

  12. Laser radar studies: A study of the feasibility of remote measurement of atmospheric density and turbidity by means of rotational Raman scattering of laser light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, N.; Schotland, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    A remote sensing technique is described which utilizes elastic scattering and rotational Raman scattering of laser light in the atmosphere to obtain soundings of turbidity, transmissivity and density. A scheme is devised whereby, through selective weighting of the rotational Raman lines, the effect of atmospheric temperature structure may be eliminated. The close spectral proximity of the elastic and Raman-scattered signals, combined with the fact that the Raman scattering is quite weak, produces special requirements for the spectroscopic and light-gathering components of a rotational Raman laser radar system. These requirements are investigated. A computation of typical signal-to-noise ratios is made. It is shown that daytime signal-to-noise ratios greater than 10 db are to be expected for observation heights of 5 km and below. For nighttime work, 10 db signal-to-noise ratios are achievable to altitudes as high as 15 km.

  13. International laser-safety regulations: a status update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, Robert M.

    1990-07-01

    There is an increase in international laser safety requirements as part of the emphasis on world-wide standardization of products and regulations. In particular the documents which will evolve from the 1992 consolidation efforts of the European Community (EC) will impact both laser manufacturers and users. This paper provides a discussion of the current status of the various laser radiation standards. NORTH AMERICAN REQUIREMENTS United States Requirements on manufacturers from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have been in effect since 1975. The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) within that agency ensures that these mandatory requirements [1] are satisfied. The CDRH regulations include the division of products into classes depending on their potential for hazard criteria for power measurement and requirements for product features labels and manuals and records and reports. Manufacturers must test products and certify that they comply with the CDRH requirements. User requirements are found in a standard published by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and in requirements from several individual states. Specific ANSI standards have also been published for fiber communications systems [34] and for lasers in medical applications [35]. Please note that the Appendix includes additional information on the standards discussed in this paper including sources for obtaining the documents. Canada In the past Canada has had requirements for two specified product categories (bar code scanners and educational lasers) [26 These will be replaced

  14. The ATC evaluation of the prototype Airport Surveillance Radar Wind Shear Processor (ASR-WSP) at Orlando International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Radame

    1993-03-01

    The Airport Surveillance Radar Wind Shear Processor (ASR-WSP), also known as Airport Surveillance Radar-9 (ASR-9) modification for low altitude wind shear detection, is a production ASR-9 with an expanded weather channel for added processing capabilities. The primary mission of the ASR-WSP is to enhance the safety of air travel through the timely detection and reporting of hazardous wind shear in and near the terminal approach and departure zones of the airport. It will also improve the management of air traffic (AT) in the terminal area through the forecast of precipitation, and ultimately the detection of other hazardous weather phenomena. The ASR-WSP may be used as a stand-alone system at airports without a Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) or Enhanced-Low Level Wind Shear Alert System (E-LLWAS), or in an integrated mode with either or both the TDWR and E-LLWAS. An operational evaluation of a prototype ASR-WSP, developed by Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratories (MIT/LL), was conducted at the Orlando International Airport (MCO) in Orlando, Florida, during the period 29 Jun. to 31 Aug. 1992. The objective of the evaluation was to obtain Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic controller reaction to the prototype ASR-WSP weather data and display equipment. The following are highlights of the evaluation: (1) the ASW-WSP is very useful when making runway configuration changes; (2) the ASR-WSP is not perceived to be as accurate as the prototype TDWR; (3) the gust front prediction feature is not reliable; and (4) the information provided on both the RDT and the GSD is very useful.

  15. Initial Analysis of Internal Layers in the Snow Cover of the Ross Island Region using Ground Penetrating Radar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruetzmann, N. C.; George, S. E.; McDonald, A. J.; Rack, W.

    2009-04-01

    In snow and ice, internal layers are created by changes in the ambient conditions at the time of deposition, and represent contrasts in density, electrical conductivity, and ice crystal orientation. By identifying and tracing internal layers in ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements of the Antarctic snow cover, these layers can be used to measure snow accumulation over time. This is particularly relevant for determining the Antarctic mass balance, as the areal coverage can be greatly expanded from the common, but potentially unrepresentative, point measurements from firn-cores, snow pits, or stake farms. This presentation discusses high-resolution GPR data acquired at three research sites in the vicinity of Scott Base (Antarctica), each site being characterised by different snow and surface properties. The first two sites examined, are located on the flat McMurdo Ice Shelf in zones with significantly different wind and accumulation patterns. The final site is located on the lower slopes of Mt. Erebus (Ross Island), in the dry snow zone, at approximately 350m above sea level. Using a pulseEKKO PRO GPR system, data was acquired at two frequencies simultaneously (500MHz and 1GHz; wavelength in dry snow: 40cm and 20cm, respectively). At the first two sites, transects were collected in an 800m x 800m grid at 100m intervals. Due to difficult terrain, the third site was restricted to a 400m x 400m domain. Radar shots were taken at 5cm intervals along each transect. This both provides a very high horizontal data resolution, and facilitates internal horizon tracking. The acquisition time-window of 135ns allows horizon detection down to a depth of approximately 12m. In order to convert layer depth to accumulation, information on snow density derived from snow pit- and CMP-measurements was also collected. The acquired data provides high-resolution ground-truth information required for the validation of CRYOSAT-2 satellite data (launch date in 2009). An additional reason

  16. Electron-nucleus interaction in laser fields: The laser-assisted internal conversion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kálmán, Péter; Bükki, Tamás

    2002-05-01

    We present a general formalism for an efficient treatment of a broad range of electron-nucleus laser processes. The interaction with the laser beam is taken into account by transforming the system into an oscillating frame, called the Henneberger picture. General expressions for the transition probability per unit time are given in the weak laser field and in the n photonic cases, and connection to previous methods is demonstrated in the appropriate limits. As an example, the transition probability per unit time of laser-induced internal conversion (IC) processes is presented. The conservation of angular momentum in the multiphoton process can be traced well in our calculation. Numerical values of the IC coefficient of the energetically forbidden IC process in case of 99mTc ignited by the absorption of up to three soft-x-ray laser photons are also given. The increase in the rate of IC decay is found comparable to or greater than the natural decay rate of the isomer in case of appropriate intensity and photon energy of the laser. Hard UV laser-induced internal conversion coefficients (ICCs) are also calculated for energetically forbidden shells of 107Agm (K shell, E3, 25.47 keV), 90Nbm (L2 shell, M2+E3, 2.3 keV), 183Wm (N1 shell, E1, 544 eV and M5 shell, E2, 1.79 keV), 188Rem (M2 shell, M3+E4, 2.63 keV), 205Pbm (M5 shell, E2, 2.4 keV), and 235Um (O4 and O5 shells, E3, 73.5 eV). Measurable induced ICCs are found in case of available intensities and photon energies of the laser beam for the above isomers. Experiments, that may demonstrate the effect and may be tools for determination of nuclear transition energies, are also suggested.

  17. Nonlinear automatic landing control of unmanned aerial vehicles on moving platforms via a 3D laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervas, Jaime Rubio; Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; Tang, Hui

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a motion tracking and control system for automatically landing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) on an oscillating platform using Laser Radar (LADAR) observations. The system itself is assumed to be mounted on a ship deck. A full nonlinear mathematical model is first introduced for the UAV. The ship motion is characterized by a Fourier transform based method which includes a realistic characterization of the sea waves. LADAR observation models are introduced and an algorithm to process those observations for yielding the relative state between the vessel and the UAV is presented, from which the UAV's state relative to an inertial frame can be obtained and used for feedback purposes. A sliding mode control algorithm is derived for tracking a landing trajectory defined by a set of desired waypoints. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) is proposed to account for process and observation noises in the design of a state estimator. The effectiveness of the control algorithm is illustrated through a simulation example.

  18. Nonlinear automatic landing control of unmanned aerial vehicles on moving platforms via a 3D laser radar

    SciTech Connect

    Hervas, Jaime Rubio; Tang, Hui; Reyhanoglu, Mahmut

    2014-12-10

    This paper presents a motion tracking and control system for automatically landing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) on an oscillating platform using Laser Radar (LADAR) observations. The system itself is assumed to be mounted on a ship deck. A full nonlinear mathematical model is first introduced for the UAV. The ship motion is characterized by a Fourier transform based method which includes a realistic characterization of the sea waves. LADAR observation models are introduced and an algorithm to process those observations for yielding the relative state between the vessel and the UAV is presented, from which the UAV's state relative to an inertial frame can be obtained and used for feedback purposes. A sliding mode control algorithm is derived for tracking a landing trajectory defined by a set of desired waypoints. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) is proposed to account for process and observation noises in the design of a state estimator. The effectiveness of the control algorithm is illustrated through a simulation example.

  19. The internal structure of sand bars on the Colorado River, Grand Canyon, as determined by ground-penetrating radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhardt, Walter A.; Kayen, Robert; Rubin, David; Minasian, Diane L.

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution, subsurface imagery from ground-penetrating radar (GPR) has revealed the internal structure of sand bars at seven sites on the Colorado River, Grand Canyon. Based on reconnaissance-level surveys, we recognized three stratigraphic units and several intervening unconformities. Unit A, which exhibits hyperbolic reflections and always occurs at the base of the section, is interpreted as bedrock and/or talus. Unit B is a commonly observed sand deposit that overlies unit A and is characterized by reflections that gently dip down toward the river axis. Unit C is a sand deposit up to 2 m thick that always occurs at the top of the section and may represent a flood deposit from 1983. This study demonstrates the utility of GPR for non-destructive investigation of sand-bar thickness and the stratigraphic record of flood events in the Grand Canyon.

  20. Internal inertia-gravity waves in the tropical lower stratosphere observed by the Arecibo radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maekawa, Y.; Kato, S.; Fukao, S.; Sato, T.; Woodman, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    A quasi-periodic wind oscillation with an apparent 20-50 hour period was observed at between 16 and 20 km in every experiment conducted during three periods from 1979 to 1981 with the Arecibo UHF radar. The wave disappeared near 20 km, where the mean zonal flow had easterly shear with height. This phenomenon is discussed in terms of wave absorption at a critical level, and it is suggested that the wave had a westward horizontal phase speed of 10-20 m/sec. On the basis of a relationship from f-plane theory in which the Doppler-shifted wave frequency approaches the Coriolis frequency at the critical level, an intrinsic period and horizontal wavelength at the wave-generated height of 20-30 hours and about 2000 km, respectively, are inferred.

  1. Hydrogen fluoride and deuterium fluoride lasers. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    Research cited from the international literature adresses various aspects of hydrogen fluoride and deuterium fluoride lasers. Topics covered include flows, laser outputs, molecular relaxation, molecular rotation, energy conversion efficiency, reaction kinetics, and laser materials. Continous wave and pulsed laser are considered. This updated bibliography contains 283 citations, 53 of which are new additions to the previous edition.

  2. HI-CLASS on AEOS: a large-aperture laser radar for space surveillance/situational awareness investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, Mark A.; Dryden, Gordon L.; Pohle, Richard H.; Ayers, Kirstie; Carreras, Richard A.; Crawford, Linda L.; Taft, Russell

    2001-12-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory/Directed Energy Directorate (AFRL/DE) via the ALVA (Applications of Lidars for Vehicles with Analysis) program installed in late 2000 a wideband, 12 J 15 Hz CO2 laser radar (ladar) on the 3.67 meter aperture AEOS (Advanced Electro-Optics System) telescope. This system is part of the Maui Space Surveillance System (MSSS), on the summit of Haleakala, Maui, HI. This ladar adopts the technology successfully demonstrated by the first generation HI-CLASS (High Performance CO2) Ladar Surveillance Sensor) operating on the nearby 0.6 meter aperture Laser Beam Director (LBD) and developed under the Field Ladar Demonstration program, jointly sponsored by AFRL/DE and the Army's Space and Missile Defense Command. The moderate power (approximately 180 watts) HI-CLASS/AEOS system generates multiple, coherent waveforms for precision satellite tracking and characterization of space objects for 1 m2 targets at ranges out to 10,000 km. This system also will be used to track space objects smaller than30 cm at ranges to 2,000 km. A third application of this system is to provide data for developing satellite identification, characterization, health and status techniques. This paper will discuss the operating characteristics and innovative features of the new system. The paper will also review recent results in support of AF needs, demonstrations, experiments, as well as planned activities that directly support applications in the DoD, scientific, and commercial arenas.

  3. PREFACE: 22nd International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS'13)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steering, LPHYS'13; Advisory; Committees, Program

    2014-03-01

    Dear Readers, The 22nd annual International Laser Physics Workshop, LPHYS'13, took place in the City of Prague, the Czech Republic. The conference gathered 387 participants from 34 countries. It was hosted by the Institute of Physics at the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic and the Czech Technical University in Prague. At this occasion, the LPHYS'13 Steering and the Advisory & Program Committees of the conference would like extend its sincere gratitude to Professor Miroslav Jelínek, Co-Chair and Head of the Local Organizing Committee and his team for the outstanding job performed on organizing, arranging, managing and putting in order the conference that lead to its successful resulting conclusion. As a result of scientific seminars at the Workshop, we would like to present to you the following conference proceedings published in this volume of the IOP Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Please be advised that the 23rd annual International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS'14) will take place from 14-18 July, 2014 in Sofia, Bulgaria, hosted by Institute of Electronics at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. LPHYS'13 Steering and Advisory & Program Committees

  4. EDITORIAL: 23rd International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS'14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-03-01

    Dear Readers, The 23rd annual International Laser Physics Workshop, LPHYS'14, took place in the City of Sofia, Bulgaria. 361 participants from 35 countries attended the conference. It was hosted by the Institute of Electronics at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. This year's Workshop was dedicated to paying tribute to two major events: • 50th anniversary of 1964 Nobel Prize in physics, • 145th anniversary of the establishment of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. LPHYS'14 has been taken under the High Patronage of Rosen Plevneliev, President of the Republic of Bulgaria. The LPHYS'14 Steering Committee and the Advisory & Program Committee would like to extend their sincere gratitude to Professor Sanka Gateva (Co-Chair) and Professor Ekaterina Borisova (Head of the Local Organizing Committee) and to their team for the outstanding job performed in organizing, arranging, managing and putting in order the conference. Their combined efforts lead to a successful result. In this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series you will find selected proceedings of the Workshop in Sofia. Please make a note that the 24th annual International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS'15) will take place from August 21 to August 25, 2015 in the city of Shanghai, China hosted by Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. With kind regards, Steering and Advisory & Program committees LPHYS'14

  5. Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery of Airports and Surrounding Areas: Denver Stapleton International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, Robert G.; Gineris, Denise J.

    1990-01-01

    This is the third in a series of three reports which address the statistical description of ground clutter at an airport and in the surrounding area. These data are being utilized in a program to detect microbursts. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data were collected at the Denver Stapleton Airport using a set of parameters which closely match those which are anticipated to be utilized by an aircraft on approach to an airport. These data and the results of the clutter study are described. Scenes of 13 x 10 km were imaged at 9.38 GHz and HH-, VV-, and HV-polarizations, and contain airport grounds and facilities (up to 14 percent), cultural areas (more than 50 percent), and rural areas (up to 6 percent). Incidence angles range from 40 to 84 deg. At the largest depression angles the distributed targets, such as forest, fields, water, and residential, rarely had mean scattering coefficients greater than -10 dB. From 30 to 80 percent of an image had scattering coefficients less than -20 dB. About 1 to 10 percent of the scattering coefficients exceeded 0 dB, and from 0 to 1 percent above 10 dB. In examining the average backscatter coefficients at large angles, the clutter types cluster according to the following groups: (1) terminals (-3 dB), (2) city and industrial (-7 dB), (3) warehouse (-10 dB), (4) urban and residential (-14 dB), and (5) grass (-24 dB).

  6. Basal conditions and ice dynamics inferred from radar-derived internal stratigraphy of the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keisling, B. A.; Christianson, K. A.; Alley, R. B.; Peters, L. E.; Christian, J. E.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Riverman, K. L.; Muto, A.; Jacobel, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    We present radio-echo sounding (RES), global positioning system (GPS) and active source seismic data from the central portion of the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream ~150 km downstream from the onset of streaming flow, which likely initiates due to locally high geothermal flux (~1 W/m2) near the ice sheet summit. Our geophysical data show that ice stream extent is limited via a feedback between basal hydrology and ice sheet surface elevation change. Active-source seismic data reveal water-saturated till beneath the central trunk of streaming flow. Subglacial till becomes increasingly dewatered and consolidated toward the shear margins. We hypothesize that ice accelerates and thins as it flows into NEGIS, producing marginal troughs in surface topography. These troughs create steep gradients in the subglacial hydropotential that generate parallel slippery and sticky bands beneath the margins, which limit ice entrainment across the margin and thus restrict further widening. Complex steady-state folds in radar reflectors within the shear margins form due to the combined influence of geothermal flux, varying basal shear stress, flow convergence, and bands of variable basal friction. Our strain rate and flux analysis of radar internal layers indicates no major changes in flow dynamics during the past ~10,000 years. However, strain rate modeling suggests that steady-state basal shear heating produces plentiful meltwater beneath the central trunk of streaming flow in addition to that supplied by geothermal flux. This meltwater supports the basal lubrication necessary to maintain streaming flow and may allow remobilization of dewatered marginal till. While the main trunk of streaming flow is remarkably stable, complex processes occurring within the shear margins merit closer scrutiny. The feedback between surface elevation change and basal water routing could mobilize currently unconsolidated sediments in the margins and result in shifts in ice dynamics.

  7. Radar-imaged internal layering in the Weddell Sea sector of West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Robert G.; Rippin, David M.; Karlsson, Nanna B.; Corr, Hugh F. J.; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Jordan, Tom A.; Le Brocq, Anne M.; Ross, Neil; Wright, Andrew P.; Siegert, Martin J.

    2013-04-01

    Radio-echo sounding (RES) across polar ice sheets reveals extensive, isochronous internal layers, whose stratigraphy, and especially their degree of continuity over multi-km distances, can inform us about both present ice flow and past ice-flow histories. Here, we bring together for the first time two recent advances in this field of cryospheric remote sensing to analyse ice flow into the Weddell Sea sector of West Antarctica. Firstly, we have developed a new quantitative routine for analysing the continuity of internal layers obtained over large areas of ice by airborne RES surveys - we term this routine the "Internal-Layering Continuity-Index (ILCI)". Secondly, in the austral season 2010-11 we acquired, by airborne RES survey, the first comprehensive dataset of deep internal layering across Institute and Möller Ice Streams, two of the more significant feeders of ice into the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf. Applying the ILCI to SAR-processed (migrated) RES profiles across Institute Ice Stream's catchment reveals two contrasting regions of internal-layering continuity behaviour. In the western portion of the catchment, where ice-stream tributaries incise deeply through the Ellsworth Subglacial Highlands, the continuity of internal layers is most disrupted across the present ice streams. We therefore interpret the ice-flow configuration in this western region as predominantly spatially stable over the lifetime of the ice. Further east, towards Möller Ice Stream, and towards the interior of the ice sheet, the ILCI does not closely match the present ice flow configuration, while across most of present-day Möller Ice Stream itself, the continuity of internal layers is generally low. We propose that the variation in continuity of internal layering across eastern Institute Ice Stream and the neighbouring Möller results primarily from two factors. Firstly, the noncorrespondence of some inland tributaries with internal-layering continuity acts as evidence for past spatial

  8. Line imaging ladar using a laser-diode transmitter and FM/cw radar principles for submunition applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stann, Barry L.; Abou-Auf, Ahmed; Ruff, William C.; Robinson, Dale; Liss, Brian; Potter, William; Sarama, Scott D.; Giza, Mark M.; Simon, Deborah R.; Frankel, Scott; Sztankay, Zoltan G.

    2000-09-01

    We describe the technical approach, component development, and test results of a line imager laser radar (ladar) being developed at the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) for smart munition applications. We obtain range information using a frequency modulation/continuous wave (FM/cw) technique implemented by directly amplitude modulating a near-IR diode laser transmitter with a radio frequency (rf) subcarrier that is linearly frequency modulated. The diode's output is collimated and projected to form a line illumination in the downrange image area. The returned signal is focused onto a line array of metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) detectors where it is detected and mixed with a delayed replica of the laser modulation signal that modulates the responsivity of each detector. The output of each detector is an intermediate frequency (IF) signal (a product of the mixing process) whose frequency is proportional to the target range. This IF signal is continuously sampled over each period of the rf modulation. Following this, a N-channel signal processor based on field- programmable gate arrays (FPGA) calculates the discrete Fourier transform over the IF waveform in each pixel to establish the ranges to all the scatterers and their respective amplitudes. Over the past year, we constructed the fundamental building blocks of this ladar, which include a 3.5-W line illuminator, a wideband linear FM chirp modulator, a N-pixel MSM detector line array, and a N-channel FPGA signal processor. In this paper we report on the development and performance of each building block and the results of system tests conducted in the laboratory.

  9. Application of airborne laser scanner measurements of ocean roughness to the calibration and validation of a satellite bistatic radar experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrin, J.; Garrison, J. L.

    2006-12-01

    A high-resolution airborne laser scanner, from the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) was used to profile the ocean surface in an attempt to experimentally measure the ocean height spectrum down to wavelengths as small as a few centimetres. In October of 2005, three data collections were scheduled, during overpasses of the UK-DMC satellite, off the coast of Virginia. UK-DMC carries an experimental bistatic radar receiver, which uses Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals as illumination sources. Most models for reflected GNSS signals relate the shape of the signal correlation waveforms to the ocean roughness, parameterized as a probability distribution (PDF) of surface slopes. This statistical description of the ocean surface must first be filtered to wavelengths greater than some fraction of the GNSS wavelength of 19 cm. Past experimental campaigns have used more common in-situ measurements, such as wind speed, for comparison with GNSS waveforms. These types of measurements will require the assumption of some empirical model for the ocean height spectrum, allowing the computation of the filtered slope statistics. Proposed applications of reflected GNSS signals include the correction of ocean roughness effects in passive microwave radiometry. To evaluate the feasibility of GNSS reflections for this measurement, it is important to make a more direct measurement of the ocean surface slope statistics, without the assumption of a spectrum model. In these experiments, a direct measurement of this spectrum was attempted, using the NCALM system. The laser scanner was operated on a low altitude (500 m) aircraft, at the highest sample rate (33KHz), generating ocean height measurements with an along-track separation of a few millimetres. The laser illuminates a spot on the ocean surface that is smaller than 10 cm, however, limiting the smallest resolvable wavelength to something on that order. Laser data were collected along multiple flight lines

  10. Under the (legal) radar screen: global health initiatives and international human rights obligations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Given that many low income countries are heavily reliant on external assistance to fund their health sectors the acceptance of obligations of international assistance and cooperation with regard to the right to health (global health obligations) is insufficiently understood and studied by international health and human rights scholars. Over the past decade Global Health Initiatives, like the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) have adopted novel approaches to engaging with stakeholders in high and low income countries. This article explores how this experience impacted on acceptance of the international obligation to (help) fulfil the right to health beyond borders. Methods The authors conducted an extensive review of international human rights law literature, transnational legal process literature, global public health literature and grey literature pertaining to Global Health Initiatives. To complement this desk work and deepen their understanding of how and why different legal norms evolve the authors conducted 19 in-depth key informant interviews with actors engaged with three stakeholders; the European Union, the United States and Belgium. The authors then analysed the interviews through a transnational legal process lens. Results Through according value to the process of examining how and why different legal norms evolve transnational legal process offers us a tool for engaging with the dynamism of developments in global health suggesting that operationalising global health obligations could advance the right to health for all. Conclusions In many low-income countries the health sector is heavily dependent on external assistance to fulfil the right to health of people thus it is vital that policies and tools for delivering reliable, long-term assistance are developed so that the right to health for all becomes more than a dream. Our research suggests that the Global Fund experience offers lessons to build on. PMID

  11. Recent advances in efficient long-life, eye-safe solid state and CO2 lasers for laser radar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. V.; Buoncristiani, A. M.; Brockman, P.; Bair, C. H.; Schryer, D. R.; Upchurch, B. T.; Wood, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    The key problems in the development of eye-safe solid-state lasers are discussed, taking into account the energy transfer mechanisms between the complicated energy level manifolds of the Tm, Ho, Er ion dopants in hosts with decreasing crystal fields such as YAG or YLF. Optimization of energy transfer for efficient lasing through choice of dopant concentration, power density, crystal field and temperature is addressed. The tailoring of energy transfer times to provide efficient energy extraction for short pulses used in DIAL and Doppler lidar is considered. Recent advances in Pt/SnO2 oxide catalysts and other noble metal/metal oxide combinations for CO2 lasers are discussed. Emphasis is given to the dramatic effects of small quantities of H2O vapor for increasing the activity and lifetime of Pt/SnO2 catalysts and to increased lifetime operation with rare isotope (C-12)(O-18)2 lasing mixtures.

  12. PREFACE: 21st International Conference on Laser Spectroscopy - ICOLS 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budker, Dmitry; Häffner, Hartmut; Müller, Holger

    2013-12-01

    The 21st International Conference on Laser Spectroscopy (ICOLS) took place at Berkeley, California on 9-14 June 2013. Following the tradition of previous meetings in this series, the conference featured about thirty invited talks broadly covering this burgeoning field of science that refuses to show any sign of saturation after more than half a century of continuous boom. In addition to the invited talks, there were two informative poster sessions, where the more than 300 ICOLS participants had an opportunity to exchange the latest scientific news and ideas while enjoying the gorgeous view of the San Francisco Bay from the vista of the Claremont Hotel, the meeting's venue. The heights of the cultural program of the meeting were excursions to several of the Bay Area gems (including the Lick observatory), as well as the conference banquet where the participants were treated to addresses by an inventor of the laser Professor Charles H Townes, a nonlinear optics pioneer Professor Erwin L Hahn, and one of the previous ICOLS chairs Professor Y R Shen. While the field of Laser Spectroscopy and the series of the bi-annual ICOLS meetings are as 'healthy' as one could imagine, the same cannot be said about the concept of published conference proceedings. With new ways to publish scientific articles and preprints, submitting papers to conference proceedings seems to be rapidly losing popularity. For this meeting, the great interest in attendance and opportunities to present is sharply contrasted with a somewhat sluggish response to the call for submission of the proceedings papers. The present collection represents a dozen or so contributions from the 'hero' invited speakers, to whom we are deeply grateful for submitting their work. We hope that this selection will faithfully convey to the readers the excitement of modern laser spectroscopy. In addition to these papers, we draw the reader's attention to the audio recordings and selected viewgraphs from the invited talks, and

  13. Towards Quantitative Optical Cross Sections in Entomological Laser Radar – Potential of Temporal and Spherical Parameterizations for Identifying Atmospheric Fauna

    PubMed Central

    Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the field of remote sensing of birds and insects in the atmosphere (the aerial fauna) has advanced considerably, and modern electro-optic methods now allow the assessment of the abundance and fluxes of pests and beneficials on a landscape scale. These techniques have the potential to significantly increase our understanding of, and ability to quantify and manage, the ecological environment. This paper presents a concept whereby laser radar observations of atmospheric fauna can be parameterized and table values for absolute cross sections can be catalogued to allow for the study of focal species such as disease vectors and pests. Wing-beat oscillations are parameterized with a discrete set of harmonics and the spherical scatter function is parameterized by a reduced set of symmetrical spherical harmonics. A first order spherical model for insect scatter is presented and supported experimentally, showing angular dependence of wing beat harmonic content. The presented method promises to give insights into the flight heading directions of species in the atmosphere and has the potential to shed light onto the km-range spread of pests and disease vectors. PMID:26295706

  14. Research on a kind of high precision and fast signal processing algorithm for FM/CW laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xinke; Liu, Guodong; Chen, Fengdong; Liu, Bingguo; Zhuang, Zhitao; Lu, Cheng; Gan, Yu

    2014-12-01

    Range accuracy and efficiency are two important indicators for Frequency modulated continuous wave (FM/CW) laser radar, improving the accuracy and efficiency of extracting beat frequency are key factors for them. Multiple Modulation Zoom Spectrum Analysis (ZFFT) and the Chirp-Z Transform (CZT) are two widely used methods for improving frequency estimation. The paper through analyze advantages and disadvantages of these methods, proposes a high accuracy and fast signal processing method which is ZFFT-CZT, it combines advantages that ZFFT can reduce data size, and CZT can zoom in frequency of any interested band. The processing of ZFFT-CZT is following: firstly ZFFT is conducted by conducting Fourier transform on short time signal to calculate amount of frequency shift, and transforming high-frequency signal into low-frequency signal of long time sampling, then CZT is conducted by choosing any interested band to continue subdividing the spectral peaks, which can reduce picket fence effect. By simulate experiment based on ZFFT-CZT method, two closed targets at distance of 50m and 50.001m are measured, and the measurement errors are 40μm and 34μm respectively. It proved that ZFFT-CZT has a small amount of calculation, which can meet the requirement of high precision frequency extraction.

  15. Towards Quantitative Optical Cross Sections in Entomological Laser Radar - Potential of Temporal and Spherical Parameterizations for Identifying Atmospheric Fauna.

    PubMed

    Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the field of remote sensing of birds and insects in the atmosphere (the aerial fauna) has advanced considerably, and modern electro-optic methods now allow the assessment of the abundance and fluxes of pests and beneficials on a landscape scale. These techniques have the potential to significantly increase our understanding of, and ability to quantify and manage, the ecological environment. This paper presents a concept whereby laser radar observations of atmospheric fauna can be parameterized and table values for absolute cross sections can be catalogued to allow for the study of focal species such as disease vectors and pests. Wing-beat oscillations are parameterized with a discrete set of harmonics and the spherical scatter function is parameterized by a reduced set of symmetrical spherical harmonics. A first order spherical model for insect scatter is presented and supported experimentally, showing angular dependence of wing beat harmonic content. The presented method promises to give insights into the flight heading directions of species in the atmosphere and has the potential to shed light onto the km-range spread of pests and disease vectors. PMID:26295706

  16. The International Laser Ranging Service and its support for IGGOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Michael; Noll, Carey; Dunn, Peter; Horvath, Julie; Husson, Van; Stevens, Paul; Torrence, Mark; Vo, Hoai; Wetzel, Scott

    2005-11-01

    The International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) was established in September 1998 as a service within the IAG to support programs in geodetic, geophysical, and lunar research activities and to provide data products to the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS) in support of its prime objectives. Now in operation for 5 years, the ILRS develops: (1) the standards and specifications necessary for product consistency and (2) the priorities and tracking strategies required to maximize network efficiency. The service collects, merges, analyzes, archives and distributes satellite and lunar laser ranging data to satisfy a variety of scientific, engineering, and operational needs and encourages the application of new technologies to enhance the quality, quantity, and cost effectiveness of its data products. The ILRS works with: (1) the global network to improve station performance; (2) new satellite missions in the design and building of retroreflector targets to maximize data quality and quantity and (3) science programs to optimize scientific data yield. The ILRS Central Bureau maintains a comprehensive web site as the primary vehicle for the distribution of information within the ILRS community. The site, which can be accessed at: http://ilrs.gsfc.nasa.gov is also available at mirrored sites at the Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) in Tokyo and the European Data Center (EDC) in Munich. During the last 2 years, the ILRS has addressed very important challenges: (1) data from the field stations are now submitted hourly and made available immediately through the data centers for access by the user community; (2) tracking on low satellites has been significantly improved through the sub-daily issue of predictions, drag functions, and the real-time exchange of time biases; (3) analysis products are now submitted in SINEX format for compatibility with the other space geodesy techniques; (4) the Analysis Working Group is heavily engaged in Pilot Projects as it works

  17. Analysis of subglacial hydrodynamics and ice dynamics through combined terrestrial laser scanning and ground penetrating radar survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbud, Chrystelle; Rüttimann, Sébastien; Micheletti, Natan; Irving, James; Lane, Stuart

    2015-04-01

    This study shows how high resolution surveys of subglacial channel morphology combined with high resolution terrestrial laser scanner survey of an Alpine glacier help to understand subglacial hydrological forcing of ice dynamics. The study area is the Haut Glacier d'Arolla in Switzerland, an Alpine valley glacier for which subglacial drainage system has been well studied. A new generation of terrestrial laser scanners was used to investigate glacier surface ablation and other elements of glacial hydrodynamics at exceptionally high spatial and temporal resolution. The LiDAR RIEGL VZ-6000 scanner, with a laser 3B specifically designed for measurements of snow and ice cover surfaces, was tested at seasonal and daily scales. The data revealed spatial variations in the patterns of surface melt, controlled by both aspect and differential debris cover at the seasonal scale, and controlled by ogive-related differences in ice surface debris content at the daily scale. More tentatively, intra-daily scale measurements pointed to possible hydraulic jacking of the glacier associated with short-term water pressure rises at the downstream part of the glacier. A ground-penetrating radar (GPR) field campaign was conducted a year later in the location where possible hydraulic jacking had been detected previously. The aims of this campaign were (i) to assess GPR usage for subglacial channel detection; (ii) identify more precisely the channel morphology; and (iii) investigate further the hydraulic jacking hypothesis. 100 MHz antennas were used to map a 240 x 34 m area near the glacier snout where the ice thickness did not exceed 50 m. The corresponding data, after processing, allowed reconstruction of the bed topography and the morphology of subglacial channels in 3D, showing two of the latter in this area. One channel was followed for approximately 20 m upglacier and corresponding morphology estimates were performed. These data allowed for 3D reconstructions of both the bed

  18. Doublet Pulse Coherent Laser Radar for Tracking of Resident Space Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Rudd, Van; Shald, Scott; Sandford, Stephen; Dimarcantonio, Albert

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the development of a long range ladar system known as ExoSPEAR at NASA Langley Research Center for tracking rapidly moving resident space objects is discussed. Based on 100 W, nanosecond class, near-IR laser, this ladar system with coherent detection technique is currently being investigated for short dwell time measurements of resident space objects (RSOs) in LEO and beyond for space surveillance applications. This unique ladar architecture is configured using a continuously agile doublet-pulse waveform scheme coupled to a closed-loop tracking and control loop approach to simultaneously achieve mm class range precision and mm/s velocity precision and hence obtain unprecedented track accuracies. Salient features of the design architecture followed by performance modeling and engagement simulations illustrating the dependence of range and velocity precision in LEO orbits on ladar parameters are presented. Estimated limits on detectable optical cross sections of RSOs in LEO orbits are discussed.

  19. An Ultra-Wideband, Microwave Radar for Measuring Snow Thickness on Sea Ice and Mapping Near-Surface Internal Layers in Polar Firn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panzer, Ben; Gomez-Garcia, Daniel; Leuschen, Carl; Paden, John; Rodriguez-Morales, Fernando; Patel, Azsa; Markus, Thorsten; Holt, Benjamin; Gogineni, Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Sea ice is generally covered with snow, which can vary in thickness from a few centimeters to >1 m. Snow cover acts as a thermal insulator modulating the heat exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere, and it impacts sea-ice growth rates and overall thickness, a key indicator of climate change in polar regions. Snow depth is required to estimate sea-ice thickness using freeboard measurements made with satellite altimeters. The snow cover also acts as a mechanical load that depresses ice freeboard (snow and ice above sea level). Freeboard depression can result in flooding of the snow/ice interface and the formation of a thick slush layer, particularly in the Antarctic sea-ice cover. The Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) has developed an ultra-wideband, microwave radar capable of operation on long-endurance aircraft to characterize the thickness of snow over sea ice. The low-power, 100mW signal is swept from 2 to 8GHz allowing the air/snow and snow/ ice interfaces to be mapped with 5 c range resolution in snow; this is an improvement over the original system that worked from 2 to 6.5 GHz. From 2009 to 2012, CReSIS successfully operated the radar on the NASA P-3B and DC-8 aircraft to collect data on snow-covered sea ice in the Arctic and Antarctic for NASA Operation IceBridge. The radar was found capable of snow depth retrievals ranging from 10cm to >1 m. We also demonstrated that this radar can be used to map near-surface internal layers in polar firn with fine range resolution. Here we describe the instrument design, characteristics and performance of the radar.

  20. Abstracts of papers presented at the Eleventh International Laser Radar Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Abstracts of 39 papers discuss measurements of properties from the Earth's ocean surface to the mesosphere, made with techniques ranging from elastic and inelastic scattering to Doppler shifts and differential absorption. Topics covered include: (1) middle atmospheric measurements; (2) meteorological parameters: temperature, density, humidity; (3) trace gases by Raman and DIAL techniques; (4) techniques and technology; (5) plume dispersion; (6) boundary layer dynamics; (7) wind measurements; visibility and aerosol properties; and (9) multiple scattering, clouds, and hydrometers.

  1. Spatial Accumulation-Rate Pattern Inferred from Radar Internal Layers and Point Measurements of Velocity and Accumulation near Taylor Mouth, Victoria Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waddington, E. D.; Neumann, T. A.; Morse, D. L.; Marshall, H.

    2002-12-01

    Internal layers in ice sheets, as measured by ice-penetrating radar, are most likely isochrones. The depth to a shallow internal layer is proportional to the local accumulation rate. However, low-frequency radars often do not record very shallow layers. High-frequency radars (GPR) record shallow layers, but cannot detect the deeper layers that reflect longer-term patterns of climate. Older, deeper layers are also influenced to an increasing degree by accumulated strain due to ice flow, and by the upstream accumulation rate. For this Geophysical Inverse Problem, our Forward Model is a steady-state ice-flow model with measured ice-sheet surface topography, ice thickness, and flowband width, which tracks particles to create modelled internal layers. Ice motion is driven by the input flux into the upper end of the flowband, and by the accumulation pattern along the flowband. To solve the Inverse Problem, our observations comprise depth of an internal layer, and point measurements of accumulation rate and surface velocity. Associated uncertainties are also required. We use Least-Squares or Singular-Value Decomposition to solve for model parameters (input ice flux, piece-wise linear accumulation-rate profile, and layer age) that minimize the mismatch between the data and the model estimates of the data. If the layer age and its uncertainty are known independently, they can also be used. Variable weights can be assigned to each type of data. The data-resolution matrix shows that, for shallow layers, we can resolve high-wavenumber variations in accumulation rate. For deeper layers, we resolve spatial averages of accumulation rates. We apply the model to a flowband at Taylor Mouth between Taylor Dome and Taylor Glacier. The model finds more variation in the inferred accumulation-rate profile than in the depth-profile of an internal layer. The new accumulation-rate profile produces an improved chronology for an ice core collected along the flowline.

  2. Improvement of the technique in treatment of internal hemorrhoids with Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xiao-qing; Zhu, Jing; Shi, Hong-Min

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To observe and study the improvement of the technique in treatment of internal hemorrhoids with Nd:YAG laser and evaluate the effective rate. Methods: 60 patients of internal hemorrhoids were treated with Nd:YAG laser (10-15mw) irradiating on the mucosa of the lesions. Results: Among 60 patients, 57 patients were primarily cured with one treatment, 3 patients were primarily cured with two treatments. The effective rate was 95% with one treatment, and it reached to 100% with two treatments. Conclusions: the improvement of the technique in treatment of internal hemorrhoids with Nd:YAG laser is effective and easy to operate.

  3. Determination of radar MTF

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D.

    1994-11-15

    The ultimate goal of the Current Meter Array (CMA) is to be able to compare the current patterns detected with the array with radar images of the water surface. The internal wave current patterns modulate the waves on the water surface giving a detectable modulation of the radar cross-section (RCS). The function relating the RCS modulations to the current patterns is the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). By comparing radar images directly with co-located CMA measurements the MTF can be determined. In this talk radar images and CMA measurements from a recent experiment at Loch Linnhe, Scotland, will be used to make the first direct determination of MTF for an X and S band radar at low grazing angles. The technical problems associated with comparing radar images to CMA data will be explained and the solution method discussed. The results suggest the both current and strain rate contribute equally to the radar modulation for X band. For S band, the strain rate contributes more than the current. The magnitude of the MTF and the RCS modulations are consistent with previous estimates when the wind is blowing perpendicular to the radar look direction.

  4. ESA's Ice Sheets CCI: validation and inter-comparison of surface elevation changes derived from laser and radar altimetry over Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland - Round Robin results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinsen, J. F.; Khvorostovsky, K.; Ticconi, F.; Shepherd, A.; Forsberg, R.; Sørensen, L. S.; Muir, A.; Pie, N.; Felikson, D.; Flament, T.; Hurkmans, R.; Moholdt, G.; Gunter, B.; Lindenbergh, R. C.; Kleinherenbrink, M.

    2013-11-01

    In order to increase the understanding of the changing climate, the European Space Agency has launched the Climate Change Initiative (ESA CCI), a program which joins scientists and space agencies into 13 projects either affecting or affected by the concurrent changes. This work is part of the Ice Sheets CCI and four parameters are to be determined for the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), each resulting in a dataset made available to the public: Surface Elevation Changes (SEC), surface velocities, grounding line locations, and calving front locations. All CCI projects have completed a so-called Round Robin exercise in which the scientific community was asked to provide their best estimate of the sought parameters as well as a feedback sheet describing their work. By inter-comparing and validating the results, obtained from research institutions world-wide, it is possible to develop the most optimal method for determining each parameter. This work describes the SEC Round Robin and the subsequent conclusions leading to the creation of a method for determining GrIS SEC values. The participants used either Envisat radar or ICESat laser altimetry over Jakobshavn Isbræ drainage basin, and the submissions led to inter-comparisons of radar vs. altimetry as well as cross-over vs. repeat-track analyses. Due to the high accuracy of the former and the high spatial resolution of the latter, a method, which combines the two techniques will provide the most accurate SEC estimates. The data supporting the final GrIS analysis stem from the radar altimeters on-board Envisat, ERS-1 and ERS-2. The accuracy of laser data exceeds that of radar altimetry; the Round Robin analysis has, however, proven the latter equally capable of dealing with surface topography thereby making such data applicable in SEC analyses extending all the way from the interior ice sheet to margin regions. This shows good potential for a~future inclusion of ESA CryoSat-2 and Sentinel-3 radar data in the analysis, and

  5. Use of 3D laser radar for navigation of unmanned aerial and ground vehicles in urban and indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uijt de Haag, Maarten; Venable, Don; Smearcheck, Mark

    2007-04-01

    This paper discusses the integration of Inertial measurements with measurements from a three-dimensional (3D) imaging sensor for position and attitude determination of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and autonomous ground vehicles (AGV) in urban or indoor environments. To enable operation of UAVs and AGVs at any time in any environment a Precision Navigation, Attitude, and Time (PNAT) capability is required that is robust and not solely dependent on the Global Positioning System (GPS). In urban and indoor environments a GPS position capability may not only be unavailable due to shadowing, significant signal attenuation or multipath, but also due to intentional denial or deception. Although deep integration of GPS and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) data may prove to be a viable solution an alternative method is being discussed in this paper. The alternative solution is based on 3D imaging sensor technologies such as Flash Ladar (Laser Radar). Flash Ladar technology consists of a modulated laser emitter coupled with a focal plane array detector and the required optics. Like a conventional camera this sensor creates an "image" of the environment, but producing a 2D image where each pixel has associated intensity vales the flash Ladar generates an image where each pixel has an associated range and intensity value. Integration of flash Ladar with the attitude from the IMU allows creation of a 3-D scene. Current low-cost Flash Ladar technology is capable of greater than 100 x 100 pixel resolution with 5 mm depth resolution at a 30 Hz frame rate. The proposed algorithm first converts the 3D imaging sensor measurements to a point cloud of the 3D, next, significant environmental features such as planar features (walls), line features or point features (corners) are extracted and associated from one 3D imaging sensor frame to the next. Finally, characteristics of these features such as the normal or direction vectors are used to compute the platform position and attitude

  6. Equatorial MU Radar project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Mamoru; Hashiguchi, H.; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University (RISH) has been studying the atmosphere by using radars. The first big facility was the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar installed in Shiga, Japan in 1984. This is one of the most powerful and multi-functional radar, and is successful of revealing importance of atmospheric waves for the dynamical vertical coupling processes. The next big radar was the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) installed at Kototabang, West Sumatra, Indonesia in 2001. The EAR was operated under close collaboration with LAPAN (Indonesia National Institute for Aeronautics and Space), and conducted the long-term continuous observations of the equatorial atmosphere/ionosphere for more than 10 years. The MU radar and the EAR are both utilized for inter-university and international collaborative research program for long time. National Institute for Polar Research (NIPR) joined EISCAT Scientific Association together with Nagoya University, and developed the PANSY radar at Syowa base in Antarctica as a joint project with University of Tokyo. These are the efforts of radar study of the atmosphere/ionosphere in the polar region. Now we can find that Japan holds a global network of big atmospheric/ionospheric radars. The EAR has the limitation of lower sensitivity compared with the other big radars shown above. RISH now proposes a plan of Equatorial MU Radar (EMU) that is to establish the MU-radar class radar next to the EAR. The EMU will have an active phased array antenna with the 163m diameter and 1055 cross-element Yagis. Total output power of the EMU will be more than 500kW. The EMU can detect turbulent echoes from the mesosphere (60-80km). In the ionosphere incoherent-scatter observations of plasma density, drift, and temperature would be possible. Multi-channel receivers will realize radar-imaging observations. The EMU is one of the key facilities in the project "Study of coupling processes in the solar-terrestrial system

  7. Extensive corneal epithelial defect associated with internal hordeolum after uneventful laser in situ keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Miguel J; Juberías, José R; Moreno-Montañés, Javier

    2002-09-01

    This report illustrates a retrospective case review in which extensive corneal epithelial ulceration occurred concomitantly with an internal hordeolum in the inferior forniceal conjunctiva 24 hours after an uneventful laser in situ keratomileusis. The internal hordeolum and epithelial defect were successfully managed using a bandage soft contact lens, a course of topical dexamethasone and tobramycin, and generous lubrication. PMID:12231335

  8. Shelly cheniers on a modern macrotidal flat (Mont-Saint-Michel bay, France) — Internal architecture revealed by ground-penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weill, Pierre; Tessier, Bernadette; Mouazé, Dominique; Bonnot-Courtois, Chantal; Norgeot, Christophe

    2012-11-01

    The relationship between short-term morphodynamics and internal structure of shelly chenier ridges is investigated using ground-penetrating radar and core X-ray analysis, complemented with a comparison of aerial photographs. These cheniers are located on the uppermost part of a macrotidal flat in Mont-Saint-Michel bay (North-Western France). They actively migrate landward over the salt-marshes by washover processes when they are submerged during the coincidence of spring tides and enhanced wave activity. The architecture of the cheniers is imaged using high-frequency radar antennas (400 MHz to 2.6 GHz). Three types of cheniers are recognized, featuring differences in morphology and internal structure. The altitude of the banks on the tidal flat relative to the level of tidal flooding, as well as local sediment supply, seem to be important forcing parameters in chenier development and stages of evolution. On a multi-annual time scale, evolution of this chenier system is influenced by a combination of the 18-year and the 4-year tidal cycles, superimposed on wave activity. During minima of the 18-year cycle, spring tide level is globally lower on the tidal flat, allowing salt marsh progradation and chenier ridge development. During peak periods of the tidal cycle, former barriers are reworked by wave action and experience onshore migration associated with salt marsh erosion. The 4-year tidal cycle coupled with enhanced wave activity is probably responsible for the deposition of large washover units, observed in GPR reflection profiles.

  9. The use of airborne radar reflectometry to establish snow/firn density distribution on Devon Ice Cap, Canadian Arctic: A path to understanding complex heterogeneous internal layering patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutishauser, A.; Grima, C.; Sharp, M. J.; Blankenship, D. D.; Young, D. A.; Dowdeswell, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The internal layer stratigraphy of polar ice sheets revealed by airborne radio-echo sounding (RES) contains valuable information about past ice sheet mass balance and dynamics. Internal layers in the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets are considered to be isochrones and are continuous over several hundreds of kilometres. In contrast, internal layers in Canadian Arctic ice caps appear to be very heterogeneous and fragmentary, consisting of highly discontinuous layers that can be traced over only a few to several tens of kilometres. Internal layers most likely relate to former ice surfaces (the upper few meters of snow/firn), the properties which are directly influenced by atmospheric conditions including the air temperature, precipitation rate, and prevailing wind pattern. We hypothesize that the heterogeneous and complex nature of layers in the Canadian Arctic results from highly variable snow and firn conditions at the surface. Characterizing surface properties such as variations in the snow/firn density from dry to wet snow/firn, as well as high-density shallow ice layers and lenses of refrozen water can help to elucidate the complex internal layer pattern in the Canadian Arctic ice caps. Estimates of the snow/firn surface density and roughness can be derived from reflectance and scattering information using the surface radar returns from RES measurements. Here we present estimates of the surface snow/firn density distribution over Devon Ice Cap in the Canadian Arctic derived by the Radar Statistical Reconnaissance (RSR) methodology (Grima et al., 2014, Planetary & Space Sciences) using data collected by recent airborne radar sounding programs. The RSR generates estimates of the statistical distribution of surface echo amplitudes over defined areas along a survey transect. The derived distributions are best-fitted with a theoretical stochastic envelope, parameterized with the signal reflectance and scattering, in order to separate those two components. Finally

  10. Evaluating the potential for internal injuries from a pulsed 3.8-micron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas E.; Fitzhugh, Dawn C.; McPherson, Nicole; Winston, Golda C. H.; Winston, Tridaugh D.; Randolph, Donald Q.

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this study is to determine if a high energy laser pulse can cause internal injury that cannot be grossly visualized. High power lasers are currently in development such as the Medical Free Electron Laser (MFEL), the Anti-Ballistic Laser (ABL) and the Tactical High Energy Laser (THEL) and the potential exists for human exposure. Little is known about the effects of these high output lasers on internal organs when a thoracic exposure occurs. This study utilized a 3.8 micron single 8 microsecond pulse laser for all exposures. Yucatan miniature pigs were exposed to a single pulse over the sternum. In addition, some animals were also exposed in the axillary region. Creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and troponin levels were measured prior to and post exposure to assess cardiac muscle damage. Gross and histologic changes were determined for the porcine skin, lung tissue, and cardiac muscle. This study explores if a greater than class 4 laser classification is warranted based on the potential for thoracic injury.

  11. Combining Ground Penetrating Radar and Terrestrial Laser Scanning techniques to non-destructively image the 2006 cross-stratified overbank deposits of Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douillet, G. A.; Dujardin, J.; Abolghasem, A.; Kueppers, U.; Bano, M.; Mothes, P. A.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador) generated Pyroclastic Density Currents (PDCs) in August 2006. The deposits are characterized by two lithofacies: a massive, unsorted, coarse-grained lithofacies confined to the valleys that directed the parent PDCs and interpreted as deposited from dense pyroclastic flows and a finer-grained and better-sorted cross-stratified lithofacies that outcrop on the overbanks of valleys downstream of cliffs and bends in the valleys deposited from dilute PDCs. The pristine surface exhibits a variety of dune-bedform (DBs) shapes. In order to better record the deposits characteristics and constrain the sedimentation processes, a field survey combining terrestrial laser scanner and ground penetrating radars (GPR) was yield. The terrestrial laser scanner records an accurate topography model of the surface of the deposits (<1 cm precision). The shape parameters of the DBs are then analyzed systematically and the size evolution calculated. Three GPR antennas were used (250, 500, 800 MHz). They permit to image the stratification within the deposits at different scales and in a non-destructive way. More than 450 profiles were collected, covering three key sectors of the volcano. A large-scale griding (profiles separated by 20 m and crossing perpendicularly) was executed with the 250 MHz antenna in three main overbank deposition zones (each zone c.a. 50.000 m^2). Of particular interest is a 200 m long ash body with a wedge shape. It has a sharp upstream onset with the shape of a quarter pipe and decreases in thickness downstream with DBs on its surface. Eight layers were identified on the GPR data and interpolated in between the profiles for a 3D image. At least three successive cross-stratified units are found on top of five units that more likely correspond to massive layers. While the cross-stratified units seem to aggrade as stoss-side backstep-strata, the massive layers are either gently thinning downstream or continuous. The data reveal the

  12. Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Blue Laser and Light Emitting Diodes (ISBLLED-2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Eun-Kyung; Yoon, Euijoon; Lee, Hyung Jae

    2004-09-01

    The 5th International Symposium on Blue Laser and Light Emitting Diodes (ISBLLED-2004) was held in Gyeongju, Korea, 15-19 March 2004. The purpose of the symposium was to provide a forum for scientists and engineers to discuss recent progress and future trends in the rapidly advancing wide band gap semiconductor science and technologies and their applications in blue laser and light emitting diodes.

  13. Ground penetrating radar and terrestrial laser scanner surveys on deposits of dilute pyroclastic density current deposits: insights for dune bedform genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rémi Dujardin, Jean; Amin Douillet, Guilhem; Abolghasem, Amir; Cordonnier, Benoit; Kueppers, Ulrich; Bano, Maksim; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2014-05-01

    Dune bedforms formed by dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDC) are often described or interpreted as antidunes and chute and pools. However, the interpretation remains essentially speculative and is not well understood. This is largely due to the seeming impossibility of in-situ measurements and experimental scaling, as well as the lack of recent, 3D exposures. Indeed, most dune bedform cross-stratifications from the dilute PDC record outcrop in 2D sections. The 2006 eruption of Tungurahua has produced well-developed bedforms that are well-exposed on the surface of the deposits with easy access. We performed a survey of these deposits combining ground penetrating radar (GPR) profiling with terrestrial laser scanning of the surface. The GPR survey was carried in dense arrays (from 10 to 25 cm spacing between profiles) over ca. 10 m long bedforms. GPR profiles were corrected for topography from photogrammetry data. An in-house software, RadLab (written in matlab), was used for common processing of individual profiles and 2D & 3D topographic migration. Each topography-corrected profile was then loaded into a seismic interpretation software, OpenDtect, for 3D visualization and interpretation. Most bedforms show high lateral stability that is independent of the cross-stratification pattern (that varies between stoss-aggrading bedsets, stoss-erosive bedsets and stoss-depositional lensoidal layers). Anecdotic bedforms have their profiles that evolve laterally (i.e. in a direction perpendicular to the flow direction). Cannibalization of two dune bedforms into a single one on one end of the profile can evolve into growth of a single bedform at the other lateral end. Also, lateral variation in the migration direction occurs, i.e. a single bedform can show upstream aggradation at one lateral end of the bedform, but show downstream migration at the other end. Some bedforms have great variations in their internal structure. Several episodes of growth and erosion can be

  14. On siphons and sediments: A new model for draining active subglacial lakes in Antarctica informed with satellite radar and laser altimeter observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, S. P.; Fricker, H. A.; Siegfried, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    With the advent of repeat-pass satellite-based surface altimetry over much of Antarctica, approximately 130 new subglacial lakes have been discovered entirely from observations of surface uplift and subsidence; these are commonly referred to as "active lakes". In contrast to the ~160 lakes detected by radar sounding ("RES" lakes), which are typically in mountains bedrock terrain near the ice divide and static with residence times spanning millenia, active lakes are typically located in fast flowing ice streams far from the divides, and have short residence times. To understand how water transfers through active lake systems we have developed a new model based on earlier theoretical work and informed by lake-volume estimates inferred from of ice surface displacements detected by satellite radar and laser altimetry. We find that although the overall pattern of filling and drainage is similar to that for ice dammed lakes in alpine regions via channels thermally eroded into the ice that then creeps shut as water pressure declines, Antarctic lake drainage is better simulated by invoking a channel mechanically eroded into the underlying sediment. The necessity of an erodable deformable substrate to explain lake drainage suggests that the distribution of active lakes is an indicator for the presence of sediment. Furthermore the process of lake drainage appears quite sensitive to the composion and strength of the underlying till. We explore these possibilities by testing the model on subglacial lakes in both East and West Antarctica, including Recovery Glacier and MacAyeal Ice stream.

  15. Fatigue testing of laser treated endosseous implants with an internal trilobe connection.

    PubMed

    Berg, Robert W; Kurtz, Kenneth S; Griggs, Jason A; Watanabe, Ikuya; Coelho, Paulo G

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of laser treatment on the fatigue resistance of a 3.5-mm diameter implant with an internal trilobe connection. Twenty two implants were embedded into acrylic resin blocks. Half the specimens were used as control group, and the other half were laser treated circumferentially around the 1.5-mm polished collar with argon shielding. Implants were fatigue tested using a step-stress accelerated lifetime test in a servo-hydraulic test machine. Despite the trend pointing towards higher fatigue resistance of laser treated specimens versus controls, step-stress analysis did not determine significant differences in the fatigue lifetimes. PMID:21528680

  16. Radar imaging of the ocean surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.

    1978-01-01

    Techniques for obtaining radar images of the ocean surface are briefly described, and examples of radar images of a variety of ocean surface wave types obtained by synthetic-aperture radar are presented and discussed. Observations described include deep-ocean waves, discrete wave trains, internal waves as surface manifestations, slicks, and eddies.

  17. Pulsed coherent solid-state 1.06-micron and 2.1-micron laser radar systems for remote velocity measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Sammy W.; Huffaker, R. Milton; Kavaya, Michael J.; Hale, Charley P.; Magee, James R.

    1990-01-01

    A low average power, pulsed, solid-state, 1.06-micron coherent laser radar (CLR) for range and velocity measurements of atmospheric and hard targets has been developed. The system has been operating at a field test site near Boulder, CO since September, 1988. Measurements have been taken on moving targets such as atmospheric aerosol particles, belt sanders, spinning disks, and various stationary targets. The field measurements have shown that this system exhibits excellent velocity measurement performance. A fast-tuning CW Nd:YAG oscillator has also been developed which has a frequency tuning range of greater than 30 GHz (which spans a target radial velocity range of over 16 km/s) and a tuning speed greater than 30 GHz/ms.

  18. Planetary Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  19. Internal stress distribution for generating closure domains in laser-irradiated Fe–3%Si(110) steels

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, Keiji; Imafuku, Muneyuki; Orihara, Hideto; Sakai, Yusuke; Ohya, Shin-Ichi; Suzuki, Tamaki; Shobu, Takahisa; Akita, Koichi; Ishiyama, Kazushi

    2015-05-07

    Internal stress distribution for generating closure domains occurring in laser-irradiated Fe–3%Si(110) steels was investigated using high-energy X-ray analysis and domain theory based on the variational principle. The measured triaxial stresses inside the specimen were compressive and the stress in the rolling direction became more dominant than stresses in the other directions. The calculations based on the variational principle of magnetic energy for closure domains showed that the measured triaxial stresses made the closure domains more stable than the basic domain without closure domains. The experimental and calculation results reveal that the laser-introduced internal stresses result in the occurrence of the closure domains.

  20. International registry results for an interstitial laser BPH treatment device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conn, Richard L.; Muschter, Rolf; Adams, Curtis S.; Esch, Victor C.

    1996-05-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) can significantly impair quality of life in older men. Most men over 60 experience some symptoms due to BPH and it is thought that essentially all men would eventually be affected by it if they lived long enough. At present, transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), a surgical treatment for BPH, is one of the more common procedures performed in the developed world, particularly in the United States. A number of other treatments are also often used, including open prostatectomy, side-firing lasers, and drug therapy. With the population in the developed world rapidly aging, BPH is expected to affect an even larger group of men in the future. Current methods of therapy carry significant disadvantages. Open prostatectomy carries a fairly high risk of impotence and incontinence, as well as sometimes significant risk of death depending on the patient's age and medical conditions. TURP also carries similar risks, albeit reduced, including the risk of substantial blood loss and a small but meaningful risk of death. Side-firing lasers are thought to have a reduced risk of death compared to TURP due to significantly reduced bleeding; however, patients often experience an extended period of pain during voiding due to prolonged tissue sloughing. Drug treatment, although useful for some patients, does not strongly improve symptoms in the majority of patients. Even with the current range of treatments, many patients with symptomatic BPH elect to avoid any current treatment due to risks and side effects. As a possible solution to this problem, previous writers have suggested the possibility of treating BPH through interstitial thermotherapy. In this treatment, prostatic tissue is heated from within the prostate to the point of irreversible necrosis. Healing processes then reduce the volume of the affected tissue, even in the absence of sloughing. This study covers initial human use of such a device, using an 810 nm wavelength diode laser

  1. Laser cooling of internal degrees of freedom of molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horchani, R.

    2016-08-01

    Optical pumping techniques using laser fields combined with photo-association of ultracold atoms leads to control of the vibrational and/or rotational population of molecules. In this study, we review the basic concepts and main steps that should be followed, including the excitation schemes and detection techniques used to achieve ro-vibrational cooling of Cs2 molecules. We also discuss the extension of this technique to other molecules. In addition, we present a theoretical model used to support the experiment. These simulations can be widely used for the preparation of various experiments because they allow the optimization of several important experimental parameters.

  2. Synthetic aperture radar capabilities in development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.

    1994-11-15

    The Imaging and Detection Program (IDP) within the Laser Program is currently developing an X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to support the Joint US/UK Radar Ocean Imaging Program. The radar system will be mounted in the program`s Airborne Experimental Test-Bed (AETB), where the initial mission is to image ocean surfaces and better understand the physics of low grazing angle backscatter. The Synthetic Aperture Radar presentation will discuss its overall functionality and a brief discussion on the AETB`s capabilities. Vital subsystems including radar, computer, navigation, antenna stabilization, and SAR focusing algorithms will be examined in more detail.

  3. Radar in the wake of WARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tompkins, R. D.

    1981-08-01

    The World Administrative Radio Conference of 1979 (WARC-79) will have a significant effect on the design, development, and operation of radar systems. This paper discusses the changes in the Table of Frequency Allocations which will affect radar and notes some of the problems which will be faced by the radar community in maintaining system performance requirements. An urgent need is shown for expanding the participation by radar developers in the affairs of the International Radio Consultative Committee (CCIR). This participation is essential to create and maintain a technical basis for radar which will define spectrum needs, examine spectrum usage, and describe techniques for efficient spectrum utilization within the International Telecommunications Union (ITU).

  4. 3D imaging of the internal structure of a rock-cored drumlin using ground-penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Edward; Spagnolo, Matteo; Rea, Brice; Ely, Jeremy; Lee, Joshua

    2016-04-01

    One key question linking subglacial bedform analyses to ice dynamics relates to the flux of sediment at the bed. It is relatively easy to measure the upper surface of subglacial sediments either in active contemporary systems (using ice-penetrating radar surveys) or in relict subglacial terrain (using high-resolution digital elevation models). However, constraining the lower surface of subglacial sediments, i.e. the contact between the bedform sediment and a lower sediment unit or bedrock, is much more difficult, yet it is crucial to any determination of sediment volume and hence flux. Without observations, we are reliant on assumptions about the nature of the lower sediment surface. For example, we might assume that all the drumlins in a particular drumlin field are deposited on a planar surface, or that all comprise a carapace of till over a rock core. A calculation of sediment volume will give very different results leading to very different interpretations of sediment flux. We have been conducting experiments in the use of ground-penetrating radar to find the lower sedimentary surface beneath drumlins near Kirkby Stephen (Northern England), part of the extensive Eden Valley drumlin field. The drumlins comprise diamict overlying a bedrock surface of Carboniferous limestone which outcrops frequently between the drumlins. Here we present the results of a grid survey over one of the drumlins that clearly demonstrate this drumlin comprises a thin carapace of till overlying a stepped limestone bedrock surface. We provide details on the field data acquisition parameters and discuss the implications for further geophysical studies of drumlin fields.

  5. Automated house internal geometric quality inspection using laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuchen; Zhang, Zhichao; Qiu, Zhouyan

    2015-12-01

    Taking a terrestrial laser scanner to scan the room of a house, the scanned data can be used to inspect the geometric quality of the room. Taking advantage of the scan line feature, we can quickly calculate normal of the scanned points. Afterwards, we develop a fast plane segmentation approach to recognize the walls of the room according to the semantic constraints of a common room. With geometric and semantic constraints, we can exclude points that don't belong to the inspecting room. With the segmented results, we can accurately do global search of max and min height, width and length of a room, and the flatness of the wall as well. Experiment shows the robustness of this geometric inspecting approach. This approach has the ability to measure some important indicators that cannot be done by manual work.

  6. Spaceborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Eckerman, J.; Meneghini, R.; Atlas, D.; Boerner, W. M.; Cherry, S.; Clark, J. F.; Doviak, R. J.; Goldhirsh, J.; Lhermitte, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    The spaceborne radar panel considered how radar could be used to measure precipitation from satellites. The emphasis was on how radar could be used with radiometry (at microwave, visible (VIS), and infrared (IR) wavelengths) to reduce the uncertainties of measuring precipitation with radiometry alone. In addition, the fundamental electromagnetic interactions involved in the measurements were discussed to determine the key work areas for research and development to produce effective instruments. Various approaches to implementing radar systems on satellites were considered for both shared and dedicated instruments. Finally, a research and development strategy was proposed for establishing the parametric relations and retrieval algorithms required for extracting precipitation information from the radar and associated radiometric data.

  7. Technology development for laser-cooled clocks on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, W. M.

    2003-01-01

    The PARCS experiment will use a laser-cooled cesium atomic clock operating in the microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station to provide both advanced tests of gravitational theory to demonstrate a new cold-atom clock technology for space.

  8. Highly Reproducible Laser Beam Scanning Device for an Internal Source Laser Desorption Microprobe Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Jill Rennee; Tremblay, Paul Leland

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, mass spectrometry has relied on manipulating the sample target to provide scanning capabilities for laser desorption microprobes. This has been problematic for an internal source laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometer (LD-FTMS) because of the high magnetic field (7 Tesla) and geometric constraints of the superconducting magnet bore. To overcome these limitations, we have implemented a unique external laser scanning mechanism for an internal source LD-FTMS. This mechanism provides adjustable resolution enhancement so that the spatial resolution at the target is not limited to that of the stepper motors at the light source (~5 µm/step). The spatial resolution is now limited by the practical optical diffraction limit of the final focusing lens. The scanning mechanism employs a virtual source that is wavelength independent up to the final focusing lens, which can be controlled remotely to account for focal length dependence on wavelength. A binary index provides an automatic alignment feature. The virtual source is located ~9 ft from the sample; therefore, it is completely outside of the vacuum system and beyond the 50 G line of the fringing magnetic field. To eliminate reproducibility problems associated with vacuum pump vibrations, we have taken advantage of the magnetic field inherent to the FTMS to utilize Lenz's law for vibrational dampening. The LD-FTMS microprobe has exceptional reproducibility, which enables successive mapping sequences for depth-profiling studies.

  9. Highly reproducible laser beam scanning device for an internal source laser desorption microprobe Fourier transform mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, mass spectrometry has relied on manipulating the sample target to provide scanning capabilities for laser desorption microprobes. This has been problematic for an internal source laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometer (LD-FTMS) because of the high magnetic field (7 Tesla) and geometric constraints of the superconducting magnet bore. To overcome these limitations, we have implemented a unique external laser scanning mechanism for an internal source LD-FTMS. This mechanism provides adjustable resolution enhancement so that the spatial resolution at the target is not limited to that of the stepper motors at the light source (˜5 μm/step). The spatial resolution is now limited by the practical optical diffraction limit of the final focusing lens. The scanning mechanism employs a virtual source that is wavelength independent up to the final focusing lens, which can be controlled remotely to account for focal length dependence on wavelength. A binary index provides an automatic alignment feature. The virtual source is located ˜9 ft from the sample; therefore, it is completely outside of the vacuum system and beyond the 50 G line of the fringing magnetic field. To eliminate reproducibility problems associated with vacuum pump vibrations, we have taken advantage of the magnetic field inherent to the FTMS to utilize Lenz's law for vibrational dampening. The LD-FTMS microprobe has exceptional reproducibility, which enables successive mapping sequences for depth-profiling studies.

  10. Strategy of manufacturing components with designed internal structure by selective laser melting of metallic powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadroitsev, I.; Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    2007-12-01

    Application of selective laser melting for manufacturing three-dimensional objects represents one of the promising directions to solve challenging industrial problems. This approach permits to extend dramatically the freedom of design and manufacture by allowing, for example, to create an object with desired shape and internal structure in a single fabrication step. The design of the part can be tailored to meet specific functions and properties (e.g. physical, mechanical, chemical, biological, etc.) using different materials. Metallic objects were manufactured by Phenix PM 100 machine from Inconel 625 powder. The objective was to analyze the influence of the manufacturing strategy on the internal structure and mechanical properties of the components manufactured by selective laser melting technology. Anisotropy of the internal structure and mechanical properties of the fabricated objects were studied.

  11. Laser-driven polarized hydrogen and deuterium internal targets

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.E.; Fedchak, J.A.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1995-08-01

    After completing comprehensive tests of the performance of the source with both hydrogen and deuterium gas, we began tests of a realistic polarized deuterium internal target. These tests involve characterizing the atomic polarization and dissociation fraction of atoms in a storage cell as a function of flow and magnetic field, and making direct measurements of the average nuclear tensor polarization of deuterium atoms in the storage cell. Transfer of polarization from the atomic electron to the nucleus as a result of D-D spin-exchange collisions was observed in deuterium, verifying calculations suggesting that high vector polarization in both hydrogen and deuterium can be obtained in a gas in spin temperature equilibrium without inducing RF transitions between the magnetic substates. In order to improve the durability of the system, the source glassware was redesigned to simplify construction and installation and eliminate stress points that led to frequent breakage. Improvements made to the nuclear polarimeter, which used the low energy {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He reaction to analyze the tensor polarization of the deuterium, included installing acceleration lenses constructed of wire mesh to improve pumping conductance, construction of a new holding field coil, and elimination of the Wien filter from the setup. These changes substantially simplified operation of the polarimeter and should have reduced depolarization in collisions with the wall. However, when a number of tests failed to show an improvement of the nuclear polarization, it was discovered that extended operation of the system with a section of teflon as a getter for potassium caused the dissociation fraction to decline with time under realistic operating conditions, suggesting that teflon may not be a suitable material to eliminate potassium from the target. We are replacing the teflon surfaces with drifilm-coated ones and plan to continue tests of the polarized internal target in this configuration.

  12. Automotive radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohling, Hermann

    2004-07-01

    Radar networks for automtovie short-range applications (up to 30m) based on powerful but inexpensive 24GHz high range resolution pulse or FMCW radar systems have been developed at the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg. The described system has been integrated in to an experimental vehicle and tested in real street environment. This paper considers the general network design, the individual pulse or FMCW radar sensors, the network signal processing scheme, the tracking procedure and possible automotive applications, respectively. Object position estimation is accomplished by the very precise range measurement of each individual sensor and additional trilateration procedures. The paper concludes with some results obtained in realistic traffic conditions with multiple target situations using 24 GHz radar network.

  13. Internal energy deposition with silicon nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SPALDI) mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagan, Shai; Hua, Yimin; Boday, Dylan J.; Somogyi, Arpad; Wysocki, Ronald J.; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2009-06-01

    The use of silicon nanoparticles for laser desorption/ionization (LDI) is a new appealing matrix-less approach for the selective and sensitive mass spectrometry of small molecules in MALDI instruments. Chemically modified silicon nanoparticles (30 nm) were previously found to require very low laser fluence in order to induce efficient LDI, which raised the question of internal energy deposition processes in that system. Here we report a comparative study of internal energy deposition from silicon nanoparticles to previously explored benzylpyridinium (BP) model compounds during LDI experiments. The internal energy deposition in silicon nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SPALDI) with different fluorinated linear chain modifiers (decyl, hexyl and propyl) was compared to LDI from untreated silicon nanoparticles and from the organic matrix, [alpha]-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA). The energy deposition to internal vibrational modes was evaluated by molecular ion survival curves and indicated that the ions produced by SPALDI have an internal energy threshold of 2.8-3.7 eV. This is slightly lower than the internal energy induced using the organic CHCA matrix, with similar molecular survival curves as previously reported for LDI off silicon nanowires. However, the internal energy associated with desorption/ionization from the silicon nanoparticles is significantly lower than that reported for desorption/ionization on silicon (DIOS). The measured survival yields in SPALDI gradually decrease with increasing laser fluence, contrary to reported results for silicon nanowires. The effect of modification of the silicon particle surface with semifluorinated linear chain silanes, including fluorinated decyl (C10), fluorinated hexyl (C6) and fluorinated propyl (C3) was explored too. The internal energy deposited increased with a decrease in the length of the modifier alkyl chain. Unmodified silicon particles exhibited the highest analyte internal energy

  14. Radar history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putley, Ernest

    2008-07-01

    The invention of radar, as mentioned in Chris Lavers' article on warship stealth technology (March pp21-25), continues to be a subject of discussion. Here in Malvern we have just unveiled a blue plaque to commemorate the physicist Albert Percival Rowe, who arrived in 1942 as the head of the Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE), which was the Air Ministry research facility responsible for the first British radar systems.

  15. Multi-point laser spark generation for internal combustion engines using a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Elliott; Kuang, Zheng; Cheng, Hua; Page, Vincent; Shenton, Tom; Dearden, Geoff

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports on a technique demonstrating for the first time successful multi-point laser-induced spark generation, which is variable in three dimensions and derived from a single laser beam. Previous work on laser ignition of internal combustion engines found that simultaneously igniting in more than one location resulted in more stable and faster combustion - a key potential advantage over conventional spark ignition. However, previous approaches could only generate secondary foci at fixed locations. The work reported here is an experimental technique for multi-point laser ignition, in which several sparks with arbitrary spatial location in three dimensions are created by variable diffraction of a pulsed single laser beam source and transmission through an optical plug. The diffractive multi-beam arrays and patterns are generated using a spatial light modulator on which computer generated holograms are displayed. A gratings and lenses algorithm is used to accurately modulate the phase of the input laser beam and create multi-beam output. The underpinning theory, experimental arrangement and results obtained are presented and discussed.

  16. Underwater three-dimensional imaging with an amplitude-modulated laser radar at a 405 nm wavelength.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, Luciano; De Dominicis, Luigi; de Collibus, Mario Ferri; Fornetti, Giorgio; Guarneri, Massimiliano; Paglia, Emiliano; Poggi, Claudio; Ricci, Roberto

    2005-11-20

    We report the results of underwater imaging with an amplitude-modulated single-mode laser beam and miniaturized piezoactuator-based scanning system. The basic elements of the device are a diode laser source at 405 nm with digital amplitude modulation and a microscanning system realized with a small-aperture aspheric lens mounted on a pair of piezoelectric translators driven by sawtooth waveforms. The system has been designed to be a low-weight and rugged imaging device suitable to operate at medium range (approximately 10 m) in clear seawater as also demonstrated by computer simulation of layout performance. In the controlled laboratory conditions a submillimeter range accuracy has been obtained at a laser amplitude modulation frequency of 36.7 MHz. PMID:16318184

  17. Studies on remote sensing method of particle size and water density distribution in mists and clouds using laser radar techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, H.; Kobayasi, T.; Inaba, H.

    1979-01-01

    A method of remote measurement of the particle size and density distribution of water droplets was developed. In this method, the size of droplets is measured from the Mie scattering parameter which is defined as the total-to-backscattering ratio of the laser beam. The water density distribution is obtained by a combination of the Mie scattering parameter and the extinction coefficient of the laser beam. This method was examined experimentally for the mist generated by an ultrasonic mist generator and applied to clouds containing rain and snow. Compared with the conventional sampling method, the present method has advantages of remote measurement capability and improvement in accuracy.

  18. Surface modification and laser pulse length effects on internal energy transfer in DIOS.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guanghong; Chen, Yong; Siuzdak, Gary; Vertes, Akos

    2005-12-29

    Benzyl-substituted benzylpyridinium (BP) chloride salts were used as a source of thermometer ions to probe the internal energy (IE) transfer in desorption/ionization on porous silicon (DIOS). To modify their wetting properties and the interaction energies with the thermometer ions, the DIOS surfaces were silylated to produce trimethylsilyl- (TMS), amine- (NH2), perfluoroalkyl- (PFA), and perfluorophenyl-derivatized (PFP) surfaces. Two laser sources--a nitrogen laser with pulse length of 4 ns and a mode locked 3 x omega Nd:YAG laser with a pulse length of 22 ps--were utilized to induce desorption/ionization and fragmentation at various laser fluence levels. The corresponding survival yields were determined as indicators of the IE transfer and the IE distributions were extracted. In most cases, with increasing the laser fluence in a broad range (approximately 20 mJ/cm2), no change in IE transfer was observed. For ns excitation, this was in remarkable contrast with MALDI, where increasing the laser fluence resulted in sharply (within approximately 5 mJ/cm2) declining survival yields. Derivatization of the porous silicon surface did not affect the survival yields significantly but had a discernible effect on the threshold fluence for ion production. The IE distributions determined for DIOS and MALDI from alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid reveal that the mean IE value is always lower for the latter. Using the ps laser, the IE distribution is always narrower for DIOS, whereas for ns laser excitation the width depends on surface modification. Most of the differences between MALDI and DIOS described here are compatible with the different dimensionality of the plume expansion and the differences in the activation energy of desorption due to surface modifications. PMID:16375447

  19. Internal strain analysis of ceramics using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, Renee M.

    1993-01-01

    Quantitative studies of material behavior characteristics are essential for predicting the functionality of a material under its operating conditions. A nonintrusive methodology for measuring the in situ strain of small dimeter (to 11 microns) ceramic fibers under uniaxial tensile loading and the local internal strains of ceramics and ceramic composites under flexural loading is introduced. The strain measurements and experimentally observed mechanical behavior are analyzed in terms of the microstructural development and fracture behavior of each test specimen evaluated. Measurement and analysis of Nicalon silicon carbide (SiC) fiber (15 microns diameter) indicate that the mean elastic modulus of the individual fiber is 185.3 GPa. Deviations observed in the experimentally determined elastic modulus values between specimens were attributed to microstructural variations which occur during processing. Corresponding variations in the fracture surface morphology were also observed. The observed local mechanical behavior of a lithium alumino-silicate (LAS) glass ceramic, a LAS/SiC monofilament composite, and a calcium alumino-silicate (CAS)/SiC fully reinforced composite exhibits nonlinearities and apparent hysteresis due to the subcritical mechanical loading. Local hysteresis in the LAS matrices coincided with the occurrence of multiple fracture initiation sites, localized microcracking, and secondary cracking. The observed microcracking phenomenon was attributed to stress relaxation of residual stresses developed during processing, and local interaction of the crack front with the microstructure. The relaxation strain and stress predicted on apparent mechanical hysteresis effects were defined and correlated with the magnitude of the measured fracture stress for each specimen studied. This quantitative correlation indicated a repeatable measure of the stress at which matrix microcracking occurred for stress relief of each material system. Stress relaxation occurred

  20. Internal strain analysis of ceramics using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Renee M.

    1993-03-01

    Quantitative studies of material behavior characteristics are essential for predicting the functionality of a material under its operating conditions. A nonintrusive methodology for measuring the in situ strain of small dimeter (to 11 microns) ceramic fibers under uniaxial tensile loading and the local internal strains of ceramics and ceramic composites under flexural loading is introduced. The strain measurements and experimentally observed mechanical behavior are analyzed in terms of the microstructural development and fracture behavior of each test specimen evaluated. Measurement and analysis of Nicalon silicon carbide (SiC) fiber (15 microns diameter) indicate that the mean elastic modulus of the individual fiber is 185.3 GPa. Deviations observed in the experimentally determined elastic modulus values between specimens were attributed to microstructural variations which occur during processing. Corresponding variations in the fracture surface morphology were also observed. The observed local mechanical behavior of a lithium alumino-silicate (LAS) glass ceramic, a LAS/SiC monofilament composite, and a calcium alumino-silicate (CAS)/SiC fully reinforced composite exhibits nonlinearities and apparent hysteresis due to the subcritical mechanical loading. Local hysteresis in the LAS matrices coincided with the occurrence of multiple fracture initiation sites, localized microcracking, and secondary cracking. The observed microcracking phenomenon was attributed to stress relaxation of residual stresses developed during processing, and local interaction of the crack front with the microstructure. The relaxation strain and stress predicted on apparent mechanical hysteresis effects were defined and correlated with the magnitude of the measured fracture stress for each specimen studied. This quantitative correlation indicated a repeatable measure of the stress at which matrix microcracking occurred for stress relief of each material system. Stress relaxation occurred

  1. Lasers '86; Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Lasers and Applications, Orlando, FL, Nov. 3-7, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Mcmillan, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Laser physics, technology, and applications are examined in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include VUV and X-ray lasers, vibrational energy transfer and kinetics, medical applications, ultrashort lasers and spectroscopy, surface and material interactions, lasers in atmospheric physics, and fiber-optic systems. Consideration is given to alexandrite lasers, four-wave mixing and nonlinear optics, chemical lasers, semiconductor lasers, photothermal and photoacoustic spectroscopy, dye lasers, optical phase conjugation and SBS, excimer lasers, SDI laser applications, remote-sensing with lasers, FELs, and applications in chemistry. Diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs are provided.

  2. Ground penetrating radar evaluation of the internal structure of fluvial tufa deposits (Dévanos-Añavieja system, NE Spain): an approach to different scales of heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchuela, Ó. Pueyo; Luzón, A.; Pérez, A.; Muñoz, A.; Mayayo, M. J.; Garbi, H. Gil

    2016-04-01

    The Quaternary Añavieja-Dévanos tufa system is located in the northern sector of the Iberia Chain. It has been previously tackled by means sedimentological studies focused on the available outcrops and some boreholes. They have permitted the proposal of a sedimentary scenario that fits with a pool-barrage fluvial tufa model. However a better knowledge of the characteristics and internal distribution of the usually non-outcropping pool deposits as well as of its relationship with barrage deposits has not been evaluated in detail yet. Palaeoenvironmental studies on tufas are usually biased because tufas are commonly delicate facies exposed to intense erosion during water level fall stages; for this reason outcrops are usually scarce and very often coincide with the most cemented barrage deposits. In order to analyse the internal characteristics of the tufa deposits under study, but also the lateral correlation among different facies, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) has been employed both for the evaluation of its applicability in such kind of environments and to improve, if possible, the sedimentary model using geophysical data in sectors without outcrops. A GPR survey including different antennas ranging from 50 to 500 MHz along different sectors and its comparison with natural outcrops has been carried out. GPR results have permitted to deduce clear differences between pool and barrage deposits and to recognise its internal structure and geometrical relationships. The survey also permitted an approach to different scales of heterogeneities in the radarfacies evaluation by using distinct antennas and therefore, reaching different resolutions and penetrations. The resulting integration from different antennas allows three different attenuant and eight reflective radarfacies to be defined permitting a better approach to the real extension of the pool areas. These results have permitted to decipher the horizontal and vertical facies changes and the identification of a

  3. Ground penetrating radar evaluation of the internal structure of fluvial tufa deposits (Dévanos-Añavieja system, NE Spain): an approach to different scales of heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo Anchuela, Ó.; Luzón, A.; Pérez, A.; Muñoz, A.; Mayayo, M. J.; Gil Garbi, H.

    2016-07-01

    The Quaternary Añavieja-Dévanos tufa system is located in the northern sector of the Iberian Chain. It has been previously tackled by means sedimentological studies focused on the available outcrops and some boreholes. They have permitted the proposal of a sedimentary scenario that fits with a pool-barrage fluvial tufa model. However a better knowledge of the characteristics and internal distribution of the usually non-outcropping pool deposits as well as of its relationship with barrage deposits has not been evaluated in detail yet. Palaeoenvironmental studies on tufas are usually biased because tufas are commonly delicate facies exposed to intense erosion during water level fall stages; for this reason outcrops are usually scarce and very often coincide with the most cemented barrage deposits. In order to analyse the internal characteristics of the tufa deposits under study, but also the lateral correlation among different facies, ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been employed both for the evaluation of its applicability in such kind of environments and to improve, if possible, the sedimentary model using geophysical data in sectors without outcrops. A GPR survey including different antennas ranging from 50 to 500 MHz along different sectors and its comparison with natural outcrops has been carried out. GPR results have permitted to deduce clear differences between pool and barrage deposits and to recognise its internal structure and geometrical relationships. The survey also permitted an approach to different scales of heterogeneities in the radarfacies evaluation by using distinct antennas and therefore, reaching different resolutions and penetrations. The resulting integration from different antennas allows three different attenuant and eight reflective radarfacies to be defined permitting a better approach to the real extension of the pool areas. These results have permitted to decipher the horizontal and vertical facies changes and the identification of

  4. Direct Global Measurements of Tropspheric Winds Employing a Simplified Coherent Laser Radar using Fully Scalable Technology and Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Spiers, Gary D.; Lobl, Elena S.; Rothermel, Jeff; Keller, Vernon W.

    1996-01-01

    Innovative designs of a space-based laser remote sensing 'wind machine' are presented. These designs seek compatibility with the traditionally conflicting constraints of high scientific value and low total mission cost. Mission cost is reduced by moving to smaller, lighter, more off-the-shelf instrument designs which can be accommodated on smaller launch vehicles.

  5. Radar properties of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, S. J.

    1982-01-01

    The radar properties of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto are summarized and present understanding of these properties is documented. The radar techniques are described, observational results reviewed, and salient aspects of the radar data set discussed. Theoretical interpretation of the satellites' anomalous radar properties is addressed, including aspects such as external scattering and double reflection from hemispherical craters, the random-facet model, total internal reflection, multiple total internal reflection, the high radar geometric albedos, the tenous upper layer, the two-component regolith, and compositional effects. It is concluded that multiple total internal reflection from randomly oriented subsurface facets can explain the anomalous circular polarization inversion in the radar echoes from the three satellites. Several refinements of the Goldstein-Green (1980) scattering model are suggested.

  6. Yield analysis of SLM DFB lasers with an axially-flattened internal field

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, J.; Matsumoto, K.

    1989-06-01

    The results of the yield analysis of distributed feedback (DFB) lasers which can operate in a single longitudinal mode (SLM) are presented. A new DFB structure with two /lambda//8 phase-shifters is analyzed, together with conventional structures with no shifters and a single shifter. The SLM yield is defined such that the lasers satisfy the criteria of both normalized threshold gain difference (/Delta//alpha/L) and a flatness factor of the internal field profile along the cavity direction. Flattening the field profile is indispensable to minimize the effect of spatial hole-burning. The SLM behavior of the double /lambda//8 shift DFB lasers with ideally zero reflectivity facets is also analyzed as a parameter of the distance between the shifters (/Delta/L).

  7. Hyperspectral laser-induced flourescence imaging for assessing internal quality of kiwi fruit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Muhua; Liao, Yifeng; Zhou, Xiaomei

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes an experimental study on non-destructive methods for predicting quality of kiwifruits using fluorescence imaging. The method is based on hyperspectral laser-induced fluorescence imaging in the region between 700 and 1110 nm, and estimates the kiwifruits quality in terms of internal sugar content and firmness. A station for acquiring hyperspectral laser-induced fluorescence imaging has been designed and carefully choosing each component. The fluorescence imaging acquired by the station has been pre-processed by selecting regions of interest (ROIs) of 50 100 × pixels. A line regressing prediction method estimates the quality of kiwifruit samples. The results obtained in classification show that the station and prediction model enables the correct discrimination of kiwifruits internal sugar content and firmness with a percentage of r= 98.5%, SEP=0.4 and r=99.9%, SEP=0.62.

  8. Study of Internal Channel Surface Roughnesses Manufactured by Selective Laser Melting in Aluminum and Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakkanen, Jukka; Calignano, Flaviana; Trevisan, Francesco; Lorusso, Massimo; Ambrosio, Elisa Paola; Manfredi, Diego; Fino, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Interest in additive manufacturing (AM) has gained considerable impetus over the past decade. One of the driving factors for AM success is the ability to create unique designs with intrinsic characteristics as, e.g., internal channels used for hydraulic components, cooling channels, and heat exchangers. However, a couple of the main problems in internal channels manufactured by AM technologies are the high surface roughness obtained and the distortion of the channel shape. There is still much to understand in these design aspects. In this study, a cylindrical geometry for internal channels to be built with different angles with respect to the building plane in AlSi10Mg and Ti6Al4V alloys by selective laser melting was considered. The internal surfaces of the channels produced in both materials were analyzed by means of a surface roughness tester and by optical and electron microscopy to evaluate the effects of the material and design choices.

  9. Study of Internal Channel Surface Roughnesses Manufactured by Selective Laser Melting in Aluminum and Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakkanen, Jukka; Calignano, Flaviana; Trevisan, Francesco; Lorusso, Massimo; Ambrosio, Elisa Paola; Manfredi, Diego; Fino, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Interest in additive manufacturing (AM) has gained considerable impetus over the past decade. One of the driving factors for AM success is the ability to create unique designs with intrinsic characteristics as, e.g., internal channels used for hydraulic components, cooling channels, and heat exchangers. However, a couple of the main problems in internal channels manufactured by AM technologies are the high surface roughness obtained and the distortion of the channel shape. There is still much to understand in these design aspects. In this study, a cylindrical geometry for internal channels to be built with different angles with respect to the building plane in AlSi10Mg and Ti6Al4V alloys by selective laser melting was considered. The internal surfaces of the channels produced in both materials were analyzed by means of a surface roughness tester and by optical and electron microscopy to evaluate the effects of the material and design choices.

  10. Radar volcano monitoring system in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arason, Þórður; Yeo, Richard F.; Sigurðsson, Geirfinnur S.; Pálmason, Bolli; von Löwis, Sibylle; Nína Petersen, Guðrún; Bjornsson, Halldór

    2013-04-01

    Weather radars are valuable instruments in monitoring explosive volcanic eruptions. Temporal variations in the eruption strength can be monitored as well as variations in plume and ash dispersal. Strength of the reflected radar signal of a volcanic plume is related to water content and droplet sizes as well as type, shape, amount and the grain size distribution of ash. The Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) owns and operates three radars and one more is planned for this radar volcano monitoring system. A fixed position 250 kW C-band weather radar was installed in 1991 in SW-Iceland close to Keflavík International Airport, and upgraded to a doppler radar in 2010. In cooperation with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), IMO has recently invested in two mobile X-band radars and one fixed position C-band radar. The fixed position 250 kW doppler C-band weather radar was installed in April 2012 at Fljótsdalsheiði, E-Iceland, and in June 2012 IMO received a mobile 65 kW dual-polarization doppler X-band radar. Early in 2013 IMO will acquire another mobile radar of the same type. Explosive volcanic eruptions in Iceland during the past 22 years were monitored by the Keflavík radar: Hekla 1991, Gjálp 1996, Grímsvötn 1998, Hekla 2000, Grímsvötn 2004, Eyjafjallajökull 2010 and Grímsvötn 2011. Additionally, the Grímsvötn 2011 eruption was mointored by a mobile X-band radar on loan from the Italian Civil Protection Authorities. Detailed technical information is presented on the four radars with examples of the information acquired during previous eruptions. This expanded network of radars is expected to give valuable information on future volcanic eruptions in Iceland.

  11. Proposed method for internal electron therapy based on high-intensity laser acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepper, Michal; Barkai, Uri; Gannot, Israel

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main methods to treat cancer. However, due to the propagation pattern of high-energy photons in tissue and their inability to discriminate between healthy and malignant tissues, healthy tissues may also be damaged, causing undesired side effects. A possible method for internal electron therapy, based on laser acceleration of electrons inside the patient's body, is suggested. In this method, an optical waveguide, optimized for high intensities, is used to transmit the laser radiation and accelerate electrons toward the tumor. The radiation profile can be manipulated in order to create a patient-specific radiation treatment profile by changing the laser characteristics. The propagation pattern of electrons in tissues minimizes the side effects caused to healthy tissues. A simulation was developed to demonstrate the use of this method, calculating the trajectories of the accelerated electron as a function of laser properties. The simulation was validated by comparison to theory, showing a good fit for laser intensities of up to 2×1020 (W/cm2), and was then used to calculate suggested treatment profiles for two tumor test cases (with and without penetration to the tumor). The results show that treatment profiles can be designed to cover tumor area with minimal damage to adjacent tissues.

  12. Internal structure of laser supported detonation waves by two-wavelength Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Shimamura, Kohei; Kawamura, Koichi; Fukuda, Akio; Wang Bin; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Hatai, Keigo; Fukui, Akihiro; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2011-04-15

    Characteristics of the internal structure of the laser supported detonation (LSD) waves, such as the electron density n{sub e} and the electron temperature T{sub e} profiles behind the shock wave were measured using a two-wavelength Mach-Zehnder interferometer along with emission spectroscopy. A TEA CO{sub 2} laser with energy of 10 J/pulse produced explosive laser heating in atmospheric air. Results show that the peak values of n{sub e} and T{sub e} were, respectively, about 2 x 10{sup 24} m{sup -3} and 30 000 K, during the LSD regime. The temporal variation of the laser absorption coefficient profile estimated from the measured properties reveals that the laser energy was absorbed perfectly in a thin layer behind the shock wave during the LSD regime, as predicted by Raizer's LSD model. However, the absorption layer was much thinner than a plasma layer, the situation of which was not considered in Raizer's model. The measured n{sub e} at the shock front was not zero while the LSD was supported, which implies that the precursor electrons exist ahead of the shock wave.

  13. Lasers '85; Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference, Las Vegas, NV, Dec. 2-6, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.P.

    1986-01-01

    The present conference on laser technology development encompasses issues in such areas as VUV and X-ray lasers; optical phase conjugation and nonlinear optics; laser applications in medicine; methods for optical processing; laser and nonlinear spectroscopy; ultrashort-pulse lasers and their applications; frequency selection in pulsed lasers; and interactions between laser beams, material surfaces, and material volumes. Also treated are laser applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative program, chemical laser design and performance, the lasing of biophysical materials, laser diagnostics in fluids and plasma, semiconductor laser diodes and arrays, solid state lasers, radiation- and solar-pumped lasers, laser cavities and propagation, remote sensing with lasers and fiber-optics, coupled resonators and diode lasers, industrial applications of lasers, excimer lasers, optoelectronics, CO/sub 2/ lasers, fiber-optic sensors, alexandrite lasers, free electron lasers, and IR and visible wavelength lasers.

  14. GEOS-3 C-Band radar investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The absolute accuracy of instrumentation radar systems, refined methods of calibrating these systems, and the techniques employed in processing the associated data. A world-wide network of C-Band instrumentation radars augmented by lasers and other tracking instrumentation systems were used. The NASA WFC AN/FPQ-6 instrumentation radar and the AN/FPS-16 instrumentation radar also located at NASA WFC were the primary instruments used in the accuracy and calibration evaluations. The results achieved at WFC were then disseminated to other Ranges where they were verified, augmented and used as part of routine operations.

  15. Validation of International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading for prostatic adenocarcinoma in thin core biopsies using TROG 03.04 'RADAR' trial clinical data.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, B; Egevad, L; Srigley, J R; Steigler, A; Murray, J D; Atkinson, C; Matthews, J; Duchesne, G; Spry, N A; Christie, D; Joseph, D; Attia, J; Denham, J W

    2015-10-01

    In 2014 a consensus conference convened by the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) adopted amendments to the criteria for Gleason grading and scoring (GS) for prostatic adenocarcinoma. The meeting defined a modified grading system based on 5 grading categories (grade 1, GS 3+3; grade 2, GS 3+4; grade 3, GS 4+3; grade 4, GS 8; grade 5, GS 9-10). In this study we have evaluated the prognostic significance of ISUP grading in 496 patients enrolled in the TROG 03.04 RADAR Trial. There were 19 grade 1, 118 grade 2, 193 grade 3, 88 grade 4 and 79 grade 5 tumours in the series, with follow-up for a minimum of 6.5 years. On follow-up 76 patients experienced distant progression of disease, 171 prostate specific antigen (PSA) progression and 39 prostate cancer deaths. In contrast to the 2005 modified Gleason system (MGS), the hazards of the distant and PSA progression endpoints, relative to grade 2, were significantly greater for grades 3, 4 and 5 of the 2014 ISUP grading scheme. Comparison of predictive ability utilising Harrell's concordance index, showed 2014 ISUP grading to significantly out-perform 2005 MGS grading for each of the three clinical endpoints. PMID:26325671

  16. Analysis of the accuracy of Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) height models using International Global Navigation Satellite System Service (IGS) Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukul, Manas; Srivastava, Vinee; Mukul, Malay

    2015-08-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) carried out in February 2000 has provided near global topographic data that has been widely used in many fields of earth sciences. The mission goal of an absolute vertical accuracy within 16 m (with 90% confidence)/RMSE ˜10 m was achieved based on ground validation of SRTM data through various studies using global positioning system (GPS). We present a new and independent assessment of the vertical accuracy of both the X- and C-band SRTM datasets using data from the International GNSS Service (IGS) network of high-precision static GPS stations. These stations exist worldwide, have better spatial distribution than previous studies, have a vertical accuracy of 6 mm and constitute the most accurate ground control points (GCPs) possible on earth; these stations are used as fiducial stations to define the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). Globally, for outlier-filtered data (135 X-band stations and 290 C-band stations), the error or difference between IGS and SRTM heights exhibits a non-normal distribution with a mean and standard error of 8.2 ± 0.7 and 6.9 ± 0.5 m for X- and C-band data, respectively. Continent-wise, Africa, Australia and North America comply with the SRTM mission absolute vertical accuracy of 16 m (with 90% confidence)/RMSE ˜10 m. However, Asia, Europe and South America have vertical errors higher than the SRTM mission goal. At stations where both the X- and C-band SRTM data were present, the root mean square error (RMSE) of both the X- and C-bands was identical at 11.5 m, indicating similar quality of both the X- and C-band SRTM data.

  17. The Triglav Glacier (South-Eastern Alps, Slovenia): Volume Estimation, Internal Characterization and 2000-2013 Temporal Evolution by Means of Ground Penetrating Radar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Gobbo, Costanza; Colucci, Renato R.; Forte, Emanuele; Triglav Čekada, Michaela; Zorn, Matija

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that small glaciers of mid latitudes and especially those located at low altitude respond suddenly to climate changes both on local and global scale. For this reason their monitoring as well as evaluation of their extension and volume is essential. We present a ground penetrating radar (GPR) dataset acquired on September 23 and 24, 2013 on the Triglav glacier to identify layers with different characteristics (snow, firn, ice, debris) within the glacier and to define the extension and volume of the actual ice. Computing integrated and interpolated 3D using the whole GPR dataset, we estimate that at the moment of data acquisition the ice area was 3800 m2 and the ice volume 7400 m3. Its average thickness was 1.95 m while its maximum thickness was slightly more than 5 m. Here we compare the results with a previous GPR survey acquired in 2000. A critical review of the historical data to find the general trend and to forecast a possible evolution is also presented. Between 2000 and 2013, we observed relevant changes in the internal distribution of the different units (snow, firn, ice) and the ice volume reduced from about 35,000 m3 to about 7400 m3. Such result can be achieved only using multiple GPR surveys, which allow not only to assess the volume occupied by a glacial body, but also to image its internal structure and the actual ice volume. In fact, by applying one of the widely used empirical volume-area relations to infer the geometrical parameters of the glacier, a relevant underestimation of ice-loss would be achieved.

  18. The Triglav Glacier (South-Eastern Alps, Slovenia): Volume Estimation, Internal Characterization and 2000-2013 Temporal Evolution by Means of Ground Penetrating Radar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Gobbo, Costanza; Colucci, Renato R.; Forte, Emanuele; Triglav Čekada, Michaela; Zorn, Matija

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that small glaciers of mid latitudes and especially those located at low altitude respond suddenly to climate changes both on local and global scale. For this reason their monitoring as well as evaluation of their extension and volume is essential. We present a ground penetrating radar (GPR) dataset acquired on September 23 and 24, 2013 on the Triglav glacier to identify layers with different characteristics (snow, firn, ice, debris) within the glacier and to define the extension and volume of the actual ice. Computing integrated and interpolated 3D using the whole GPR dataset, we estimate that at the moment of data acquisition the ice area was 3800 m2 and the ice volume 7400 m3. Its average thickness was 1.95 m while its maximum thickness was slightly more than 5 m. Here we compare the results with a previous GPR survey acquired in 2000. A critical review of the historical data to find the general trend and to forecast a possible evolution is also presented. Between 2000 and 2013, we observed relevant changes in the internal distribution of the different units (snow, firn, ice) and the ice volume reduced from about 35,000 m3 to about 7400 m3. Such result can be achieved only using multiple GPR surveys, which allow not only to assess the volume occupied by a glacial body, but also to image its internal structure and the actual ice volume. In fact, by applying one of the widely used empirical volume-area relations to infer the geometrical parameters of the glacier, a relevant underestimation of ice-loss would be achieved.

  19. Planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The radar astronomy activities supported by the Deep Space Network during June, July, and August 1980 are reported. The planetary bodies observed were Venus, Mercury, and the asteroid Toro. Data were obtained at both S and X band, and the observations were considered successful.

  20. Scanning of the internal structure part with laser ultrasonic in aviation industry.

    PubMed

    Swornowski, Pawel J

    2011-01-01

    The detection of internal defects is a major production and safety issue for the newest generations of aircraft. New materials and manufacturing processes in the aircraft industry demand efficient quality assurance in manufacturing and inspection in maintenance. Advanced metallic material processes (titanium) are used or developed for the production of heavily loaded flying components (in fan blade construction). The inspection of these parts mainly made out of titanium (or CFRP) requires the determination of the percentage of bonded grain sizes around 10-30 µm. This is primarily due to the advantages of a high signal-to-noise ratio and good detection sensitivity. In this article, a diagnosing method of the blade interior by means of the laser ultrasonic is presented. Identification of small fatigue cracks presents a challenging problem during nondestructive testing of fatigue-damaged structures. Laser ultrasonic is a technique that uses two laser beams; one with a short pulse for the generation of ultrasound and another with a long pulse or continuous coupled to an optical interferometer for detection. The results of research of the internal blade structure are presented. PMID:21809348

  1. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  2. Research progress on a focal plane array ladar system using a laser diode transmitter and FM/cw radar principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stann, Barry L.; Abou-Auf, Ahmed; Aliberti, Keith; Giza, Mark M.; Ovrebo, Greg; Ruff, William C.; Simon, Deborah R.; Stead, Michael R.

    2002-07-01

    The Army Research Laboratory is developing scannerless ladar systems for smart munition and reconnaissance applications. Here we report on progress attained over the past year related to the construction of a 32x32 pixel ladar. The 32x32 pixel architecture achieves ranging based on a frequency modulation/continuous wave (FM/cw) technique implemented by directly amplitude modulating a near-IR diode laser transmitter with a radio frequency (rf) subcarrier that is linearly frequency modulated. The diode's output is collected and projected to form an illumination field in the downrange image area. The returned signal is focused onto an array of metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) detectors where it is detected and mixed with a delayed replica of the laser modulation signal that modulates the responsivity of each detector. The output of each detector is an intermediate frequency (IF) signal (a product of the mixing process) whose frequency is proportional to the target range. This IF signal is continuously sampled over each period of the rf modulation. Following this, a N channel signal processor based-on field-programmable gate arrays calculates the discrete Fourier transform over the IF waveform in each pixel to establish the ranges to all the scatterers and their respective amplitudes. Over the past year, we have built one and two-dimensional self-mixing MSM detector arrays at .8 and 1.55 micrometers , designed and built circuit boards for reading data out of a 32x32 pixel array, and designed an N channel FPGA signal processor for high-speed formation of range gates. In this paper we report on the development and performance of these components and the results of system tests conducted in the laboratory.

  3. Sub-microsecond wavelength stabilization of tunable lasers with the internal wavelength locker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Ryoga; Tatsumoto, Yudai; Sakuma, Kazuki; Onji, Hirokazu; Shimokozono, Makoto; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kato, Kazutoshi

    2016-08-01

    We proposed a method of accelerating the wavelength stabilization after wavelength switching of the tunable distributed amplification-distributed feedback (TDA-DFB) laser using the internal wavelength locker to reduce the size and the cost of the wavelength control system. The configuration of the wavelength stabilization system based on this locker was as follows. At the wavelength locker, the light intensity after an optical filter is detected as a current by the photodiodes (PDs). Then, for estimating the wavelength, the current is processed by the current/voltage-converting circuit (IVC), logarithm amplifier (Log Amp) and field programmable gate array (FPGA). Finally, the laser current is tuned to the desired wavelength with reference to the estimated wavelength. With this control system the wavelength is stabilized within 800 ns after wavelength switching, which is even faster than that with the conventional control system.

  4. Desorption Dynamics, Internal Energies and Imaging of Organic Molecules from Surfaces with Laser Desorption and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2011-04-05

    There is enormous interest in visualizing the chemical composition of organic material that comprises our world. A convenient method to obtain molecular information with high spatial resolution is imaging mass spectrometry. However, the internal energy deposited within molecules upon transfer to the gas phase from a surface can lead to increased fragmentation and to complications in analysis of mass spectra. Here it is shown that in laser desorption with postionization by tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, the internal energy gained during laser desorption leads to minimal fragmentation of DNA bases. The internal temperature of laser-desorbed triacontane molecules approaches 670 K, whereas the internal temperature of thymine is 800 K. A synchrotron-based VUV postionization technique for determining translational temperatures reveals that biomolecules have translational temperatures in the range of 216-346 K. The observed low translational temperatures, as well as their decrease with increased desorption laser power is explained by collisional cooling. An example of imaging mass spectrometry on an organic polymer, using laser desorption VUV postionization shows 5 mu m feature details while using a 30 mu m laser spot size and 7 ns duration. Applications of laser desorption postionization to the analysis of cellulose, lignin and humic acids are briefly discussed.

  5. Treatment of Parapelvic Cyst by Internal Drainage Technology Using Ureteroscope and Holmium Laser

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Q; Huang, S; Li, Q; Xu, L; Wei, X; Huang, S; Li, S; Liu, Z

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The aim of parapelvic cyst treatment is to have complete drainage of cyst fluid and prevent its further compression of the kidney and collective system. This study explores the efficacy and safety of surgical approaches with holmium laser ureteroscopic internal drainage in the treatment of parapelvic cyst. Methods: The compression effect of parapelvic cyst on the renal collective system was observed by rigid ureteroscope using retrograde ureteroscopic technology. With direct vision, the cyst wall on the obvious parapelvic compression site was cut. The diameter of the cyst wall cut was about 1 cm. The internal drainage was obtained by double-J tubes. When the cyst was in the inferior pole of kidney or where the rigid ureteroscope could not reach, a flexible ureteroscope was used. Results: In 28 cases of operation, 27 cases were successful. The cyst treatment time was eight to 40 minutes (average 26 minutes). During the operation, no massive haemorrhage, damage of nearby organ and ureter, or other complications happened. Time of follow-up was 10–72 months (average 39 months). The results of follow-up showed that in 22 cases, the cyst disappeared; the diameter of the cyst in four cases was reduced by more than half, and one case recurred. Conclusion: The treatment of parapelvic cyst by internal drainage operation using holmium laser and ureteroscopy was effective. The operation was safe with few complications. PMID:26426175

  6. Neutron Imaging for Selective Laser Melting Inconel Hardware with Internal Passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tramel, Terri L.; Norwood, Joseph K.; Bilheux, Hassina

    2014-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing is showing great promise for the development of new innovative designs and large potential life cycle cost reduction for the Aerospace Industry. However, more development work is required to move this technology into space flight hardware production. With selective laser melting (SLM), hardware that once consisted of multiple, carefully machined and inspected pieces, joined together can be made in one part. However standard inspection techniques cannot be used to verify that the internal passages are within dimensional tolerances or surface finish requirements. NASA/MSFC traveled to Oak Ridge National Lab's (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source to perform some non-destructive, proof of concept imaging measurements to assess the capabilities to understand internal dimensional tolerances and internal passages surface roughness. This presentation will describe 1) the goals of this proof of concept testing, 2) the lessons learned when designing and building these Inconel 718 test specimens to minimize beam time, 3) the neutron imaging test setup and test procedure to get the images, 4) the initial results in images, volume and a video, 4) the assessment of using this imaging technique to gather real data for designing internal flow passages in SLM manufacturing aerospace hardware, and lastly 5) how proper cleaning of the internal passages is critically important. In summary, the initial results are very promising and continued development of a technique to assist in SLM development for aerospace components is desired by both NASA and ORNL. A plan forward that benefits both ORNL and NASA will also be presented, based on the promising initial results. The initial images and volume reconstruction showed that clean, clear images of the internal passages geometry are obtainable. These clear images of the internal passages of simple geometries will be compared to the build model to determine any differences. One surprising result was that a new cleaning

  7. Regional Sea level change in the Arctic Ocean from a combination of radar and laser altimetry, tide gauges and ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, O. B.; Bondo, T.; Cheng, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Lack of adequate spatial and temporal sea level observations in the Arctic Ocean is one of the most challenging problems in the study of changes in sea level and ocean circulation in the Arctic Ocean today. Especially as sea level variation in the Arctic Ocean plays an important role in the global climate system. Only a few tide gauges with long time series exists (1933-> present). Preliminarily investigations show that several of these are not indicative of sea level changes but rather of changes in river flows due to their position so a careful editing is required. The use of satellite altimetry (1992->present) is hampered due to a suite of problems. The error on sea level recovery increases, standard retracking removes most data in areas of sea ice and furthermore most of the Arctic is not covered due to the inclination of the satellites. Only the radar altimeters on board ERS and ENVISAT and the laser altimeter on board ICESAT have so far provided sparse information about Arctic sea level change. However, the combined relatively long operation period of the three satellites has now made it possible to investigate annual and decadal sea level variations. Together with similar results from ocean models like GECCO, MICOM and University of Washington Ocean model we aim to improve the recovery of sea level changes in the Arctic Ocean on annual to inter-decadal scale and the first result for this work will be presented. The presentation is a contribution to the EU supported projects MONARCH and MyOcean.

  8. Reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy for detecting internal voids in structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The reliability of 100 MHz scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting internal voids in sintered specimens of silicon nitride and silicon carbide was evaluated. The specimens contained artificially implanted voids and were positioned at depths ranging up to 2 mm below the specimen surface. Detection probability of 0.90 at a 0.95 confidence level was determined as a function of material, void diameter, and void depth. The statistical results presented for void detectability indicate some of the strengths and limitations of SLAM as a nondestructive evaluation technique for structural ceramics.

  9. Visualization of internal flows of complex geometry using three-dimensional dynamical laser sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prenel, J.-P.; Porcar, R.; Diemunsch, G.; Hostache, G.

    1986-12-01

    An extension of a previous visualization method (Prenel et al., 1986) is described in which three-dimensional light sheets obtained by sweeping of a laser beam are used to analyze internal flows of arbitrary geometry, with application to the testing of the ducts of thermal machines. The example of a variable circular test section with an elbow bend demonstrates the ability of the present method to successfully follow the evolution of a fluid in a channel of arbitrary form. Various aerodynamic parameters including position and dimension of the vortex flow, and dead zones and recirculations, are easily analyzed.

  10. Airborne laser scan measurements of winter snow accumulation in high alpine catchments - hydrological implications and verification by ground penetrating radar at glacier surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfricht, K.; Keuschnig, M.; Heilig, A.; Mayer, C.; Kuhn, M.

    2012-04-01

    The snow cover as storage of winter precipitation is a substantial source for runoff generation in high mountain catchments. Redistribution of solid precipitation, caused by wind and gravity, leads to a characteristic spatial distribution of snow accumulation which differs from simple model assumption of a homogenous snowpack increasing with altitude. Both, the distinct distribution of snow accumulation and the total amount of SWE stored in the snow cover, affect the magnitude and seasonality of melt water runoff. Complex relations exist between the spatial pattern of snow accumulation and the presence of glaciers and vice versa. For proper hydrological modeling in high mountain catchments, knowledge about snow cover distribution is an important requirement. To date, to evaluate modeling results, spatially insufficient point data on snow depths and SWE are usually available. On catchment scale, optical space-borne remote sensing techniques deliver areal extent of snow cover, but no snow depths and hence no volume of snow cover. Multi-temporal airborne laser scanning (ALS) is an active remote sensing method to obtain elevation changes extensively even in inaccessible alpine terrain. Before the start and at the end of accumulation season of winter 2010/2011, two airborne laser scan acquisitions were performed in the Ötztal Alps (Tirol, Austria). Differences of the respective digital elevation models were interpreted as snow depths and converted into SWE using a simple regression method between snow depths and snow density. Preferred snow accumulation areas were determined, e.g. wind sheltered depressions, the base of steep mountain walls and flat glacier surfaces. At catchment scale, solid precipitation is obviously redistributed from wind exposed mountain ridges to lower elevations, inducing characteristic elevations of maximum snow accumulation. Overall, catchment precipitation derived from snow accumulation is a valuable reference for precipitation approaches in

  11. TRMM radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okamoto, Kenichi

    1993-01-01

    The results of a conceptual design study and the performance of key components of the Bread Board Model (BBM) of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) radar are presented. The radar, which operates at 13.8 GHz and is designed to meet TRMM mission objectives, has a minimum measurable rain rate of 0.5 mm/h with a range resolution of 250 m, a horizontal resolution of about 4 km, and a swath width of 220 km. A 128-element active phased array system is adopted to achieve contiguous scanning within the swath. The basic characteristics of BBM were confirmed by experiments. The development of EM started with the cooperation of NASDA and CRL.

  12. The Second Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Summaries of the papers presented at the Second Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium are presented. The purpose of the symposium was to present an overwiew of recent developments in the different scientific and technological fields related to spaceborne imaging radars and to present future international plans.

  13. International linking of research and development on the model of Laser Centre Hanover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowitzki, Klaus-Dieter; Boedecker, Olaf

    2005-10-01

    Asia is becoming one of the most important regions in the world from the political, economic and scientific point of view. Germany believes that it is becoming increasingly necessary to cooperate with certain Asian countries especially for scientific and technological reasons. Above and beyond exchanges of scientists, the scientific and technological cooperation will be organized to cover projects with specific targets and to find solutions to important problems. International economic development is characterized by a mixture of competition and cooperation within the context of growing globalization. Germany, being one of the world's largest exporting nation, must therefore combine its active role in cooperation with these countries in the fields of education, research and innovation with economic cooperation. The Laser Centre Hanover pursues the goal of establishing and operating a Chinese German center for training and further education in laser technology and setting up a joint platform for long-term German Chinese cooperation in laser technology. An optimized training infrastructure combined with modern production processes support consequently long-term German businesses in China and secures their market-shares. LZH establishes Laser academies for skilled workers and technical decision makers in Shanghai and Changchun together with local universities and German partners. Due to the economic growth, Russia records since more than two years, the economic conditions are improving the cooperation between Germany and Russia step-by-step. The main goal of Russian science-politics is to stabilize an efficient scientific-technical potential with better chances in the global competition. The German-Russian scientific and technological cooperation plays an important role in this context. It has considerably increased in the last years in terms of width and depth and virtually includes all areas of science and technology at present. The region around Moscow is regarded

  14. Ultrafast internal conversion of aromatic molecules studied by photoelectron spectroscopy using Sub-20 fs laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshinori

    2014-01-01

    This article describes our recent experimental studies on internal conversion via a conical intersection using photoelectron spectroscopy. Ultrafast S2(ππ*)-S1(nπ*) internal conversion in pyrazine is observed in real time using sub-20 fs deep ultraviolet pulses (264 and 198 nm). While the photoelectron kinetic energy distribution does not exhibit a clear signature of internal conversion, the photoelectron angular anisotropy unambiguously reveals the sudden change of electron configuration upon internal conversion. An explanation is presented as to why these two observables have different sensitivities to internal conversion. The 198 nm probe photon energy is insufficient for covering the entire Franck-Condon envelopes upon photoionization from S2/S1 to D1/D0. A vacuum ultraviolet free electron laser (SCSS) producing 161 nm radiation is employed to solve this problem, while its pulse-to-pulse timing jitter limits the time resolution to about 1 ps. The S2-S1 internal conversion is revisited using the sub-20 fs 159 nm pulse created by filamentation four-wave mixing. Conical intersections between D1(π-1) and D0(n-1) and also between the Rydberg state with a D1 ion core and that with a D0 ion core of pyrazine are studied by He(I) photoelectron spectroscopy, pulsed field ionization photoelectron spectroscopy and one-color resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. Finally, ultrafast S2(ππ*)-S1(ππ*) internal conversion in benzene and toluene are compared with pyrazine. PMID:24566311

  15. Internal Energy Deposition for Low Energy, Femtosecond Laser Vaporization and Nanospray Post-ionization Mass Spectrometry using Thermometer Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanigan, Paul M.; Shi, Fengjian; Archer, Jieutonne J.; Levis, Robert J.

    2015-05-01

    The internal energy of p-substituted benzylpyridinium ions after laser vaporization using low energy, femtosecond duration laser pulses of wavelengths 800 and 1042 nm was determined using the survival yield method. Laser vaporization of dried benzylpyridinium ions from metal slides into a buffered nanospray with 75 μJ, 800 nm laser pulses resulted in a higher extent of fragmentation than conventional nanospray due to the presence of a two-photon resonance fragmentation pathway. Using higher energy 800 nm laser pulses (280 and 505 μJ) led to decreased survival yields for the four different dried benzylpyridinium ions. Analyzing dried thermometer ions with 46.5 μJ, 1042 nm pulse-bursts resulted in little fragmentation and mean internal energy distributions equivalent to nanospray, which is attributable to the absence of a two-photon resonance that occurs with higher energy, 800 nm laser pulses. Vaporization of thermometer ions from solution with either 800 nm or 1042 nm laser pulses resulted in comparable internal energy distributions to nanospray ionization.

  16. Internal energy deposition for low energy, femtosecond laser vaporization and nanospray post-ionization mass spectrometry using thermometer ions.

    PubMed

    Flanigan, Paul M; Shi, Fengjian; Archer, Jieutonne J; Levis, Robert J

    2015-05-01

    The internal energy of p-substituted benzylpyridinium ions after laser vaporization using low energy, femtosecond duration laser pulses of wavelengths 800 and 1042 nm was determined using the survival yield method. Laser vaporization of dried benzylpyridinium ions from metal slides into a buffered nanospray with 75 μJ, 800 nm laser pulses resulted in a higher extent of fragmentation than conventional nanospray due to the presence of a two-photon resonance fragmentation pathway. Using higher energy 800 nm laser pulses (280 and 505 μJ) led to decreased survival yields for the four different dried benzylpyridinium ions. Analyzing dried thermometer ions with 46.5 μJ, 1042 nm pulse-bursts resulted in little fragmentation and mean internal energy distributions equivalent to nanospray, which is attributable to the absence of a two-photon resonance that occurs with higher energy, 800 nm laser pulses. Vaporization of thermometer ions from solution with either 800 nm or 1042 nm laser pulses resulted in comparable internal energy distributions to nanospray ionization. PMID:25724375

  17. Laser assisted internal mammary artery-coronary artery anastomosis - an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hong-Sheng; Zhang, Liang-ping; Feng, Lian

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To observe the time required for anastomosis and the reliability for pressure tolerance after internal mammay artery (IMA) -coronary artery anastomosis. Method: Eight sheep underwent thoracotomy and left IMA harvest. In group I (T) the IMA were anastomosed to left anterior descending artery (LAD) with 7-0 prolene suture (n=4) and in group II (LA) IMA were anastomosed to LAD with laser. Result: The time required for laser technique was shorter than that required in suturing technique [117.5+/-39.48min (total) and 38.25+/-6.23 min vs 62.5+/-37.83 min (total) and 20+/-6.53 min respectively ] (p<0.01). Prior to closing thoracotomy both two groups endured the impact of pharmacologic vasopressor. No leakage at the anastomosed site was observed in both groups. After the closure of thoracotomy, well tolerance for both adrenalin and thoracic negative pressure was observed in the two groups. The peak systolic pressure induced by pharmacologic agent was similar in both groups. Neither stenosis nor thrombus or embolism was observed and immediate patency rate in both groups was 100%. Conclusion: Laser assisted technique seems to be favorable for patency rate and could lead to better result after coronary artery bypass grafting(CABG).

  18. Mars meter-scale roughness: Goldstone Solar System Radar delay-doppler database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haldemann, A. F. C.; Jurgens, R. F.; Slade, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    The entire fourteen-year database of Goldstone Solar System Radar Mars near-nadir radar scattering model fits is being revised using the latest topography from the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter instrument.

  19. Internal magnetic field measurements by laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. Q.; Jie, Y. X.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Zou, Z. Y.; Qian, J. P.; Li, W. M.; Yang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Zhang, S. B.; Lan, T.; Wang, S. X.; Hanada, K.; Wei, X. C.; Hu, L. Q.; Wan, B. N.

    2016-01-01

    A multi-channel far-infrared laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system utilizing the three-wave technique has been implemented for fully diagnosing the internal magnetic field in the EAST tokamak. Double-pass, horizontal, radially-viewing chords access the plasma via an equatorial port. The laser source consists of three CW formic acid (HCOOH) FIR lasers at nominal wavelength 432.5 μm which are optically pumped by independent infrared CO2 lasers. Output power is more than 30 mW of per cavity. Novel molybdenum retro-reflectors, can with withstand baking temperature up to 350°C and discharge duration more than 1000 s, are mounted in the inside wall for the double-pass optical arrangement. A Digital Phase Detector with 250 kHz bandwidth, which provide real-time Faraday rotation angle and density phase shift output for plasma control, have been developed for the POINT system. Reliability of both polarimetric and interferometric measurement are obtained in 22 s long pulse H mode discharge and 8 s NBI H mode discharge, indicating the POINT system works for any heating scheme on EAST so far. The electron line-integrated density resolution of POINT is less than 1 × 1016 m-2 (< 1°), and the Faraday rotation angle rms phase noise is < 0.1°. With the high temporal (~ 1 μsec) and phase resolution (< 0.1°), perturbations associated with the sawtooth cycle and MHD activity have been observed. The current profile, density profile and safety factor (q) profile are reconstructed by using EFIT code from the external magnetic and the validation POINT data. Realtime EFIT with Faraday angle and density phase shift constraints will be implemented in the plasma control system in the future.

  20. Multispecies in situ monitoring of a static internal combustion engine by near-infrared diode laser sensors.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Yvan; Holdsworth, Robert J; Martin, Philip A

    2007-07-01

    A multispecies near-infrared diode laser spectrometer has been constructed for measurements of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and methane directly in the exhaust of a static internal combustion engine. A wavelength modulation-division multiplexing scheme was implemented for the two distributed feedback diode lasers. Gas concentration variations were observed for changes in operating conditions such as increasing and decreasing the throttle, adjusting the air-fuel ratio, and engine start-up. PMID:17571130

  1. Neodymium YAG lasers. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    Various aspects of neodymium yag lasers are discussed in approximately 267 citations. Laser materials and outputs, laser mode locking; crystal, fiber, and nonlinear optics, optical pumping communications, energy conversion efficiency, and laser applications are covered. Pulsed, continuous wave, solid state, Q switched, infrared, and dye lasers are included.

  2. Graded doping low internal loss 1060-nm InGaAs/AlGaAs quantum well semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Shao-Yang; Zhai, Teng; Zhang, Rui-Kang; Lu, Dan; Wang, Wei; Ji, Chen

    2015-06-01

    Internal loss is a key internal parameter for high power 1060-nm InGaAs/AlGaAs semiconductor laser. In this paper, we discuss the origin of internal loss of 1060-nm InGaAs/GaAs quantum well (QW) AlGaAs separate confinement heterostructure semiconductor laser, and the method to reduce internal loss. By light doping the n-cladding layer, and stepwise doping the p-cladding layer combined with the expanded waveguide layer, a broad area laser with internal loss of 1/cm is designed and fabricated. Ridge waveguide laser with an output power of 350 mW is obtained. The threshold current and slope efficiency near the threshold current are 20 mA and 0.8 W/A, respectively. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274046, 61335009, 61201103, and 61320106013) and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013AA014202).

  3. Planetary landing-zone reconnaissance using ice-penetrating radar data: Concept validation in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grima, Cyril; Schroeder, Dustin M.; Blankenship, Donald D.; Young, Duncan A.

    2014-11-01

    The potential for a nadir-looking radar sounder to retrieve significant surface roughness/permittivity information valuable for planetary landing site selection is demonstrated using data from an airborne survey of the Thwaites Glacier Catchment, West Antarctica using the High Capability Airborne Radar Sounder (HiCARS). The statistical method introduced by Grima et al. (2012. Icarus 220, 84-99. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11214-012-9916-y) for surface characterization is applied systematically along the survey flights. The coherent and incoherent components of the surface signal, along with an internally generated confidence factor, are extracted and mapped in order to show how a radar sounder can be used as both a reflectometer and a scatterometer to identify regions of low surface roughness compatible with a planetary lander. These signal components are used with a backscattering model to produce a landing risk assessment map by considering the following surface properties: Root mean square (RMS) heights, RMS slopes, roughness homogeneity/stationarity over the landing ellipse, and soil porosity. Comparing these radar-derived surface properties with simultaneously acquired nadir-looking imagery and laser-altimetry validates this method. The ability to assess all of these parameters with an ice penetrating radar expands the demonstrated capability of a principle instrument in icy planet satellite science to include statistical reconnaissance of the surface roughness to identify suitable sites for a follow-on lander mission.

  4. Super hydrophobic surface of polytetrafluoroethylene fabricated by picosecond laser and phenomenon of total internal reflection underwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yijian; Cao, Wenshen; Zhao, Yan; Wu, Yan; Ji, Lingfei

    2015-03-01

    A groove-shaped array with average 25 μm interval, 25 μm wall thickness, 75 μm depth and a columnar array with average 30 μm side length, 25 μm interval, 43 μm depth are processed by 1064 nm picosecond laser on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface at room temperature. The water contact angle of modified PTFE surface can reach 167°, which show super hydrophobic surface of PTFE is prepared. It is observed super hydrophobic surface reflects metal luster underwater through the glassware when super hydrophobic PTFE entirely immerses in pure water. The experiment conducts super hydrophobic surface will enhance intensity of reflection of visible light underwater, which is due to total internal reflection of super hydrophobic surface und erwater.

  5. Abstracts of the 5th International Conference on Lasers and their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Results were presented in the fields of laser physics and laser applications including the development of laser light sources, laser frequencies in the UV and VUV spectral regions using anti-Stokes Raman scattering, nonlinear optical effects for the formation of ultrashort optical pulses, laser spectroscopy, collisionless multiphoton excitation processes using molecular beams, selective generation of free radicals by laser, laser applications in medicine, plasma diagnostics analyzing X-ray spectra for studying laser fusion problems, coherence properties in phase-sampling interferometric techniques, and fundamental problems in quantum physics and nonlinear processes.

  6. Robust Sparse Sensing Using Weather Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, K. V.; Kruger, A.; Krajewski, W. F.; Xu, W.

    2014-12-01

    The ability of a weather radar to detect weak echoes is limited by the presence of noise or unwanted echoes. Some of these unwanted signals originate externally to the radar system, such as cosmic noise, radome reflections, interference from co-located radars, and power transmission lines. The internal source of noise in microwave radar receiver is mainly thermal. The thermal noise from various microwave devices in the radar receiver tends to lower the signal-to-noise ratio, thereby masking the weaker signals. Recently, the compressed sensing (CS) technique has emerged as a novel signal sampling paradigm that allows perfect reconstruction of signals sampled at frequencies lower than the Nyquist rate. Many radar and remote sensing applications require efficient and rapid data acquisition. The application of CS to weather radars may allow for faster target update rates without compromising the accuracy of target information. In our previous work, we demonstrated recovery of an entire precipitation scene from its compressed-sensed version by using the matrix completion approach. In this study, we characterize the performance of such a CS-based weather radar in the presence of additive noise. We use a signal model where the precipitation signals form a low-rank matrix that is corrupted with (bounded) noise. Using recent advances in algorithms for matrix completion from few noisy observations, we reconstruct the precipitation scene with reasonable accuracy. We test and demonstrate our approach using the data collected by Iowa X-band Polarimetric (XPOL) weather radars.

  7. The melanosome: threshold temperature for explosive vaporization and internal absorption coefficient during pulsed laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Jacques, S L; McAuliffe, D J

    1991-06-01

    The explosive vaporization of melanosomes in situ in skin during pulsed laser irradiation (pulse duration less than 1 microsecond) is observed as a visible whitening of the superficial epidermal layer due to stratum corneum disruption. In this study, the ruby laser (694 nm) was used to determine the threshold radiant exposure, H0 (J/cm2), required to elicit whitening for in vitro black (Negroid) human skin samples which were pre-equilibrated at an initial temperature, Ti, of 0, 20, or 50 degrees C. A plot of H0 vs Ti yields a straight line whose x-intercept indicates the threshold temperature of explosive vaporization to be 112 +/- 7 degrees C (SD, N = 3). The slope, delta H0/delta Ti, specifies the internal absorption coefficient, mua, within the melanosome: mua = -rho C/(slope(1 + 7.1 Rd)), where rho C is the product of density and specific heat, and Rd is the total diffuse reflectance from the skin. A summary of the absorption spectrum (mua) for the melanosome interior (351-1064 nm) is presented based on H0 data from this study and the literature. The in vivo absorption spectrum (380-820 nm) for human epidermal melanin was measured by an optical fiber spectrophotometer and is compared with the melanosome spectrum. PMID:1886936

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Carbon Steel with Multi-Line Internal Standard Calibration Method Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Congyuan; Du, Xuewei; An, Ning; Zeng, Qiang; Wang, Shengbo; Wang, Qiuping

    2016-04-01

    A multi-line internal standard calibration method is proposed for the quantitative analysis of carbon steel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). A procedure based on the method was adopted to select the best calibration curves and the corresponding emission lines pairs automatically. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy experiments with carbon steel samples were performed, and C, Cr, and Mn were analyzed via the proposed method. Calibration curves of these elements were constructed via a traditional single line internal standard calibration method and a multi-line internal standard calibration method. The calibration curves obtained were evaluated with the determination coefficient, the root mean square error of cross-validation, and the average relative error of cross-validation. All of the parameters were improved significantly with the proposed method. The results show that accurate and stable calibration curves can be obtained efficiently via the multi-line internal standard calibration method. PMID:26872822

  9. Application of total internal reflection microscopy for laser damage studies on fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, L. M., LLNL

    1997-12-01

    Damage studies show that the majority of damage on ultraviolet grade fused silica initiates at the front or rear surface. The grinding and polishing processes used to produce the optical surfaces of transparent optics play a key role in the development of defects which can ultimately initiate damage. These defects can be on or breaking through the surface or can be sub-surface damage. Total Internal Reflection Microscopy has been documented as a tool for revealing both sub-surface and surface defects in transparent materials. Images taken which compare both Total Internal Reflection Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy show that the observed defects can be less than one micron in size. Total Internal Reflection Microscopy has the added benefit of being able to observe large areas (1 square millimeter) with sub-micron detection. Both off-line and in-situ systems have been applied in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s damage laboratory in order to understand defects in the surface and subsurface of polished fused silica. There is a preliminary indication that TIRM quality can be related to the damage resistance. The in-situ microscope is coupled into a 355 run, 7.5 ns, 10 Hz Nd:YAG laser system in order to study damage occurring at localized scatter sites revealed with the Total Internal Reflection Microscopy method. The tests indicate damage initiating at observed artifacts which have many different morphologies and damage behaviors. Some of the scatter sites and damage morphologies revealed have been related back to the finishing process.

  10. Kharkiv Meteor Radar System (the XX Age)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomiyets, S. V.

    2012-09-01

    Kharkiv meteor radar research are of historic value (Kolomiyets and Sidorov 2007). Kharkiv radar observations of meteors proved internationally as the best in the world, it was noted at the IAU General Assembly in 1958. In the 1970s Kharkiv meteor automated radar system (MARS) was recommended at the international level as a successful prototype for wide distribution. Until now, this radar system is one of the most sensitive instruments of meteor radars in the world for astronomical observations. In 2004 Kharkiv meteor radar system is included in the list of objects which compose the national property of Ukraine. Kharkiv meteor radar system has acquired the status of the important historical astronomical instrument in world history. Meteor Centre for researching meteors in Kharkiv is a analogue of the observatory and performs the same functions of a generator and a battery of special knowledge and skills (the world-famous studio). Kharkiv and the location of the instrument were brand points on the globe, as the place where the world-class meteor radar studies were carried out. They are inscribed in the history of meteor astronomy, in large letters and should be immortalized on a world-wide level.

  11. Performance evaluation of ground based radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Stanley E.

    1994-06-01

    Ground based radar systems are a critical resource to the command, control, and communications system. This thesis provides the tools and methods to better understand the actual performance of an operational ground based radar system. This thesis defines two measurable performance standards: (1) the baseline performance, which is based on the sensor's internal characteristics, and (2) the theoretical performance, which considers not only the sensor's internal characteristics, but also the effects of the surrounding terrain and atmosphere on the sensor's performance. The baseline radar system performance, often used by operators, contractors, and radar modeling software to determine the expected system performance, is a simplistic and unrealistic means to predict actual radar system performance. The theoretical radar system performance is more complex; but, the results are much more indicative of the actual performance of an operational radar system. The AN/UPS-1 at the Naval Postgraduate School was used as the system under test to illustrate the baseline and theoretical radar system performance. The terrain effects are shown by performing a multipath study and producing coverage diagrams. The key variables used to construct the multipath study and coverage diagrams are discussed in detail. The atmospheric effects are illustrated by using the Integrated Refractive Effects Prediction System (IREPS) and the Engineer's Refractive Effects Prediction System (EREPS) software tools to produce propagations conditions summaries and coverage displays.

  12. Radar and Lidar Radar DEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liskovich, Diana; Simard, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Using radar and lidar data, the aim is to improve 3D rendering of terrain, including digital elevation models (DEM) and estimates of vegetation height and biomass in a variety of forest types and terrains. The 3D mapping of vegetation structure and the analysis are useful to determine the role of forest in climate change (carbon cycle), in providing habitat and as a provider of socio-economic services. This in turn will lead to potential for development of more effective land-use management. The first part of the project was to characterize the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission DEM error with respect to ICESat/GLAS point estimates of elevation. We investigated potential trends with latitude, canopy height, signal to noise ratio (SNR), number of LiDAR waveform peaks, and maximum peak width. Scatter plots were produced for each variable and were fitted with 1st and 2nd degree polynomials. Higher order trends were visually inspected through filtering with a mean and median filter. We also assessed trends in the DEM error variance. Finally, a map showing how DEM error was geographically distributed globally was created.

  13. PREFACE: Fourteenth International Symposium on Laser-Aided Plasma Diagnostics (LAPD14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicotti, L.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2010-04-01

    The attached PDF contains, the full preface, a list of the scientific committee, former LAPD chairmen, local organizers, previous locations of LAPD meetings, participants email contacts and a list of the contributed papers. logo The Fourteenth International Symposium on Laser-Aided Plasma Diagnostics (LAPD14), was held from 21-24 September 2009 in Castelbrando, Treviso, Italy. The series of LAPD symposia was originally started at Kyushu University in 1983, and since then it has been organized every two years alternately in Japan, Europe and the United States, traveling around the world five times. Each LAPD Symposium brings together scientists working in different disciplines all related to the diagnostics of any type of plasma by laser or similar techniques. Researchers working on nuclear fusion, industrial process, low temperature plasma chemistry, laser development and material science, are invited to present prominent new diagnostic developments, with the aim of synergetic discussions. The broad spectrum of contributions represents one of the strengths of this symposium, which is an important, unique and fruitful source of cross-fertilization between these fields and a forum of discussions. The scope of LAPD14 was very broad, including many techniques related to laser probing of plasmas: incoherent and coherent Thomson scattering, polarimetry, interferometry, reflectometry, laser induced fluorescence, laser absorption spectroscopy, laser photodetachment spectroscopy, cavity ringdown spectroscopy, Raman scattering, reflectometry, microwave diagnostics and related laser and hardware developments. LAPD14 was attended by 66 researchers, from 15 different countries who presented a total of 57 papers (13 general, 12 topical, 10 short talks and 23 poster contributions). It is a tradition of LAPD that the first lecture of each meeting, which is more general and aims to review prominent new developments, is called 'the Akazaki lecture' in honor of Professor Masanori

  14. Radar applications of gigawatt sources at millimeter wave frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Bruder, J.A.; Belcher, M.L. . Research Inst.)

    1991-06-01

    The high transmit powers provided by free electron laser (FEL) sources in combination with the narrow antenna beamwidths achievable at millimeter wave (MMW) frequencies offer potential for use in a number of radar applications. Potential applications of high power millimeter wave sources include satellite imaging, low angle radar tracking, radar astronomy, and a number of other possible applications such as atmospheric research, space debris detection, and space vehicle tracking. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Internal stress-induced melting below melting temperature at high-rate laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Seok; Levitas, Valery I.

    2014-06-30

    In this Letter, continuum thermodynamic and phase field approaches (PFAs) predicted internal stress-induced reduction in melting temperature for laser-irradiated heating of a nanolayer. Internal stresses appear due to thermal strain under constrained conditions and completely relax during melting, producing an additional thermodynamic driving force for melting. Thermodynamic melting temperature for Al reduces from 933.67 K for a stress-free condition down to 898.1 K for uniaxial strain and to 920.8 K for plane strain. Our PFA simulations demonstrated barrierless surface-induced melt nucleation below these temperatures and propagation of two solid-melt interfaces toward each other at the temperatures very close to the corresponding predicted thermodynamic equilibrium temperatures for the heating rate Q≤1.51×10{sup 10}K/s. At higher heating rates, kinetic superheating competes with a reduction in melting temperature and melting under uniaxial strain occurs at 902.1 K for Q = 1.51 × 10{sup 11 }K/s and 936.9 K for Q = 1.46 × 10{sup 12 }K/s.

  16. Laser-Ultrasonic Testing and its Applications to Nuclear Reactor Internals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, M.; Miura, T.; Yamamoto, S.

    2008-02-01

    A new nondestructive testing technique for surface-breaking microcracks in nuclear reactor components based on laser-ultrasonics is developed. Surface acoustic wave generated by Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and detected by frequency-stabilized long pulse laser coupled with confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer is used to detect and size the cracks. A frequency-domain signal processing is developed to realize accurate sizing capability. The laser-ultrasonic testing allows the detection of surface-breaking microcrack having a depth of less than 0.1 mm, and the measurement of their depth with an accuracy of 0.2 mm when the depth exceeds 0.5 mm including stress corrosion cracking. The laser-ultrasonic testing system combined with laser peening system, which is another laser-based maintenance technology to improve surface stress, for inner surface of small diameter tube is developed. The generation laser in the laser-ultrasonic testing system can be identical to the laser source of the laser peening. As an example operation of the system, the system firstly works as the laser-ultrasonic testing mode and tests the inner surface of the tube. If no cracks are detected, the system then changes its work mode to the laser peening and improves surface stress to prevent crack initiation. The first nuclear industrial application of the laser-ultrasonic testing system combined with the laser peening was completed in Japanese nuclear power plant in December 2004.

  17. Space Radar Image of Long Island Optical/Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    visible in the radar image; many of them can also be seen as bright lines i the optical image. The runways of John F. Kennedy International Airport appear as a dark rectangle in Jamaica Bay on the left side of the image. Developed areas appear generally as bright green and orange, while agricultural, protected and undeveloped areas appear darker blue or purple. This contrast can be seen on the barrier islands along the south coast of Long Island, which are heavily developed in the Rockaway and Long Beach areas south and east of Jamaica Bay, but further to the east, the islands are protected and undeveloped.

  18. Partial support of the 3rd International Laser Science Conference held in Atlantic City, New Jersey on 1-4 November 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stwalley, William C.

    1988-12-01

    The annual International Laser Science Conferences have been established to survey the core laser science areas including lasers and their properties, spectroscopy, laser-induced processes, and a selection of laser applications. This meeting is a Topical Conference of the American Physical Society (APS) and is also the annual meeting of the APS Topical Group on Laser Science. Earlier ILS Conferences were held in Dallas in 1985 (ILS-I) and in Seattle in 1986 (ILS-II). ILS-III was held in Atlantic City, New Jersey, November 1-4, 1987, with the co-sponsorship of the Optical Society of America.

  19. Capabilities and limitations of existing MST radars: Colorado wind profilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauch, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    The Wave Propagation Laboratory is developing a ground-based remote sensing system called PROFILER to measure troposphere parameters currently measured in operational meteorology by radiosondes. The prototype PROFILER uses two radars for wind sounding: a 6-m radar located at Platteville, Colorado, and a 33-cm radar located at Denver's Stapleton International Airport. In addition, a network of three 6-m wind-profiling radars is being installed in Colorado, and a fourth site is planned. The location of the five radars, their characteristics, and their limitations are described.

  20. Improved Measurement Performance of Inorganic Elements in Coal by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Coupled with Internal Standardization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shunchun; Xu, Jialong; Bai, Kaijie; Lu, Jidong

    2015-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was employed to determine the inorganic elements in coal. To improve the measurement's accuracy and precision, a new internal standardization scheme, which we named changed internal standardization, was compared with the traditional internal standardization and no internal standardization for the analysis of inorganic elements. The new internal standardization scheme used the atomic line of carbon at 247.86 nm and the molecular band of CN at 388.34 nm and C2 at 516.32 nm to normalize the lines of inorganic elements that were distributed in the same spectral channel. The performance of the utilization of the new internal standardization scheme was evaluated using a set of coal samples, including twenty calibration samples and five validation samples. The results show that the coefficients of determination R2 and the slope of calibration models coupled with changed internal standardization are better than that of the calibration models coupled with fixed internal standardization and no internal standardization. Moreover, the measurement accuracy and reproducibility of changed internal standardization for the analysis of five validation samples also yielded further improvement. The results that we obtained suggest that changed internal standardization could compensate for the matrix effects, as well as the influence of the difference in the spectral response of the light collection system. supported by Open Research Fund of State Key Laboratory of Pulsed Power Laser Technology of China (No. SKL2013KF03), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51206055, 51476061), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. 2014ZZ0014), the New Star of Pearl River on Science and Technology of Guangzhou, China (No. 2014J2200054), the Key Laboratory of Efficient and Clean Energy Utilization of Guangdong Higher Education Institutes of China (No. KLB10004) and Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Efficient and

  1. Internal structure of the nanogratings generated inside bulk fused silica by ultrafast laser direct writing

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S. P.; Vilar, R.; Oliveira, V.; Herrero, P.

    2014-08-07

    The aim of the present work was to characterize the internal structure of nanogratings generated inside bulk fused silica by ultrafast laser processing and to study the influence of diluted hydrofluoric acid etching on their structure. The nanogratings were inscribed at a depth of 100 μm within fused silica wafers by a direct writing method, using 1030 nm radiation wavelength and the following processing parameters: E = 5 μJ, τ = 560 fs, f = 10 kHz, and v = 100 μm/s. The results achieved show that the laser-affected regions are elongated ellipsoids with a typical major diameter of about 30 μm and a minor diameter of about 6 μm. The nanogratings within these regions are composed of alternating nanoplanes of damaged and undamaged material, with an average periodicity of 351 ± 21 nm. The damaged nanoplanes contain nanopores randomly dispersed in a material containing a large density of defects. These nanopores present a roughly bimodal size distribution with average dimensions for each class of pores 65 ± 20 × 16 ± 8 × 69 ± 16 nm{sup 3} and 367 ± 239 × 16 ± 8 × 360 ± 194 nm{sup 3}, respectively. The number and size of the nanopores increases drastically when an hydrofluoric acid treatment is performed, leading to the coalescence of these voids into large planar discontinuities parallel to the nanoplanes. The preferential etching of the damaged material by the hydrofluoric acid solution, which is responsible for the pores growth and coalescence, confirms its high defect density.

  2. PREFACE: 3rd International Symposium on Laser Ultrasonics and Advanced Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    Based on the use of laser as a coherent and intense light source, the photo-acoustics originated from the discovery made by Alexander Graham Bell was extended to laser-ultrasonics (LU), and it has been applied to wide area of ultrasonics, optics, material characterization and nondestructive inspection. In 1996, a research group for LU was started in the Japanese Society for Nondestructive Inspection (JSNDI), and researches on LU and related topics such as noncontact measurements and elastic wave theories were discussed. Similar activities were pursued also in North America and in Europe. The international symposium on LU was started in Montreal, Canada in 2008 by Jean Pierre Monchalin in order to offer a forum for involved with basic researches and industrial applications of LU. In the second symposium in Bordeaux, France nearly 120 papers were presented. It is our honor to have organized the third symposium, LU2013 on 25-28 June in Yokohama, Japan. The articles published here provide a sample of achievements presented there. In LU2013, we focused on the laser generation and/or detection of acoustic waves, application to nondestructive testing, ultrafast-optoacoustics and innovative instruments. Research achievements in biomedical applications, advanced sensing including noncontact, micro/nanoscale or nonlinear measurements, as well as theory and simulation of ultrasound were also included, considering the interdisciplinary nature of this field. We enjoyed very excellent and informative 3 plenary talks, 11 invited talks, 81 oral and 41 poster presentations with 168 attendees. According to requests, we organized a post deadline poster session to give an opportunity to present recent achievements after the deadline. Contributions of the participants, the scientific and organizing committees are highly appreciated. The conference tour was a dinner cruise to the Tokyo bay, and we hope this experience will remain as a pleasant memory in attendees. As decided in the

  3. Femtosecond laser written 16.5 mm long glass-waveguide amplifier and laser with 5.2 dB cm-1 internal gain at 1534 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyo, J.; Berdejo, V.; Toney Fernandez, T.; Ferrer, A.; Ruiz, A.; Valles, J. A.; Rebolledo, M. A.; Ortega-Feliu, I.; Solis, J.

    2013-10-01

    A 16.5 mm long, heavily doped erbium-ytterbium phosphate glass-waveguide amplifier was fabricated by the femtosecond laser (fs-laser) inscription technique. The femtosecond laser inscription of waveguides was carried out at 500 kHz repetition rate using a 0.68 NA aspheric lens. The energy deposition profile in the dielectric material was initially simulated using a generalized adaptive fast-Fourier evolver (GAFFE) algorithm. The size and shape of the guiding structures were carefully controlled by the slit shaping technique to reduce the coupling losses, with achievable values down to less than 0.1 dB. Rigorous simulations of the response of the active waveguides were carried out to optimize their performance as optical amplifiers. A maximum of 8.6 dB internal gain at 1534 nm was obtained upon bidirectional laser pumping at 976 nm, leading to a gain per unit length of 5.2 dB cm-1. Laser action was also achieved for both ring and linear cavity configurations.

  4. Imaging radar for bridge deck inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Warhus, J.; Mast, J.; Nelson, S.

    1995-04-13

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)l is developing a prototype imaging radar for inspecting steel reinforced concrete bridge decks. The system is designed to acquire Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data and provide high-resolution images of internal structure, flaws, and defects enabling bridge inspectors to nondestructively evaluate and characterize bridge deck condition. Concrete delamination resulting from corrosion of steel reinforcing bars (rebars) is an important structural defect that the system is designed to detect. The prototype system uses arrays of compact, low-cost Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR) modules, supported by appropriate data acquisition and storage subsystems, to generate and collect the radar data, and unique imaging codes to reconstruct images of bridge deck internals. In this paper, we provide an overview of the prototype system concept, discuss its expected performance, and present recent experimental results showing the capability of this approach to detect thin delamination simulations embedded in concrete.

  5. Space Radar Image of Baikal Lake, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an X-band black-and-white image of the forests east of the Baikal Forest in the Jablonowy Mountains of Russia. The image is centered at 52.5 degrees north latitude and 116 degrees east longitude near the mining town of Bukatschatscha. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 4, 1994, during the second flight of the spaceborne radar. This area is part of an international research project known as the Taiga Aerospace Investigation using Geographic Information System Applications.

  6. Analysis of synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Average radar response for L-band like polarized system appeared to be related to the watershed runoff coefficients when the viewing angle was approximately 42 deg off nadir. Four requirements for radar systems used to verify applications of active microwave for water resources were identified: (1) first generation digital data will be required; (2) radar should be calibrated both internally and externally; (3) new systems should avoid radom use; and (4) images should be geometrically rectified prior to delivery to the user.

  7. Evaluation of holmium laser versus cold knife in optical internal urethrotomy for the management of short segment urethral stricture

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sudhir Kumar; Kaza, Ram Chandra Murthy; Singh, Bipin Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Sachse cold knife is conventionally used for optical internal urethrotomy intended to manage urethral strictures and Ho: YAG laser is an alternative to it. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of urethral stricture treatment outcomes, efficacy, and complications using cold knife and Ho: YAG (Holmium laser) for optical internal urethrotomy Materials and Methods: In this prospective study included, 90 male patients age >18 years, with diagnosis of urethral stricture admitted for internal optical urethrotomy during April 2010 to March 2012. The patients were randomized into two groups containing 45 patients each using computer generated random number. In group A (Holmium group), internal urethrotomy was done with Holmium laser and in group B (Cold knife group) Sachse cold knife was used. Patients were followed up for 6 months after surgery in Out Patient Department on 15, 30 and 180 post-operative days. At each follow up visit physical examination, and uroflowmetry was performed along with noting complaints, if any. Results: The peak flow rates (PFR) were compared between the two groups on each follow up. At 180 days (6 month interval) the difference between mean of PFR for Holmium and Cold knife group was statistically highly significant (P < 0.001). Complications were seen in 12.22% of cases. Conclusion: Both modalities are effective in providing immediate relief to patients with single and short segment (<2 cm long) urethral strictures but more sustained response was attained with Cold knife urethrotomy. PMID:25371611

  8. Achieving operational two-way laser acquisition for OPALS payload on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamson, Matthew J.; Oaida, Bogdan V.; Sindiy, Oleg; Biswas, Abhijit

    2015-03-01

    The Optical PAyload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) experiment was installed on the International Space Station (ISS) in April 2014. Developed as a technology demonstration, its objective was to experiment with space-to-ground optical communications transmissions from Low Earth Orbit. More than a dozen successful optical links were established between a Wrightwood, California-based ground telescope and the OPALS flight terminal from June 2014 to September 2014. Each transmission required precise bi-directional pointing to be maintained between the space-based transmitter and ground-based receiver. This was accomplished by acquiring and tracking a laser beacon signal transmitted from the ground telescope to the OPALS flight terminal on the ISS. OPALS demonstrated the ability to nominally acquire the beacon within three seconds at 25° elevation and maintain lock within 140 μrad (3σ) for the full 150-second transmission duration while slewing at rates up to 1°/sec. Additional acquisition attempts in low elevation and weather-challenged conditions provided valuable insight on the optical link robustness under off-nominal operational conditions.

  9. Dynamic Oil Consumption Measurement of Internal Combustion Engines using Laser Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sellmeier, Stefan; Alonso, Eduardo; Boesl, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    A new approach has been developed to measure dynamic consumption of lubricant oil in an internal combustion engine. It is based on the already known technique where sulfur is used as a natural tracer of the engine oil. Since ejection of motor oil in gaseous form into the exhaust is by far the main source of engine oil consumption, detection of sulfur in the exhaust emission is a valuable way to measure engine oil consumption in a dynamic way. In earlier approaches, this is done by converting all sulfur containing chemical components into SO2 by thermal pyrolysis in a high temperature furnace at atmospheric pressure. The so-formed SO2 then is detected by broadband-UV-induced fluorescence or mass spectrometric methods. The challenge is to reach the necessary detection limit of 50 ppb. The new approach presented here includes sulfur conversion in a low-pressure discharge cell and laser-induced fluorescence with wavelength and fluorescence lifetime selection. A limit of detection down to 10 ppb at a temporal resolution in the time scale of few seconds is reached. Extensive, promising studies have been performed at a real engine test bench. Future developments of a compact, mobile device based on these improvements are discussed. PMID:24279690

  10. The MST Radar Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roettger, J.

    1984-01-01

    The coherent radar technique is reviewed with special emphasis to mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars operating in the VHF band. Some basic introduction to Doppler radar measurements and the radar equation is followed by an outline of the characteristics of atmospheric turbulence, viewed from the scattering and reflection processes of radar signals. Radar signal acquisition and preprocessing, namely coherent detection, digital sampling, pre-integration and coding, is briefly discussed. The data analysis is represented in terms of the correlation and spectrum analysis, yielding the essential parameters: power, signal-to-noise ratio, average and fluctuating velocity and persistency. The techniques to measure wind velocities, viz. the different modes of the Doppler method as well as the space antenna method are surveyed and the feasibilities of the MST radar interferometer technique are elucidated. A general view on the criteria to design phased array antennas is given. An outline of the hardware of a typical MST radar system is presented.

  11. Doppler radar results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bracalente, Emedio M.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are covered in viewgraph form and include the following: (1) a summary of radar flight data collected; (2) a video of combined aft cockpit, nose camera, and radar hazard displays; (3) a comparison of airborne radar F-factor measurements with in situ and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) F-factors for some sample events; and (4) a summary of wind shear detection performance.

  12. Lunar radar backscatter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    The lunar surface material in the Plato area is characterized using Earth based visual, infrared, and radar signatures. Radar scattering in the lunar regolith with an existing optical scattering computer program is modeled. Mapping with 1 to 2 km resolution of the Moon using a 70 cm Arecibo radar is presented.

  13. Radar: Human Safety Net

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a technology that can be used to detect distant objects not visible to the human eye. A predecessor of radar, called the telemobiloscope, was first used to detect ships in the fog in 1904 off the German coast. Many scientists have worked on the development and refinement of radar (Hertz with electromagnetic waves; Popov with determining…

  14. SMAP RADAR Processing and Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Kwoun, O.; Chaubell, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission uses L-band radar and radiometer measurements to estimate soil moisture with 4% volumetric accuracy at a resolution of 10 km, and freeze-thaw state at a resolution of 1-3 km. Model sensitivities translate the soil moisture accuracy to a radar backscatter accuracy of 1 dB at 3 km resolution and a brightness temperature accuracy of 1.3 K at 40 km resolution. This presentation will describe the level 1 radar processing and calibration challenges and the choices made so far for the algorithms and software implementation. To obtain the desired high spatial resolution the level 1 radar ground processor employs synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging techniques. Part of the challenge of the SMAP data processing comes from doing SAR imaging on a conically scanned system with rapidly varying squint angles. The radar echo energy will be divided into range/Doppler bins using time domain processing algorithms that can easily follow the varying squint angle. For SMAP, projected range resolution is about 250 meters, while azimuth resolution varies from 400 meters to 1.2 km. Radiometric calibration of the SMAP radar means measuring, characterizing, and where necessary correcting the gain and noise contributions from every part of the system from the antenna radiation pattern all the way to the ground processing algorithms. The SMAP antenna pattern will be computed using an accurate antenna model, and then validated post-launch using homogeneous external targets such as the Amazon rain forest to look for uncorrected gain variation. Noise subtraction is applied after image processing using measurements from a noise only channel. Variations of the internal electronics are tracked by a loopback measurement which will capture most of the time and temperature variations of the transmit power and receiver gain. Long-term variations of system performance due to component aging will be tracked and corrected using stable external reference

  15. Single mode wavelength control of modulated AlGaAs lasers with external and internal etalon feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, William L.

    1989-01-01

    Single mode lasing without mode hops has been obtained for VSIS and CSP laser diodes with an external etalon attached to the laser's front facet for up to an 8 C range CW and a 4 C range pulsed, with .07 nm/C tuning. Tests of thin tapered-thickness (TTT) laser diodes show CW and pulsed single mode lasing over 10 C and 2 C ranges, respectively, with .08 nm/C tuning. An analysis of the TTT structure reveals the equivalent of an internal etalon. The time-resolved pulsed behavior for both types of lasers show single mode lasing within the proper temperature ranges with minor modes present only early in the optical pulse, if at all. The external etalon produces noticeable interference fringes in the farfield pattern, while those of the TTT lasers are smooth. Ongoing CW lifetest results indicate stability to within one longitudinal mode after a few hundred hours of operation, along with at least several thousand hours lifetime.

  16. LPHYS'13: 22nd International Laser Physics Workshop (Prague, 15-19 July 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevseyev, Alexander V.

    2013-04-01

    The 22nd annual International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS'13) will be held from 15-19 July 2013 in the city of Prague, Czech Republic, at the Hotel Krystal and Czech Technical University hosted this year by the Institute of Physics ASCR and Czech Technical University in Prague. LPHYS'13 continues a series of workshops that took place in Dubna, 1992; Dubna/Volga river tour, 1993; New York, 1994; Moscow/Volga river tour (jointly with NATO SILAP Workshop), 1995; Moscow, 1996; Prague, 1997; Berlin, 1998; Budapest, 1999; Bordeaux, 2000; Moscow, 2001; Bratislava, 2002; Hamburg, 2003; Trieste, 2004; Kyoto, 2005; Lausanne, 2006; León, 2007; Trondheim, 2008; Barcelona, 2009; Foz do Iguaçu, 2010; Sarajevo, 2011; and Calgary, 2012. The total number of participants this year is expected to be about 400. In the past, annual participation was typically from over 30 countries. 2013 Chairmen: Miroslav Jelinek (Czech Republic) and Pavel P Pashinin (Russia) LPHYS'13 will offer eight scientific section seminars and one general symposium: Seminar 1 Modern Trends in Laser Physics Seminar 2 Strong Field & Attosecond Physics Seminar 3 Biophotonics Seminar 4 Physics of Lasers Seminar 5 Nonlinear Optics & Spectroscopy Seminar 6 Physics of Cold Trapped Atoms Seminar 7 Quantum Information Science Seminar 8 Fiber Optics Symposium Extreme Light Technologies, Science and Applications Abstract of your presentation A one-page abstract should contain: title; list of all co-authors (the name of the speaker underlined); affiliations; correspondence addresses including phone numbers, fax numbers, e-mail addresses; and the text of the abstract. Abstracts should be sent to the following co-chairs of the scientific seminars and the symposium: Kirill A Prokhorov (Seminar 1) E-mail: cyrpro@gpi.ru Mikhail V Fedorov (Seminar 2) E-mail: fedorov@ran.gpi.ru Sergey A Gonchukov (Seminar 3) E-mail: gonchukov@mephi.ru Ivan A Shcherbakov (Seminar 4) E-mail: gbufetova@lsk.gpi.ru Vladimir A Makarov (Seminar 5) E

  17. LPHYS'14: 23rd International Laser Physics Workshop (Sofia, Bulgaria, 14-18 July 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevseyev, Alexander V.

    2014-04-01

    The 23rd annual International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS14) will be held from 14 July to 18 July 2014 in the city of Sofia, Bulgaria, at the Ramada Sofia Hotel hosted this year by the Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. LPHYS14 continues a series of workshops that took place in Dubna,1992; Dubna/Volga river tour, 1993; New York, 1994; Moscow/Volga river tour (jointly with NATO SILAP Workshop), 1995; Moscow, 1996; Prague, 1997; Berlin, 1998; Budapest, 1999; Bordeaux, 2000; Moscow, 2001; Bratislava, 2002; Hamburg, 2003; Trieste, 2004; Kyoto, 2005; Lausanne, 2006; Len, 2007; Trondheim, 2008; Barcelona, 2009; Foz do Iguau, 2010; Sarajevo, 2011; Calgary, 2012 and Prague, 2013. The total number of participants this year is expected to be about 400. In the past, annual participation was typically from over 30 countries. 2014 Chairpersons Sanka Gateva (Bulgaria), Pavel Pashinin (Russia) LPHYS14 will offer eight scientific section seminars and one general symposium: Seminar 1 Modern Trends in Laser Physics Seminar 2 Strong Field and Attosecond Physics Seminar 3 Biophotonics Seminar 4 Physics of Lasers Seminar 5 Nonlinear Optics and Spectroscopy Seminar 6 Physics of Cold Trapped Atoms Seminar 7 Quantum Information Science Seminar 8 Fiber Optics Symposium Extreme Light Technologies, Science and Applications Abstract of your presentation A one-page abstract should contain: title; list of all co-authors (the name of the speaker underlined); affiliations; correspondence addresses including phone numbers, fax numbers, e-mail addresses; and the text of the abstract. Abstracts should be sent to the following co-chairs of the scientific seminars and the symposium: Kirill A Prokhorov (Seminar 1) E-mail: cyrpro@gpi.ru Mikhail V Fedorov (Seminar 2) E-mail: fedorov@ran.gpi.ru Sergey A Gonchukov (Seminar 3) E-mail: gonchukov@mephi.ru Ivan A Shcherbakov (Seminar 4) E-mail: gbufetova@lsk.gpi.ru Vladimir A Makarov (Seminar 5) E-mail: makarov@msu.ilc.edu.ru Vyacheslav

  18. Application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) instrumentation for international safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Barefield Ii, James E; Clegg, Samuel M; Lopez, Leon N; Le, Loan A; Veirs, D Kirk; Browne, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Advanced methodologies and improvements to current measurements techniques are needed to strengthen the effectiveness and efficiency of international safeguards. This need was recognized and discussed at a Technical Meeting on 'The Application of Laser Spectrometry Techniques in IAEA Safeguards' held at IAEA headquarters (September 2006). One of the principal recommendations from that meeting was the need to pursue the development of novel complementary access instrumentation based on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (UBS) for the detection of gaseous and solid signatures and indicators of nuclear fuel cycle processes and associated materials'. Pursuant to this recommendation the Department of Safeguards (SG) under the Division of Technical Support (SGTS) convened the 'Experts and Users Advisory Meeting on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for Safeguards Applications' also held at IAEA headquarters (July 2008). This meeting was attended by 12 LlBS experts from the Czech Republic, the European Commission, France, the Republic of South Korea, the United States of America, Germany, the United Kingdom of Great Britain, Canada, and Northern Ireland. Following a presentation of the needs of the IAEA inspectors, the LIBS experts agreed that needs as presented could be partially or fully fulfilled using LIBS instrumentation. Inspectors needs were grouped into the following broad categories: (1) Improvements to in-field measurements/environmental sampling; (2) Monitoring status of activities in Hot Cells; (3) Verify status of activity at a declared facility via process monitoring; and (4) Need for pre-screening of environmental samples before analysis. The primary tool employed by the IAEA to detect undeclared processes and activities at special nuclear material facilities and sites is environmental sampling. One of the objectives of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) Program Plan calls for the development of advanced tools and methodologies to

  19. CloudSat as a Global Radar Calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Protat, Alain; Bouniol, Dominique; O'Connor, E. J.; Baltink, Henk K.; Verlinde, J.; Widener, Kevin B.

    2011-03-01

    The calibration of the CloudSat spaceborne cloud radar has been thoroughly assessed using very accurate internal link budgets before launch, comparisons with predicted ocean surface backscatter at 94 GHz, direct comparisons with airborne cloud radars, and statistical comparisons with ground-based cloud radars at different locations of the world. It is believed that the calibration of CloudSat is accurate to within 0.5 to 1 dB. In the present paper it is shown that an approach similar to that used for the statistical comparisons with ground-based radars can now be adopted the other way around to calibrate other ground-based or airborne radars against CloudSat and / or detect anomalies in long time series of ground-based radar measurements, provided that the calibration of CloudSat is followed up closely (which is the case). The power of using CloudSat as a Global Radar Calibrator is demonstrated using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement cloud radar data taken at Barrow, Alaska, the cloud radar data from the Cabauw site, The Netherlands, and airborne Doppler cloud radar measurements taken along the CloudSat track in the Arctic by the RASTA (Radar SysTem Airborne) cloud radar installed in the French ATR-42 aircraft for the first time. It is found that the Barrow radar data in 2008 are calibrated too high by 9.8 dB, while the Cabauw radar data in 2008 are calibrated too low by 8.0 dB. The calibration of the RASTA airborne cloud radar using direct comparisons with CloudSat agrees well with the expected gains and losses due to the change in configuration which required verification of the RASTA calibration.

  20. Cloud and Precipitation Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Martin; Höller, Hartmut; Schmidt, Kersten

    Precipitation or weather radar is an essential tool for research, diagnosis, and nowcasting of precipitation events like fronts or thunderstorms. Only with weather radar is it possible to gain insights into the three-dimensional structure of thunderstorms and to investigate processes like hail formation or tornado genesis. A number of different radar products are available to analyze the structure, dynamics and microphysics of precipitation systems. Cloud radars use short wavelengths to enable detection of small ice particles or cloud droplets. Their applications differ from weather radar as they are mostly orientated vertically, where different retrieval techniques can be applied.

  1. Velocity measurement inside a motored internal combustion engine using three-component laser Doppler anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, V. S. S.; Turner, J. T.

    2000-10-01

    A three-component laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) system has been employed to investigate the structure of the flow inside the cylinder of a motored internal combustion engine. This model engine was reasonably representative of a typical, single cylinder, spark ignition engine although it did not permit firing. It was equipped with overhead valve gear and optical access was provided in the top and side walls of the cylinder. A principal objective was to study the influence of the inlet port design on the flow within the cylinder during the induction and compression strokes of the engine. Here, it can be noted that results obtained in an unfired engine are believed to be representative of the flow behaviour before combustion occurs in a fired engine (see P.O. Witze, Measurements of the spatial distribution and engine speed dependence of turbulent air motion in an i.c. engine, SAE Paper No. 770220, 1977; Witze, Sandia Laboratory Energy Report, SAND 79-8685, Sandia Laboratories, USA, 1979). Experimental data presented for an inclined inlet port configuration reveal the complex three-dimensional nature of the flow inside the model engine cylinder. Not surprisingly, the results also show that the inclined inlet port created flow conditions more favourable to mixing in the cylinder. Specifically, the inclined inlet flow was found to generate a region with a relatively high shear and strong recirculation zones in the cylinder. Inclining the inlet port also produced a more nearly homogeneous flow structure at top dead centre during the compression stroke. The paper identifies the special difficulties encountered in making the LDA measurements. The experimental findings are examined and the problems that arise in presenting time-varying three-dimensional data of this type are discussed. Finally, the future potential of this experimental approach is explored.

  2. Evaluation of the Diode laser (810nm,980nm) on dentin tubule diameter following internal bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Salim, Soheil; Sarraf, Pegah; Javad-Kharazifard, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of diode laser irradiation and bleaching materials on the dentinal tubule diameter after laser bleaching. Material and Methods The dentin discs of 40 extracted third molar were used in this experiment. Each disc surface was divided into two halves by grooving. Half of samples were laser bleached at different wavelengths with two different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Other half of each disc with no laser bleaching remained as a negative control. Dentin discs were assigned randomly into four groups (n=10) with following hydrogen peroxide and diode laser wavelength specifications; Group 1 (30% - 810 nm), group 2 (30% - 980 nm), group 3 (46% - 810 nm) and group 4 (46% - 980 nm). All specimens were sent for scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis in order to measure tubular diameter in laser treated and control halves. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05). Results A significant reduction in dentin tubule diameter was observed in groups 1, 2 and 4. There was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2 and between groups 3 and 4 after bleaching. Conclusions The SEM results showed that diode laser was able to reduce dentin tubule diameter and its effect on dentin was dependent on chemical action of bleaching material. Key words:Laser, diode, dentin, tubule, diameter. PMID:27398172

  3. Radar imaging of ocean surface patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. E., Jr.; Elachi, C.; Thompson, T. W.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents some examples of imaging radar oceanographic observations and discusses physical phenomena on the surface that may cause the radar image. The different ocean scattering theories are briefly discussed, including the tangent plane model, the Bragg-Rice model, and the Rayleigh scattering model. All but one of the images presented were obtained with an L-band HH-polarized radar; they include deep-ocean swells, coastal swells, wave refractions, internal waves, ship wakes, abrupt transitions in open-ocean surface roughness, surface slicks, island wind shadowing, and currents. Analyses are shown to suggest that the primary source of the L-band imagery of ocean surface patterns is the variation of small-scale surface roughness and local tilt angle. It is also noted that surface irregularities behave as isotropic scatterers for a radar wavelength of 25 cm.

  4. Physical working principles of medical radar.

    PubMed

    Aardal, Øyvind; Paichard, Yoann; Brovoll, Sverre; Berger, Tor; Lande, Tor Sverre; Hamran, Svein-Erik

    2013-04-01

    There has been research interest in using radar for contactless measurements of the human heartbeat for several years. While many systems have been demonstrated, not much attention have been given to the actual physical causes of why this work. The consensus seems to be that the radar senses small body movements correlated with heartbeats, but whether only the movements of the body surface or reflections from internal organs are also monitored have not been answered definitely. There has recently been proposed another theory that blood perfusion in the skin could be the main reason radars are able to detect heartbeats. In this paper, an experimental approach is given to determine the physical causes. The measurement results show that it is the body surface reflections that dominate radar measurements of human heartbeats. PMID:23192469

  5. A radar tour of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beatty, J. K.

    1985-06-01

    The surface of Venus is briefly characterized in a summary of results obtained by the Soviet Venera 15 and 16 8-cm synthetic-aperture radars, IR radiometers, and radar altimeters. A series of radar images, mainly from Kotelnikov et al. (1984), are presented and discussed, and the descent vehicles to be released by the two Vega spacecraft as they pass Venus in June 1985 on their way to an encounter with Halley's comet are described. Plans for the missions Phobos (two spacecraft to orbit Mars, rendezvous with Phobos and Deimos, release small instrumented landers, and perform mass spectrometry of vapors released by laser pulses directed at the satellite surfaces, beginning in 1988), a lunar-orbiter mission for 1989-1990, and Vesta (a not-yet-approved 1991 mission comprising a French probe to the asteroid 4 Vesta and perhaps 53 Kalypso and 453 Tea and a Soviet spacecraft to release a kite-supported Venus-atmosphere probe before flying on to an unknown destination) are considered.

  6. 2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, prime search radar tower, height finder radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, prime search radar tower, height finder radar towards, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  7. Monitoring by holographic radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catapano, Ilaria; Crocco, Lorenzo; Affinito, Antonio; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays, radar technology represents a significant opportunity to collect useful information for the monitoring and conservation of critical infrastructures. Radar systems exploit the non-invasive interaction between the matter and the electromagnetic waves at microwave frequencies. Such an interaction allows obtaining images of the region under test from which one can infer the presence of potential anomalies such as deformations, cracks, water infiltrations, etc. This information turns out to be of primary importance in practical scenarios where the probed structure is in a poor state of preservation and renovation works must be planned. In this framework, the aim of this contribution is to describe the potentialities of the holographic radar Rascan 4/4000, a holographic radar developed by Remote Sensing Laboratory of Bauman Moscow State Technical University, as a non-destructive diagnostic tool capable to provide, in real-time, high resolution subsurface images of the sounded structure [1]. This radar provides holograms of hidden anomalies from the amplitude of the interference signal arising between the backscattered signal and a reference signal. The performance of the holographic radar is appraised by means of several experiments. Preliminary tests concerning the imaging below the floor and inside wood structures are carried out in controlled conditions at the Electromagnetic Diagnostic Laboratory of IREA-CNR. After, with reference to bridge monitoring for security aim, the results of a measurement campaign performed on the Musmeci bridge are presented [2]. Acknowledgments This research has been performed in the framework of the "Active and Passive Microwaves for Security and Subsurface imaging (AMISS)" EU 7th Framework Marie Curie Actions IRSES project (PIRSES-GA-2010-269157). REFERENCES [1] S. Ivashov, V. Razevig, I. Vasilyev, A. Zhuravlev, T. Bechtel, L. Capineri, The holographic principle in subsurface radar technology, International Symposium to

  8. Radar Image of Galapagos Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image showing part of Isla Isabella in the western Galapagos Islands. It was taken by the L-band radar in HH polarization from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar on the 40th orbit of the space shuttle Endeavour. The image is centered at about 0.5 degree south latitude and 91 degrees west longitude and covers an area of 75 by 60 kilometers (47 by 37 miles). The radar incidence angle at the center of the image is about 20 degrees.

    The western Galapagos Islands, which lie about 1,200 kilometers (750 miles) west of Ecuador in the eastern Pacific, have six active volcanoes similar to the volcanoes found in Hawaii. Since the time of Charles Darwin's visit to the area in 1835, there have been over 60 recorded eruptions of these volcanoes. This SIR-C/X-SAR image of Alcedo and Sierra Negra volcanoes shows the rougher lava flows as bright features, while ash deposits and smooth pahoehoe lava flows appear dark. A small portion of Isla Fernandina is visible in the extreme upper left corner of the image.

    The Galapagos Islands are one of the SIR-C/X-SAR supersites and data of this area will be taken several times during the flight to allow scientists to conduct topographic change studies and to search for different lava flow types, ash deposits and fault lines.

    Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes

  9. Sub-MHz linewidth of 633 nm diode lasers with internal surface DBR gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feise, D.; Blume, G.; Pohl, J.; Sumpf, B.; Thiem, H.; Reggentin, M.; Wiedmann, J.; Paschke, K.

    2013-03-01

    Red-emitting diode lasers having a large coherence length with a tunable wavelength and a narrow spectral linewidth with an emission power in the 10 mW range are sought for a variety of techniques in applications such as spectroscopy, interferometry and holography. Currently, helium-neon lasers or diode lasers with external wavelength stabilization are widely used for these applications. By integrating a wavelength selective element into the ridge waveguide (RW) of the diode laser chip itself a high degree of miniaturization and stability can be reached. To this end, we have developed RW lasers with deeply etched surface distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) gratings in order to achieve a high-yield, singleepitaxy manufacturing process. These DBR lasers consist of a 1.5 mm RW gain section and a 500 μm grating section, which has a reflectivity of about 60%. The facets of the lasers were coated to achieve a reflectivity of 30% at the front and smaller than 0.1% at the rear facet. The diode lasers achieve an optical output power of 20 mW at an injection current of 150 mA and a heat-sink temperature of 15°C at a wavelength of 633 nm. The DBR enables single longitudinal mode operation over a wide range of operation conditions. Self-delayed heterodyne measurements were performed to measure the emission linewidth of these lasers using a 1 km long fiber, which gives a spectral resolution of about 100 kHz. A linewidth of less than 1 MHz was obtained. In reliability tests at 14 mW a lifetime of more than 1,700 h could be demonstrated, dedicating these devices to the above mentioned applications.

  10. Planetary radar studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Cutts, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    A catalog of lunar and radar anomalies was generated to provide a base for comparison with Venusian radar signatures. The relationships between lunar radar anomalies and regolith processes were investigated, and a consortium was formed to compare lunar and Venusian radar images of craters. Time was scheduled at the Arecibo Observatory to use the 430 MHz radar to obtain high resolution radar maps of six areas of the lunar suface. Data from 1978 observations of Mare Serenitas and Plato are being analyzed on a PDP 11/70 computer to construct the computer program library necessary for the eventual reduction of the May 1981 and subsequent data acquisitions. Papers accepted for publication are presented.

  11. Application of a high-repetition-rate laser diagnostic system for single-cycle-resolved imaging in internal combustion engines.

    PubMed

    Hult, Johan; Richter, Mattias; Nygren, Jenny; Aldén, Marcus; Hultqvist, Anders; Christensen, Magnus; Johansson, Bengt

    2002-08-20

    High-repetition-rate laser-induced fluorescence measurements of fuel and OH concentrations in internal combustion engines are demonstrated. Series of as many as eight fluorescence images, with a temporal resolution ranging from 10 micros to 1 ms, are acquired within one engine cycle. A multiple-laser system in combination with a multiple-CCD camera is used for cycle-resolved imaging in spark-ignition, direct-injection stratified-charge, and homogeneous-charge compression-ignition engines. The recorded data reveal unique information on cycle-to-cycle variations in fuel transport and combustion. Moreover, the imaging system in combination with a scanning mirror is used to perform instantaneous three-dimensional fuel-concentration measurements. PMID:12206207

  12. 3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  13. 30. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #318, showing radar control. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #318, showing radar control. Console and line printers - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  14. 1999 IEEE radar conference

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    This conference addresses the stringent radar technology demands facing the next century: target detection, tracking and identification; changing target environment; increased clutter mitigation techniques; air traffic control; transportation; drug smuggling; remote sensing, and other consumer oriented applications. A timely discussion covers how to minimize costs for these emerging areas. Advanced radar technology theory and applications are also presented. Topics covered include: signal processing; space time adaptive processing/antennas; surveillance technology; radar systems; dual use; and phenomenology.

  15. Planetary radar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostro, S. J.

    1983-03-01

    The present investigation is concerned with planetary radar research reported during the time from 1979 to 1982. A brief synopsis of radar definitions and technical terminology is also provided. In connection with the proximity of the moon to earth, lunar radar studies have been performed over a wider range of wavelengths than radar investigations of other planetary targets. The most recent study of lunar quasispecular scattering is due to Simpson and Tyler (1982). The latest efforts to interpret the lunar radar maps focus on maria-highlands regolith differences and models of crater ejecta evolution. The highly successful Pioneer Venus Radar Mapper experiment has provided a first look at Venus' global distributions of topography, lambda 17-cm radar reflectivity, and rms surface slopes. Attention is given to recent comparisons of Viking Orbiter images of Mars to groundbased radar altimetry of the planet, the icy Galilean satellites, radar observations of asteroids and comets, and lambda 4-cm and lambda 13-cm observations of Saturn's rings.

  16. Free Electron Laser for Gamma-Gamma Collider at a Low-Energy Option of International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, Evgeny; Schneidmiller, Evgeny; Yurkov, Mikhail; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    Different scenarios of a start-up with International Linear Collider (ILC) are under discussion at the moment in the framework of the Global Design Effort (GDE). One of them assumes construction of the ILC in stages from some minimum CM energy up to final target of 500 GeV CM energy. Gamma-gamma collider with CM energy of 180GeV is considered as a candidate for the first stage of the facility. In this report we present conceptual design of a free electron laser as a source of primary photons for the first stage of ILC.

  17. International Symposium on Gas Flow and Chemical Lasers, 8th, Madrid, Spain, Sept. 10-14, 1990, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Orza, J.M.; Domingo, C.

    1991-01-01

    Papers are presented on current research developments and applications related to high-powered lasers. Recent advances in excimer laser technology, electron-beam-pumped excimer lasers, discharge technology for excimer lasers, and pulsed XeF lasers are examined. Consideration is given to short-wavelength lasers, chemical oxygen iodine lasers, and vibrational chemical lasers. Papers are presented on CO2, CO, N2O lasers, coupled CO2 lasers, laser induced perturbation in pulsed CO2 lasers, construction of sealed-off CO2 lasers, and computer modeling of discharge-excited CO gas flow. Topics discussed include gas-dynamic lasers, discharge and flow effects, matrix and laser optics and laser beam parameters. Laser-matter interactions, laser-induced surface plasma, plasma motion velocity along laser beams and thermocapillary effects are also discussed. Applications of laser technology are examined and high-speed laser welding, welding results, laser ablation, laser steel processing, and numerical modeling of laser-matter interaction in high-intensity laser applications are considered.

  18. Ice-flow structure and ice dynamic changes in the Weddell Sea sector of West Antarctica from radar-imaged internal layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Robert G.; Rippin, David M.; Karlsson, Nanna B.; Corr, Hugh F. J.; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Jordan, Tom A.; Le Brocq, Anne M.; Rose, Kathryn C.; Ross, Neil; Siegert, Martin J.

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have aroused concerns over the potential for ice draining the Weddell Sea sector of West Antarctica to figure more prominently in sea level contributions should buttressing from the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf diminish. To improve understanding of how ice stream dynamics there evolved through the Holocene, we interrogate radio echo sounding (RES) data from across the catchments of Institute and Möller Ice Streams (IIS and MIS), focusing especially on the use of internal layering to investigate ice-flow change. As an important component of this work, we investigate the influence that the orientation of the RES acquisition track with respect to ice flow exerts on internal layering and find that this influence is minimal unless a RES flight track parallels ice flow. We also investigate potential changes to internal layering characteristics with depth to search for important temporal transitions in ice-flow regime. Our findings suggest that ice in northern IIS, draining the Ellsworth Subglacial Highlands, has retained its present ice-flow configuration throughout the Holocene. This contrasts with less topographically constrained ice in southern IIS and much of MIS, whose internal layering evinces spatial changes to the configuration of ice flow over the past ~10,000 years. Our findings confirm Siegert et al.'s (2013) inference that fast flow was diverted from Bungenstock Ice Rise during the Late Holocene and suggest that this may have represented just one component of wider regional changes to ice flow occurring across the IIS and MIS catchments as the West Antarctic Ice Sheet has thinned since the Last Glacial Maximum.

  19. A Fine-Resolution Radar for Mapping Near-Surface Isochronous Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rink, T. P.; Kanagaratnam, P.; Braaten, D.; Zimmerman, K.; Akins, T.; Gogineni, S.

    2005-12-01

    Information on the spatial and temporal variation of snow accumulation is required for interpreting satellite-based radar and laser surface elevation measurements made by CryoSAT and ICESAT altimeters. Current methods of using ice cores and analyzing snow pit stratigraphy is time consuming and prone to errors in spatial representation due to the sparse sampling. Remote sensing methods that can map near-surface internal layers for estimating spatial and temporal variation are required. To accomplish this, we developed a 12-18 GHz FMCW radar to map near-surface layers with 3 cm vertical resolution to a depth of about 10 m. We developed the system to be mobile and self-contained so that spatial variability of the accumulation over a large area can be characterized. The fine resolution of this radar is achieved by its wide bandwidth and by illuminating the target area with a plane-wave, which is implemented using an offset-fed parabolic reflector. Traditional wide-beamwidth antennas are susceptible to spherical wave scattering from off-vertical targets that can potentially mask weaker reflections from internal layers. The radar features a fast transmit waveform synthesizer implemented using a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) and a phase-locked loop (PLL) using a linear chirp as the reference. The highly linear reference chirp was generated by a direct digital synthesis (DDS) waveform generator and compared against the instantaneous output of the VCO to create a highly linear 12 to 18 GHz transmit chirp. The waveform synthesizer can be swept from 12 to 18 GHz in 500 microseconds. The antenna was mounted on a sled and the radar system was integrated with the antenna feed. We designed and built the sled with a gimbaled antenna mount and sensing control system to ensure that the antenna points at nadir. The radar system was successfully tested at the Summit camp, Greenland, in July 2005. We collected a large amount of data from various locations around Summit camp. The

  20. Wind Shear radar program future plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Roy E.

    1991-01-01

    The status of the Windshear Radar Program at the Collins Air Transport Division of Rockwell International is given in viewgraph form. Topics covered include goals, modifications to the WXR-700 system, flight test plans, technical approaches, design considerations, system considerations, certification, and future plans.

  1. Development of a non-contact screening system for rapid medical inspection at a quarantine depot using a laser Doppler blood-flow meter, microwave radar and infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Suzuki, S; Ujikawa, K; Usui, T; Gotoh, S; Sugamata, M; Badarch, Z; Abe, S

    2009-01-01

    In order to conduct fast screening of passengers with infections such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or pandemic influenza at a quarantine depot, we developed a non-contact screening system with a self-produced program to conduct a human screening within five seconds, via a linear discriminant function from non-contact derived variables, i.e. palmer pulse derived from a laser Doppler blood-flow meter, respiration rate determined by a 10-GHz microwave radar, and facial temperature measured by a thermography. The system evaluation was conducted on seven healthy male subjects (23+1 years). In order to achieve a pseudo-infection condition, the subjects maintained an ergo-meter exercise load (100 W, 10 minutes). Before (normal condition) and after (pseudo-infection condition) exercise, a significant linear discriminant function (p50.001) was determined to distinguish the pseudo-infection condition from the normal condition (Mahalanobis D-square 1/4 20.3, classification error rate55%). The proposed system appears promising for future application in fast screening of infection at a quarantine depot. PMID:19440915

  2. The PROUST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, F.; Glass, M.; Ney, R.; Petitdidier, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST) radar called PROUST works at 935 MHz using the same klystron and antenna as the coherent-scatter radar. The use of this equipment for ST work has required some important modifications of the transmitting system and the development of receiving, data processing and acquisition (1984,1985) equipment. The modifications are discussed.

  3. Java Radar Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaczek, Mariusz P.

    2005-01-01

    Java Radar Analysis Tool (JRAT) is a computer program for analyzing two-dimensional (2D) scatter plots derived from radar returns showing pieces of the disintegrating Space Shuttle Columbia. JRAT can also be applied to similar plots representing radar returns showing aviation accidents, and to scatter plots in general. The 2D scatter plots include overhead map views and side altitude views. The superposition of points in these views makes searching difficult. JRAT enables three-dimensional (3D) viewing: by use of a mouse and keyboard, the user can rotate to any desired viewing angle. The 3D view can include overlaid trajectories and search footprints to enhance situational awareness in searching for pieces. JRAT also enables playback: time-tagged radar-return data can be displayed in time order and an animated 3D model can be moved through the scene to show the locations of the Columbia (or other vehicle) at the times of the corresponding radar events. The combination of overlays and playback enables the user to correlate a radar return with a position of the vehicle to determine whether the return is valid. JRAT can optionally filter single radar returns, enabling the user to selectively hide or highlight a desired radar return.

  4. Decoders for MST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Decoding techniques and equipment used by MST radars are described and some recommendations for new systems are presented. Decoding can be done either by software in special-purpose (array processors, etc.) or general-purpose computers or in specially designed digital decoders. Both software and hardware decoders are discussed and the special case of decoding for bistatic radars is examined.

  5. Radar illusion via metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2011-02-01

    An optical illusion is an image of a real target perceived by the eye that is deceptive or misleading due to a physiological illusion or a specific visual trick. The recently developed metamaterials provide efficient approaches to generate a perfect optical illusion. However, all existing research on metamaterial illusions has been limited to theory and numerical simulations. Here, we propose the concept of a radar illusion, which can make the electromagnetic (EM) image of a target gathered by radar look like a different target, and we realize a radar illusion device experimentally to change the radar image of a metallic target into a dielectric target with predesigned size and material parameters. It is well known that the radar signatures of metallic and dielectric objects are significantly different. However, when a metallic target is enclosed by the proposed illusion device, its EM scattering characteristics will be identical to that of a predesigned dielectric object under the illumination of radar waves. Such an illusion device will confuse the radar, and hence the real EM properties of the metallic target cannot be perceived. We designed and fabricated the radar illusion device using artificial metamaterials in the microwave frequency, and good illusion performances are observed in the experimental results. PMID:21405918

  6. space Radar Image of Long Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    An area near Long Valley, California, was mapped by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavor on April 13, 1994, during the first flight of the radar instrument, and on October 4, 1994, during the second flight of the radar instrument. The orbital configurations of the two data sets were ideal for interferometric combination -- that is overlaying the data from one image onto a second image of the same area to create an elevation map and obtain estimates of topography. Once the topography is known, any radar-induced distortions can be removed and the radar data can be geometrically projected directly onto a standard map grid for use in a geographical information system. The 50 kilometer by 50 kilometer (31 miles by 31 miles) map shown here is entirely derived from SIR-C L-band radar (horizontally transmitted and received) results. The color shown in this image is produced from the interferometrically determined elevations, while the brightness is determined by the radar backscatter. The map is in Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) coordinates. Elevation contour lines are shown every 50 meters (164 feet). Crowley Lake is the dark feature near the south edge of the map. The Adobe Valley in the north and the Long Valley in the south are separated by the Glass Mountain Ridge, which runs through the center of the image. The height accuracy of the interferometrically derived digital elevation model is estimated to be 20 meters (66 feet) in this image. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global

  7. Automation and Control of an Imaging Internal Laser Desorption Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometer (I2LD-FTMS)

    SciTech Connect

    McJunkin, Timothy R; Tranter, Troy Joseph; Scott, Jill Rennee

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes the automation of an imaging internal source laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometer (I2LD-FTMS). The I2LD-FTMS consists of a laser-scanning device [Scott and Tremblay, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 2002, 73, 1108–1116] that has been integrated with a laboratory-built FTMS using a commercial data acquisition system (ThermoFinnigan FT/MS, Bremen, Germany). A new user interface has been developed in National Instrument's (Austin, Texas) graphical programming language LabVIEW to control the motors of the laser positioning system and the commercial FTMS data acquisition system. A feature of the FTMS software that allows the user to write macros in a scripting language is used creatively to our advantage in creating a mechanism to control the FTMS from outside its graphical user interface. The new user interface also allows the user to configure target locations. Automation of the data analysis along with data display using commercial graphing software is also described.

  8. Intelligent radar data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzbaur, Ulrich D.

    The application of artificial intelligence principles to the processing of radar signals is considered theoretically. The main capabilities required are learning and adaptation in a changing environment, processing and modeling information (especially dynamics and uncertainty), and decision-making based on all available information (taking its reliability into account). For the application to combat-aircraft radar systems, the tasks include the combination of data from different types of sensors, reacting to electronic counter-countermeasures, evaluation of how much data should be acquired (energy and radiation management), control of the radar, tracking, and identification. Also discussed are related uses such as monitoring the avionics systems, supporting pilot decisions with respect to the radar system, and general applications in radar-system R&D.

  9. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  10. Spaceborne weather radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, Robert; Kozu, Toshiaki

    1990-01-01

    The present work on the development status of spaceborne weather radar systems and services discusses radar instrument complementarities, the current forms of equations for the characterization of such aspects of weather radar performance as surface and mirror-image returns, polarimetry, and Doppler considerations, and such essential factors in spaceborne weather radar design as frequency selection, scanning modes, and the application of SAR to rain detection. Attention is then given to radar signal absorption by the various atmospheric gases, rain drop size distribution and wind velocity determinations, and the characteristics of clouds, as well as the range of available estimation methods for backscattering, single- and dual-wavelength attenuation, and polarimetric and climatological characteristics.

  11. Radar Sensing for Intelligent Vehicles in Urban Environments

    PubMed Central

    Reina, Giulio; Johnson, David; Underwood, James

    2015-01-01

    Radar overcomes the shortcomings of laser, stereovision, and sonar because it can operate successfully in dusty, foggy, blizzard-blinding, and poorly lit scenarios. This paper presents a novel method for ground and obstacle segmentation based on radar sensing. The algorithm operates directly in the sensor frame, without the need for a separate synchronised navigation source, calibration parameters describing the location of the radar in the vehicle frame, or the geometric restrictions made in the previous main method in the field. Experimental results are presented in various urban scenarios to validate this approach, showing its potential applicability for advanced driving assistance systems and autonomous vehicle operations. PMID:26102493

  12. Radar Sensing for Intelligent Vehicles in Urban Environments.

    PubMed

    Reina, Giulio; Johnson, David; Underwood, James

    2015-01-01

    Radar overcomes the shortcomings of laser, stereovision, and sonar because it can operate successfully in dusty, foggy, blizzard-blinding, and poorly lit scenarios. This paper presents a novel method for ground and obstacle segmentation based on radar sensing. The algorithm operates directly in the sensor frame, without the need for a separate synchronised navigation source, calibration parameters describing the location of the radar in the vehicle frame, or the geometric restrictions made in the previous main method in the field. Experimental results are presented in various urban scenarios to validate this approach, showing its potential applicability for advanced driving assistance systems and autonomous vehicle operations. PMID:26102493

  13. 5. VIEW EAST, height finder radar towers, radar tower (unknown ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW EAST, height finder radar towers, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar tower, operations building, and central heating plant - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  14. 4. VIEW NORTHEAST, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTHEAST, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar tower, emergency power building, and height finder radar tower - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  15. Accuracy analysis of the 2014-2015 Global Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 1 arc-sec C-Band height model using International Global Navigation Satellite System Service (IGS) Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukul, Manas; Srivastava, Vinee; Mukul, Malay

    2016-07-01

    Global Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data products have been widely used in Earth Sciences without an estimation of their accuracy and reliability even though large outliers exist in them. The global 1 arc-sec, 30 m resolution, SRTM C-Band (C-30) data collected in February 2000 has been recently released (2014-2015) outside North America. We present the first global assessment of the vertical accuracy of C-30 data using Ground Control Points (GCPs) from the International GNSS Service (IGS) Network of high-precision static fiducial stations that define the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). Large outliers (height error ranging from -1285 to 2306 m) were present in the C-30 dataset and 14% of the data were removed to reduce the root mean square error (RMSE) of the dataset from ˜187 to 10.3 m which is close to the SRTM goal of an absolute vertical accuracy of RMSE ˜10 m. Globally, for outlier-filtered data from 287 GCPs, the error or difference between IGS and SRTM heights exhibited a non-normal distribution with a mean and standard error of 6.5 ± 0.5 m. Continent-wise, only Australia, North and South America complied with the SRTM goal. At stations where all the X- and C-Band SRTM data were present, the RMSE of the outlier-filtered C-30 data was 11.7 m. However, the RMSE of outlier-included dataset where C- and X-Band data were present was ˜233 m. The results suggest that the SRTM data must only be used after regional accuracy analysis and removal of outliers. If used raw, they may produce results that are statistically insignificant with RMSE in 100s of meters.

  16. Spaceborne imaging radar - Geologic and oceanographic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.

    1980-01-01

    Synoptic, large-area radar images of the earth's land and ocean surface, obtained from the Seasat orbiting spacecraft, show the potential for geologic mapping and for monitoring of ocean surface patterns. Structural and topographic features such as lineaments, anticlines, folds and domes, drainage patterns, stratification, and roughness units can be mapped. Ocean surface waves, internal waves, current boundaries, and large-scale eddies have been observed in numerous images taken by the Seasat imaging radar. This article gives an illustrated overview of these applications.

  17. Educational and retraining programs in the International Laser Center of Moscow State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, V. A.; Shlenov, S. A.

    2005-10-01

    We present educational programs on nonlinear optics and laser physics in the ILC MSU. These programs are aimed on both full-t ime students of physics faculty and students of retraining courses. As a part of life-l ong learning we offer different types of programs ranging from short courses to one-y ear long retraining programs. These programs include lecture courses, practical work in the training laboratories, and graduate research work in the scientific labs under a supervision of an expert. Special attention will be paid to new tendencies in the educational activities at the ILC MSU: developing and using multimedia courses, short-range practical courses in adjacent fields, constantly developing university teaching laboratory on laser physics and optics.

  18. The proceedings of the 1st international workshop on laboratory astrophysics experiments with large lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, B. A.; Goldstein, W. H.

    1996-08-01

    The world has stood witness to the development of a number of highly sophisticated and flexible, high power laser facilities (energies up to 50 kJ and powers up to 50 TW), driven largely by the world-wide effort in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The charter of diagnosing implosions with detailed, quantitative measurements has driven the ICF laser facilities to be exceedingly versatile and well equipped with diagnostics. Interestingly, there is considerable overlap in the physics of ICF and astrophysics. Both typically involve compressible radiative hydrodynamics, radiation transport, complex opacities, and equations of state of dense matter. Surprisingly, however, there has been little communication between these two communities to date. With the recent declassification of ICF in the USA, and the approval to commence with construction of the next generation 'superlasers', the 2 MJ National Ignition Facility in the US, and its equivalent, the LMJ laser in France, the situation is ripe for change. . Given the physics similarities that exist between ICF and astrophysics, one strongly suspects that there should exist regions of overlap where supporting research on the large lasers could be beneficial to the astrophysics community. As a catalyst for discussions to this end, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory sponsored this workshop. Approximately 100 scientists attended from around the world, representing eight countries: the USA, Canada, UK, France, Germany, Russia, Japan, and Israel. A total of 30 technical papers were presented. The two day workshop was divided into four sessions, focusing on nonlinear hydrodynamics, radiative hydrodynamics, radiation transport, and atomic physics-opacities. Copies of the presentations are contained in these proceedings.

  19. The proceedings of the 1st international workshop on laboratory astrophysics experiments with large lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B.A.; Goldstein, W.H.

    1996-08-09

    The world has stood witness to the development of a number of highly sophisticated and flexible, high power laser facilities (energies up to 50 kJ and powers up to 50 TW), driven largely by the world-wide effort in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The charter of diagnosing implosions with detailed, quantitative measurements has driven the ICF laser facilities to be exceedingly versatile and well equipped with diagnostics. Interestingly, there is considerable overlap in the physics of ICF and astrophysics. Both typically involve compressible radiative hydrodynamics, radiation transport, complex opacities, and equations of state of dense matter. Surprisingly, however, there has been little communication between these two communities to date. With the recent declassification of ICF in the USA, and the approval to commence with construction of the next generation ``superlasers``, the 2 MJ National Ignition Facility in the US, and its equivalent, the LMJ laser in France, the situation is ripe for change. . Given the physics similarities that exist between ICF and astrophysics, one strongly suspects that there should exist regions of overlap where supporting research on the large lasers could be beneficial to the astrophysics community. As a catalyst for discussions to this end, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory sponsored this workshop. Approximately 100 scientists attended from around the world, representing eight countries: the USA, Canada, UK, France, Germany, Russia, Japan, and Israel. A total of 30 technical papers were presented. The two day workshop was divided into four sessions, focusing on nonlinear hydrodynamics, radiative hydrodynamics, radiation transport, and atomic physics-opacities. Copies of the presentations are contained in these proceedings.

  20. Planetary Radar Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, Steven J.

    1993-01-01

    Radar is a powerful technique that has furnished otherwise unavailable information about solar system bodies for three decades. The advantages of radar in planetary astronomy result from: (1) the observer's control of all the attributes of the coherent signal used to illuminate the target, especially the wave form's time/frequency modulation and polarization; (2) the ability of radar to resolve objects spatially via measurements of the distribution of echo power in time delay and Doppler frequency; (3) the pronounced degree to which delay-Doppler measurements constrain orbits and spin vectors; and (4) centimeter-to-meter wavelengths, which easily penetrate optically opaque planetary clouds and cometary comae, permit investigation of near-surface macrostructure and bulk density, and are sensitive to high concentrations of metal or, in certain situations, ice. Planetary radar astronomy has primarily involved observations with Earth-based radar telescopes, but also includes some experiments with a spaceborne transmitter or receiver. In addition to providing a wealth of information about the geological and dynamical properties of asteroids, comets, the inner planets, and natural satellites, radar experiments have established the scale of the solar system, have contributed significantly to the accuracy of planetary ephemerides, and have helped to constrain theories of gravitation. This review outlines radar astronomical techniques and describes principal observational results.

  1. Ground-penetrating radar methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ground-penetrating radar geophysical methods are finding greater and greater use in agriculture. With the ground-penetrating radar (GPR) method, an electromagnetic radio energy (radar) pulse is directed into the subsurface, followed by measurement of the elapsed time taken by the radar signal as it ...

  2. Radar remote sensing in biology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Richard K.; Simonett, David S.

    1967-01-01

    The present status of research on discrimination of natural and cultivated vegetation using radar imaging systems is sketched. The value of multiple polarization radar in improved discrimination of vegetation types over monoscopic radars is also documented. Possible future use of multi-frequency, multi-polarization radar systems for all weather agricultural survey is noted.

  3. Radar applications overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenspan, Marshall

    1996-06-01

    During the fifty years since its initial development as a means of providing early warning of airborne attacks against allied countries during World War II, radar systems have developed to the point of being highly mobile and versatile systems capable of supporting a wide variety of remote sensing applications. Instead of being tied to stationary land-based sites, radar systems have found their way into highly mobile land vehicles as well as into aircraft, missiles, and ships of all sizes. Of all these applications, however, the most exciting revolution has occurred in the airborne platform arena where advanced technology radars can be found in all shapes and sizes...ranging from the large AWACS and Joint STARS long range surveillance and targeting systems to small millimeter wave multi-spectral sensors on smart weapons that can detect and identify their targets through the use of highly sophisticated digital signal processing hardware and software. This paper presents an overview of these radar applications with the emphasis on modern airborne sensors that span the RF spectrum. It will identify and describe the factors that influence the parameters of low frequency and ultra wide band radars designed to penetrate ground and dense foliage environments and locate within them buried mines, enemy armor, and other concealed or camouflaged weapons of war. It will similarly examine the factors that lead to the development of airborne radar systems that support long range extended endurance airborne surveillance platforms designed to detect and precision-located both small high speed airborne threats as well as highly mobile time critical moving and stationary surface vehicles. The mission needs and associated radar design impacts will be contrasted with those of radar systems designed for high maneuverability rapid acquisition tactical strike warfare platforms, and shorter range cued air-to-surface weapons with integral smart radar sensors.

  4. Radar frequency radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malowicki, E.

    1981-11-01

    A method is presented for the determination of radar frequency radiation power densities that the PAVE PAWS radar system could produce in its air and ground environment. The effort was prompted by the concern of the people in the vicinity of OTIS AFB MA and BEALE AFB CA about the possible radar frequency radiation hazard of the PAVE PAWS radar. The method is based on the following main assumptions that: (a) the total field can be computed as the vector summation of the individual fields due to each antenna element; (b) the individual field can be calculated using distances for which the field point is in the far field of the antenna element. An RFR computer program was coded for the RADC HE 6180 digital computer and exercised to calculate the radiation levels in the air and ground space for the present baseline and the possible Six DB and 10 DB growth systems of the PAVE PAWS radar system at OTIS AFB MA. The average radiation levels due to the surveillance fence were computed for three regions: in the air space in front of the radar, at the radar hazard fence at OTIS AFB MA and at representative ground points in the OTIS AFB vicinity. It was concluded that the radar frequency radiation of PAVE PAWS does not present a hazard to personnel provided there is no entry to the air hazard zone or to the area within the hazard fence. The method developed offers a cost effective way to determine radiation levels from a phased array radar especially in the near field and transition regions.

  5. Asteroid radar astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, S. J.; Jurgens, R. F.; Rosema, K. D.; Winkler, R.; Yeomans, D. K.; Campbell, D. B.; Chandler, J. F.; Shapiro, I. I.; Hine, A. A.; Velez, R.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of time delay and Doppler frequency are reported for asteroid-radar echoes obtained at Arecibo and Goldstone during 1980-1990. Radar astrometry is presented for 23 near-earth asteroids and three mainbelt asteroids. These measurements, which are orthogonal to optical, angular-position measurements, and typically have a fractional precision between 10 to the -5th and 10 to the -8th, permit significant improvement in estimates of orbits and hence in the accuracy of prediction ephemerides. Estimates are also reported of radar cross-section and circular polarization ratio for all asteroids observed astrometrically during 1980-1990.

  6. EISCAT Svalbard radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, Markku; Kangas, Jorma

    1992-02-01

    The main fields of interest of the Finnish scientists in EISCAT research are listed. Finnish interests in the Polar Cap Radar (PMR) and areas where the Finnish contribution could be important are addressed: radar techniques; sporadic E layers in the polar cap; atmospheric models; auroral studies in the polar cap; nonthermal plasmas in the F region; coordinated measurements with the Cluster satellites; studies of the ionospheric traveling; convection vortices; polar cap absorption; studies of lower atmosphere; educational program. A report on the design specification of an ionospheric and atmospheric radar facility based on the archipelago of Svalbard (Norway) is summarized.

  7. A microprogrammable radar controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    The Wave Propagation Lab. has completed the design and construction of a microprogrammable radar controller for atmospheric wind profiling. Unlike some radar controllers using state machines or hardwired logic for radar timing, this design is a high speed programmable sequencer with signal processing resources. A block diagram of the device is shown. The device is a single 8 1/2 inch by 10 1/2 inch printed circuit board and consists of three main subsections: (1) the host computer interface; (2) the microprogram sequencer; and (3) the signal processing circuitry. Each of these subsections are described in detail.

  8. Polarimetric Doppler Weather Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringi, V. N.; Chandrasekar, V.

    2001-10-01

    This work provides a detailed introduction to the principles of Doppler and polarimetric radar, focusing in particular on their use in the analysis of weather systems. The authors first discuss underlying topics such as electromagnetic scattering, polarization, and wave propagation. They then detail the engineering aspects of pulsed Doppler polarimetric radar, before examining key applications in meteorology and remote sensing. The book is aimed at graduate students of electrical engineering and atmospheric science as well as practitioners involved in the applications of polarimetric radar.

  9. Cassini radar : system concept and simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melacci, P. T.; Orosei, R.; Picardi, G.; Seu, R.

    1998-10-01

    The Cassini mission is an international venture, involving NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Italian Space Agency (ASI), for the investigation of the Saturn system and, in particular, Titan. The Cassini radar will be able to see through Titan's thick, optically opaque atmosphere, allowing us to better understand the composition and the morphology of its surface, but the interpretation of the results, due to the complex interplay of many different factors determining the radar echo, will not be possible without an extensive modellization of the radar system functioning and of the surface reflectivity. In this paper, a simulator of the multimode Cassini radar will be described, after a brief review of our current knowledge of Titan and a discussion of the contribution of the Cassini radar in answering to currently open questions. Finally, the results of the simulator will be discussed. The simulator has been implemented on a RISC 6000 computer by considering only the active modes of operation, that is altimeter and synthetic aperture radar. In the instrument simulation, strict reference has been made to the present planned sequence of observations and to the radar settings, including burst and single pulse duration, pulse bandwidth, pulse repetition frequency and all other parameters which may be changed, and possibly optimized, according to the operative mode. The observed surfaces are simulated by a facet model, allowing the generation of surfaces with Gaussian or non-Gaussian roughness statistic, together with the possibility of assigning to the surface an average behaviour which can represent, for instance, a flat surface or a crater. The results of the simulation will be discussed, in order to check the analytical evaluations of the models of the average received echoes and of the attainable performances. In conclusion, the simulation results should allow the validation of the theoretical evaluations of the capabilities of microwave instruments, when

  10. The radar cross section of dielectric disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    A solution is presented for the backscatter (nonstatic) radar cross section of dielectric disks of arbitrary shape, thickness and dielectric constant. The result is obtained by employing a Kirchhoff type approximation to obtain the fields inside the disk. The internal fields induce polarization and conduction currents from which the scattered fields and the radar cross section can be computed. The solution for the radar cross section obtained in this manner is shown to agree with known results in the special cases of normal incidence, thin disks and perfect conductivity. The solution can also be written as a product of the reflection coefficient of an identically oriented slab times the physical optics solution for the backscatter cross section of a perfectly conducting disk of the same shape. This result follows directly from the Kirchhoff type approximation without additional assumptions.

  11. Radar Thickness Measurements over the Southern Part of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuah, Teong Sek; Gogineni, Siva Prasad; Allen, Christopher; Wohletz, Brad; Wong, Y. C.; Ng, P. Y.; Ajayi, E.

    1996-01-01

    We performed ice thickness measurements over the southern part of the Greenland ice sheet during June and July 1993. We used an airborne coherent radar depth sounder for these measurements. The radar was operated from a NASA P-3 aircraft equipped with GPS receivers. Radar data were collected in conjunction with laser altimeter and microwave altimeter measurements of ice surface elevation. This report provides radio echograms and thickness profiles from data collected during 1993.

  12. RADAR performance experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leroux, C.; Bertin, F.; Mounir, H.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical studies and experimental results obtained at Coulommiers airport showed the capability of Proust radar to detect wind shears, in clear air condition as well as in presence of clouds or rain. Several examples are presented: in a blocking highs situation an atmospheric wave system at the Brunt-Vaisala frequency can be clearly distinguished; in a situation of clouds without rain the limit between clear air and clouds can be easily seen; and a windshear associated with a gust front in rainy conditions is shown. A comparison of 30 cm clear air radar Proust and 5 cm weather Doppler radar Ronsard will allow to select the best candidate for wind shear detection, taking into account the low sensibility to ground clutter of Ronsard radar.

  13. Editorial Introduction to the Proceedings of the International Conference on Laser Applications at Accelerators, LA3NET 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, Carsten P.

    These proceedings present selected contributed talks from the International Conference on Laser Applications at Accelerators, LA3NET 2015 held in Mallorca, Spain from 25th to 27th March 2015 with around 70 participants. The Conference was the culmination of a series of technical schools and topical workshops delivered by the LA3NET project, an FP7 Marie Curie Initial Training Network funded by the European Commission. This report focuses on the results of the LA3NET project in addition to the invited talks and other contributions to the Conference. I would like to thank everyone who has been involved in the LA3NET network, as well as all the invited speakers, for their contribution to the Conference.

  14. Distributed array radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimiller, R. C.; Belyea, J. E.; Tomlinson, P. G.

    1983-11-01

    Distributed array radar (DAR) is a concept for efficiently accomplishing surveillance and tracking using coherently internetted mini-radars. They form a long baseline, very thinned array and are capable of very accurate location of targets. This paper describes the DAR concept. Factors involving two-way effective gain patterns for deterministic and random DAR arrays are analyzed and discussed. An analysis of factors affecting signal-to-noise ratio is presented and key technical and performance issues are briefly summarized.

  15. Downhole pulse radar

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Hsi-Tien

    1989-01-01

    A borehole logging tool generates a fast rise-time, short duration, high peak-power radar pulse having broad energy distribution between 30 MHz and 300 MHz through a directional transmitting and receiving antennas having barium titanate in the electromagnetically active region to reduce the wavelength to within an order of magnitude of the diameter of the antenna. Radar returns from geological discontinuities are sampled for transmission uphole.

  16. Downhole pulse radar

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Hsi-Tien

    1987-09-28

    A borehole logging tool generates a fast rise-time, short duration, high peak-power radar pulse having broad energy distribution between 30 MHz and 300 MHz through a directional transmitting and receiving antennas having barium titanate in the electromagnetically active region to reduce the wavelength to within an order of magnitude of the diameter of the antenna. Radar returns from geological discontinuities are sampled for transmission uphole. 7 figs.

  17. Internal structure and expansion dynamics of laser ablation plumes into ambient gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harilal, S. S.; Bindhu, C. V.; Tillack, M. S.; Najmabadi, F.; Gaeris, A. C.

    2003-03-01

    The effect of ambient gas on the expansion dynamics of the plasma generated by laser ablation of an aluminum target has been investigated using frequency doubled radiation from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The diagnostic tools include fast photography of overall visible plume emission using a 2 ns gated intensified charged coupled device and space and time resolved emission spectroscopy using a 50 cm monochromator/spectrograph and photomultiplier tube. The expansion behavior of the plasma was studied with ambient air pressure ranging from 10-6 to 100 Torr. Free expansion, plume splitting and sharpening, hydrodynamic instability, and stagnation of the plume were observed at different pressure levels. Space and time resolved emission spectroscopic studies showed a twin peak distribution for Al and Al+ species at farther distances illustrating plume splitting at pressures higher than 100 mTorr. Combining imaging together with time resolved emission diagnostics, a triple structure of the plume was observed. The expansion of the plume front was compared with various expansion models and found to be generally in good agreement.

  18. Similarity solution for laser-driven shock waves in a dust-laden gas with internal heat transfer effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gretler, W.; Regenfelder, R.

    2002-05-01

    The non-adiabatic flow behind a laser-driven strong shock wave propagating in a mixture of gas and small solid particles is the subject of this paper. A similarity solution which accounts for the influence of internal heat fluxes due to high temperatures achieved at the centre has been obtained. The heat fluxes in the blast-wave equations are considered in terms of Fourier's law for conduction and by an expression for thermal radiation of the diffusion type. As for adiabatic flow, it is assumed that the equilibrium-flow condition is maintained and that the variable laser energy is completely absorbed at the shock front according to a time-dependent power law. The formulation results in a two-point boundary-value problem. The effects of a parameter characterising the various energy input of the blast wave on the similarity solution as well as on its limits have been examined. The computations have been performed for various values of mass concentration of the solid particles and for the ratio of density of solid particles to the constant initial density of gas.

  19. Radar Mosaic of Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is an image of equatorial Africa, centered on the equator at longitude 15degrees east. This image is a mosaic of almost 4,000 separate images obtained in 1996 by the L-band imaging radar onboard the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite. Using radar to penetrate the persistent clouds prevalent in tropical forests, the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite was able for the first time to image at high resolution this continental scale region during single flooding seasons. The area shown covers about 7.4 million square kilometers (2.8 million square miles) of land surface, spans more than 5,000 kilometers(3,100 miles) east and west and some 2,000 kilometers (1,240 miles) north and south. North is up in this image. At the full resolution of the mosaic (100 meters or 330 feet), this image is more than 500 megabytes in size, and was processed from imagery totaling more than 60 gigabytes.

    Central Africa was imaged twice in 1996, once between January and March, which is the major low-flood season in the Congo Basin, and once between October and November, which is the major high-flood season in the Congo Basin. The red color corresponds to the data from the low-flood season, the green to the high-flood season, and the blue to the 'texture' of the low-flood data. The forests appear green as a result, the flooded and palm forests, as well as urban areas, appear yellow, the ocean and lakes appear black, and savanna areas appear blue, black or green, depending on the savanna type, surface topography and other factors. The areas of the image that are black and white were mapped only between January and March 1996. In these areas, the black areas are savanna or open water, the gray are forests, and the white areas are flooded forests or urban areas. The Congo River dominates the middle of the image, where the nearby forests that are periodically flooded by the Congo and its tributaries stand out as yellow. The Nile River flows north from Lake Victoria in the middle right of

  20. Laser Disks at the Library Door: The Microsoft First International Conference on CD-ROM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Description of First International CD-ROM Conference held by Microsoft, Inc., in March, 1986, covers types of participants, hardware and support services, and technical standards and intellectual property rights as market barriers. The importance of librarians planning for CD-ROM is stressed, and a detailed directory of references and contacts is…

  1. On wave radar measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewans, Kevin; Feld, Graham; Jonathan, Philip

    2014-09-01

    The SAAB REX WaveRadar sensor is widely used for platform-based wave measurement systems by the offshore oil and gas industry. It offers in situ surface elevation wave measurements at relatively low operational costs. Furthermore, there is adequate flexibility in sampling rates, allowing in principle sampling frequencies from 1 to 10 Hz, but with an angular microwave beam width of 10° and an implied ocean surface footprint in the order of metres, significant limitations on the spatial and temporal resolution might be expected. Indeed there are reports that the accuracy of the measurements from wave radars may not be as good as expected. We review the functionality of a WaveRadar using numerical simulations to better understand how WaveRadar estimates compare with known surface elevations. In addition, we review recent field measurements made with a WaveRadar set at the maximum sampling frequency, in the light of the expected functionality and the numerical simulations, and we include inter-comparisons between SAAB radars and buoy measurements for locations in the North Sea.

  2. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture-Electrospray Ionization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-27

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed non-contact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect 355 nm UV laser ablated material in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appear to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the softness of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. A series of benzlypyridinium salts, known as thermometer ions, were used to comparemore » internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. This data indicates ions formed directly by UV laser ablation, if any, are likely an extremely small constituent of the total ion signal observed. Instead, neutral molecules, clusters or particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream then electrosprayed are the predominant source of ion signal observed. The electrospray ionization process used controls the softness of the technique.« less

  3. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture-Electrospray Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-27

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed non-contact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect 355 nm UV laser ablated material in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appear to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the softness of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. A series of benzlypyridinium salts, known as thermometer ions, were used to compare internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. This data indicates ions formed directly by UV laser ablation, if any, are likely an extremely small constituent of the total ion signal observed. Instead, neutral molecules, clusters or particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream then electrosprayed are the predominant source of ion signal observed. The electrospray ionization process used controls the softness of the technique.

  4. Radar Ionospheric Impact Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, G.; Decker, D.; Baker, C.

    2006-12-01

    New ionospheric modeling technology is being developed to improve correction of ionospheric impacts on the performance of ground-based space-surveillance radars (SSRs) in near-real-time. These radars, which detect and track space objects, can experience significant target location errors due to ionospheric delay and refraction of the radar signals. Since these radars must detect and track targets essentially to the radar horizon, it is necessary to accurately model the ionosphere as the radar would observe it, down to the local horizon. To correct for spatial and temporal changes in the ionosphere the model must be able to update in near-real-time using ionospheric sensor data. Since many radars are in isolated locations, or may have requirements to operate autonomously, an additional required capability is to provide accurate ionospheric mitigation by exploiting only sensor data from the radar site. However, the model must also be able to update using additional data from other types of sensors that may be available. The original radar ionospheric mitigation approach employed the Bent climatological model. This 35-year-old technology is still the means employed in the many DoD SSRs today. One more recent approach used capabilities from the PRISM model. PRISM technology has today been surpassed by `assimilative models' which employ better physics and Kalman filtering techniques. These models are not necessarily tailored for SSR application which needs to optimize modeling of very small regions using only data from a single sensor, or very few. The goal is to develop and validate the performance of innovative and efficient ionospheric modeling approaches that are optimized for the small regions applicable to ground-based radar coverage (radius of ~2000 km at ionospheric altitudes) and somewhat beyond. These approaches must adapt a continuous modeling scheme in near-real-time to be consistent with all observational data that may become available, and degrade

  5. Internal photomechanical fracture of spatially limited absorbers irradiated by short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paltauf, Guenther; Schmidt-Kloiber, Heinz

    1998-05-01

    A photomechanical damage mechanism in abosrbing regions or particles surrounded by a non-abosrbing medium after irradiation with a short laser pulse is investigated experimentally and theoretically. In tissue, such absorbers are for example melanosomes, blood vessels or tatoo pigments. It follows from theoretical considerations that the photoacoustic wave caused by irradiation of a spatially limited volume contains both compressive and tensile stress. Experiments were performed to test whether these tensile stresses cause cavitation in absorbers of spherical or cylindrical shape. High-speed video images of liquid spheres or gelatin cylinders (diameters 200 to 300 micrometer) suspended in oil showed that cavitation occurs at the center of the spheres or on the cylinder axis, respectively, shortly after irradiation with a light pulse (6 ns duration) from an optical parametric oscillator. The cavitation effect was observed at maximum temperatures below and above the boiling point and at ratios of the absorber size on the absorption length larger and smaller than one. The experimental findings are supported by theoretical calculations, from which strong tensile stresses are predicted in the interior of the absorbers, even if the values of acoustic impedance inside and outside the absorbing volume are equal. The reported effect is believed to cause damage to absorbers if the pulse duration is short enough to provide stress confinement, that is if the time an acoustic wave needs to cross the abosrbing region is longer than the pulse duration. For small absorbers such as melanosomes with a size of about 1 micrometer this requires a laser pulse duration in the picosecond regime.

  6. Proceedings of the Third Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This publication contains summaries of the papers presented at the Third Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium held at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, in Pasadena, California, on 18-21 Jan. 1993. The purpose of the symposium was to present an overview of recent developments in the different scientific and technological fields related to spaceborne imaging radars and to present future international plans. This symposium is the third in a series of 'Spaceborne Imaging Radar' symposia held at JPL. The first symposium was held in Jan. 1983 and the second in 1986.

  7. Advances in laser science - III; Proceedings of the Third International Laser Science Conference, Atlantic City, NJ, Nov. 1-4, 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Andrew C.; Gole, James L.; Stwalley, William C.

    Laser devices and their applications are discussed in reviews and reports of recent theoretical and experimental investigations. Topics addressed include solid-state lasers, semiconductor diode lasers, new short-wavelength sources, nonlinear optics in atomic and molecular gases and in semiconductors, nonlinear phenomena in thin films and solids, phase conjugation, and dephasing-induced processes in nonlinear optics. Consideration is given to laser cooling and trapping of particles; multiple excitation or ionization of atoms and molecules; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; condensed-matter and surface spectroscopy; solitons, laser propagation, and particulate interactions; photochemistry, photofragmentation, and photophysics; energy transfer and state-resolved processes; laser photobiology; ultrafast laser spectroscopy and dynamics; photothermal spectroscopy; and high-temperature diagnostics.

  8. Program Analyzes Radar Altimeter Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandemark, Doug; Hancock, David; Tran, Ngan

    2004-01-01

    A computer program has been written to perform several analyses of radar altimeter data. The program was designed to improve on previous methods of analysis of altimeter engineering data by (1) facilitating and accelerating the analysis of large amounts of data in a more direct manner and (2) improving the ability to estimate performance of radar-altimeter instrumentation and provide data corrections. The data in question are openly available to the international scientific community and can be downloaded from anonymous file-transfer- protocol (FTP) locations that are accessible via links from altimetry Web sites. The software estimates noise in range measurements, estimates corrections for electromagnetic bias, and performs statistical analyses on various parameters for comparison of different altimeters. Whereas prior techniques used to perform similar analyses of altimeter range noise require comparison of data from repetitions of satellite ground tracks, the present software uses a high-pass filtering technique to obtain similar results from single satellite passes. Elimination of the requirement for repeat-track analysis facilitates the analysis of large amounts of satellite data to assess subtle variations in range noise.

  9. Ultrasound visualization of internal crystalline lens deformation using laser-induced microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpiouk, Andrei B.; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Glasser, Adrian; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2014-02-01

    The progressive loss of accommodation of the eye, called presbyopia, affects people with age and can result in a complete loss of accommodation by about age 55 years. It is generally accepted that presbyopia is due to an increase in stiffness of the lens. With increasing age, the stiffness of the crystalline lens nucleus increases faster than that of the cortex. During accommodation, the deformation of different parts of the crystalline lens is different and likely changes with age. However, a direct observation of crystalline lens deformation and strain distribution is difficult because although imaging methods such as OCT or Scheimpflug imaging can distinguish cortex and nucleus, they cannot determine their regional deformation. Here, patterns of laser-induced microbubbles were created in gelatin phantoms and different parts of excised animal crystalline lenses and their displacements in response to external deformation were tracked by ultrasound imaging. In the animal lenses, the deformation of the lens cortex was greater than that of nucleus and this regional difference is greater for a 27-month-old bovine lens than for a 6-month-old porcine lens. This approach enables visualization of localized, regional deformation of crystalline lenses and, if applied to lenses from animal species that undergo accommodation, may help to understand the mechanisms of accommodation and presbyopia, improve diagnostics, and, potentially, aid in the development of new methods of lens modifying presbyopia treatments.

  10. A barrier radar concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Ball, C.; Weissman, I.

    A description is given of a low power, light-weight radar that can be quickly set up and operated on batteries for extended periods of time to detect airborne intruders. With low equipment and operating costs, it becomes practical to employ a multiplicity of such radars to provide an unbroken intrusion fence over the desired perimeter. Each radar establishes a single transmitted fan beam extending vertically from horizon to horizon. The beam is generated by a two-face array antenna built in an A-frame configuration and is shaped, through phasing of the array elements, to concentrate the transmitter power in a manner consistent with the expected operating altitude ceiling of the targets of interest. The angular width of this beam in the dimension transverse to the fan depends on the radar transmission frequency and the antenna aperture dimension, but is typically wide enough so that a target at the maximum altitude or range will require tens of seconds to pass through the beam. A large number of independent samples of radar data will thus be available to provide many opportunities for target detection.

  11. ISLPI'92 - International Symposium on Laser-Plasma Interactions, Shanghai, China, Nov. 9-12, 1992, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhijiang; Xu, Zhizhan

    Laser-plasma interactions and target physics, X-ray lasers, radiation and particle emission from laser-produced plasmas, and advances in related fields are the broad topics addressed. Particular papers are presented on high-intensity ultrashort pulse laser interaction with dense plasmas, second harmonic generation by lightwave-plasma interaction in an oscillating magnetic field, the effect of illumination nonuniformity on the compression of high-aspect ratio laser-fusion targets, and ablation parameters from ion emission in laser-target interaction. Consideration is also given to photopumped Balmer beta X-ray lasers, the spatial characteristics of recombination X-ray lasers, ion cyclotron maser instability, a new type of cavity for a Raman free-electron laser, and the reflection of soft X-rays from quasi-periodic multilayer films.

  12. 33. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #320, perimeter acquisition radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #320, perimeter acquisition radar operations center (PAROC), contains the tactical command and control group equipment required to control the par site. Showing spacetrack monitor console - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  13. Step-taper active-region quantum cascade lasers for carrier-leakage suppression and high internal differential efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirch, J. D.; Chang, C.-C.; Boyle, C.; Mawst, L. J.; Lindberg, D.; Earles, T.; Botez, D.

    2016-03-01

    By stepwise tapering both the barrier heights and quantum-well depths in the active regions of 8.7 μm- and 8.4 μm-emitting quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) virtually complete carrier-leakage suppression is achieved, as evidenced by high values for both the threshold-current characteristic temperature coefficient T0 (283 K and 242 K) and the slope-efficiency characteristic temperature coefficient T1 (561 K and 279 K), over the 20-60 °C heatsink-temperature range, for low- and high-doped devices, respectively. Such high values are obtained while the threshold-current density is kept relatively low for 35-period, low- and high-doped devices: 1.58 kA/cm2 and 1.88 kA/cm2, respectively. In addition, due to resonant extraction from the lower laser level, high differential-transition-efficiency values (89-90%) are obtained. In turn, the slope-efficiency for 3 mm-long, 35-period high-reflectivity (HR)-coated devices are: 1.15-1.23 W/A; that is, 30- 40 % higher than for same-geometry and similar-doping conventional 8-9 μm-emitting QCLs. As a result of both efficient carrier-leakage suppression as well as fast and efficient carrier extraction, the values for the internal differential efficiency are found to be ≍ 86%, by comparison to typical values in the 58-67 % range for conventional QCLs emitting in the 7-11 μm wavelength range.

  14. Phase modulating the Urbana radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrington, L. J., Jr.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    The design and operation of a switched phase modulation system for the Urbana Radar System are discussed. The system is implemented and demonstrated using a simple procedure. The radar system and circuits are described and analyzed.

  15. Flux correction for closed-path laser spectrometers without internal water vapor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, R. V.; Zellweger, C.; Knohl, A.; Eugster, W.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, instruments became available on the market that provide the possibility to perform eddy covariance flux measurements of CH4 and many other trace gases, including the traditional CO2 and H2O. Most of these instruments employ laser spectroscopy, where a cross-sensitivity to H2O is frequently observed leading to an increased dilution effect. Additionally, sorption processes at the intake tube walls modify and delay the observed H2O signal in closed-path systems more strongly than the signal of the sampled trace gas. Thereby, a phase shift between the trace gas and H2O fluctuations is introduced that dampens the H2O flux observed in the sampling cell. For instruments that do not provide direct H2O measurement in the sampling cell, transfer functions from externally measured H2O fluxes are needed to estimate the effect of H2O on trace gas flux measurements. The effects of cross-sensitivity and the damping are shown for an eddy covariance setup with the Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (FGGA, Los Gatos Research Inc.) that measures CO2, CH4, and H2O fluxes. This instrument is technically identical with the Fast Methane Analyzer (FMA, Los Gatos Research Inc.) that does not measure H2O concentrations. Hence, we used measurements from a FGGA to derive a modified correction for the FMA accounting for dilution as well as phase shift effects in our instrumental setup. With our specific setup for eddy covariance flux measurements, the cross-sensitivity counteracts the damping effects, which compensate each other. Hence, the new correction only deviates very slightly from the traditional Webb, Pearman, and Leuning density correction, which is calculated from separate measurements of the atmospheric water vapor flux.

  16. Mercury radar speckle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holin, Igor V.

    2010-06-01

    Current data reveal that Mercury is a dynamic system with a core which has not yet solidified completely and is at least partially decoupled from the mantle. Radar speckle displacement experiments have demonstrated that the accuracy in spin-dynamics determination for Earth-like planets can approach 10 -5. The extended analysis of space-time correlation properties of radar echoes shows that the behavior of speckles does not prevent estimation of Mercury's instantaneous spin-vector components to accuracy of a few parts in 10 7. This limit can be reached with more powerful radar facilities and leads to constraining the interior in more detail from effects of spin dynamics, e.g., from observation of the core-mantle interplay through high precision monitoring of the 88-day spin-variation of Mercury's crust.

  17. The MST Radar Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsley, B. B.

    1985-01-01

    The past ten year have witnessed the development of a new radar technique to examine the structure and dynamics of the atmosphere between roughly 1 to 100 km on a continuous basis. The technique is known as the MST (for Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere) technique and is usable in all weather conditions, being unaffected by precipitation or cloud cover. MST radars make use of scattering from small scale structure in the atmospheric refractive index, with scales of the order of one-half the radar wavelength. Pertinent scale sizes for middle atmospheric studies typically range between a fraction of a meter and a few meters. The structure itself arises primarily from atmospheric turbulence. The technique is briefly described along with the meteorological parameters it measures.

  18. Characteristics of Sunset radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Located in a narrow canyon 15 km west of Boulder, Colorado, the Sunset pulsed Doppler radar was the first radar designed and constructed specifically as a VHF ST radar. The antenna system is a phased array of coaxial-colinear dopoles with computer-controlled phase shifters for each line of dipoles. It operates at a frequency of 40.475 MHz and a wavelength of 7.41M. Peak transmitter power is 100 kW. Aperture efficiency is 0.58 and resistive loss is 0.30 for its 3600 sq m area. The practical steering rate is 1 record/minute/position to any arbitrary antenna beam position. The first clear-air turbulence echoes and wind velocity measurements were obtained in 1974. Significant accomplishments are listed.

  19. Micropower impulse radar technology and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, J., LLNL

    1998-04-15

    The LLNL-developed Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR) technology has quickly gone from laboratory concept to embedded circuitry in numerous government and commercial systems in the last few years[l]. The main ideas behind MIR, invented by T. McEwan in the Laser Program, are the generation and detection systems for extremely low- power ultra-wideband pulses in the gigaHertz regime using low-cost components. These ideas, coupled with new antenna systems, timing and radio-frequency (RF) circuitry, computer interfaces, and signal processing, have provided the catalyst for a new generation of compact radar systems. Over the past several years we have concentrated on a number of applications of MIR which address a number of remote-sensing applications relevant to emerging programs in defense, transportation, medical, and environmental research. Some of the past commercial successes have been widely publicized [2] and are only now starting to become available for market. Over 30 patents have been filed and over 15 licenses have been signed on various aspects of the MIR technology. In addition, higher performance systems are under development for specific laboratory programs and government reimbursables. The MIR is an ultra- wideband, range-gated radar system that provides the enabling hardware technology used in the research areas mentioned above. It has numerous performance parameters that can be Selected by careful design to fit the requirements. We have improved the baseline, short- range, MIR system to demonstrate its effectiveness. The radar operates over the hand from approximately I to 4 GHz with pulse repetition frequencies up to 10 MHz. It provides a potential range resolution of I cm at ranges of greater than 20 m. We have developed a suite of algorithms for using MIR for image formation. These algorithms currently support Synthetic aperture and multistate array geometries. This baseline MIR radar imaging system has been used for several programmatic applications.

  20. Radar data smoothing filter study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. V.

    1984-01-01

    The accuracy of the current Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) data smoothing techniques for a variety of radars and payloads is examined. Alternative data reduction techniques are given and recommendations are made for improving radar data processing at WFF. A data adaptive algorithm, based on Kalman filtering and smoothing techniques, is also developed for estimating payload trajectories above the atmosphere from noisy time varying radar data. This algorithm is tested and verified using radar tracking data from WFF.

  1. Radar Investigations of Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    Radar investigations of asteroids, including observations during 1984 to 1985 of at least 8 potential targets and continued analyses of radar data obtained during 1980 to 1984 for 30 other asteroids is proposed. The primary scientific objectives include estimation of echo strength, polarization, spectral shape, spectral bandwidth, and Doppler shift. These measurements yield estimates of target size, shape, and spin vector; place constraints on topography, morphology, density, and composition of the planetary surface; yield refined estimates of target orbital parameters; and reveals the presence of asteroidal satellites.

  2. Threat radar system simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L.

    The capabilities, requirements, and goals of radar emitter simulators are discussed. Simulators are used to evaluate competing receiver designs, to quantify the performance envelope of a radar system, and to model the characteristics of a transmitted signal waveform. A database of candidate threat systems is developed and, in concert with intelligence data on a given weapons system, permits upgrading simulators to new projected threat capabilities. Four currently available simulation techniques are summarized, noting the usefulness of developing modular software for fast controlled-cost upgrades of simulation capabilities.

  3. Terminal Doppler weather radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, M.; Shrader, W. W.; Wieler, J. G.

    1990-02-01

    The terminal Doppler weather radar (TDWR) system, now under development, will provide automatic detection of microbursts and low-level wind shear. This paper discusses the TDWR performance parameters and describes its structural elements, including the antenna subsystem, the transmitter, the receiver/exciter, the digital signal processor, and the radar product generator/remote monitoring subsystem. Attention is also given to the processes of the base data formation, point target removal, signal-to-noise thresholding, and velocity de-aliasing and to the TDWR algorithms and displays. A schematic diagram of the TDWR system is presented.

  4. Microwave radar oceanographic investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1988-01-01

    The Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer (ROWS) technique was developed and demonstrated for measuring ocean wave directional spectra from air and space platforms. The measurement technique was well demonstrated with data collected in a number of flight experiments involving wave spectral comparisons with wave buoys and the Surface Contour Radar (SCR). Recent missions include the SIR-B underflight experiment (1984), FASINEX (1986), and LEWEX (1987). ROWS related activity is presently concentrating on using the aircraft instrument for wave-processes investigations and obtaining the necessary support (consensus) for a satellite instrument development program. Prospective platforms include EOS and the Canadian RADARSAT.

  5. Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.

    1983-01-01

    An overview of the present state of the art in the different scientific and technological fields related to spaceborne imaging radars was presented. The data acquired with the SEASAT SAR (1978) and Shuttle Imaging Radar, SIR-A (1981) clearly demonstrated the important emphasis in the 80's is going to be on in-depth research investigations conducted with the more flexible and sophisticated SIR series instruments and on long term monitoring of geophysical phenomena conducted from free-flying platforms such as ERS-1 and RADARSAT.

  6. Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communications Program (AVLOC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The design, development, and operation of airborne and ground-based laser communications and laser radar hardware is described in support of the Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communication program. The major emphasis is placed on the development of a highly flexible test bed for the evaluation of laser communications systems techniques and components in an operational environment.

  7. Systems and Methods for Radar Data Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, Brian (Inventor); Szeto, Roland (Inventor); Miller, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A radar information processing system is operable to process high bandwidth radar information received from a radar system into low bandwidth radar information that may be communicated to a low bandwidth connection coupled to an electronic flight bag (EFB). An exemplary embodiment receives radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth; processes the received radar information into processed radar information, the processed radar information configured for communication over a connection operable at a second bandwidth, the second bandwidth lower than the first bandwidth; and communicates the radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth.

  8. Space Radar Image of Los Angeles, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a radar image of Los Angeles, California, taken on October 2, 1994. Visible in the image are Long Beach Harbor at the bottom right (south corner of the image), Los Angeles International Airport at the bottom center, with Santa Monica just to the left of it and the Hollywood Hills to the left of Santa Monica. Also visible in the image are the freeway systems of Los Angeles, which appear as dark lines. The San Gabriel Mountains (center top) and the communities of San Fernando Valley, Simi Valley and Palmdale can be seen on the left-hand side. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 24th orbit. The image is centered at 34 degrees north latitude, 118 degrees west longitude. The area shown is approximately 100 kilometers by 52 kilometers (62 miles by 32 miles). This single-frequency SIR-C image was obtained by the L-band (24 cm) radar channel, horizontally transmitted and received. Portions of the Pacific Ocean visible in this image appear very dark as do freeways and other flat surfaces such as the airport runways. Mountains in the image are dark grey, with brighter patches on the mountain slopes, which face in the direction of the radar illumination (from the top of the image). Suburban areas, with the low-density housing and tree-lined streets that are typical of Los Angeles, appear as lighter grey. Areas with high-rise buildings, such as downtown Los Angeles, appear in very bright white, showing a higher density of housing and streets which run parallel to the radar flight track. Scientists hope to use radar image data from SIR-C/X-SAR to map fire scars in areas prone to brush fires, such as Los Angeles. In this image, the Altadena fire area is visible in the top center of the image as a patch of mountainous terrain which is slightly darker than the nearby mountains. Using all the radar frequency and polarization images provided by SIR

  9. Radar Studies on Kamb Ice Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersson, R.; Osterhouse, D. J.; Mulhausen, A.; Welch, B. C.; Strandli, C. W.; Jacobel, R. W.

    2006-12-01

    During the past two Antarctic field seasons we acquired approximately 1600 km of ground-based ice- penetrating radar data on the lower trunk of Kamb Ice Stream (KIS) as part of radar, GPS and modeling study with scientists at the University of California Santa Cruz examining the possibility of ice stream reactivation. We present here a summary of radar results from this work and preliminary interpretations. Our working hypothesis is that the reactivation of the stagnant KIS may be triggered by excess influx of basal water produced by increased basal strain heating when mass builds up in the upper reaches of the locked ice stream. Using radar data, we have quantified variations in the amplitude of radar reflections from the ice-bed interface to estimate different provenances of occurrence of basal water. The weakest-reflecting ice-bed interface is found at a "sticky spot" in the middle of the ice stream trunk where ice appears to have become grounded over a large bedrock bump. At the sticky spot, bore holes drilled by California Technical Institute in 2000 showed a dry bed. A more highly reflective bed is located to either side of the sticky spot in regions of faster flow of KIS including one location where bore holes showed water at the ice-bed interface. However, the brightest bed is located approximately 80~km upstream of the sticky spot, where ice velocities are still on the order of 120~m a-1. Here radar reflected power is up to 1.5 times higher than elsewhere in the trunk despite the ice being 40% deeper. From this pattern of bed reflectivity we hypothesize that conditions allowing for rapid flow still exist under most areas of KIS and that sticky spots, like the one studied here, have played a key role in the ice stream shut down. We have also produced a map of detailed bed topography and tracked internal reflection layers over the sticky spot. We are able to trace the evolution of folds in the radar internal stratigraphy in this region in both time and space

  10. SEASAT Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of radar imagery from space altitudes is discussed and the advantages of radar over passive sensor systems are outlined. Specific reference is made to the SEASAT synthetic aperture radar. Possible applications include oil spill monitoring, snow and ice reconnaissance, mineral exploration, and monitoring phenomena in the urban environment.

  11. Space Radar Image of Raco Biomass Map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This biomass map of the Raco, Michigan, area was produced from data acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard space shuttle Endeavour. Biomass is the amount of plant material on an area of Earth's surface. Radar can directly sense the quantity and organizational structure of the woody biomass in the forest. Science team members at the University of Michigan used the radar data to estimate the standing biomass for this Raco site in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Detailed surveys of 70 forest stands will be used to assess the accuracy of these techniques. The seasonal growth of terrestrial plants, and forests in particular, leads to the temporary storage of large amounts of carbon, which could directly affect changes in global climate. In order to accurately predict future global change, scientists need detailed information about current distribution of vegetation types and the amount of biomass present around the globe. Optical techniques to determine net biomass are frustrated by chronic cloud-cover. Imaging radar can penetrate through cloud-cover with negligible signal losses. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German

  12. Space Radar Image of San Francisco, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a radar image of San Francisco, California, taken on October 3,1994. The image is about 40 kilometers by 55 kilometers (25 miles by 34 miles) with north toward the upper right. Downtown San Francisco is visible in the center of the image with the city of Oakland east (to the right) across San Francisco Bay. Also visible in the image is the Golden Gate Bridge (left center) and the Bay Bridge connecting San Francisco and Oakland. North of the Bay Bridge is Treasure Island. Alcatraz Island appears as a small dot northwest of Treasure Island. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on orbit 56. The image is centered at 37 degrees north latitude, 122degrees west longitude. This single-frequency SIR-C image was obtained by the L-band (24 cm) radar channel, horizontally transmitted and received. Portions of the Pacific Ocean visible in this image appear very dark as do other smooth surfaces such as airport runways. Suburban areas, with the low-density housing and tree-lined streets that are typical of San Francisco, appear as lighter gray. Areas with high-rise buildings, such as those seen in the downtown areas, appear in very bright white, showing a higher density of housing and streets which run parallel to the radar flight track. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: the L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes

  13. Space Radar Image of Star City, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image shows the Star City cosmonaut training center, east of Moscow, Russia. Four American astronauts are training here for future long-duration flights aboard the Russian Mir space station. These joint flights are giving NASA and the Russian Space Agency experience necessary for the construction of the international Alpha space station, beginning in late 1997. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR), on its 62nd orbit on October 3, 1994. This Star City image is centered at 55.55 degrees north latitude and 38.0 degrees east longitude. The area shown is approximately 32 kilometers by 49 kilometers (20 miles by 30 miles). North is to the top in this image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The image was produced using three channels of SIR-C radar data: red indicates L-band (23 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and received); green indicates L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue indicates C-band (6 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and vertically received). In general, dark pink areas are agricultural; pink and light blue areas are urban communities; black areas represent lakes and rivers; dark blue areas are cleared forest; and light green areas are forested. The prominent black runways just right of center are Shchelkovo Airfield, about 4 km long. The textured pale blue-green area east and southeast of Shchelkovo Airfield is forest. Just east of the runways is a thin railroad line running southeast; the Star City compound lies just east of the small bend in the rail line. Star City contains the living quarters and training facilities for Russian cosmonauts and their families. Moscow's inner loop road is visible at the lower left edge of the image. The Kremlin is just off the left edge, on the banks of the meandering Moskva River. The Klyazma River snakes to the southeast from the reservoir in the upper left (shown in bright red

  14. Space radar image of New York City

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This radar image of the New York city metropolitan area. The island of Manhattan appears in the center of the image. The green-colored rectangle on Manhattan is Central Park. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/ X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 10, 1994. North is toward the upper right. The area shown is 75.0 kilometers by 48.8 kilometers (46.5 miles by 30.2 miles). The image is centered at 40.7 degrees north latitude and 73.8 degrees west longitude. In general, light blue areas correspond to dense urban development, green areas to moderately vegetated zones and black areas to bodies of water. The Hudson River is the black strip that runs from the left edge to the upper right corner of the image. It separates New Jersey, in the upper left of the image, from New York. The Atlantic Ocean is at the bottom of the image where two barrier islands along the southern shore of Long Island are also visible. John F. Kennedy International Airport is visible above these islands. Long Island Sound, separating Long Island from Connecticut, is the dark area right of the center of the image. Many bridges are visible in the image, including the Verrazano Narrows, George Washington and Brooklyn bridges. The radar illumination is from the left of the image; this causes some urban zones to appear red because the streets are at a perpendicular angle to the radar pulse. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received). Radar images like this one could be used as a tool for city planners and resource managers to map and monitor land use patterns. The radar imaging systems can clearly detect the variety of landscapes in the area, as well as the density of urban

  15. Nonlinear synthetic aperture radar imaging using a harmonic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Kyle A.; Mazzaro, Gregory J.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Nguyen, Lam H.; Martone, Anthony F.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of linear and nonlinear targets. Data are collected using a linear/nonlinear step frequency radar. We show that it is indeed possible to produce SAR images using a nonlinear radar. Furthermore, it is shown that the nonlinear radar is able to reduce linear clutter by at least 80 dB compared to a linear radar. The nonlinear SAR images also show the system's ability to detect small electronic devices in the presence of large linear clutter. The system presented here has the ability to completely ignore a 20-inch trihedral corner reflector while detecting a RF mixer with a dipole antenna attached.

  16. Space Radar Image of Oil Slicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a radar image of an offshore drilling field about 150 km (93 miles) west of Bombay, India, in the Arabian Sea. The dark streaks are extensive oil slicks surrounding many of the drilling platforms, which appear as bright white spots. Radar images are useful for detecting and measuring the extent of oil seepages on the ocean surface, from both natural and industrial sources. The long, thin streaks extending from many of the platforms are spreading across the sea surface, pushed by local winds. The larger dark patches are dispersed slicks that were likely discharged earlier than the longer streaks, when the winds were probably from a different direction. The dispersed oil will eventually spread out over the more dense water and become a layer which is a single molecule thick. Many forms of oil, both from biological and from petroleum sources, smooth out the ocean surface, causing the area to appear dark in radar images. There are also two forms of ocean waves shown in this image. The dominant group of large waves (upper center) are called internal waves. These waves are formed below the ocean surface at the boundary between layers of warm and cold water and they appear in the radar image because of the way they change the ocean surface. Ocean swells, which are waves generated by winds, are shown throughout the image but are most distinct in the blue area adjacent to the internal waves. Identification of waves provide oceanographers with information about the smaller scale dynamic processes of the ocean. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 9, 1994. The colors are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: Red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is the average of L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received and C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; blue is C

  17. Shuttle imaging radar-C science plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Shuttle Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) mission will yield new and advanced scientific studies of the Earth. SIR-C will be the first instrument to simultaneously acquire images at L-band and C-band with HH, VV, HV, or VH polarizations, as well as images of the phase difference between HH and VV polarizations. These data will be digitally encoded and recorded using onboard high-density digital tape recorders and will later be digitally processed into images using the JPL Advanced Digital SAR Processor. SIR-C geologic studies include cold-region geomorphology, fluvial geomorphology, rock weathering and erosional processes, tectonics and geologic boundaries, geobotany, and radar stereogrammetry. Hydrology investigations cover arid, humid, wetland, snow-covered, and high-latitude regions. Additionally, SIR-C will provide the data to identify and map vegetation types, interpret landscape patterns and processes, assess the biophysical properties of plant canopies, and determine the degree of radar penetration of plant canopies. In oceanography, SIR-C will provide the information necessary to: forecast ocean directional wave spectra; better understand internal wave-current interactions; study the relationship of ocean-bottom features to surface expressions and the correlation of wind signatures to radar backscatter; and detect current-system boundaries, oceanic fronts, and mesoscale eddies. And, as the first spaceborne SAR with multi-frequency, multipolarization imaging capabilities, whole new areas of glaciology will be opened for study when SIR-C is flown in a polar orbit.

  18. Venus Radar Mapper (VRM): Multimode radar system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, William T. K.; Edgerton, Alvin T.

    1986-01-01

    The surface of Venus has remained a relative mystery because of the very dense atmosphere that is opaque to visible radiation and, thus, normal photographic techniques used to explore the other terrestrial objects in the solar system are useless. The atmosphere is, however, almost transparent to radar waves and images of the surface have been produced via Earth-based and orbital radars. The technique of obtaining radar images of a surface is variously called side looking radar, imaging radar, or synthetic aperture radar (SAR). The radar requires a moving platform in which the antenna is side looking. High resolution is obtained in the cross-track or range direction by conventional radar pulse encoding. In the along-track or azimuth direction, the resolution would normally be the antenna beam width, but for the SAR case, a much longer antenna (or much sharper beam) is obtained by moving past a surface target as shown, and then combining the echoes from many pulses, by using the Doppler data, to obtain the images. The radar design of the Venus Radar Mapper (VRM) is discussed. It will acquire global radar imagery and altimetry data of the surface of Venus.

  19. Airborne radar surveys of snow depth over Antarctic sea ice during Operation IceBridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzer, B.; Gomez-Garcia, D.; Leuschen, C.; Paden, J. D.; Gogineni, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    comparison of snow depths with two weeks elapsed between passes. [1] Farrell, S.L., et al., "A First Assessment of IceBridge Snow and Ice Thickness Data Over Arctic Sea Ice," IEEE Tran. Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Vol. 50, No. 6, pp. 2098-2111, June 2012. [2] Kwok, R., and G. F. Cunningham, "ICESat over Arctic sea ice: Estimation of snow depth and ice thickness," J. Geophys. Res., 113, C08010, 2008. [3] Kwok, R., et al., "Airborne surveys of snow depth over Arctic sea ice," J. Geophys. Res., 116, C11018, 2011. [4] Panzer, B., et al., "An ultra-wideband, microwave radar for measuring snow thickness on sea ice and mapping near-surface internal layers in polar firn," Submitted to J. Glaciology, July 23, 2012. [5] Wingham, D.J., et al., "CryoSat: A Mission to Determine the Fluctuations in Earth's Land and Marine Ice Fields," Advances in Space Research, Vol. 37, No. 4, pp. 841-871, 2006. [6] Zwally, H. J., et al., "ICESat's laser measurements of polar ice, atmosphere, ocean, and land," J. Geodynamics, Vol. 34, No. 3-4, pp. 405-445, Oct-Nov 2002. [7] Zwally, H. J., et al., "ICESat measurements of sea ice freeboard and estimates of sea ice thickness in the Weddell Sea," J. Geophys. Res., 113, C02S15, 2008.

  20. Space Radar Image of Bahia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a color composite image of southern Bahia, Brazil, centered at 15.22 degree south latitude and 39.07 degrees west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 38th orbit of Earth on October 2, 1994. The image covers an area centered over the Una Biological Reserve, one the largest protected areas in northeastern Brazil. The 7,000-hectare reserve is administered by the Brazilian Institute for the Environment and is part of the larger Atlantic coastal forest, a narrow band of rain forest extending along the eastern coast of Brazil. The Atlantic coastal forest of southern Bahia is one of the world's most threatened and diverse ecosystems. Due to widespread settlement, only 2 to 5 percent of the original forest cover remains. Yet the region still contains an astounding variety of plants and animals, including a large number of endemic species. More than half of the region's tree species and 80 percent of its animal species are indigenous and found nowhere else on Earth. The Una Reserve is also the only federally protected habitat for the golden-headed lion tamarin, the yellow-breasted capuchin monkey and many other endangered species. In the past few years, scientists from Brazilian and international conservation organizations have coordinated efforts to study the biological diversity of this region and to develop practical and economically viable options for preserving the remaining primary forests in southern Bahia. The shuttle imaging radar is used in this study to identify various land uses and vegetation types, including remaining patches of primary forest, cabruca forest (cacao planted in the understory of the native forest), secondary forest, pasture and coastal mangrove. Standard remote-sensing technology that relies on light reflected from the forest canopy cannot accurately distinguish between cabruca and undisturbed forest. Optical remote sensing is also

  1. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-10-10

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes. 9 figs.

  2. The Newcastle meteor radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keay, Colin

    1987-01-01

    A brief history and development of the Newcastle Meteor Radar system is given. Also described are its geographical coordinates and its method of operation. The initial objective when the project was commenced was to develop an entirely digital analyzer capable of recognizing meteor echo signals and recording as many of their parameters as possible. This objective was achieved.

  3. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Joughin, I. R.; Li, F.; Madsen, S. N.; Rodriguez, E.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry is an imaging technique for measuring the topography of a surface, its changes over time, and other changes in the detailed characteristics of the surface. This paper reviews the techniques of interferometry, systems and limitations, and applications in a rapidly growing area of science and engineering.

  4. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes.

  5. Rain radar instrument definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Nicolas; Chenebault, J.; Suinot, Noel; Mancini, Paolo L.

    1996-12-01

    As a result of a pre-phase a study, founded by ESA, this paper presents the definition of a spaceborne Rain Radar, candidate instrument for earth explorer precipitation mission. Based upon the description of user requirements for such a dedicated mission, a mission analysis defines the most suitable space segment. At system level, a parametric analysis compares pros and cons of instrument concepts associated with rain rate retrieval algorithms in order to select the most performing one. Several trade-off analysis at subsystem level leads then to the definition of the proposed design. In particular, as pulse compression is implemented in order to increase the radar sensitivity, the selected method to achieve a pulse response with a side-lobe level below--60 dB is presented. Antenna is another critical rain radar subsystem and several designs are com pared: direct radiating array, single or dual reflector illuminated by single or dual feed arrays. At least, feasibility of centralized amplification using TWTA is compared with criticality of Tx/Rx modules for distributed amplification. Mass and power budgets of the designed instrument are summarized as well as standard deviations and bias of simulated rain rate retrieval profiles. The feasibility of a compliant rain radar instrument is therefore demonstrated.

  6. Passive bistatic radar analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hagan, Daniel W.; Kuschel, H.; Schiller, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    Passive Bistatic Radar (PBR) research is at its zenith with several notable PBR systems currently operational, or available for deployment. Such PBRs include the Manastash Ridge Radar (MRR) developed for and by academia; Silent Sentry developed as a commercial concern by Lockheed Martin; and Homeland Alerter (HA100) also a commercial system developed by Thales. However at present, despite the existence of numerous PBR prototypes, take up of commercial passive radar technology remains slow. This is due in part to technology immaturity, in part to politics, and particularly due to the fact that monostatic radars perform so well. If PBRs are to enjoy longevity as a viable technology then it is imperative that they address certain niche application areas, with the aforementioned MRR being one prime example of this. The focus of this paper will be an analysis of a PBR system that utilised FM radio signals of opportunity to detect aircraft targets with an RCS generally not lower than 20 m2. The paper will demonstrate the theoretical detection coverage of an FM based PBR operating in a severe interference environment.

  7. Demonstration of frequency control and CW diode laser injection control of a titanium-doped sapphire ring laser with no internal optical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, Clayton H.; Brockman, Philip; Hess, Robert V.; Modlin, Edward A.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental frequency narrowing studies of a Ti:sapphire ring laser with no intracavity optical elements are reported. Frequency narrowing has been achieved using a birefringent filter between a partially reflecting reverse wave suppressor mirror and the ring cavity output mirror. Results of CW diode laser injection seeding are reported.

  8. IV INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ATOM AND MOLECULAR PULSED LASERS (AMPL'99): Surface oxide removal by a XeCl laser for decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentis, M. L.; Delaporte, Ph; Marine, W.; Uteza, O.

    2000-06-01

    The laser ablation performed with an automated excimer XeCl laser unit is used for large surface cleaning. The study focuses on metal surfaces that are oxidised and are representative of contaminated surfaces with radionuclides in a context of nuclear power plant maintenance. The unit contains an XeCl laser, the beam delivery system, the particle collection cell, and the system for real-time control of cleaning processes. The interaction of laser radiation with a surface is considered, in particular, the surface damage caused by cleaning radiation. The beam delivery system consists of an optical fibre bundle of 5 m long and allows delivering 150 W at 308 nm for laser surface cleaning. The cleaning process is controlled by analysing in real time the plasma electric field evolution. The system permits the cleaning of 2 to 6 m2 h-1 of oxides with only slight substrate modifications.

  9. GeoSAR: A Radar Terrain Mapping System for the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas; vanZyl, Jakob; Hensley, Scott; Reis, James; Munjy, Riadh; Burton, John; Yoha, Robert

    2000-01-01

    GeoSAR Geographic Synthetic Aperture Radar) is a new 3 year effort to build a unique, dual-frequency, airborne Interferometric SAR for mapping of terrain. This is being pursued via a Consortium of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Calgis, Inc., and the California Department of Conservation. The airborne portion of this system will operate on a Calgis Gulfstream-II aircraft outfitted with P- and X-band Interferometric SARs. The ground portions of this system will be a suite of Flight Planning Software, an IFSAR Processor and a Radar-GIS Workstation. The airborne P-band and X-band radars will be constructed by JPL with the goal of obtaining foliage penetration at the longer P-band wavelengths. The P-band and X-band radar will operate at frequencies of 350 Mhz and 9.71 Ghz with bandwidths of either 80 or 160 Mhz. The airborne radars will be complemented with airborne laser system for measuring antenna positions. Aircraft flight lines and radar operating instructions will be computed with the Flight Planning Software The ground processing will be a two-step step process. First, the raw radar data will be processed into radar images and interferometer derived Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). Second, these radar images and DEMs will be processed with a Radar GIS Workstation which performs processes such as Projection Transformations, Registration, Geometric Adjustment, Mosaicking, Merging and Database Management. JPL will construct the IFSAR Processor and Calgis, Inc. will construct the Radar GIS Workstation. The GeoSAR Project was underway in November 1996 with a goal of having the radars and laser systems fully integrated onto the Calgis Gulfstream-II aircraft in early 1999. Then, Engineering Checkout and Calibration-Characterization Flights will be conducted through November 1999. The system will be completed at the end of 1999 and ready for routine operations in the year 2000.

  10. Servomechanism for Doppler shift compensation in optical correlator for synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constaninides, N. J.; Bicknell, T. J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus for correcting Doppler shifts in synthetic aperture radar data is described. An optical correlator for synthetic aperture radar data has a means for directing a laser beam at a signal film having radar return pulse intensity information recorded on it. A resultant laser beam passes through a range telescope, an azimuth telescope, and a Fourier transform filter located between the range and azimuth telescopes, and forms an image for recording on an image film. A compensation means for Doppler shift in the radar return pulse intensity information includes a beam splitter for reflecting the modulated laser beam, after having passed through the Fourier transform filter, to a detection screen having two photodiodes mounted on it.

  11. Space Radar Image of Chernobyl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and its surroundings, centered at 51.17 north latitude and 30.15 west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 16th orbit on October 1, 1994. The area is located on the northern border of the Ukraine Republic and was produced by using the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) polarization. The differences in the intensity are due to differences in vegetation cover, with brighter areas being indicative of more vegetation. These data were acquired as part of a collaboration between NASA and the National Space Agency of Ukraine in Remote Sensing and Earth Sciences. NASA has included several sites provided by the Ukrainian space agency as targets of opportunity during the second flight of SIR-C/X-SAR. The Ukrainian space agency also plans to conduct airborne surveys of these sites during the mission. The Chernobyl nuclear power plant is located toward the top of the image near the Pripyat River. The 12-kilometer (7.44-mile)-long cooling pond is easily distinguishable as an elongated dark shape in the center near the top of the image. The reactor complex is visible as the bright area to the extreme left of the cooling pond and the city of Chernobyl is the bright area just below the cooling pond next to the Pripyat River. The large dark area in the bottom right of the image is the Kiev Reservoir just north of Kiev. Also visible is the Dnieper River, which feeds into the Kiev Reservoir from the top of the image. The Soviet government evacuated 116,000 people within 30 kilometers (18.6 miles) of the Chernobyl reactor after the explosion and fire on April 26, 1986. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight

  12. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture/Electrospray Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-09-01

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed noncontact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect material ablated by a 355 nm UV laser in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appears to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the `softness' of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. In this work, a series of benzylpyridinium salts were employed as thermometer ions to compare internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation/liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. These data, along with results from the analysis the biological molecules bradykinin and angiotensin III indicated that the ions or their fragments formed directly by UV laser ablation that survive the liquid capture/electrospray ionization process were likely to be an extremely small component of the total ion signal observed. Instead, the preponderate neutral molecules, clusters, and particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream, then electrosprayed, were the principal source of the ion signal observed. Thus, the electrospray ionization process used controls the overall `softness' of this technique.

  13. UAV-based Radar Sounding of Antarctic Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuschen, Carl; Yan, Jie-Bang; Mahmood, Ali; Rodriguez-Morales, Fernando; Hale, Rick; Camps-Raga, Bruno; Metz, Lynsey; Wang, Zongbo; Paden, John; Bowman, Alec; Keshmiri, Shahriar; Gogineni, Sivaprasad

    2014-05-01

    deep temperate glaciers—examples from the Northern Patagonian Icefield, 14th International Conference on Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) June 4-8, 2012, Shanghai, China, ISBN 978-1-4673-2663-6.

  14. VLBI Radar of the 2012 DA14 Asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechaeva, M. B.; Dugin, N. A.; Antipenko, A. A.; Bezrukov, D. A.; Bezrukov, V. V.; Voytyuk, V. V.; Dement'ev, A. F.; Jekabsons, N.; Klapers, M.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Kulishenko, V. F.; Nabatov, A. S.; Nesteruk, V. N.; Putillo, D.; Reznichenko, A. M.; Salerno, E.; Snegirev, S. D.; Tikhomirov, Yu. V.; Khutornoy, R. V.; Skirmante, K.; Shmeld, I.; Chagunin, A. K.

    2015-03-01

    An experiment on VLBI radar of the 2012 DA14 asteroid was carried out on February 15-16, 2011 at the time of its closest approach to the Earth. The research teams of Kharkov (Institute of Radio Astronomy of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine), Evpatoria (National Space Facilities Control and Test Center), Nizhny Novgorod (Radiophysical Research Institute), Bologna (Istituto di Radioastronomia (INAF)), and Ventspils (Ventspils International Radioastronomy Center) took part in the experiment. The asteroid was irradiated by the RT-70 planetary radar (Evpatoria) at a frequency of 5 GHz. The reflected signal was received using two 32-m radio telescopes in Medicina (Italy) and Irbene (Latvia) in radiointerferometric mode. The Doppler frequency shifts in bi-static radar mode and interference frequency in VLBI mode were measured. Accuracy of the VLBI radar method for determining the radial and angular velocities of the asteroid were estimated.

  15. Under the Radar: Trials and Tribulations of Landing on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Erik; Chen, Curtis; Shaffer, Scott; Skulsky, Eli D.

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Mission requires a ground-sensing radar altimeter/ velocimeter to meet touchdown velocity requirements During Phase C/D, the radar underwent a testing triptych: a) Aerial Testing, both captive carry and tethered drop tests (36 sorties, approx. 80 hrs). b) Testing with Electronic Ground Support Equipment (EGSE) on the bench (500+ hrs). c) Detailed Simulation including both RF physics and internal firmware logic (100,000+ simulated landings). All three venues were implemented to provide sufficient uniqueness and overlap to: a) Verify the radar is meeting its requirements. b) Validate radar performance within the flight system and environment. Significant discoveries were attributed to each of the three elements of the testing triptych, leading to greatly improved EDL system robustness. An overview of the testing triptych methodology, discoveries, and responses to them will be subsequently discussed.

  16. Radar characterization of asteroids and comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, E.; Taylor, P.; Nolan, M.; Springmann, A.; Benner, L.; Brozovic, M.; Giorgini, J.; Busch, M.; Margot, J.; Naidu, S.; Magri, C.; Shepard, M.

    2014-07-01

    Radar observations are one of the few ground-based techniques that reveal shapes and surface details of asteroids and comets. Since 1998, over 400 asteroids and 15 comets have been detected by radar at either the Arecibo Observatory, the Goldstone Solar System Radar, or both. With resolution as fine as 7.5 m at Arecibo and 3.75 m at Goldstone for the highest signal-to-noise (SNR) observations, the images show a variety of shapes. Nearly 60 percent of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) detected are of high-enough SNR or have enough time coverage to at least categorize the shape. At least 35 percent of the NEAs are spheroidal, including the 15 percent that are binary or multiple systems. These NEAs, with diameters less than a few kilometers, must have little or no internal strength, in order to have a spheroidal shape. Contact binary, or two-lobed objects, where the lobes are nearly the same size, may also be strengthless. NEA contact binaries may have formed by being spun up, but then failing to form a stable binary system. Few cometary nuclei have been imaged using radar, but several of those also seem to have a contact binary, or two-lobed structure. 103P/Hartley~2, and 8P/Tuttle both have nearly equal lobes joined by a narrow waist [1,2]. The very slow rotation rates of comet nuclei compared to most asteroids suggests that they may not share a common formation mechanism. Radar measurements also give an instantaneous measure of the line-of-sight velocity of the asteroid limb, which is proportional to the rotation rate for an equatorial view. NEAs with H>21 (diameter smaller than 150--300 m) frequently have rotation rates well beyond the spin limit for a strengthless body. However, not all small asteroids are rotating at very rapid rates. Lightcurve measurements become difficult for very small asteroids, which are not observable for long periods of time and have rapidly changing viewing geometries. Radar measurements of the rotation rates, while affected by projection

  17. Tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for quantitative fuel/air-ratio measurements in a hydrogen internal combustion engine.

    PubMed

    Blotevogel, Thomas; Hartmann, Matthias; Rottengruber, Hermann; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-12-10

    A measurement technique for the quantitative investigation of mixture formation processes in hydrogen internal combustion engines (ICEs) has been developed using tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence (TLIF). This technique can be employed to fired and motored engine operation. The quantitative TLIF fuel/air-ratio results have been verified by means of linear Raman scattering measurements. Exemplary results of the simultaneous investigation of mixture formation and combustion obtained at an optical accessible hydrogen ICE are shown. PMID:19079454

  18. Space Radar Image of Bahia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a color composite image of southern Bahia, Brazil, centered at 15.22 degree south latitude and 39.07 degrees west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 38th orbit of Earth on October 2, 1994. The image covers an area centered over the Una Biological Reserve, one the largest protected areas in northeastern Brazil. The 7,000-hectare reserve is administered by the Brazilian Institute for the Environment and is part of the larger Atlantic coastal forest, a narrow band of rain forest extending along the eastern coast of Brazil. The Atlantic coastal forest of southern Bahia is one of the world's most threatened and diverse ecosystems. Due to widespread settlement, only 2 to 5 percent of the original forest cover remains. Yet the region still contains an astounding variety of plants and animals, including a large number of endemic species. More than half of the region's tree species and 80 percent of its animal species are indigenous and found nowhere else on Earth. The Una Reserve is also the only federally protected habitat for the golden-headed lion tamarin, the yellow-breasted capuchin monkey and many other endangered species. In the past few years, scientists from Brazilian and international conservation organizations have coordinated efforts to study the biological diversity of this region and to develop practical and economically viable options for preserving the remaining primary forests in southern Bahia. The shuttle imaging radar is used in this study to identify various land uses and vegetation types, including remaining patches of primary forest, cabruca forest (cacao planted in the understory of the native forest), secondary forest, pasture and coastal mangrove. Standard remote-sensing technology that relies on light reflected from the forest canopy cannot accurately distinguish between cabruca and undisturbed forest. Optical remote sensing is also

  19. Use of radar to assess aeolian processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Lancaster, N.; Gaddis, L.; Blumberg, D.; Debrovolskis, A.; Saunders, R. S.; Wall, S.; Iversen, J. D.; White, B.; Rasmussen, K. R.

    1991-01-01

    The interaction between wind and desert surfaces has important implications for sediment transport on Earth, Mars, and Venus, and for understanding the relationship between radar backscatter and aerodynamic roughness. Here, researchers report results from measurements of atmospheric boundary layer profiles, assessment of radar backscatter at P, L, and C wavelengths, and surface roughness in Death Valley, the Mojave Desert, and Lunar Lake, NV, and discuss the implications for aeolian process. The sites include playas, gravel and sand regs, alluvial fans, and lava flows. Boundary layer wind profiles were measured using anemometers at heights of 0.75, 1.25, 2.07, 3.44, 5.72, and 9.5 m; temperature sensors at heights of 1.3 and 9.6 m; and wind vanes at 9.7 and 1.5 m. Microtopographic measurements were made using a template and a laser-photo device to obtain RMS height. This study demonstrates that radar backscatter coefficients obtained from airborne and perhaps orbiting instruments could permit the derivation of aerodynamic roughness values for large areas. Such values, when combined with wind frequency data, could enable assessment of aeolian processes on a regional scale.

  20. An MSK Radar Waveform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Srinivasan, Meera

    2012-01-01

    The minimum-shift-keying (MSK) radar waveform is formed by periodically extending a waveform that separately modulates the in-phase and quadrature- phase components of the carrier with offset pulse-shaped pseudo noise (PN) sequences. To generate this waveform, a pair of periodic PN sequences is each passed through a pulse-shaping filter with a half sinusoid impulse response. These shaped PN waveforms are then offset by half a chip time and are separately modulated on the in-phase and quadrature phase components of an RF carrier. This new radar waveform allows an increase in radar resolution without the need for additional spectrum. In addition, it provides self-interference suppression and configurable peak sidelobes. Compared strictly on the basis of the expressions for delay resolution, main-lobe bandwidth, effective Doppler bandwidth, and peak ambiguity sidelobe, it appears that bi-phase coded (BPC) outperforms the new MSK waveform. However, a radar waveform must meet certain constraints imposed by the transmission and reception of the modulation, as well as criteria dictated by the observation. In particular, the phase discontinuity of the BPC waveform presents a significant impediment to the achievement of finer resolutions in radar measurements a limitation that is overcome by using the continuous phase MSK waveform. The phase continuity, and the lower fractional out-of-band power of MSK, increases the allowable bandwidth compared with BPC, resulting in a factor of two increase in the range resolution of the radar. The MSK waveform also has been demonstrated to have an ambiguity sidelobe structure very similar to BPC, where the sidelobe levels can be decreased by increasing the length of the m-sequence used in its generation. This ability to set the peak sidelobe level is advantageous as it allows the system to be configured to a variety of targets, including those with a larger dynamic range. Other conventionally used waveforms that possess an even greater

  1. Intercontinental Bistatic Radar Test Observation of Asteroid 1998 WT24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righini, S.; Poppi, S.; Montebugnoli, S.; DiMartino, M.; Saba, L.; Delbo, M.; Ostro, S.; Monari, J.; Poloni, M.; Orlati, A.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the first intercontinental planetary radar test performed in Italy observing the near Earth asteroid (NEA) 33342 (1998 WT24) in December 2001 by means of the bistatic configurations Goldstone (California, USA)-Medicina (Italy) and Evpatoria (Ukraine)-Medicina. The experiment goal was to characterize the system for realtime radar follow-up observations of NEAs and artificial orbiting debris, in the framework of a feasibility study which aims at using the Sardinia Radio Telescope, at present under construction, also as a planetary radar facility. We report the preliminary results of the radar observations carried out by the IRA-CNR (Instituto di Radioastronomia - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche) and the OATo (Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino) groups, aimed at exploring the scientific potentials of a new space radar program, using the existing facilities in Italy. The planetary radar technique is uniquely capable of investigating geometry and surface properties of various solar system objects, demonstrating advantages over the optical methods in its high spatial resolution and ability to obtain three-dimensional images. A single radar detection allows to obtain extremely accurate orbital elements, improving the instantaneous positional uncertainties by orders of magnitude with respect to an optically determined orbit. Radar is a powerful means to spatially resolve NEAs by measuring the distribution of the echo power in time delay (range) and Doppler frequency (line-of-sight velocity) with extreme precision in each coordinate, as it provides detailed information about the target physical properties like size, shape, rotation, near-surface bulk density and roughness and internal density distribution. The Medicina 32m antenna had been successfully used for the first time as the receiving part of a bistatic configuration during a test experiment (September 2001) held to check the capabilities of the entire data acquisition system. This test was possible

  2. Space Radar Image of Manaus, Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    These two images were created using data from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). On the left is a false-color image of Manaus, Brazil acquired April 12, 1994, onboard space shuttle Endeavour. In the center of this image is the Solimoes River just west of Manaus before it combines with the Rio Negro to form the Amazon River. The scene is around 8 by 8 kilometers (5 by 5 miles) with north toward the top. The radar image was produced in L-band where red areas correspond to high backscatter at HH polarization, while green areas exhibit high backscatter at HV polarization. Blue areas show low backscatter at VV polarization. The image on the right is a classification map showing the extent of flooding beneath the forest canopy. The classification map was developed by SIR-C/X-SAR science team members at the University of California,Santa Barbara. The map uses the L-HH, L-HV, and L-VV images to classify the radar image into six categories: Red flooded forest Green unflooded tropical rain forest Blue open water, Amazon river Yellow unflooded fields, some floating grasses Gray flooded shrubs Black floating and flooded grasses Data like these help scientists evaluate flood damage on a global scale. Floods are highly episodic and much of the area inundated is often tree-covered. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those

  3. A satellite-borne radar wind sensor (RAWS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Richard K.; Stuart, Michael; Xin, Weizhuang; Propp, Timothy

    1992-01-01

    The Laser Wind Sounder (LAWS) measures Doppler shifts from aerosols in the plan for the Earth Observation System (EOS). Gaps exist in LAWS coverage where heavy clouds are present. The radar wind sensor (RAWS) can be utilized to fill these gaps by measuring Doppler shifts from clouds and rain. It is shown that RAWS is a feasible instrument. The antenna required is large and the power is comparable with a spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR). Studies show that such an instrument could measure winds at about 1-km height intervals in denser clouds and rain.

  4. Radar imagery from the 1994 Lock Linnhe ship wake experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenhoff, C.J.; Lehman, S.K.; Jones, H.

    1994-11-15

    The 1994 Loch Linnhe radar ocean imaging trials were held from September 4 through September 17. Two ships were used: the R.V. Colonel Templer, and the RMAS Collie. Thorn EMI, Inc., fielded a dual band, dual polarization radar on a hillside overlooking the loch. A primary purpose of the experiment was to obtain highly visible images of ship generated internal waves. Presented here is imagery for a few of the good ship runs, as well as a study of the environment of the visibility of ship generated internal waves.

  5. Floor-plan radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconer, David G.; Ueberschaer, Ronald M.

    2000-07-01

    Urban-warfare specialists, law-enforcement officers, counter-drug agents, and counter-terrorism experts encounter operational situations where they must assault a target building and capture or rescue its occupants. To minimize potential casualties, the assault team needs a picture of the building's interior and a copy of its floor plan. With this need in mind, we constructed a scale model of a single- story house and imaged its interior using synthetic-aperture techniques. The interior and exterior walls nearest the radar set were imaged with good fidelity, but the distal ones appear poorly defined and surrounded by ghosts and artifacts. The latter defects are traceable to beam attenuation, wavefront distortion, multiple scattering, traveling waves, resonance phenomena, and other effects not accounted for in the traditional (noninteracting, isotropic point scatterer) model for radar imaging.

  6. New weather radar coming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    What would you call the next generation of radar for severe weather prediction? NEXRAD, of course. A prototype for the new system was recently completed in Norman, Okla., and by the early 1990s up to 195 stations around the United States will be tracking dangerous weather and sending faster, more accurate, and more detailed warnings to the public.NEXRAD is being built for the Departments of Commerce, Transportation, and Defense by the Unisys Corporation under a $450 million contract signed in December 1987. Th e system will be used by the National Weather Service, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the U.S. Air Force and Navy. The NEXRAD radar tower in Norman is expected to be operational in October.

  7. RADAR Reveals Titan Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Callahan, P.; Seu, R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Paganelli, F.; Lopes, R.; Elachi, C.

    2005-01-01

    The Cassini Titan RADAR Mapper is a K(sub u)-band (13.78 GHz, lambda = 2.17 cm) linear polarized RADAR instrument capable of operating in synthetic aperture (SAR), scatterometer, altimeter and radiometer modes. During the first targeted flyby of Titan on 26 October, 2004 (referred to as Ta) observations were made in all modes. Evidence for topographic relief based on the Ta altimetry and SAR data are presented here. Additional SAR and altimetry observations are planned for the T3 encounter on 15 February, 2005, but have not been carried out at this writing. Results from the T3 encounter relevant to topography will be included in our presentation. Data obtained in the Ta encounter include a SAR image swath

  8. Kuiper Belt Mapping Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, A.; Nilsen, E.

    2001-01-01

    Since their initial discovery in 1992, to date only a relatively small number of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBO's) have been discovered. Current detection techniques rely on frame-to-frame comparisons of images collected by optical telescopes such as Hubble, to detect KBO's as they move against the background stellar field. Another technique involving studies of KBO's through occultation of known stars has been proposed. Such techniques are serendipitous, not systematic, and may lead to an inadequate understanding of the size, range, and distribution of KBO's. In this paper, a future Kuiper Belt Mapping Radar is proposed as a solution to the problem of mapping the size distribution, extent, and range of KBO's. This approach can also be used to recover radar albedo and object rotation rates. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Radar cross-sectional study using noise radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freundorfer, A. P.; Siddiqui, J. Y.; Antar, Y. M. M.

    2015-05-01

    A noise radar system is proposed with capabilities to measure and acquire the radar cross-section (RCS) of targets. The proposed system can cover a noise bandwidth of near DC to 50 GHz. The noise radar RCS measurements were conducted for selective targets like spheres and carpenter squares with and without dielectric bodies for a noise band of 400MHz-5000MHz. The bandwidth of operation was limited by the multiplier and the antennae used.

  10. 41. Perimeter acquisition radar building radar element and coaxial display, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Perimeter acquisition radar building radar element and coaxial display, with drawing of typical antenna section. Drawing, from left to right, shows element, aluminum ground plane, cable connectors and hardware, cable, and back-up ring. Grey area is the concrete wall - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  11. 51. View of upper radar scanner switch in radar scanner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. View of upper radar scanner switch in radar scanner building 105 from upper catwalk level showing emanating waveguides from upper switch (upper one-fourth of photograph) and emanating waveguides from lower radar scanner switch in vertical runs. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  12. 10. Perimeter acquisition radar power plant (upper level) room #219E, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Perimeter acquisition radar power plant (upper level) room #219E, station services room; showing air compressors which provide diesel generators with internal power kick-on - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Power Plant, In Limited Access Area, Southwest of PARB at end of Service Road B, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  13. Goldstone solar system radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurgens, Raymond F.

    1991-01-01

    Caltech/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) radar astronomers made use of the Very Large Array (VLA) at Socorro, NM, during February 1990, to receive radio echoes from the planet Venus. The transmitter was the 70 meter antenna at the Goldstone complex northwest of Barstow, CA. These observations contain new information about the roughness of Venus at cm to decimeter scales and are complementary to information being obtained by the Magellan spacecraft. Asteroid observations are also discussed.

  14. Imaging synthetic aperture radar

    DOEpatents

    Burns, Bryan L.; Cordaro, J. Thomas

    1997-01-01

    A linear-FM SAR imaging radar method and apparatus to produce a real-time image by first arranging the returned signals into a plurality of subaperture arrays, the columns of each subaperture array having samples of dechirped baseband pulses, and further including a processing of each subaperture array to obtain coarse-resolution in azimuth, then fine-resolution in range, and lastly, to combine the processed subapertures to obtain the final fine-resolution in azimuth. Greater efficiency is achieved because both the transmitted signal and a local oscillator signal mixed with the returned signal can be varied on a pulse-to-pulse basis as a function of radar motion. Moreover, a novel circuit can adjust the sampling location and the A/D sample rate of the combined dechirped baseband signal which greatly reduces processing time and hardware. The processing steps include implementing a window function, stabilizing either a central reference point and/or all other points of a subaperture with respect to doppler frequency and/or range as a function of radar motion, sorting and compressing the signals using a standard fourier transforms. The stabilization of each processing part is accomplished with vector multiplication using waveforms generated as a function of radar motion wherein these waveforms may be synthesized in integrated circuits. Stabilization of range migration as a function of doppler frequency by simple vector multiplication is a particularly useful feature of the invention; as is stabilization of azimuth migration by correcting for spatially varying phase errors prior to the application of an autofocus process.

  15. Radar Stratigraphy of Ice on Earth and Mars: What are we Missing? An Evaluation of Multiple Radars and Processing Techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, J. W.; Blankenship, D. D.; Corr, H. F.; Plaut, J. J.; Safaeinili, A.

    2007-12-01

    Radar sounding has been used for decades on Earth to map sub-ice topography, yet we are only beginning to fully make use of the information contained within the radar-detected, ice-internal layering. This internal layering serves as a guide to estimate accumulation rates and flow reorganization, to detect geothermal anomalies and to extrapolate ice core results over large regions. Radar layering in snow and ice on Earth is generally caused by variations in acidity due to deposits from volcanic eruptions, changes in ice crystal fabric, or variations in density (near the surface). Radar studies in Antarctica have been undertaken by a variety of means, most commonly airborne systems operating at 60 or 150 MHz, typically with 10 - 15 MHz bandwidths, but also sled-mounted systems generally operating in the 1 - 10 MHz range. The stratigraphy of icy deposits on Mars is also thought to hold important information about past climatic variations there and radar sounding has started to reveal new stratigraphic information to complement optical and spectral studies. Two orbital radar sounders are currently operating at Mars. MARSIS on Mars Express operates at 2 - 5 MHz, while SHARAD on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter operates in the 15 - 25 MHz band. This is a tremendous advance over our ability to probe the subsurface of Mars just a few years ago; however, we don't know how much information we may be missing due to limited over-ice data at these frequencies on Earth. We therefore examine the impact of different wavelengths, bandwidths, and pulse types on the reconstruction of ice stratigraphy on both Earth and Mars by comparing data obtained from different radar systems over the same locations. Simulated results are also compared, as are the effects of data reduction schemes such as unfocused and focused synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing.

  16. The dawn of optical radar: a story from another side of the globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molebny, Vasyl; Zarubin, Peter; Kamerman, Gary

    2010-04-01

    Some episodes are reviewed of the early development of laser radar in Ukraine and Russia being the parts of the former Soviet Union, including laser radars for Navy applications, anti-missile defense experiments, and medical applications. Some details are pointed out on spatial suppression of the backscattered light, on laser radar for fire control systems, and long-range multi-channel laser radar. Double-circuit tracking is discussed for high-precision designator. High-power multi-channel ruby laser transmitter with high pulse repetition rate and matrix multi-channel photodetector were tested at Sary-Shagan in the mode of missile and satellite ranging and tracking. Specular target identification is analyzed which uses polarization parameters. Studies of speckle propagation in the atmosphere resulted in their dual application for speckle suppression and for selection of the fluctuating retroreflecting targets. An aberrometer - instrument for wave front measurements using the principles of laser radar is described with its application in the field of ophthalmology.

  17. A family of radars for advanced systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaccari, Ennio; Penazzi, Carlo Alberto

    1989-04-01

    The military and air traffic control radars developed by Selenia are reviewed. The design, production, and testing aspects of the radar development process are discussed, focusing on shipborne, ground based, and air traffic control radars. An overview of radar subsystems is given, including the antenna, transmitter, receiver-exciter, signal processor, data processor, and radar controller subsystems.

  18. Spaceborne Imaging Radar Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Neil

    1986-01-01

    In June of 1985 the Project Initiation Agreement was signed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the NASA Office of Space Science and Applications for the Spaceborne Imaging Radar Project (SIR). The thrust of the Spaceborne Imaging Radar Project is to continue the evolution of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) science and technology developed during SEASAT, SIR-A and SIR-B missions to meet the needs of the Earth Observing System (EOS) in the mid 1990's. As originally formulated, the Project plans were for a reflight of the SIR-B in 1987, the development of a new SAR, SIR-C, for missions in mid 1989 and early 1990, and the upgrade of SIR-C to EOS configuration with a qualification flight aboard the shuttle in the 1993 time frame (SIR-D). However, the loss of the shuttle Challenger has delayed the first manifest for SIR to early 1990. This delay prompted the decision to drop SIR-B reflight plans and move ahead with SIR-C to more effectively utilize this first mission opportunity. The planning for this project is discussed.

  19. Radar gun hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-20

    Radar guns - hand-held units used by the law to nail speeders - have been in use since the early '60s. Now they've been accused of causing cancer. Police officers in several states have so far filed eight suits against the manufacturer, claiming that they have contracted rare forms of cancer, such as of the eyelid and the testicle, from frequent proximity to the devices. Spurred by concerns expressed by police groups, researchers at the Rochester Institute of Technology are conducting what they believe to be the first research of its kind in the nation. Last month psychologist John Violanti, an expert in policy psychology and health, sent out a one-page survey to 6,000 active and retired police officers in New York State, asking them about their health and their use of radar guns. Violanti says melanoma, leukemia, and lymph node cancer may be linked to these as well as other electromagnetic devices. The Food and Drug Administration earlier this year issued a warning about radar guns, telling users not to operate them closer than 6 inches from the body. But this may not be a sufficient safeguard since the instruments can give off crisscrossing wave emissions within a police vehicle. The survey will be used to help determine if it would be safer to mount the guns, which are currently either hand-held or mounted on dashboards, outside troopers' cars.

  20. Space Radar Image of Glascow, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a false-color L-band image of an area near Glasgow, Missouri, centered at about 39.2 degrees north latitude and 92.8 degrees west longitude. The image was acquired using the L-band radar channel (horizontally transmitted and received and horizontally transmitted/vertically received) polarizations combined. The data were acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on orbit 50 on October 3,1994. The area shown is approximately 37 kilometers by 25 kilometers (23 miles by 16 miles). The radar data, coupled with pre-flood aerial photography and satellite data and post-flood topographic and field data, are being used to evaluate changes associated with levee breaks in landforms, where deposits formed during the widespread flooding in 1993 along the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers. The distinct radar scattering properties of farmland, sand fields and scoured areas will be used to inventory floodplains along the Missouri River and determine the processes by which these areas return to preflood conditions. The image shows one such levee break near Glasgow, Missouri. In the upper center of the radar image, below the bend of the river, is a region covered by several meters of sand, shown as dark regions. West (left) of the dark areas, a gap in the levee tree canopy shows the area where the levee failed. Radar data such as these can help scientists more accurately assess the potential for future flooding in this region and how that might impact surrounding communities. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific

  1. Long range aircraft detection using high-frequency surface-wave radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Hank

    1994-12-01

    Experimental data from a high-frequency surface-wave radar (HFSWR) operating at 1.95 MHz at Cape Bonavista, Newfoundland are analyzed to assess the capability of the radar to detect aircraft over an ocean surface. The results of the analysis show that the HFSWR could easily detect and track a low-flying CP-140 Aurora aircraft at ranges between 11 and 56 km. The radar's coverage area coincides with a trans-Atlantic international flight route, and the radar was also able to detect and track some commercial aircraft in range as far as 280 km.

  2. Laser one-dimensional range profile and the laser two-dimensional range profile of cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yanjun; Wang, Mingjun; Gong, Lei

    2015-10-01

    Laser one-dimensional range profile, that is scattering power from pulse laser scattering of target, is a radar imaging technology. The laser two-dimensional range profile is two-dimensional scattering imaging of pulse laser of target. Laser one-dimensional range profile and laser two-dimensional range profile are called laser range profile(LRP). The laser range profile can reflect the characteristics of the target shape and surface material. These techniques were motivated by applications of laser radar to target discrimination in ballistic missile defense. The radar equation of pulse laser is given in this paper. This paper demonstrates the analytical model of laser range profile of cylinder based on the radar equation of the pulse laser. Simulations results of laser one-dimensional range profiles of some cylinders are given. Laser range profiles of cylinder, whose surface material with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser range profiles of different pulse width of cylinder are given in this paper. The influences of geometric parameters, pulse width, attitude on the range profiles are analyzed.

  3. Cognitive processing for nonlinear radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martone, Anthony; Ranney, Kenneth; Hedden, Abigail; Mazzaro, Gregory; McNamara, David

    2013-05-01

    An increasingly cluttered electromagnetic environment (EME) is a growing problem for radar systems. This problem is becoming critical as the available frequency spectrum shrinks due to growing wireless communication device usage and changing regulations. A possible solution to these problems is cognitive radar, where the cognitive radar learns from the environment and intelligently modifies the transmit waveform. In this paper, a cognitive nonlinear radar processing framework is introduced where the main components of this framework consist of spectrum sensing processing, target detection and classification, and decision making. The emphasis of this paper is to introduce a spectrum sensing processing technique that identifies a transmit-receive frequency pair for nonlinear radar. It will be shown that the proposed technique successfully identifies a transmit-receive frequency pair for nonlinear radar from data collected from the EME.

  4. Radar-aeolian roughness project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Dobrovolskis, A.; Gaddis, L.; Iversen, J. D.; Lancaster, N.; Leach, Rodman N.; Rasnussen, K.; Saunders, S.; Vanzyl, J.; Wall, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to establish an empirical relationship between measurements of radar, aeolian, and surface roughness on a variety of natural surfaces and to understand the underlying physical causes. This relationship will form the basis for developing a predictive equation to derive aeolian roughness from radar backscatter. Results are given from investigations carried out in 1989 on the principal elements of the project, with separate sections on field studies, radar data analysis, laboratory simulations, and development of theory for planetary applications.

  5. Radar studies of bird migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of bird migration with NASA radars were made at Wallops Island, Va. Simultaneous observations were made at a number of radar sites in the North Atlantic Ocean in an effort to discover what happened to those birds that were observed leaving the coast of North America headed toward Bermuda, the Caribbean and South America. Transatlantic migration, utilizing observations from a large number of radars is discussed. Detailed studies of bird movements at Wallops Island are presented.

  6. On the study of radar backscattering of ocean surface in response to rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinan; Zheng, Quanan; Liu, Ren; Duncan, James H.

    2013-11-01

    A model of radar backscattering from the ocean surface in response to rainfall is developed. The model shows that the radar return intensity is a function of the wavelength and incident angle of the radar waves and the rain rate. The model explains the differences between the radar response to rain rate simultaneously observed by C-band ASAR and ground-based weather radar. An experiment on the simultaneous measurements of the characteristics of the ocean surface in response to rainfall and its radar back-scatter is performed in the laboratory. The experiment is carried out in a water pool that is 1.22 m by 1.22 m with a water depth of 0.3 m. Artificial rainfall is generated from an array of hypodermic needles. The surface characteristics including crowns, stalks and ring waves are measured with a cinematic Laser-Induced-Florescence (LIF) technique while secondary droplets are measured with a shadowgraph technique. The radar backscattering signal is recorded with a dual-polarized, ultra-wide band radar. The frequency dependence and polarization of the radar signatures due to the surface features are discussed. The work is supported by National Science Foundations, Division of Ocean Science.

  7. Radar data processing and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ausherman, D.; Larson, R.; Liskow, C.

    1976-01-01

    Digitized four-channel radar images corresponding to particular areas from the Phoenix and Huntington test sites were generated in conjunction with prior experiments performed to collect X- and L-band synthetic aperture radar imagery of these two areas. The methods for generating this imagery are documented. A secondary objective was the investigation of digital processing techniques for extraction of information from the multiband radar image data. Following the digitization, the remaining resources permitted a preliminary machine analysis to be performed on portions of the radar image data. The results, although necessarily limited, are reported.

  8. Mars: Seasonally variable radar reflectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, L. E.; Downs, G. S.; Saunders, R. S.; Schubert, G.

    1985-01-01

    The 1971/1973 Mars data set acquired by the Goldstone Solar System Radar was analyzed. It was established that the seasonal variations in radar reflectivity thought to occur in only one locality on the planet (the Solis Lacus radar anomaly) occur, in fact, over the entire subequatorial belt observed by the Goldstone radar. Since liquid water appears to be the most likely cause of the reflectivity excursions, a permanent, year-round presence of subsurface water (frozen or thawed) in the Martian tropics can be inferred.

  9. Reconfigurable L-Band Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.

    2008-01-01

    The reconfigurable L-Band radar is an ongoing development at NASA/GSFC that exploits the capability inherently in phased array radar systems with a state-of-the-art data acquisition and real-time processor in order to enable multi-mode measurement techniques in a single radar architecture. The development leverages on the L-Band Imaging Scatterometer, a radar system designed for the development and testing of new radar techniques; and the custom-built DBSAR processor, a highly reconfigurable, high speed data acquisition and processing system. The radar modes currently implemented include scatterometer, synthetic aperture radar, and altimetry; and plans to add new modes such as radiometry and bi-static GNSS signals are being formulated. This development is aimed at enhancing the radar remote sensing capabilities for airborne and spaceborne applications in support of Earth Science and planetary exploration This paper describes the design of the radar and processor systems, explains the operational modes, and discusses preliminary measurements and future plans.

  10. Python-ARM Radar Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan Helmus, Scott Collis

    2013-03-17

    The Python-ARM Radar Toolkit (Py-ART) is a collection of radar quality control and retrieval codes which all work on two unifying Python objects: the PyRadar and PyGrid objects. By building ingests to several popular radar formats and then abstracting the interface Py-ART greatly simplifies data processing over several other available utilities. In addition Py-ART makes use of Numpy arrays as its primary storage mechanism enabling use of existing and extensive community software tools.

  11. Mode S baseline radar tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancus, E. F.; Baker, L. H.

    1982-11-01

    The baseline performance characteristics of the moving target detector (MTD) and radar data acquisition system (RDAS) as an integral part of the Mode S sensor, were determined. The MTD and RDAS were separately evaluated to determine their capability to provide radar data suitable for utilization by the Mode S sensor and automated radar terminal system (ARTS). The design modifications made to the Mode S sensor to provide the capability of interfacing to either an MTD or RDAS were evaluated to determine if they were in compliance with the Federal Aviation Administration engineering requirement, FAA-ER-240-26. Radar baseline technical performance data was provided to characterize the MTD, RDAS, Mode S, and ARTS. The minimum radar tracking requirements are studied to determine if they are adequate to provide reliable radar track data to an air traffic control facility. It was concluded that the Mode S sensor, when integrated with an MTD-2 radar digitizer, can provide reliable primary radar track data to the ARTS III system for automated radar track acquisition.

  12. Carrier-density-wave transport and local internal electric field measurements in biased metal-oxide-semiconductor n-Si devices using contactless laser photo-carrier radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelis, Andreas; Pawlak, Micha; Shaughnessy, Derrick

    2004-11-01

    Laser infrared photo-carrier radiometry was used with an n-type Si metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) diode and with a Si-SiO2 structure with a transparent electrode and under external bias. Application of three-dimensional PCR theory yielded values of the minority carrier (hole) transport properties in the presence of the thus created local internal electric field at fixed frequencies. Furthermore, the internal electric field at fixed applied voltage was calculated. Under the combination of increased temperature and voltage, the sub-interface position of the carrier-density-wave centroid was found to depend on a trade-off between increased recombination lifetime and decreased ambipolar (conductivity) mobility. The ability of PCR to measure local internal electric fields by combining applied bias sweeps and frequency scans appears to pave the way towards the contactless reconstruction of depth profiles of these fields in active devices.

  13. An effective method for incoherent scattering radar's detecting ability evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ziqing; Yao, Ming; Deng, Xiaohua

    2016-06-01

    Ionospheric incoherent scatter radar (ISR), which is used to detect ionospheric electrons and ions, generally, has megawatt class transmission power and hundred meter level antenna aperture. The crucial purpose of this detecting technology is to get ionospheric parameters by acquiring the autocorrelation function and power spectrum of the target ionospheric plasma echoes. Whereas the ISR's echoes are very weak because of the small radar cross section of its target, estimating detecting ability will be significantly instructive and meaningful for ISR system design. In this paper, we evaluate the detecting ability through signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The soft-target radar equation is deduced to be applicable to ISR, through which we use data from International Reference Ionosphere model to simulate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of echoes, and then comparing the measured SNR from European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association and Advanced Modular Incoherent Scatter Radar with the simulation. The simulation results show good consistency with the measured SNR. For ISR, the topic of this paper is the first comparison between the calculated SNR and radar measurements; the detecting ability can be improved through increasing SNR. The effective method for ISR's detecting ability evaluation provides basis for design of radar system.

  14. Removing interfering clutter associated with radar pulses that an airborne radar receives from a radar transponder

    DOEpatents

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Axline, Robert M.

    2008-12-02

    Interfering clutter in radar pulses received by an airborne radar system from a radar transponder can be suppressed by developing a representation of the incoming echo-voltage time-series that permits the clutter associated with predetermined parts of the time-series to be estimated. These estimates can be used to estimate and suppress the clutter associated with other parts of the time-series.

  15. Sample interchange of MST radar data from the Urbana radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowhill, S. A.; Rennier, A.

    1984-01-01

    As a first step in interchange of data from the Urbana mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar, a sample tape has been prepared in 9-track 1600-bpi IBM format. It includes all Urbana data for April 1978 (the first month of operation of the radar). The 300-ft tape contains 260 h of typical mesospheric power and line-of-sight velocity data.

  16. Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    KB Widener; K Johnson

    2005-01-30

    The millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) systems probe the extent and composition of clouds at millimeter wavelengths. The MMCR is a zenith-pointing radar that operates at a frequency of 35 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar will also report radar reflectivity (dBZ) of the atmosphere up to 20 km. The radar possesses a doppler capability that will allow the measurement of cloud constituent vertical velocities.

  17. Comprehensive analysis of the internal losses in 2.0μm (AlGaIn)(AsSb) quantum-well diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattunde, M.; Schmitz, J.; Kiefer, R.; Wagner, J.

    2004-06-01

    We have fabricated and characterized high-power 2.0 μm-wavelength (AlGaIn)(AsSb) quantum-well diode lasers emitting a power of 1.7 W in continuous-wave operation and over 9 W in pulsed operation at 300 K heat sink temperature. For potential further improvement of laser performance, the different contribution to the internal losses αi has been analyzed in detail for the present laser structure. Consistent results have been obtained for a series of samples, for which different design parameters were varied systematically: As expected, the losses in the cladding layers are dominated by free carrier absorption in the p-doped cladding. The cross section for free-hole absorption in Al0.84Ga0.16As0.06Sb0.94 is determined to σP=4.6×10-17 cm2, which is comparable to values reported in the literature for (AlGaIn)(AsP)-based lasers emitting at 1.5 μm. The losses in the active region were found to increase linearly with increasing number of quantum wells at a rate of 1.5 cm-1 per quantum well, whereas the losses in the separate confinement layers are negligible.

  18. Radar Studies of the Trunk and `Sticky Spot' of Kamb Ice Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobel, R. W.; Pettersson, R.; Osterhouse, D.; Tulaczyk, S.; Howat, I.

    2005-12-01

    During the 2004-05 Antarctic field season we acquired approximately 275 km of ground-based ice-penetrating radar data on the trunk of Kamb Ice Stream (KIS) as a part of a two-year program of radar and GPS studies examining the possibility of ice stream reactivation. Many of the profiles explore a region of near-stagnant ice, the `sticky spot', in the vicinity of camps occupied by a number of groups from 1986-2000 and which was the focus of extensive borehole studies by Cal Tech in 1996 and 2000. We also investigated an area of the trunk approximately 80 km upstream where repeat laser altimeter profiling revealed an anomalous 4m surface uplift of between 1998-2000 (Spikes, et al., 2003). The radar data image bedrock and internal layer stratigraphy in detail; in many cases the layers are present nearly to the bottom. We have identified a bright layer at about two-thirds to three-fourths of the ice thickness in all profiles. This is likely is the same bright layer that we have detected throughout West Antarctica in ITASE traverses and dated to 17.5 KY (Jacobel and Welch, 2004). We have also produced maps of variations in bed reflectivity that correspond closely (but not identically) with the surface expression of the sticky spot in satellite imagery. Bright areas of the bed are found in the trunk of the ice stream on both sides of the sticky spot and also along the south margin where a layer of liquid water was identified in Cal Tech bore hole 00-01 (Englehart et al., in press). However, the brightest bed reflections are found in the area of anomalous surface uplift. Echoes from near the bed at this location indicate the possible presence of a highly reflective surface off to one side of our profiles. Our bed amplitude studies are augmented by two densely-spaced constant midpoint profiles that enable us to characterize attenuation and e/m wave speed within the ice at locations that are both stagnant and fast-moving. In addition, we have re-imaged fold features in the

  19. Planetary radar studies. [radar mapping of the Moon and radar signatures of lunar and Venus craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Cutts, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Progress made in studying the evolution of Venusian craters and the evolution of infrared and radar signatures of lunar crater interiors is reported. Comparison of radar images of craters on Venus and the Moon present evidence for a steady state Venus crater population. Successful observations at the Arecibo Observatory yielded good data on five nights when data for a mix of inner and limb areas were acquired. Lunar craters with radar bright ejects are discussed. An overview of infrared radar crater catalogs in the data base is included.

  20. Broadview Radar Altimetry Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escolà, Roger; Garcia-Mondejar, Albert; Moyano, Gorka; Roca, Mònica; Terra-Homem, Miguel; Friaças, Ana; Martinho, Fernando; Schrama, Ernst; Naeije, Marc; Ambrozio, Americo; Restano, Marco; Benveniste, Jérôme

    2016-04-01

    The universal altimetry toolbox, BRAT (Broadview Radar Altimetry Toolbox) which can read all previous and current altimetry missions' data, incorporates now the capability to read the upcoming Sentinel-3 L1 and L2 products. ESA endeavoured to develop and supply this capability to support the users of the future Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Mission. BRAT is a collection of tools and tutorial documents designed to facilitate the processing of radar altimetry data. This project started in 2005 from the joint efforts of ESA (European Space Agency) and CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales), and it is freely available at http://earth.esa.int/brat. The tools enable users to interact with the most common altimetry data formats. The BratGUI is the front-end for the powerful command line tools that are part of the BRAT suite. BRAT can also be used in conjunction with MATLAB/IDL (via reading routines) or in C/C++/Fortran via a programming API, allowing the user to obtain desired data, bypassing the data-formatting hassle. BRAT can be used simply to visualise data quickly, or to translate the data into other formats such as NetCDF, ASCII text files, KML (Google Earth) and raster images (JPEG, PNG, etc.). Several kinds of computations can be done within BRAT involving combinations of data fields that the user can save for posterior reuse or using the already embedded formulas that include the standard oceanographic altimetry formulas. The Radar Altimeter Tutorial, that contains a strong introduction to altimetry, shows its applications in different fields such as Oceanography, Cryosphere, Geodesy, Hydrology among others. Included are also "use cases", with step-by-step examples, on how to use the toolbox in the different contexts. The Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Toolbox shall benefit from the current BRAT version. While developing the toolbox we will revamp of the Graphical User Interface and provide, among other enhancements, support for reading the upcoming S3 datasets and

  1. Broadview Radar Altimetry Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondéjar, Albert; Benveniste, Jérôme; Naeije, Marc; Escolà, Roger; Moyano, Gorka; Roca, Mònica; Terra-Homem, Miguel; Friaças, Ana; Martinho, Fernando; Schrama, Ernst; Ambrózio, Américo; Restano, Marco

    2016-07-01

    The universal altimetry toolbox, BRAT (Broadview Radar Altimetry Toolbox) which can read all previous and current altimetry missions' data, incorporates now the capability to read the upcoming Sentinel-3 L1 and L2 products. ESA endeavoured to develop and supply this capability to support the users of the future Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Mission. BRAT is a collection of tools and tutorial documents designed to facilitate the processing of radar altimetry data. This project started in 2005 from the joint efforts of ESA (European Space Agency) and CNES (Centre National d'Études Spatiales), and it is freely available at http://earth.esa.int/brat. The tools enable users to interact with the most common altimetry data formats. The BratGUI is the front-end for the powerful command line tools that are part of the BRAT suite. BRAT can also be used in conjunction with MATLAB/IDL (via reading routines) or in C/C++/Fortran via a programming API, allowing the user to obtain desired data, bypassing the data-formatting hassle. BRAT can be used simply to visualise data quickly, or to translate the data into other formats such as NetCDF, ASCII text files, KML (Google Earth) and raster images (JPEG, PNG, etc.). Several kinds of computations can be done within BRAT involving combinations of data fields that the user can save for posterior reuse or using the already embedded formulas that include the standard oceanographic altimetry formulas. The Radar Altimeter Tutorial, that contains a strong introduction to altimetry, shows its applications in different fields such as Oceanography, Cryosphere, Geodesy, Hydrology among others. Included are also "use cases", with step-by-step examples, on how to use the toolbox in the different contexts. The Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Toolbox shall benefit from the current BRAT version. While developing the toolbox we will revamp of the Graphical User Interface and provide, among other enhancements, support for reading the upcoming S3 datasets and

  2. Augmented reality using ultra-wideband radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Lam; Koenig, Francois; Sherbondy, Kelly

    2011-06-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has been investigating the utility of ultra-wideband (UWB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology for detecting concealed targets in various applications. We have designed and built a vehicle-based, low-frequency UWB SAR radar for proof-of-concept demonstration in detecting obstacles for autonomous navigation, detecting concealed targets (mines, etc.), and mapping internal building structures to locate enemy activity. Although the low-frequency UWB radar technology offers valuable information to complement other technologies due to its penetration capability, it is very difficult to comprehend the radar imagery and correlate the detection list from the radar with the objects in the real world. Using augmented reality (AR) technology, we can superimpose the information from the radar onto the video image of the real world in real-time. Using this, Soldiers would view the environment and the superimposed graphics (SAR imagery, detection locations, digital map, etc.) via a standard display or a head-mounted display. The superimposed information would be constantly changed and adjusted for every perspective and movement of the user. ARL has been collaborating with ITT Industries to implement an AR system that integrates the video data captured from the real world and the information from the UWB radar. ARL conducted an experiment and demonstrated the real-time geo-registration of the two independent data streams. The integration of the AR sub-system into the radar system is underway. This paper presents the integration of the AR and SAR systems. It shows results that include the real-time embedding of the SAR imagery and other information into the video data stream.

  3. PROC: a new Planetary Radars Operating Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catallo, C.; Alberti, G.; Flamini, E.; Olivieri, A.; Orosei, R.

    2009-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using Ground Penetrating Radars (GPR) is an important role of Italy and numerous scientific international space programs are carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Actually three important experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry) provided by ASI within a NASA/ESA/ASI joint venture framework are operating in the frame of an extended missions : MARSIS on-board Mars Express, SHARAD on-board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft. Three dedicated operational centers, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD are operating from the starting of the missions in order In order to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution and even if they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). In order to harmonize operations either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view PROC is designed and developed for offering improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. PROC is, therefore, conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs, such as Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) The paper describes how PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and

  4. Space radar image of Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This image of the Mauna Loa volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii shows the capability of imaging radar to map lava flows and other volcanic structures. Mauna Loa has erupted more than 35 times since the island was first visited by westerners in the early 1800s. The large summit crater, called Mokuaweoweo Caldera, is clearly visible near the center of the image. Leading away from the caldera (towards top right and lower center) are the two main rift zones shown here in orange. Rift zones are areas of weakness within the upper part of the volcano that are often ripped open as new magma (molten rock) approaches the surface at the start of an eruption. The most recent eruption of Mauna Loa was in March and April 1984, when segments of the northeast rift zones were active. If the height of the volcano was measured from its base on the ocean floor instead of from sea level, Mauna Loa would be the tallest mountain on Earth. Its peak (center of the image) rises more than 8 kilometers (5 miles) above the ocean floor. The South Kona District, known for cultivation of macadamia nuts and coffee, can be seen in the lower left as white and blue areas along the coast. North is toward the upper left. The area shown is 41.5 by 75 kilometers (25.7 by 46.5 miles), centered at 19.5 degrees north latitude and 155.6 degrees west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/ X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 36th orbit on October 2, 1994. The radar illumination is from the left of the image. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received). The resulting color combinations in this radar image are caused by differences in surface roughness of the lava flows. Smoother flows

  5. SPace Radar Image of Fort Irwin, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This image of Fort Irwin in California's Mojave Desert compares interferometric radar signatures topography -- data that were obtained by multiple imaging of the same region to produce three-dimensional elevation maps -- as it was obtained on October 7-8, 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. Data were acquired using the L-band (24 centimeter wavelength) and C-band (6 centimeter wavelength). The image covers an area about 25 kilometers by 70 kilometers (15.5 miles by 43 miles). North is to the lower right of the image. The color contours shown are proportional to the topographic elevation. With a wavelength one-fourth that of the L-band, the results from the C-band cycle through the color contours four times faster for a given elevation change. Detailed comparisons of these multiple frequency data over different terrain types will provide insights in the future into wavelength-dependent effects of penetration and scattering on the topography measurement accuracy. Fort Irwin is an ideal site for such detailed digital elevation model comparisons because a number of high precision digital models of the area already exist from conventional measurements as well as from airborne interferometric SAR data. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human

  6. Space Radar Image of Raco Vegetation Map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a vegetation map of the Raco, Michigan area produced from data acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard space shuttle Endeavour. The radar image, taken on April 9, 1994, has been used by science team members at the University of Michigan to produce detailed map of land cover. This image is centered at 46.4 degrees north latitude and 84.9 degrees west longitude. The imaged area is approximately 24 by 32 kilometers (15 by 20 miles). The Raco airport, which is a decommissioned military base, is easily identified by its triangular runway structure. An edge of Lake Superior, approximately 44 kilometers (27 miles) west of Sault Sainte Marie, appears in the top right of the image. In this land cover map each 30- by 30-meter (98- by 98-foot) spot is identified as either a water surface, bare ground, short vegetation, deciduous forest, lowland conifers or upland conifers. Different types of ground cover have different effects on Earth's chemical, water and energy cycles. By cataloguing ground cover in an area, scientists expect to better understand the processes of these cycles in a specific area. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio

  7. Interferometric radar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ronald A.; Shipman, Mark; Holder, E. J.; Williams, James K.

    2002-08-01

    The United States Army Space and Missile Defense Command (USASMDC) has interest in a technology demonstration that capitalizes on investment in fire control and smart interceptor technologies that have matured beyond basic research. The concept SWORD (Short range missile defense With Optimized Radar Distribution) consists of a novel approach utilizing a missile interceptor and interferometric fire control radar. A hit-to-kill, closed-loop, command guidance scheme is planned that takes advantage of extremely accurate target and interceptor state vectors derived via the fire control radar. The fire control system has the capability to detect, track, and classify multiple threats in a tactical regime as well as simultaneously provide command guidance updates to multiple missile interceptors. The missile interceptor offers a cost reduction potential as well as an enhancement to the kinematics range and lethality over existing SHORAD systems. Additionally, the Radio Frequency (RF) guidance scheme offers increased battlefield weather performance. The Air Defense (AD) community, responding to current threat capabilities and trends, has identified an urgent need to have a capability to counter proliferated, low cost threats with a low cost-per-kill weapon system. The SWORD system will offer a solution that meets this need. The SWORD critical technologies will be identified including a detailed description of each. Validated test results and basic principles of operation will be presented to prove the merit of past investments. The Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology (DAS(R&T) has a three- year Science and Technology Program to evaluate the errors and proposed mitigation techniques associated with target spectral dispersion and range gate straddle. Preliminary bench-top experiment results will be presented in this paper.

  8. Integrating Radar Image Data with Google Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Bruce D.; Gibas, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    A public Web site has been developed as a method for displaying the multitude of radar imagery collected by NASA s Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) instrument during its 16-year mission. Utilizing NASA s internal AIRSAR site, the new Web site features more sophisticated visualization tools that enable the general public to have access to these images. The site was originally maintained at NASA on six computers: one that held the Oracle database, two that took care of the software for the interactive map, and three that were for the Web site itself. Several tasks were involved in moving this complicated setup to just one computer. First, the AIRSAR database was migrated from Oracle to MySQL. Then the back-end of the AIRSAR Web site was updated in order to access the MySQL database. To do this, a few of the scripts needed to be modified; specifically three Perl scripts that query that database. The database connections were then updated from Oracle to MySQL, numerous syntax errors were corrected, and a query was implemented that replaced one of the stored Oracle procedures. Lastly, the interactive map was designed, implemented, and tested so that users could easily browse and access the radar imagery through the Google Maps interface.

  9. Space Radar Image of Patagonian Ice Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    , a direct indication of the steep meteorological gradients known to exist in this region. The bluer color of the outlet glaciers is probably due to a thin snow cover. A portion of the terminus of the outlet glacier at the top left center of the images has advanced approximately 600 meters (1,970 feet) in the five-and-a-half months between the two missions. Because of the persistent cloud cover this observation was only possible by using the orbiting, remote imaging radar system. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.v.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  10. Space Radar Image of Oetzal, Austria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    site is covered by glaciers. Corner reflectors are set up for calibration. Five corner reflectors can be seen on the Gepatschferner and two can be seen on the Vernagtferner. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  11. Space Radar Image of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    radar missions to help in better understanding the processes responsible for volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  12. Doppler radar flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Petlevich, Walter J.; Sverdrup, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    A Doppler radar flowmeter comprises a transceiver which produces an audio frequency output related to the Doppler shift in frequency between radio waves backscattered from particulate matter carried in a fluid and the radiated radio waves. A variable gain amplifier and low pass filter are provided for amplifying and filtering the transceiver output. A frequency counter having a variable triggering level is also provided to determine the magnitude of the Doppler shift. A calibration method is disclosed wherein the amplifier gain and frequency counter trigger level are adjusted to achieve plateaus in the output of the frequency counter and thereby allow calibration without the necessity of being able to visually observe the flow.

  13. Venus radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R. M.; Green, R. R.; Rumsey, H. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents a set of seven radar brightness images and the corresponding altitude contours of small portions (circular regions of 1500-km diameter) of the Venus surface located at the center of the disk taken in the winter of 1973-1974. The regions imaged are arranged in an equatorial belt on the one face of Venus which is always seen on the occasions of closest approach to earth. A real resolution for the images is, typically, 100 x 10 km, while altitude resolution is 500 m.

  14. A fully photonics-based coherent radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghelfi, Paolo; Laghezza, Francesco; Scotti, Filippo; Serafino, Giovanni; Capria, Amerigo; Pinna, Sergio; Onori, Daniel; Porzi, Claudio; Scaffardi, Mirco; Malacarne, Antonio; Vercesi, Valeria; Lazzeri, Emma; Berizzi, Fabrizio; Bogoni, Antonella

    2014-03-01

    The next generation of radar (radio detection and ranging) systems needs to be based on software-defined radio to adapt to variable environments, with higher carrier frequencies for smaller antennas and broadened bandwidth for increased resolution. Today's digital microwave components (synthesizers and analogue-to-digital converters) suffer from limited bandwidth with high noise at increasing frequencies, so that fully digital radar systems can work up to only a few gigahertz, and noisy analogue up- and downconversions are necessary for higher frequencies. In contrast, photonics provide high precision and ultrawide bandwidth, allowing both the flexible generation of extremely stable radio-frequency signals with arbitrary waveforms up to millimetre waves, and the detection of such signals and their precise direct digitization without downconversion. Until now, the photonics-based generation and detection of radio-frequency signals have been studied separately and have not been tested in a radar system. Here we present the development and the field trial results of a fully photonics-based coherent radar demonstrator carried out within the project PHODIR. The proposed architecture exploits a single pulsed laser for generating tunable radar signals and receiving their echoes, avoiding radio-frequency up- and downconversion and guaranteeing both the software-defined approach and high resolution. Its performance exceeds state-of-the-art electronics at carrier frequencies above two gigahertz, and the detection of non-cooperating aeroplanes confirms the effectiveness and expected precision of the system.

  15. A fully photonics-based coherent radar system.

    PubMed

    Ghelfi, Paolo; Laghezza, Francesco; Scotti, Filippo; Serafino, Giovanni; Capria, Amerigo; Pinna, Sergio; Onori, Daniel; Porzi, Claudio; Scaffardi, Mirco; Malacarne, Antonio; Vercesi, Valeria; Lazzeri, Emma; Berizzi, Fabrizio; Bogoni, Antonella

    2014-03-20

    The next generation of radar (radio detection and ranging) systems needs to be based on software-defined radio to adapt to variable environments, with higher carrier frequencies for smaller antennas and broadened bandwidth for increased resolution. Today's digital microwave components (synthesizers and analogue-to-digital converters) suffer from limited bandwidth with high noise at increasing frequencies, so that fully digital radar systems can work up to only a few gigahertz, and noisy analogue up- and downconversions are necessary for higher frequencies. In contrast, photonics provide high precision and ultrawide bandwidth, allowing both the flexible generation of extremely stable radio-frequency signals with arbitrary waveforms up to millimetre waves, and the detection of such signals and their precise direct digitization without downconversion. Until now, the photonics-based generation and detection of radio-frequency signals have been studied separately and have not been tested in a radar system. Here we present the development and the field trial results of a fully photonics-based coherent radar demonstrator carried out within the project PHODIR. The proposed architecture exploits a single pulsed laser for generating tunable radar signals and receiving their echoes, avoiding radio-frequency up- and downconversion and guaranteeing both the software-defined approach and high resolution. Its performance exceeds state-of-the-art electronics at carrier frequencies above two gigahertz, and the detection of non-cooperating aeroplanes confirms the effectiveness and expected precision of the system. PMID:24646997

  16. Calibration Plans for the SMAP Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Kwoun, O.

    2012-12-01

    This presentation will describe the calibration and validation plans for the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) radar. The SMAP radar will supply high resolution backscatter measurements using synthetic aperture (SAR) processing that will aid higher resolution soil moisture retrievals in combination with coincident passive radiometry measurements. Science requirements lead to a backscatter accuracy requirement of 1-dB (one-sigma) at a resolution of 3 km. The errors in backscatter come from speckle noise which can be averaged down in time and/or space, and from calibration errors. Calibration errors are expected due to uncertainties in measuring and modeling of internal performance parameters and external effects. Internal performance parameters include the antenna gain pattern, pointing knowledge, receiver gain, and transmit power. Variations in these are expected due to temperature variation and component aging. External effects include Faraday rotation, and radio frequency interference (RFI). Short term variations in instrument parameters will be tracked by internal calibration measurements that are expected to be stable on a time scale up to one month. Long term variations and biases will be removed using measurements of stable reference targets such as parts of the Amazon rain forest, the oceans and possibly the ice sheets. Faraday rotation effects will be modeled using GPS based total electron content measurements and a forward model of the SMAP radar. These data will be compared with Faraday rotation estimates obtained directly from the SMAP radiometer using the third stokes parameter. RFI will be detected with a threshold technique applied right before range compression. RFI contaminated data are removed and replaced by neighboring uncontaminated data. Discarding contaminated data degrades resolution and increases speckle noise, but avoids the larger errors associated with RFI. In this presentation, we will discuss the expected performance of these

  17. Holmium laser core through internal urethrotomy with explantation of UroLume stent. An ideal approach for a complicated posterior urethral stricture.

    PubMed

    Gupta, N P; Ansari, M S

    2004-05-01

    Although the UroLume wallstent has been proven effective in the treatment of recurrent urethral stricture, obstruction may recur in some cases. A likely cause of obstruction is hyperplastic tissue reaction, which may necessitate the removal of the stent. The hyperplastic tissue reaction may be severe, resulting in a completely obliterative stricture. Stent removal with a completely obliterative stricture and the stent in situ is a tedious job, as there is no lumen in which to place the laser fiber to cut the stent wires. We report on a patient in whom a UroLume urethral stent was placed one year ago for post-traumatic recurrent bulbomembranous urethral stricture. The stricture recurred in spite of the stent in place and the lumen was finally completely obliterated. A holmium laser was used for core through internal urethrotomy and the explantation of the stent. PMID:15147555

  18. Experimental investigations of the internal energy of molecules evaporated via laser-induced acoustic desorption into a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Shea, Ryan C; Petzold, Christopher J; Liu, Ji-Ang; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2007-03-01

    The internal energy of neutral gas-phase organic and biomolecules, evaporated by means of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) into a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer, was investigated through several experimental approaches. The desorbed molecules were demonstrated not to undergo degradation during the desorption process by collecting LIAD-evaporated molecules and subjecting them to analysis by electrospray ionization/quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. Previously established gas-phase basicity values were remeasured for LIAD-evaporated organic molecules and biomolecules with the use of the bracketing method. No endothermic reactions were observed. The remeasured basicity values are in close agreement with the values reported in the literature. The amount of internal energy deposited during LIAD is concluded to be less than a few kilocalories per mole. Chemical ionization with a series of proton-transfer reagents was employed to obtain a breakdown curve for a protonated dipeptide, Val-Pro, evaporated by LIAD. Comparison of this breakdown curve with a previously published analogous curve obtained by using substrate-assisted laser desorption (SALD) to evaporate the peptide suggests that the molecules evaporated via LIAD have a similar internal energy as those evaporated via SALD. PMID:17263513

  19. SMAP's Radar OBP Algorithm Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Charles; Spencer, Michael W.; Veilleux, Louise; Chan, Samuel; He, Yutao; Zheng, Jason; Nguyen, Kayla

    2009-01-01

    An approach for algorithm specifications and development is described for SMAP's radar onboard processor with multi-stage demodulation and decimation bandpass digital filter. Point target simulation is used to verify and validate the filter design with the usual radar performance parameters. Preliminary FPGA implementation is also discussed.

  20. Equatorial MST radars: Further consideration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagos, P.

    1983-01-01

    The results presented give additional support to the need of equatorial MST radars in order to obtain more information on the nature of equatorial waves in the MST region. Radar deduced winds such as obtained at Jicamarca for periods of months indicate that with these data the full range of equatorial waves, with time scales of seconds to years, can be studied.

  1. Space Radar Image of Kilauea, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Data acquired on April 13, 1994 and on October 4, 1994 from the X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar on board the space shuttle Endeavour were used to generate interferometric fringes, which were overlaid on the X-SAR image of Kilauea. The volcano is centered in this image at 19.58 degrees north latitude and 155.55 degrees west longitude. The image covers about 9 kilometers by 13 kilometers (5.6 miles by 8 miles). The X-band fringes correspond clearly to the expected topographic image. The yellow line indicates the area below which was used for the three-dimensional image using altitude lines. The yellow rectangular frame fences the area for the final topographic image. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR. The Instituto Ricerca Elettromagnetismo Componenti Elettronici (IRECE) at the University of Naples was a partner in interferometry analysis.

  2. Space Radar Image of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This three-dimensional image of the volcano Kilauea was generated based on interferometric fringes derived from two X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar data takes on April 13, 1994 and October 4, 1994. The altitude lines are based on quantitative interpolation of the topographic fringes. The level difference between neighboring altitude lines is 20 meters (66 feet). The ground area covers 12 kilometers by 4 kilometers (7.5 miles by 2.5 miles). The altitude difference in the image is about 500 meters (1,640 feet). The volcano is located around 19.58 degrees north latitude and 155.55 degrees west longitude. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR. The Instituto Ricerca Elettromagnetismo Componenti Elettronici (IRECE) at the University of Naples was a partner in the interferometry analysis.

  3. The Science and Utility of Extended Runs and the Future Development of Incoherent Scatter Radar Observational Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eyken, T.

    2006-12-01

    Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) data represent the most comprehensive observations of the temporal behavior of the main parts of the ionosphere, and the associated atmosphere, available. As such, the radars are invaluable tools in characterizing the ionospheric response to energy flows in the Solar-Terrestrial system. Developments in radar operations and reliability now allow very extended data sets to be produced on a fairly routine basis and plans for the International Polar Year (IPY) include the continuous operation of at least one high latitude radar. Using data from two very different 30-day `World Day' co-ordinated observation periods in Autumn 2005 and Spring 2006, we illustrate the utility of such data sets for, inter alia, space weather observation and modeling and discuss the possible future development of such programs using the EISCAT Svalbard Radar, the soon to be completed Advanced Modular Incoherent Scatter Radar (AMISR), and the EISCAT_3D radar (currently being designed).

  4. Low-brightness quantum radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2015-05-01

    One of the major scientific thrusts from recent years has been to try to harness quantum phenomena to dramatically increase the performance of a wide variety of classical information processing devices. These advances in quantum information science have had a considerable impact on the development of standoff sensors such as quantum radar. In this paper we analyze the theoretical performance of low-brightness quantum radar that uses entangled photon states. We use the detection error probability as a measure of sensing performance and the interception error probability as a measure of stealthiness. We compare the performance of quantum radar against a coherent light sensor (such as lidar) and classical radar. In particular, we restrict our analysis to the performance of low-brightness standoff sensors operating in a noisy environment. We show that, compared to the two classical standoff sensing devices, quantum radar is stealthier, more resilient to jamming, and more accurate for the detection of low reflectivity targets.

  5. Atmospheric radar sounding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    Monostatic and bistatic radar techniques for the measurement of the structure of volume targets in the troposphere and lower stratosphere are reviewed. The targets considered are thin turbulent layers in the lower stratosphere and rain in the troposphere. The measurements of scattering from thin turbulent layers show that layers are generally detected at or near the tropopause, and in 31 out of 34 sets of measurements, layers were detected above the tropopause in the lower 10 km of the stratosphere. The threshold for turbulent layer detection corresponds to an equivalent thickness product of ten to the minus 13th power times the cube root of m at a range of 100 km and for layers with less than 1000 m thickness. The measurement of scattering by rain shows that in the New England area both convective and widespread rain consists of a number of small cells. On average, the cells appear to have a half-intensity width of 3 to 4 km as measured with a radar system with a 1.8 km resolution cell size for cells at 100 km range.

  6. Using raindrop size distributions from different types of disdrometer to establish weather radar algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, Luca; Adirosi, Elisa; Roberto, Nicoletta; Vulpiani, Gianfranco; Russo, Fabio; Napolitano, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Radar precipitation retrieval uses several relationships that parameterize precipitation properties (like rainfall rate and liquid water content and attenuation (in case of radars at attenuated frequencies such as those at C- and X- band) as a function of combinations of radar measurements. The uncertainty in such relations highly affects the uncertainty precipitation and attenuation estimates. A commonly used method to derive such relationships is to apply regression methods to precipitation measurements and radar observables simulated from datasets of drop size distributions (DSD) using microphysical and electromagnetic assumptions. DSD datasets are determined both by theoretical considerations (i.e. based on the assumption that the radar always samples raindrops whose sizes follow a gamma distribution) or from experimental measurements collected throughout the years by disdrometers. In principle, using long-term disdrometer measurements provide parameterizations more representative of a specific climatology. However, instrumental errors, specific of a disdrometer, can affect the results. In this study, different weather radar algorithms resulting from DSDs collected by diverse types of disdrometers, namely 2D video disdrometer, first and second generation of OTT Parsivel laser disdrometer, and Thies Clima laser disdrometer, in the area of Rome (Italy) are presented and discussed to establish at what extent dual-polarization radar algorithms derived from experimental DSD datasets are influenced by the different error structure of the different type of disdrometers used to collect the data.

  7. A radar backscattering mechanism of ocean surface in response to rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinan; Zheng, Quanan; Liu, Ren; Duncan, James H.

    2012-11-01

    The characteristics of ocean surface in response to rainfall and its radar back-scatter are simultaneously measured in laboratory. The experiment is carried out in a water pool that is 1.22 m by 1.22 m with a water depth of 0.3 m. Artificial rainfall is generated from an array of hypodermic needles. The surface characteristics including crowns, stalks, secondary droplets and ring waves are measured with a cinematic Laser-Induced-Florescence (LIF) technique. Our experimental results show that impinging raindrops on the water surface generate various water surface structures with different relative sizes. Among them stalks and crowns comprise the dominant radar backscattering. On the basis of these laboratory experiments and theories of radar scattering from a rough surface, a near-resonance radar backscattering model for quantifying the dependence of the radar return intensity on rain rate on the ocean surface is developed. The model explains the radar response to rain rate simultaneously observed by C-band ASAR and ground-based weather radar. The physical model provides reasonable mechanisms to explain the frequency dependence and polarization behavior of radar signatures from rain cells on the ocean surface. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation, Division of Ocean Sciences under grant OCE962107.

  8. Radar Imaging of Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostro, S. J.

    1996-09-01

    Measurements of the distribution of echo power in time delay (range) and Doppler frequency (line-of-sight velocity) can synthesize images of near-Earth and main-belt asteroids (NEAs and MBAs) that traverse the detectability windows of groundbased radar telescopes. Under ideal circumstances, current radar waveforms can achieve decameter surface resolution. The number of useful pixels obtainable in an imaging data set is of the same order as the signal-to-noise ratio, SNR, of an optimally filtered, weighted sum of all the data. (SNR increases as the square root of the integration time.) The upgraded Arecibo telescope which is about to become operational, should be able to achieve single-date SNRs {\\underline>} (20,100) for an average of (35,5) MBAs per year and single-date SNRs {\\underline>} (20,100,1000) for an average of (10,6,2) of the currently catalogued NEAs per year; optical surveying of the NEA population could increase the frequency of opportunities by an order of magnitude. The strongest imaging opportunities predicted for Arecibo between now and the end of 1997 include (the peak SNR/date is in parentheses): 9 Metis (110), 27 Euterpe (170), 80 Sappho (100), 139 Juewa (140), 144 Vibilia (140), 253 Mathilde (100), 2102 Tantalus (570), 3671 Dionysus (170), 3908 1980PA (4400), 4179 Toutatis (16000), 4197 1982TA (1200), 1991VK (700), and 1994PC1 (7400). A delay-Doppler image projects the echo power distribution onto the target's apparent equatorial plane. One cannot know a priori whether one or two (or more) points on the asteroid contributed power to a given pixel, so accurate interpretation of delay-Doppler images requires modeling (Hudson, 1993, Remote Sensing Rev. 8, 195-203). Inversion of an imaging sequence with enough orientational coverage can remove "north/south" ambiguities and can provide estimates of the target's three-dimensional shape, spin state, radar scattering properties, and delay-Doppler trajectory (e.g., Ostro et al. 1995, Science 270, 80

  9. Space Radar Image of North Sea, Germany

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    swiftly than is currently possible. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  10. Space Radar Image of Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a radar image of the Mississippi River Delta where the river enters into the Gulf of Mexico along the coast of Louisiana. This multi-frequency image demonstrates the capability of the radar to distinguish different types of wetlands surfaces in river deltas. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 2, 1995. The image is centered on latitude 29.3 degrees North latitude and 89.28 degrees West longitude. The area shown is approximately 63 kilometers by 43 kilometers (39 miles by 26 miles). North is towards the upper right of the image. As the river enters the Gulf of Mexico, it loses energy and dumps its load of sediment that it has carried on its journey through the mid-continent. This pile of sediment, or mud, accumulates over the years building up the delta front. As one part of the delta becomes clogged with sediment, the delta front will migrate in search of new areas to grow. The area shown on this image is the currently active delta front of the Mississippi. The migratory nature of the delta forms natural traps for oil and the numerous bright spots along the outside of the delta are drilling platforms. Most of the land in the image consists of mud flats and marsh lands. There is little human settlement in this area due to the instability of the sediments. The main shipping channel of the Mississippi River is the broad red stripe running northwest to southeast down the left side of the image. The bright spots within the channel are ships. The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; blue is X-band vertically transmitted, vertically received. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars

  11. Space Radar Image of Altona, Manitoba, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    the magenta indicate differences in the degree of soil moisture change and differences in surface roughness. This seasonal composite demonstrates the sensitivity of radar to changes in agricultural surface conditions such as soil moisture, tillage, cropping and harvesting. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  12. Temperate Ice Depth-Sounding Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara-Olivares, V. A.; Player, K.; Rodriguez-Morales, F.; Gogineni, P.

    2008-12-01

    Glaciers in several parts of the world are reported to be retreating and thinning rapidly over the last decade. Radar instruments can be used to provide a wealth of information regarding the internal and basal conditions of large and small ice masses. These instruments typically operate in the VHF and UHF regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. For temperate-ice sounding, however, the high water content produces scattering and attenuation in propagating radar waves at VHF and UHF frequencies, which significantly reduce the penetration depths. Radars operating in the HF band are better suited for systematic surveys of the thickness and sub-glacial topography of temperate-ice regions. We are developing a dual-frequency Temperate-Ice-Depth Sounding Radar (TIDSoR) that can penetrate through water pockets, thus providing more accurate measurements of temperate ice properties such as thickness and basal conditions. The radar is a light-weight, low power consumption portable system for surface-based observations in mountainous terrain or aerial surveys. TIDSoR operates at two different center frequencies: 7.7 MHz and 14 MHz, with a maximum output peak power of 20 W. The transmit waveform is a digitally generated linear frequency-modulated chirp with 1 MHz bandwidth. The radar can be installed on aircrafts such as the CReSIS UAV [1], DCH-6 (Twin Otter), or P-3 Orion for aerial surveys, where it could be supported by the airplane power system. For surface based experiments, TIDSoR can operate in a backpack configuration powered by a compact battery system. The system can also be installed on a sled towed by a motorized vehicle, in which case the power supply can be replaced by a diesel generator. The radar consists of three functional blocks: the digital section, the radio-frequency (RF) section, and the antenna, and is designed to weigh less than 2 kg, excluding the power supply. The digital section generates the transmit waveforms as well as timing and control signals

  13. Ground Penetrating Radar in Hydrogeophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Susan; Lambot, S.; Binley, A.; Slob, E.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-01-15

    electromagnetic properties and their spatial distribution. As the dielectric permittivity of water overwhelms the permittivity of other soil components, the presence of water in the soil principally governs GPR wave propagation. Therefore, GPR-derived dielectric permittivity is usually used as surrogate measure for soil water content. In the areas of unsaturated zone hydrology and water resources, GPR has been used to identify soil stratigraphy, to locate water tables, to follow wetting front movement, to estimate soil water content, to assist in subsurface hydraulic parameter identification, to assess soil salinity, and to support the monitoring of contaminants. The purpose of this special section of the Vadose Zone Journal is to present recent research advances and applications of GPR in hydrogeophysics, with a particular emphasis on vadose zone investigations. This special section includes contributions presented at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2006 (EGU 2006, Vienna, Austria) and the 11th International Conference on Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR 2006, Columbus, OH). The studies presented here deal with a wide range of surface and borehole GPR applications, including GPR sensitivity to contaminant plumes, new methods for soil water content determination, three-dimensional imaging of the subsurface, time-lapse monitoring of hydrodynamic events and inversion techniques for soil hydraulic properties estimation, and joint interpretation of GPR and electric resistivity tomography (ERT) data.

  14. Large phased-array radars

    SciTech Connect

    Brookner, D.E.

    1988-12-15

    Large phased-array radars can play a very important part in arms control. They can be used to determine the number of RVs being deployed, the type of targeting of the RVs (the same or different targets), the shape of the deployed objects, and possibly the weight and yields of the deployed RVs. They can provide this information at night as well as during the day and during rain and cloud covered conditions. The radar can be on the ground, on a ship, in an airplane, or space-borne. Airborne and space-borne radars can provide high resolution map images of the ground for reconnaissance, of anti-ballistic missile (ABM) ground radar installations, missile launch sites, and tactical targets such as trucks and tanks. The large ground based radars can have microwave carrier frequencies or be at HF (high frequency). For a ground-based HF radar the signal is reflected off the ionosphere so as to provide over-the-horizon (OTH) viewing of targets. OTH radars can potentially be used to monitor stealth targets and missile traffic.

  15. Radar, Insect Population Ecology, and Pest Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, C. R. (Editor); Wolf, W. (Editor); Klassen, W. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Discussions included: (1) the potential role of radar in insect ecology studies and pest management; (2) the potential role of radar in correlating atmospheric phenomena with insect movement; (3) the present and future radar systems; (4) program objectives required to adapt radar to insect ecology studies and pest management; and (5) the specific action items to achieve the objectives.

  16. Evaluation of meteorological airborne Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, P. H.; Mueller, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper will discuss the capabilities of airborne Doppler radar for atmospheric sciences research. The evaluation is based on airborne and ground based Doppler radar observations of convective storms. The capability of airborne Doppler radar to measure horizontal and vertical air motions is evaluated. Airborne Doppler radar is shown to be a viable tool for atmospheric sciences research.

  17. 47 CFR 80.273 - Radar standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar standards. 80.273 Section 80.273... MARITIME SERVICES Equipment Authorization for Compulsory Ships § 80.273 Radar standards. (a) Radar... with radar must comply with the following standards (all incorporated by reference, see § 80.7):...

  18. 47 CFR 80.273 - Radar standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar standards. 80.273 Section 80.273... MARITIME SERVICES Equipment Authorization for Compulsory Ships § 80.273 Radar standards. (a) Radar... with radar must comply with the following standards (all incorporated by reference, see § 80.7):...

  19. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  20. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  1. FIRE_CI2_ETL_RADAR

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-11-25

    FIRE_CI2_ETL_RADAR Project Title:  FIRE II CIRRUS Discipline:  ... Platform:  Ground Station Instrument:  Radar Spatial Coverage:  (37.06, -95.34) Spatial ... Search Guide Documents:  ETL_RADAR Guide Readme Files:  Readme ETL_RADAR (PS) ...

  2. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  3. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  4. 47 CFR 80.273 - Radar standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar standards. 80.273 Section 80.273... MARITIME SERVICES Equipment Authorization for Compulsory Ships § 80.273 Radar standards. (a) Radar... with radar must comply with the following standards (all incorporated by reference, see § 80.7):...

  5. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  6. Radar backscatter modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaber, G. G.; Kozak, R. C.; Gurule, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The terrain analysis software package was restructured and documentation was added. A program was written to test Johnson Space Center's four band scatterometer data for spurious signals data. A catalog of terrain roughness statistics and calibrated four frequency multipolarization scatterometer data is being published to support the maintenance of Death Valley as a radar backscatter calibration test site for all future airborne and spacecraft missions. Test pits were dug through sand covered terrains in the Eastern Sahara to define the depth and character of subsurface interfaces responsible for either backscatter or specular response in SIR-A imagery. Blocky sandstone bedrock surfaces at about 1 m depth were responsible for the brightest SIR-A returns. Irregular very dense CaCO3 cemented sand interfaces were responsible for intermediate grey tones. Ancient river valleys had the weakest response. Reexamination of SEASAT l-band imagery of U.S. deserts continues.

  7. Radar investigation of asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, S. J.

    1982-01-01

    The dual polarization CW radar system which permits simultaneous reception in the same rotational sense of circular polarization as transmitted (i.e., the "SC" sense) and in the opposite ("OC") sense, was used to observe five previously unobserved asteroids: 2 Pallas, 8 Flora, 22 Kalliope, 132 Aethra, and 471 Papagena. Echoes from Pallas and Flora were easily detected in the OC sense on each of several nights. Weighted mean echo power spectra also show marginally significant responses in the SC sense. An approximately 4.5 standard deviation signal was obtained for Aethra. The Doppler shift of the peak is about 10 Hz higher than that predicted from the a priori trial ephemeris. Calculations are performed to determine whether this frequency offset can be reconciled dynamically with optical positions reported for Aethra.

  8. He-Ne laser-induced changes in germination, thermodynamic parameters, internal energy, enzyme activities and physiological attributes of wheat during germination and early growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Yasir; Perveen, Rashida; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ali, Qasim; Iqbal, Munawar; Ahmad, Muhammad Raza

    2013-04-01

    Using low power continuous wave He-Ne laser irradiation of seeds, the germination characteristics, thermodynamic changes and enzyme activities as well as changes in morphological attributes were explored for wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. S-24) cultivar. The changes in thermodynamic properties such as change in enthalpy (ΔH), entropy generation [(ΔSe)], entropy flux [(ΔSc)], entropy generation ratio [(ΔS)e/Δt], and entropy flux ratio [(ΔS)c/Δt] showed significant (P < 0.05) changes at an energy level of 500 mJ. The germination energy (GE), germination percentage (G%), germination index (GI) as well as α-amylase and protease activities was also found to be higher at 500 mJ, while the mean emergence time (MET) and time for 50% germination (E50) decreased for 300 mJ irradiance. The internal energy of the seeds increased significantly at all laser energy levels, but was highest for 500 mJ 72 h after sowing. The enzyme activities increased up to 24 h after sowing and then declined. The activities of α-amylase and protease were found to be positively correlated with the plant physiological attributes. These results indicate that low power continuous wave He-Ne laser (632 nm) treatment has considerable biological effects on seed metabolism during germination as well as on later vegetative growth.

  9. Capturing atmospheric effects on 3D millimeter wave radar propagation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Richard D.; Fiorino, Steven T.; Keefer, Kevin J.; Stringer, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    Traditional radar propagation modeling is done using a path transmittance with little to no input for weather and atmospheric conditions. As radar advances into the millimeter wave (MMW) regime, atmospheric effects such as attenuation and refraction become more pronounced than at traditional radar wavelengths. The DoD High Energy Laser Joint Technology Offices High Energy Laser End-to-End Operational Simulation (HELEEOS) in combination with the Laser Environmental Effects Definition and Reference (LEEDR) code have shown great promise simulating atmospheric effects on laser propagation. Indeed, the LEEDR radiative transfer code has been validated in the UV through RF. Our research attempts to apply these models to characterize the far field radar pattern in three dimensions as a signal propagates from an antenna towards a point in space. Furthermore, we do so using realistic three dimensional atmospheric profiles. The results from these simulations are compared to those from traditional radar propagation software packages. In summary, a fast running method has been investigated which can be incorporated into computational models to enhance understanding and prediction of MMW propagation through various atmospheric and weather conditions.

  10. The Clementine Bistatic Radar Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozette, S.; Lichtenberg, C. L.; Spudis, P.; Bonner, R.; Ort, W.; Malaret, E.; Robinson, M.; Shoemaker, E. M.

    1996-01-01

    During the Clementine 1 mission, a bistatic radar experiment measured the magnitude and polarization of the radar echo versus bistatic angle, beta, for selected lunar areas. Observations of the lunar south pole yield a same-sense polarization enhancement around beta = 0. Analysis shows that the observed enhancement is localized to the permanently shadowed regions of the lunar south pole. Radar observations of periodically solar-illuminated lunar surfaces, including the north pole, yielded no such enhancement. A probable explanation for these differences is the presence of low-loss volume scatterers, such as water ice, in the permanently shadowed region at the south pole.

  11. Gyroklystron-Powered WARLOC Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danly, B. G.; Cheung, W. J.; Gregers-Hansen, V.; Linde, G.; Ngo, M.

    2003-12-01

    A high-power, coherent, W-band (94 GHz) millimeter-wave radar has been developed at the Naval Research Laboratory. This radar, named WARLOC, employs a 100 kW peak power, 10 kW average power gyro-klystron as the final power amplifier, an overmoded transmission line system, and a quasi-optical duplexer, together with a high gain antenna, four-channel receiver, and state-of-the-art signal processing. The gyro-amplifiers and the implementation in the WARLOC radar will be described.

  12. The Clementine bistatic radar experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nozette, S.; Lichtenberg, C.L.; Spudis, P.; Bonner, R.; Ort, W.; Malaret, E.; Robinson, M.; Shoemaker, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    During the Clementine 1 mission, a bistatic radar experiment measured the magnitude and polarization of the radar echo versus bistatic angle, ??, for selected lunar areas. Observations of the lunar south pole yield a same- sense polarization enhancement around ?? = 0. Analysis shows that the observed enhancement is localized to the permanently shadowed regions of the lunar south pole. Radar observations of periodically solar-illuminated lunar surfaces, including the north pole, yielded no such enhancement. A probable explanation for these differences is the presence of low-loss volume scatterers, such as water ice, in the permanently shadowed region at the south pole.

  13. Flight evaluation of a radar cursor technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, J.

    1980-03-01

    Preliminary results are presented of a flight test evaluation of a radar cursor technique to be used as an aid in acquiring and tracking the desired ground track during airborne radar approaches. The test was performed using a Sikorsky CH-53A helicopter. The airborne radar system used was a BENDIX RDR-1400A modified to electronically produce a radar cursor display of course error. Airborne radar approaches were made to an offshore and an airport test environment. The specific purpose of the test was to evaluate the practical utility of the radar cursor as an aid to performing airborne radar approaches. The preliminary conclusion of this test is that the use of the radar cursor improved course acquisition and ground tracking significantly with pilotage errors and total system cross-track errors reduced by one-half or better. The radar cursor technique shows potential in reducing airspace requirements for airborne radar approaches.

  14. Radar manifestations of ship wakes in algae bloom zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mityagina, Marina I.; Lavrova, Olga Yu.

    2014-10-01

    Radar manifestations of ship wakes in zones of phytoplankton bloom are discussed. It is shown that these signatures can be regarded as indicators of biogenic activity. The main data are satellite radar images. Satellite visible (VIS) and infrared (IR) satellite data are also analyzed. The large amount of the available data allowed us to make some generalizations and obtain statistically reliable results concerning spatial and temporal variability of certain type of ship wake manifestations in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the sea surface. Traditional classification of surface ship wakes manifestations in satellite SAR images specifies distinct features such as a dark trailing centreline region (turbulent wake), narrow V-wakes aligned at some angle to the ship's path (the Kelvin wake), and, sometimes, internal wave wakes generated under conditions of shallow stratification. Their characteristic lengths are reported to be up to tens of kilometers and they can last from tens of minutes up to one hour. Instances of radar signatures of the ship wakes dissimilar to the previously described were detected in radar images obtained in the course of a satellite monitoring campaign of the central and south-eastern Baltic. These ship wakes can be seen in satellite radar images as long bright strips of enhanced backscatter with characteristic length of up to several hundred kilometres lasting more than 5 hours. A hypothesis is put forward of the coherence of this type of ship wakes detected in sea surface radar imagery and areas of intensive biogenic activity under conditions of low near-surface winds. Statistics on their seasonal, spatial and year-to-year distribution are drawn. These results are compared with temporal and spatial variations in chlorophyll a concentration and intensity of phytoplankton bloom in the area of interest. Chlorophyll a concentration maps derived from satellite data are used, as well as those based on in situ measurements. The relation

  15. An enhanced Planetary Radar Operating Centre (PROC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catallo, C.

    2010-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using GPRs is an important role of Italy and numerous scientific international space programs are carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Three experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry) provided by ASI within a NASA/ESA/ASI joint venture framework are successfully operating: MARSIS on-board MEX, SHARAD on-board MRO and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft: the missions have been further extended . Three dedicated operational centers, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD are operating from the missions beginning to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution and even if they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). In order to harmonize operations either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view PROC is designed and developed for offering improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. PROC is, therefore, conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs, such as Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) The paper describes how the new PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation aiding scientists to increase their knowledge in the field of surface

  16. Definition of The Consert / Rosetta Radar Performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herique, A.; Kofman, W.

    The ROSETTA/ESA probe will rendezvous Comet Wirtanen in 2011 and launch a Lander at the nucleus surface. The CONSERT instrument will perform the sounding of the comet nucleus by measuring a 90 MHz electromagnetic wave propagation from the Lander to the orbiter throughout the nucleus. The goal of this sounding is to de- termine the internal structures of the comet nucleus at different scales and to deduce information on its composition (density, type and abundance of the refractor). The flight model of both Lander and Orbiter parts of the instrument are in integration and calibration phases. The CONSERT instrument is an original concept of spaceborne radar based on the propagation throughout the nucleus while the classical radars are based on the reflec- tion. This radar consists in three functions: - A chronometer to measure the propaga- tion delay (main function) - An imager to separate the multipath propagation - A ra- diometer to estimate the wave attenuation (secondary function) The ground calibration of the instrument has to characterize these three functions but due to the novelty of the instrument concept we have no classical set of parameters to quantify the instrument performances and we do not know the relevant performances from a data-inversion point of view. In this paper, we present the mission and its objectives and so we develop the method used to define a relevant set of instrument performances using the data of prototypes of the instrument and we compare our radar characterization with the SAR instru- ment performances. In particular, we study the accuracy and the stability of the delay measurement and of the power measurement. In a second time we propose a ground calibration plan. The instrument design and the absence of calibration channel due to mass and power constraints show technical limitation and require specific signal pro- cessing and calibration protocol. To end we show preliminary results of the instrument ground calibration. - Herique

  17. Propagation of radar rainfall uncertainty in urban flood simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liguori, Sara; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel

    2013-04-01

    This work discusses the results of the implementation of a novel probabilistic system designed to improve ensemble sewer flow predictions for the drainage network of a small urban area in the North of England. The probabilistic system has been developed to model the uncertainty associated to radar rainfall estimates and propagate it through radar-based ensemble sewer flow predictions. The assessment of this system aims at outlining the benefits of addressing the uncertainty associated to radar rainfall estimates in a probabilistic framework, to be potentially implemented in the real-time management of the sewer network in the study area. Radar rainfall estimates are affected by uncertainty due to various factors [1-3] and quality control and correction techniques have been developed in order to improve their accuracy. However, the hydrological use of radar rainfall estimates and forecasts remains challenging. A significant effort has been devoted by the international research community to the assessment of the uncertainty propagation through probabilistic hydro-meteorological forecast systems [4-5], and various approaches have been implemented for the purpose of characterizing the uncertainty in radar rainfall estimates and forecasts [6-11]. A radar-based ensemble stochastic approach, similar to the one implemented for use in the Southern-Alps by the REAL system [6], has been developed for the purpose of this work. An ensemble generator has been calibrated on the basis of the spatial-temporal characteristics of the residual error in radar estimates assessed with reference to rainfall records from around 200 rain gauges available for the year 2007, previously post-processed and corrected by the UK Met Office [12-13]. Each ensemble member is determined by summing a perturbation field to the unperturbed radar rainfall field. The perturbations are generated by imposing the radar error spatial and temporal correlation structure to purely stochastic fields. A

  18. Fly eye radar or micro-radar sensor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, Pavlo; Asmolova, Olga

    2014-05-01

    To compensate for its eye's inability to point its eye at a target, the fly's eye consists of multiple angularly spaced sensors giving the fly the wide-area visual coverage it needs to detect and avoid the threats around him. Based on a similar concept a revolutionary new micro-radar sensor technology is proposed for detecting and tracking ground and/or airborne low profile low altitude targets in harsh urban environments. Distributed along a border or around a protected object (military facility and buildings, camp, stadium) small size, low power unattended radar sensors can be used for target detection and tracking, threat warning, pre-shot sniper protection and provides effective support for homeland security. In addition it can provide 3D recognition and targets classification due to its use of five orders more pulses than any scanning radar to each space point, by using few points of view, diversity signals and intelligent processing. The application of an array of directional antennas eliminates the need for a mechanical scanning antenna or phase processor. It radically decreases radar size and increases bearing accuracy several folds. The proposed micro-radar sensors can be easy connected to one or several operators by point-to-point invisible protected communication. The directional antennas have higher gain, can be multi-frequency and connected to a multi-functional network. Fly eye micro-radars are inexpensive, can be expendable and will reduce cost of defense.

  19. Historical aspects of radar atmospheric dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, Susumu

    1989-01-01

    A review of the history of radar techniques which have been applied to atmospheric observation is given. The author starts with ionosphere observation with the ionosonde, symbolizing as it does the earliest history of radar observation, and proceeds to later developments in radar observation such as the use of partial reflection, meteor, and incoherent scatter radars. Mesosphere stratosphere troposphere (MST) radars are discussed in terms of lower atmosphere observation.

  20. NASA Radar Images Asteroid Toutatis

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 64-frame movie of asteroid Toutatis was generated from data by Goldstone's Solar System Radar on Dec. 12 and 13, 2012. In the movie clips, the rotation of the asteroid appears faster than it o...