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Sample records for international textile clothing

  1. Clothing and Textiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide on clothing and textiles was developed for use in consumer and homemaking education in Texas. Introductory materials provide information on contents and use of the guide, program planning, curriculum planning, and teaching handicapped and disadvantaged students. The guide is divided into five parts, containing materials for…

  2. Clothing and Textile Student Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    Forty-seven performance-based instructional modules on six major topics are provided for the home economics content area of clothing and textiles. The six topics are (1) planning basics (psychological, physical, social, and behavioral aspects of clothing; elements of design; principles of design; and style and fashion in clothing), (2) buyership…

  3. Clothing and Textiles (Intermediate). Instructor's Guide. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This clothing and textiles teacher's manual contains five instructional units for a semester course. Units included are (1) Significance of Textiles and Clothing to the Individual in Society; (2) Nature of Textiles and Clothing; (3) Acquisition, Use, and Care of Textiles and Clothing; (4) Garment Construction; and (5) Occupations in…

  4. Stories in the Cloth: Art Therapy and Narrative Textiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garlock, Lisa Raye

    2016-01-01

    In this article I weave together the relevance of narrative textile work in therapeutic and human rights contexts; showcase Common Threads, an international nonprofit that uses story cloths with survivors of gender-based violence; outline a master's level art therapy course in story cloths; and relate how textiles helped build a sibling…

  5. Textiles & Clothing. Home Economics for Oregon Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This curriculum guide on textiles and clothing is one of a set of five Oregon goal-based home economics curriculum guides. Provided in this guide are the following: one suggested district goal (students will be able to make textile and clothing decisions which meet individual and family needs); four suggested program goals (e.g., the student will…

  6. North Carolina Clothing and Textiles Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This guide was developed to be used by consumer home economics teachers as a resource in planning and teaching a year-long course in clothing and textiles for high school students in North Carolina. The guide is organized in units of instruction for a first semester course and a second semester course. Each unit contains a content outline,…

  7. Clothing and Textiles II. Semester Course. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Harriet; And Others

    The clothing and textiles guide for a second level semester course for grades 10-12 identifies objectives and learning experiences with basic reference to developmental tasks, needs, interests, capacities, and prior learning experiences of students. It was developed for use with students who exhibited skill and a high degree of satisfaction from…

  8. The effect of clothing care activities on textile formaldehyde content.

    PubMed

    Novick, Rachel M; Nelson, Mindy L; McKinley, Meg A; Anderson, Grace L; Keenan, James J

    2013-01-01

    Textiles are commonly treated with formaldehyde-based residues that may potentially induce allergic contact dermatitis in sensitive individuals. This study examined the initial formaldehyde content in clothing and resulting changes due to care activities. Twenty clothing articles were examined and 17 of them did not have detectable levels of formaldehyde. One shirt contained a formaldehyde concentration of 3172 ppm, and two pairs of pants had formaldehyde concentrations of 1391 ppm and 86 ppm. The two highest results represent formaldehyde levels that are up to 40-fold greater than international textile regulations. The two items with the greatest formaldehyde content were washed and dried in a manner similar to that used by consumers, including hand and machine washing in hot or cold water followed by air or machine drying. The washing and drying procedures reduced formaldehyde levels to between 26 and 72% of untreated controls. Differences in the temperature or type of washing and drying did not result in a clear trend in the subsequent formaldehyde content. In addition, samples were hot ironed, which did not affect the formaldehyde content as significantly. Understanding the formaldehyde content in clothing and its potential reduction through care activities may be useful for manufacturers and formaldehyde-sensitive individuals. PMID:24053365

  9. 78 FR 35875 - Proposed Extension of Approval of Information Collection; Comment Request: Clothing Textiles...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... Proposed Extension of Approval of Information Collection; Comment Request: Clothing Textiles, Vinyl Plastic... manufacturers and importers of clothing, textiles and related materials intended for use in clothing under the Standard for the Flammability of Clothing Textiles (16 CFR part 1610) and the Standard for the...

  10. Reeling in the textiles at Row Clothing Enterprises

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgley, H.

    1997-12-01

    While a handful of textile processing centers in operation today can date their roots back to the turn of this century or before, Row Clothing Enterprises (Baltimore) first opened its doors in 1985. Soon after, it climbed its way to becoming one of the premier textile processing businesses in the country. And what they want most of all is usable clothing--the discards of American secondhand clothing stores. The company exports 100% of the usable clothing it recovers paying institutions as much as $150 a ton for the material. Graders also sort the material into piles headed for the mutilating, or fiber-shredding, machine. While not all the material is shredded, it does provide more opportunities for resale. Whatever Row cannot resell as clothing--because it is soiled or torn--gets processed into industrial wiping cloths, if it is cotton. Clothing made from wool and polyester is sent to woolen and polyester fiber mills to be made into new clothing. While 80% of Row`s wiper market is domestic, 80% of its fiber market is overseas.

  11. Vocational Training in the Textiles and Clothing Industries in Greece.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drimousis, I.; Zisimopoulos, A.

    This document examines the circumstances under which vocational training in Greece is provided for jobs in the textile and clothing industries. Its objective is to identify guidelines for vocational training for a skilled work force at regional and national levels and to contribute to job mobility between industries. Statistical data,…

  12. Textiles & Clothing Curriculum Guide. Energy and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Jane S.; Morris, Carol

    This curriculum guide on textiles and clothing, covering one of the five content areas of the Energy and Family Curriculum Guide, has been designed to provide learning experiences and identify resources that can be used to develop units of study related to energy usage and conservation. The guide is intended for use in comprehensive courses of…

  13. TEACHING-LEARNING UNITS IN CLOTHING AND TEXTILES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Association of Future Homemakers of America, Phoenix.

    GUIDELINES FOR TEACHERS WHO ARE PLANNING LESSONS FOR ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY STUDENTS IN CLOTHING AND TEXTILE CLASSES WERE DEVELOPED BY TEACHERS, TEACHER EDUCATORS, AND STATE SUPERVISORS. MATERIALS WERE TESTED BY CLASSROOM TEACHERS, REFINED, AND EDITED. MODELS OF TEACHING-LEARNING UNITS, EACH ON DIFFERENT COLORED PAPER, ARE PRESENTED FOR THREE…

  14. Chemistry I and Clothing, Textiles and Fashion Merchandising Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clausen, Donald F.

    1980-01-01

    The application of principles learned in a first course in chemistry to chemical problems of interest to home economics majors specializing in clothing and textiles or fashion merchandising is described. Concept transfer--teaching difficult concepts in terms of an everyday analogue--is also explained and relevant laboratory experiments are…

  15. Measurement of EMG activity with textile electrodes embedded into clothing.

    PubMed

    Finni, T; Hu, M; Kettunen, P; Vilavuo, T; Cheng, S

    2007-11-01

    Novel textile electrodes that can be embedded into sports clothing to measure averaged rectified electromyography (EMG) have been developed for easy use in field tests and in clinical settings. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity, reliability and feasibility of this new product to measure averaged rectified EMG. The validity was tested by comparing the signals from bipolar textile electrodes (42 cm(2)) and traditional bipolar surface electrodes (1.32 cm(2)) during bilateral isometric knee extension exercise with two electrode locations (A: both electrodes located in the same place, B: traditional electrodes placed on the individual muscles according to SENIAM, n=10 persons for each). Within-session repeatability (the coefficient of variation CV%, n=10) was calculated from five repetitions of 60% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). The day-to-day repeatability (n=8) was assessed by measuring three different isometric force levels on five consecutive days. The feasibility of the textile electrodes in field conditions was assessed during a maximal treadmill test (n=28). Bland-Altman plots showed a good agreement within 2SD between the textile and traditional electrodes, demonstrating that the textile electrodes provide similar information on the EMG signal amplitude to the traditional electrodes. The within-session CV ranged from 13% to 21% in both the textile and traditional electrodes. The day-to-day CV was smaller, ranging from 4% to 11% for the textile electrodes. A similar relationship (r(2)=0.5) was found between muscle strength and the EMG of traditional and textile electrodes. The feasibility study showed that the textile electrode technique can potentially make EMG measurements very easy in field conditions. This study indicates that textile electrodes embedded into shorts is a valid and feasible method for assessing the average rectified value of EMG. PMID:17978424

  16. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Consumer Approach Strand: Textiles and Clothing. Module I-D-1: Consumer Approach to Textiles and Clothing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Fresno. Dept. of Home Economics.

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on consumer approach to textiles and clothing is the first in a set of four modules on consumer education related to textiles and clothing. (This set is part of a larger series of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education…

  17. The Engineering Design of Intelligent Protective Textiles and Clothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungmee; Jayaraman, Sundaresan

    Terrorism has been on the rise in the past decade and continues to disrupt everyday life in many parts of the world. Protection against such threats is therefore critical for preserving peace and security around the world. In particular, the safety of defense personnel engaged in confronting and responding to such threats must be ensured. Since textiles and clothing are pervasive and are always "on" the soldier, they can serve as an excellent infrastructure or platform for such individual protection systems.

  18. Clothing and Textiles (Intermediate). Performance Objectives and Criterion-Referenced Test Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide was developed to assist home economics teachers in implementing the Missouri Vocational Instructional Management System in an intermediate clothing and textiles semester course. A minimum of two performance objectives were developed and validated for each competency by teachers with expertise in the area of clothing and textiles and one…

  19. Research Trends in Textiles and Clothing: An Analysis of Three Journals, 1980-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennon, Sharron J.; Johnson, Kim K. P.; Park, Ji-Hye

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of textiles and clothing research in the Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal, and Clothing and Textiles Research Journal 1980-1999 (n=586) found that survey and experimentation were used most often; data analysis is primarily quantitative, although qualitative is increasing; and in the…

  20. Competencies in Clothing and Textiles Needed by Beginning Family and Consumer Sciences Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Cheryl L.

    2002-01-01

    A survey of 300 family and consumer sciences (FCS) professionals in North Carolina received 140 responses that rated the importance of teacher competencies in textiles and clothing instruction. Clothing construction ranked highest. Results informed the work of a committee revising FCS curriculum. (JOW)

  1. Textile electrode characterization: dependencies in the skin-clothing-electrode interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macías, R.; Fernández, M.; Bragós, R.

    2013-04-01

    Given the advances in the technology known as smart textiles, the use of textile electrodes is more and more common. However this kind of electrodes presents some differences regarding the standard ones as the Ag-AgCl electrodes. Therefore to characterize them as best as possible is required. In order to make the characterization reproducible and repetitive, a skin dummy made of agar-agar and a standardized measurement set-up is used in this article. Thus, some dependencies in the skin-electrode interface are described. These dependencies are related to the surface of the textile electrode, the conductive material and the applied pressure. Furthermore, the dependencies on clothing in the skin-textile electrode interface are also analyzed. Thus, based on some parameters such as textile material, width and number of layers, the behavior of the interface made up by the skin, the textile electrode and clothing is depicted.

  2. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Consumer Approach Strand: Textiles and Clothing. Module I-D-4: Applications and Implications of New Technology in Textiles and Clothing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Marjory

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on applications and implications of new technology in textiles and clothing is the fourth in a set of four modules on consumer education related to textiles and clothing. (This set is part of a larger series of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching…

  3. 75 FR 5578 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request-Flammability Standards for Clothing Textiles and Vinyl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... October 29, 2009 (74 FR 55819), the Consumer Product Safety Commission published a notice in accordance... COMMISSION Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request--Flammability Standards for Clothing Textiles and Vinyl... clothing textiles and vinyl plastic film. DATES: Written comments on this request for extension of...

  4. Determination of Appropriate Content for a Clothing and Textiles Specialized Course. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Instructional Materials Center.

    A study was undertaken to obtain and analyze input from consumer and homemaking education teachers, students, and parents regarding desired content for a clothing and textiles semester course. Of the 1,200 questionnaires mailed to parents, teachers, and students throughout Texas, 327 were returned. Of these, 178 were teacher questionnaires, 84…

  5. Technical Training Requirements of Middle Management in the Greek Textile and Clothing Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fotinopoulou, K.; Manolopoulos, N.

    A case study of 16 companies in the Greek textile and clothing industry elicited the training needs of the industry's middle managers. The study concentrated on large and medium-sized work units, using a lengthy questionnaire. The study found that middle managers increasingly need to solve problems and ensure the reliability of new equipment and…

  6. 75 FR 51016 - Third Party Testing for Certain Children's Products; Clothing Textiles: Requirements for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... section 14(a) of the CPSA in a notice published in the Federal Register on February 9, 2009 (74 FR 6396... December 28, 2009, the Commission published a notice in the Federal Register (74 FR 68588) revising the... COMMISSION Third Party Testing for Certain Children's Products; Clothing Textiles: Requirements...

  7. Teaching Clothing and Textiles: An Appraisal by Students in Tertiary Institutions in Delta State Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arubayi, D. O.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to find out how students appraise the teaching of Clothing and Textiles in Tertiary Institutions in Delta State, Nigeria. To do this two research questions and two hypotheses were formulated to give direction to the study. The target population consisted of 660 Home Economics Students enrolled in Home Economics in…

  8. Attitude and Motivation as Predictors of Academic Achievement of Students in Clothing and Textiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uwameiye, B. E.; Osho, L. E.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated attitude and motivation as predictors of academic achievement of students in clothing and textiles. Three colleges of education in Edo and Delta States were randomly selected for use in this study. From each school, 40 students were selected from Year III using simple random technique yielding a total of 240 students. The…

  9. Protective clothing textile research for space activities in the 1980's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radnofsky, M. I.; Kosmo, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    Textile and clothing specifications for space activities are discussed, emphasizing a chronological and utilitarian role. New fabrication techniques led to the Mercury Space Suit, a constant-wear hybrid of the omni-environmental full pressure suit used by high-flying pilots of the 1950s. The Gemini program (1964-1966) provided the first specifically designed protective clothing assembly for both intra- and extravehicular operations. The G4C, used for EV (extravehicular) activities, protected the astronaut against solar radiation, heat loss, and meteoroid penetration. The clothing for the Apollo program (1968-1975) mirrored a greater concern for fire safety with Durette (a halogenated polyamide) and PBI (polybenzimadazole) widely used for intravehicular garments. With the advent of the Shuttle program, cabin pressure and composition were changed from 6 psi, 100% oxygen to 9-14 psi, 23.4% oxygen, 76.6% N2. As a result, 'off-the-shelf' materials were used without compromising fire safety. Reusability was stressed, as textile costs and durability were now important selection criteria noting that existing textile materials will probably be adequate for the next 20 years of space operations and research. A portable lunar survival shelter made of textiles is being developed; and a preliminary design for an EV 'tunnel suit system' (an access tunnel and homoform work station) is already in existence.

  10. Fiber, Fabric, and Fashion. Clothing and Textiles Curriculum. Environment I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Univ., Tempe.

    A competency-based instructional guide for grades 7-14, this volume is one of three parts, each of which focuses on a different instructional environment (psychomotor, cognitive, or affective) for clothing or fashion instruction, and each of which includes competencies and corresponding learning activities for each of three instructional levels.…

  11. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Occupational Strand: Textiles and Clothing. Module II-D-3: Merchandising Textiles and Ready-to-Wear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gylling, Margaret

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on merchandising textiles and ready-to-wear is the third in a set of three modules on occupational aspects of textiles and clothing. (This set is part of a larger series of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education…

  12. Research in intelligent biomedical clothing vs. realities in the European textile business.

    PubMed

    Walter, Lutz

    2004-01-01

    In order to make intelligent biomedical clothing a market reality, a critical mass of scientific, technical and industrial capacities from various disciplines and industries must be successfully brought together. The textiles and clothing sector, i.e. the industry that transform natural or man-made fibres into yarns then with a myriad of processing options into complex tissues and finally into clothing, is undoubtedly a crucial element in such development. With Europe disposing of the world's most diverse, productive and innovative textiles and clothing industry, in addition to relevant expertise and resources in other scientific disciplines and industrial sectors, it could play a leading role in the advancement of the concept of intelligent biomedical clothing. In this process, a great number of challenges--firstly scientific and technical in nature--still need to be overcome and support from public funding programmes could constitute the necessary trigger for research and industrial efforts to be seriously undertaken. In view of the great benefits of such new products for the individual consumer, national health care systems and the society as a whole, a concerted effort in private-public partnership seems merited. PMID:15718632

  13. The Potential of RFID Technology in the Textile and Clothing Industry: Opportunities, Requirements and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legnani, Elena; Cavalieri, Sergio; Pinto, Roberto; Dotti, Stefano

    In the current competitive environment, companies need to extensively exploit the use of advanced technologies in order to develop a sustainable advantage, enhance their operational efficiency and better serve customers. In this context, RFID technology has emerged as a valid support for the company progress and its value is becoming more and more apparent. In particular, the textile and clothing industry, characterised by short life-cycles , quick response production , fast distribution, erratic customer preferences and impulsive purchasing, is one of the sectors which can extensively benefit from the RFID technology. However, actual applications are still very limited, especially in the upstream side of the supply network. This chapter provides an insight into the main benefits and potentials of this technology and highlights the main issues which are currently inhibiting its large scale development in the textile and clothing industry. The experience of two industry-academia projects and the relative fallouts are reported.

  14. Quinolines in clothing textiles--a source of human exposure and wastewater pollution?

    PubMed

    Luongo, Giovanna; Thorsén, Gunnar; Ostman, Conny

    2014-05-01

    A production process in which the use of various types of chemicals seems to be ubiquitous makes the textile industry a growing problem regarding both public health as well as the environment. Among several substances used at each stage, the present study focuses on the quinolines, a class of compounds involved in the manufacture of dyes, some of which are skin irritants and/or classified as probable human carcinogens. A method was developed for the determination of quinoline derivatives in textile materials comprising ultrasound-assisted solvent extraction, solid phase extraction cleanup, and final analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Quinoline and ten quinoline derivatives were determined in 31 textile samples. The clothing samples, diverse in color, material, brand, country of manufacture, and price, and intended for a broad market, were purchased from different shops in Stockholm, Sweden. Quinoline, a possible human carcinogen, was found to be the most abundant compound present in almost all of the samples investigated, reaching a level of 1.9 mg in a single garment, and it was found that quinoline and its derivatives were mainly correlated to polyester material. This study points out the importance of screening textiles with nontarget analysis to investigate the presence of chemicals in an unbiased manner. Focus should be primarily on clothing worn close to the body. PMID:24604325

  15. Benzothiazole, benzotriazole, and their derivates in clothing textiles--a potential source of environmental pollutants and human exposure.

    PubMed

    Avagyan, Rozanna; Luongo, Giovanna; Thorsén, Gunnar; Östman, Conny

    2015-04-01

    Textiles play an important role in our daily life, and textile production is one of the oldest industries. In the manufacturing chain from natural and/or synthetic fibers to the final clothing products, the use of many different chemicals is ubiquitous. A lot of research has focused on chemicals in textile wastewater, but the knowledge of the actual content of harmful chemicals in clothes sold on the retail market is limited. In this paper, we have focused on eight benzothiazole and benzotriazole derivatives, compounds rated as high production volume chemicals. Twenty-six clothing samples of various textile materials and colors manufactured in 14 different countries were analyzed in textile clothing using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Among the investigated textile products, 11 clothes were for babies, toddlers, and children. Eight of the 11 compounds included in the investigation were detected in the textiles. Benzothiazole was present in 23 of 26 investigated garments in concentrations ranging from 0.45 to 51 μg/g textile. The garment with the highest concentration of benzothiazole contained a total amount of 8.3 mg of the chemical. The third highest concentration of benzothiazole (22 μg/g) was detected in a baby body made from "organic cotton" equipped with the "Nordic Ecolabel" ("Svanenmärkt"). It was also found that concentrations of benzothiazoles in general were much higher than those for benzotriazoles. This study implicates that clothing textiles can be a possible route for human exposure to harmful chemicals by skin contact, as well as being a potential source of environmental pollutants via laundering and release to household wastewater. PMID:25342452

  16. Improving the appearance of all textile products from clothing to home textile using laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondogan, Ziynet; Pamuk, Oktay; Ondogan, Ece Nuket; Ozguney, Arif

    2005-11-01

    Denim trousers, commonly known as "blue jeans", have maintained their popularity for many years. For the purpose of supporting customers' purchasing behaviour and to address their aesthetic taste, companies have been trying in recent years to develop various techniques to improve the visual aspects of denim fabrics. These techniques mainly include printing on fabrics, embroidery and washing the final product. Especially, fraying certain areas of the fabric by sanding and stone washing to create designs is a popular technique. However, due to certain inconveniences caused by these procedures and in response to growing demands, research is underway to obtain a similar appearance by creating better quality and more advantageous manufacturing conditions. As is known, the laser is a source of energy which can be directed on desired objects and whose power and intensity can be easily controlled. Use of the laser enables us to cut a great variety of material from metal to fabric. Starting off from this point, we thought it would be possible to transfer certain designs onto the surface of textile material by changing the dye molecules in the fabric and creating alterations in its colour quality values by directing the laser to the material at reduced intensity. This study mainly deals with a machine specially designed for making use of laser beams to transfer pictures, figures as well as graphics of desired variety, size and intensity on all kinds of surfaces in textile manufacturing such as knitted—woven fabrics, leather, etc. at desired precision and without damaging the texture of the material. In the designed system, computer-controlled laser beams are used to change the colour of the dye material on the textile surface by directing the laser beams at a desired wavelength and intensity onto various textile surfaces selected for application. For this purpose, a laser beam source that can reach the initial level of power and that can be controlled by means of a

  17. Vocational Profiles and Training Requirements of Foremen and Overseers in the Textile/Clothing Sector in Portugal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereira, Licinio Chainho; And Others

    A study examined the current needs of middle management in the textile and clothing industry in Portugal. Focus was on Level 3--foremen, overseers, and team leaders. Eight of 400 enterprises responded to the first questionnaire; 370 of 1,000 responded to the revised questionnaire. The following data were collected: number of employees according to…

  18. Tracing a Transformation in Industrial Relations. The Case of Xerox Corporation and the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutcher-Gershenfeld, Joel

    A combination of crises and innovative attempts to manage them that began in 1980 transformed the relationship between Xerox Corporation and the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union, which represents most of Xerox's manufacturing employees. Eight pivotal episodes were largely responsible for the transformation. The first was a joint…

  19. Made to Measure: Language, Literacy and Numeracy in TCF [Textile, Clothing, and Footwear] Industry Training. A Guide for Workplace Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Sue

    This guide is designed to help workplace trainers in the textile, clothing, and footwear (TCF) industry to become more aware of the language, literacy, and numeracy demands of training. It is divided into two main sections. Section 1, "Background Information," covers understanding language, literacy, and numeracy; understanding training in the TCF…

  20. Sweat responses to pesticide-proof clothing influenced by textile materials.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi-Yamashita, Y; Hayashi, C; Imamura, R; Tokura, H

    1995-05-01

    Themoregulatory responses were compared at an ambient temperature of 30 degrees C and a relative humidity of 50% between two kinds of protective clothing for pesticide spraying. One was made of nylon with wet coating polyurethane (A) and another was made of cotton with water repellent finish (B). The clothing ensemble was composed of a short-sleeved cotton shirt, long cotton underpants, cotton socks, shoes and the protective clothing. Five young female adults served as subjects. They took a rest with protective clothing ensemble for 15 min and then walked on a motor-driven treadmill (80m/min, 5% uphill grade) for 40 min, followed by 20-min rest. The increase of forearm sweat rate was higher in clothing A than in clothing B in 4 out of 5 subjects, although the average values were not significantly different. The total sweat rate of the whole body was also significantly larger in clothing A. Mean skin temperature and local skin temperatures in the arm, the chest and the thigh were significantly higher in clothing A than in clothing B. Clothing microclimate humidity was significantly higher in clothing A, while clothing microclimate temperature tended to be higher in clothing A. Individual observations about thermal, humidity and comfort sensation disclosed that the sensation was improved as a whole in clothing B. Local sweat rate was linearly related to mean body temperature and the regression line for clothing A was located above that for clothing B in 4 out of 5 subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7641064

  1. Speaking through Cloth: Teaching Hmong History and Culture through Textile Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Ava L.

    1999-01-01

    Urges social studies educators to explore textile art and interviews with textile artists as a tool for fostering understanding and empathy for Hmong Americans. Summarizes Hmong history and culture as they lived traditionally in Laos, as refugees in Thailand, and as immigrants in the United States suggesting examples of textile art. (CMK)

  2. More Than a Pretty Cloth: Teaching Hmong History and Culture Through Textile Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Ava L.

    1997-01-01

    Argues that textile arts, often created by women, provide a valuable, but frequently overlooked, resource for learning about a culture. Describes an effort to learn about Hmong culture and history through a study of textile arts and to teach preservice teachers in a social studies methods course about this culture. (DSK)

  3. Highly Flexible Dye-sensitized Solar Cells Produced by Sewing Textile Electrodes on Cloth

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Min Ju; Cha, Seung I.; Seo, Seon Hee; Lee, Dong Y.

    2014-01-01

    Textile forms of solar cells possess special advantages over other types of solar cells, including their light weight, high flexibility, and mechanical robustness. Recent demand for wearable devices has promoted interest in the development of high-efficiency textile-based solar cells for energy suppliers. However, the weaving process occurs under high-friction, high-tension conditions that are not conducive to coated solar-cell active layers or electrodes deposited on the wire or strings. Therefore, a new approach is needed for the development of textile-based solar cells suitable for woven fabrics for wide-range application. In this report, we present a highly flexible, efficient DSSC, fabricated by sewing textile-structured electrodes onto casual fabrics such as cotton, silk, and felt, or paper, thereby forming core integrated DSSC structures with high energy-conversion efficiency (~5.8%). The fabricated textile-based DSSC devices showed high flexibility and high performance under 4-mm radius of curvature over thousands of deformation cycles. Considering the vast number of textile types, our textile-based DSSC devices offer a huge range of applications, including transparent, stretchable, wearable devices. PMID:24957920

  4. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Occupational Strand: Textiles and Clothing. Module II-D-2: Assembly Line Garment Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Nina

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on assembly line garment construction is the second in a set of three modules on occupational aspects of textiles and clothing. (This set is part of a larger series of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education [MATCHE]--see…

  5. Waiting time to pregnancy and pregnancy outcome among Danish workers in the textile, clothing, and footwear industries.

    PubMed

    Schaumburg, I; Boldsen, J L

    1992-06-01

    The relationship between time from planned to achieved pregnancy and pregnancy outcome has been studied in a group of 18,658 workers in the textile, clothing and footwear industries. Information on pregnancy outcome and delay in conception in the period 1979-84 was collected by self administered questionnaires in 1985. The response rate was 70.3%. During the study period there had been 5,171 live births and 708 spontaneous abortions. Information on delay in conception was collected in broad categories. The data were analysed by means of a newly developed statistical parametric model in order to collect all possible information from the highly grouped data. Median waiting time before a pregnancy which ended in spontaneous abortion was 1.68 times longer than median waiting time before a pregnancy leading to a live birth. There seems to be a correlation between the length of the waiting time and abortion. PMID:1496329

  6. Printed organic conductive polymers thermocouples in textile and smart clothing applications.

    PubMed

    Seeberg, Trine M; Røyset, Arne; Jahren, Susannah; Strisland, Frode

    2011-01-01

    This work reports on an experimental investigation of the potential of using selected commercially available organic conductive polymers as active ingredients in thermocouples printed on textiles. Poly(3, 4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(4 styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and polyaniline (PANI) were screen printed onto woven cotton textile. The influence of multiple thermocycles between 235 K (-38 °C) and 350 K (+77 °C) on resistivity and thermoelectric properties was examined. The Seebeck coefficients of PEDOT:PSS and PANI were found to be about +18 μV/K and +15 uV/K, respectively, when "metal-polymer" thermocouples were realized by combining the polymer with copper. When "polymer-polymer" thermocouples were formed by combining PEDOT:PSS and PANI, a thermoelectric voltage of about +10 μV/K was observed. A challenge recognized in the experiments is that the generated voltage exhibited drift and fluctuations. PMID:22255039

  7. Identification of non-regulated aromatic amines of toxicological concern which can be cleaved from azo dyes used in clothing textiles.

    PubMed

    Brüschweiler, Beat J; Küng, Simon; Bürgi, Daniel; Muralt, Lorenz; Nyfeler, Erich

    2014-07-01

    Azo dyes in textiles may release aromatic amines after enzymatic cleavage by skin bacteria or after dermal absorption and metabolism in the human body. From the 896 azo dyes with known chemical structure in the available textile dyes database, 426 azo dyes (48%) can generate one or more of the 22 regulated aromatic amines in the European Union in Annex XVII of REACH. Another 470 azo dyes (52%) can be cleaved into exclusively non-regulated aromatic amines. In this study, a search for publicly available toxicity data on non-regulated aromatic amines was performed. For a considerable percentage of non-regulated aromatic amines, the toxicity database was found to be insufficient or non-existent. 62 non-regulated aromatic amines with available toxicity data were prioritized by expert judgment with objective criteria according to their potential for carcinogenicity, genotoxicity, and/or skin sensitization. To investigate the occurrence of azo dye cleavage products, 153 random samples of clothing textiles were taken from Swiss retail outlets and analyzed for 22 high priority non-regulated aromatic amines of toxicological concern. Eight of these 22 non-regulated aromatic amines of concern could be detected in 17% of the textile samples. In 9% of the samples, one or more of the aromatic amines of concern could be detected in concentrations >30 mg/kg, in 8% of the samples between 5 and 30 mg/kg. The highest measured concentration was 622 mg/kg textile. There is an obvious need to assess consumer health risks for these non-regulated aromatic amines and to fill this gap in the regulation of clothing textiles. PMID:24793261

  8. Carbon fiber cloth supported Au nano-textile fabrics as an efficient catalyst for hydrogen peroxide electroreduction in acid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Cheng, Kui; Wang, Guiling; Cao, Dianxue

    2015-09-01

    The size-controlled hierarchical textile-like Au nanostructures supported carbon fiber cloth (Au NTs/CFC) is successfully fabricated through a simple low-cost electrochemical route. The electrodes are characterised by scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometer. Without any conducting carbons and polymer binders, the 3D electrode with unique structure is directly used as the electrocatalyst for H2O2 reduction in acid solution and the catalytic performance is evaluated by voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The Au NTs/CFC electrode exhibits much higher catalytic activity and remarkably improved utilization of Au than Au nanoparticles (Au NPs/CFC) prepared by the same method owing to its unique structure. In the solution of 3.0 mol L-1 H2SO4 + 0.1 mol L-1 H2O2, with the reduction potential of 0 V, the current of -0.72 A cm-2 mg-1 can be obtained on Au NTs/CFC electrode and only a current of -0.09 A cm-2 mg-1 can be achieved on Au NPs/CFC electrode. All these results reveal that the novel Au NTs/CFC electrode exhibits excellent catalytic performance and superior stability for H2O2 electroreduction in acid medium, benefitting from the unique 3D structure which can ensure high utilization of catalyst.

  9. Textiles.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2016-10-01

    A review of the literature published in 2015 on topics relating to the treatment alternatives for wastewater from the textile industries is presented. This review is divided into the following sections: a brief introduction on the implementation of the Best Available Techniques into textile industry, a review of the more promising treatment technologies distinguished into physico-chemical, biological and combined processes. PMID:27620097

  10. The impact of an employee wellness programme in clothing/textile manufacturing companies: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of health risk behaviours is growing amongst South African employees. Health risk behaviours have been identified as a major contributor to reduced health related quality of life (HRQoL) and the increased prevalence of non-communicable diseases. Worksite wellness programmes promise to promote behaviour changes amongst employees and to improve their HRQoL. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short-term effects of an employee wellness programme on HRQoL, health behaviour change, body mass index (BMI) and absenteeism amongst clothing and textile manufacturing employees. Methods The study used a randomised control trial design. The sample consisted of 80 subjects from three clothing manufacturing companies in Cape Town, South Africa. The experimental group was subjected to a wellness programme based on the principles of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) as well as weekly supervised exercise classes over six weeks. The control group received a once-off health promotion talk and various educational pamphlets, with no further intervention. Measurements were recorded at baseline and at six weeks post-intervention. Outcome measures included the EQ-5D, Stanford Exercise Behaviours Scale, body mass index and absenteeism. Data was analysed with the Statistica-8 software program. Non-parametric tests were used to evaluate the differences in the medians between the two groups and to determine the level of significance. The Sign test was used to determine the within group changes. The Mann–Whitney U test was used to determine the difference between the two groups. Results At six weeks post intervention the experimental group (39 subjects) demonstrated improvement in almost every parameter. In contrast, apart from an overall decrease in time off work and a reduction in BMI for all study participants, there was no significant change noted in the behaviour of the control group (41 subjects). Seventy percent of the experimental group had improved

  11. Literature Reviews on Modeling Internal Geometry of Textile Composites and Rate-Independent Continuum Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su-Yuen, Hsu

    2011-01-01

    Textile composite materials have good potential for constructing composite structures where the effects of three-dimensional stresses are critical or geometric complexity is a manufacturing concern. There is a recent interest in advancing competence within Langley Research Center for modeling the degradation of mechanical properties of textile composites. In an initial effort, two critical areas are identified to pursue: (1) Construction of internal geometry of textile composites, and (2) Rate-independent continuum damage mechanics. This report documents reviews on the two subjects. Various reviewed approaches are categorized, their assumptions, methods, and progress are briefed, and then critiques are presented. Each review ends with recommended research.

  12. Smart textiles: Tough cotton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Alba G.; Hinestroza, Juan P.

    2008-08-01

    Cotton is an important raw material for producing soft textiles and clothing. Recent discoveries in functionalizing cotton fibres with nanotubes may offer a new line of tough, wearable, smart and interactive garments.

  13. Textile recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonowski, E. ); Carlton, J.

    1995-01-01

    The most common household textiles include clothing, linens, draperies, carpets, shoes, handbags, and rugs. Old clothing, of course, is the most readily reused and/or recycled residentially generated textile category. State and/or local mandates to recycle a percentage of the waste stream are providing the impetus to add new materials to existing collection programs. Concurrently, the textile industry is aggressively trying to increase its throughput by seeking new sources of material to meet increased world demand for product. As experienced with drop-off programs for traditional materials, a majority of residents will not recycle materials unless the collection programs are convenient, i.e., curbside collection. The tonnage of marketable textiles currently being landfilled provide evidence of this. It is the authors' contention that if textile recycling is made convenient and accessible to every household in a municipality or region, then the waste stream disposed may be reduced in a similar fashion as when traditional recyclables are included in curbside programs.

  14. Men's Clothing Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margerum, B. Jean; And Others

    1977-01-01

    An informal consumer interview study, using 187 men, was conducted to highlight directions that clothing and textiles education and research might take. Mentioned most often were problems of fabric durability and garment construction as well as size and fit. Suggestions for curbing economic waste in the male fashion industry and implications for…

  15. Handling difficult materials: Textiles

    SciTech Connect

    Polk, T.

    1994-07-01

    As recyclable materials, textiles are a potentially valuable addition to community collection programs. They make up a fairly substantial fraction--about 4%--of the residential solid waste stream, a higher figure than corrugated cardboard or magazines. Textiles have well-established processing and marketing infrastructures, with annual sales of over $1 billion in the US And buyers are out there, willing to pay $40 to $100 per ton. There doesn't seem to be any cumbersome government regulations standing in the way, either. So why are so few municipalities and waste haulers currently attempting to recover textiles The answers can be found in the properties of the material itself and a lack of knowledge about the existing textile recycling industry. There are three main end markets that come from waste textiles. In descending order of market share, they are: used clothing, fiber for paper and re-processing, and industrial wiping and polishing cloths.

  16. Advanced Clothing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyan, James; Orndoff, Evelyne

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the Advanced Clothing System (ACS) is to use advanced commercial off-the-shelf fibers and antimicrobial treatments with the goal of directly reducing the mass and volume of a logistics item. The current clothing state-of-the-art on the International Space Station (ISS) is disposable, mostly cotton-based, clothing with no laundry provisions. Each clothing article has varying use periods and will become trash. The goal is to increase the length of wear of the clothing to reduce the logistical mass and volume. The initial focus has been exercise clothing since the use period is lower. Various ground studies and an ISS technology demonstration have been conducted to evaluate clothing preference and length of wear. The analysis indicates that use of ACS selected garments (e.g. wool, modacrylic, polyester) can increase the breakeven point for laundry to 300 days.

  17. Advanced Clothing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlesinger, Thilini; Broyan, James; Orndoff, Evelyne

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the Advanced Clothing System (ACS) is to use advanced commercial off-theshelf fibers and antimicrobial treatments with the goal of directly reducing the mass and volume of a logistics item. The current clothing state-of-the-art on the International Space Station (ISS) is disposable, mostly cotton-based, clothing with no laundry provisions. Each clothing article has varying use periods and will become trash. The goal is to increase the length of wear of the clothing to reduce the logistical mass and volume. The initial focus has been exercise clothing since the use period is lower. Various ground studies and an ISS technology demonstration have been conducted to evaluate clothing preference and length of wear. The analysis indicates that use of ACS selected garments (e.g. wool, modacrylic, polyester) can increase the breakeven point for laundry to 300 days.

  18. Kente Cloth-Inspired Reduction Prints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    The textiles of Africa are rich with possibilities for art lessons. With their unique balance of color, pattern, symmetry and repetition, they lend themselves to exciting art lessons with cultural significance. Asante cloth--or Kente cloth, as it is commonly known--is a perfect example. These rich, colorful repeat patterns from Ghana are woven in…

  19. Human exposure to trace elements through the skin by direct contact with clothing: Risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Joaquim; Nadal, Martí; Schuhmacher, Marta; Domingo, José L

    2015-07-01

    Metals in textile products and clothing are used for many purposes, such as metal complex dyes, pigments, mordant, catalyst in synthetic fabrics manufacture, synergists of flame retardants, antimicrobials, or as water repellents and odour-preventive agents. When present in textile materials, heavy metals may mean a potential danger to human health. In the present study, the concentrations of a number of elements (Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sn, Sr, Tl, V, and Zn) were determined in skin-contact clothes. Analysed clothes were made of different materials, colours, and brands. Interestingly, we found high levels of Cr in polyamide dark clothes (605 mg/kg), high Sb concentrations in polyester clothes (141 mg/kg), and great Cu levels in some green cotton fabrics (around 280 mg/kg). Dermal contact exposure and human health risks for adult males, adult females, and for <1-year-old children were assessed. Non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risks were below safe (HQ<1) and acceptable (<10(-6)) limits, respectively, according to international standards. However, for Sb, non-carcinogenic risk was above 10% of the safety limit (HQ>0.1) for dermal contact with clothes. PMID:25889781

  20. 16 CFR 1610.4 - Requirements for classifying textiles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for classifying textiles. 1610... REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard § 1610.4 Requirements for classifying textiles. (a) Class 1, Normal Flammability. Class 1 textiles exhibit normal flammability and...

  1. Textile Messages: Dispatches from the World of E-Textiles and Education. New Literacies and Digital Epistemologies. Volume 62

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buechley, Leah, Ed.; Peppler, Kylie, Ed.; Eisenberg, Michael, Ed.; Yasmin, Kafai, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    "Textile Messages" focuses on the emerging field of electronic textiles, or e-textiles--computers that can be soft, colorful, approachable, and beautiful. E-textiles are articles of clothing, home furnishings, or architectures that include embedded computational and electronic elements. This book introduces a collection of tools that…

  2. Tin Can Textile Printing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield, Patricia; Sanford, Barbara

    1979-01-01

    Describes the process of "canning"--applying textile pigment or dye to cloth by moving a pigment-filled can across the fabric to create a linear design. This printing process is described as low-cost, easy, and suitable for all age and artistic levels. (Author/SJL)

  3. Human exposure to trace elements through the skin by direct contact with clothing: Risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rovira, Joaquim; Nadal, Martí; Schuhmacher, Marta; Domingo, José L.

    2015-07-15

    Metals in textile products and clothing are used for many purposes, such as metal complex dyes, pigments, mordant, catalyst in synthetic fabrics manufacture, synergists of flame retardants, antimicrobials, or as water repellents and odour-preventive agents. When present in textile materials, heavy metals may mean a potential danger to human health. In the present study, the concentrations of a number of elements (Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sn, Sr, Tl, V, and Zn) were determined in skin-contact clothes. Analysed clothes were made of different materials, colours, and brands. Interestingly, we found high levels of Cr in polyamide dark clothes (605 mg/kg), high Sb concentrations in polyester clothes (141 mg/kg), and great Cu levels in some green cotton fabrics (around 280 mg/kg). Dermal contact exposure and human health risks for adult males, adult females, and for <1-year-old children were assessed. Non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risks were below safe (HQ<1) and acceptable (<10{sup −6}) limits, respectively, according to international standards. However, for Sb, non-carcinogenic risk was above 10% of the safety limit (HQ>0.1) for dermal contact with clothes. - Highlights: • We determined in skin-contact clothes the concentrations of a number of metals. • Dermal contact exposure and health risks for adults and for 1-year-old children were assessed. • Carcinogenic risks were considered as acceptable (<10{sup −6}). • For non-carcinogenic risks, only Sb exceeded a 10% of the HQ for dermal contact with clothes.

  4. A dynamic approach to assess international competitiveness of Vietnam's garment and textile industry.

    PubMed

    Vu, Huong Thanh; Pham, Lam Cat

    2016-01-01

    Garment and textile (G&T) industry has been playing as a driving force for the socio-economic development of Vietnam. With the international integration process and rising challenges from the global market, there is a need to examine international competitiveness of Vietnam's G&T industry to find out what Vietnam should focus on to enhance its position in the global market place. This paper, by using the Generalized Double Diamond Model (GDDM), analyzed international competitiveness of Vietnam's G&T industry and compared it with China. The results showed that Vietnam was less competitive than China in all four attributes of the GDDM. The lowest competitiveness of Vietnam in comparison with China was Related and Supporting industries, followed by Factor Conditions. Therefore, the paper argued that although Vietnam should improve all of the four attributes in the long term, Vietnam must put a high priority on developing Related and Supporting Industries and then enhance Factor Conditions while maintaining its strengths over China in terms of G&T export growths and favorable business context. PMID:27026899

  5. Clothes from Grain--A Miracle or a Problem? Active Learning Lessons. Economics International.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, Joyce

    This lesson plan was developed through "Economics International," an international program to help build economic education infrastructures in the emerging market economies. It provides a lesson description; appropriate age level; economic concepts; content standards and benchmarks; related subject areas; instructional objectives; time required…

  6. Toxic and biomedical effects of textiles and textile production. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning toxicity associated with textiles. Vapors from burning flame-resistant fabric, magnesium vapors from polyester foam, and toxic emissions from insulation, clothing, and upholstery are described and evaluated. Health effects resulting from formaldehyde treatment of fabrics for crease-resistance, lubricant addition to polyester fabrics, and exposure to textile mill effluents and airborne particulates from textile mill rooms are examined. (Contains a minimum of 150 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. 16 CFR 1610.33 - Test procedures for textile fabrics and film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Test procedures for textile fabrics and film... REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Rules and Regulations § 1610.33 Test procedures for textile fabrics and film. (a)(1) All textile fabrics (except those with a nitro-cellulose...

  8. 16 CFR 1611.33 - Test procedures for textile fabrics and film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Test procedures for textile fabrics and film... procedures for textile fabrics and film. (a)(1) All textile fabrics (except those with a nitro-cellulose... Clothing Textiles, Commercial Standard 191-53”. (2) Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraph (a)(1)...

  9. [Allergic and irritative textile dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Elsner, P

    1994-01-22

    Textile dermatitis is only one example of adverse health effects due to clothing. It may present with a wide spectrum of clinical features, but the main mechanisms are irritant dermatitis, often observed in atopics intolerant to wool and synthetic fibers, and allergic contact dermatitis, usually caused by textile finishes and dyes. The newer azo dyes Disperse Blue 106 and 124 in particular are potent sensitizers that have caused significant problems, most recently in the form of "leggins dermatitis". Although severe textile dermatitis appears to be a rare event, more systematic population-based research is needed since many oligosymptomatic cases are probably overlooked. Criteria for healthy textiles are an optimum combination of efficacy (regulation of skin temperature and humidity and protection from environmental damage) and safety (lack of carcinogenicity, toxicity and allergenicity). If potentially allergenic substances are used in textiles, they should be declared as in the case of cosmetics. PMID:8115841

  10. Textiles and Training in Portugal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrez, Jaime Serrao; Dias, Mario Caldeira

    Analyzing the role of vocational training in an economic sector that is declining in Portugal, this document consists of five chapters, a bibliography, and a list of training organizations. An introduction tells why the study is important and explains that the major obstacles to development of the Portuguese textile and clothing sector are the…

  11. Anisotropic Cloth Modeling for Material Fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mingmin; Pan, Zhigengx; Mi, Qingfeng

    Physically based cloth simulation has been challenging the graphics community for more than three decades. With the developing of virtual reality and clothing CAD, it has become the key technique of virtual garment and try-on system. Although it has received considerable attention in computer graphics, due to its flexible property and realistic feeling that the textile engineers pay much attention to, there is not a successful methodology to simulate cloth both in visual realism and physical accuracy. We present a new anisotropic textile modeling method based on physical mass-spring system, which models the warps and wefts separately according to the different material fabrics. The simulation process includes two main steps: firstly the rigid object simulation and secondly the flexible mass simulation near to be equilibrium. A multiresolution modeling is applied to enhance the tradeoff fruit of the realistic presentation and computation cost. Finally, some examples and the analysis results show the efficiency of the proposed method.

  12. Clothing Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for clothing management is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a career ladder, a matrix relating duty/task numbers to job titles, and a task list. Each task is…

  13. Activated Natural Zeolites on Textiles: Protection from Radioactive Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grancaric, A. M.; Prlic, I.; Tarbuk, A.; Marovic, G.

    Clothing designed to protect against radioactive contamination was based on a simple principle. It was important not to inhale contaminated dust and air and to ensure that contaminated particles could not reach the skin. Therefore, the density of the textile was crucial. New developments, keeping in mind that textile should be lightweight, are focused on textiles which can chemically bind the contamination particles and not allow them either to diffuse to the skin or spread back into the environment. A great success would be if the clothing were made reusable (e.g., for use in the space station). Therefore, new methods (or chemical preparations) are being proposed for developing intelligent textiles.

  14. Nettle as a distinct Bronze Age textile plant

    PubMed Central

    Bergfjord, C.; Mannering, U.; Frei, K. M.; Gleba, M.; Scharff, A. B.; Skals, I.; Heinemeier, J.; Nosch, M. -L; Holst, B.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally assumed that the production of plant fibre textiles in ancient Europe, especially woven textiles for clothing, was closely linked to the development of agriculture through the use of cultivated textile plants (flax, hemp). Here we present a new investigation of the 2800 year old Lusehøj Bronze Age Textile from Voldtofte, Denmark, which challenges this assumption. We show that the textile is made of imported nettle, most probably from the Kärnten-Steiermark region, an area which at the time had an otherwise established flax production. Our results thus suggest that the production of woven plant fibre textiles in Bronze Age Europe was based not only on cultivated textile plants but also on the targeted exploitation of wild plants. The Lusehøj find points to a hitherto unrecognized role of nettle as an important textile plant and suggests the need for a re-evaluation of textile production resource management in prehistoric Europe. PMID:23024858

  15. Three-dimensional carbon nanotube-textile anode for high-performance microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xing; Hu, Liangbing; Pasta, Mauro; Wells, George F; Kong, Desheng; Criddle, Craig S; Cui, Yi

    2011-01-12

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) harness the metabolism of microorganisms, converting chemical energy into electrical energy. Anode performance is an important factor limiting the power density of MFCs for practical application. Improving the anode design is thus important for enhancing the MFC performance, but only a little development has been reported. Here, we describe a biocompatible, highly conductive, two-scale porous anode fabricated from a carbon nanotube-textile (CNT-textile) composite for high-performance MFCs. The macroscale porous structure of the intertwined CNT-textile fibers creates an open 3D space for efficient substrate transport and internal colonization by a diverse microflora, resulting in a 10-fold-larger anolyte-biofilm-anode interfacial area than the projective surface area of the CNT-textile. The conformally coated microscale porous CNT layer displays strong interaction with the microbial biofilm, facilitating electron transfer from exoelectrogens to the CNT-textile anode. An MFC equipped with a CNT-textile anode has a 10-fold-lower charge-transfer resistance and achieves considerably better performance than one equipped with a traditional carbon cloth anode: the maximum current density is 157% higher, the maximum power density is 68% higher, and the energy recovery is 141% greater. PMID:21158405

  16. Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  17. Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fiberous and other waste materials from textile production. The use of recyclable materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, fiber waste, glass fiber wastes, and waste dusts for use in textile products, insulation, paneling and other building supplies, yarns, roping, and pavement materials are considered. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are referenced in related bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  1. Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  2. Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  3. Competence Management System Design in International Multicultural Environment: Registration, Transfer, Recognition and Transparency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starcic, Andreja Istenic

    2012-01-01

    A competence management system (CMS) was devised to assist the registration of competencies in the textile and clothing sector, starting in the four EU countries of Portugal, Slovenia, the UK and Denmark, further leading to the European network. This paper presents the design and development framework assisting international multicultural…

  4. Textile Wastes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from textile industry, covering publications of 1977. This review covers studies such as removing heavy metals in textile wastes, and the biodegradability of six dyes. A list of references is also presented. (HM)

  5. Defined UV protection by apparel textiles.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, K; Laperre, J; Avermaete, A; Altmeyer, P; Gambichler, T

    2001-08-01

    This article was written to update information on test methods and standards for determining the UV protection of apparel textiles and on factors affecting UV protective properties of fabrics, from dermatological and textile technological viewpoints. Articles from dermatological and textile technological journals published from 1990 to 2001 were identified from MEDLINE, Excerpta Medica/EMBASE, World Textiles, and Textile Technology Digest. Peer-reviewed dermatological articles, textile technological research articles, and normative publications were selected. Independent data extraction was performed by several observers. Spectrophotometry is the preferred method for determining UV protection factor of textile materials. Various textile qualities affect the UV protection factor of a finished garment; important elements are the fabric porosity, type, color, weight, and thickness. The application of UV absorbers in the yarns significantly improves the UV protection factor of a garment. With wear and use, several factors can alter the UV protective properties of a textile, including stretch, wetness, and degradation due to laundering. Standards in the field exist in Australia and Great Britain, and organizations such as the European Standardization Commission in Europe and the American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists and the American Society for Testing and Materials in the United States are also establishing standards for the determination and labeling of sun protective clothing. Various textile qualities and conditions of wear and use affect UV protective properties of apparel textiles. The use of UV blocking fabrics can provide excellent protection against the hazards of sunlight; this is especially true for garments manufactured as UV protective clothing. PMID:11493104

  6. Fitness Shoes and Clothes

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Go4Life Get Free Stuff Be a Partner Fitness Shoes and Clothes Choosing the right clothing and ... be a great motivator! Download the Tip Sheet Fitness Shoes and Clothes (PDF, 436.87 KB) You ...

  7. 16 CFR 1610.35 - Procedures for testing special types of textile fabrics under the standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... textile fabrics under the standard. 1610.35 Section 1610.35 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Rules and Regulations § 1610.35 Procedures for testing special types of textile fabrics under the standard. (a)...

  8. 16 CFR 1610.35 - Procedures for testing special types of textile fabrics under the standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... textile fabrics under the standard. 1610.35 Section 1610.35 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Rules and Regulations § 1610.35 Procedures for testing special types of textile fabrics under the standard. (a)...

  9. 16 CFR 1610.35 - Procedures for testing special types of textile fabrics under the standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... textile fabrics under the standard. 1610.35 Section 1610.35 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Rules and Regulations § 1610.35 Procedures for testing special types of textile fabrics under the standard. (a)...

  10. 16 CFR 1610.35 - Procedures for testing special types of textile fabrics under the standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... textile fabrics under the standard. 1610.35 Section 1610.35 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Rules and Regulations § 1610.35 Procedures for testing special types of textile fabrics under the standard. (a)...

  11. 16 CFR 1610.35 - Procedures for testing special types of textile fabrics under the standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... textile fabrics under the standard. 1610.35 Section 1610.35 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Rules and Regulations § 1610.35 Procedures for testing special types of textile fabrics under the standard. (a)...

  12. Radio frequency and infrared drying of sized textile warp yarns

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddick, H.G. )

    1990-11-01

    Drying sized textile warp yarns without contacting the warp is easily accomplished by either radio frequency or infrared techniques. Although the process is more expensive than conventional drying, the substantial savings accrued during subsequent weaving and finishing of the cloth can help keep the US textile industry competitive and support electrical load. 5 refs., 8 figs., 14 tabs.

  13. Identification and Characterization of Textile Fibers by Thermal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Fiona M.; Smith, Michael J.; Silva, Magda B.

    2011-01-01

    Textile fibers are ubiquitous in the sense that they are present in the fabric of clothing, furniture, and floor and wall coverings. A remarkable variety of textile fibers with different chemical compositions are produced for many different commercial applications. As fibers are readily transferred, they are frequently recovered from crime scenes…

  14. Thermal Clothing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Gateway Technologies, Inc. is marketing and developing textile insulation technology originally developed by Triangle Research and Development Corporation. The enhanced thermal insulation stems from Small Business Innovation Research contracts from NASA's Johnson Space Center and the U.S. Air Force. The effectiveness of the insulation comes from the microencapsulated phase-change materials originally made to keep astronauts gloved hands warm. The applications for the product range from outer wear, housing insulation, and blankets to protective firefighting gear and scuba diving suits. Gateway has developed and begun marketing thermal regulating products under the trademark, OUTLAST. Products made from OUTLAST are already on the market, including boot and shoe liners, winter headgear, hats and caps for hunting and other outdoor sports, and a variety of men's and women's ski gloves.

  15. Textile electrodes and integrated smart textile for reliable biomonitoring.

    PubMed

    Paradiso, R; Pacelli, M

    2011-01-01

    Since birth the first and the most natural interface for the body is fabric, a soft, warm and reassuring material. Cloth is usually covering more than 80 % of the skin; which leads us to consider textile material as the most appropriate interface where new sensorial and interactive functions can be implemented. The new generation of personalised monitoring systems is based on this paradigm: functions like sensing, transmission and elaboration are implementable in the materials through the textile technology. Functional yarns and fibres are usable to realise garments where electrical and computing properties are combined with the traditional mechanical characteristics, giving rise to textile platforms that are comparable with the cloths that are normally used to produce our garments. The feel of the fabric is the same, but the functionality is augmented. Nowadays, consumers demand user-friendly connectivity and interactivity; sensing clothes are the most natural and ordinary interface able to follow us, everywhere in a non-intrusive way, in natural harmony with our body. PMID:22255038

  16. Decontaminating pesticide protective clothing.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, J

    1993-01-01

    The review of recent work on the mechanisms of soil removal from textiles assists in understanding decontamination of pesticide protective clothing. The current work provides explanatory conclusions about residue retention as a basis of making recommendations for the most effective decontamination procedures. A caution about generalizations: Some pesticides produce very idiosyncratic responses to decontamination. An example is the paraquat/salt response. Other pesticides exhibit noticeable and unique responses to a highly alkaline medium (carbaryl), or to bleach (chlorpyrifos), or are quickly volatilized (methyl parathion). Responses such as these do not apply to other pesticides undergoing decontamination. Given this caution, there are soil, substrate, and solvent responses that do maximize residue removal. Residue removal is less complete as the concentration of pesticide increases. The concentration of pesticide in fabric builds with successive exposures, and the more concentrated the pesticide, the more difficult the removal. Use a prewash product and/or presoak. The surfactant and/or solvent in a prewash product is a booster in residue removal. Residues transfer from contaminated clothing to other clothing during the washing cycle. Use a full washer of water for a limited number of garments to increase residue removal. The hotter the washing temperature, the better. Generally, this means a water temperature of at least 49 degrees C, and preferably 60 degrees C. Select the detergent shown to be more effective for the formulation: heavy-duty liquid detergents for emulsifiable concentrate formulations and powdered phosphate detergents for wettable powder formulations. If the fabric has a soil-repellent finish, use 1.25 times the amount recommended on the detergent label. For water hardness above 300 ppm, an additional amount of powdered phosphate detergent is needed to obtain the same level of residue removal as obtained with the heavy-duty liquid detergent when

  17. Comparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency Criteria in Selected International Standards and Labeling Programs for Clothes Washers, Water Dispensers, Vending Machines and CFLs

    SciTech Connect

    Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

    2010-06-01

    Since the late 1970s, energy labeling programs and mandatory energy performance standards have been used in many different countries to improve the efficiency levels of major residential and commercial equipment. As more countries and regions launch programs covering a greater range of products that are traded worldwide, greater attention has been given to harmonizing the specific efficiency criteria in these programs and the test methods for measurements. For example, an international compact fluorescent light (CFL) harmonization initiative was launched in 2006 to focus on collaboration between Australia, China, Europe and North America. Given the long history of standards and labeling programs, most major energy-consuming residential appliances and commercial equipment are already covered under minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) and/or energy labels. For these products, such as clothes washers and CFLs, harmonization may still be possible when national MEPS or labeling thresholds are revised. Greater opportunity for harmonization exists in newer energy-consuming products that are not commonly regulated but are under consideration for new standards and labeling programs. This may include commercial products such as water dispensers and vending machines, which are only covered by MEPS or energy labels in a few countries or regions. As China continues to expand its appliance standards and labeling programs and revise existing standards and labels, it is important to learn from recent international experiences with efficiency criteria and test procedures for the same products. Specifically, various types of standards and labeling programs already exist in North America, Europe and throughout Asia for products in China's 2010 standards and labeling programs, namely clothes washers, water dispensers, vending machines and CFLs. This report thus examines similarities and critical differences in energy efficiency values, test procedure specifications and other

  18. Auxetic textiles.

    PubMed

    Rant, Darja; Rijavec, Tatjana; Pavko-Čuden, Alenka

    2013-01-01

    Common materials have Poisson's ratio values ranging from 0.0 to 0.5. Auxetic materials exhibit negative Poisson's ratio. They expand laterally when stretched longitudinally and contract laterally when compressed. In recent years the use of textile technology to fabricate auxetic materials has attracted more and more attention. It is reflected in the extent of available research work exploring the auxetic potential of various textile structures and subsequent increase in the number of research papers published. Generally there are two approaches to producing auxetic textiles. The first one includes the use of auxetic fibers to produce an auxetic textile structure, whereas the other utilizes conventional fibres to produce a textile structure with auxetic properties. This review deals with auxetic materials in general and in the specific context of auxetic polymers, auxetic fibers, and auxetic textile structures made from conventional fibers and knitted structures with auxetic potential. PMID:24362973

  19. Textile materials for electromagnetic field shielding made with the use of nano- and micro-technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeziński, Stefan; Rybicki, Tomasz; Karbownik, Iwona; Malinowska, Grażyna; Śledzińska, Katarzyna

    2012-10-01

    Studies have been carried out aimed at the development of structures and technology for making special multi-layer textile-polymeric systems of shielding electromagnetic field (EMF). The use of textiles as EMF shielding materials is commonly known, however the EMF attenuation obtained practically exclusively results from the reflection of EMF, while the materials used for this purpose as a rule, show poor EMF absorption abilities. The basic assumption for a new solution is the exploitation of the multiple internal reflection of incident EMF either in textile-polymeric coating materials containing fine-particle electromagnetic materials or in special textile structures. This paper presents the results of investigating the EMF shielding effectiveness of several selected and developed textile-polymeric materials in respect of both their practical applications (protective clothing elements, technical materials, masking elements, etc.) and the structure and content of components with various EMF reflection and absorption properties. The measurement method for independent determination of reflection and transmission coefficients with a wavequide applicator was used. The results obtained with the 2.5 GHz to 18 GHz frequency range show a low value of transmission coefficient (min. -35 dB) and accepted reflection attenuation from about -4 dB to -15 dB for higher frequencies.

  20. State Skill Standards: Fashion, Textiles and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Rene Crepaldi; Gaudy, Glenna; Green-Jobe, Victoria; Hatch, Susan; Moen, Julianne; Sheldon, Shannon; Smith, Loree; Chessell, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The mission of Fashion, Textiles and Design Education is to prepare students for family and community life and careers in the fashion industry by creating opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviors needed to: (1) Examine skills needed to effectively manage clothing decisions; (2) Evaluate the use, care and production…

  1. Reconceptualizing the Teaching of Clothing in Consumer and Homemaking Programs: Implications for Teacher Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCleave-Frazier, Anne; Murray, Eloise Comeau

    This report offers materials from a project proposing a conceptual framework for teacher preparation for clothing program instruction. The project reflects contemporary and future concerns of individuals and families as well as the state of the art of clothing and textiles. The data collection procedures are described as well as questions that…

  2. Waste recycling in the textile industry. July 1983-September 1989 (Citations from World Textile abstracts). Report for July 1983-September 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations on the recycling of waste-fibrous materials for textile production, and the recycling of textile-waste materials. Topics include use of wastes as raw materials for textile and fabric manufacturing; reuse of waste cloth, scraps, fibers, and polymeric materials from textile manufacturing; and the equipment used to collect, sort, and process textile wastes. Materials considered include cellulosic wastes, polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, fiber waste, glass-fiber wastes, and waste dusts. Applications discussed include textile products, insulation, paneling and other building supplies, yarns, roping, and pavement materials. Heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are referenced in related published bibliographies. (Contains 242 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  3. Development of smart textiles with embedded fiber optic chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Saif E.; Yuan, Jianming; El-Sherif, Mahmoud A.

    2004-03-01

    Smart textiles are defined as textiles capable of monitoring their own health conditions or structural behavior, as well as sensing external environmental conditions. Smart textiles appear to be a future focus of the textile industry. As technology accelerates, textiles are found to be more useful and practical for potential advanced technologies. The majority of textiles are used in the clothing industry, which set up the idea of inventing smart clothes for various applications. Examples of such applications are medical trauma assessment and medical patients monitoring (heart and respiration rates), and environmental monitoring for public safety officials. Fiber optics have played a major role in the development of smart textiles as they have in smart structures in general. Optical fiber integration into textile structures (knitted, woven, and non-woven) is presented, and defines the proper methodology for the manufacturing of smart textiles. Samples of fabrics with integrated optical fibers were processed and tested for optical signal transmission. This was done in order to investigate the effect of textile production procedures on optical fiber performance. The tests proved the effectiveness of the developed methodology for integration of optical fibers without changing their optical performance or structural integrity.

  4. The effects of clothes on independent walking in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Théveniau, Nicolas; Boisgontier, Matthieu P; Varieras, Sabine; Olivier, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    The spatiotemporal features of walking in toddlers are known to be related to the level of maturation of the central nervous system. However, previous studies did not assess whether there could be an effect of clothes on the acquisition of walking. In this study, it was hypothesized that clothes modify the toddlers' walking. To test this hypothesis, 22 healthy toddlers divided into 3 groups of walking experience were assessed in four clothing conditions (Diaper+Trousers; Diaper+Pants of tracksuit; Diaper; Underwear). Results revealed significant effects of clothing on velocity and step length of toddlers from 6 to 18 months of walking experience. These results suggested that biomechanical constraints induced by the textile features alter the walking of toddlers. Therefore, in studies of toddler's gait, the clothing worn should be carefully mentioned and controlled. PMID:24054348

  5. Making Complex Electrically Conductive Patterns on Cloth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Andrew; Fink, Patrick W.; Dobbins, Justin A.; Lin, Greg Y.; Scully, Robert C.; Trevino, Robert

    2008-01-01

    A method for automated fabrication of flexible, electrically conductive patterns on cloth substrates has been demonstrated. Products developed using this method, or related prior methods, are instances of a technology known as 'e-textiles,' in which electrically conductive patterns ar formed in, and on, textiles. For many applications, including high-speed digital circuits, antennas, and radio frequency (RF) circuits, an e-textile method should be capable of providing high surface conductivity, tight tolerances for control of characteristic impedances, and geometrically complex conductive patterns. Unlike prior methods, the present method satisfies all three of these criteria. Typical patterns can include such circuit structures as RF transmission lines, antennas, filters, and other conductive patterns equivalent to those of conventional printed circuits. The present method overcomes the limitations of the prior methods for forming the equivalent of printed circuits on cloth. A typical fabrication process according to the present method involves selecting the appropriate conductive and non-conductive fabric layers to build the e-textile circuit. The present method uses commercially available woven conductive cloth with established surface conductivity specifications. Dielectric constant, loss tangent, and thickness are some of the parameters to be considered for the non-conductive fabric layers. The circuit design of the conductive woven fabric is secured onto a non-conductive fabric layer using sewing, embroidery, and/or adhesive means. The portion of the conductive fabric that is not part of the circuit is next cut from the desired circuit using an automated machine such as a printed-circuit-board milling machine or a laser cutting machine. Fiducials can be used to align the circuit and the cutting machine. Multilayer circuits can be built starting with the inner layer and using conductive thread to make electrical connections between layers.

  6. Textile Supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, Kristy Alana

    Innovative and interdisciplinary solutions to wearable textile energy storage are explored as power sources for wearable electronics and smart textiles. Due to their long cycle life, non-toxic and inexpensive materials, supercapacitors were converted into textiles. Textile supercapacitors were developed using scalable fabrication methods including screen-printing, yarn making, and 3D computerized knitting. The electrode materials reported in this thesis undergo thorough electrochemical analysis, and are capable of storing up to 0.5 F/cm2 which is on par with conventionally solid supercapacitors (0.6 F/cm2). Capacitive yarns are capable of storing up to 37 mF/cm and are shown to be knittable on industrial knitting equipment. Both are some of the highest reported capacitance for all-carbon systems in the field. Yet both are the only systems composed of inexpensive and non-toxic activated carbon, the most commonly used electrode material used in supercapacitors, opposed to carbon nanotubes or graphene, which are typically more 10-100 times more expensive. However, all of the fabrication techniques reported here are also capable of incorporating a wide variety of materials, ultimately broadening the applications of textile energy storage as a whole. Fully machine knitted supercapacitors are also explored and electrochemically characterized in order to determine how the textile structure affects the capacitance. In conclusion, a wide variety of fabrication techniques for making textile supercapacitors were successfully explored.

  7. The European standard for sun-protective clothing: EN 13758.

    PubMed

    Gambichler, T; Laperre, J; Hoffmann, K

    2006-02-01

    Clothing is considered one of the most important tools for sun protection. Contrary to popular opinion, however, some summer fabrics provide insufficient ultraviolet (UV) protection. The European Committee for Standardization (CEN), has developed a new standard on requirements for test methods and labelling of sun-protective garments. This document has now been completed and is published. Within CEN, a working group, CEN/TC 248 WG14 'UV protective clothing', was set up with the mission to produce standards on the UV-protective properties of textile materials. This working group started its activities in 1998 and included 30 experts (dermatologists, physicists, textile technologists, fabric manufacturers and retailers of apparel textiles) from 11 European member states. Within this working group, all medical, ethical, technical and economical aspects of standardization of UV-protective clothing were discussed on the basis of the expertise of each member and in consideration of the relevant literature in this field. Decisions were made in consensus. The first part of the standard (EN 13758-1) deals with all details of test methods (e.g. spectrophotometric measurements) for textile materials and part 2 (EN 13758-2) covers classification and marking of apparel textiles. UV-protective cloths for which compliance with this standard is claimed must fulfill all stringent instructions of testing, classification and marking, including a UV protection factor (UPF) larger than 40 (UPF 40+), average UVA transmission lower than 5%, and design requirements as specified in part 2 of the standard. A pictogram, which is marked with the number of the standard EN 13758-2 and the UPF of 40+, shall be attached to the garment if it is in compliance with the standard. The dermatology community should take cognizance of this new standard document. Garment manufacturers and retailers may now follow these official guidelines for testing and labelling of UV-protective summer clothes, and the

  8. DNA Extraction and Amplification from Contemporary Polynesian Bark-Cloth

    PubMed Central

    Moncada, Ximena; Payacán, Claudia; Arriaza, Francisco; Lobos, Sergio; Seelenfreund, Daniela; Seelenfreund, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Background Paper mulberry has been used for thousands of years in Asia and Oceania for making paper and bark-cloth, respectively. Museums around the world hold valuable collections of Polynesian bark-cloth. Genetic analysis of the plant fibers from which the textiles were made may answer a number of questions of interest related to provenance, authenticity or species used in the manufacture of these textiles. Recovery of nucleic acids from paper mulberry bark-cloth has not been reported before. Methodology We describe a simple method for the extraction of PCR-amplifiable DNA from small samples of contemporary Polynesian bark-cloth (tapa) using two types of nuclear markers. We report the amplification of about 300 bp sequences of the ITS1 region and of a microsatellite marker. Conclusions Sufficient DNA was retrieved from all bark-cloth samples to permit successful PCR amplification. This method shows a means of obtaining useful genetic information from modern bark-cloth samples and opens perspectives for the analyses of small fragments derived from ethnographic materials. PMID:23437166

  9. Image-Based Reverse Engineering and Visual Prototyping of Woven Cloth.

    PubMed

    Schroder, Kai; Zinke, Arno; Klein, Reinhard

    2015-02-01

    Realistic visualization of cloth has many applications in computer graphics. An ongoing research problem is how to best represent and capture cloth models, specifically when considering computer aided design of cloth. Previous methods produce highly realistic images, however, they are either difficult to edit or require the measurement of large databases to capture all variations of a cloth sample. We propose a pipeline to reverse engineer cloth and estimate a parametrized cloth model from a single image. We introduce a geometric yarn model, integrating state-of-the-art textile research. We present an automatic analysis approach to estimate yarn paths, yarn widths, their variation and a weave pattern. Several examples demonstrate that we are able to model the appearance of the original cloth sample. Properties derived from the input image give a physically plausible basis that is fully editable using a few intuitive parameters. PMID:26357029

  10. Textile damage caused by vapour cloud explosions.

    PubMed

    Was-Gubala, J; Krauss, W

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the project was to investigate the damage to garments caused by particular vapour cloud explosions. The authors would like to be able to provide investigators with specific information on how to link clothes to a specific type of crime: a particular case study was the inspiration for the examinations. Experiments were carried out in the fire reconstruction chamber of the laboratory using a selection of 26 clothes and 15 household garments differing in colour, fibre composition and textile construction. PMID:15527183

  11. Measurement of noise and impedance of dry and wet textile electrodes, and textile electrodes with hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Puurtinen, Merja M; Komulainen, Satu M; Kauppinen, Pasi K; Malmivuo, Jaakko A V; Hyttinen, Jari A K

    2006-01-01

    Textile sensors, when embedded into clothing, can provide new ways of monitoring physiological signals, and improve the usability and comfort of such monitoring systems in the areas of medical, occupational health and sports. However, good electrical and mechanical contact between the electrode and the skin is very important, as it often determines the quality of the signal. This paper introduces a study where the properties of dry textile electrodes, textile electrodes moistened with water, and textile electrodes covered with hydrogel were studied with five different electrode sizes. The aim was to study how the electrode size and preparation of the electrode (dry electrode/wet electrode/electrode covered with hydrogel membrane) affect the measurement noise, and the skin-electrode impedance. The measurement noise and skin-electrode impedance were determined from surface biopotential measurements. These preliminary results indicate that noise level increases as the electrode size decreases. The noise level is high in dry textile electrodes, as expected. Yet, the noise level of wet textile electrodes is quite low and similar to that of textile electrodes covered with hydrogel. Hydrogel does not seem to improve noise properties, however it may have effects on movement artifacts. Thus, it is feasible to use textile embedded sensors in physiological monitoring applications when moistening or hydrogel is applied. PMID:17946734

  12. Wearable Electricity Generators Fabricated Utilizing Transparent Electronic Textiles Based on Polyester/Ag Nanowires/Graphene Core-Shell Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chaoxing; Kim, Tae Whan; Li, Fushan; Guo, Tailiang

    2016-07-26

    The technological realization of wearable triboelectric generators is attractive because of their promising applications in wearable self-powered intelligent systems. However, the low electrical conductivity, the low electrical stability, and the low compatibility of current electronic textiles (e-textiles) and clothing restrict the comfortable and aesthetic integration of wearable generators into human clothing. Here, we present high-performance, transparent, smart e-textiles that employ commercial textiles coated with silver nanowire/graphene sheets fabricated by using a scalable, environmentally friendly, full-solution process. The smart e-textiles show superb and stable conduction of below 20 Ω/square as well as excellent flexibility, stretchability, foldability, and washability. In addition, wearable electricity-generating textiles, in which the e-textiles act as electrodes as well as wearable substrates, are presented. Because of the high compatibility of smart e-textiles and clothing, the electricity-generating textiles can be easily integrated into a glove to harvest the mechanical energy induced by the motion of the fingers. The effective output power generated by a single generator due to that motion reached as high as 7 nW/cm(2). The successful demonstration of the electricity-generating glove suggests a promising future for polyester/Ag nanowire/graphene core-shell nanocomposite-based smart e-textiles for real wearable electronic systems and self-powered clothing. PMID:27284809

  13. [The choice of work clothes and the risk of ignition].

    PubMed

    Larsen, T K; Ebbehøj, J

    1989-12-11

    Cotton is easily ignited in atmospheric air. Aramid (Nomex) is only ignited if the oxygen concentration is 30% and the ignition temperature is 800 degrees C. Thirty one steelmill employees used one hundred and twenty suits of working clothes made of cotton, cotton/polyamide, cotton/polyester or Aramid (Nomex) in a four month period. 17% were more comfortable when using cotton/polyester. No differences were found between cotton and Aramid. Cotton should not be used as textile for working clothes in environments with risks of ignition. PMID:2609447

  14. Microbial Odor Profile of Polyester and Cotton Clothes after a Fitness Session

    PubMed Central

    Callewaert, Chris; De Maeseneire, Evelyn; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Verliefde, Arne; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Clothing textiles protect our human body against external factors. These textiles are not sterile and can harbor high bacterial counts as sweat and bacteria are transmitted from the skin. We investigated the microbial growth and odor development in cotton and synthetic clothing fabrics. T-shirts were collected from 26 healthy individuals after an intensive bicycle spinning session and incubated for 28 h before analysis. A trained odor panel determined significant differences between polyester versus cotton fabrics for the hedonic value, the intensity, and five qualitative odor characteristics. The polyester T-shirts smelled significantly less pleasant and more intense, compared to the cotton T-shirts. A dissimilar bacterial growth was found in cotton versus synthetic clothing textiles. Micrococci were isolated in almost all synthetic shirts and were detected almost solely on synthetic shirts by means of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting. A selective enrichment of micrococci in an in vitro growth experiment confirmed the presence of these species on polyester. Staphylococci were abundant on both cotton and synthetic fabrics. Corynebacteria were not enriched on any textile type. This research found that the composition of clothing fibers promotes differential growth of textile microbes and, as such, determines possible malodor generation. PMID:25128346

  15. Microbial odor profile of polyester and cotton clothes after a fitness session.

    PubMed

    Callewaert, Chris; De Maeseneire, Evelyn; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Verliefde, Arne; Van de Wiele, Tom; Boon, Nico

    2014-11-01

    Clothing textiles protect our human body against external factors. These textiles are not sterile and can harbor high bacterial counts as sweat and bacteria are transmitted from the skin. We investigated the microbial growth and odor development in cotton and synthetic clothing fabrics. T-shirts were collected from 26 healthy individuals after an intensive bicycle spinning session and incubated for 28 h before analysis. A trained odor panel determined significant differences between polyester versus cotton fabrics for the hedonic value, the intensity, and five qualitative odor characteristics. The polyester T-shirts smelled significantly less pleasant and more intense, compared to the cotton T-shirts. A dissimilar bacterial growth was found in cotton versus synthetic clothing textiles. Micrococci were isolated in almost all synthetic shirts and were detected almost solely on synthetic shirts by means of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting. A selective enrichment of micrococci in an in vitro growth experiment confirmed the presence of these species on polyester. Staphylococci were abundant on both cotton and synthetic fabrics. Corynebacteria were not enriched on any textile type. This research found that the composition of clothing fibers promotes differential growth of textile microbes and, as such, determines possible malodor generation. PMID:25128346

  16. Pesticide personal protective clothing.

    PubMed

    Branson, D H; Sweeney, M

    1991-01-01

    A fairly large established data base provides information on clothing worn by U.S. and Canadian farmers to work with pesticides, their attitudes and beliefs about pesticide risk, and clothing as a dermal barrier. Very limited similar data are available for farmers in less developed countries. Clearly, farmers perceive the benefits of pesticides to far exceed any risks. While few report poisoning symptoms, most believe that their usual work clothing offers a sufficient pesticide barrier, and few wear special-purpose protective clothing. Gloves of various materials, including cotton and leather, appear to be the major protective clothing item. Although farmers feel that their usual work clothing provides excellent protection, fabric penetration research does not support this. Shirting-weight fabrics offer some limited protection against light spray of field-strenght pesticides. Heavier-weight fabrics, such as denim and twill, are better barriers. With a heavier spray or a spill, usual work clothing does not give sufficient protection. Greater protection can usually be achieved with the use of a fluorocarbon finished fabric, such as Scotchgard or Zepel. Scotchgard can readily be applied at home. A durable-press finish does not appear to improve fabric's pesticide-barrier resistance and some data suggest that it may decrease barrier properties. A second alternative for increased protection is the use of a special-purpose fabric, such as a coated nonwoven or possibly Gore-Tex. Numerous other new "waterproof breathable" fabrics have recently come to the market. Many of these are finished or coated fabrics and one would expect them to be at least somewhat resistant to pesticides. However, they have not been tested. Wearing an additional layer also appears to be another clothing strategy to minimize exposure. Fabric penetration research also shows that pesticide formulation, volume or spray regime, concentration, and active ingredients influence the barrier properties of

  17. Nonflammable Clothing Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Richard; Radnofsky, Matthew I.

    1968-01-01

    Protective clothing is of major importance in our space program. The authors discuss the requirements, selection, and testing of materials considered for use in the program. The various types of garments worn by astronauts and support personnel are briefly described.

  18. Laundering Your Baby's Clothes

    MedlinePlus

    ... using a detergent that's free of colors and fragrances. If you notice a skin reaction, stick with ... or fabric softeners, which often have chemicals and fragrances that can irritate the skin. Cloth diapers are ...

  19. Flexible cloth seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumar; Taura, Joseph Charles; Aksit, Mahmut Faruk; Demiroglu, Mehmet; Predmore, Daniel Ross

    1999-01-01

    A seal assembly having a flexible cloth seal which includes a shim assemblage surrounded by a cloth assemblage. A first tubular end portion, such as a gas turbine combustor, includes a longitudinal axis and has smooth and spaced-apart first and second surface portions defining a notch therebetween which is wider at its top than at its bottom and which extends outward from the axis. The second surface portion is outside curved, and a first edge of the cloth seal is positioned in the bottom of the notch. A second tubular end portion, such as a first stage nozzle, is located near, spaced apart from, and coaxially aligned with, the first tubular end portion. The second tubular end portion has a smooth third surface portion which surrounds at least a portion of the first tubular end portion and which is contacted by the cloth seal.

  20. Flexible cloth seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bagepalli, B.S.; Taura, J.C.; Aksit, M.F.; Demiroglu, M.; Predmore, D.R.

    1999-06-29

    A seal assembly is described having a flexible cloth seal which includes a shim assemblage surrounded by a cloth assemblage. A first tubular end portion, such as a gas turbine combustor, includes a longitudinal axis and has smooth and spaced-apart first and second surface portions defining a notch there between which is wider at its top than at its bottom and which extends outward from the axis. The second surface portion is outside curved, and a first edge of the cloth seal is positioned in the bottom of the notch. A second tubular end portion, such as a first stage nozzle, is located near, spaced apart from, and coaxially aligned with, the first tubular end portion. The second tubular end portion has a smooth third surface portion which surrounds at least a portion of the first tubular end portion and which is contacted by the cloth seal. 7 figs.

  1. Clean room wiping cloths

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    The suitability of various fabrics for use as clean room wiping cloths was investigated. These fabrics included knit polyester, knit nylon, urethane foam, woven cotton, nonwoven polyester, nonwoven rayon, nonwoven polyethylene and polypropylene, and woven nylon. These materials were tested for detachable lint and fibers, deterioration, and oil content which could leave contaminating films on wiped surfaces. Well-laundered nylon and polyester cloths knitted from filamentary yarn, with hems, were found to be suitable. (LCL)

  2. Clothing and personal hygiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finogenov, A. M.; Azhayev, A. N.; Kaliberdin, G. V.

    1975-01-01

    The biomedical maintenance of astronauts is discussed in terms of personal hygiene. Principal characteristics and general requirements are described which must be followed in perfecting a system of hygienic practices and in devising means to maintain personal hygiene, flight clothing, underwear, bedding, and medical-domestic equipment for manned space flights of varying durations. Factors discussed include: disposable clothing, thermal protection, oral hygiene, cleansing of the skin, and grooming of the hair.

  3. REDUCED PROTECTIVE CLOTHING DETERMINATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN, R.L.

    2003-06-13

    This technical basis document defines conditions where reduced protective clothing can be allowed, defines reduced protective clothing, and documents the regulatory review that determines the process is compliant with the Tank Farm Radiological Control Manual (TFRCM) and Title 10, Part 835, of the Code of Federal Regulations (10CFR835). The criteria, standards, and requirements contained in this document apply only to Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) facilities.

  4. Burns and military clothing.

    PubMed

    McLean, A D

    2001-02-01

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment. The risks during combat are well recognised, but the handling of fuel, oil, munitions and other hot or flammable materials during peacetime deployment and training also imposes an inherent risk of accidental burn injury. Over the last hundred years, the burn threat in combat has ranged from nuclear weapons to small shoulder-launched missiles. Materials such as napalm and white phosphorus plainly present a risk of burn, but the threat extends to encompass personnel in vehicles attacked by anti-armour weapons, large missiles, fuel-air explosives and detonations/conflagrations on weapons platforms such as ships. Large numbers of burn casualties were caused at Pearl Harbor, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam, during the Arab/Israeli Wars and in the Falkland Islands conflict. The threat from burns is unlikely to diminish, indeed new developments in weapons seek to exploit the vulnerability of the serviceman and servicewoman to burns. Clothing can be a barrier to some types of burn--both inherently in the properties of the material, but also by trapping air between clothing layers. Conversely, ignition of the clothing may exacerbate a burn. There is hearsay that burnt clothing products within a wound may complicate the clinical management, or that materials that melt (thermoplastic materials) should not be worn if there is a burn threat. This paper explores the incidence of burn injury, the mechanisms of heat transfer to bare skin and skin covered by materials, and the published evidence for the complication of wound management by materials. Even light-weight combat clothing can offer significant protection to skin from short duration flash burns; the most vulnerable areas are the parts of the body not covered--face and hands. Multilayered combat clothing can offer significant protection for short periods from engulfment by flames; lightweight tropical wear with few layers offers little protection. Under

  5. Microflora involved in textile dye waste removal.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Rahim, Wafaa M; Moawad, Hassan; Khalafallah, M

    2003-01-01

    Textile dyes are heavily used in factories for coloring different cloth materials. This work was designed to identify microorganisms capable of removing textile dyes, either by biodegradation or by biosorption. We expected to isolate microorganisms adapted to high dye concentrations from sites near textile industry complex. An experiment was conducted to study the efficiency of the isolates in removing textile dyes. The tested dyes were used as carbon and nitrogen sources for isolation of soil and/or water microorganisms capable of removing textile dyes wastes from factories effluent. The results indicated the low efficiency of both bacteria and actinomycetes in clean-up the effluent from the waste dyes in 10-21 days. On the other hand six fungal isolates were obtained by plating factory effluent on Martin's medium and media containing dyes as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen for growth. These isolates fell in two genera, Aspergillus and Trichoderma. Results of these studies revealed the potential capacity of these fungi to decolorize the tested dyes in comparatively short time (2-24 hours) indicating strong efficiency of dye bioremediation by the fungal isolates. Since the process involved is mostly fast interaction between the fungal mycelium and the dye in the media, the possible mechanism could be based on a biosorption of such chemicals on the intact fungal biomass, rather than direct biodegradation of the compounds. PMID:12761767

  6. Astronaut Clothing for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poritz, Darwin H.; Orndoff, Evelyne; Kaspranskiy, Rustem R.; Schesinger, Thilini; Byrne, Vicky

    2016-01-01

    Astronaut clothes for exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit need to satisfy several challenges not met by the currently-used mostly-cotton clothing. A laundering system is not expected to be available, and thus soiled garments must be trashed. Jettisoning waste does not seem feasible at this time. The cabin oxygen concentration is expected to be higher than standard, and thus fabrics must better resist ignition and burning. Fabrics need to be identified that reduce logistical mass, that can be worn longer before disposal, that are at least as comfortable as cotton, and that resist ignition or that char immediately after ignition. Human factors and psychology indicate that crew well-being and morale require a variety of colors and styles to accommodate personal identity and preferences. Over the past four years, the Logistics Reduction Project under NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems Program has sponsored the Advanced Clothing System Task to conduct several ground studies and one ISS study. These studies have evaluated length of wear and personal preferences of commercially-available exercise- and routine-wear garments made from several fabrics (cotton, polyester, Merino wool, and modacrylic), woven and knitted. Note that Merino wool and modacrylic char like cotton in ambient air, while polyester unacceptably melts. This paper focuses on the two components of an International Space Station study, onboard and on the ground, with astronauts and cosmonauts. Fabrics were randomized to participants. Length of wear was assessed by statistical survival analysis, and preference by exact binomial confidence limits. Merino wool and modacrylic t-shirts were worn longer on average than polyester t-shirts. Interestingly, self-assessed preferences were inconsistent with length-of-wear behavior, as polyester was preferred to Merino wool and modacrylic.

  7. Numerical Simulation for Effects of Microcapsuled Phase Change Material (mpcm) Distribution on Heat and Moisture Transfer in Porous Textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fengzhi

    In recent years, the use of phase change materials (PCM) to improve heat and moisture transfer properties of clothing has gained considerable attention. The PCM distribution in the clothing impacts heat and moisture transfer properties of the clothing significantly. For describing the mechanisms of heat and moisture transfer in clothing with PCM and investigating the effect of the PCM distribution, a new dynamic model of coupled heat and moisture transfer in porous textiles with PCM was developed. The effect of water content on physical parameters of textiles and heat transfer with phase change in the PCM microcapsules were considered in the model. Meanwhile, the numerical predictions were compared with experimental data, and good agreement was observed between the two, indicating that the model was satisfactory. Also the effects of the PCM distribution on heat transfer in the textiles-PCM microcapsule composites were investigated by using the model.

  8. Personal Clothing Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, Donna

    This curriculum guide is designed to help Oklahoma teachers of students in the 11th and 12th grades and of adult students to teach clothing management. The instructional materials in the guide were developed for use in a one-semester vocational home economics program. The guide contains six units that focus on the following subjects: wardrobe…

  9. Hmong Story Cloths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkenberg, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author provides a brief history of Hmong and traces the origin of Hmong story cloths. The Hmong, a nomadic and agrarian people, may date back 5000 years. Today they live in China, Vietnam, Thailand, and Laos, where during the Vietnam War and its aftermath, many Hmong were killed or persecuted for siding with the American…

  10. Occupational Clothing Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Annette J.

    Designed to provide individualized, hands-on experience for secondary or postsecondary students in gainful homemaking programs, this occupational clothing curriculum contains eight learning modules. The following topics are covered in the modules: plant production for the needle trades (needle trade structure and operation, terminology, history,…

  11. Carbon cloth supported electrode

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen-Tong P.; Ammon, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    A flow-by anode is disclosed made by preparing a liquid suspension of about to about 18% by weight solids, the solids comprising about 3.5 to about 8% of a powdered catalyst of platinum, palladium, palladium oxide, or mixtures thereof; about 60 to about 76% carbon powder (support) having a particle size less than about 20 m.mu.m and about 20 to about 33% of an inert binder having a particle size of less than about 500 m.mu.m. A sufficient amount of the suspension is poured over a carbon cloth to form a layer of solids about 0.01 to about 0.05 cm thick on the carbon cloth when the electrode is completed. A vacuum was applied to the opposite side of the carbon cloth to remove the liquid and the catalyst layer/cloth assembly is dried and compressed at about 10 to about 50 MPa's. The binder is then sintered in an inert atmosphere to complete the electrode. The electrode is used for the oxidation of sulfur dioxide in a sulfur based hybrid cycle for the decomposition of water.

  12. A review of stimuli-responsive polymers for smart textile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinlian; Meng, Harper; Li, Guoqiang; Ibekwe, Samuel I.

    2012-05-01

    Stimuli-responsive polymers (SRPs) are smart materials which can show noticeable changes in their properties with environmental stimulus variations. Novel functionalities can be delivered to textiles by integrating smart SRPs into them. SRPs inclusive of thermal-responsive polymers, moisture-responsive polymers, thermal-responsive hydrogels, pH-responsive hydrogels, and light-responsive polymers have been applied in textiles to improve or achieve textile smart functionalities. The functionalities include aesthetic appeal, comfort, textile soft display, smart controlled drug release, fantasy design with color changing, wound monitoring, smart wetting properties and protection against extreme variations in environmental conditions. In this review, the applications of SRPs in the textile and clothing sector are elucidated; the associated constraints in fabrication processes for textiles and their potential applications in the near future are discussed.

  13. Viking and Early Middle Ages Northern Scandinavian Textiles Proven to be made with Hemp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoglund, G.; Nockert, M.; Holst, B.

    2013-10-01

    Nowadays most plant textiles used for clothing and household are made of cotton and viscose. Before the 19th century however, plant textiles were mainly made from locally available raw materials, in Scandinavia these were: nettle, hemp and flax. It is generally believed that in Viking and early Middle Ages Scandinavia hemp was used only for coarse textiles (i.e. rope and sailcloth). Here we present an investigation of 10 Scandinavian plant fibre textiles from the Viking and Early Middle Ages, believed to be locally produced. Up till now they were all believed to be made of flax. We show that 4 textiles, including two pieces of the famous Överhogdal Viking wall-hanging are in fact made with hemp (in three cases hemp and flax are mixed). This indicates that hemp was important, not only for coarse but also for fine textile production in Viking and Early Middle Ages in Scandinavia.

  14. Viking and early Middle Ages northern Scandinavian textiles proven to be made with hemp.

    PubMed

    Skoglund, G; Nockert, M; Holst, B

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays most plant textiles used for clothing and household are made of cotton and viscose. Before the 19th century however, plant textiles were mainly made from locally available raw materials, in Scandinavia these were: nettle, hemp and flax. It is generally believed that in Viking and early Middle Ages Scandinavia hemp was used only for coarse textiles (i.e. rope and sailcloth). Here we present an investigation of 10 Scandinavian plant fibre textiles from the Viking and Early Middle Ages, believed to be locally produced. Up till now they were all believed to be made of flax. We show that 4 textiles, including two pieces of the famous Överhogdal Viking wall-hanging are in fact made with hemp (in three cases hemp and flax are mixed). This indicates that hemp was important, not only for coarse but also for fine textile production in Viking and Early Middle Ages in Scandinavia. PMID:24135914

  15. Maths Work: Maths in the Textile, Clothing, Footwear & Allied Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Midge

    This book is designed to help individuals be aware of how much mathematics is used at work. It is designed to help trainers decide what to do if workers need help to improve their mathematics skills. An introduction looks at mathematics as it is used at work by discussing how it is used on the job. The book discusses the problems for workers with…

  16. Multimedia in the University Textiles and Clothing Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batra, Mansi; Marcketti, Sara B.; Ratute, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    Teaching has always been a multimedia enterprise; what has changed dramatically is the technology available for delivering course information. The use of technology for today's "digital native" students is an assumed rather than a novel activity. From a pedagogical perspective, technology is a powerful tool for customizing instruction to the needs…

  17. Long term respiratory health effects in textile workers

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Peggy S.; Christiani, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Over 60 million people worldwide work in the textile or clothing industry. Recent studies have recognized the contribution of workplace exposures to chronic lung diseases, in particular chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Early studies in textile workers have focused on the relationship between hemp or cotton dust exposure and the development of a syndrome termed Byssinosis. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the effect of long term exposure to organic dust in textile workers on chronic respiratory disease in the broader context of disease classifications such as reversible or irreversible obstructive lung disease (i.e. asthma or COPD), and restrictive lung disease. Recent findings Cessation of exposure to cotton dusts leads to improvement in lung function. Recent animal models have suggested a shift in the lung macrophage:dendritic cell population as a potential mechanistic explanation for persistent inflammation in the lung due to repeated cotton-dust related endotoxin exposure. Other types of textile dust, such as silk, may contribute to COPD in textile workers. Summary Textile dust related obstructive lung disease has characteristics of both asthma and COPD. Significant progress has been made in the understanding of chronic lung disease due to organic dust exposure in textile workers. PMID:23361196

  18. Bacterial burden of worn therapeutic silver textiles for neurodermitis patients and evaluation of efficacy of washing.

    PubMed

    Daeschlein, G; Assadian, O; Arnold, A; Haase, H; Kramer, A; Jünger, M

    2010-01-01

    To reduce pruritus and colonization with Staphylococcus aureus, textiles containing silver are increasingly used as therapeutic option for patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). While wearing such textiles, the contained silver is in close contact with the patient's skin. The silver serves two purposes: to reduce bacterial colonization of the skin, and to prevent contamination of the textile with ensuing growth of microorganisms. It is unknown whether the silver impregnation is able to reduce bacterial contamination of the textile during wearing and to prevent bacterial growth within the textile. The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial contamination in textiles containing silver versus placebo worn by patients with AD and to determine the efficacy of processing worn textiles by manual and machine-based washing. Additionally, the effect of silver textiles on S. aureus and total bacterial counts colonizing the skin of AD patients was analyzed. The reduction factor of silver textile compared to placebo was 0.5 log steps against S. aureus and 0.4 log steps against total bacteria. Silver textiles exhibited significantly less S. aureus as well as total bacterial colonization after 2 days of wearing without washing, as compared with a placebo textile. On placebo textiles 385.6 +/- 63.5 CFU total bacteria and 236.5 +/- 49.9 CFU S. aureus, and on silver textiles 279.9 +/- 78.7 CFU total bacteria and 119.3 +/- 39.4 CFU S. aureus were found on the inner side of the textiles facing the neurodermitis lesions. However, the unexpectedly high residual contamination despite the silver exposure represents a potential risk as recontamination source of S. aureus that could maintain the proinflammatory process in AD. This contamination is nearly completely eliminated by machine-based washing at 60 degrees C using conventional washing powder. AD patients wearing silver textiles should change their used clothes at least daily and wash them in a washing machine at 60 degrees

  19. Smart Textiles: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Langenhove, Lieva; Hertleer, Carla; Schwarz, Anne

    This chapter introduces smart textiles and explains how textile materials and structures can be used as sensors, actuators, communication devices, energy sources and storage tools, and even processors. Conductive materials serve as the base for smart textiles. There are several advantages of using textiles as a substrate for smart functions; this chapter explains their important role in thermoregulation and highlights a smart suit for rescue workers.

  20. Textiles and Apparel Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This document contains teacher's materials for a seven-unit secondary education vocational home economics course on textiles and apparel design. The units cover: (1) fiber/fiber characteristics and textile development (including fabrication and dyeing, printing, and finishing); (2) textile and apparel design industries (including their history and…

  1. Conductive fiber-based ultrasensitive textile pressure sensor for wearable electronics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehong; Kwon, Hyukho; Seo, Jungmok; Shin, Sera; Koo, Ja Hoon; Pang, Changhyun; Son, Seungbae; Kim, Jae Hyung; Jang, Yong Hoon; Kim, Dae Eun; Lee, Taeyoon

    2015-04-17

    A flexible and sensitive textile-based pressure sensor is developed using highly conductive fibers coated with dielectric rubber materials. The pressure sensor exhibits superior sensitivity, very fast response time, and high stability, compared with previous textile-based pressure sensors. By using a weaving method, the pressure sensor can be applied to make smart gloves and clothes that can control machines wirelessly as human-machine interfaces. PMID:25692572

  2. Ultrasonic Clothes Drying Technology

    ScienceCinema

    Patel, Viral; Momen, Ayyoub

    2016-05-12

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers Ayyoub Momen and Viral Patel demonstrate a direct contact ultrasonic clothes dryer under development by ORNL in collaboration with General Electric (GE) Appliances. This novel approach uses high-frequency mechanical vibrations instead of heat to extract moisture as cold mist, dramatically reducing drying time and energy use. Funding for this project was competitively awarded by DOE?s Building Technologies Office in 2014.

  3. A self-charging power unit by integration of a textile triboelectric nanogenerator and a flexible lithium-ion battery for wearable electronics.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xiong; Li, Linxuan; Song, Huanqiao; Du, Chunhua; Zhao, Zhengfu; Jiang, Chunyan; Cao, Guozhong; Hu, Weiguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-04-17

    A novel integrated power unit realizes both energy harvesting and energy storage by a textile triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG)-cloth and a flexible lithium-ion battery (LIB) belt, respectively. The mechanical energy of daily human motion is converted into electricity by the TENG-cloth, sustaining the energy of the LIB belt to power wearable smart electronics. PMID:25736078

  4. Comparison of Observed Beta Cloth Interactions with Simulated and Actual Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamenetzy, R. R.; Finckenor, M. M.

    1999-01-01

    A common component of multilayer insulation blankets is beta cloth, a woven fiberglass cloth impregnated with Teflon(TM). It is planned for extensive use on the International Space Station. The Environmental Etl'ects Group of the Marshall Space Flight Center Materials, Processing, and Manufacturing Department has investigated the impact of atomic oxygen (AO) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the optical properties of plain and aluminized beta cloth. both in the laboratory and as part of long-duration flight experiments. These investigations indicate that beta cloth is susceptible to darkening in the presence of UV radiation, dependent on the additives used. AO interactions resulted in bleaching of the beta cloth.

  5. Recovery of spray paint traces from clothing by beating.

    PubMed

    Olderiks, Maurice; Baiker, Martin; van Velzen, Jill; van der Weerd, Jaap

    2015-03-01

    Manual recovery of spray paints from textiles using a microscope, the routine method in many laboratories, is often laborious. Beating the clothing with a plastic rod, the routine method used for recovery of glass traces within the authors' laboratory, is proposed as an alternative. The efficiency of the method was evaluated by spray tests with fluorescent paint. In these tests, paint particles in the acquired debris samples, as well as those remaining on the textiles, were investigated. The results show that beating is an efficient way to recover and concentrate paint particles. A good efficiency for jeans fabric and rough knitwear is reported. The results appeared to be less satisfactory for smooth woven fabric. Application of the method in casework was effective for graffiti paints as well as for flaked car paint. PMID:25482095

  6. 21 CFR 177.2800 - Textiles and textile fibers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Polybutene, hydrogenated; complying with the identity prescribed under 21 CFR 178.3740(b) of this chapter... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Textiles and textile fibers. 177.2800 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2800 Textiles and textile fibers. Textiles and...

  7. Smart textile device using ion polymer metal compound.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Taro; Ihara, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a smart textile device that detects angular displacement of attached surface using ion polymer metal compound. The device was composed of ion polymer metal compound (IPMC) which was fabricated from Nafion resin by heat-press and chemical gold plating. The generated voltage from IPMC was measured as a function of bending angle. Fabricated IPMC device was weaved into a cotton cloth and multidirectional movements were detected. PMID:24109750

  8. Advanced Clothing Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orndoff, Evelyne; Poritz, Darwin

    2014-01-01

    All human space missions require significant logistical mass and volume that add an unprecedented burden on longduration missions beyond low-Earth orbit. For these missions with limited cleaning resources, a new wardrobe must be developed to reduce this logistical burden by reducing clothing mass and extending clothing wear. The present studies have been undertaken, for the first time, to measure length of wear and to assess the acceptance of such extended wear. Garments in these studies are commercially available exercise T-shirts and shorts, routine-wear T-shirts, and longsleeved pullover shirts. Fabric composition (cotton, polyester, light-weight, superfine Merino wool, modacrylic, cotton/rayon, polyester/Cocona, modacrylic/Xstatic, modacrylic/rayon, modacrylic/lyocell/aramid), construction (open knit, tight knit, open weave, tight weave), and finishing treatment (none, quaternary ammonium salt) are the independent variables. Eleven studies are reported here: five studies of exercise T-shirts, three of exercise shorts, two of routine wear Tshirts, and one of shirts used as sleep-wear. All studies are conducted in a climate-controlled environment, similar to a space vehicle's. For exercise clothing, study participants wear the garments during aerobic exercise. For routine wear clothing, study participants wear the T-shirts daily in an office or laboratory. Daily questionnaires collected data on ordinal preferences of nine sensory elements and on reason for retiring a used garment. Study 1 compares knitted cotton, polyester, and Merino exercise T-shirts (61 participants), study 2, knitted polyester, modacrylic, and polyester/Cocona exercise T-shirts (40 participants), study 3, cotton and polyester exercise shorts, knitted and woven (70 participants), all three using factorial experimental designs with and without a finishing treatment, conducted at the Johnson Space Center, sharing study participants. Study 4 compares knitted polyester and ZQ Merino exercise T

  9. 16 CFR 1610.61 - Reasonable and representative testing to assure compliance with the standard for the clothing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Commission enforces the Standard for the Flammability of Clothing Textiles (“the Standard”), 16 CFR part 1610... relied upon as a bar to prosecution. 16 CFR 1608.4. The guaranty must be based on the exempted types of... 2.6 oz. or more per sq. yd., and plain and raised surface fabrics made of acrylic, modacrylic,...

  10. 16 CFR 1610.61 - Reasonable and representative testing to assure compliance with the standard for the clothing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Commission enforces the Standard for the Flammability of Clothing Textiles (“the Standard”), 16 CFR part 1610... relied upon as a bar to prosecution. 16 CFR 1608.4. The guaranty must be based on the exempted types of... 2.6 oz. or more per sq. yd., and plain and raised surface fabrics made of acrylic, modacrylic,...

  11. 16 CFR 1610.61 - Reasonable and representative testing to assure compliance with the standard for the clothing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Commission enforces the Standard for the Flammability of Clothing Textiles (“the Standard”), 16 CFR part 1610... relied upon as a bar to prosecution. 16 CFR 1608.4. The guaranty must be based on the exempted types of... 2.6 oz. or more per sq. yd., and plain and raised surface fabrics made of acrylic, modacrylic,...

  12. 16 CFR 1610.61 - Reasonable and representative testing to assure compliance with the standard for the clothing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Commission enforces the Standard for the Flammability of Clothing Textiles (“the Standard”), 16 CFR part 1610... relied upon as a bar to prosecution. 16 CFR 1608.4. The guaranty must be based on the exempted types of... 2.6 oz. or more per sq. yd., and plain and raised surface fabrics made of acrylic, modacrylic,...

  13. 16 CFR 1610.61 - Reasonable and representative testing to assure compliance with the standard for the clothing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Commission enforces the Standard for the Flammability of Clothing Textiles (“the Standard”), 16 CFR part 1610... relied upon as a bar to prosecution. 16 CFR 1608.4. The guaranty must be based on the exempted types of... 2.6 oz. or more per sq. yd., and plain and raised surface fabrics made of acrylic, modacrylic,...

  14. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... clothing allowance; multiple types of garments affected. A veteran is entitled to an annual clothing...) Two clothing allowances; single type of garment affected. A veteran is entitled to two annual...

  15. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... clothing allowance; multiple types of garments affected. A veteran is entitled to an annual clothing...) Two clothing allowances; single type of garment affected. A veteran is entitled to two annual...

  16. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... clothing allowance; multiple types of garments affected. A veteran is entitled to an annual clothing...) Two clothing allowances; single type of garment affected. A veteran is entitled to two annual...

  17. Production of anticandidal cotton textiles treated with oak gall extract.

    PubMed

    Tayel, Ahmed A; El-Tras, Wael F; Abdel-Monem, Omnia A; El-Sabbagh, Sabha M; Alsohim, Abdullah S; El-Refai, Elham M

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans, one of the most dreadful fungal pathogens threatening humans, could not be easily prevented. The anticandidal activity of oak gall extract, Quercus infectoria (QIE), was investigated as a potential natural alternative to synthetic and chemical fungicides. QIE anticandidal potentiality was confirmed using both qualitative and quantitative assays. Cotton textiles were treated with QIE and then evaluated as anticandidal fabrics. QIE-treated textiles had a potent anticandidal activity, which could completely inhibit the inoculated C. albicans cells. The durability of anticandidal activity in QIE-treated textiles almost completely disappeared after the fourth laundering cycle. QIE could be recommended, however, as a potent anticandidal agent for preparing antiseptic solutions and emulsions and as a finishing agent for manufacturing anticandidal disposable diapers and hygienic clothes. PMID:24401783

  18. Textiles and Microbes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freney, Jean; Renaud, François N. R.

    Microbes can be carried by and even multiply on textiles. The first real, premeditated, microbiological warfare happened in 1763, during the Anglo-French wars in North America, when Native American emissaries were given blankets or handkerchiefs contaminated with smallpox. Thus, a small epidemic started and spread rapidly, causing considerable damage to the rank and file of the Native Americans. Nowadays, it could be said that textiles could be vectors of infections in hospitals or communities. The making of antimicrobial textiles could prevent them from becoming a reservoir of microbes in the transmission of infections and in cases of voluntary contamination in a terrorist threat for example. However, methods have to show that textiles are really active and do not attack the cutaneous flora they are in contact with. In this chapter, the role of textiles in the transmission of infections is summarized and the main characteristics of antimicrobial textiles are described.

  19. 75 FR 11845 - Exporters' Textile Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... International Trade Administration Exporters' Textile Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting A meeting of the Exporters' Textile Advisory Committee will be held on Tuesday, April 20th, 2010. The meeting will... officials on the identification and surmounting of barriers to the expansion of textile exports, and...

  20. Protective Clothing for Pesticide Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This brief, largely pictorial guide to protective clothing for pesticide users addresses moderately to highly toxic pesticides. The guide discusses the potential hazards of pesticides and the kinds of clothing and equipment that should be worn for personal protection. It also explains how the type of pesticide formulation affects an individual's…

  1. New Clothing for Handheld Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    Clothing is influenced by many factors, trends, and social happenings. Much of what is worn today had utilitarian roots in the past. In the activitiy presented in this article, students will have the opportunity to redesign clothing for new trends, in this case, the explosion of handheld electronic devices.

  2. Does allergic contact dermatitis from formaldehyde in clothes treated with durable-press chemical finishes exist in the USA?

    PubMed

    de Groot, Anton C; Maibach, Howard I

    2010-03-01

    Recent US studies have presented case series of patient with allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) allegedly caused by formaldehyde in clothes treated with durable-press chemical finishes (DPCF), which are known formaldehyde releasers. However, the amounts of formaldehyde released by modern DPCF are thought to be well below the levels previously estimated to be able to elicit ACD. The objectives of this review are (i) to investigate whether clothes sold in the USA may contain enough free formaldehyde to elicit ACD in previously sensitized individuals and (ii) to assess the validity of US reports on ACD from formaldehyde in DPCF treated clothes. Literature was examined using various resources. The threshold level for formaldehyde in clothes that may cause ACD in sensitized individuals is unknown; we present data suggesting that levels < 200 ppm will be safe for most patients and that textiles will rarely contain higher amounts. All US studies presenting patients with ACD from formaldehyde in clothes had some weaknesses and in no report was the diagnosis proven beyond doubt. Currently, there is no definite proof that textile ACD from formaldehyde in DPCF in the USA exists. Future research should be directed at establishing the elicitation threshold and the amounts of formaldehyde present in textiles. PMID:19807751

  3. Application of biomass-derived flexible carbon cloth coated with MnO2 nanosheets in supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shuijian; Chen, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Successful application of inexpensive energy storage devices lies in the exploitation of fabrication approaches that are based on cost-efficient materials and that can be easily scaled up. Here, inexpensive textile weaved by natural flax fiber is selected as raw material in preparing flexible and binder-free electrode material for supercapacitors. Although carbon fiber cloth obtained from the direct carbonization of flax textile exhibits a low specific capacitance of 0.78 F g-1, carbon fiber cloth electrode shows a very short relaxation time of 39.1 m s and good stability with almost 100% capacitance retaining after 104 cycles at 5 A g-1. To extend the application of the resulting carbon cloth in supercapacitor field, a layer of MnO2 nanosheets is deposited on the surface of carbon fiber via in situ redox reaction between carbon and KMnO4. The specific capacitance of MnO2 reaches 683.73 F g-1 at 2 A g-1 and still retains 269.04 F g-1 at 300 A g-1, indicating the excellent rate capacitance performance of the carbon cloth/MnO2 hybrids. The present study shows that carbon cloth derived from flax textile can provide a low-cost material platform for the facile, cost-efficient and large scale fabrication of binder-free electrode materials for energy storage devices.

  4. Smart Electronic Textiles.

    PubMed

    Weng, Wei; Chen, Peining; He, Sisi; Sun, Xuemei; Peng, Huisheng

    2016-05-17

    This Review describes the state-of-the-art of wearable electronics (smart textiles). The unique and promising advantages of smart electronic textiles are highlighted by comparing them with the conventional planar counterparts. The main kinds of smart electronic textiles based on different functionalities, namely the generation, storage, and utilization of electricity, are then discussed with an emphasis on the use of functional materials. The remaining challenges are summarized together with important new directions to provide some useful clues for the future development of smart electronic textiles. PMID:27005410

  5. Portuguese Child Labour: Manufacturing for Change or Continuing Exploitation in the Textiles Industry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Martin; da Silva, Carlos Pereira

    1998-01-01

    Provides an overview of the role of Portuguese child laborers, focusing on the textile, clothing, and footwear industries. Argues that in the long term, positive outcomes will be based upon improved education; an alteration in the views of the factory owners, parents, and their children; and greater knowledge of innovative working practices among…

  6. Detection of the Deformation of an Intelligent Textile in a Specific Point

    PubMed Central

    Alsina, Maria; Escudero, Francesc; Margalef, Jordi; Cambra, Vicente; Gisbert, José

    2007-01-01

    An intelligent textile is a textile structure that measures and reacts in front of external agents or stimulus with or without integrated electronic equipment. The finality of the present textile is to take one more step towards intelligent textile, considering the integration of electronics and textile needs, to be industrially viable and to keep up the necessary competitiveness, raising the final price as little as possible. The finality of these experiments is to develop a textile that varies in conductivity and resistance in relation to the elongation of the textile, detecting changes caused by the alteration of a piece of clothing, from the pressure of a finger on the material, for example. One of the most important characteristics of textile is the capacity of reproducing measures, of varying the response in different tests. Two lines of research were opened: the study of the most adequate structure to achieve a response that can be reproduced and the study of the best way of taking measures without altering the behavior of the textile.

  7. Flexible technologies and smart clothing for citizen medicine, home healthcare, and disease prevention.

    PubMed

    Axisa, Fabrice; Schmitt, Pierre Michael; Gehin, Claudine; Delhomme, Georges; McAdams, Eric; Dittmar, André

    2005-09-01

    Improvement of the quality and efficiency of healthcare in medicine, both at home and in hospital, is becoming more and more important for patients and society at large. As many technologies (micro technologies, telecommunication, low-power design, new textiles, and flexible sensors) are now available, new user-friendly devices can be developed to enhance the comfort and security of the patient. As clothes and textiles are in direct contact with about 90% of the skin surface, smart sensors and smart clothes with noninvasive sensors are an attractive solution for home-based and ambulatory health monitoring. Moreover, wearable devices or smart homes with exosensors are also potential solutions. All these systems can provide a safe and comfortable environment for home healthcare, illness prevention, and citizen medicine. PMID:16167686

  8. N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide-containing microcapsules for bio-cloth finishing.

    PubMed

    Fei, Bin; Xin, John H

    2007-07-01

    To obtain long-duration protection from mosquitoes using insect repellent N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET), this compound was incapsulated in situ during the graft copolymerization of butyl acrylate onto chitosan in an aqueous solution. Morphology of microcapsules was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. This morphology supported successful encapsulation of DEET into polymer capsules. The encapsulation ratio of DEET was greater than 33%, as estimated from thermo-gravimetric results. The aqueous emulsions were applied to cotton textiles by spraying. Treated cloth showed high bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Mosquito repellency of the bio-cloth was evaluated with Aedes albopictus. The 90% effective dose of emulsions on textiles was compared with that of DEET in ethanol. A time profile showed that the repellency of an optimized emulsion was 100% after eight hours, and partially preserved even after exposure to air for 48 hours. PMID:17620630

  9. Clothing and thermoregulation during exercise.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Timothy P

    2003-01-01

    Exercise increases heat production. During exercise in both warm and cold conditions, the major dilemma is the dissipation of the heat produced from muscular activity. The use of clothing generally represents a layer of insulation and as such imposes a barrier to heat transfer and evaporation from the skin surface. In warm environments, additional clothing increases thermal insulation causing more rapid increases in temperature during exercise and imposes a barrier to sweat evaporation. However, clothing can serve a protective function by reducing radiant heat gain and thermal stress. Recent research suggests that neither the inclusion of modest amounts of clothing nor the clothing fabric alter thermoregulation or thermal comfort during exercise in warm conditions. In the cold, most reports do not support an effect of clothing fabric on thermoregulation; however, there are reports demonstrating an effect. Clothing construction does alter thermoregulation during and following exercise in the cold, where fishnet construction offers greater heat dissipation. Future research should include conditions that more closely mimic outdoor conditions, where high work rates, large airflow and high relative humidity can significantly impact thermoregulation. PMID:14606923

  10. NIR Analysis for Textiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near Infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been found to be a useful technique to characterize raw materials and finished textile products, and NIR methods and techniques continue to find increasingly diverse and wide-ranging quantitative and qualitative applications in the textile industry. NIR methods ...

  11. Whitening of textiles.

    PubMed

    Hefti, H

    1975-01-01

    In the textile field, fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) can be used on practically all types of goods at any stage in the finishing process. As examples, three important types of methods for applying FWAs to textiles have been outlined. PMID:1064548

  12. Wrinkle resistant cellulosic textiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchens, J.D.; Patton, R.T.; Nadar, R.S.

    1991-08-27

    This patent describes a process for treating a cellulosic textile material so as to impart wrinkle resistance and smooth drying properties. It comprises treating the cellulosic textile material with an aqueous solution comprising trans-1,2,3,4-cyclobutane tetracarboxylic acid, and a curing catalyst, and heating the treated material so as to produce esterification and crosslinking of the material with the acid.

  13. The effect of soil texture on the degradation of textiles associated with buried bodies.

    PubMed

    Lowe, A C; Beresford, D V; Carter, D O; Gaspari, F; O'Brien, R C; Stuart, B H; Forbes, S L

    2013-09-10

    There are many factors which affect the rate of decomposition in a grave site including; the depth of burial, climatic conditions, physical conditions of the soil (e.g. texture, pH, moisture), and method of burial (e.g. clothing, wrappings). Clothing is often studied as a factor that can slow the rate of soft tissue decomposition. In contrast, the effect of soft tissue decomposition on the rate of textile degradation is usually reported as anecdotal evidence rather than being studied under controlled conditions. The majority of studies in this area have focused on the degradation of textiles buried directly in soil. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of soil texture on the degradation and/or preservation of textile materials associated with buried bodies. The study involved the burial of clothed domestic pig carcasses and control clothing in contrasting soil textures (silty clay loam, fine sand and fine sandy loam) at three field sites in southern Ontario, Canada. Graves were exhumed after 2, 12 and 14 months burial to observe the degree of degradation for both natural and synthetic textiles. Recovered textile samples were chemically analyzed using infrared (IR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to investigate the lipid decomposition by-products retained in the textiles. The findings of this study demonstrate that natural textile in contact with a buried decomposing body will be preserved for longer periods of time when compared to the same textile buried directly in soil and not in contact with a body. The soil texture did not visually impact the degree of degradation or preservation. Furthermore, the natural-synthetic textile blend was resistant to degradation, regardless of soil texture, contact with the body or time since deposition. Chemical analysis of the textiles using GC-MS correctly identified a lipid degradation profile consistent with the degree of soft tissue decomposition. Such information may be

  14. Designing Clothing for Coal Miners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Susan M.

    1977-01-01

    Describes procedures taken by apparel design students, working in an industrial setting, in designing functional clothing for coal miners as part of the Armco Steel Corporation's Student Design Program. (TA)

  15. Smart textiles: Challenges and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherenack, Kunigunde; van Pieterson, Liesbeth

    2012-11-01

    Smart textiles research represents a new model for generating creative and novel solutions for integrating electronics into unusual environments and will result in new discoveries that push the boundaries of science forward. A key driver for smart textiles research is the fact that both textile and electronics fabrication processes are capable of functionalizing large-area surfaces at very high speeds. In this article we review the history of smart textiles development, introducing the main trends and technological challenges faced in this field. Then, we identify key challenges that are the focus of ongoing research. We then proceed to discuss fundamentals of smart textiles: textile fabrication methods and textile interconnect lines, textile sensor, and output device components and integration of commercial components into textile architectures. Next we discuss representative smart textile systems and finally provide our outlook over the field and a prediction for the future.

  16. Waterless Clothes-Cleaning Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Glenn; Ganske, Shane

    2013-01-01

    A waterless clothes-cleaning machine has been developed that removes loose particulates and deodorizes dirty laundry with regenerative chemical processes to make the clothes more comfortable to wear and have a fresher smell. This system was initially developed for use in zero-g, but could be altered for 1-g environments where water or other re sources are scarce. Some of these processes include, but are not limited to, airflow, filtration, ozone generation, heat, ultraviolet light, and photocatalytic titanium oxide.

  17. The UTCI-clothing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havenith, George; Fiala, Dusan; Błazejczyk, Krzysztof; Richards, Mark; Bröde, Peter; Holmér, Ingvar; Rintamaki, Hannu; Benshabat, Yael; Jendritzky, Gerd

    2012-05-01

    The Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) was conceived as a thermal index covering the whole climate range from heat to cold. This would be impossible without considering clothing as the interface between the person (here, the physiological model of thermoregulation) and the environment. It was decided to develop a clothing model for this application in which the following three factors were considered: (1) typical dressing behaviour in different temperatures, as observed in the field, resulting in a model of the distribution of clothing over the different body segments in relation to the ambient temperature, (2) the changes in clothing insulation and vapour resistance caused by wind and body movement, and (3) the change in wind speed in relation to the height above ground. The outcome was a clothing model that defines in detail the effective clothing insulation and vapour resistance for each of the thermo-physiological model's body segments over a wide range of climatic conditions. This paper details this model's conception and documents its definitions.

  18. Protective clothing, re-engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, S.M.

    1995-11-01

    In 1993, Commonwealth Edison spent 5.1 Million dollars for protective clothing materials and services for six power plants. Therefore, it was necessary for ComEd to evaluate their protective clothing programs while also considering the rapid escalation in disposal costs and the potential for on-site storage of waste. Today, I will be discussing the preliminary planning and the outcome of one year`s worth of investigating, reviewing, and calculating for an operation that will save Commonwealth Edison millions of dollars. A Process Engineering Reevaluation Team composed of corporate and power plant personnel was formed to evaluate all aspects of protective clothing materials and services. Throughout the year, the nine member team consulted clothing manufacturers, commercial laundry operators, and laundry equipment specialists. Faced with a wide range of garment design, types, sizes, materials, and disposal options, we were faced with a considerable challenge. In addition, we had to develop a product that all six sites would agree on. Three areas in particular that the team sought to improve were the material of the clothing, design of the garment, and the ability to share the protective clothing with all six of our nuclear sites.

  19. Passive and Active Protective Clothing against High-Power Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennigs, C.; Hustedt, M.; Kaierle, S.; Wenzel, D.; Markstein, S.; Hutter, A.

    The main objective of the work described in this paper was the development of passive and active protective clothing for the protection of the human skin against accidental laser irradiation and of active protective curtains. Here, the passive systems consist of functional multi-layer textiles, providing a high level of passive laser resistance. In addition, the active functional multi-layer textiles incorporate sensors that detect laser exposure and are, by means of a safety control, able to deactivate the laser beam automatically.Due to the lack of regulations for testing and qualifying textiles to be used as laser PPE, test methods were defined and validated. Additionally, corresponding testing set-ups were developed.Finally, the gap with respect to standardization was bridged by the definition of a test procedure and the requirements with respect to laser PPE.The developments were demonstrated by a set of tailored functional passive and active laser-protective clothing prototypes (gloves, jackets, aprons, trousers) and active curtains as well as by a prototype testing rig, providing the possibility to perform the specified low-power and high-power textile test procedure.

  20. Finite element based micro-mechanics modeling of textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, E. H.; Griffin, O. H., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Textile composites have the advantage over laminated composites of a significantly greater damage tolerance and resistance to delamination. Currently, a disadvantage of textile composites is the inability to examine the details of the internal response of these materials under load. Traditional approaches to the study fo textile based composite materials neglect many of the geometric details that affect the performance of the material. The present three dimensional analysis, based on the representative volume element (RVE) of a plain weave, allows prediction of the internal details of displacement, strain, stress, and failure quantities. Through this analysis, the effect of geometric and material parameters on the aforementioned quantities are studied.

  1. Skin physiology and textiles - consideration of basic interactions.

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Abdel-Naser, M B; Verma, S

    2006-01-01

    The skin exerts a number of essential protective functions ensuring homeostasis of the whole body. In the present review barrier function of the skin, thermoregulation, antimicrobial defence and the skin-associated immune system are discussed. Barrier function is provided by the dynamic stratum corneum structure composed of lipids and corneocytes. The stratum corneum is a conditio sine qua non for terrestrial life. Impairment of barrier function can be due to injury and inflammatory skin diseases. Textiles, in particular clothing, interact with skin functions in a dynamic pattern. Mechanical properties like roughness of fabric surface are responsible for non-specific skin reactions like wool intolerance or keratosis follicularis. Thermoregulation, which is mediated by local blood flow and evaporation of sweat, is an important subject for textile-skin interactions. There are age-, gender- and activity-related differences in thermoregulation of skin that should be considered for the development of specifically designed fabrics. The skin is an important immune organ with non-specific and specific activities. Antimicrobial textiles may interfere with non-specific defence mechanisms like antimicrobial peptides of skin or the resident microflora. The use of antibacterial compounds like silver, copper or triclosan is a matter of debate despite their use for a very long period. Macromolecules with antimicrobial activity like chitosan that can be incorporated into textiles or inert material like carbon fibres or activated charcoal seem to be promising agents. Interaction of textiles with the specific immune system of skin is a rare event but may lead to allergic contact dermatitis. Electronic textiles and other smart textiles offer new areas of usage in health care and risk management but bear their own risks for allergies. PMID:16766877

  2. Economic and employment potential in textile waste management of Faisalabad.

    PubMed

    Noman, Muhammad; Batool, Syeda Adila; Chaudhary, Muhammad Nawaz

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize the waste from the textile industry, to identify the sources and types of waste generation and to find out the economic and employment potential in this sector. Textile waste, its management, and the economic and employment potential in this sector are unrevealed facts in developing countries such as Pakistan. The textile industry is ranked first in export earning in Pakistan. Textile export of yarn and cloth from Faisalabad is US$3 billion per year. On average 161 325 people are employed in the textile sector in Faisalabad, of which 11 860 are involved in solid waste handling and management. The textile industries generate solid wastes such as fibre, metal, plastic and paper waste. A total of 794 209 kg day(-1) (289 886 285 kg year(-1)) solid waste is produced from this sector and purchased by cotton waste junkshop owners at US$125 027 day(-1) (US$45 634 855 year(-1)). Only pre-consumer textile waste is considered. Interestingly no waste is sent to landfill. The waste is first segregated into different categories/ types by hand and then weighed. Cotton waste is sold to brick kilns where it is used as an alternative fuel as it is cheaper than wood/coal. Iron scrap is sold in the junk market from where it is resold to recycling industries. Paper waste is recycled, minimizing the virgin material used for producing new paper products. Iron and plastic drums are returned to the chemical industries for refilling, thus decreasing the cost of dyes and decreasing the demand for new drums. Cutting rags are used for making different things such as ropes and underlay, it is also shredded and used as fillings for pillows and mattresses, thus improving waste management, reducing cost and minimizing the need for virgin material. As no system of quality control and no monitoring of subsequent products exist there is a need to carry out quality control and monitoring. PMID:23439877

  3. Ultrasonic washing of textiles.

    PubMed

    Choi, Junhee; Kim, Tae-Hong; Kim, Ho-Young; Kim, Wonjung

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of experimental investigation of ultrasonic washing of textiles. The results demonstrate that cavitation bubbles oscillating in acoustic fields are capable of removing soils from textiles. Since the washing performance is mitigated in a large washing bath when using an ultrasonic transducer, we propose a novel washing scheme by combining the ultrasonic vibration with a conventional washing method utilizing kinetic energy of textiles. It is shown that the hybrid washing scheme achieves a markedly enhanced performance up to 15% in comparison with the conventional washing machine. This work can contribute to developing a novel laundry machine with reduced washing time and waste water. PMID:26215790

  4. Thermal insulation and clothing area factors of typical Arabian Gulf clothing ensembles for males and females: measurements using thermal manikins.

    PubMed

    Al-ajmi, F F; Loveday, D L; Bedwell, K H; Havenith, G

    2008-05-01

    The thermal insulation of clothing is one of the most important parameters used in the thermal comfort model adopted by the International Standards Organisation (ISO) [BS EN ISO 7730, 2005. Ergonomics of the thermal environment. Analytical determination and interpretation of thermal comfort using calculation of the PMV and PPD indices and local thermal comfort criteria. International Standardisation Organisation, Geneva.] and by ASHRAE [ASHRAE Handbook, 2005. Fundamentals. Chapter 8. American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air-conditioning Engineers, Inc., 1791 Tullie Circle N.E., Atlanta, GA.]. To date, thermal insulation values of mainly Western clothing have been published with only minimal data being available for non-Western clothing. Thus, the objective of the present study is to measure and present the thermal insulation (clo) values of a number of Arabian Gulf garments as worn by males and females. The clothing ensembles and garments of Arabian Gulf males and females presented in this study are representative of those typically worn in the region during both summer and winter seasons. Measurements of total thermal insulation values (clo) were obtained using a male and a female shape thermal manikin in accordance with the definition of insulation as given in ISO 9920. In addition, the clothing area factors (f cl) determined in two different ways were compared. The first method used a photographic technique and the second a regression equation as proposed in ISO 9920, based on the insulation values of Arabian Gulf male and female garments and ensembles as they were determined in this study. In addition, fibre content, descriptions and weights of Arabian Gulf clothing have been recorded and tabulated in this study. The findings of this study are presented as additions to the existing knowledge base of clothing insulation, and provide for the first time data for Arabian Gulf clothing. The analysis showed that for these non-Western clothing designs, the

  5. Retrieving Similar Styles to Parse Clothing.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kota; Kiapour, M Hadi; Ortiz, Luis E; Berg, Tamara L

    2015-05-01

    Clothing recognition is a societally and commercially important yet extremely challenging problem due to large variations in clothing appearance, layering, style, and body shape and pose. In this paper, we tackle the clothing parsing problem using a retrieval-based approach. For a query image, we find similar styles from a large database of tagged fashion images and use these examples to recognize clothing items in the query. Our approach combines parsing from: pre-trained global clothing models, local clothing models learned on the fly from retrieved examples, and transferred parse-masks (Paper Doll item transfer) from retrieved examples. We evaluate our approach extensively and show significant improvements over previous state-of-the-art for both localization (clothing parsing given weak supervision in the form of tags) and detection (general clothing parsing). Our experimental results also indicate that the general pose estimation problem can benefit from clothing parsing. PMID:26353326

  6. The Structure and Properties of Parachute Cloths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnicholas, H J; Hedrick, F

    1930-01-01

    The requisite properties of a parachute cloth are discussed and the methods for measuring these properties described. In addition to the structural analysis of the cloths, the properties measured were weight, breaking strength, tear resistance, elasticity, and air permeability. Thirty-six silk cloths of domestic manufacture, not previously used in parachute construction are compared with some silk cloths of foreign manufacture. These foreign cloths were ones proven by trial and extended use to be suitable materials for parachute construction. Contrary to the belief that domestic woven cloths were not suitable materials for parachute construction, it is shown that many domestic silk cloths are satisfactory and in some respects superior to the foreign products. Based on a comparative study of all the cloths, specifications are drawn for the manufacture of silk parachute cloth.

  7. Flame-resistant textiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogg, L. C.; Stringham, R. S.; Toy, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    Flame resistance treatment for acid resistant polyamide fibers involving photoaddition of fluorocarbons to surface has been scaled up to treat 10 yards of commercial width (41 in.) fabric. Process may be applicable to other low cost polyamides, polyesters, and textiles.

  8. Dynamic moisture permeation through clothing.

    PubMed

    Kakitsuba, N; Gaul, K; Michna, H; Mekjavic, I B

    1988-01-01

    Dynamic moisture permeation through clothing often occurs during thermal transience, causing an imbalance between evaporative heat loss from the skin (Esk) and that from the clothing surface (Ecl). A device was designed to observe Esk and Ecl simultaneously. It consists of two relative humidity sensors coupled with thermistors so that densities of water vapor at two points within the boundary layer can be calculated. The rate of local evaporation is then estimated from Fick's law of diffusion. Local evaporation rates from the skin and clothing surface at the chest, arm, and thigh were measured during exposure to controlled ambient temperatures varying from 20 degrees-40 degrees C. The subjects wore four different types of helicopter pilot suits: Nomex/Neoprene, Goretex, cotton ventile, and Nomex/Insulite. For the Goretex and cotton ventile suits, consisting of relatively permeable and hygroscopic fabrics, a sudden increase in Esk, exponential decay of Esk, and a gradual increase in Ecl were observed. These appear to be associated with, respectively, the onset of sweat secretion, moisture build-up within the clothing, and water gain in the fabric. Thus, the device may be useful for observing dynamic moisture permeation through clothing. PMID:3355466

  9. Clothing creator trademark : Business plan

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, B.

    1990-10-01

    SYMAGERY has developed a patented process to manufacture clothing without direct human labor. This CLOTHING CREATOR{trademark}, will have the ability to produce two (2) perfect garments every 45 seconds or one (1) every 30 seconds. The process will combine Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) technology with heat molding and ultrasonic bonding/cutting techniques. This system for garment production, will have the capacity to produce garments of higher quality and at lower productions costs than convention cut and sew methods. ADVANTAGES of the process include: greatly reduced production costs; increased quality of garments; reduction in lead time; and capacity to make new class of garments. This technology will accommodate a variety of knit, woven and nonwoven materials containing a majority of synthetic fibers. Among the many style of garments that could be manufactured by this process are: work clothing, career apparel, athletic garments, medical disposables, health care products, activewear, haz/mat garments, military clothing, cleanroom clothing, outdoor wear, upholstery, and highly contoured stuffed toy shells. 3 refs.

  10. Safer work clothing for fishermen.

    PubMed

    Geving, Ingunn Holmen; Reitan, Jarl; Sandsund, Mariann; Faerevik, Hilde; Reinertsen, Randi Eidsmo; Aasjord, Halvard

    2006-01-01

    The fisherman's work environment consists of many potential risks. A study of occupational accidents in the Norwegian fishing industry in the nine-year period from 1998 to 2006 shows that more than 3/4 of the deaths were caused by loss of fishing vessel or man-overboard accidents. Furthermore, the greatest risk of drowning is found in the smallest fleet. The aim of our project was to develop safer work clothing and through this contribute to a reduction in work accidents and injuries in the fishing fleet. We considered that it is possible to produce protective work clothing that satisfies a specification of requirements covering the fishermen's needs for protection and comfort during work. An end user-centred process including twenty-three personal interviews and a questionnaire was used to clarify the fishermen's needs and wishes before detailed design and product development. We identified an overview of all the fishermen's needs for protection during work, and produced a prioritised list of functional requirements for the clothing. The results show that the clothing previously preferred by fishermen does not satisfy all the users' demands for safety, functionality and comfort. These demands have been taken into consideration when designing improved work clothing for the fishing fleet. A selected number of prototypes were developed on the basis of the established specification of requirements. The prototypes were evaluated according to the users' requirements through tests in SINTEF's Work Physiology Laboratory and on board fishing vessels. The results demonstrate that the new protective clothing satisfies the fishermen's requirements. PMID:17312698

  11. Wearable textile battery rechargeable by solar energy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Hee; Kim, Joo-Seong; Noh, Jonghyeon; Lee, Inhwa; Kim, Hyeong Jun; Choi, Sunghun; Seo, Jeongmin; Jeon, Seokwoo; Kim, Taek-Soo; Lee, Jung-Yong; Choi, Jang Wook

    2013-01-01

    Wearable electronics represent a significant paradigm shift in consumer electronics since they eliminate the necessity for separate carriage of devices. In particular, integration of flexible electronic devices with clothes, glasses, watches, and skin will bring new opportunities beyond what can be imagined by current inflexible counterparts. Although considerable progresses have been seen for wearable electronics, lithium rechargeable batteries, the power sources of the devices, do not keep pace with such progresses due to tenuous mechanical stabilities, causing them to remain as the limiting elements in the entire technology. Herein, we revisit the key components of the battery (current collector, binder, and separator) and replace them with the materials that support robust mechanical endurance of the battery. The final full-cells in the forms of clothes and watchstraps exhibited comparable electrochemical performance to those of conventional metal foil-based cells even under severe folding-unfolding motions simulating actual wearing conditions. Furthermore, the wearable textile battery was integrated with flexible and lightweight solar cells on the battery pouch to enable convenient solar-charging capabilities. PMID:24164580

  12. Plasma Sterilization: New Epoch in Medical Textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, P.; Arun, N.; Vigneswaran, C.

    2015-04-01

    Clothing is perceived to be second skin to the human body since it is in close contact with the human skin most of the times. In hospitals, use of textile materials in different forms and sterilization of these materials is an essential requirement for preventing spread of germs. The need for appropriate disinfection and sterilization techniques is of paramount importance. There has been a continuous demand for novel sterilization techniques appropriate for use on various textile materials as the existing sterilization techniques suffer from various technical and economical drawbacks. Plasma sterilization is the alternative method, which is friendlier and more effective on the wide spectrum of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. Basically, the main inactivation factors for cells exposed to plasma are heat, UV radiation and various reactive species. Plasma exposure can kill micro-organisms on a surface in addition to removing adsorbed monolayer of surface contaminants. Advantages of plasma surface treatment are removal of contaminants from the surface, change in the surface energy and sterilization of the surface. Plasma sterilization aims to kill and/or remove all micro-organisms which may cause infection of humans or animals, or which can cause spoilage of foods or other goods. This review paper emphasizes necessity for sterilization, essentials of sterilization, mechanism of plasma sterilization and the parameters influencing it.

  13. Sensitization to reactive textile dyes in patients with contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Manzini, B M; Motolese, A; Conti, A; Ferdani, G; Seidenari, S

    1996-03-01

    Reactive dyes are used especially for colouring natural fibres (cotton, silk and wool) that are widely used in Western countries, particularly Italy, in the production of clothes. The aim of our study was to investigate sensitization to the most commonly used reactive textile dyes in patients undergoing patch tests, and to assess the clinical relevance of contact sensitization to these dyes. 1813 consecutive patients underwent patch tests with the GIRDCA standard series and an additional textile series of 12 reactive dyes. 18 of these patients were sensitized to reactive dyes (0.99%) (4 only to reactive dyes). The dyes most frequently responsible for positive patch tests were Red Cibacron CR and Violet Remazol 5R (respectively, 8 and 5 positivities). In 5 cases only was a history of intolerance to particular garments given; of 4 patch tests performed with pieces of garment, 2 were positive. In 1 occupationally-exposed patient, airborne contact dermatitis was suspected. Owing to the lack of up-to-date patch test series, some cases of allergic contact dermatitis from textile dyes are probably misdiagnosed: new colouring agents are continuously introduced to the market, so that a close relationship with textile industry is necessary to improve our diagnostic tools. PMID:8833459

  14. Infant Clothing: Sex Labeling for Strangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakin, Madeline; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Use of sex-typed clothing in the natural setting was both common and effective as a cue for strangers. Infants not dressed in sex-typed clothes were not identifiable by sex. The near universality of sex-typed clothing contrasted with the low salience it displayed in parents' answers. (Author/GC)

  15. Effect of clothing weight on body weight

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: In clinical settings, it is common to measure weight of clothed patients and estimate a correction for the weight of clothing, but we can find no papers in the medical literature regarding the variability in clothing weight with weather, season, and gender. Methods: Fifty adults (35 wom...

  16. 76 FR 70883 - Clothing Allowance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... published in the Federal Register on February 2, 2011 (76 FR 5733-5734), VA proposed to amend its... appliances affecting different articles of clothing. 76 FR 5733; Sursely, 551 F.3d at 1356. VA will make the... used by a veteran for a skin condition that is due to a service-connected disability that affects...

  17. Clothing Production. Student Learning Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridge Vocational-Technical Center, Winter Haven, FL.

    These 59 learning guides are self-instructional packets for 59 tasks identified as essential for performance on an entry-level job in clothing production. Each guide is based on a terminal performance objective (task) and 2-5 enabling objectives. For each enabling objective, some or all of these materials may be presented: learning steps (outline…

  18. New concept in protective clothing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    A new concept in protective clothing is discussed. Preliminary design work has been done to develop a garment, a protective coverall, that would provide a necessary cushion of safety to significantly reduce the occurrence of injuries to underground miners. The protective coverall incorporates an elastic undergarment to provide needed support to the lower back.

  19. 76 FR 5733 - Clothing Allowance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ...://www.Regulations.gov ; by mail or hand-delivery to Director, Regulations Management (02REG), Department... veteran, because of a service-connected disability or disabilities due to loss or loss of use of a hand or.... 2009), VA, based upon this statutory interpretation, rejected a claim for a second clothing...

  20. Shopping for clothes: Body satisfaction, appearance investment, and functions of clothing among female shoppers.

    PubMed

    Tiggemann, Marika; Lacey, Catherine

    2009-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the link between clothing and body experience in women of different ages. Participants were 162 female clothes shoppers between the ages of 18 and 55 who completed questionnaire measures of body image, functions of clothing, self-esteem, and enjoyment of clothes shopping. It was found that clothing was worn primarily for assurance and fashion by women of all ages. On the other hand, BMI and body dissatisfaction were related to the use of clothing for camouflage purposes and to a more negative clothes shopping experience. Both components of appearance investment were related to choice of clothes for fashion and assurance. However, the self-evaluative salience component was negatively related, while the motivational salience was positively related, to enjoyment of clothes shopping. It was concluded that although clothing is an under-researched aspect of body image, it represents an important part of women's appearance management, whatever their age. PMID:19660999

  1. Superoleophobic cotton textiles.

    PubMed

    Leng, Boxun; Shao, Zhengzhong; de With, Gijsbertus; Ming, Weihua

    2009-02-17

    Common cotton textiles are hydrophilic and oleophilic in nature. Superhydrophobic cotton textiles have the potential to be used as self-cleaning fabrics, but they typically are not super oil-repellent. Poor oil repellency may easily compromise the self-cleaning property of these fabrics. Here, we report on the preparation of superoleophobic cotton textiles based on a multilength-scale structure, as demonstrated by a high hexadecane contact angle (153 degrees for 5 microL droplets) and low roll-off angle (9 degrees for 20 microL droplets). The multilength-scale roughness was based on the woven structure, with additional two layers of silica particles (microparticles and nanoparticles, respectively) covalently bonded to the fiber. Superoleophobicity was successfully obtained by incorporating perfluoroalkyl groups onto the surface of the modified cotton. It proved to be essential to add the nanoparticle layer in achieving superoleophobicity, especially in terms of low roll-off angles for hexadecane. PMID:19199744

  2. Superhydrophobic antibacterial cotton textiles.

    PubMed

    Shateri Khalil-Abad, Mohammad; Yazdanshenas, Mohammad E

    2010-11-01

    We present a facile and effective method to prepare superhydrophobic cotton textiles. Silver particles were produced on cotton fibers by treatment with aqueous KOH and AgNO(3), followed by reduction treatment with ascorbic acid in the presence of a polymeric steric stabilizer to generate a dual-size surface roughness. Further modification of the particle-containing cotton textiles with octyltriethoxysilane led to hydrophobic surfaces. Surfaces prepared showed a sticky property, which exhibits a static water contact angle of 151 degrees for a 10 microL droplet that water drop did not slid off even when the sample was held upside down. The modified cotton has potent antibacterial activity toward both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The Ag particles were uniformly and stably distributed on the substrate surface and killed bacteria. These modified cotton textiles are potentially useful; as superhydrophobic antibacterial fabrics in a wide variety of biomedical and general use applications. PMID:20709327

  3. Textile technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Bharat M.

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of this report were to evaluate and select resin systems for Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Powder Towpreg Material, to develop and evaluate advanced textile processes by comparing 2-D and 3-D braiding for fuselage frame applications and develop window belt and side panel structural design concepts, to evaluate textile material properties, and to develop low cost manufacturing and tooling processes for the automated manufacturing of fuselage primary structures. This research was in support of the NASA and Langley Research Center (LaRc) Advanced Composite Structural Concepts and Materials Technologies for Primary Aircraft Structures program.

  4. Evaluation of cloths for decontamination by wiping

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, W.N.; Reiff, D.J.; Fink, S.D. ); Luckenbach, R.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Treated polyester cloth was evaluated in laboratory-scale and larger-scale tests as an alternative to atomic wipes and cotton cloth for use in decontamination by wiping. The advantages of the treated polyester are as follows: does not react with nitric acid to form unstable product, more fire resistant, less volume of radioactive waste generated (versus atomic wipes), and product can be recovered by soaking the polyester cloths in nitric acid. Results are that even though treated polyester wiping cloths are slightly less effective than atomic wipes and cotton cloth, its many other benefits greatly outweigh this slight disadvantage. 5 figs.

  5. Growing Backyard Textiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Eleanor Hall

    1975-01-01

    For those involved in creative work with textiles, the degree of control possible in texture, finish, and color of fiber by growing and processing one's own (perhaps with students' help) can make the experience rewarding. The author describes the processes for flax and nettles and gives tips on necessary equipment. (Author/AJ)

  6. Nanotechnology in Textiles.

    PubMed

    Yetisen, Ali K; Qu, Hang; Manbachi, Amir; Butt, Haider; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Hinestroza, Juan P; Skorobogatiy, Maksim; Khademhosseini, Ali; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-03-22

    Increasing customer demand for durable and functional apparel manufactured in a sustainable manner has created an opportunity for nanomaterials to be integrated into textile substrates. Nanomoieties can induce stain repellence, wrinkle-freeness, static elimination, and electrical conductivity to fibers without compromising their comfort and flexibility. Nanomaterials also offer a wider application potential to create connected garments that can sense and respond to external stimuli via electrical, color, or physiological signals. This review discusses electronic and photonic nanotechnologies that are integrated with textiles and shows their applications in displays, sensing, and drug release within the context of performance, durability, and connectivity. Risk factors including nanotoxicity, nanomaterial release during washing, and environmental impact of nanotextiles based on life cycle assessments have been evaluated. This review also provides an analysis of nanotechnology consolidation in the textiles market to evaluate global trends and patent coverage, supplemented by case studies of commercial products. Perceived limitations of nanotechnology in the textile industry and future directions are identified. PMID:26918485

  7. TEXTILE PLANT WASTEWATER TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study to provide chemical and toxicological baseline data on wastewater samples collected from 32 textile plants in the U.S. Raw waste and secondary effluent wastewater samples were analyzed for 129 consent decree priority pollutants, effluent guideli...

  8. Visual effects of the first ladies’ Kebaya clothing on the image of Indonesian women’s appearances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suciati

    2016-04-01

    The image of Indonesian women on international level is partly influenced by the appearance of the First Lady. The role and position of the First Lady is the representation of Indonesian women, because basically the First Lady, as the wife who accompanies the President (head of state), has a strong background of cultural grip, high intellectuality and good personality in her daily lifestyle, including in wearing clothes, and as an ambassador of culture and design. Fashion style of the First Lady always draws praise and criticism from the public. The purpose of this study is to reveal the visualization effects of Indonesian First Ladies’ kebaya clothing style in various state occasions on the image of Indonesian women’s appearances. This study is a qualitative research of visual data that emphasizes the discussion of Kebaya Clothing using semiological study (connotation and denotation meaning) that bring out self-image. The results showed that the style the First Ladies’ Kebaya clothing in every presidency period of their husbands had characteristics both in the style of clothing or hairstyle, indicating self-image. The conclusion of this study reveals that the First Ladies’ Kebaya Clothing (National Clothing) is interpreted as having implied messages because clothing can be observed visually. Implication was done on the construction of learning patterns of clothing, national fashion design and Nusantara ethnic clothing design.

  9. Novel antimicrobial textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Unchin

    2003-10-01

    Many microorganisms can survive, and perhaps proliferate on textiles, generating adverse effects such as: disease transmission, odor generation, pH changes, staining, discoloration and loss of performance. These adverse effects may threaten users' health, deteriorate textile properties and degrade service quality. It may, therefore, be desirable to incorporate antimicrobials on textiles for controlling the growth of microorganisms. This dissertation focuses on the development of antimicrobial fibers and fabrics by integration of antimicrobials with these textiles. The applications of hydantoin-based halamines were mainly investigated in the research. The typical process is that hydantoin containing compounds are grafted onto textiles and transformed to halamine by chlorination. Hydantoin-based halamines are usually chloramines that release chlorine (Cl+) via cleavage of the -NCl functional group which attacks and kills microbes. The antimicrobial behavior is rechargeable many times by rinsing the fiber or fabric with chlorine-containing solution. Some quaternary ammonium type antimicrobials were also investigated in this research. The choice of integrating techniques is dependant on both the textile and antimicrobial compounds. In this dissertation, the nine approaches were studied for incorporating antimicrobial with various textiles: (1) co-extrusion of fibers with halamine precursor additive; (2) grafting of the quaternary ammonium compounds onto ethylene-co-acrylic acid fiber for creating quaternary ammonium type antimicrobial fiber; (3) entrapment of the additives in thermally bonded bicomponent nonwoven fabrics; (4) attaching antimicrobial additives to surfaces with latex adhesive coating; (5) grafting of antimicrobial compounds onto rubber latex via UV exposure; (6) reaction of halamine with needle-punched melamine formaldehyde nonwoven fabric and laminates; (7) coating melamine resin onto tent fabrics and laminates; (8) synthesis of super absorbent polymer

  10. Clothes Dryer Automatic Termination Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.

    2014-10-01

    Volume 2: Improved Sensor and Control Designs Many residential clothes dryers on the market today provide automatic cycles that are intended to stop when the clothes are dry, as determined by the final remaining moisture content (RMC). However, testing of automatic termination cycles has shown that many dryers are susceptible to over-drying of loads, leading to excess energy consumption. In particular, tests performed using the DOE Test Procedure in Appendix D2 of 10 CFR 430 subpart B have shown that as much as 62% of the energy used in a cycle may be from over-drying. Volume 1 of this report shows an average of 20% excess energy from over-drying when running automatic cycles with various load compositions and dryer settings. Consequently, improving automatic termination sensors and algorithms has the potential for substantial energy savings in the U.S.

  11. Protective clothing and heat stress.

    PubMed

    Holmér, I

    1995-01-01

    The high level of protection required by protective clothing (PPC) severely impedes heat exchange by sweat evaporation. As a result work associated with wearing PPC, particularly in hot environments, implies considerable physiological strain and may render workers exhausted in a short time. Current methods of describing evaporative heat exchange with PPC are insufficient, will overestimate evaporative heat loss and should not be recommended. More reliable measures of the resistance to evaporative heat transfer by PPC should be developed and standardized. Direct measurements of evaporative resistance of PPC may be carried. However, a more promising method appears to be the definition of evaporative resistance on the basis of the icl-index for the fabric layers. The icl-index is a permeation efficiency ratio, which in combination with clothing insulation determines the evaporative heat transfer. Current methods should be further developed to account for effects of moisture condensation and microclimate ventilation. PMID:7875118

  12. Modeling cloth at micron resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, Kavita

    2014-02-01

    Fabric is one of the most common materials in our everyday lives, and accurately simulating the appearance of cloth is a critical problem in graphics, design, and virtual prototyping. But modeling and rendering fabric is very challenging because fabrics have a very complex structure, and this structure plays an important role in their visual appearance—cloth is made of fibers that are twisted into yarns which are woven into patterns. Light interacting with this complex structure produce the characteristic visual appearance that humans recognize as silk, cotton, or wool. In this paper we present an end-to-end pipeline to model and render fabrics: we introduce a novel modality to create volume models of fabric at micron resolution using CT technology coupled with photographs; a new technique to synthesize models of user-specified designs from such CT scans; and finally, an efficient algorithm to render these complex volumetric models for practical applications. This pipeline produces the most realistic images of virtual cloth to date, and opens the way to bridging the gap between real and virtual fabric appearance.

  13. Effect of temperature difference between manikin and wet fabric skin surfaces on clothing evaporative resistance: how much error is there?

    PubMed

    Wang, Faming; Kuklane, Kalev; Gao, Chuansi; Holmér, Ingvar

    2012-01-01

    Clothing evaporative resistance is one of the inherent factors that impede heat exchange by sweating evaporation. It is widely used as a basic input in physiological heat strain models. Previous studies showed a large variability in clothing evaporative resistance both at intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory testing. The errors in evaporative resistance may cause severe problems in the determination of heat stress level of the wearers. In this paper, the effect of temperature difference between the manikin nude surface and wet textile skin surface on clothing evaporative resistance was investigated by both theoretical analysis and thermal manikin measurements. It was found that the temperature difference between the skin surface and the manikin nude surface could lead to an error of up to 35.9% in evaporative resistance of the boundary air layer. Similarly, this temperature difference could also introduce an error of up to 23.7% in the real clothing total evaporative resistance (R ( et_real ) < 0.1287 kPa m(2)/W). Finally, it is evident that one major error in the calculation of evaporative resistance comes from the use of the manikin surface temperature instead of the wet textile fabric skin temperature. PMID:21318453

  14. From industrially weavable and knittable highly conductive yarns to large wearable energy storage textiles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Hu, Hong; Huang, Yang; Zhu, Minshen; Meng, Wenjun; Liu, Chang; Pei, Zengxia; Hao, Chonglei; Wang, Zuankai; Zhi, Chunyi

    2015-05-26

    Wearable electronic textiles that store capacitive energy are a next frontier in personalized electronics. However, the lack of industrially weavable and knittable conductive yarns in conjunction with high capacitance, limits the wide-scale application of such textiles. Here pristine soft conductive yarns are continuously produced by a scalable method with the use of twist-bundle-drawing technique, and are mechanically robust enough to be knitted to a cloth by a commercial cloth knitting machine. Subsequently, the reduced-graphene-oxide-modified conductive yarns covered with a hierarchical structure of MnO2 nanosheets and a polypyrrole thin film were used to fabricate weavable, knittable and wearable yarn supercapacitors. The resultant modified yarns exhibit specific capacitances as high as 36.6 mF cm(-1) and 486 mF cm(-2) in aqueous electrolyte (three-electrode cell) or 31 mF cm(-1) and 411 mF cm(-2) in all solid-state two-electrode cell. The symmetric solid-state supercapacitor has high energy densities of 0.0092 mWh cm(-2) and 1.1 mWh cm(-3) (both normalized to the whole device) with a long cycle life. Large energy storage textiles are fabricated by weaving our flexible all-solid-state supercapacitor yarns to a 15 cm × 10 cm cloth on a loom and knitting in a woollen wrist band to form a pattern, enabling dual functionalities of energy storage capability and wearability. PMID:25842997

  15. Sporicidal/bactericidal textiles via the chlorination of silk.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Matthew B; Lyon, Wanda; Gruner, William E; Mirau, Peter A; Slocik, Joseph M; Naik, Rajesh R

    2012-03-01

    Bacterial spores, such as those of the Bacillus genus, are extremely resilient, being able to germinate into metabolically active cells after withstanding harsh environmental conditions or aggressive chemical treatments. The toughness of the bacterial spore in combination with the use of spores, such as those of Bacillus anthracis, as a biological warfare agent necessitates the development of new antimicrobial textiles. In this work, a route to the production of fabrics that kill bacterial spores and cells within minutes of exposure is described. Utilizing this facile process, unmodified silk cloth is reacted with a diluted bleach solution, rinsed with water, and dried. The chlorination of silk was explored under basic (pH 11) and slightly acidic (pH 5) conditions. Chloramine-silk textiles prepared in acidified bleach solutions were found to have superior breaking strength and higher oxidative Cl contents than those prepared under caustic conditions. Silk cloth chlorinated for ≥1 h at pH 5 was determined to induce >99.99996% reduction in the colony forming units of Escherichia coli, as well as Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam (B. anthracis simulant) spores and cells within 10 min of contact. The processing conditions presented for silk fabric in this study are highly expeditionary, allowing for the on-site production of protein-based antimicrobial materials from a variety of agriculturally produced feed-stocks. PMID:22352921

  16. Pre-Flight Advanced Clothing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orndoff, Evelyne; Poritz, Darwin; Schlesinger, Thilini; Byme, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    All human space missions require significant logistical mass and volume that will become an excessive burden for long duration missions beyond low Earth orbit. The current International Space Station (ISS) crew wardrobe has already evolved not only to reduce some of the logistical burden but also to address crew preference. The present study was undertaken to find ways further to reduce this logistical burden while examining human response to different types of clothes. The primary objective of the study is to measure how long people can wear the same exercise garment, depending on the type of fabric and the presence of antimicrobial treatment. The secondary objective is to assess the reasons for length of wear from perceptions of clothing characteristics, including nine ordinal scales. Cardiovascular exercise was chosen as the activity in this experiment for its profuse sweating effect and because it is considered a more severe treatment applied to the clothes than every-day usage. Study garments were exercise T-shirts and shorts purchased from various vendors. Fabric construction, fabric composition, and finishing treatment were defined as the key variables. A web-based questionnaire was used for self-reported data collection. The study was divided in three balanced experiments: a cotton-polyester-wool (CPW) T-shirts study with 61 participants, a polyester-modacrylic-polyester/cocona (PMC) T-shirts study with 40 participants, and a shorts study with 70 participants. In the CPW study, the T-shirts were made of 100% cotton, or of 100% polyester or of 100% wool, and categorized into open and tight knit constructions. In the PMC study, the T-shirts were made of 100% polyester, or of 82% modacrylic, or of 95% polyester with 5% cocona fiber, without construction distinction. The shorts were made either of 100% cotton or of 100% polyester, and were knitted or woven. Some garments were treated with Bio-Protect 500 antimicrobial finish according the experimental design

  17. Combining 3D printed forms with textile structures - mechanical and geometrical properties of multi-material systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabantina, L.; Kinzel, F.; Ehrmann, A.; Finsterbusch, K.

    2015-07-01

    The 3D printing belongs to the rapidly emerging technologies which have the chance to revolutionize the way products are created. In the textile industry, several designers have already presented creations of shoes, dresses or other garments which could not be produced with common techniques. 3D printing, however, is still far away from being a usual process in textile and clothing production. The main challenge results from the insufficient mechanical properties, especially the low tensile strength, of pure 3D printed products, prohibiting them from replacing common technologies such as weaving or knitting. Thus, one way to the application of 3D printed forms in garments is combining them with textile fabrics, the latter ensuring the necessary tensile strength. This article reports about different approaches to combine 3D printed polymers with different textile materials and fabrics, showing chances and limits of this technique.

  18. Analytical assessment of woven fabrics under vertical stabbing - The role of protective clothing.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Sayyed Mahdi; Kadivar, Nastaran; Sajjadi, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Knives are being used more commonly in street fights and muggings. Therefore, this work presents an analytical model for woven fabrics under vertical stabbing loads. The model is based on energy method and the fabric is assumed to be unidirectional comprised of N layers. Thus, the ultimate stab resistance of fabric was determined based on structural parameters of fabric and geometrical characteristics of blade. Moreover, protective clothing is nowadays considered as a strategic branch in technical textile industry. The main idea of the present work is improving the stab resistance of woven textiles by using metal coating method. In the final, a series of vertical stabbing tests were conducted on cotton, polyester and polyamide fabrics. Consequently, it was found that the model predicts with a good accuracy the ultimate stab resistance of the sample fabrics. PMID:26774251

  19. Use of textiles in atopic dermatitis: care of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Ricci, G; Patrizi, A; Bellini, F; Medri, M

    2006-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease which usually starts during the first years of life. In the management of AD, the correct approach requires a combination of multiple treatments to identify and eliminate trigger factors, and to improve the alteration of the skin barrier. In this article we try to explain the importance of skin care in the management of AD in relation to the use of textiles: they may be useful to improve disrupted skin but they are also a possible cause of triggering or worsening the lesions. Garments are in direct contact with the skin all day long, and for this reason it is important to carefully choose suitable fabrics in atopic subjects who have disrupted skin. Owing to their hygienic properties fabrics produced from natural fibres are preferential. Wool fibres are frequently used in human clothes but are irritant in direct contact with the skin. Wool fibre has frequently been shown to be irritant to the skin of atopic patients, and for this reason wool intolerance was included as a minor criterion in the diagnostic criteria of AD by Hanifin and Rajka in 1980. Cotton is the most commonly used textile for patients with AD; it has wide acceptability as clothing material because of its natural abundance and inherent properties like good folding endurance, better conduction of heat, easy dyeability and excellent moisture absorption. Silk fabrics help to maintain the body temperature by reducing the excessive sweating and moisture loss that can worsen xerosis. However, the type of silk fabric generally used for clothes is not particularly useful in the care and dressing of children with AD since it reduces transpiration and may cause discomfort when in direct contact with the skin. A new type of silk fabric made of transpiring and slightly elastic woven silk is now commercially available (Microair Dermasilk) and may be used for the skin care of children with AD. The presence of increased bacterial colonization

  20. Smart Coat with a Fully-Embedded Textile Antenna for IoT Applications.

    PubMed

    Loss, Caroline; Gonçalves, Ricardo; Lopes, Catarina; Pinho, Pedro; Salvado, Rita

    2016-01-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) scenario is strongly related with the advance of the development of wireless sensor networks (WSN) and radio frequency identification (RFID) systems. Additionally, in the WSN context, for a continuous feed, the integration of textile antennas for energy harvesting into smart clothing is a particularly interesting solution when the replacement of batteries is not easy to practice, such as in wearable devices. This paper presents the E-Caption: Smart and Sustainable Coat. It has an embedded dual-band textile antenna for electromagnetic energy harvesting, operating at global system for mobile communication (GSM) 900 and digital cellular system (DCS) 1800 bands. This printed antenna is fully integrated, as its dielectric is the textile material composing the coat itself. The E-Caption illustrates the innovative concept of textile antennas that can be manipulated as simple emblems. Seven prototypes of these "emblem" antennas, manufactured by lamination and embroidering techniques are also presented. It is shown that the orientation of the conductive fabric does not influence the performance of the antenna. It is also shown that the direction and number of the stitches in the embroidery may influence the performance of the antenna. Moreover, the comparison of results obtained before and after the integration of the antenna into cloth shows the integration does not affect the behavior of the antenna. PMID:27338407

  1. Smart Coat with a Fully-Embedded Textile Antenna for IoT Applications

    PubMed Central

    Loss, Caroline; Gonçalves, Ricardo; Lopes, Catarina; Pinho, Pedro; Salvado, Rita

    2016-01-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) scenario is strongly related with the advance of the development of wireless sensor networks (WSN) and radio frequency identification (RFID) systems. Additionally, in the WSN context, for a continuous feed, the integration of textile antennas for energy harvesting into smart clothing is a particularly interesting solution when the replacement of batteries is not easy to practice, such as in wearable devices. This paper presents the E-Caption: Smart and Sustainable Coat. It has an embedded dual-band textile antenna for electromagnetic energy harvesting, operating at global system for mobile communication (GSM) 900 and digital cellular system (DCS) 1800 bands. This printed antenna is fully integrated, as its dielectric is the textile material composing the coat itself. The E-Caption illustrates the innovative concept of textile antennas that can be manipulated as simple emblems. Seven prototypes of these “emblem” antennas, manufactured by lamination and embroidering techniques are also presented. It is shown that the orientation of the conductive fabric does not influence the performance of the antenna. It is also shown that the direction and number of the stitches in the embroidery may influence the performance of the antenna. Moreover, the comparison of results obtained before and after the integration of the antenna into cloth shows the integration does not affect the behavior of the antenna. PMID:27338407

  2. Origin of Clothing Lice Indicates Early Clothing Use by Anatomically Modern Humans in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Toups, Melissa A.; Kitchen, Andrew; Light, Jessica E.; Reed, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Clothing use is an important modern behavior that contributed to the successful expansion of humans into higher latitudes and cold climates. Previous research suggests that clothing use originated anywhere between 40,000 and 3 Ma, though there is little direct archaeological, fossil, or genetic evidence to support more specific estimates. Since clothing lice evolved from head louse ancestors once humans adopted clothing, dating the emergence of clothing lice may provide more specific estimates of the origin of clothing use. Here, we use a Bayesian coalescent modeling approach to estimate that clothing lice diverged from head louse ancestors at least by 83,000 and possibly as early as 170,000 years ago. Our analysis suggests that the use of clothing likely originated with anatomically modern humans in Africa and reinforces a broad trend of modern human developments in Africa during the Middle to Late Pleistocene. PMID:20823373

  3. Woven-Yarn Thermoelectric Textiles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Ah; Aliev, Ali E; Bykova, Julia S; de Andrade, Mônica Jung; Kim, Daeyoung; Sim, Hyeon Jun; Lepró, Xavier; Zakhidov, Anvar A; Lee, Jeong-Bong; Spinks, Geoffrey M; Roth, Siegmar; Kim, Seon Jeong; Baughman, Ray H

    2016-07-01

    The fabrication and characterization of highly flexible textiles are reported. These textiles can harvest thermal energy from temperature gradients in the desirable through-thickness direction. The tiger yarns containing n- and p-type segments are woven to provide textiles containing n-p junctions. A high power output of up to 8.6 W m(-2) is obtained for a temperature difference of 200 °C. PMID:27110905

  4. Everything clean? Transfer of DNA traces between textiles in the washtub.

    PubMed

    Kamphausen, Thomas; Fandel, Sabine Birgit; Gutmann, Jochen Stefan; Bajanowski, Thomas; Poetsch, Micaela

    2015-07-01

    Forensic genetic analysis of items possibly handled by a suspect or a victim is frequently inquired by the law enforcement authorities, since DNA left on touched objects can often be linked to an individual. Due to technical improvement, even poor traces, which seemed to be unsuitable for DNA analysis a few years ago, may be amplified successfully today. Yet, DNA can be transferred to a crime scene artificially or unintentionally without any primary contact between the individual and the object found at the crime scene, the so-called secondary transfer or indirect transfer in general. In this study, "secondary transfer" scenarios with cells and DNA of different origins under wet conditions were investigated. Transfer was simulated as either "washing by hand" in a washtub or as "machine laundry" in a washing machine. As expected, major differences were seen between blood stains and epithelial abrasions. DNA from blood donors could be detected clearly both on the donor and on the acceptor textile, regardless of washing method. Regarding epithelial abrasions, simulating worn clothes, after washing by hand, only little residual DNA was found, and partial profiles were displayed on the donor textile, while transfer to the acceptor textile occurred even less and not in noteworthy amount and quality. Single alleles could be found both on donor textiles and acceptor textiles after simulated machine wash, but no reliable DNA profile could be verified after laundry in machine. Therefore, a DNA transfer from one worn cloth (without blood stains) to another textile in the washing machine seems to be extremely unlikely. PMID:26024792

  5. Insertion Loss of Personal Protective Clothing

    SciTech Connect

    Shull D.J.; Biesel, V.B.; Cunefare, K.A.

    1999-05-13

    'The use of personal protective clothing that covers the head is a common practice in many industries. Such personal protective clothing will impact the sound pressure level and the frequency content of sounds to which the wearer will be exposed. The use of such clothing, then, may impact speech and alarm audibility. A measure of the impact of such clothing is its insertion loss. Insertion loss measurements were performed on four types of personal protective clothing in use by Westinghouse Savannah River Company personnel which utilize cloth and plastic hood configurations to protect the head. All clothing configurations tested at least partially cover the ears. The measurements revealed that insertion loss of the items tested was notable at frequencies above 1000 Hz only and was a function of material stiffness and acoustic flanking paths to the ear. Further, an estimate of the clothing''s noise reduction rating reveals poor performance in that regard, even though the insertion loss of the test articles was significant at frequencies at and above 1000 Hz.'

  6. Awareness of the Social Implications of Clothing in Relation to Fashion Awareness and Clothing Economic Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horridge, Patricia; Richards, Mary Lynne

    1986-01-01

    The Sproles Consumer Interests and Priorities questionnaire was administered to 3,036 home economists. Awareness of social implications of clothing, correlated positively with fashion awareness and clothing economic practices. Results suggest that persons exhibiting substantial awareness of social importance of clothing also tend to evidence…

  7. Advanced modelling of the transport phenomena across horizontal clothing microclimates with natural convection.

    PubMed

    Mayor, T S; Couto, S; Psikuta, A; Rossi, R M

    2015-12-01

    The ability of clothing to provide protection against external environments is critical for wearer's safety and thermal comfort. It is a function of several factors, such as external environmental conditions, clothing properties and activity level. These factors determine the characteristics of the different microclimates existing inside the clothing which, ultimately, have a key role in the transport processes occurring across clothing. As an effort to understand the effect of transport phenomena in clothing microclimates on the overall heat transport across clothing structures, a numerical approach was used to study the buoyancy-driven heat transfer across horizontal air layers trapped inside air impermeable clothing. The study included both the internal flow occurring inside the microclimate and the external flow occurring outside the clothing layer, in order to analyze the interdependency of these flows in the way heat is transported to/from the body. Two-dimensional simulations were conducted considering different values of microclimate thickness (8, 25 and 52 mm), external air temperature (10, 20 and 30 °C), external air velocity (0.5, 1 and 3 m s(-1)) and emissivity of the clothing inner surface (0.05 and 0.95), which implied Rayleigh numbers in the microclimate spanning 4 orders of magnitude (9 × 10(2)-3 × 10(5)). The convective heat transfer coefficients obtained along the clothing were found to strongly depend on the transport phenomena in the microclimate, in particular when natural convection is the most important transport mechanism. In such scenario, convective coefficients were found to vary in wavy-like manner, depending on the position of the flow vortices in the microclimate. These observations clearly differ from data in the literature for the case of air flow over flat-heated surfaces with constant temperature (which shows monotonic variations of the convective heat transfer coefficients, along the length of the surface). The flow

  8. Advanced modelling of the transport phenomena across horizontal clothing microclimates with natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, T. S.; Couto, S.; Psikuta, A.; Rossi, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The ability of clothing to provide protection against external environments is critical for wearer's safety and thermal comfort. It is a function of several factors, such as external environmental conditions, clothing properties and activity level. These factors determine the characteristics of the different microclimates existing inside the clothing which, ultimately, have a key role in the transport processes occurring across clothing. As an effort to understand the effect of transport phenomena in clothing microclimates on the overall heat transport across clothing structures, a numerical approach was used to study the buoyancy-driven heat transfer across horizontal air layers trapped inside air impermeable clothing. The study included both the internal flow occurring inside the microclimate and the external flow occurring outside the clothing layer, in order to analyze the interdependency of these flows in the way heat is transported to/from the body. Two-dimensional simulations were conducted considering different values of microclimate thickness (8, 25 and 52 mm), external air temperature (10, 20 and 30 °C), external air velocity (0.5, 1 and 3 m s-1) and emissivity of the clothing inner surface (0.05 and 0.95), which implied Rayleigh numbers in the microclimate spanning 4 orders of magnitude (9 × 102-3 × 105). The convective heat transfer coefficients obtained along the clothing were found to strongly depend on the transport phenomena in the microclimate, in particular when natural convection is the most important transport mechanism. In such scenario, convective coefficients were found to vary in wavy-like manner, depending on the position of the flow vortices in the microclimate. These observations clearly differ from data in the literature for the case of air flow over flat-heated surfaces with constant temperature (which shows monotonic variations of the convective heat transfer coefficients, along the length of the surface). The flow patterns and

  9. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Presenting for Redundant Clothing

    PubMed Central

    Uvais, N. A.; Sreeraj, V. S.

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report of a 15-year-old girl who presented with redundant clothing. On evaluation, it was found that she had obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and redundant clothing was a symptom of OCD, which has hitherto not been reported. PMID:27011408

  10. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Clothing allowance. 3.810 Section 3.810 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Special Benefits § 3.810 Clothing allowance. (a) Except as provided in paragraph...

  11. Your Clothing Dollar. [Revised.] Money Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Nancy H., Ed.; Tarrant, Sharon M., Ed.

    This booklet on clothing, 1 in a series of 12 covers all the basic aspects of personal- and family-money management. Suitable for use by high school and college students as well as adults, this handbook gives wardrobe planning, buying, and care information. The first three sections consider the functions of clothing, the importance of…

  12. 20 CFR 638.525 - Clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clothing. 638.525 Section 638.525 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.525 Clothing. The Job Corps Director...

  13. MSFC Investigations of Beta Cloth Darkening Due to Ultraviolet Radiation Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamenetzky, Rachel R.; Finckenor, Miria M.

    1999-01-01

    A common component of multi-layer insulation blankets is beta cloth, a woven fiberglass cloth impregnated with Teflon. It is planned for extensive use on the International Space Station (ISS). The Environmental Effects Group of the Marshall Space Flight Center Materials, Processing and Manufacturing Department has investigated the impact of atomic oxygen (AO) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the optical properties of plain and aluminized beta cloth, both in the laboratory and as part of long-duration flight experiments. These investigations indicate that beta cloth was susceptible to darkening in the presence of UV radiation, dependent on the additives used. The presence of AO countered some, if not all, of the UV degradation.

  14. Uptake and elimination of permethrin related to the use of permethrin treated clothing for forestry workers.

    PubMed

    Rossbach, Bernd; Niemietz, Adrian; Kegel, Peter; Letzel, Stephan

    2014-12-01

    Wearing of permethrin treated clothing usually implicates an uptake of permethrin by the user. Aim of our study was to examine the kinetics of internal permethrin exposure in volunteers during and after a single 8h-use of treated clothing as well as factors potentially influencing permethrin uptake. 28 male volunteers (age: 20-34 years) were equipped with permethrin treated jackets and pants from two different suppliers. The clothing was worn for 8h, simulating differing external conditions, including comfort conditions as well as conditions of increased temperature and humidity without and with additional physical workload. Internal permethrin exposure was monitored by determination of permethrin metabolites (DCCA and 3-PBA) in a set of 12 urine samples, covering a period of 504 h from the beginning of the wearing interval. Time-concentration curves showed an increase of internal exposure associated with wearing of the clothing (individual maximum: 109.5 μg/L) followed by a first-order like decay (mean half-life: 38.5 h). Metabolite excretion was affected by the make of clothing, which could be explained by differing permethrin contents of the garment. Furthermore, internal exposure increased with increasing temperature/humidity and additional physical workload. Assuming dermal uptake of permethrin, this may be ascribed to an alteration of the barrier function of the skin. PMID:25455447

  15. New textile composite materials development, production, application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikhailov, Petr Y.

    1993-01-01

    New textile composite materials development, production, and application are discussed. Topics covered include: super-high-strength, super-high-modulus fibers, filaments, and materials manufactured on their basis; heat-resistant and nonflammable fibers, filaments, and textile fabrics; fibers and textile fabrics based on fluorocarbon poylmers; antifriction textile fabrics based on polyfen filaments; development of new types of textile combines and composite materials; and carbon filament-based fabrics.

  16. Unexpected behavioural consequences of preterm newborns' clothing.

    PubMed

    Durier, Virginie; Henry, Séverine; Martin, Emmanuelle; Dollion, Nicolas; Hausberger, Martine; Sizun, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Restrictions of preterm newborns' movements could have consequences ranging from stress enhancement to impairment of their motor development. Therefore, ability to freely express motor activities appears crucial for their behavioural and physiological development. Our aim was to evaluate behavioural issues of two types of clothing used in NICU. We observed 18 healthy 34-37 post-conception week-old preterm newborns, during resting periods, when they were undisturbed by any interventions. Newborns wore either light clothing (bodysuit and a light wrapping) or heavy clothing (pyjamas, cardigan and sleep-sack). The percentages of time each subject spent in different postures were compared between clothing situations. Arm and hand postures differed in relation to clothing: babies bent their arms more and held their hands nearer their heads when in bodysuits than when in sleepwear. Consequently, babies in bodysuits spent more time touching their body or their environment whereas the others generally were touching nothing. Self-touch is an important way to comfort one's self. Heavy clothing may impair self-soothing behaviours of preterm newborn babies that already lack other forms of contact. Results suggest that more attention should be paid to apparently routine and marginal decisions such as choice of clothes. PMID:25776252

  17. Unexpected behavioural consequences of preterm newborns' clothing

    PubMed Central

    Durier, Virginie; Henry, Séverine; Martin, Emmanuelle; Dollion, Nicolas; Hausberger, Martine; Sizun, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Restrictions of preterm newborns' movements could have consequences ranging from stress enhancement to impairment of their motor development. Therefore, ability to freely express motor activities appears crucial for their behavioural and physiological development. Our aim was to evaluate behavioural issues of two types of clothing used in NICU. We observed 18 healthy 34–37 post-conception week-old preterm newborns, during resting periods, when they were undisturbed by any interventions. Newborns wore either light clothing (bodysuit and a light wrapping) or heavy clothing (pyjamas, cardigan and sleep-sack). The percentages of time each subject spent in different postures were compared between clothing situations. Arm and hand postures differed in relation to clothing: babies bent their arms more and held their hands nearer their heads when in bodysuits than when in sleepwear. Consequently, babies in bodysuits spent more time touching their body or their environment whereas the others generally were touching nothing. Self-touch is an important way to comfort one's self. Heavy clothing may impair self-soothing behaviours of preterm newborn babies that already lack other forms of contact. Results suggest that more attention should be paid to apparently routine and marginal decisions such as choice of clothes. PMID:25776252

  18. An investigation of cotton for parachute cloth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appel, Wm D; Worner, R K

    1931-01-01

    This is a resume of the work of the Bureau of Standards on a cotton parachute cloth for use as a substitute for silk in the event of an emergency curtailing the supply. Cotton yarn of high strength in proportion to its weight and otherwise specially suitable for parachute cloth was developed. Cloth woven from this yarn in the bureau mill was equal or superior to parachute silk in strength and tear resistance, met the requirements with respect to air permeability, and weighed only a few tenths of an ounce per square yard more than the silk cloth. Practical trials of cotton parachutes carried out by the Navy Department clearly indicate that the cotton parachute closely approaches the silk parachute in performance as to rate of descent, opening time, strength and ability to function when stored in the pack for sixty days. The increase in weight of the equipment resulting from the use of cotton cloth instead of silk is considered to be well within practicable limits. A specification for cotton parachute cloth and the way in which the requirements of the specification have been met are given. Cotton yarns suitable for parachute cloth are now being woven commercially in the United States.

  19. Protective clothing: fire and radiation environments. January 1970-February 1989 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for January 1970-February 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning research on clothing, respirators, visors, and associated equipment for personal protection when exposed to flames or radiation. Topics include treatment of fibers and textiles, design of protective gear, testing for physiological tolerances, methods of decontamination after exposure, and acceptance of equipment for intended use. (This updated bibliography contains 326 citations, 81 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  20. Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, Clarence C. (Editor); Harris, Charles E. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference in Hampton, Virginia, December 6-8, 1994. This conference was the culmination of a 3-year program that was initiated by NASA late in 1990 to develop mechanics of textile composites in support of the NASA Advance Composites Technology Program (ACT). The goal of the program was to develop mathematical models of textile preform materials and test methods to facilitate structural analysis and design. Participants in the program were from NASA, academia, and industry.

  1. Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Poe, C.C.; Harris, C.E.

    1995-10-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference in Hampton, Virginia, December 6-8, 1994. This conference was the culmination of a 3-year program that was initiated by NASA late in 1990 to develop mechanics of textile composites in support of the NASA Advance Composites Technology Program (ACT). The goal of the program was to develop mathematical models of textile preform materials and test methods to facilitate structural analysis and design. Participants in the program were from NASA, academia, and industry. Separate abstracts were prepared for articles from this document.

  2. Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Poe, C.C. Jr.; Harris, C.E.

    1995-10-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference in Hampton, Virginia, December 6-8, 1994. This conference was the culmination of a 3-year program that was initiated by NASA late in 1990 to develop mechanics of textile composites in support of the NASA Advanced Composites Technology Program (ACT). The goal of the program was to develop mathematical models of textile preform materials and test methods to facilitate structural analysis and design. Participants in the program were from NASA, academia, and industry. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the database for articles from this conference.

  3. PROTECTIVE CLOTHING BASED ON PERMSELECTIVE MEMBRANE AND CARBON ADSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    J.G. Wijmans; J.O. Stull

    2001-11-07

    The goal of this project was to develop chemical protective clothing for use by DOE decontamination and decommissioning workers that is sufficiently water vapor permeable to keep the workers cool, thereby enhancing their productivity. This report describes the results of Phase II of a two-phase project to complete development of the novel permselective material and to test protective clothing made from the fabric. In Phase I a novel material incorporating a nonporous hydrophilic polyvinylacohol (PVA) layer, which is water vapor permeable but relatively impermeable to organic vapors, was developed. The results of the Phase I tests showed that the chemical resistance of the MTR material is comparable to that of Saranex/Tyvek materials, and that the comfort properties are closer to those of Tyvek (as measured in terms of CLO and permeability). Chemical resistance was measured using permeation tests against liquid dichloromethane. Comfort properties were ascertained by measuring the water vapor transmission of the material and by sweating manikin tests on whole protective suits. In addition, a cost/benefit analysis demonstrated that use of MTR's material technology could result in significant improvements in work productivity and cost savings if protective clothing items made from the new material were used more than once. In Phase II, MTR undertook a program to optimize the performance and production engineering for the new material technology. A partnership was formed with Kimberly-Clark Corporation to assist with a detailed evaluation of the MTR technology, and MTR used the services of Mr. Jeff Stull, President of the consulting firm International Personnel Protection, Inc., who conducted a detailed economic and application analysis for the developed fabric. The protective fabric manufacturing steps were simplified significantly, resulting in a 30% reduction in manufacturing costs and eliminating the necessity for capital investment in production equipment

  4. Color management in textile application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Maurizio; Vannucci, Massimiliano; Buonopane, Massimo; Fabroni, Cosimo; Fabrini, Francesco

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this research was to study a system of acquisition and processing of images capable of confronting colored wool with a reference specimen, in order to define the conformity using objective parameters. The first step of the research was to comprise and to analyze in depth the problem: there has been numerous implications of technical, physical, cultural, biological and also psychological character, that come down from the attempt of giving a quantitative appraisal to the color. In the scene of the national and international scientific and technological research, little has been made as regards measurement of color through digital processing of the images through linear CCD. The reason is fundamentally of technological nature: only during the last years we found the presence on the market of low cost equipment capable of acquiring and processing images with adequate performances and qualities. The job described has permitted to create a first prototype of system for the color measuring with use of CCD linear devices. -Hardware identification to carry out a series of tests and experiments in laboratory. -Verification of such device in a textile facility. -Statistics analysis of the collected data and of the employed models.

  5. Prediction of clothing thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance of the clothed body walking in wind.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaoming; Fan, Jintu

    2006-11-01

    Clothing thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance are the two most important parameters in thermal environmental engineering, functional clothing design and end use of clothing ensembles. In this study, clothing thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance of various types of clothing ensembles were measured using the walking-able sweating manikin, Walter, under various environmental conditions and walking speeds. Based on an extensive experimental investigation and an improved understanding of the effects of body activities and environmental conditions, a simple but effective direct regression model has been established, for predicting the clothing thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance under wind and walking motion, from those when the manikin was standing in still air. The model has been validated by using experimental data reported in the previous literature. It has shown that the new models have advantages and provide very accurate prediction. PMID:16857703

  6. 19 CFR 10.58 - Bolting cloths; marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... § 10.58 Bolting cloths; marking. (a) As a prerequisite to the free entry of bolting cloth for milling... expressly for milling purposes” in block letters 7.62 centimeters in height. Bolting cloths composed of silk imported expressly for milling purposes shall be considered only such cloths as are suitable for and...

  7. 19 CFR 10.58 - Bolting cloths; marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... § 10.58 Bolting cloths; marking. (a) As a prerequisite to the free entry of bolting cloth for milling... expressly for milling purposes” in block letters 7.62 centimeters in height. Bolting cloths composed of silk imported expressly for milling purposes shall be considered only such cloths as are suitable for and...

  8. 19 CFR 10.58 - Bolting cloths; marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... § 10.58 Bolting cloths; marking. (a) As a prerequisite to the free entry of bolting cloth for milling... expressly for milling purposes” in block letters 7.62 centimeters in height. Bolting cloths composed of silk imported expressly for milling purposes shall be considered only such cloths as are suitable for and...

  9. 19 CFR 10.58 - Bolting cloths; marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... § 10.58 Bolting cloths; marking. (a) As a prerequisite to the free entry of bolting cloth for milling... expressly for milling purposes” in block letters 7.62 centimeters in height. Bolting cloths composed of silk imported expressly for milling purposes shall be considered only such cloths as are suitable for and...

  10. 19 CFR 10.58 - Bolting cloths; marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... § 10.58 Bolting cloths; marking. (a) As a prerequisite to the free entry of bolting cloth for milling... expressly for milling purposes” in block letters 7.62 centimeters in height. Bolting cloths composed of silk imported expressly for milling purposes shall be considered only such cloths as are suitable for and...

  11. 28 CFR 571.22 - Release clothing and transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Release clothing and transportation. 571... AND RELEASE RELEASE FROM CUSTODY Release Gratuities, Transportation, and Clothing § 571.22 Release clothing and transportation. (a) Staff shall provide release clothing appropriate for the time of year...

  12. 28 CFR 571.22 - Release clothing and transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Release clothing and transportation. 571... AND RELEASE RELEASE FROM CUSTODY Release Gratuities, Transportation, and Clothing § 571.22 Release clothing and transportation. (a) Staff shall provide release clothing appropriate for the time of year...

  13. 28 CFR 571.22 - Release clothing and transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Release clothing and transportation. 571... AND RELEASE RELEASE FROM CUSTODY Release Gratuities, Transportation, and Clothing § 571.22 Release clothing and transportation. (a) Staff shall provide release clothing appropriate for the time of year...

  14. 28 CFR 571.22 - Release clothing and transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Release clothing and transportation. 571... AND RELEASE RELEASE FROM CUSTODY Release Gratuities, Transportation, and Clothing § 571.22 Release clothing and transportation. (a) Staff shall provide release clothing appropriate for the time of year...

  15. 28 CFR 571.22 - Release clothing and transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Release clothing and transportation. 571... AND RELEASE RELEASE FROM CUSTODY Release Gratuities, Transportation, and Clothing § 571.22 Release clothing and transportation. (a) Staff shall provide release clothing appropriate for the time of year...

  16. Improve protective clothing and reduce radwaste

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, G.A.; Fryer, J.

    1995-12-31

    Nuclear power plants have been reducing radioactive waste production through aggressive volume reduction and control at the point of generation. Waste reduction efforts may, however, have reached a plateau. Certain items, such as protective clothing, are a necessary part of plant operations and cannot be eliminated. There are more than 800,000 sets of protective clothing currently in use at U.S. nuclear plants. Since up to 25% of these garments are removed from service each year, spent protective wear accounts for {approximately}100,000 ft{sup 3} of prevolume reduced waste annually. Furthermore, up to 10% of dry active waste produced at commercial power reactor sites is comprised of exhausted protective clothing and related goods. This report describes the design of protective clothing which lasts longer and is lighter than traditional fabrics.

  17. FLUORESCENT TRACER EVALUATION OF PROTECTIVE CLOTHING PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field studies evaluating chemical protective clothing (CPC), which is often employed as a primary control option to reduce occupational exposures during pesticide applications, are limited. This study, supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), was designed to...

  18. Media, Individualized Instruction, and Clothing Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Naomi

    1975-01-01

    A system for teaching clothing design (draping or flat pattern) and advanced construction techniques by means of individualized instruction utilizing 8mm color sound filmloop is described. (Author/HB)

  19. TEXTILE DYEBATH RECONSTITUTION AND REUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the recent demonstration of the application of an important wastewater recycle technology (reconstitution and reuse of spent dyebath solutions) to the textile industry. After several months of bench and pilot testing, the technology was demonstrated under prod...

  20. Tensile properties of textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avva, V. Sarma; Sadler, Robert L.; Lyon, Malcolm

    1992-01-01

    The importance of textile composite materials in aerospace structural applications has been gaining momentum in recent years. With a view to better understand the suitability of these materials in aerospace applications, an experimental program was undertaken to assess the mechanical properties of these materials. Specifically, the braided textile preforms were infiltrated with suitable polymeric matrices leading to the fabrication of composite test coupons. Evaluation of the tensile properties and the analyses of the results in the form of strength moduli, Poisson's ratio, etc., for the braided composites are presented. Based on our past experience with the textile coupons, the fabrication techniques have been modified (by incorporating glass microballoons in the matrix and/or by stabilizing the braid angle along the length of the specimen with axial fibers) to achieve enhanced mechanical properties of the textile composites. This paper outlines the preliminary experimental results obtained from testing these composites.

  1. NICE3 Textile Finishing Process

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, S.

    1999-01-29

    This new energy-saving approach to fabric finishing can help our domestic textile industry compete in an increasingly competitive global market. Learn how this new technology can lower your maintenance costs and increase your productivity.

  2. Textiles in dermatology: our experience and literature review.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Lucia; Brena, Michela; Tourlaki, Athanasia

    2016-06-01

    Skin protects its host from its environment and allows their interactions by providing a physical permeability barrier, protection from infectious agents, thermoregulation, and ultraviolet protection. Textiles, in particular clothing, interact with skin functions in a dynamic pattern. For years cotton has been considered as the only comfortable tissue suitable for patients with dermatologic disorders. Nowadays new synthetic fibers with important functions, for example breathability and waterproofing have leaned out and new tissues can be used as a complementary tool in dermatologic treatments. Our purpose is to report the main fibers used for dermatological problems and to review the literature on their use in dermatological field; finally, we also report our personal experience on this topic. PMID:25366891

  3. Wearable solar cells by stacking textile electrodes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shaowu; Yang, Zhibin; Chen, Peining; Deng, Jue; Li, Houpu; Peng, Huisheng

    2014-06-10

    A new and general method to produce flexible, wearable dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) textiles by the stacking of two textile electrodes has been developed. A metal-textile electrode that was made from micrometer-sized metal wires was used as a working electrode, while the textile counter electrode was woven from highly aligned carbon nanotube fibers with high mechanical strengths and electrical conductivities. The resulting DSC textile exhibited a high energy conversion efficiency that was well maintained under bending. Compared with the woven DSC textiles that are based on wire-shaped devices, this stacked DSC textile unexpectedly exhibited a unique deformation from a rectangle to a parallelogram, which is highly desired in portable electronics. This lightweight and wearable stacked DSC textile is superior to conventional planar DSCs because the energy conversion efficiency of the stacked DSC textile was independent of the angle of incident light. PMID:24789065

  4. The influence of a possible contamination of the victim's clothing by gunpowder residue on the estimation of shooting distance.

    PubMed

    Vinokurov, Asya; Zelkowicz, Avraham; Wolf, Ehud Udi; Zeichner, Arie

    2010-01-30

    A study was conducted to assess the influence of a possible contamination of the victim's clothing by gunpowder residue on the estimation of shooting distance. The study was focused on the scenario in which the contamination might be caused by the surface on which the shot victim could fall. Contamination of two types of textile was examined after contact with two types of surfaces. One round was fired above those surfaces (the line of firing parallel to the surface) prior to the contact. It was found that few gunpowder residue particles could be transferred to the clothing. These findings should be taken into account when interpreting results for shooting distance estimation in cases when a minute quantity of gunpowder residue particles is found around the bullet entrance hole. PMID:19926415

  5. European Cloth and “Tropical” Skin:

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    As Britain’s imperial and colonial ambitions intensified toward the end of the nineteenth century, the preservation of white European health in tropical climates became an increasingly important concern. Since at least the seventeenth century, the “tropics” had been seen as spaces holding vast potential wealth but also death and disease. To combat these deadly but desirable landscapes, the British built a considerable commodity culture around the preservation of white European health, and for many, tropical clothing was one of the most important and essential items in their “kits.” This article investigates the composition and use of such clothing in relation to British ideas of health and hygiene in tropical climates. First, it considers debates that ensued over the best material—wool, cotton, linen, silk, or a combination of these materials—and the role of “black” skin and local practice in the development of tropical clothing. Second, it demonstrates the importance of location in any discussion of tropical medicine and hygiene, and the tension and ambiguity that still surrounded British ideas of health and hygiene in the tropical colonies. Third, it argues that tropical clothing was important in the maintenance of climatic etiologies despite advances in parasitology and sanitary science. Finally, it considers the relationship of tropical clothing to the formation of a unique colonial identity. To British men and women embarking for any number of tropical destinations, proper clothing was not a banal and mundane component of their outfitting. For many, the clothing signified a departure from the safe and “civil” climes of Britain for adventure in the expanding tropical empire. PMID:19801795

  6. Scope of nanotechnology in modern textiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review article demonstrates the scope and applications of nanotechnology towards modification and development of advanced textile fibers, yarns and fabrics and their processing techniques. Basically, it summarizes the recent advances made in nanotechnology and its applications to cotton textil...

  7. Illustrated glossary of textile terms for composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastore, Christopher M.

    1993-01-01

    A glossary was developed to define textile terminology applicable to the manufacture of composites. Terms describing fabric structure were illustrated for clarity. Descriptive terms for defects from both textile and composites industry were included.

  8. Integral Textile Ceramic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, David B.; Cox, Brian N.

    2008-08-01

    A new paradigm for ceramic composite structural components enables functionality in heat exchange, transpiration, detailed shape, and thermal strain management that significantly exceeds the prior art. The paradigm is based on the use of three-dimensional fiber reinforcement that is tailored to the specific shape, stress, and thermal requirements of a structural application and therefore generally requires innovative textile methods for each realization. Key features include the attainment of thin skins (less than 1 mm) that are nevertheless structurally robust, transpiration holes formed without cutting fibers, double curvature, compliant integral attachment to other structures that avoids thermal stress buildup, and microcomposite ceramic matrices that minimize spalling and allow the formation of smooth surfaces. All these features can be combined into structures of very varied gross shape and function, using a wide range of materials such as all-oxide systems and SiC and carbon fibers in SiC matrices. Illustrations are drawn from rocket nozzles, thermal protection systems, and gas turbine engines. The new design challenges that arise for such material/structure systems are being met by specialized computational modeling that departs significantly in the representation of materials behavior from that used in conventional finite element methods.

  9. Development of textile-based high-tech products: the new challenge.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Ana Maria M F

    2004-01-01

    The new generation of smart textiles is represented by fibers, yarns, fabrics and other resulting products that have special properties, regarding mechanical, chemical, electrical and thermal performances. These high-tech products, being able to respond to external stimuli through the integration of electronic components, phase change materials, shape memory materials or nano materials, enabled the development of different active and functional products. These products when combining the functions of medium, carrier and interface for micro-systems applications represent the ideal connecting channel between humans and the environment. This is a field of innovation that broadened the scope of the traditional textile and apparel products to high-tech textiles, designed to meet specific needs, involving different technologies and produced according to required properties, like personal protection, safety, leisure or health wear. The development of smart wear is a new challenge for the textile and clothing industry: it has to develop products based not only on design, fashion and comfort concepts but also in terms of functions. Moreover these products must be easy to care and durable. PMID:15718663

  10. Portable Bioimpedance Spectroscopy device and textile electrodes for mobile monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, L.; Jacob, M.; Hoog Antink, C.; Cordes, A.; Pikkemaat, R.; Jungbecker, N.; Gries, T.; Leonhardt, S.

    2010-04-01

    A balanced body composition is necessary for a person's health and performance. Therefore, it is important to control the body composition continuously since complications and diseases due to dehydration often appear gradually. Based on these facts a miniaturized mobile Bioimpedance Spectroscopy device was developed that can be integrated into clothing and allows the continuous monitoring of a person's body water. The implemented system has been tested using different body models. The first measurements showed very precise and stable results. Besides the portable measurement system, textile electrodes are needed for continuous long term monitoring. Therefore, special textile electrodes were developed, tested and evaluated. The electrodes are structured in a specific way leading to a rougher surface. Such a surface improves the interface impedance and therefore optimizes the connection between electronic hardware and body. For comparison, five different structured electrodes were manufactured and tested on a special test setup that allows reproducible interface-impedance measurements using a dummy made of agar-agar to simulate the skin. It could be shown that the surface structure significantly influences the interface impedance in a positive way as compared to standard plane textile electrodes. In the future, a combination of the miniaturized BIS electronic and the structured textile electrodes could allow reproducible long term monitoring of a person's body composition.

  11. Radioactive contamination incidents involving protective clothing

    SciTech Connect

    Reichelt, R.; Clay, M.; Eichorst, J.

    1996-10-01

    The study focuses on incidents at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities involving the migration of radioactive contaminants through protective clothing. The authors analyzed 68 occurrence reports for the following factors: (1) type of work; (2) working conditions; (3) type of anti-contamination (anti-C) material; (4) area of body or clothing contaminated; and (5) nature of spread of contamination. A majority of reports identified strenuous work activities such as maintenance, construction, or decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects. The reports also indicated adverse working conditions that included hot and humid or cramped work environments. The type of anti-C clothing most often identified was cotton or water-resistant, disposable clothing. Most of the reports also indicated contaminants migrating through perspiration-soaked areas, typically in the knees and forearms. On the basis of their survey, the authors recommend the use of improved engineering controls and resilient, breathable, waterproof protective clothing for work in hot, humid, or damp areas where the possibility of prolonged contact with contamination cannot be easily avoided or controlled.

  12. Radioactive contamination incidents involving protective clothing

    SciTech Connect

    Reichelt, R.A.; Clay, M.E.; Eichorst, A.J.

    1998-01-01

    The study focuses on incidents at Department of Energy facilities involving the migration of radioactive contaminants through protective clothing. The authors analyzed 68 occurrence reports for the following factors: (1) type of work, (2) working conditions, (3) type of anti-contamination material; (4) area of body or clothing contaminated; and (5) nature of spread of contamination. A majority of reports identified strenuous work activities such as maintenance, construction, or decontamination and decommissioning projects. The reports also indicated adverse working conditions that included hot and humid or cramped work environments. The type of anti-contamination clothing most often identified was cotton or water-resistant disposable clothing. Most of the reports also indicated contaminants migrating through perspiration-soaked areas, typically in the knees and forearms. On the basis of their survey, the authors recommend the use of improved engineering controls and resilient, breathable, waterproof protective clothing for work in hot, humid, or damp areas where the possibility of prolonged contact with contamination cannot be easily avoided or controlled. 1 ref., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Radioactive contamination incidents involving protective clothing.

    PubMed

    Reichelt, R A; Clay, M E; Eichorst, A J

    1998-01-01

    The study focuses on incidents at Department of Energy facilities involving the migration of radioactive contaminants through protective clothing. The authors analyzed 68 occurrence reports for the following factors: (1) type of work; (2) working conditions; (3) type of anti-contamination material; (4) area of body or clothing contaminated; and (5) nature of spread of contamination. A majority of reports identified strenuous work activities such as maintenance, construction, or decontamination and decommissioning projects. The reports also indicated adverse working conditions that included hot and humid or cramped work environments. The type of anti-contamination clothing most often identified was cotton or water-resistant disposable clothing. Most of the reports also indicated contaminants migrating through perspiration-soaked areas, typically in the knees and forearms. On the basis of their survey, the authors recommend the use of improved engineering controls and resilient, breathable, waterproof protective clothing for work in hot, humid, or damp areas where the possibility of prolonged contact with contamination cannot be easily avoided or controlled. PMID:9415588

  14. Photonic textiles for pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Rothmaier, Markus; Selm, Bärbel; Spichtig, Sonja; Haensse, Daniel; Wolf, Martin

    2008-08-18

    Biomedical sensors, integrated into textiles would enable monitoring of many vitally important physiological parameters during our daily life. In this paper we demonstrate the design and performance of a textile based pulse oximeter, operating on the forefinger tip in transmission mode. The sensors consisted of plastic optical fibers integrated into common fabrics. To emit light to the human tissue and to collect transmitted light the fibers were either integrated into a textile substrate by embroidery (producing microbends with a nominal diameter of 0.5 to 2 mm) or the fibers inside woven patterns have been altered mechanically after fabric production. In our experiments we used a two-wavelength approach (690 and 830 nm) for pulse wave acquisition and arterial oxygen saturation calculation. We have fabricated different specimens to study signal yield and quality, and a cotton glove, equipped with textile based light emitter and detector, has been used to examine movement artifacts. Our results show that textile-based oximetry is feasible with sufficient data quality and its potential as a wearable health monitoring device is promising. PMID:18711536

  15. Textiles for protection against microorganism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauperl, O.

    2016-04-01

    Concerning micro-organisms such as bacteria, viruses and fungi, there is a huge progress in the development of textile materials and procedures which should effectively protect against these various pathogens. In this sense there is especially problematic hospital environment, where it is necessary to take into account properly designed textile material which, when good selected and composed, act as a good barrier against transfer of micro-organisms through material mainly in its wet state. Respect to this it is necessary to be familiar with the rules regarding selection of the input material, the choice of proper yarn construction, the choice of the proper weaving mode, the rules regarding selection of antimicrobial-active compound suitable for (eco-friendly) treatment, and the choice of the most appropriate test method by which it is possible objectively to conclude on the reduction of selected microorganism. As is well known, fabrics are three-dimensional structures with void and non-void areas. Therefore, the physical-chemical properties of the textile material/fabric, the surface characteristics together with the shape of microorganism, and the carriers' characteristics contribute to control the transfer of microorganism through textile material. Therefore, careful planning of textile materials and treatment procedure with the compound which is able to reduce micro-organism satisfactory is particularly important, especially due to the fact that in hospital environment population with impaired immune system is mainly presented.

  16. Clothing choices, weight, and trait self-objectification.

    PubMed

    Tiggemann, Marika; Andrew, Rachel

    2012-06-01

    The present study aimed to assess the link between clothing choice and aspects of body image. Participants were 112 female undergraduate students who completed a questionnaire containing a measure of clothing functions, as well as BMI, self-classified weight, and trait self-objectification. Results indicated that BMI and self-classified weight were positively correlated with the choice of clothes for camouflage. Self-objectification was positively correlated with choice of clothes for fashion, and negatively correlated with choosing clothes for comfort. It was concluded that clothing represents an important but neglected aspect of contemporary women's management of their body's appearance. PMID:22465473

  17. 29 CFR 1910.262 - Textiles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Textiles. 1910.262 Section 1910.262 Labor Regulations... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Special Industries § 1910.262 Textiles. (a) Application requirements—(1) Application. The requirements of this subpart for textile safety apply to the...

  18. Textile Design for the Real World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassano, Denise M.

    2007-01-01

    Textile design is a multimillion-dollar business that affects all of us. However, the idea of textile design is often ignored in art classes. This paper describes a project that challenges students to identify functional art in their everyday lives. In this project, students analyze textile designs, then create their own motifs and repeat them to…

  19. Procedures to evaluate the efficiency of protective clothing worn by operators applying pesticide.

    PubMed

    Espanhol-Soares, Melina; Nociti, Leticia A S; Machado-Neto, Joaquim Gonçalves

    2013-10-01

    The evaluation of the efficiency of whole-body protective clothing against pesticides has already been carried out through field tests and procedures defined by international standards, but there is a need to determine the useful life of these garments to ensure worker safety. The aim of this article is to compare the procedures for evaluating efficiency of two whole-body protective garments, both new and previously used by applicators of herbicides, using a laboratory test with a mannequin and in the field with the operator. The evaluation of the efficiency of protective clothing used both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, leading to a proposal for classification according to efficiency, and determination of the useful life of protective clothing for use against pesticides, based on a quantitative assessment. The procedures used were in accordance with the standards of the modified American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) F 1359:2007 and International Organization for Standardization 17491-4. The protocol used in the field was World Health Organization Vector Biology and Control (VBC)/82.1. Clothing tested was personal water repellent and pesticide protective. Two varieties of fabric were tested: Beige (100% cotton) and Camouflaged (31% polyester and 69% cotton). The efficiency in exposure control of the personal protective clothing was measured before use and after 5, 10, 20, and 30 uses and washes under field conditions. Personal protective clothing was worn by workers in the field during the application of the herbicide glyphosate on weed species in mature sugar cane plantations using a knapsack sprayer. The modified ASTM 1359:2007 procedure was chosen as the most appropriate due to its greater repeatability (lower coefficient of variation). This procedure provides quantitative evaluation needed to determine the efficiency and useful life of individual protective clothing, not just at specific points of failure, but according to dermal

  20. Skin dose from radionuclide contamination on clothing

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.C.; Hussein, E.M.A.; Yuen, P.S.

    1997-06-01

    Skin dose due to radio nuclide contamination on clothing is calculated by Monte Carlo simulation of electron and photon radiation transport. Contamination due to a hot particle on some selected clothing geometries of cotton garment is simulated. The effect of backscattering in the surrounding air is taken into account. For each combination of source-clothing geometry, the dose distribution function in the skin, including the dose at tissue depths of 7 mg cm{sup -2} and 1,000 Mg cm{sup -2}, is calculated by simulating monoenergetic photon and electron sources. Skin dose due to contamination by a radionuclide is then determined by proper weighting of & monoenergetic dose distribution functions. The results are compared with the VARSKIN point-kernel code for some radionuclides, indicating that the latter code tends to under-estimate the dose for gamma and high energy beta sources while it overestimates skin dose for low energy beta sources. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Transparent conductive graphene textile fibers.

    PubMed

    Neves, A I S; Bointon, T H; Melo, L V; Russo, S; de Schrijver, I; Craciun, M F; Alves, H

    2015-01-01

    Transparent and flexible electrodes are widely used on a variety of substrates such as plastics and glass. Yet, to date, transparent electrodes on a textile substrate have not been explored. The exceptional electrical, mechanical and optical properties of monolayer graphene make it highly attractive as a transparent electrode for applications in wearable electronics. Here, we report the transfer of monolayer graphene, grown by chemical vapor deposition on copper foil, to fibers commonly used by the textile industry. The graphene-coated fibers have a sheet resistance as low as ~1 kΩ per square, an equivalent value to the one obtained by the same transfer process onto a Si substrate, with a reduction of only 2.3 per cent in optical transparency while keeping high stability under mechanical stress. With this approach, we successfully achieved the first example of a textile electrode, flexible and truly embedded in a yarn. PMID:25952133

  2. Transparent conductive graphene textile fibers

    PubMed Central

    Neves, A. I. S.; Bointon, T. H.; Melo, L. V.; Russo, S.; de Schrijver, I.; Craciun, M. F.; Alves, H.

    2015-01-01

    Transparent and flexible electrodes are widely used on a variety of substrates such as plastics and glass. Yet, to date, transparent electrodes on a textile substrate have not been explored. The exceptional electrical, mechanical and optical properties of monolayer graphene make it highly attractive as a transparent electrode for applications in wearable electronics. Here, we report the transfer of monolayer graphene, grown by chemical vapor deposition on copper foil, to fibers commonly used by the textile industry. The graphene-coated fibers have a sheet resistance as low as ~1 kΩ per square, an equivalent value to the one obtained by the same transfer process onto a Si substrate, with a reduction of only 2.3 per cent in optical transparency while keeping high stability under mechanical stress. With this approach, we successfully achieved the first example of a textile electrode, flexible and truly embedded in a yarn. PMID:25952133

  3. Transparent conductive graphene textile fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, A. I. S.; Bointon, T. H.; Melo, L. V.; Russo, S.; de Schrijver, I.; Craciun, M. F.; Alves, H.

    2015-05-01

    Transparent and flexible electrodes are widely used on a variety of substrates such as plastics and glass. Yet, to date, transparent electrodes on a textile substrate have not been explored. The exceptional electrical, mechanical and optical properties of monolayer graphene make it highly attractive as a transparent electrode for applications in wearable electronics. Here, we report the transfer of monolayer graphene, grown by chemical vapor deposition on copper foil, to fibers commonly used by the textile industry. The graphene-coated fibers have a sheet resistance as low as ~1 kΩ per square, an equivalent value to the one obtained by the same transfer process onto a Si substrate, with a reduction of only 2.3 per cent in optical transparency while keeping high stability under mechanical stress. With this approach, we successfully achieved the first example of a textile electrode, flexible and truly embedded in a yarn.

  4. Electrical Conductivity in Textiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Copper is the most widely used electrical conductor. Like most metals, though, it has several drawbacks: it is heavy, expensive, and can break. Fibers that conduct electricity could be the solutions to these problems, and they are of great interest to NASA. Conductive fibers provide lightweight alternatives to heavy copper wiring in a variety of settings, including aerospace, where weight is always a chief concern. This is an area where NASA is always seeking improved materials. The fibers are also more cost-effective than metals. Expenditure is another area where NASA is always looking to make improvements. In the case of electronics that are confined to small spaces and subject to severe stress, copper is prone to breaking and losing connection over time. Flexible conductive fibers eliminate that problem. They are more supple and stronger than brittle copper and, thus, find good use in these and similar situations. While clearly a much-needed material, electrically conductive fibers are not readily available. The cost of new technology development, with all the pitfalls of troubleshooting production and the years of testing, and without the guarantee of an immediate market, is often too much of a financial hazard for companies to risk. NASA, however, saw the need for electrical fibers in its many projects and sought out a high-tech textile company that was already experimenting in this field, Syscom Technology, Inc., of Columbus, Ohio. Syscom was founded in 1993 to provide computer software engineering services and basic materials research in the areas of high-performance polymer fibers and films. In 1999, Syscom decided to focus its business and technical efforts on development of high-strength, high-performance, and electrically conductive polymer fibers. The company developed AmberStrand, an electrically conductive, low-weight, strong-yet-flexible hybrid metal-polymer YARN.

  5. Cardiovascular and thermal consequences of protective clothing: a comparison of clothed and unclothed states.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Alison; Armstrong, Karen; Gordon, Christopher; Groeller, Herbert; Woods, Brian; Stocks, Jodie; Taylor, Nigel

    2004-08-15

    We have undertaken a laboratory-based examination of the cardiovascular and thermal impact of wearing thermal (heat) protective clothing during fatiguing exercise in the heat. Seven males completed semi-recumbent, intermittent cycling (39.6 degrees C, 45% relative humidity) wearing either protective clothing or shorts (control). Mean core and skin temperatures, cardiac frequency (f(c)), stroke volume (Q), cardiac output (Q), arterial pressure, forearm blood flow (Q(f)), plasma volume change, and sweat rates were measured. In the clothed trials, subjects experienced significantly shorter times to fatigue (52.5 vs. 58.9 min), at lower peak work rates (204.3 vs. 277.4 W), and with higher core (37.9 degrees vs. 37.5 degrees C) and mean skin temperatures (37.3 degrees vs. 36.9 degrees C). There was a significant interaction between time and clothing on f(c), such that, over time, the clothing effect became more powerful. Clothing had a significant main affect on Q, but not Q, indicating the higher Q was chronotropically driven. Despite a greater sweat loss when clothed (923.0 vs. 547.1 g.m(-2) x h(-1); P<0.05), Q(f) and plasma volume change remained equivalent. Protective clothing reduced exercise tolerance, but did not affect overall cardiovascular function, at the point of volitional fatigue. It was concluded that, during moderately heavy, semi-recumbent exercise under hot, dry conditions, the strain on the unclothed body was already high, such that the additional stress imparted by the clothing ensemble represented a negligible, further impact upon cardiovascular stability. PMID:15370864

  6. Ergonomics principles to design clothing work for electrical workers in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Juan; Cubillos, A

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of the Colombian legislation, have been identified the need to develop protective clothing to work according to specifications from the work done and in compliance with international standards. These involve the development and design of new strategies and measures for work clothing design. In this study we analyzes the activities of the workers in the electrical sector, the method analyzes the risks activity data in various activities, that activities include power generation plants, local facilities, industrial facilities and maintenance of urban and rural networks. The analyses method is focused on ergonomic approach, risk analysis is done, we evaluate the role of security expert and we use a design algorithm developed for this purpose. The result of this study is the identification of constraints and variables that contribute to the development of a model of analysis that leads to the development the work protective clothes. PMID:22316792

  7. Preliminary engineering analysis for clothes washers

    SciTech Connect

    Biermayer, Peter J.

    1996-10-01

    The Engineering Analysis provides information on efficiencies, manufacturer costs, and other characteristics of the appliance class being analyzed. For clothes washers, there are two classes: standard and compact. Since data were not available to analyze the compact class, only clothes washers were analyzed in this report. For this analysis, individual design options were combined and ordered in a manner that resulted in the lowest cumulative cost/savings ratio. The cost/savings ratio is the increase in manufacturer cost for a design option divided by the reduction in operating costs due to fuel and water savings.

  8. Textile composite fuselage structures development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Anthony C.; Barrie, Ronald E.; Chu, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Phase 2 of the NASA ACT Contract (NAS1-18888), Advanced Composite Structural Concepts and Materials Technology for Transport Aircraft Structures, focuses on textile technology, with resin transfer molding or powder coated tows. The use of textiles has the potential for improving damage tolerance, reducing cost and saving weight. This program investigates resin transfer molding (RTM), as a maturing technology for high fiber volume primary structures and powder coated tows as an emerging technology with a high potential for significant cost savings and superior structural properties. Powder coated tow technology has promise for significantly improving the processibility of high temperature resins such as polyimides.

  9. 2010 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Clothing and Textile Services. (Program CIP-19.0905)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redfield, Verlene

    2010-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  10. 76 FR 22608 - Third Party Testing for Certain Children's Products; Clothing Textiles: Revisions to Terms of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ...). In the Federal Register of August 18, 2010 (75 FR 51016), we published a notice of requirements... testing (75 FR at 51018). We addressed testing performed by a third party conformity assessment body prior... 1610. 75 FR at 51019 through 51020. II. Requests for Revision On December 2, 2010, the American...

  11. Self-contained clothing system provides protection against hazardous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Self-contained clothing system protects personnel against hazardous environments. The clothing has an environmental control system and a complete protection envelope consisting of an outer garment, inner garment, underwear, boots, gloves, and helmet.

  12. 78 FR 41911 - Foreign-Trade Zone 39-Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; CSI Calendering, Inc. (Rubber Coated Textile...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... Federal Register inviting public comment (78 FR 18314, March 26, 2013). Pursuant to Section 400.37, the... Coated Textile Fabric); Arlington, Texas On March 4, 2013, the Dallas/Fort Worth International...

  13. [Resources on Clothing for Persons with Special Needs].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    P.R.I.D.E. Foundation, Inc., Groton, CT.

    The resource guide to the modification of clothing for disabled individuals suggests solutions to clothing, grooming, and home management problems for a variety of handicapping conditions. Services of PRIDE (Promote Real Independence for the Disabled and Elderly) are noted, including manuals on clothing for the disabled, a workshop, a curriculum…

  14. Alcohol Promotional Clothing Items and Alcohol Use by Underage Consumers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workman, Jane E.

    2003-01-01

    Of 154 female and 106 male adolescents, 76.3% had tried alcohol; more than 36% owned alcohol promotional clothing and more than half had seen such clothing at school. Ownership increased with alcohol use status. Those who received such clothing from their parents were more likely to perceive parental approval of their drinking. (Contains 59…

  15. 46 CFR 153.933 - Chemical protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chemical protective clothing. 153.933 Section 153.933... § 153.933 Chemical protective clothing. When table 1 refers to this section, the following apply: (a) The master shall ensure that the following chemical protective clothing constructed of...

  16. 46 CFR 153.933 - Chemical protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chemical protective clothing. 153.933 Section 153.933... § 153.933 Chemical protective clothing. When table 1 refers to this section, the following apply: (a) The master shall ensure that the following chemical protective clothing constructed of...

  17. 46 CFR 153.933 - Chemical protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chemical protective clothing. 153.933 Section 153.933... § 153.933 Chemical protective clothing. When table 1 refers to this section, the following apply: (a) The master shall ensure that the following chemical protective clothing constructed of...

  18. 46 CFR 153.933 - Chemical protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chemical protective clothing. 153.933 Section 153.933... § 153.933 Chemical protective clothing. When table 1 refers to this section, the following apply: (a) The master shall ensure that the following chemical protective clothing constructed of...

  19. 46 CFR 153.933 - Chemical protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chemical protective clothing. 153.933 Section 153.933... § 153.933 Chemical protective clothing. When table 1 refers to this section, the following apply: (a) The master shall ensure that the following chemical protective clothing constructed of...

  20. A laboratory evaluation of the decontamination properties of microfibre cloths.

    PubMed

    Moore, G; Griffith, C

    2006-12-01

    Standards of cleanliness in health care continue to attract attention. Effective cleaning requires the input of energy, and microfibre cloths may help in the physical removal of soil. The ability of these cloths to remove organic soil (measured by ATP) and bacteria was compared with paper towel and a conventional cloth in controlled wet and dry conditions. When used wet on a dry surface, the cleaning ability of six different microfibre cloths was variable, and in most cases, not significantly better than paper towel or a conventional cloth. One type of microfibre cloth did perform significantly better than the others and paper towel in reducing both organic soil and microbial load. When used dry on a dry surface, there was no significant difference between the cloths, and none of the cloths reduced microbial and organic bioburden effectively. The ability of the cloths to recontaminate the surface was also tested, and some of the microfibre cloths transferred significantly less organic debris and micro-organisms back to the surface than other cloths. Different makes of microfibre cloths have different characteristics, and the name 'microfibre' should not imply superior cleaning efficacy. PMID:17055112

  1. Airborne phthalate partitioning to cotton clothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Glenn; Li, Hongwan; Mishra, Santosh; Buechlein, Melissa

    2015-08-01

    Accumulation on indoor surfaces and fabrics can increase dermal uptake and non-dietary ingestion of semi-volatile organic compounds. To better understand the potential for dermal uptake of phthalates from clothing, we measured the mass accumulation on cotton fabrics of two phthalate esters commonly identified in indoor air: diethylphthalate (DEP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP). In 10-day chamber experiments, we observed strong air-to-cloth partitioning of these phthalates to shirts and jean material. Area-normalized partition coefficients ranged from 209 to 411 (μg/m2)/(μg/m3) for DEP and 2850 to 6580 (μg/m2)/(μg/m3) for DnBP. Clothing volume-normalized partition coefficients averaged 2.6 × 105 (μg/m3)/(μg/m3) for DEP and 3.9 × 106 (μg/m3)/(μg/m3) for DnBP. At equilibrium, we estimate that a typical set of cotton clothing can sorb DnBP from the equivalent of >10,000 m3 of indoor air, thereby substantially decreasing external mass-transfer barriers to dermal uptake. Further, we estimate that a significant fraction of a child's body burden of DnBP may come from mouthing fabric material that has been equilibrated with indoor air.

  2. 33 CFR 142.36 - Protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protective clothing. 142.36 Section 142.36 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment §...

  3. Heat Pump Clothes Dryer Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    A heat pump clothes dryer (HPCD) is an innovative appliance that uses a vapor compression system to dry clothes. Air circulates in a closed loop through the drum, so no vent is required. The condenser heats air to evaporate moisture out of the clothes, and the evaporator condenses water out of the air stream. As a result, the HPCD can achieve 50% energy savings compared to a conventional electric resistance dryer. We developed a physics-based, quasi-steady-state HPCD system model with detailed heat exchanger and compressor models. In a novel approach, we applied a heat and mass transfer effectiveness model to simulate the drying process of the clothes load in the drum. The system model is able to simulate the inherently transient HPCD drying process, to size components, and to reveal trends in key variables (e.g. compressor discharge temperature, power consumption, required drying time, etc.) The system model was calibrated using experimental data on a prototype HPCD. In the paper, the modeling method is introduced, and the model predictions are compared with experimental data measured on a prototype HPCD.

  4. Additivity of Clothing Cues in First Impressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennon, Sharron J.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of information integration was used to predict that in first impression situations, clothing/physical appearance cues have differential importance depending upon the type of judgment elicited. Female college students (N=104) viewed and responded to slides of colored line drawings of female stimulus persons. Multiple regression of data…

  5. The Art of African Senufo Cloth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Jane

    2009-01-01

    The Senufo people create paintings on hand-woven fabric using natural fibers, natural dyes made from leaves, and mud dug from the roots of trees. The fabric of the Senufo is woven in strips approximately six-to-eight inches wide, and sewn together to make a larger fabric for painting. The stylized drawings painted on the cloth are of masked…

  6. Clothing Services and Machine Repair Helper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looney, Era; Morgan, Samuel D.

    Designed for use in a self-paced, open-entry/open-exit vocational training program in clothing services and machine repair, this curriculum guide is one of six for teachers of adult women offenders from a correctional institution. Module topic outlines presented on fourteen topics: fashion, characteristics of fibers and fabrics, custom…

  7. Clothing Construction Performance Assessment. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Betty A.

    The goal of the project was to validate, refine, and develop plans for implementation of a performance-based challenge test in the cognitive and psychomotor aspects of basic clothing construction skills that could be utilized for grades 7-14. An advisory board and a jury panel representing the three instructional levels provided assistance in…

  8. Home Economics Education: Tips on Purchasing Clothes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Univ. System, Albany.

    The learning package on purchasing clothes is designed for use by instructors in adult consumer-homemaking programs, with the target population generally being adults in socioeconomically disadvantaged innercity and rural areas. Major topics include: government regulations related to care and labeling of fabrics and garments, wardrobe planning,…

  9. Protective clothing for accident and emergency personnel.

    PubMed Central

    Steedman, D J

    1994-01-01

    There is a significant risk of clothing soilure and skin contamination from patients' blood or other body fluids whilst working in an accident and emergency (A&E) department. It is therefore unhygienic to wear personal clothing and traditional uniforms do not provide adequate protection. Contamination occurs despite operating 'universal precautions' and emergency presentations often preclude adopting such precautions despite the anticipation of possible contact with blood or other body fluids. The protection afforded to medical staff working in an A&E department by a suit made from a liquid repellent polyester fabric was assessed during the period 2 November 1992-1 January 1993. Ninety-one splash incidents were recorded. A total of 85.7% of splashes (78) were with patients' blood, 13.1% with vomitus (12) and 1.1% with pus (1). There were no instances of splashes to the suit that resulted in strike through to the inner surface or visible contamination of underlying skin. However, some 15.4% of splashes (14) resulted in contamination of exposed skin and 78.6% of these (11) occurred between glove and sleeve. Clothing of appropriated design and fabric can afford skin protection from blood and body fluid contamination. Such clothing alone does not provide overall protection and other precautions currently recommended should be taken. PMID:7921544

  10. Protective clothing ensembles and physical employment standards.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Tom M; Havenith, George

    2016-06-01

    Physical employment standards (PESs) exist for certain occupational groups that also require the use of protective clothing ensembles (PCEs) during their normal work. This review addresses whether these current PESs appropriately incorporate the physiological burden associated with wearing PCEs during respective tasks. Metabolic heat production increases because of wearing PCE; this increase is greater than that because of simply the weight of the clothing and can vary 2-fold among individuals. This variation negates a simple adjustment to the PES for the effect of the clothing on metabolic rate. As a result, PES testing that only simulates the weight of the clothing and protective equipment does not adequately accommodate this effect. The physiological heat strain associated with the use of PCEs is also not addressed with current PESs. Typically the selection tests of a PES lasts less than 20 min, whereas the requirement for use of PCE in the workplace may approach 1 h before cooling strategies can be employed. One option that might be considered is to construct a heat stress test that requires new recruits and incumbents to work for a predetermined duration while exposed to a warm environmental temperature while wearing the PCE. PMID:27277562

  11. Clothing Services: Coordinated Vocational Academic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Dept. of Occupational Education and Technology.

    Designed for junior or senior high school students with academic, socio-economic, or other handicaps, the Coordinated Vocational-Academic Education (CVAE) Clothing Services curriculum guide is also useful in other vocational education programs. Information is presented in three sections. Section one is an overview for teacher preparation;…

  12. Clothing and exercise. I: Biophysics of heat transfer between the individual, clothing and environment.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, D D; Shanley, L A; Smith, E W

    1994-07-01

    Despite large environmental variations, the human body maintains a tightly regulated core temperature. Effective thermoregulation must balance the interaction between skin surface, clothing and ambient air. Indices of thermal stress (wet bulb globe temperature, heat stress index, maximum evaporation rate, required evaporative rate and wind chill) provide valuable information concerning the heat exchange between the individual and the environment, and serve as protective guidelines while working in environmental extremes. The role of clothing, as an interactive barrier, greatly affects thermal balance. Clothing is varied according to prevailing environmental conditions, metabolic heat production, gender and age differences, fabric thermal properties, garment design and intended use. Models (static, dynamic and human) have investigated the biophysical transfer of heat between the skin surface area, clothing and ambient air. Additionally, the role of metabolic heat production during exercise can greatly influence tolerance to thermal stress during a variety of environmental conditions. PMID:7939038

  13. NICE3: Textile Brine Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Recca, L.

    1999-01-29

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate the significant energy and waste savings that can be realized by using nanofiltration technology to reuse textile dyebath brines. Read this new fact sheet to learn how this new membrane technology can benefit your business.

  14. Systematic development of technical textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, M.; Schrank, V.; Gloy, Y.-S.; Gries, T.

    2016-07-01

    Technical textiles are used in various fields of applications, ranging from small scale (e.g. medical applications) to large scale products (e.g. aerospace applications). The development of new products is often complex and time consuming, due to multiple interacting parameters. These interacting parameters are production process related and also a result of the textile structure and used material. A huge number of iteration steps are necessary to adjust the process parameter to finalize the new fabric structure. A design method is developed to support the systematic development of technical textiles and to reduce iteration steps. The design method is subdivided into six steps, starting from the identification of the requirements. The fabric characteristics vary depending on the field of application. If possible, benchmarks are tested. A suitable fabric production technology needs to be selected. The aim of the method is to support a development team within the technology selection without restricting the textile developer. After a suitable technology is selected, the transformation and correlation between input and output parameters follows. This generates the information for the production of the structure. Afterwards, the first prototype can be produced and tested. The resulting characteristics are compared with the initial product requirements.

  15. Micromechanical models for textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, Bhavani V.; Marrey, Ramesh V.

    1995-01-01

    Numerical and analytical micromechanical models are presented to predict the thermoelastic behavior of a textile composite. In the numerical model, the unit-cell is discretized with finite elements, and periodic boundary conditions are imposed between opposite faces of the unit-cell. For a thin textile composite, stress gradients effects through the thickness are demonstrated. The consequent difference in the stiffness and strength behavior of thick and thin composites are discussed. The numerical model is implemented to predict 3-D thermo-elastic constants for a thick textile composite, and the plate thermo-mechanical properties for a thin textile composite. The numerical model is extended to compute the thermal residual microstresses due to processing to predict the composite failure envelopes. An analytical model - Selective Averaging Method (SAM) - is proposed, which is based on a judicious combination of stiffness and compliance averaging to estimate the 3-D elastic constants. Both the models are tested and verified for several examples by comparing the stiffness properties with elasticity solutions and available results.

  16. Integrated microelectronics for smart textiles.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Christl; Glaser, Rupert; Savio, Domnic; Schnell, Markus; Weber, Werner

    2005-01-01

    The combination of textile fabrics with microelectronics will lead to completely new applications, thus achieving elements of ambient intelligence. The integration of sensor or actuator networks, using fabrics with conductive fibres as a textile motherboard enable the fabrication of large active areas. In this paper we describe an integration technology for the fabrication of a "smart textile" based on a wired peer-to-peer network of microcontrollers with integrated sensors or actuators. A self-organizing and fault-tolerant architecture is accomplished which detects the physical shape of the network. Routing paths are formed for data transmission, automatically circumventing defective or missing areas. The network architecture allows the smart textiles to be produced by reel-to-reel processes, cut into arbitrary shapes subsequently and implemented in systems at low installation costs. The possible applications are manifold, ranging from alarm systems to intelligent guidance systems, passenger recognition in car seats, air conditioning control in interior lining and smart wallpaper with software-defined light switches. PMID:16282655

  17. Smart fabrics and interactive textile enabling wearable personal applications: R&D state of the art and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Lymberis, A; Paradiso, R

    2008-01-01

    Smart fabrics and interactive textiles (SFIT) are fibrous structures that are capable of sensing, actuating, generating/storing power and/or communicating. Research and development towards wearable textile-based personal systems allowing e.g. health monitoring, protection & safety, and healthy lifestyle gained strong interest during the last 10 years. Under the Information and Communication Programme of the European Commission, a cluster of R&D projects dealing with smart fabrics and interactive textile wearable systems regroup activities along two different and complementary approaches i.e. 'application pull' and 'technology push'. This includes projects aiming at personal health management through integration, validation, and use of smart clothing and other networked mobile devices as well as projects targeting the full integration of sensors/actuators, energy sources, processing and communication within the clothes to enable personal applications such as protection/safety, emergency and healthcare. The integration part of the technologies into a real SFIT product is at present stage on the threshold of prototyping and testing. Several issues, technical as well user-centred, societal and business, remain to be solved. The paper presents on going major R&D activities, identifies gaps and discuss key challenges for the future. PMID:19163906

  18. 3D quantification of microclimate volume in layered clothing for the prediction of clothing insulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yejin; Hong, Kyunghi; Hong, Sung-Ae

    2007-05-01

    Garment fit and resultant air volume is a crucial factor in thermal insulation, and yet, it has been difficult to quantify the air volume of clothing microclimate and relate it to the thermal insulation value just using the information on the size of clothing pattern without actual 3D volume measurement in wear condition. As earlier methods for the computation of air volume in clothing microclimate, vacuum over suit and circumference model have been used. However, these methods have inevitable disadvantages in terms of cost or accuracy due to the limitations of measurement equipment. In this paper, the phase-shifting moiré topography was introduced as one of the 3D scanning tools to measure the air volume of clothing microclimate quantitatively. The purpose of this research is to adopt a non-contact image scanning technology, phase-shifting moiré topography, to ascertain relationship between air volume and insulation value of layered clothing systems in wear situations where the 2D fabric creates new conditions in 3D spaces. The insulation of vests over shirts as a layered clothing system was measured with a thermal manikin in the environmental condition of 20 degrees C, 65% RH and air velocity of 0.79 m/s. As the pattern size increased, the insulation of the clothing system was increased. But beyond a certain limit, the insulation started to decrease due to convection and ventilation, which is more apparent when only the vest was worn over the torso of manikin. The relationship between clothing air volume and insulation was difficult to predict with a single vest due to the extreme openings which induced active ventilation. But when the vest was worn over the shirt, the effects of thickness of the fabrics on insulation were less pronounced compared with that of air volume. In conclusion, phase-shifting moiré topography was one of the efficient and accurate ways of quantifying air volume and its distribution across the clothing microclimate. It is also noted

  19. Intelligent biomedical clothing for personal health and disease management: state of the art and future vision.

    PubMed

    Lymberis, Andreas; Olsson, Silas

    2003-01-01

    Telemedicine has been introduced to overcome distance in order to get prompt access to medical knowledge and appropriate health care. More recently, work in telemedicine has aimed at developing solutions to support the management of chronic diseases such as diabetes, and lung and heart diseases, as well as to provide support for home care services. Telemedicine is also entering the fields of health promotion/prevention disease, life style management, and well-being. The evolution and broadening of telemedicine gives birth to a nomenclature that includes "e-health," "telehealth," and "telecare." The latest developments in microsystems and nanotechnologies as well as in information processing and communication technologies allow miniaturization and non-invasive smart monitoring of physiological and physical data. Ongoing cutting-edge multidisciplinary research in textile fibers, biomedical sensors, and wireless and mobile telecommunications integrated with telemedicine, aims at developing intelligent biomedical clothing (IBC) that could pave the way to support personalized management of health and diseases at the point of need and at any time. In this study, we aim to describe the current status of multidisciplinary research and development of IBC, based on bibliographic research and reports from seminars, workshops, conferences, and working groups. A further aim is to inform the developers, the decision makers, and users in the health and healthcare sector regarding future solutions to support personalized health care and disease management. Both the textile sector and healthcare sector are looking with great interest at the innovative products and applications that could result from the integration of microsystems, nanotechnologies, biomedical sensors, textiles, and mobile telecommunications. For health monitoring, disease prevention and management, rehabilitation, and sport medicine, IBC may offer, in the mid-term future, a unique, wearable non

  20. Estimating Clothing Thermal Insulation Using an Infrared Camera.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Young-Keun; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel algorithm for estimating clothing insulation is proposed to assess thermal comfort, based on the non-contact and real-time measurements of the face and clothing temperatures by an infrared camera. The proposed method can accurately measure the clothing insulation of various garments under different clothing fit and sitting postures. The proposed estimation method is investigated to be effective to measure its clothing insulation significantly in different seasonal clothing conditions using a paired t-test in 99% confidence interval. Temperatures simulated with the proposed estimated insulation value show closer to the values of actual temperature than those with individual clothing insulation values. Upper clothing's temperature is more accurate within 3% error and lower clothing's temperature is more accurate by 3.7%~6.2% error in indoor working scenarios. The proposed algorithm can reflect the effect of air layer which makes insulation different in the calculation to estimate clothing insulation using the temperature of the face and clothing. In future, the proposed method is expected to be applied to evaluate the customized passenger comfort effectively. PMID:27005625

  1. Tween consumers: catalog clothing purchase behavior.

    PubMed

    Simpson, L; Douglas, S; Schimmel, J

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the catalog shopping behavior of students in their tween years (i.e., between childhood and adolescence; ages 12-14) with that of older students (ages 15-18). Junior high and high school students who had purchased clothing from a catalog in the past 12 months responded to a questionnaire that examined the label information sought and product-specific attributes considered. Results indicated that tweens were more concerned with style, brand names, and the latest fashion than were older students. This finding was especially interesting, as these attributes all relate to status; the tweens were more interested than the older students in wearing the latest fashions, being in style, and gaining the prestige of wearing brand-name clothing. This supports previous findings indicating that the tween years are a time when peer pressure and "fitting in" are very important. PMID:9831881

  2. Test methods for textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minguet, Pierre J.; Fedro, Mark J.; Gunther, Christian K.

    1994-01-01

    Various test methods commonly used for measuring properties of tape laminate composites were evaluated to determine their suitability for the testing of textile composites. Three different types of textile composites were utilized in this investigation: two-dimensional (2-D) triaxial braids, stitched uniweave fabric, and three-dimensional (3-D) interlock woven fabric. Four 2-D braid architectures, five stitched laminates, and six 3-D woven architectures were tested. All preforms used AS4 fibers and were resin-transfer-molded with Shell RSL-1895 epoxy resin. Ten categories of material properties were investigated: tension, open-hole tension, compression, open-hole compression, in-plane shear, filled-hole tension, bolt bearing, interlaminar tension, interlaminar shear, and interlaminar fracture toughness. Different test methods and specimen sizes were considered for each category of test. Strength and stiffness properties obtained with each of these methods are documented in this report for all the material systems mentioned above.

  3. A new penetration test method: protection efficiency of glove and clothing materials against diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI).

    PubMed

    Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Mäkelä, Erja

    2015-03-01

    penetration (the nonwoven fabric), the precision was lower with RSDs of 35 and 50%. For two clothing materials, the penetration was high (134-577 µg cm(-2)). Low penetration (<0.5 µg cm(-2)) was shown by the arm shield and the natural rubber glove. Three glove materials showed no detectable MDI penetration (<0.002 µg cm(-2)). Two affordable glove materials (natural rubber and nitrile rubber) and one clothing material (dust proof arm shield) that can provide adequate protection during short contact with solvent free PMDI formulations were found. The new test procedure should be standardized in order to get a new international penetration standard. PMID:25324563

  4. Musical and clothing invitations to protection.

    PubMed

    Deniaud, F

    1993-01-01

    The Chaussez Capote Project interviewed 48 youths in Abidjan and Dabou aged 14-25 years on how to best get individuals in their age group to use condoms. 251 individuals aged 15-25 were also surveyed in Abidjan on the same subject. While more than 80% of this latter group had already discussed AIDS, sexually transmitted disease (STD), and prevention with others, 90% still wanted advice on these themes from medical staff and the media. 40% who had already used condoms did so incorrectly, while approximately 33% had experienced condom breakage during use. Respondents felt that condom promotion should be associated with information on AIDS, STDs, and contraception or information on general health. In response to this feedback, the project commissioned the creation of a promotional music cassette with French and African songs of different musical styles. Lyrics imparted technical information and correct misconceptions related to condom use. Free distribution of the cassette commenced August 1992, and approximately 800 were given to organizations and businesses. The cassette also aired on radio and Ivorian television, but met with only limited success. It is thought that its impact was limited due to the small number of copies duplicated and inefficient distribution. A new version was therefore created with different songs and short messages by popular African singers for local duplication and sale at a subsidized price starting December 1993. As a 2nd intervention, clothing metaphors applied to condoms and condom use were applied to the development of a clothing promotion loincloth designed Spring 1993. The cloth was pretested and revised to ultimately consist of panels depicting 2 young couples, a condom, a panther, and the words Entre nous. The cloth has been ordered for use by the National AIDS Committee, a condom social marketing project, and the French agency for development cooperation. PMID:12345380

  5. Clothing insulation and temperature, layer and mass of clothing under comfortable environmental conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the relationship between the microclimate temperature and clothing insulation (Icl) under comfortable environmental conditions. In total, 20 subjects (13 women, 7 men) took part in this study. Four environmental temperatures were chosen: 14°C (to represent March/April), 25°C (May/June), 29°C (July/August), and 23°C (September/October). Wind speed (0.14ms-1) and humidity (45%) were held constant. Clothing microclimate temperatures were measured at the chest (Tchest) and on the interscapular region (Tscapular). Clothing temperature of the innermost layer (Tinnermost) was measured on this layer 30 mm above the centre of the left breast. Subjects were free to choose the clothing that offered them thermal comfort under each environmental condition. We found the following results. 1) All clothing factors except the number of lower clothing layers (Llower), showed differences between the different environmental conditions (P<0.05). The ranges of Tchest were 31.6 to 33.5°C and 32.2 to 33.4°C in Tscapular. The range of Tinnermost was 28.6 to 32.0°C. The range of the upper clothing layers (Lupper) and total clothing mass (Mtotal) was 1.1 to 3.2 layers and 473 to 1659 g respectively. The range of Icl was 0.78 to 2.10 clo. 2) Post hoc analyses showed that analysis of Tinnermost produced the same results as for that of Icl. Likewise, the analysis of Lupper produced the same result as the analysis of the number of total layers (Ltotal) within an outfit. 3) Air temperature (ta) had positive relationships with Tchest and Tscapular and with Tinnermost but had inverse correlations with Icl, Mtotal, Lupper and Ltotal. Tchest, Tscapular, and Tinnermost increased as ta rose. 4) Icl had inverse relationships with Tchest and Tinnermost, but positive relationships with Mtotal, Lupper and Ltotal. Icl could be estimated by Mtotal, Lupper, and Tscapular using a multivariate linear regression model. 5) Lupper had positive relationships with Icl

  6. Econazole imprinted textiles with antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mirza Akram; Lalloz, Augustine; Benhaddou, Aicha; Pagniez, Fabrice; Raymond, Martine; Le Pape, Patrice; Simard, Pierre; Théberge, Karine; Leblond, Jeanne

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose pharmaceutical textiles imprinted with lipid microparticles of Econazole nitrate (ECN) as a mean to improve patient compliance while maintaining drug activity. Lipid microparticles were prepared and characterized by laser diffraction (3.5±0.1 μm). Using an optimized screen-printing method, microparticles were deposited on textiles, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The drug content of textiles (97±3 μg/cm(2)) was reproducible and stable up to 4 months storage at 25 °C/65% Relative Humidity. Imprinted textiles exhibited a thermosensitive behavior, as witnessed by a fusion temperature of 34.8 °C, which enabled a larger drug release at 32 °C (temperature of the skin) than at room temperature. In vitro antifungal activity of ECN textiles was compared to commercial 1% (wt/wt) ECN cream Pevaryl®. ECN textiles maintained their antifungal activity against a broad range of Candida species as well as major dermatophyte species. In vivo, ECN textiles also preserved the antifungal efficacy of ECN on cutaneous candidiasis infection in mice. Ex vivo percutaneous absorption studies demonstrated that ECN released from pharmaceutical textiles concentrated more in the upper skin layers, where the fungal infections develop, as compared to dermal absorption of Pevaryl®. Overall, these results showed that this technology is promising to develop pharmaceutical garments textiles for the treatment of superficial fungal infections. PMID:26883854

  7. Electrostatic sampling of trace DNA from clothing.

    PubMed

    Zieger, Martin; Defaux, Priscille Merciani; Utz, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    During acts of physical aggression, offenders frequently come into contact with clothes of the victim, thereby leaving traces of DNA-bearing biological material on the garments. Since tape-lifting and swabbing, the currently established methods for non-destructive trace DNA sampling from clothing, both have their shortcomings in collection efficiency and handling, we thought about a new collection method for these challenging samples. Testing two readily available electrostatic devices for their potential to sample biological material from garments made of different fabrics, we found one of them, the electrostatic dust print lifter (DPL), to perform comparable to well-established sampling with wet cotton swabs. In simulated aggression scenarios, we had the same success rate for the establishment of single aggressor profiles, suitable for database submission, with both the DPL and wet swabbing. However, we lost a substantial amount of information with electrostatic sampling, since almost no mixed aggressor-victim profiles suitable for database entry could be established, compared to conventional swabbing. This study serves as a proof of principle for electrostatic DNA sampling from items of clothing. The technique still requires optimization before it might be used in real casework. But we are confident that in the future it could be an efficient and convenient contribution to the toolbox of forensic practitioners. PMID:26753871

  8. Textile influence on remote identification of explosives in the THz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczakowski, M. J.; Palka, N.; Szustakowski, M.

    2015-10-01

    In this study common clothing and variety of textile materials were used in research on its influence on remote materials identification. Experimental setup was designed for the terahertz reflection spectroscopy of different materials located at a distance up to 5 m. The source of the radiation is a tunable solid-state optical parametric oscillator (OPO), which generates a narrow-band nanosecond pulses in the range of 0.7-2.7 THz. The signal is detected with hot electron bolometer (HEB). Investigations were carried out for 1 m, 3 m and 5 m distance between the examined sample and the system. Experiment was conducted in the 0.7 - 2.5 THz range. Fabrics subjected to testing were varied in terms of the fibers kind which they were made from and weights of test materials ranged from 53 g/m2 up to 420 g/m2. Also textiles with a composition consisting of several fibers with differing percentage of the fibers composition of each sample were measured. Information about textiles transmission was obtained in separate set of experiments. The study fabrics were made of viscose, polyester, cotton, spandex, wool, nylon, leather, flax.

  9. Study Abroad in West Africa: An Interdisciplinary Program of International Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Tony B.; Dozier, Cheryl D.; Hunt-Hurst, Patricia; Smith, Bettye P.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes development of an interdisciplinary study abroad program to West Africa at the University of Georgia to help students gain a global perspective. The program is interdisciplinary with several disciplines including social work, clothing and textile, history, and teacher education. This article discusses/highlights a need for a…

  10. Textile Visual Materials: Appropriate Technology in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donoghue, Beverly Emerson

    An innovative educational medium--screenprinted visual aids on cloth--is one alternative to conventional media in Africa, where visual materials are important communication tools but conventional media and materials are often scarce. A production process for cloth visual aids was developed and evaluated in Ghana and Sudan through the…

  11. Math for Textile Technicians. Workforce 2000 Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enterprise State Junior Coll., AL.

    This curriculum package on math for textile technicians has been developed by the Workforce 2000 Partnership, a network of industries and educational institutions provides training in communication, computation, and creative thinking to employees and supervisors in textile, apparel, and carpet industries at 15 plants in Alabama, Georgia, and South…

  12. 29 CFR 1910.262 - Textiles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Textiles. 1910.262 Section 1910.262 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Special Industries § 1910.262 Textiles. (a) Application requirements—(1) Application. The requirements of...

  13. A Wearable All-Solid Photovoltaic Textile.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nannan; Chen, Jun; Huang, Yi; Guo, Wanwan; Yang, Jin; Du, Jun; Fan, Xing; Tao, Changyuan

    2016-01-13

    A solution is developed to power portable electronics in a wearable manner by fabricating an all-solid photovoltaic textile. In a similar way to plants absorbing solar energy for photosynthesis, humans can wear the as-fabricated photovoltaic textile to harness solar energy for powering small electronic devices. PMID:26544099

  14. Environmental Considerations for Flame Resistant Textiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virtually all common textiles will ignite and burn. There are mandatory and voluntary cigarette and open-flame ignition regulations to address unreasonable fire risks associated with textile products that require them to be treated with and/or contain flame retardant chemicals to make them flame res...

  15. 29 CFR 1910.262 - Textiles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Textiles. 1910.262 Section 1910.262 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Special Industries § 1910.262 Textiles. (a) Application requirements—(1) Application. The requirements of...

  16. Chemistry of Durable and Regenerable Biocidal Textiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gang Sun; Worley, S. Dave

    2005-01-01

    Antimicrobial textiles can be categorized into two groups, biocidal and biostatic materials, according to their functions. Biostatic functions refer to inhibiting growth of microorganisms on textiles and preventing the materials from biodegradation and biocidal materials are able to kill microorganisms, thus eliminating their growth, sterilizing…

  17. Multi-Layer E-Textile Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunne, Lucy E.; Bibeau, Kaila; Mulligan, Lucie; Frith, Ashton; Simon, Cory

    2012-01-01

    Stitched e-textile circuits facilitate wearable, flexible, comfortable wearable technology. However, while stitched methods of e-textile circuits are common, multi-layer circuit creation remains a challenge. Here, we present methods of stitched multi-layer circuit creation using accessible tools and techniques.

  18. Problem Based Learning in Constructed Textile Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayer, Kate; Wilson, Jacquie; Challis, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Staff observing undergraduate students enrolled on the BSc Hons Textile Design and Design Management programme in The School of Materials, The University of Manchester, identified difficulties with knowledge retention in the area of constructed textile design. Consequently an experimental pilot was carried out in seamless knitwear design using a…

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION CONTROL: TEXTILE PROCESSING INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual contains information relating to the design of air, water and solids pollution abatement systems for the textile industry. It is intended for use by process design engineers, consultants, and engineering companies active in the design or upgrading of textile waste tre...

  20. Micromechanical models for textile structural composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrey, Ramesh V.; Sankar, Bhavani V.

    1995-01-01

    The objective is to develop micromechanical models for predicting the stiffness and strength properties of textile composite materials. Two models are presented to predict the homogeneous elastic constants and coefficients of thermal expansion of a textile composite. The first model is based on rigorous finite element analysis of the textile composite unit-cell. Periodic boundary conditions are enforced between opposite faces of the unit-cell to simulate deformations accurately. The second model implements the selective averaging method (SAM), which is based on a judicious combination of stiffness and compliance averaging. For thin textile composites, both models can predict the plate stiffness coefficients and plate thermal coefficients. The finite element procedure is extended to compute the thermal residual microstresses, and to estimate the initial failure envelope for textile composites.

  1. Estimating Clothing Thermal Insulation Using an Infrared Camera

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Young-Keun; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel algorithm for estimating clothing insulation is proposed to assess thermal comfort, based on the non-contact and real-time measurements of the face and clothing temperatures by an infrared camera. The proposed method can accurately measure the clothing insulation of various garments under different clothing fit and sitting postures. The proposed estimation method is investigated to be effective to measure its clothing insulation significantly in different seasonal clothing conditions using a paired t-test in 99% confidence interval. Temperatures simulated with the proposed estimated insulation value show closer to the values of actual temperature than those with individual clothing insulation values. Upper clothing’s temperature is more accurate within 3% error and lower clothing’s temperature is more accurate by 3.7%~6.2% error in indoor working scenarios. The proposed algorithm can reflect the effect of air layer which makes insulation different in the calculation to estimate clothing insulation using the temperature of the face and clothing. In future, the proposed method is expected to be applied to evaluate the customized passenger comfort effectively. PMID:27005625

  2. Teachers' perceptions of students' feelings of clothing deprivation.

    PubMed

    Francis, S K; Demissee, D W

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare teachers' perceptions of the feelings of perceived clothing deprivation among their students with the students' actual feelings. The samples consisted of 336 home economics students in Grades 9 through 12 from 6 high schools and 140 teachers employed by the same 6 schools. Results indicated that there was no difference between teachers and students on two measures of clothing deprivation, Inability to Buy and Clothing Deprivation Relative to Peers. In addition, a number of programs for meeting students' clothing needs were identified by the teachers. PMID:8337068

  3. High Efficiency, High Performance Clothes Dryer

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Pescatore; Phil Carbone

    2005-03-31

    This program covered the development of two separate products; an electric heat pump clothes dryer and a modulating gas dryer. These development efforts were independent of one another and are presented in this report in two separate volumes. Volume 1 details the Heat Pump Dryer Development while Volume 2 details the Modulating Gas Dryer Development. In both product development efforts, the intent was to develop high efficiency, high performance designs that would be attractive to US consumers. Working with Whirlpool Corporation as our commercial partner, TIAX applied this approach of satisfying consumer needs throughout the Product Development Process for both dryer designs. Heat pump clothes dryers have been in existence for years, especially in Europe, but have not been able to penetrate the market. This has been especially true in the US market where no volume production heat pump dryers are available. The issue has typically been around two key areas: cost and performance. Cost is a given in that a heat pump clothes dryer has numerous additional components associated with it. While heat pump dryers have been able to achieve significant energy savings compared to standard electric resistance dryers (over 50% in some cases), designs to date have been hampered by excessively long dry times, a major market driver in the US. The development work done on the heat pump dryer over the course of this program led to a demonstration dryer that delivered the following performance characteristics: (1) 40-50% energy savings on large loads with 35 F lower fabric temperatures and similar dry times; (2) 10-30 F reduction in fabric temperature for delicate loads with up to 50% energy savings and 30-40% time savings; (3) Improved fabric temperature uniformity; and (4) Robust performance across a range of vent restrictions. For the gas dryer development, the concept developed was one of modulating the gas flow to the dryer throughout the dry cycle. Through heat modulation in a

  4. Aesthetic and Utilitarian Qualities of Clothing: Use of a Multidimensional Clothing Value Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morganosky, Michelle

    1984-01-01

    This study investigated consumers' valuation of clothing on the basis of aesthetic and utilitarian qualities. Findings indicated that subjects were willing to pay the most for high aesthetic items regardless of utility and the least for low aesthetic, low utility items. (JB)

  5. 49 CFR 178.520 - Standards for textile bags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for textile bags. 178.520 Section 178... PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Performance-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.520 Standards for textile bags. (a) The following are identification codes for textile bags: (1) 5L1 for an unlined or non-coated textile bag;...

  6. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553 Section 10... Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.553 Textile and apparel site visits. (a... Textile Agreements (CITA), exclude from the territory of the United States textile or apparel...

  7. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553 Section 10... Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.553 Textile and apparel site visits. (a... Textile Agreements (CITA), exclude from the territory of the United States textile or apparel...

  8. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553 Section 10... Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.553 Textile and apparel site visits. (a... Textile Agreements (CITA), exclude from the territory of the United States textile or apparel...

  9. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553 Section 10... Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.553 Textile and apparel site visits. (a... Textile Agreements (CITA), exclude from the territory of the United States textile or apparel...

  10. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553 Section 10... Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.553 Textile and apparel site visits. (a... Textile Agreements (CITA), exclude from the territory of the United States textile or apparel...

  11. Cotton Dust Exposure and Respiratory Disorders among Textile Workers at a Textile Company in the Southern Part of Benin.

    PubMed

    Hinson, Antoine Vikkey; Lokossou, Virgil K; Schlünssen, Vivi; Agodokpessi, Gildas; Sigsgaard, Torben; Fayomi, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The textile industry sector occupies a prominent place in the economy of Benin. It exposes workers to several occupational risks, including exposure to cotton dust. To assess the effect of exposure to cotton dust on the health of workers, this study was initiated and conducted in a Beninese cotton industry company. The objective of the study was to evaluate the respiratory disorders among the textile workers exposed to cotton dust and the cross-sectional study involved 656 subjects exposed to cotton dust and 113 non-exposed subjects. The methods used are mainly based on a survey using a questionnaire of organic dust designed by the International Commission of Occupational Health (ICOH); and on the measures of lung function parameters (FEV₁ and FVC). The main results of the different analyzes revealed that subjects exposed to cotton dust have more respiratory symptoms than unexposed subjects (36.9% vs. 21.2%). The prevalence of chronic cough, expectorations, dyspnoea, asthma and chronic bronchitis are 16.8%, 9.8%, 17.3%, 2.6%, and 5.9% respectively among the exposed versus 2.6%, 0.8%, 16.8%, 0% and 0.8% among the unexposed subjects. The prevalence of byssinosis is 44.01%.The prevalence of symptoms is dependent on the sector of activity and the age of the subject. These results should encourage medical interventions and technical prevention especially since the textile industry occupies an important place in the Benin's economy. PMID:27618081

  12. Temperature and humidity within the clothing microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, P J; Mekjavić, I B

    1992-03-01

    The present study investigates clothing microenvironment conditions that may develop during prolonged exposure of workers to a hot environment. Five subjects were exposed to a linear increase in ambient temperature from 20-40 degrees C over a 90-min period, and then remained at 40 degrees C for an additional 90 min. During the exposures, subjects were clad in four types of helicopter personnel suits (Gore-Tex, Cotton Ventile, Nomex/Insulite, and Nomex/Neoprene), incorporating both dry-suit and wet-suit designs. Continuous assessment was made of skin temperature, rectal temperature, and of microenvironment temperature, relative humidity, and vapor pressure (T mu, RH mu, and VP mu) 8 mm from the surface of the skin. Results indicate that although microenvironment temperatures were similar among suits and slightly lower than that of the environment, the RH mu and VP mu were much greater than those of the ambient air. The Nomex/Insulite and Nomex/Neoprene suits showed the highest VP mu, of which only the Nomex/Insulite resulted in significantly greater increases in rectal temperature, likely due to complete covering of the body with the impermeable insulite component. The present study demonstrates the need to discern between the ambient conditions and the conditions encountered next to the skin when protective clothing is worn. PMID:1567319

  13. Mapping Of Textile Surface Relief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Manuel F. P. C. M.; Almeida, Jose B.

    1989-01-01

    We describe a system which is capable of mapping the relief of textile surfaces, by non contact optical means, designed to be used in textile engineering laboratories to study the alterations produced in fabrics by the action of dyes, shock, stress, and so on. The specific nature of these materials precludes the use of conventional profiling systems, which led us to develop a new method with the necessary versatility but reasonably immune to dispersion, diffraction and speckle, phenomena which usually make very difficult the application of optical methods to this situation. The method is based on the horizontal shift of the bright spot on an horizontal surface when this is illuminated with an oblique beam and moved vertically. In order to make the profilometry the sample is swept by an oblique laser beam and the bright spot position is compared with a reference position. The system is thus formed by an HeNe laser focused onto a reference surface (sample support) endowed of bidirectional motion obtained by two stepping motors which are controlled by a 8051 microcomputer that will also control the data acquisition and processing system, and it's forwarding to the working microcomputer. The laser beam incidence angle, the focusing system and the reception objective can be changed to increase the system fickleness.

  14. Stretchable, porous, and conductive energy textiles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liangbing; Pasta, Mauro; Mantia, Fabio La; Cui, Lifeng; Jeong, Sangmoo; Deshazer, Heather Dawn; Choi, Jang Wook; Han, Seung Min; Cui, Yi

    2010-02-10

    Recently there is strong interest in lightweight, flexible, and wearable electronics to meet the technological demands of modern society. Integrated energy storage devices of this type are a key area that is still significantly underdeveloped. Here, we describe wearable power devices using everyday textiles as the platform. With an extremely simple "dipping and drying" process using single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) ink, we produced highly conductive textiles with conductivity of 125 S cm(-1) and sheet resistance less than 1 Omega/sq. Such conductive textiles show outstanding flexibility and stretchability and demonstrate strong adhesion between the SWNTs and the textiles of interest. Supercapacitors made from these conductive textiles show high areal capacitance, up to 0.48F/cm(2), and high specific energy. We demonstrate the loading of pseudocapacitor materials into these conductive textiles that leads to a 24-fold increase of the areal capacitance of the device. These highly conductive textiles can provide new design opportunities for wearable electronics and energy storage applications. PMID:20050691

  15. Interactive textiles for warrior systems applications.

    PubMed

    Leitch, D Paul

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to briefly summarize the basis of the U.S. Army's interest in Interactive Textiles and to describe some of the salient needs in the area of healthcare and E-Textiles and finally to indicate the current and near term market for interactive textile solutions. The basis of current Army, indeed DoD interest in Interactive Textiles including E-Textiles is found in the concept of Network-Centric Warfare. The individual soldier in this concept is often at the hub of a vast information network than shares information across platforms such as vehicles and aircraft as well as across echelongs of command from the font line to the rearmost command and control centers. In order to realize the advantages of such a war fighting concept, E-Textiles are required in a number of areas including soldier's uniforms, tentage and airdrop systems. With respect to healthcare, the Army's interest in E-Textile solutions lie in the areas of human performance monitoring (broadly defined to include physiological states such as blood pressure and hydration as well as the more difficult to measure states of attentiveness and cognitive functioning), wound detection and treatment, energy harvesting and flexible displays. PMID:15718634

  16. Job Loss and Survival Strategies in the Textile and Apparel Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittelhauser, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the job loss in the textile and apparel industries because of fierce domestic and international competition that has closed mills and factories. Suggests that intensified competition and advanced technology will ensure turbulent and challenging years ahead for the domestic industries. (JOW)

  17. Impact of clothing on exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jon-Kyle; Bishop, Phillip A

    2013-08-01

    Clothing targeting the exercise enthusiast has been advertised to keep individuals drier, cooler, and more comfortable during exercise in the heat. The marketing of such clothing has increased dramatically within the last decade. In hot environments, clothing acts as a barrier to thermal balance by inhibiting evaporative and convective cooling. Clothing construction, fit, and fabric are all critical influences on the amount of sweat absorbed from the skin and transported throughout the clothing. The majority of the research analyzing advertised synthetic fabrics has shown no difference in thermoregulation or clothing comfort while exercising in those fabrics in the heat compared to natural fabrics. The influence of clothing construction on thermal balance has received minimal research in regards to exercise. Further research is needed in this area, since it is poorly understood from ecologically valid human testing. Future research should also consider examining the effects of clothing characteristics on comfort during exercise and recovery. The incorporation of protocols that more closely mirror sporting and recreational activity lasting >60 min as well as simulated work-related protocols lasting >120 min is warranted. PMID:23620245

  18. The Relationship of Clothing to Perceived Teaching Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblatt, Suzanne

    1980-01-01

    In-fashion versus out-of-fashion and concealing versus exposing were clothing dimensions most salient to differentiating teaching style groups. Social interaction types rated themselves more out-of-fashion, demanding fewer external symbols of personal characteristics such as fashionable clothing. (Author/BEF)

  19. Pre-Employment Laboratory Education. Clothing/Fashion Design Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Instructional Materials Center.

    This guidebook is designed for use in teaching students enrolled in preemployment laboratory education (PELE) clothing/fashion design programs. The first of two major sections includes an overview for teachers on planning, conducting, and evaluating a PELE clothing/fashion design program. Specific topics discussed in section 1 include (1)…

  20. 10 CFR 429.21 - Residential clothes dryers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Residential clothes dryers. 429.21 Section 429.21 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.21 Residential clothes dryers. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for...

  1. 46 CFR 153.932 - Goggles and protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Goggles and protective clothing. 153.932 Section 153.932... § 153.932 Goggles and protective clothing. (a) The master shall ensure that each person wear a face mask or tight-fitting goggles for eye protection against splashing or spraying liquids if that person...

  2. 46 CFR 153.932 - Goggles and protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Goggles and protective clothing. 153.932 Section 153.932... § 153.932 Goggles and protective clothing. (a) The master shall ensure that each person wear a face mask or tight-fitting goggles for eye protection against splashing or spraying liquids if that person...

  3. 46 CFR 153.932 - Goggles and protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Goggles and protective clothing. 153.932 Section 153.932... § 153.932 Goggles and protective clothing. (a) The master shall ensure that each person wear a face mask or tight-fitting goggles for eye protection against splashing or spraying liquids if that person...

  4. 46 CFR 153.932 - Goggles and protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Goggles and protective clothing. 153.932 Section 153.932... § 153.932 Goggles and protective clothing. (a) The master shall ensure that each person wear a face mask or tight-fitting goggles for eye protection against splashing or spraying liquids if that person...

  5. 46 CFR 151.50-73 - Chemical protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chemical protective clothing. 151.50-73 Section 151.50... BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-73 Chemical... of cargo handling operations shall ensure that the following chemical protective clothing...

  6. 46 CFR 151.50-73 - Chemical protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chemical protective clothing. 151.50-73 Section 151.50... BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-73 Chemical... of cargo handling operations shall ensure that the following chemical protective clothing...

  7. 46 CFR 151.50-73 - Chemical protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chemical protective clothing. 151.50-73 Section 151.50... BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-73 Chemical... of cargo handling operations shall ensure that the following chemical protective clothing...

  8. 46 CFR 151.50-73 - Chemical protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chemical protective clothing. 151.50-73 Section 151.50... BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-73 Chemical... of cargo handling operations shall ensure that the following chemical protective clothing...

  9. 46 CFR 151.50-73 - Chemical protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chemical protective clothing. 151.50-73 Section 151.50... BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-73 Chemical... of cargo handling operations shall ensure that the following chemical protective clothing...

  10. Exercise Clothing for Children in a Weight-Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Kate; Alexander, Marina; Spencer, Virginia

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated whether clothing can be perceived as a form of encouragement for success in a weight management exercise program. A small (n = 30) sample of children and parents, enrolled in a weight-management exercise program, responded to a survey instrument that included questions regarding fit and comfort of the clothing children wore…

  11. This Specialty Line of Clothing Really Is the "Bee's Knees"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Jan Carter

    2009-01-01

    This article features "Bee's Knees," a specialty line of clothing. While not the typical product one would think of when considering mobility equipment, this line of clothing certainly does aid in helping those with disabilities access their world more safely and comfortably. "Bee's Knees" offers pint-sized pants made of kid-friendly, durable…

  12. Depression: Relationships to Clothing and Appearance Self-Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubler, Mary Lynn Johnson; Gurel, Lois M.

    1984-01-01

    Using a mood scale, a measure of the intensity of depression, and ideal and perceived clothing and appearance self-concept scales, researchers collected data from two groups of women over a 28-day time span. One conclusion was that clothing may be used in an attempt to boost self-concept and mood. (JB)

  13. PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF LIFE-CYCLE COSTS OF PROTECTIVE CLOTHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many different types of chemical protective clothing (CPC) are used to isolate workers at hazardous waste sites from contact with the potential hazards posed by chemical wastes. he goal in selecting the appropriate clothing for a particular occupational situation is to optimize w...

  14. ESTIMATION OF THE COST OF USING CHEMICAL PROTECTIVE CLOTHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, either directly or through its Superfund contractors, is a major user of chemical protective clothing. he purpose of this study was to develop estimates for the cost of using this clothing. hese estimates can be used to guide purchase dec...

  15. Protective clothing based on permselective membrane and carbon adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this program is to develop improved protective clothing for use by workers engaged in decomissioning and decontamination of former DOE sites. The proposed technology concerns a new protective clothing fabric that combines a permselective membrane layer (for water transmission and breathability) with a sorptive layer.

  16. 45. 1915 CLOTH ROOM ADJACENT TO PICKER ROOM, SECOND FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. 1915 CLOTH ROOM ADJACENT TO PICKER ROOM, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH END OF MILL NO. 2, WALL ON LEFT DIVIDING CLOTH ROOM ADDED LATER (PROBABLY C. 1970s). - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  17. 10 CFR 431.152 - Definitions concerning commercial clothes washers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definitions concerning commercial clothes washers. 431.152 Section 431.152 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN... efficiency, water consumption, or water efficiency. Commercial clothes washer means a soft-mounted...

  18. 10 CFR 431.152 - Definitions concerning commercial clothes washers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Definitions concerning commercial clothes washers. 431.152 Section 431.152 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN... efficiency, water consumption, or water efficiency. Commercial clothes washer means a soft-mounted...

  19. 10 CFR 431.152 - Definitions concerning commercial clothes washers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Definitions concerning commercial clothes washers. 431.152 Section 431.152 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN... efficiency, water consumption, or water efficiency. Commercial clothes washer means a soft-mounted...

  20. Clothing Fasteners: Ease of Manipulation and Preference among Arthritic Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forcese, Valeria L.; Shannon, Elizabeth

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a study that determined type of clothing fastener preferred by arthritic women when both function and aesthetics were considered. Results revealed appearance was more important than ease of manipulation, and clothing fastener types must be considered when selecting or modifying garments for arthritics. (Availability: CHEA National…

  1. Protective clothing for pesticide operators: part I--selection of a reference test chemical for penetration testing.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Anugrah; Schiffelbein, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A systematic approach was taken to develop a database for protective clothing for pesticide operators; results are reported as a two-part series. Part I describes the research studies that led to identification of a pesticide formulation that could serve as a reference test chemical for further testing. Measurement of pesticide penetration was conducted using different types of pesticide formulations. Six fabrics were tested using 10 formulations at different concentrations. Three formulations were subsequently selected for further testing. Analysis of the data indicated that, when compared with other formulations, mean percent penetration of 5% Prowl 3.3 EC [emulsifiable concentrate diluted to 5% active ingredient (pendimethalin)] is either similar to or higher than most test chemicals. Those results led to choosing 5% Prowl 3.3 EC as a reference test liquid. Part II of the study, published as a separate paper, includes data on a wide range of textile materials. PMID:26327158

  2. Advances in textile sensing and actuation for e-textile applications.

    PubMed

    Paradiso, Rita; De Rossi, Danilo

    2008-01-01

    SMART fabrics and interactive textiles (SFIT) are conceived as innovative textile structure integrating sensing, actuation, electronic, and power and/or communication functions. Due to their multifunctional interactivity, enabled by wearable devices that are flexible and conformable to the human body, e-textiles are considered relevant promoters of a higher quality of life and progress in biomedicine, as well as in several health-focused disciplines, such as biomonitoring, rehabilitation, telemedicine, teleassistance, ergonomics and sport medicine. PMID:19163496

  3. Effluent treatment in the textile industry: Excluding dyes. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the treatment and reuse of textile industry effluents exclusive of dyes. Topics include the recovery of lubricants, lye, sizing agents, polyvinyl alcohol, zinc, dirt, and heat from textile effluents. Air and water pollution control technology that is effective in treating textile effluents is discussed. Effluents from synthetic fiber manufacture and wool scouring processes are emphasized. Effluents that contain dyes are discusssed in a separate bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Effluent treatment in the textile industry: Excluding dyes. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the treatment and reuse of textile industry effluents exclusive of dyes. Topics include the recovery of lubricants, lye, sizing agents, polyvinyl alcohol, zinc, dirt, and heat from textile effluents. Air and water pollution control technology that is effective in treating textile effluents is discussed. Effluents from synthetic fiber manufacture and wool scouring processes are emphasized. Effluents that contain dyes are discusssed in a separate bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Resin transfer molding of textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falcone, Anthony; Dursch, Harry; Nelson, Karl; Avery, William

    1993-01-01

    The design and manufacture of textile composite panels, tubes, and angle sections that were provided to NASA for testing and evaluation are documented. The textile preform designs and requirements were established by NASA in collaboration with Boeing and several vendors of textile reinforcements. The following four types of preform architectures were used: stitched uniweave, 2D-braids, 3D-braids, and interlock weaves. The preforms consisted primarily of Hercules AS4 carbon fiber; Shell RSL-1895 resin was introduced using a resin transfer molding process. All the finished parts were inspected using ultrasonics.

  6. Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, Clarence C., Jr. (Editor); Harris, Charles E. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference in Hampton, Virginia, December 6-8, 1994. This conference was the culmination of a 3-year program that was initiated by NASA late in 1990 to develop mechanics of textile composites in support of the NASA Advanced Composites Technology Program (ACT). The goal of the program was to develop mathematical models of textile preform materials and test methods to facilitate structural analysis and design. Participants in the program were from NASA, academia, and industry.

  7. Handbook of Analytical Methods for Textile Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian N.; Flanagan, Gerry

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to introduce models and computer codes for predicting the properties of textile composites. The handbook includes several models for predicting the stress-strain response all the way to ultimate failure; methods for assessing work of fracture and notch sensitivity; and design rules for avoiding certain critical mechanisms of failure, such as delamination, by proper textile design. The following textiles received some treatment: 2D woven, braided, and knitted/stitched laminates and 3D interlock weaves, and braids.

  8. People, clothing, music, and arousal as contextual retrieval cues in verbal memory.

    PubMed

    Standing, Lionel G; Bobbitt, Kristin E; Boisvert, Kathryn L; Dayholos, Kathy N; Gagnon, Anne M

    2008-10-01

    Four experiments (N = 164) on context-dependent memory were performed to explore the effects on verbal memory of incidental cues during the test session which replicated specific features of the learning session. These features involved (1) bystanders, (2) the clothing of the experimenter, (3) background music, and (4) the arousal level of the subject. Social contextual cues (bystanders or experimenter clothing) improved verbal recall or recognition. However, recall decreased when the contextual cue was a different stimulus taken from the same conceptual category (piano music by Chopin) that was heard during learning. Memory was unaffected by congruent internal cues, produced by the same physiological arousal level (low, moderate, or high heart rate) during the learning and test sessions. However, recall increased with the level of arousal across the three congruent conditions. The results emphasize the effectiveness as retrieval cues of stimuli which are socially salient, concrete, and external. PMID:19093614

  9. Role of healthcare apparel and other healthcare textiles in the transmission of pathogens: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, A; Spencer, M; Edmiston, C

    2015-08-01

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) wear uniforms, such as scrubs and lab coats, for several reasons: (1) to identify themselves as hospital personnel to their patients and employers; (2) to display professionalism; and (3) to provide barrier protection for street clothes from unexpected exposures during the work shift. A growing body of evidence suggests that HCWs' apparel is often contaminated with micro-organisms or pathogens that can cause infections or illnesses. While the majority of scrubs and lab coats are still made of the same traditional textiles used to make street clothes, new evidence suggests that current innovative textiles function as an engineering control, minimizing the acquisition, retention and transmission of infectious pathogens by reducing the levels of bioburden and microbial sustainability. This paper summarizes recent literature on the role of apparel worn in healthcare settings in the acquisition and transmission of healthcare-associated pathogens. It proposes solutions or technological interventions that can reduce the risk of transmission of micro-organisms that are associated with the healthcare environment. Healthcare apparel is the emerging frontier in epidemiologically important environmental surfaces. PMID:25935701

  10. Geometrical modelling of textile reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastore, Christopher M.; Birger, Alexander B.; Clyburn, Eugene

    1995-01-01

    The mechanical properties of textile composites are dictated by the arrangement of yarns contained with the material. Thus to develop a comprehensive understanding of the performance of these materials, it is necessary to develop a geometrical model of the fabric structure. This task is quite complex, as the fabric is made form highly flexible yarn systems which experience a certain degree of compressability. Furthermore there are tremendous forces acting on the fabric during densification typically resulting in yarn displacement and misorientation. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology for characterizing the geometry of yarns within a fabric structure including experimental techniques for evaluating these models. Furthermore, some applications of these geometric results to mechanical prediction models are demonstrated. Although more costly than its predecessors, the present analysis is based on the detailed architecture developed by one of the authors and his colleagues and accounts for many of the geometric complexities that other analyses ignore.

  11. Geometrical modelling of textile reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastore, Christopher M.; Birger, Alexander B.; Clyburn, Eugene

    1995-01-01

    The mechanical properties of textile composites are dictated by the arrangement of yarns contained within the material. Thus, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the performance of these materials, it is necessary to develop a geometrical model of the fabric structure. This task is quite complex, as the fabric is made from highly flexible yarn systems which experience a certain degree of compressibility. Furthermore there are tremendous forces acting on the fabric during densification typically resulting in yarn displacement and misorientation. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology for characterizing the geometry of yarns within a fabric structure including experimental techniques for evaluating these models. Furthermore, some applications of these geometric results to mechanical property predictions models are demonstrated.

  12. Thermoelectric fabrics: toward power generating clothing.

    PubMed

    Du, Yong; Cai, Kefeng; Chen, Song; Wang, Hongxia; Shen, Shirley Z; Donelson, Richard; Lin, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we demonstrate that a flexible, air-permeable, thermoelectric (TE) power generator can be prepared by applying a TE polymer (e.g. poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate)) coated commercial fabric and subsequently by linking the coated strips with a conductive connection (e.g. using fine metal wires). The poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate) coated fabric shows very stable TE properties from 300 K to 390 K. The fabric device can generate a TE voltage output (V) of 4.3 mV at a temperature difference (ΔT) of 75.2 K. The potential for using fabric TE devices to harvest body temperature energy has been discussed. Fabric-based TE devices may be useful for the development of new power generating clothing and self-powered wearable electronics. PMID:25804132

  13. Thermoelectric Fabrics: Toward Power Generating Clothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yong; Cai, Kefeng; Chen, Song; Wang, Hongxia; Shen, Shirley Z.; Donelson, Richard; Lin, Tong

    2015-03-01

    Herein, we demonstrate that a flexible, air-permeable, thermoelectric (TE) power generator can be prepared by applying a TE polymer (e.g. poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate)) coated commercial fabric and subsequently by linking the coated strips with a conductive connection (e.g. using fine metal wires). The poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate) coated fabric shows very stable TE properties from 300 K to 390 K. The fabric device can generate a TE voltage output (V) of 4.3 mV at a temperature difference (ΔT) of 75.2 K. The potential for using fabric TE devices to harvest body temperature energy has been discussed. Fabric-based TE devices may be useful for the development of new power generating clothing and self-powered wearable electronics.

  14. Thermoelectric Fabrics: Toward Power Generating Clothing

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yong; Cai, Kefeng; Chen, Song; Wang, Hongxia; Shen, Shirley Z.; Donelson, Richard; Lin, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we demonstrate that a flexible, air-permeable, thermoelectric (TE) power generator can be prepared by applying a TE polymer (e.g. poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate)) coated commercial fabric and subsequently by linking the coated strips with a conductive connection (e.g. using fine metal wires). The poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate) coated fabric shows very stable TE properties from 300 K to 390 K. The fabric device can generate a TE voltage output (V) of 4.3 mV at a temperature difference (ΔT) of 75.2 K. The potential for using fabric TE devices to harvest body temperature energy has been discussed. Fabric-based TE devices may be useful for the development of new power generating clothing and self-powered wearable electronics. PMID:25804132

  15. Green piezoelectric for autonomous smart textile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, E.; Borsa, C. J.; Briand, D.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the fabrication of Rochelle salt based piezoelectric textiles are shown. Structures composed of fibers and Rochelle salt are easily produced using green processes. Both manufacturing and the material itself are really efficient in terms of environmental impact, considering the fabrication processes and the material resources involved. Additionally Rochelle salt is biocompatible. In this green paradigm, active sensing or actuating textiles are developed. Thus processing method and piezoelectric properties have been studied: (1) pure crystals are used as acoustic actuator, (2) fabrication of the textile-based composite is detailed, (3) converse effective d33 is evaluated and compared to lead zirconate titanate ceramic. The utility of textile-based piezoelectric merits its use in a wide array of applications.

  16. Advanced textile applications for primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Anthony C.; Barrie, Ronald E.; Shah, Bharat M.; Shukla, Jay G.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced composite primary structural concepts were evaluated for low cost, damage tolerant structures. Development of advanced textile preforms for fuselage structural applications with resin transfer molding and powder epoxy materials are now under development.

  17. Advanced textile applications for primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Anthony C.; Barrie, Ronald E.; Shah, Bharat M.; Shukla, Jay G.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced composite primary structural concepts have been evaluated for low cost, damage tolerant structures. Development of advanced textile preforms for fuselage structural applications with resin transfer molding and powder epoxy material is now under development.

  18. A novel dynamic sensing of wearable digital textile sensor with body motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chang-Ming; Lin, Zhan-Sheng; Hu, Chang-Lin; Chen, Yu-Shih; Ke, Ling-Yi; Chen, Yin-Rui

    2010-01-01

    This work proposes an innovative textile sensor system to monitor dynamic body movement and human posture by attaching wearable digital sensors to analyze body motion. The proposed system can display and analyze signals when individuals are walking, running, veering around, walking up and down stairs, as well as falling down with a wearable monitoring system, which reacts to the coordination between the body and feet. Several digital sensor designs are embedded in clothing and wear apparel. Any pressure point can determine which activity is underway. Importantly, wearable digital sensors and a wearable monitoring system allow adaptive, real-time postures, real time velocity, acceleration, non-invasive, transmission healthcare, and point of care (POC) for home and non-clinical environments. PMID:21096657

  19. Airborne irritant contact dermatitis and conjunctivitis after occupational exposure to chlorothalonil in textiles.

    PubMed

    Lensen, Gerda; Jungbauer, Frank; Gonçalo, Margarida; Coenraads, Pieter Jan

    2007-09-01

    Chlorothalonil (tetrachloro-1,3-benzenedicarbonitrile, CAS 1897-45-6) is a pesticide that has been on the market for many years. It is used as a fungicide in agriculture, horticulture, and floriculture; as a wood preservative; and in paint. We report an epidemic of airborne irritant contact dermatitis, conjunctivitis, and upper airway complaints among seamstresses in a Portuguese trailer tent factory, which we attribute to chlorothalonil. All exposed workers had work-related skin symptoms. After patch testing, we showed that none of these were of allergic origin. Instead of allergic reactions, we noticed a delayed type of irritation after 72 hr to chlorothalonil and to the textile extracts containing high concentrations of chlorothalonil. Although allergic and irritant contact dermatitis from chlorothalonil has been described before, this is, as far as we know, the first time that a delayed type of dermatitis, conjunctivitis, and upper airway irritation after exposure to chlorothalonil in tent-cloth is described. PMID:17680869

  20. Dermatotoxicologic clinical solutions: textile dye dermatitis patch testing.

    PubMed

    Coman, Garrett; Blickenstaff, Nicholas; Edwards, Ashley; Maibach, Howard

    2015-03-01

    The authors provide a framework for working up and counseling a patient with suspected textile dermatitis, focusing on identifying which textile materials are most likely to be the cause of the eczematous lesions, the current clinical guidelines, the utility and appropriateness of patch testing, the limitations of these guidelines, and our pro tempore recommendations. While there are many challenges to correctly identify and counsel patients on how to avoid the offending textile products in a patient with suspected textile dye dermatitis, there is value in following the guidelines set forth to help identify the causative textile(s). Although patch tests can be useful, dermatologists should understand the limitations of standardized patch testing for patients with suspected textile dye-induced dermatitis. These guidelines are expected to increase the likelihood of identifying the causative textile(s), so that patch testing can be supplemented with swatch testing and chemical dye extraction to help discover the allergenic dye. PMID:24678750

  1. Bern clothes washer study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, J.J.; Rizy, D.T.

    1998-03-01

    The US market for domestic clothes washers is currently dominated by conventional, vertical axis washers, which typically require about 40 gallons of water for each load. Although small for an individual load, the fact that 35 billion loads of laundry are washed annually in the US results in a substantial quantity of water and energy use. Although much smaller, today`s market for high-efficiency clothes washers which use much less water and energy is growing albeit slowly as manufacturers are making washers based around tumble-action, horizontal axis designs available, information about their performance and benefits is being developed, and consumers are made aware of these benefits. To help build awareness of these benefits and to accelerate markets for high-efficiency washers, DOE, under its Energy Star Program and in cooperation with Maytag Appliances, conducted a field-evaluation of high-efficiency washers using Bern, Kansas (population approximately 200) as a test bed. Baseline washer performance data as well as customer washing behavior were obtained from data collected on the existing washers of more than 100 participants in this instrumented study. Following a 2-month initial study period, all conventional washers were replaced by high-efficiency, tumble action washers, and the experiment continued for another 3-month period. Based on measured data from over 20,000 loads of laundry, the impact of the washer replacement on (1) individual customers` energy and water consumption, (2) customers` laundry habits and perceptions, and (3) the community`s water supply and waste water systems were determined and reported.

  2. Biocidal textiles can help fight nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Borkow, Gadi; Gabbay, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    The rates of nosocomial infections, especially by those caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria, are increasing alarmingly over the globe. Although more rigorous infection control measures are being implemented, it is clear that the current modalities to reduce nosocomial infections are not sufficient. Textiles are an excellent substrate for bacterial growth under appropriate moisture and temperature conditions. Patients shed bacteria and contaminate their pyjamas and sheets. The temperature and humidity between the patients and the bed are appropriate conditions allowing for effective bacterial proliferation. Several studies have found that personnel in contact with contaminated textiles were the source of transmission of the micro-organisms to susceptible patients. Furthermore, it has been reported that bed making in hospitals releases large quantities of micro-organisms into the air, which contaminate the immediate and non-immediate surroundings. Contaminated textiles in hospitals can thus be an important source of microbes contributing to endogenous, indirect-contact, and aerosol transmission of nosocomial related pathogens. We hypothesize that the use of antimicrobial textiles, especially in those textiles that are in close contact with the patients, may significantly reduce bioburden in clinical settings and consequently reduce the risk of nosocomial infections. These textiles should possess broad spectrum biocidal properties. They should be safe for use and highly effective against antibiotic resistant micro-organisms, including those that are commonly involved in hospital-acquired infections, and they should not permit the development of resistant micro-organisms to the active compound. PMID:17959322

  3. Research and development in the textile industry

    SciTech Connect

    1987-06-01

    Included in the portfolio of IP's projects are the R and D activities for several advanced technologies targeted at the textile industry, one of the top ten energy intensive industries in the country. These R and D projects have primarily been aimed at improving the energy efficiency and productivity of textile production processes. Many projects in this area have been successfully completed, and some have resulted in the development and implementation of new technologies (e.g., foam processing) for various process steps. Other projects have produced technical results that have later been utilized by the industry in other capacities (e.g., hyperfiltration). Several projects at various stages of development are currently underway. This brochure describes the Office of Industrial Programs' R and D activities relevant to the textile industry. The brochure is comprised of the following: Industry Update, Energy Consumption in the Textile Industry, Energy Consumption in the Textile Industry, Potential Energy Savings in the Textile Industry, Office of Industrial Programs, R and D Efforts, and R and D Data Base.

  4. Micro-CT features of intermediate gunshot wounds covered by textiles.

    PubMed

    Giraudo, Chiara; Fais, Paolo; Pelletti, Guido; Viero, Alessia; Miotto, Diego; Boscolo-Berto, Rafael; Viel, Guido; Montisci, Massimo; Cecchetto, Giovanni; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2016-09-01

    The analysis of gunshot residue (GSR) on the clothing and the underlying skin of the victim may play an important role in the reconstruction of the shooting incident. The aim of the present study was to test micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) for the analysis of firearm wounds experimentally produced on human skin covered by textiles. Firing trials were performed on 60 sections of human calves enveloped by a single layer of fabric (cotton or jeans or leather or nylon) and 15 controls consisting of bare calves. Experimental firings were conducted in a ballistic laboratory at three different muzzle-to-target distances (5, 15, and 30 cm), using a .32 ACP pistol (Beretta Mod. 81) loaded with full-jacketed bullets coming from the same production lot (7.65 × 17 mm, Browning SR). The visual inspection revealed the classic pattern of GSR distribution on the fabrics and the skin of control samples, while only a dark ring around the entrance lesion was identified on the skin beneath the fabrics. Micro-CT analysis showed the presence of radiopaque material on all entrance wounds, with a statistically significant difference between cases and controls. No differences were found among specimens covered by fabrics, with regard to the firing distance and the type of clothing. No GSR-like deposits were detected in exit wounds. Our results suggest that micro-CT analysis may be a useful screening tool for differentiating entry from exit gunshot wounds when the covering textiles are contaminated, damaged, or missing. PMID:27325255

  5. EPRI guide to managing nuclear utility protective clothing programs

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.J. )

    1991-05-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) commissioned a radioactive waste related project (RP2414-34) during the last quarter of 1989 to produce a guide for developing and managing nuclear protective clothing programs. Every nuclear facility must coordinate some type of protective clothing program for its radiation workers to insure proper and safe protection for the wearer and to maintain control over the spread of contamination. Yet, every nuclear facility has developed its own unique program for managing such clothing. Accordingly, a need existed for a reference guide to assist with the standardization of protective clothing programs and to assist in controlling the potentially runaway economics of such programs. This document is the first known effort to formalize the planning and economic factors surrounding a nuclear utility protective clothing program. It is intended to be informative by addressing the various pieces of information necessary to establish and maintain an effective, professionally managed protective clothing program. It also attempts to provide guidance toward tailoring the information and providing examples within the report to fit each utility's specific needs. This report is further intended to address new issues and trends occurring throughout the nuclear industry in late 1989 which can have either a significant positive or negative impact on the operations or economics of nuclear protective clothing programs. 1 ref., 11 tabs.

  6. Non-iterative distance constraints enforcement for cloth drapes simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidajat, R. L. L. G.; Wibowo, Arifin, Z.; Suyitno

    2016-03-01

    A cloth simulation represents the behavior of cloth objects such as flag, tablecloth, or even garments has application in clothing animation for games and virtual shops. Elastically deformable models have widely used to provide realistic and efficient simulation, however problem of overstretching is encountered. We introduce a new cloth simulation algorithm that replaces iterative distance constraint enforcement steps with non-iterative ones for preventing over stretching in a spring-mass system for cloth modeling. Our method is based on a simple position correction procedure applied at one end of a spring. In our experiments, we developed a rectangle cloth model which is initially at a horizontal position with one point is fixed, and it is allowed to drape by its own weight. Our simulation is able to achieve a plausible cloth drapes as in reality. This paper aims to demonstrate the reliability of our approach to overcome overstretches while decreasing the computational cost of the constraint enforcement process due to an iterative procedure that is eliminated.

  7. Resource Communication Technology and Marketing of Textile Products: A U.S. Textile Industry Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baah, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the qualitative positivistic case study was to explore whether resource communication technology has helped or would help the marketing of textile products in the U.S. textile industry. The contributions of human capital in the marketing department, the marketing-demand information system function, and the product supply chain…

  8. Protective clothing laundering and monitoring at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hylko, J.M. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Miller, M.L. , Inc., Albuquerque, NM ); Brehm, L.E.; Peterson, S.K. )

    1988-02-01

    This paper reports that a small but significant number of skin contamination incidents at Northern States Power Company's Monticello Nuclear Generating Plant were believed to have been caused by residual contamination in laundered, clean protective clothing. Since very little information was available on this mode of skin contamination, a two-part study was undertaken to evaluate it more fully. The first part of this study consisted of a survey of protective clothing laundering and monitoring practices at 24 nuclear power plants. The second part of the study was a simple experiment to evaluate the effect of perspiration on the transfer of residual contamination from laundered clothing.

  9. Wire Cloth as Porous Material for Transpiration-cooled Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Kinsler, Martin R; Cochran, Reeves B

    1951-01-01

    The permeability characteristics and tensile strength of a porous material developed from stainless-steel corduroy wire cloth for use in transpiration-cooled walls where the primary stresses are in one direction were investigated. The results of this investigation are presented and compared with similar results obtained with porous sintered metal compacts. A much wider range of permeabilities is obtainable with the wire cloth than with the porous metal compacts considered and the ultimate tensile strength in the direction of the primary stresses for porous materials produced from three mesh sizes of wire cloth are from two to three times the ultimate tensile strengths of the porous metal compacts.

  10. A simple method for collection of gunshot residues from clothing.

    PubMed

    Andrasko, J; Pettersson, S

    1991-01-01

    Simple equipment for the sampling of gunshot residue particles from clothing, inside of bags, pockets, etc, is described. Collection was achieved by vacuuming through a double filtration system constructed from a Nucleopore aerosol holder connected to an ordinary vacuum cleaner. The collected particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Good results were observed in functional tests of this equipment and the method has been introduced into casework in our laboratory. Various experiments on possible contamination of clothing by GSR particles were performed. The usefulness of clothing as evidence material in searching for GSR particles is discussed. PMID:1744623

  11. Heat strain models applicable for protective clothing: Comparison of core temperature response. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, R.R.; McLellan, T.M.; Withey, W.R.; Chang, S.K.; Pandolf, K.B.

    1995-06-01

    This report represents the results of TTCP-UTP6 efforts on modeling aspects when chemical protective ensembles are worn which need to be considered in warm environments. Since 1983, a significant data base has been collected using human experimental studies and wide clothing systems from which predictive modeling equations have been developed with individuals working in temperate and hot environments, but few comparisons of the -- results from various model outputs have ever been carried out. This initial comparison study was part of a key technical area (KIA) project for The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP) UTP-6 working party. A modeling workshop was conducted in Toronto, Canada on 9-10 June 1994 to discuss the data reduction and results acquired in an initial clothing analysis study of TTCP using various chemical protective garments. To our knowledge, no comprehensive study to date has ever focused on comparing experimental results using an international standardized heat stress procedure matched to physiological outputs from various model predictions in individuals dressed in chemical protective clothing systems. This is the major focus of this TTCP key technical study. This technical report covers one aspect of the working party`s results.

  12. An Investigation of Self-Concept, Clothing Selection, and Life Satisfaction among Disabled Consumers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Hyo Jung

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the relationships between various aspects of self-concept (i.e., generalized self-efficacy, public self-consciousness, state hope, and self-esteem), clothing selection (i.e., clothing that expresses individuality, clothing that improves the emotional state, clothing that camouflages the body), and life satisfaction…

  13. Physiological tolerance times while wearing explosive ordnance disposal protective clothing in simulated environmental extremes.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Ian B; Stewart, Kelly L; Worringham, Charles J; Costello, Joseph T

    2014-01-01

    Explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) technicians are required to wear protective clothing to protect themselves from the threat of overpressure, fragmentation, impact and heat. The engineering requirements to minimise these threats results in an extremely heavy and cumbersome clothing ensemble that increases the internal heat generation of the wearer, while the clothing's thermal properties reduce heat dissipation. This study aimed to evaluate the heat strain encountered wearing EOD protective clothing in simulated environmental extremes across a range of differing work intensities. Eight healthy males [age 25 ± 6 years (mean ± sd), height 180 ± 7 cm, body mass 79 ± 9 kg, VO2max 57 ± 6 ml(.) kg(-1.)min(-1)] undertook nine trials while wearing an EOD9 suit (weighing 33.4 kg). The trials involved walking on a treadmill at 2.5, 4 and 5.5 km ⋅ h(-1) at each of the following environmental conditions, 21, 30 and 37 °C wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) in a randomised controlled crossover design. The trials were ceased if the participants' core temperature reached 39 °C, if heart rate exceeded 90% of maximum, if walking time reached 60 minutes or due to fatigue/nausea. Tolerance times ranged from 10-60 minutes and were significantly reduced in the higher walking speeds and environmental conditions. In a total of 15 trials (21%) participants completed 60 minutes of walking; however, this was predominantly at the slower walking speeds in the 21 °C WBGT environment. Of the remaining 57 trials, 50 were ceased, due to attainment of 90% maximal heart rate. These near maximal heart rates resulted in moderate-high levels of physiological strain in all trials, despite core temperature only reaching 39 °C in one of the 72 trials. PMID:24586228

  14. Fluoroalkylsilane-Modified Textile-Based Personal Energy Management Device for Multifunctional Wearable Applications.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yinben; Li, Kerui; Hou, Chengyi; Li, Yaogang; Zhang, Qinghong; Wang, Hongzhi

    2016-02-01

    The rapid development of wearable electronics in recent years has brought increasing energy consumption, making it an urgent need to focus on personal energy harvesting, storage and management. Herein, a textile-based personal energy management device with multilayer-coating structure was fabricated by encapsulating commercial nylon cloth coated with silver nanowires into polydimethylsiloxane using continuous and facile dip-coating method. This multilayer-coating structure can not only harvest mechanical energy from human body motion to power wearable electronics but also save energy by keeping people warm without losing heat to surroundings and wasting energy to heat empty space and inanimate objects. Fluoroalkylsilanes (FAS) were grafted onto the surface of the film through one single dip-coating process to improve its energy harvesting performance, which has hardly adverse effect to heat insulation and Joule heating property. In the presence of FAS modification, the prepared film harvested mechanical energy to reach a maximum output power density of 2.8 W/m(2), charged commercial capacitors and lighted LEDs, showing its potential in powering wearable electronics. Furthermore, the film provided 8% more thermal insulation than normal cloth at 37 °C and efficiently heated to 40 °C within 4 min when applied the voltage of only 1.5 V due to Joule heating effect. The high flexibility and stability of the film ensures its wide and promising application in the wearable field. PMID:26809194

  15. Process industries - graphic arts, paint, plastics, and textiles: all cousins under the skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Frederick T.

    2002-06-01

    The origin and selection of colors in the process industries is different depending upon how the creative process is applied and what are the capabilities of the manufacturing process. The fashion industry (clothing) with its supplier of textiles is the leader of color innovation. Color may be introduced into textile products at several stages in the manufacturing process from fiber through yarn and finally into fabric. The paint industry is divided into two major applications: automotive and trades sales. Automotive colors are selected by stylists who are in the employ of the automobile manufacturers. Trade sales paint on the other hand can be decided by paint manufactureres or by invididuals who patronize custom mixing facilities. Plastics colors are for the most part decided by the industrial designers who include color as part of the design. Graphic Arts (painting) is a burgeoning industry that uses color in image reproduction and package design. Except for text, printed material in color today has become the norm rather than an exception.

  16. Removal of residual contamination from clean protective clothing

    SciTech Connect

    Hylko, J.M. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Miller, M.L. , Inc., Albuquerque, NM ); Brehm, L.E.; Peterson, S.K. )

    1988-06-01

    This paper reports that during 1986, a small but significant number of skin contamination incidents at Northern States Power Company's Monticello Nuclear Generating Plant were believed to have been caused by residual contamination in dry-cleaned protective clothing. A survey of 24 other nuclear power plants in May and June of 1986 indicated that about half of these facilities had experienced instances of sweat-induced skin contamination on persons wearing laundered, clean protective clothing, and a simple experiment showed that perspiration was indeed capable of removing residual contamination from the 100% cotton fabric used in the Monticello Plant's coveralls. In order to further study this problem, a series of tests were performed on samples of the plant's protective clothing coveralls to determine how effective wet washing methods would be in removing residual contamination from this clothing, which previously had been laundered exclusively by dry cleaning.

  17. 9. FLOOR 1: FLOUR BOLTER, REEL IN PLACE BUT CLOTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. FLOOR 1: FLOUR BOLTER, REEL IN PLACE BUT CLOTH MISSING: LAYSHAFT WHICH FORMERLY DROVE BOLTER IS STORED AGAINST WALL - Windmill at Water Mill, Montauk Highway & Halsey Lane, Water Mill, Suffolk County, NY

  18. 8. This metal chute in building #3 carried the cloth ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. This metal chute in building #3 carried the cloth bags full of finished tire chains from upper floors to the warehouse on the first floor. - American Chain & Cable Company, East Princess Street (400 Block), York, York County, PA

  19. 46 CFR 197.555 - Personal protective clothing and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.555 Personal protective clothing and..., tight-fitting eye goggles to limit dermal exposure to, and prevent eye contact with, liquid benzene....

  20. 46 CFR 197.555 - Personal protective clothing and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.555 Personal protective clothing and..., tight-fitting eye goggles to limit dermal exposure to, and prevent eye contact with, liquid benzene....

  1. 46 CFR 197.555 - Personal protective clothing and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.555 Personal protective clothing and..., tight-fitting eye goggles to limit dermal exposure to, and prevent eye contact with, liquid benzene....

  2. 46 CFR 197.555 - Personal protective clothing and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.555 Personal protective clothing and..., tight-fitting eye goggles to limit dermal exposure to, and prevent eye contact with, liquid benzene....

  3. 46 CFR 197.555 - Personal protective clothing and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.555 Personal protective clothing and..., tight-fitting eye goggles to limit dermal exposure to, and prevent eye contact with, liquid benzene....

  4. 7. Band Wheel, Showing Cloth Web Belt and Wooden Bearing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Band Wheel, Showing Cloth Web Belt and Wooden Bearing Blocks, Looking West - David Renfrew Oil Rig, East side of Connoquenessing Creek, 0.4 mile North of confluence with Thorn Creek, Renfrew, Butler County, PA

  5. Hazard Assessment of Personal Protective Clothing for Hydrogen Peroxide Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Ben; McClure, Mark B.; Johnson, Harry T.

    2004-01-01

    Selection of personal protective equipment (PPE) for hydrogen peroxide service is an important part of the hazard assessment process. But because drip testing of chemical protective clothing for hydrogen peroxide service has not been reported for about 40 years, it is of great interest to test new protective clothing materials with new, high-concentration hydrogen peroxide following similar procedures. The suitability of PPE for hydrogen peroxide service is in part determined by observations made when hydrogen peroxide is dripped onto swatches of protective clothing material. Protective clothing material was tested as received, in soiled condition, and in grossly soiled condition. Materials were soiled by pretreating the material with potassium permanganate (KMnO4) solution then drying to promote a reaction. Materials were grossly soiled with solid KMnO4 to greatly promote reaction. Observations of results including visual changes to the hydrogen peroxide and materials, times to ignition, and self-extinguishing characteristics of the materials are reported.

  6. Exploration of Home Economics Related Occupations in Clothing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Virginia F.; Plumb, Sandra

    1976-01-01

    A five-unit lesson plan is presented titled "Introduction to Careers in the Fashion Industry" which involved three sections of a ninth grade home economics class in an assembly line sewing experience in a clothing production factory. (JT)

  7. Coping with arsenic-based pesticides on Dine (Navajo) textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jae R.

    Arsenic-based pesticide residues have been detected on Arizona State Museum's (ASM) Dine (Navajo) textile collection using a handheld portable X-ray (pXRF) spectrometer. The removal of this toxic pesticide from historic textiles in museums collections is necessary to reduce potential health risks to Native American communities, museum professionals, and visitors. The research objective was divided into three interconnected stages: (1) empirically calibrate the pXRF instrument for arsenic contaminated cotton and wool textiles; (2) engineer an aqueous washing treatment exploring the effects of time, temperature, agitation, and pH conditions to efficiently remove arsenic from wool textiles while minimizing damage to the structure and properties of the textile; (3) demonstrate the devised aqueous washing treatment method on three historic Navajo textiles known to have arsenic-based pesticide residues. The preliminary results removed 96% of arsenic from a high arsenic concentration (~1000 ppm) textile opposed to minimal change for low arsenic concentration textiles (<100 ppm).

  8. Clothed Particles in Quantum Electrodynamics and Quantum Chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebeko, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    The notion of clothing in quantum field theory (QFT), put forward by Greenberg and Schweber and developed by M. Shirokov, is applied in quantum electrodynamics (QED) and quantum chromodynamics (QCD). Along the guideline we have derived a novel analytic expression for the QED Hamiltonian in the clothed particle representation (CPR). In addition, we are trying to realize this notion in QCD (to be definite for the gauge group SU(3)) when drawing parallels between QCD and QED.

  9. WBGT clothing adjustment factors for four clothing ensembles and the effects of metabolic demands.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Thomas E; Caravello, Victor; Schwartz, Skai W; Ashley, Candi D

    2008-01-01

    This study measured the clothing adjustment factors (CAFs) for four clothing ensembles (Cotton Coveralls, Tyvek 1427 Coveralls, NexGen Coveralls, and Tychem QC Coveralls; all coveralls were worn without hoods) against a baseline of cotton work clothes to determine whether the CAFs would be affected by the metabolic rate. Fifteen participants wore one of the five ensembles while walking on a treadmill at low, moderate, and high rates of work in an environment maintained at 50% relative humidity. A climatic chamber was used to slowly increase the level of heat stress by increasing air temperature. When the participant's core temperature reached a steady-state, the dry bulb temperature was increased. The point at which the core temperature began to increase was defined as the inflection point, and the WBGT recorded 5 min before the inflection point was the critical WBGT for each ensemble. A three-way mixed effects linear model with ensemble by metabolic rate category interactions demonstrated that the CAF did not change with metabolic rate, so CAFs can be used over a wide range of metabolic rates. The data at the moderate metabolic rate were combined with data on 14 participants from a previous study under the same conditions. The CAFs in degrees C WBGT were 0 for cotton coveralls, 1.0 for Tyvek 1422A, and 2.5 for NexGen. Although the value of 7.5 for Tychem QC was found, the recommendation remained at 10 to account for the effects of humidity. The standard error for the determination of WBGT crit at 50% relative humidity was 1.60 degrees C WBGT. PMID:17999329

  10. Piezoresistive sensors for smart textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, Paul; Patra, Prabir; Lo, Te-Chen; Chen, Chi H.; Sawhney, Amit; Agrawal, Animesh

    2007-04-01

    We have used inkjet printing to deposit silver conducting lines and small PEDOT (conducting polymer) sensors onto fabrics. The printed conductors penetrate into the fabric and can be shown to coat the individual fibers within the yarn, through the full thickness of the cloth. The PEDOT sensor has a resistance in the region of a few kilo-ohms and is connected to measuring equipment by printed silver lines with a resistance of a few ohms. In this way, local strains can be measured at different sites on a fabric. The PEDOT responds to a tensile strain by a reduction in resistance with a gauge factor (change in resistance/strain) from -5 to -20. This compares with conventional strain gauges where the gauge factor is normally +2. These sensors cycle to strains of over 10%. We have measured gauge factors as a function of the orientation of the sensing line to the fabric axes, to the strain axes for different fabric structures. We can correlate the gauge factor with the extent to which the twisted multifilament yarns are expected to become laterally compressed. In preliminary tests we have shown that these printed sensors can be used to monitor knee and wrist motions and so could be used to provide information in applications such as rehabilitation from joint damage.

  11. Asbestos penetration test system for clothing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, O.D.; Stampfer, J.F.; Sandoval, A.N.; Heath, C.A.; Cooper, M.H.

    1997-04-01

    For hazardous work such as asbestos abatement, there is a need to assess protective clothing fabrics and seam constructions to assure an adequate barrier against hazardous material. The penetration of aerosols through fabrics usually is measured by challenging fabric samples with an aerosol stream at a constant specified airflow. To produce the specified airflow, pressure differentials across the samples often are higher than exist in a work environment. This higher airflow results in higher aerosol velocities through the fabric and, possibly, measured penetration values not representative of those actually experienced in the field. The objective of the reported work was to develop a test method that does not require these higher airflows. The authors have designed and fabricated a new system that tests fabric samples under a low, constant, specified pressure differential across the samples. This differential is adjustable from tenths of a mm Water Gauge (hundredths of an in WG) to over 25-mm WG (1-in WG). The system operates at a pressure slightly lower than its surroundings. Although designed primarily for asbestos, the system is equally applicable to the testing of other aerosols by changing the aerosol generator and detector. Through simple modification of the sample holders, the test apparatus would be capable of evaluating seam and closure constructions.

  12. Falling clothes irons rarely cause burns.

    PubMed

    Allasio, David; Shanti, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Children's Hospital of Michigan's Burn Center treats approximately three pediatric contact burns annually related to clothes irons, which involve the face, torso, and extremities. These burns leave well-demarcated burn patterns, including the steam holes from the heat plate of the iron. The average age of these children is 15 months. The history given by the parent is that the child pulled the cord of an iron that was on an ironing board or high shelf. It seemed unlikely to the investigators that a falling iron would produce such demarcated burns. A free-standing shelf unit was built with shelf heights of 36, 60, and 72 inches (the height of an ironing board and shelves at home). Three irons of different weights were put in three different positions on each shelf, with the cord dangling. A doll the approximate size of a 15-month old was positioned in front of the shelf. The dangling cord was pulled, and the falling iron was videotaped. The video was edited in freeze frame at the point at which the iron hit the doll. Two hundred seventy falls were recorded. The flat heat plate of the iron never hit the doll. The linear edge of the heat plate hit the doll on only seven falls. This study demonstrates that it is very unlikely for the flat heat plate of a falling iron to contact a toddler-sized doll. Children who allegedly sustain demarcated burns in this manner need to be investigated for nonaccidental injury. PMID:24476991

  13. Making the optimal decision in selecting protective clothing

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J. Mark

    2007-07-01

    Protective Clothing plays a major role in the decommissioning and operation of nuclear facilities. Literally thousands of employee dress-outs occur over the life of a decommissioning project and during outages at operational plants. In order to make the optimal decision on which type of protective clothing is best suited for the decommissioning or maintenance and repair work on radioactive systems, a number of interrelating factors must be considered, including - Protection; - Personnel Contamination; - Cost; - Radwaste; - Comfort; - Convenience; - Logistics/Rad Material Considerations; - Reject Rate of Laundered Clothing; - Durability; - Security; - Personnel Safety including Heat Stress; - Disposition of Gloves and Booties. In addition, over the last several years there has been a trend of nuclear power plants either running trials or switching to Single Use Protective Clothing (SUPC) from traditional protective clothing. In some cases, after trial usage of SUPC, plants have chosen not to switch. In other cases after switching to SUPC for a period of time, some plants have chosen to switch back to laundering. Based on these observations, this paper reviews the 'real' drivers, issues, and interrelating factors regarding the selection and use of protective clothing throughout the nuclear industry. (authors)

  14. Development of a microwave clothes dryer. Interim report II

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Gerling, J.E.

    1994-07-01

    The objective of the project is to investigate the microwave drying of clothes and to produce a database for use by interested parties, including appliance manufacturers, in designing and developing microwave clothes dryers. This is an interim report covering 1992 activities. Performance of a research model of a microwave dryer was compared to that of a conventional (top-of-the-line) electric dryer. Drying time was reduced by 58%; superior fabric care was demonstrated on fine fabrics because of the low drying temperatures; and efficiency was increased 18%. Microwaves penetrate the clothes and heat the water molecules directly while conventional heat energy must be conducted through the clothes to heat the water. A flow of heated air conducts the water vapor away from the clothes. Conventional metal buttons and zippers do not heat greatly in the 2,450 MHz microwave field but bobby pins, bread ties and nails heat enough to damage clothes. That heating has been eliminated by switching to the 915-MHz microwave frequency. Metallized threads may still constitute a heating problem. Based upon results from tests of the research model, a prototype has been designed and three units have been constructed. One unit is retained for laboratory testing while the other two will be shipped to two major appliance manufacturers for evaluations in their laboratories. Consumer panels generally liked the high speed, fabric care and improved efficiency of the microwave dryer but were concerned about the higher first cost.

  15. Instrumental color control in textile printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, Roland L., Sr.

    1996-03-01

    In textile printing there are several color outputs that need to be controlled. Just as important is the color coordination of these outputs. The types of color output are the video display on the textile design system (CATD for Computer Aided Textile Design), the color scanner, the color pattern printer, and the actual pattern printed on the textile substrate. Each of these systems has its own gamut(s) that is partially overlapping of the others and will require mapping and/or truncation to adequately represent the colors of the final print in the other systems. One of the goals of instrumentation systems is to control these devices so that the message of the pattern is the same on all four media. To accomplish this is a significant task that has yet to be completed to meet the rigorous requirements of the textile and apparel industries. Several of the major problems and directions for solving them will be discussed in this paper. These include getting good instrumental measurements, translation of data between systems, and specific problems related to the hard copy output.

  16. Influence of the air gap between protective clothing and skin on clothing performance during flash fire exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazy, Ahmed; Bergstrom, Donald J.

    2011-10-01

    A finite volume model was developed to simulate transient heat transfer in protective clothing during flash fire exposure. The model accounts for the combined conduction-radiation heat transfer in the air gap between the fabric and skin. The variation in the fabric and air gap properties with temperature and the thermochemical reactions in the fabric are also considered. This study investigates the influence of the air gap in protective clothing on the energy transfer through the clothing and hence on its performance. Different parameters that affect the conduction-radiation heat transfer through the air gap such as the air gap absorption coefficient and the air gap width were studied. Finally, the paper demonstrates that an innovative and potentially significant way to improve protective clothing performance is to reduce the emissivity on the backside of the fabric.

  17. 16 CFR 1610.4 - Requirements for classifying textiles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for classifying textiles. 1610... classifying textiles. (a) Class 1, Normal Flammability. Class 1 textiles exhibit normal flammability and are...), when tested as described in § 1610.6 shall be classified as Class 1, Normal flammability, when the...

  18. 16 CFR 1610.4 - Requirements for classifying textiles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for classifying textiles. 1610... classifying textiles. (a) Class 1, Normal Flammability. Class 1 textiles exhibit normal flammability and are...), when tested as described in § 1610.6 shall be classified as Class 1, Normal flammability, when the...

  19. 16 CFR 1610.4 - Requirements for classifying textiles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for classifying textiles. 1610... classifying textiles. (a) Class 1, Normal Flammability. Class 1 textiles exhibit normal flammability and are...), when tested as described in § 1610.6 shall be classified as Class 1, Normal flammability, when the...

  20. 16 CFR 1610.4 - Requirements for classifying textiles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirements for classifying textiles. 1610... classifying textiles. (a) Class 1, Normal Flammability. Class 1 textiles exhibit normal flammability and are...), when tested as described in § 1610.6 shall be classified as Class 1, Normal flammability, when the...

  1. Success Skills for Textile Workers. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steck, Susan

    The Success Skills for Textile Workers project was established in November 1994 by Alabama educational institutions and textile manufacturers to provide workplace literacy training for textile workers. This report details project objectives and outcomes through October 31, 1997. Introductory materials describe project components and list…

  2. 19 CFR 11.12b - Labeling textile fiber products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling textile fiber products. 11.12b Section 11.12b Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY PACKING AND STAMPING; MARKING Marking § 11.12b Labeling textile fiber products. (a) Textile fiber products imported into the...

  3. 16 CFR 303.12 - Trimmings of household textile articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Trimmings of household textile articles. 303... household textile articles. (a) Trimmings incorporated in articles of wearing apparel and other household textile articles may, among other forms of trim, include: (1) Rick-rack, tape, belting, binding,...

  4. 16 CFR 303.12 - Trimmings of household textile articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Trimmings of household textile articles. 303... household textile articles. (a) Trimmings incorporated in articles of wearing apparel and other household textile articles may, among other forms of trim, include: (1) Rick-rack, tape, belting, binding,...

  5. 16 CFR 303.12 - Trimmings of household textile articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Trimmings of household textile articles. 303... household textile articles. (a) Trimmings incorporated in articles of wearing apparel and other household textile articles may, among other forms of trim, include: (1) Rick-rack, tape, belting, binding,...

  6. Textile-based sampling for potentiometric determination of ions.

    PubMed

    Lisak, Grzegorz; Arnebrant, Thomas; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas; Bobacka, Johan

    2015-06-01

    Potentiometric sensing utilizing textile-based micro-volume sampling was applied and evaluated for the determination of clinically (Na(+), K(+), Cl(-)) and environmentally (Cd(2+), Pb(2+) and pH) relevant analytes. In this technological design, calibration solutions and samples were absorbed into textiles while the potentiometric cells (ion-selective electrodes and reference electrode) were pressed against the textile. Once the liquid, by wicking action, reached the place where the potentiometric cell was pressed onto the textile, hence closing the electric circuit, the potentiometric response was obtained. Cotton, polyamide, polyester and their blends with elastane were applied for micro-volume sampling. The textiles were found to influence the determination of pH in environmental samples with pH close to neutral and Pb(2+) at low analyte concentrations. On the other hand, textile-based micro-volume sampling was successfully applied in measurements of Na(+) using solid-contact sodium-selective electrodes utilizing all the investigated textiles for sampling. It was found that in order to extend the application of textile-based sampling toward environmental analysis of ions it will be necessary to tailor the physio-chemical properties of the textile materials. In general, textile-based sampling opens new possibilities for direct chemical analysis of small-volume samples and provide a simple and low-cost method to screen various textiles for their effects on samples to identify which textiles are the most suitable for on-body sensing. PMID:26002212

  7. 16 CFR 423.6 - Textile wearing apparel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Textile wearing apparel. 423.6 Section 423.6 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES CARE LABELING OF TEXTILE WEARING APPAREL AND CERTAIN PIECE GOODS AS AMENDED § 423.6 Textile wearing apparel. This section applies to...

  8. 19 CFR 10.771 - Textile or apparel goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Textile or apparel goods. 10.771 Section 10.771... Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.771 Textile or apparel goods. (a) De minimis. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, a textile or apparel good that is not an originating good under the...

  9. 16 CFR 303.12 - Trimmings of household textile articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trimmings of household textile articles. 303... CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.12 Trimmings of household textile articles. (a) Trimmings incorporated in articles of wearing apparel and other...

  10. 19 CFR 10.811 - Textile or apparel goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Textile or apparel goods. 10.811 Section 10.811... Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.811 Textile or apparel goods. (a) De minimis—(1) General. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, a textile or apparel good that is not an originating good...

  11. 19 CFR 102.21 - Textile and apparel products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Textile and apparel products. 102.21 Section 102... THE TREASURY RULES OF ORIGIN Rules of Origin § 102.21 Textile and apparel products. (a) Applicability... control the determination of the country of origin of imported textile and apparel products for...

  12. 16 CFR 303.12 - Trimmings of household textile articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Trimmings of household textile articles. 303... household textile articles. (a) Trimmings incorporated in articles of wearing apparel and other household textile articles may, among other forms of trim, include: (1) Rick-rack, tape, belting, binding,...

  13. Cutaneous Recording and Stimulation of Muscles Using Organic Electronic Textiles.

    PubMed

    Papaiordanidou, Maria; Takamatsu, Seiichi; Rezaei-Mazinani, Shahab; Lonjaret, Thomas; Martin, Alain; Ismailova, Esma

    2016-08-01

    Electronic textiles are an emerging field providing novel and non-intrusive solutions for healthcare. Conducting polymer-coated textiles enable a new generation of fully organic surface electrodes for electrophysiological evaluations. Textile electrodes are able to assess high quality muscular monitoring and to perform transcutaneous electrical stimulation. PMID:27242014

  14. Effluent treatment in the textile industry: Excluding dyes. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the treatment and reuse of textile industry effluents exclusive of dyes. Topics include the recovery of lubricants, lye, sizing agents, polyvinyl alcohol, zinc, dirt, and heat from textile effluents. Air and water pollution control technology that is effective in treating textile effluents is discussed. Effluents from synthetic fiber manufacture and wool scouring processes are emphasized. Effluents that contain dyes are discusssed in a separate bibliography.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  15. Method for Evaluating Energy Use of Dishwashers, Clothes Washers, and Clothes Dryers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Eastment, M.; Hendron, R.

    2006-08-01

    Building America teams are researching opportunities to improve energy efficiency for some of the more challenging end-uses, such as lighting (both fixed and occupant-provided), appliances (clothes washer, dishwasher, clothes dryer, refrigerator, and range), and miscellaneous electric loads, which are all heavily dependent on occupant behavior and product choices. These end-uses have grown to be a much more significant fraction of total household energy use (as much as 50% for very efficient homes) as energy efficient homes have become more commonplace through programs such as ENERGY STAR and Building America. As modern appliances become more sophisticated the residential energy analyst is faced with a daunting task in trying to calculate the energy savings of high efficiency appliances. Unfortunately, most whole-building simulation tools do not allow the input of detailed appliance specifications. Using DOE test procedures the method outlined in this paper presents a reasonable way to generate inputs for whole-building energy-simulation tools. The information necessary to generate these inputs is available on Energy-Guide labels, the ENERGY-STAR website, California Energy Commission's Appliance website and manufacturer's literature. Building America has developed a standard method for analyzing the effect of high efficiency appliances on whole-building energy consumption when compared to the Building America's Research Benchmark building.

  16. Behaviour of Steel Arch Stabilized by a Textile Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, O.; Machacek, J.

    2015-11-01

    Behaviour of the slender steel arch supporting textile membranes in a membrane structure with respect to in-plane and out-of plane stability is investigated in the paper. In the last decades the textile membranes have been widely used to cover both common and exclusive structures due to progress in new membrane materials with eminent properties. Nevertheless, complex analysis of such membranes in interaction with steel structure (carbon/stainless steel perimeter or supporting elements) is rather demanding, even with specialized software. Laboratory model of a large membrane structure simulating a shelter roof of a concert stage was tested and the resulting stress/deflection values are presented. The model of a reasonable size was provided with prestressed membrane of PVC coated polyester fabric Ferrari® Précontraint 702S and tested under various loadings. The supporting steel structure consisted of two steel arch tubes from S355 grade steel and perimeter prestressed cables. The stability behaviour of the inner tube was the primary interest of the investigation. The SOFiSTiK software was used to analyse the structural behaviour in 3D. Numerical non-linear analysis of deflections and internal forces of the structure under symmetrical and asymmetrical loadings covers various membrane prestressing and specific boundary conditions. The numerical results are validated using test results. Finally, the preliminary recommendations for appropriate numerical modelling and stability design of the supporting structure are presented.

  17. [NIR analysis of textile natural raw material].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Xu, Hui-rong; Ying, Yi-bin

    2008-12-01

    NIR technology has gained more and more attention of researchers because of its advantage of simplicity, quickness and non destructive property of detection. And combined with chemometrics method, it could remedy some disadvantages such as overlapping of peaks and feebleness of information. Now, NIR has been applied in many fields such as medicine and chemical industry. Textile is an important part in human life. With the development of society, people pay more attention to this field. Using microscope to discriminate textile fibre by man and using solution method to detect content of fibre are two main detection methods in textile national standards. These methods of discrimination demand a lot of training and practical experience. At the same time, many artificial factors in the process may result in different examination results of the same sample. In addition, they are time-consuming (6 hours on average) and not suitable for large quantity of sample detection. Therefore, doubtless finding another more quickly and nondestructive way to complete detection of textile fibre makes great sense. Compared with microscope method and chemical method, NIR technical could decrease test time down to about 30 seconds. Because the structure of natural fibre is more complex than artificial fibre, NIR application in this field is much more difficult and demands more experience. So many researches were done by experts domestically and abroad in this field. The scope of these researches includes differentiation of foreign substance in natural fibre such as wool, cotton, and silk; prediction of natural fibre content such as residual grease content, mean fibre diameter (MFD) and moisture content. The present paper focuses mainly on the application of NIR in the textile industry, especially the analysis of textile natural raw material, including discrimination of natural fibre variety and detection of foreign fibre. PMID:19248487

  18. Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry

    SciTech Connect

    China Energy Group; Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2010-09-29

    The textile industry is one of the most complicated manufacturing industries because it is a fragmented and heterogeneous sector dominated by small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Energy is one of the main cost factors in the textile industry. Especially in times of high energy price volatility, improving energy efficiency should be a primary concern for textile plants. There are various energy-efficiency opportunities that exist in every textile plant, many of which are cost-effective. However, even cost-effective options often are not implemented in textile plants mostly because of limited information on how to implement energy-efficiency measures, especially given the fact that a majority of textile plants are categorized as SMEs and hence they have limited resources to acquire this information. Know-how on energy-efficiency technologies and practices should, therefore, be prepared and disseminated to textile plants. This guidebook provides information on energy-efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the textile industry. The guidebook includes case studies from textile plants around the world and includes energy savings and cost information when available. First, the guidebook gives a brief overview of the textile industry around the world, with an explanation of major textile processes. An analysis of the type and the share of energy used in different textile processes is also included in the guidebook. Subsequently, energy-efficiency improvement opportunities available within some of the major textile sub-sectors are given with a brief explanation of each measure. The conclusion includes a short section dedicated to highlighting a few emerging technologies in the textile industry as well as the potential for the use of renewable energy in the textile industry.

  19. Flexible textile light diffuser for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selm, Barbel; Camenzind, Martin

    2005-03-01

    In this article a new medical application is introduced using textile production techniques to deliver a defined radiation dose. The advantage for photodynamic therapy (PDT) is that a flat luminous textile structure can homogeneously illuminate unequal body surfaces. The optical properties of this two-dimensional luminous pad are characterized with a set of bench-scale tests. In vitro investigations on petri dishes with cultivated cells and first clinical tests on animal patients are promising. In addition first measurement results are presented together with an outlook to future developments.

  20. Comparative evaluation of antimicrobials for textile applications.

    PubMed

    Windler, Lena; Height, Murray; Nowack, Bernd

    2013-03-01

    Many antimicrobial technologies are available for textiles. They may be used in many different textile applications to prevent the growth of microorganisms. Due to the biological activity of the antimicrobial compounds, the assessment of the safety of these substances is an ongoing subject of research and regulatory scrutiny. This review aims to give an overview on the main compounds used today for antimicrobial textile functionalization. Based on an evaluation of scientific publications, market data as well as regulatory documents, the potential effects of antimicrobials on the environment and on human health were considered and also life cycle perspectives were taken into account. The characteristics of each compound were summarized according to technical, environmental and human health criteria. Triclosan, silane quaternary ammonium compounds, zinc pyrithione and silver-based compounds are the main antimicrobials used in textiles. The synthetic organic compounds dominate the antimicrobials market on a weight basis. On the technical side the application rates of the antimicrobials used to functionalize a textile product are an important parameter with treatments requiring lower dosage rates offering clear benefits in terms of less active substance required to achieve the functionality. The durability of the antimicrobial treatment has a strong influence on the potential for release and subsequent environmental effects. In terms of environmental criteria, all compounds were rated similarly in effective removal in wastewater treatment processes. The extent of published information about environmental behavior for each compound varies, limiting the possibility for an in-depth comparison of all textile-relevant parameters across the antimicrobials. Nevertheless the comparative evaluation showed that each antimicrobial technology has specific risks and benefits that should be taken into account in evaluating the suitability of different antimicrobial products. The

  1. Properties of textile grade ceramic fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pudnos, Eric

    1992-01-01

    The availability of textile grade ceramic fibers has sparked great interest for applications in composite reinforcement and high temperature insulation. This paper summarizes the properties of various small diameter textile grade ceramic fibers currently available. Room temperature mechanical and electrical properties of the fibers are discussed for three cases: ambient conditions, after heat aging in argon, and after heat aging in wet air. Dow Corning (R) HPZ Ceramic Fiber, a silicon nitride type fiber, is shown to have improved retention of mechanical and electrical properties above 1200 C.

  2. The interaction between clothing and air weapon pellets.

    PubMed

    Wightman, G; Wark, K; Thomson, J

    2015-01-01

    Comparatively few studies have been carried out on air weapon injuries yet there are significant number of injuries and fatalities caused by these low power weapons because of their availability and the public perception that because they need no licence they are assumed to be safe. In this study ballistic gel was tested by Bloom and rupture tests to check on consistency of production. Two series of tests were carried out firing into unclothed gel blocks and blocks loosely covered by different items of clothing to simulate attire (tee shirt, jeans, fleece, and jacket). The damage to the clothing caused by different shaped pellets when fired at different ranges was examined. The apparent hole size was affected by the shape of pellet (round, pointed, flat and hollow point) and whether damage was predominantly caused by pushing yarn to one side or by laceration of the yarn through cutting or tearing. The study also compared penetration into clothed gel and unclothed gel under identical conditions, and loose clothing greatly reduced penetration. With loose clothing at 9.1 m range clothing reduced penetration to 50-70% of the penetration of unclothed gel but at 18.3m range only 7 out of 36 shots penetrated the gel. This cannot be accounted for by the energy loss at the longer range (3-7% reduction from 9.1 m to 18.3 m range in unclothed gels) and it is suggested that impulse may have a role to play. Shots that did not penetrate the gel were used to estimate the possible stopping time for the pellet (around 75 μs) and force (1700 N) or stress (100 MPa) required to bring the pellet to a halt. Even with these low energy projectiles, cloth fibres were entrained in the gel showing the potential for penetration of the body and subsequent infection. PMID:25460102

  3. Environmentally friendly antibacterial cotton textiles finished with siloxane sulfopropylbetaine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiguo; Chen, Shaojun; Jiang, Song; Xiong, Meiling; Luo, Junxuan; Tang, Jiaoning; Ge, Zaochuan

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports a novel environmentally friendly antibacterial cotton textile finished with reactive siloxane sulfopropylbetaine(SSPB). The results show that SSPB can be covalently bound onto the cotton textile surface, imparting perdurable antibacterial activity. The textiles finished with SSPB have been investigated systematically from the mechanical properties, thermal stability, hydrophilic properties and antibacterial properties. It is found that the hydrophilicity and breaking strength are improved greatly after the cotton textiles are finished with SSPB. Additionally, the cotton textiles finished with SSPB exhibit good antibacterial activities against gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus, ATCC 6538), gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (E.coli, 8099) and fungi Candida albicans (C.albicans, ATCC 10231). Moreover, SSPB is nonleachable from the textiles, and it does not induce skin stimulation and is nontoxic to animals. Thus, SSPB is ideal candidate for environmentally friendly antibacterial textile applications. PMID:21417413

  4. Estimation of the cost of using chemical protective clothing

    SciTech Connect

    Schwope, A.D.; Renard, E.R.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, either directly or through its Superfund contractors, is a major user of chemical protective clothing. The purpose of the study was to develop estimates for the cost of using this clothing. These estimates can be used to guide purchase decisions and use practices. For example, economic guidelines would assist in decisions pertinent to single-use versus reusable clothing. Eight cost elements were considered: (1) purchase cost, (2) the number of times an item is used, (3) the number of items used per day, (4) cost of decontamination, (5) cost of inspection, (6) cost of maintenance, (7) cost of storage, and (8) cost of disposal. Estimates or assumed inputs for each of these elements were developed based on labor costs, fixed costs, and recurring costs. The cost elements were combined into an economic (mathematical) model having the single output of cost/use. By comparing cost/use for various use scenarios, conclusions are readily reached as to the optimum economics for purchase, use, and reuse of the clothing. In general, clothing should be considered disposable if its purchase cost is less than its average cost/use per use for the anticipated number of times it will be reused.

  5. Testing of a heat pump clothes dryer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, D.; Dieckmann, J.; Mallory, D.

    1995-05-01

    The integration of a heat pump heat source into a clothes dryer has been investigated by several U.S. and foreign appliance developers and manufacturers but no commercial or residential heat pump clothes dryers are currently available in North America. The objectives of this effort were to: (1) Evaluate a heat pump dryer prototype relative to residential dryer performance tests. (2) Quantify the product limitations. (3) Suggest design changes that would reduce the impact of the limitations or that have a positive impact on the benefits. (4) Position the product relative to utility DSM/IRP opportunities (e.g., reduced connected load, or energy conservation). (5) Develop preliminary cost data The program evaluated the performance of a prototype closed-cycle heat pump clothes dryer designed and built by the Nyle Corporation. The prototype design goals were: (1) Drying times equivalent to a conventional electric clothes dryer. (2) 60% reduction in energy consumption. (3) Effective lint removal (to prevent coil fouling). (4) Cool-down mode performance similar to conventional dryer. (5) 20 lb load capacity. (6) Low temperature dry for reduced clothes wrinkle. Test results indicated that the closed-cycle heat pump met some of the above mentioned goals but it fell short with respect to energy savings and dry time. Performance improvement recommendations were developed for the closed-cycle dryer approach. In addition, the closed-cycle design potential was compared to an open-cycle heat pump dryer configuration.

  6. Cloth-Based Power Shirt for Wearable Energy Harvesting and Clothes Ornamentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Suling; Zhong, Qize; Zhong, Junwen; Cheng, Xiaofeng; Wang, Bo; Hu, Bin; Zhou, Jun

    2015-07-15

    Harvesting ambient mechanical energy from human body motion has attracted great research interest. In this work, a power shirt based on triboelectrification and the electrostatic induction effect between fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) and external objects is demonstrated. This power shirt can effectively convert the ambient mechanical energy into electric power, and the working mechanism is systematically discussed. A maximum short-circuit current density of ∼0.37 μA/cm2 and a maximum peak power density of ∼4.65 μW/cm2 were achieved. Simultaneously, 11 blue LEDs were lit by sliding the sleeve and power shirt, indicating the potential application of the power shirt in clothes ornamentation and risk warning. This study develops an efficient path for harvesting human body energy and promoting the development of wearable electronics and smart garments. PMID:26098265

  7. Rubber Impact on 3D Textile Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimbs, Sebastian; Van Den Broucke, Björn; Duplessis Kergomard, Yann; Dau, Frederic; Malherbe, Benoit

    2012-06-01

    A low velocity impact study of aircraft tire rubber on 3D textile-reinforced composite plates was performed experimentally and numerically. In contrast to regular unidirectional composite laminates, no delaminations occur in such a 3D textile composite. Yarn decohesions, matrix cracks and yarn ruptures have been identified as the major damage mechanisms under impact load. An increase in the number of 3D warp yarns is proposed to improve the impact damage resistance. The characteristic of a rubber impact is the high amount of elastic energy stored in the impactor during impact, which was more than 90% of the initial kinetic energy. This large geometrical deformation of the rubber during impact leads to a less localised loading of the target structure and poses great challenges for the numerical modelling. A hyperelastic Mooney-Rivlin constitutive law was used in Abaqus/Explicit based on a step-by-step validation with static rubber compression tests and low velocity impact tests on aluminium plates. Simulation models of the textile weave were developed on the meso- and macro-scale. The final correlation between impact simulation results on 3D textile-reinforced composite plates and impact test data was promising, highlighting the potential of such numerical simulation tools.

  8. HYPERFILTRATION FOR TEXTILE PREPARATION CAUSTIC DISCHARGE REDUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study, joining a hyperfiltration (HF) system with an operating caustic scour and preparation range in an integrated textile dye and finishing plant. (HF is a membrane separation technique widely used in desalination of natural water and in some indus...

  9. Cutaneous abscess after Conus textile sting.

    PubMed

    Veraldi, Stefano; Violetti, Silvia Alberti; Serini, Stefano Maria

    2011-01-01

    We present a 31-year-old man who, after a Conus textile sting acquired in New Caledonia, developed a cutaneous abscess on a buttock. The abscess was accompanied by pain, paraesthesia, general malaise, and fever. Complete remission was achieved by sodium hypochlorite packs and oral amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, metronidazole, and tramadol. PMID:21539663

  10. Smart technical textiles with integrated POF sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebber, Katerina; Lenke, Philipp; Liehr, Sascha; Witt, Jens; Schukar, Marcus

    2008-03-01

    Fiber optic sensors based on polymer optical fibers (POF) take advantage of the high elasticity and high break-down strain of POF. Because of their outstanding elastic properties, POF are well suited for integration into technical textiles like geotextiles and medical textiles. Smart textiles with incorporated POF sensors, able to sense various mechanical and physical quantities, can be realized. The integration of POF as a sensor into geotextiles for monitoring of displacement of soil is very attractive since POF can be used for distributed strain measurement of strain values of more than 40 %. An online monitoring of critical mechanical deformations of geotechnical structures like dikes, dams, slopes, embankments as well as of masonry structures can be ensured. Medical textiles that incorporate POF sensors can control vital physiological parameters like respiratory movement and can be used for wearable health monitoring of patients requiring a continuous medical assistance and treatment. The biocompatibility of POF is an important criterion for selecting POF as a medical sensor. The paper shows selected examples of using POF sensors for the mentioned monitoring purposes.

  11. Computer-Assisted Programmed Instruction in Textiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kean, Rita C.; Laughlin, Joan

    Students in an introductory textiles course at the University of Nebraska's College of Home Economics actively participate in the learning experience through a self-paced instructional technique. Specific learning packets were developed adapting programmed instructional learning materials to computer assisted instruction (CAI). A study booklet…

  12. Textiles. Teacher Edition. Marketing Education LAPs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawley, Jana

    This learning activity packet is designed to help students to acquire a competency: how to use knowledge of textile design to gain expertise in preparation for a career in the fashion industry. The unit consists of the competency, four objectives, suggested learning activities, transparency masters, and a pretest/posttest with answer keys.…

  13. NASA CPAS Drogue Textile Riser Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennings, Elsa J.; Petersen, Michael L.; Anderson, Brian; Johnson, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Steel cable was chosen for the lower end of the drogue and main parachute risers on NASA's Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) to protect the risers from extreme temperatures and abrasion should they contact the crew module during deployment, as was done for Apollo. Due to the weight and deployment complexity inherent in steel, there was significant interest in the possibility of substituting textile for steel for the drogue and main parachute risers. However, textile risers could be damaged when subjected to high temperature and abrasion. Investigations were consequently performed by a subset of the authors to determine whether sacrificial, non-load-bearing textile riser covers could be developed to mitigate the thermal and abrasion concerns. Multiple material combinations were tested, resulting in a cover design capable of protecting the riser against severe riser/crew module contact interactions. A feasibility study was then conducted to evaluate the performance of the textile drogue riser cover in relevant abrasive environments. This paper describes the testing performed and documents the results of this feasibility study.

  14. Research in textile composites at KU, Leuven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verpoest, Ignaas; Ivens, Jan; Willemvanvuure, Aart; Efstratiou, Vassilios

    1993-01-01

    An overview is presented of the research on textile composites at Katholieke Universiteit Leuven. Three dimensionally woven sandwich fabric preforms are investigated for delamination resistant sandwich structures, velvet woven 2.5 dimensional fabrics for delamination resistant laminates, and knitted fabrics with good drapability for laminates of complex shape.

  15. Textile Recycling, Convenience, and the Older Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domina, Tanya; Koch, Kathryn

    2001-01-01

    Results of a study to examine the recycling practices and needs of older adults (n=217) indicated that older adults do recycle traditional materials, but need accommodations for physical limitations. They report textile recycling as time consuming and difficult and used donations to religious organizations as their principal means of textile…

  16. Database of Mechanical Properties of Textile Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delbrey, Jerry

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the approach followed to develop a database for mechanical properties of textile composites. The data in this database is assembled from NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) programs and from data in the public domain. This database meets the data documentation requirements of MIL-HDBK-17, Section 8.1.2, which describes in detail the type and amount of information needed to completely document composite material properties. The database focuses on mechanical properties of textile composite. Properties are available for a range of parameters such as direction, fiber architecture, materials, environmental condition, and failure mode. The composite materials in the database contain innovative textile architectures such as the braided, woven, and knitted materials evaluated under the NASA ACT programs. In summary, the database contains results for approximately 3500 coupon level tests, for ten different fiber/resin combinations, and seven different textile architectures. It also includes a limited amount of prepreg tape composites data from ACT programs where side-by-side comparisons were made.

  17. 3-D textile reinforcements in composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Miravete, A.

    1999-11-01

    Laminated composite materials have been used in structural applications since the 1960s. However, their high cost and inability to accommodate fibers in the laminate`s thickness direction greatly reduce their damage tolerance and impact resistance. The second generation of materials--3-D textile reinforced composites--offers significant cost reduction, and by incorporating reinforcement in the thickness direction, dramatically increases damage tolerance and impact resistance. However, methods for predicting mechanical properties of 3-D textile reinforced composite materials tend to be more complex. These materials also have disadvantages--particularly in regard to crimps in the yarns--that require more research. Textile preforms, micro- and macromechanical modeling, manufacturing processes, and characterization all need further development. As researchers overcome these problems, this new generation of composites will emerge as a highly competitive family of materials. This book provides a state-of-the-art account of this promising technology. In it, top experts describe the manufacturing processes, highlight the advantages, identify the main applications, analyze methods for predicting mechanical properties, and detail various reinforcement strategies, including grid structure, knitted fabric composites, and the braiding technique. Armed with the information in this book, readers will be prepared to better exploit the advantages of 3-D textile reinforced composites, overcome its disadvantages, and contribute to the further development of the technology.

  18. Textiles, Tariffs, and Turnarounds: Profits Improved.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronoff, Craig

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. textile industry may serve as a classic study on regeneration through market forces. The industry has recently made a turnaround in profits after having been recognized as an industry that was losing most of its profits to overseas producers. The reasons for the emerging strength of the industry is that it began to innovate after a…

  19. Tough Textiles Protect Payloads and Public Safety Officers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    In order to create the Mars Pathfinder s mission-critical airbags in the 1990s, NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory collaborated with New Ipswich, New Hampshire s Warwick Mills Inc. to weave multi-layer textiles for the airbags for both Pathfinder and the Mars Exploration Rovers. Warwick Mills applied techniques from the collaboration to its puncture- and impact-resistant TurtleSkin product line. The company's metal flex armor (MFA) vests offer stab protection comparable with rigid steel plates and over 50,000 of the vests have sold. The SoftPlate body armor offers protection from handgun bullets, and like the MFA, is designed to be more comfortable than rigid vests. International public safety and military customers are now benefiting from the TurtleSkin products.

  20. Clothed particle representation in quantum field theory: Mass renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korda, V. Yu.; Shebeko, A. V.

    2004-10-01

    We consider the neutral pion and nucleon fields interacting via the pseudoscalar (PS) Yukawa-type coupling. The method of unitary clothing transformations is used to handle the so-called clothed particle representation, where the total field Hamiltonian and the three boost operators in the instant form of relativistic dynamics take on the same sparse structure in the Hilbert space of hadronic states. In this approach the mass counterterms are cancelled (at least, partly) by commutators of the generators of clothing transformations and the field interaction operator. This allows the pion and nucleon mass shifts to be expressed through the corresponding three-dimensional integrals whose integrands depend on certain covariant combinations of the relevant three-momenta. The property provides the momentum independence of mass renormalization. The present results prove to be equivalent to the results obtained by Feynman techniques.

  1. Impact of Clothing on Dermal Exposure to Phthalates: Observations and Insights from Sampling Both Skin and Clothing.

    PubMed

    Gong, Mengyan; Weschler, Charles J; Zhang, Yinping

    2016-04-19

    Clothing can either retard or accelerate dermal exposure to phthalates. To investigate the impact of clothing on dermal exposure to six phthalates (DMP/DEP/DiBP/DnBP/BBzP/DEHP) in real environments, two sets of experiments have been conducted: (1) Skin wipes were collected from 11 adults to examine the phthalate levels on both bare-skin (hand/forehead) and clothing-covered body locations (arm/back/calf); (2) Five adults were asked to wear just-washed jeans for 1 day (1(st) experiment), 5 days (2(nd) experiment), and 10 days (3(rd) experiment). Phthalate levels on their legs were measured on selected days during the wearing period, and phthalate levels in the jeans were measured at the end of each experiment and again after washing. Measured phthalate levels on body locations covered by clothing were lower than those on uncovered locations, but still substantial. Dermal uptake would be underestimated by a factor of 2 to 5 if absorption through body locations covered by clothing were neglected. Phthalate levels in the jeans and on the legs increased with the wearing time. However, the levels in the jeans and on the legs were not strongly correlated, indicating that other pathways, e.g, contact with bedding or bedclothes, likely contribute to the levels on the legs. The efficiency with which laundering washing removed phthalates from the jeans increased with decreasing Kow; median values ranged from very low (<5%) for DEHP to very high (∼75%) for DMP. PMID:27007912

  2. Effect of body mass and clothing on carrion entomofauna.

    PubMed

    Matuszewski, Szymon; Frątczak, Katarzyna; Konwerski, Szymon; Bajerlein, Daria; Szpila, Krzysztof; Jarmusz, Mateusz; Szafałowicz, Michał; Grzywacz, Andrzej; Mądra, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Carcass mass largely affects pattern and rate of carrion decomposition. Supposedly, it is similarly important for carrion entomofauna; however, most of its likely effects have not been tested experimentally. Here, simultaneous effects of carcass mass and clothing are analyzed. A factorial block experiment with four levels of carcass mass (small carcasses 5-15 kg, medium carcasses 15.1-30 kg, medium/large carcasses 35-50 kg, large carcasses 55-70 kg) and two levels of carcass clothing (clothed and unclothed) was made in a grassland habitat of Western Poland. Pig carcasses (N = 24) were grouped into spring, early summer, and late summer blocks. Insects were sampled manually and with pitfall traps. Results demonstrate that insect assemblages are more complex, abundant, and long-lasting on larger carcasses, whereas clothing is of minor importance in this respect. Only large or medium/large carcasses were colonized by all guilds of carrion insects, while small or medium carcasses revealed high underrepresentation of late-colonizing insects (e.g., Cleridae or Nitidulidae). This finding indicates that carcasses weighing about 23 kg-a standard in forensic decomposition studies-give an incomplete picture of carrion entomofauna. Residencies of all forensically relevant insects were distinctly prolonged on larger carcasses, indicating that cadaver mass is a factor of great importance in this respect. The pre-appearance interval of most taxa was found to be unrelated to mass or clothing of a carcass. Moreover, current results suggest that rate of larval development is higher on smaller carcasses. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that carcass mass is a factor of crucial importance for carrion entomofauna, whereas the importance of clothing is small. PMID:25874664

  3. Protective clothing based on permselective membrane and carbon adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschlich, D.; Baker, R.

    1995-12-01

    This paper is a description of Phase I of the US DOE`s program to develop improved protective clothing for use by workers engaged in decommissioning and decontamination of former DOE sites, including those used for atomic weapons research and production. Membrane Technology and Research has been developing the clothing with an innovative feature of an ultrathin, permselective outer membrane that is extremely permeable to water but impermeable to toxic organic compounds. Phase I (as described herein) includes fabric optimization, commercial-scale fabric production, and prototype suit evaluation. This phase is complete, with the results discussed in this document.

  4. Arc Synthesis of Fullerenes from the Carbide of Waste Cloths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Koichiro; Mieno, Tetsu

    2000-09-01

    A great many scraps of cotton cloth are disposed of as industrial waste through making clothes. The purpose of this study is to transform the waste into very valuable carbon compounds, that is, fullerenes. The scraps were piled and carbonized in air at 1050°C. By carbonization, the weight of the scraps decreased to 16-18%. Carbide from the scraps was used as the raw material for synthesizing fullerenes with the \\mbi{J}×\\mbi{B} arc discharge method. The soot that was deposited on the inside of the vacuum chamber contained C60 (>0.05 wt%), C70 and higher fullerenes.

  5. Permeation of chemical protective clothing by three binary solvent mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mickelsen, R.L.; Roder, M.M.; Berardinelli, S.P.

    1986-04-01

    An evaluation of glove materials against three different binary chemical mixtures selected from common industrial solvents was conducted. Changes in breakthrough time and permeation rate of the mixture components were evaluated as a function of the mixture composition. An increase in employee risk resulting from early mixture breakthrough time and enhanced mixture permeation rate over that of the pure chemicals was demonstrated. The permeation of a binary mixture through chemical protective clothing could not be predicted by the permeation results of the pure components. It is recommended that chemical protective clothing be tested for its permeation characteristics with the use of the chemical mixtures and conditions that reflect the work site exposure.

  6. Mechanical and piezoelectric properties of zinc oxide nanorods grown on conductive textile fabric as an alternative substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Azam; Hussain, Mushtaque; Nur, Omer; Willander, Magnus

    2014-08-01

    The present research is devoted to understanding the mechanism and causes of variation in the piezoelectric potential generated from vertically aligned zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs), which were grown on a conductive textile fabric as an alternative substrate by using the aqueous chemical growth method. The piezoelectric voltage was harvested from vertically aligned ZnO NRs having different physical parameters by using atomic force microscopy in contact mode and the variation in the generated piezoelectricity was investigated. The generated output potential indicates that different physical parameters such aspect ratio, crystal size and lattice internal crystal strain have a strong influence on the piezoelectric properties of vertically aligned ZnO NRs, which were grown on a textile fabric. Presented results indicate that textiles can be used as an alternative substrate just like the other conventional substrates, because our results are similar/better than many reported works on conventional substrates.

  7. Transfer of triazine-iron(II) chromic complexes left by iron items on textile background and human skin.

    PubMed

    Szumera, Jakub; Wełniak, Mirołsaw; Olejniczak, Andrzej; Lukaszewicz, Jerzy P

    2010-07-01

    The research is focused on the detection and transfer of iron traces left by iron items on clothing and human skin. The method is based on the formation of colored complexes between ferrous ions and five synthesized, mostly new triazines. Iron traces originally were left by iron rings on slightly wetted (artificial sweat) cotton fabrics and subsequently transferred to a separate textile substrate. Prior to the use of trazines the contact spots were treated with a new inorganic reducing agent (Sn(2+)) to reduce Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). The method is sensitive to detect iron traces on wetted canvas after 10 min contact with iron items. More spectacular results were obtained for traces left on human palm even after very short contact (10 sec). The new iron-trace-transfer method eliminated the contact of triazines solutions with human skin. Transmission visible spectra of Fe(II)-triazine complexes were determined. PMID:20345803

  8. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF THE LOW TEMPERATURE CHARACTERISTICS OF FOUR PROTECTIVE CLOTHING MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to evaluate several low-temperature characteristics of Challenge 5100, a new protective clothing material developed by Chemical Fabrics Corporation. he low temperature characteristics of three other protective clothing materials were also evaluated...

  9. A METHOD TO MEASURE PROTECTIVE CLOTHING PERMEATION UNDER INTERMITTENT CHEIMCAL CONTACT CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A preliminary method was developed to measure chemical permeation under intermittent chemical contact conditions. Protective clothing permeation is presently measured using ASTM Method F739-85. Because this test measures permeation when the clothing material is in continuous cont...

  10. 8. Cloth Room Building/Bleach House of the Monadnock Mills complex. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Cloth Room Building/Bleach House of the Monadnock Mills complex. The Cloth Room structure dates from 1895; the Bleach House, in the background, from 1902. - Monadnock Mills, 15 Water Street, Claremont, Sullivan County, NH

  11. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF THE LOW TEMPERATURE CHARACTERISTICS OF FOUR PROTECTIVE CLOTHING MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the study was to evaluate several low-temperature characteristics of Challenge 5100, a new protective clothing material developed by Chemical Fabrics Corporation. The low temperature characteristics of three other protective clothing materials were also evaluated...

  12. Electrochemical activation of carbon cloth in aqueous inorganic salt solution for superior capacitive performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Dong; Yu, Yao; Tang, Jie; Liu, Lin; Wu, Yue

    2016-05-01

    Carbon cloth (CC) is an inexpensive and highly conductive textile with excellent mechanical flexibility and strength; it holds great promise as an electrode material for flexible supercapacitors. However, pristine CC has such a low surface area and poor electrochemical activity that the energy storage capability is usually very poor. Herein, we report a green method, two-step electrochemical activation in an aqueous solution of inorganic salts, to significantly enhance the capacitance of CC for supercapacitor application. Micro-cracks, exfoliated carbon fiber shells, and oxygen-containing functional groups (OFGs) were introduced onto the surface of the carbon filament. This resulted in an enhancement of over two orders of magnitude in capacitance compared to that of the bare CC electrode, reaching up to a maximum areal capacitance of 505.5 mF cm-2 at the current density of 6 mA cm-2 in aqueous H2SO4 electrolyte. Electrochemical reduction of CC electrodes led to the removal of most electrochemically unstable surface OFGs, resulting in superior charging/discharging rate capability and excellent cycling stability. Although the activated CC electrode contained a high-level of surface oxygen functional groups (~15 at%), it still exhibited a remarkable charging-discharging rate capability, retaining ~88% of the capacitance when the charging rate increased from 6 to 48 mA cm-2. Moreover, the activated CC electrode exhibited excellent cycling stability with ~97% capacitance remaining after 10 000 cycles at a current density of 24 mA cm-2. A symmetrical supercapacitor based on the activated CC exhibited an ideal capacitive behavior and fast charge-discharge properties. Such a simple, environment-friendly, and cost-effective strategy to activate CC shows great potential in the fabrication of high-performance flexible supercapacitors.Carbon cloth (CC) is an inexpensive and highly conductive textile with excellent mechanical flexibility and strength; it holds great promise as

  13. Physiological Tolerance Times while Wearing Explosive Ordnance Disposal Protective Clothing in Simulated Environmental Extremes

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Ian B.; Stewart, Kelly L.; Worringham, Charles J.; Costello, Joseph T.

    2014-01-01

    Explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) technicians are required to wear protective clothing to protect themselves from the threat of overpressure, fragmentation, impact and heat. The engineering requirements to minimise these threats results in an extremely heavy and cumbersome clothing ensemble that increases the internal heat generation of the wearer, while the clothing’s thermal properties reduce heat dissipation. This study aimed to evaluate the heat strain encountered wearing EOD protective clothing in simulated environmental extremes across a range of differing work intensities. Eight healthy males [age 25±6 years (mean ± sd), height 180±7 cm, body mass 79±9 kg, V˙O2max 57±6 ml.kg−1.min−1] undertook nine trials while wearing an EOD9 suit (weighing 33.4 kg). The trials involved walking on a treadmill at 2.5, 4 and 5.5 km⋅h−1 at each of the following environmental conditions, 21, 30 and 37°C wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) in a randomised controlled crossover design. The trials were ceased if the participants’ core temperature reached 39°C, if heart rate exceeded 90% of maximum, if walking time reached 60 minutes or due to fatigue/nausea. Tolerance times ranged from 10–60 minutes and were significantly reduced in the higher walking speeds and environmental conditions. In a total of 15 trials (21%) participants completed 60 minutes of walking; however, this was predominantly at the slower walking speeds in the 21°C WBGT environment. Of the remaining 57 trials, 50 were ceased, due to attainment of 90% maximal heart rate. These near maximal heart rates resulted in moderate-high levels of physiological strain in all trials, despite core temperature only reaching 39°C in one of the 72 trials. PMID:24586228

  14. Electrochemical activation of carbon cloth in aqueous inorganic salt solution for superior capacitive performance.

    PubMed

    Ye, Dong; Yu, Yao; Tang, Jie; Liu, Lin; Wu, Yue

    2016-05-21

    Carbon cloth (CC) is an inexpensive and highly conductive textile with excellent mechanical flexibility and strength; it holds great promise as an electrode material for flexible supercapacitors. However, pristine CC has such a low surface area and poor electrochemical activity that the energy storage capability is usually very poor. Herein, we report a green method, two-step electrochemical activation in an aqueous solution of inorganic salts, to significantly enhance the capacitance of CC for supercapacitor application. Micro-cracks, exfoliated carbon fiber shells, and oxygen-containing functional groups (OFGs) were introduced onto the surface of the carbon filament. This resulted in an enhancement of over two orders of magnitude in capacitance compared to that of the bare CC electrode, reaching up to a maximum areal capacitance of 505.5 mF cm(-2) at the current density of 6 mA cm(-2) in aqueous H2SO4 electrolyte. Electrochemical reduction of CC electrodes led to the removal of most electrochemically unstable surface OFGs, resulting in superior charging/discharging rate capability and excellent cycling stability. Although the activated CC electrode contained a high-level of surface oxygen functional groups (∼15 at%), it still exhibited a remarkable charging-discharging rate capability, retaining ∼88% of the capacitance when the charging rate increased from 6 to 48 mA cm(-2). Moreover, the activated CC electrode exhibited excellent cycling stability with ∼97% capacitance remaining after 10 000 cycles at a current density of 24 mA cm(-2). A symmetrical supercapacitor based on the activated CC exhibited an ideal capacitive behavior and fast charge-discharge properties. Such a simple, environment-friendly, and cost-effective strategy to activate CC shows great potential in the fabrication of high-performance flexible supercapacitors. PMID:27141910

  15. 78 FR 16661 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... Dominican Republic- Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement, 73 FR 53200) (``CITA's procedures... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add...

  16. 78 FR 17642 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... Dominican Republic- Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement, 73 FR 53200) (``CITA's procedures... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add...

  17. 78 FR 11159 - Determination under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... Dominican Republic- Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement, 73 FR 53200) (``CITA's procedures... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add...

  18. Stretchable biofuel cell with enzyme-modified conductive textiles.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yudai; Takai, Yuki; Kato, Yuto; Kai, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Takeo; Nishizawa, Matsuhiko

    2015-12-15

    A sheet-type, stretchable biofuel cell was developed by laminating three components: a bioanode textile for fructose oxidation, a hydrogel sheet containing fructose as fuel, and a gas-diffusion biocathode textile for oxygen reduction. The anode and cathode textiles were prepared by modifying carbon nanotube (CNT)-decorated stretchable textiles with fructose dehydrogenase (FDH) and bilirubin oxidase (BOD), respectively. Enzymatic reaction currents of anode and cathode textiles were stable for 30 cycles of 50% stretching, with initial loss of 20-30% in the first few cycles due to the partial breaking of the CNT network at the junction of textile fibers. The assembled laminate biofuel cell showed power of ~0.2 mW/cm(2) with 1.2 kΩ load, which was stable even at stretched, twisted, and wrapped forms. PMID:26257187

  19. Microencapsulated citronella oil for mosquito repellent finishing of cotton textiles.

    PubMed

    Specos, M M Miró; García, J J; Tornesello, J; Marino, P; Vecchia, M Della; Tesoriero, M V Defain; Hermida, L G

    2010-10-01

    Microcapsules containing citronella essential oil were prepared by complex coacervation and applied to cotton textiles in order to study the repellent efficacy of the obtained fabrics. Citronella released from treated textiles was indirectly monitored by the extractable content of its main components. Repellent activity was assessed by exposure of a human hand and arm covered with the treated textiles to Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Fabrics treated with microencapsulated citronella presented a higher and longer lasting protection from insects compared to fabrics sprayed with an ethanol solution of the essential oil, assuring a repellent effect higher than 90% for three weeks. Complex coacervation is a simple, low cost, scalable and reproducible method of obtaining encapsulated essential oils for textile application. Repellent textiles were achieved by padding cotton fabrics with microcapsules slurries using a conventional pad-dry method. This methodology requires no additional investment for textile finishing industries, which is a desirable factor in developing countries. PMID:20673937

  20. Failure Mechanisms for Ceramic Matrix Textile Composites at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Brian

    1999-03-01

    OAK B188 Failure Mechanisms for Ceramic Matrix Textile Composites at High Temperature. This summary refers to work done in approximately the twelve months to the present in our contract ''Failure Mechanisms for Ceramic Matrix Textile Composites at High Temperature,'' which commenced in August, 1997. Our activities have consisted mainly of measurements of creep-controlled crack growth in ceramic matrix composites (CMCS) at high temperature; imaging of deformation fields in textile CMCS; the assessment of mechanisms of damage in textile composites, especially those with through-thickness reinforcement; the formulation of models of delamination crack growth under fatigue in textile composites; analytical models of the bridging traction law for creeping fibers in a CMC at high temperature; and an analytical model of a bridging fiber tow in a textile composite.