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Sample records for internet medical document

  1. A Model for Enhancing Internet Medical Document Retrieval with “Medical Core Metadata”

    PubMed Central

    Malet, Gary; Munoz, Felix; Appleyard, Richard; Hersh, William

    1999-01-01

    Objective: Finding documents on the World Wide Web relevant to a specific medical information need can be difficult. The goal of this work is to define a set of document content description tags, or metadata encodings, that can be used to promote disciplined search access to Internet medical documents. Design: The authors based their approach on a proposed metadata standard, the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set, which has recently been submitted to the Internet Engineering Task Force. Their model also incorporates the National Library of Medicine's Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) vocabulary and Medline-type content descriptions. Results: The model defines a medical core metadata set that can be used to describe the metadata for a wide variety of Internet documents. Conclusions: The authors propose that their medical core metadata set be used to assign metadata to medical documents to facilitate document retrieval by Internet search engines. PMID:10094069

  2. Document Delivery over the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Mary E.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses three innovative Internet-based electronic document delivery systems: Ariel, developed by the Research Libraries Group; Digitized Document Transmission Project, developed by North Carolina State University; and Network Fax Project, developed by Ohio State University. System are compared in terms of equipment, operation, advantages and…

  3. Ariel on the Internet: Enhanced Document Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Valerie M.; Palmer, Eileen M.

    1993-01-01

    Compares the use of a telefacsimile network and the Internet-based software, Ariel, for interlibrary loan document delivery in the Health Sciences Libraries Consortium. Topics discussed include document processing efficiency, impact of the Ariel workstations on interlibrary loan procedures, interlibrary loan policies, and possible prototype…

  4. Developing a BI Program for Medical Resources on Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hongjie

    This document describes a bibliographic instruction (BI) course on accessing medical resources on the Internet through discussion lists and Gopher that consisted of short sessions taught biweekly each semester at the University of Vermont medical library. The introduction lists the rationale for starting the program; principles for teaching the…

  5. Verifiable and Redactable Medical Documents

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jordan; Blough, Douglas M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers how to verify provenance and integrity of data in medical documents that are exchanged in a distributed system of health IT services. Provenance refers to the sources of health information within the document and integrity means that the information was not modified after generation by the source. Our approach allows intermediate parties to redact the document by removing information that they do not wish to reveal. For example, patients can store verifiable health information and provide subsets of it to third parties, while redacting sensitive information that they do not wish employers, insurers, or others to receive. Our method uses a cryptographic primitive known as a redactable signature. We study practical issues and performance impacts of building, redacting, and verifying Continuity of Care Documents (CCDs) that are protected with redactable signatures. Results show that manipulating redactable CCDs provides superior security and privacy with little computational overhead. PMID:23304391

  6. Electronic document delivery using the Internet.

    PubMed

    Bennett, V M; Palmer, E M

    1994-04-01

    The Health Sciences Libraries Consortium (HSLC) was established in 1985 by thirteen founding member institutions in Pennsylvania and Delaware. In 1989, the Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery, and Union List Task Force, appointed by the HSLC Board of Directors, successfully demonstrated the feasibility of supplying 94% of all interlibrary loan (ILL) photocopy requests in forty-eight hours or less by a network application of group 3-level memory telefacsimiles. However, the expenses associated with the telefacsimile operation and the limitations associated with network polling protocols challenged participants to seek new alternatives for ILL. In 1990, the HSLC introduced HSLC HealthNET, an online wide-area network linking eleven of the thirteen institutions and their resources while providing access to the Internet. The HSLC HealthNET additionally supports a centralized shared library system, several locally mounted databases, and consortiumwide electronic mail. In 1991, a project was initiated to evaluate Ariel software, pioneered by the Research Libraries Group (RLG), compared to the existing network application of group 3-level telefacsimiles. Factors identified as critical to Ariel's potential to replace the telefacsimile network were the proprietary software specifications for Internet access, the use of HSLC's existing wide-area network (WAN), and a hardware platform that was optimal for an ILL environment. This article describes the Ariel project history, the transition to Ariel from the telefacsimile network, evaluation of equipment features for processing efficiency, and operational issues affecting ILL policy. PMID:8004018

  7. Electronic document delivery using the Internet.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, V M; Palmer, E M

    1994-01-01

    The Health Sciences Libraries Consortium (HSLC) was established in 1985 by thirteen founding member institutions in Pennsylvania and Delaware. In 1989, the Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery, and Union List Task Force, appointed by the HSLC Board of Directors, successfully demonstrated the feasibility of supplying 94% of all interlibrary loan (ILL) photocopy requests in forty-eight hours or less by a network application of group 3-level memory telefacsimiles. However, the expenses associated with the telefacsimile operation and the limitations associated with network polling protocols challenged participants to seek new alternatives for ILL. In 1990, the HSLC introduced HSLC HealthNET, an online wide-area network linking eleven of the thirteen institutions and their resources while providing access to the Internet. The HSLC HealthNET additionally supports a centralized shared library system, several locally mounted databases, and consortiumwide electronic mail. In 1991, a project was initiated to evaluate Ariel software, pioneered by the Research Libraries Group (RLG), compared to the existing network application of group 3-level telefacsimiles. Factors identified as critical to Ariel's potential to replace the telefacsimile network were the proprietary software specifications for Internet access, the use of HSLC's existing wide-area network (WAN), and a hardware platform that was optimal for an ILL environment. This article describes the Ariel project history, the transition to Ariel from the telefacsimile network, evaluation of equipment features for processing efficiency, and operational issues affecting ILL policy. PMID:8004018

  8. Medical internet ethics: a field in evolution.

    PubMed

    Dyer, K A; Thompson, C D

    2001-01-01

    As in any new field, the merger of medicine, e-commerce and the Internet raises many questions pertaining to ethical conduct. Key issues include defining the essence of the patient-provider relationship, establishing guidelines and training for practicing online medicine and therapy, setting standards for ethical online research, determining guidelines for providing quality healthcare information and requiring ethical conduct for medical and health websites. Physicians who follow their professional code of ethics are obligated not to exploit the relationship they have with patients, nor allow anyone else working with them to do so. Physicians and therapists are obligated to serve those who place trust in them for treatment, whether in face-to-face or online Internet encounters with patients or clients. This ethical responsibility to patients and clients is often in direct conflict with the business model of generating profits. Healthcare professionals involved in Medical Internet Ethics need to define the scope of competent medical and healthcare on the Internet. The emerging ethical issues facing medicine on the Internet, the current state of medical ethics on the Internet and questions for future directions of study in this evolving field are reviewed in this paper. PMID:11604935

  9. Medical group adoption of Internet services.

    PubMed

    Coye, M J; Jacks, G; Everett, W E; Akay, L

    2001-10-01

    Physician leaders and office-based practicing physicians in medium and large practice organizations were surveyed regarding their use of administrative and clinical systems enabled by the Internet. More than 85% of medical groups reported using one or more Internet-enabled services and 35 reported use of more than five Internet-enabled services, including both business and clinical applications. Physician leaders and practicing physicians identified six Internet-enabled services as "essential" for the future success of their practice and indicated that reduced administrative costs, faster payments, and improved quality of care are the most important benefits derived from Internet-enabled applications. Ninety-six percent of survey respondents estimated that Internet-enabled technologies will have a significant, positive impact on the practice of medicine in general and will improve the quality of care before 2003. The lack of industrywide standards for health information and the inability of current computer systems to exchange information across health care delivery networks were cited as the most important barriers to the adoption of Internet-enabled applications by physicians. Respondents believed that action by the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) or major health plans to require participating physicians to use the Internet for administrative services will be needed to bring about rapid migration to Internet-enabled services. PMID:11680240

  10. Creating your own medical Internet library

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, A

    1999-01-01

    Many physicians struggle to keep up with new developments in their fields. The internet can provide a solution to this problem by allowing rapid access to a broad spectrum of reliable information. Becoming familiar with a few clinically relevant and freely available medical resources on the World Wide Web may enhance a physician's efforts to provide evidence-based care on a daily basis. This article outlines a simple strategy for physicians to make the internet a useful tool. PMID:10569106

  11. Obtaining medical information from the Internet.

    PubMed

    Klemenz, B; McSherry, D

    1997-01-01

    The Internet is rapidly expanding as an environment for electronic communication and resource sharing. The World Wide Web, a relatively new service on the Internet, provides access to a wealth of information resources through a simple point-and-click interface. Available resources of interest to physicians include bibliographical and statistical databases, literature reviews, discussion groups, press releases, newsletters, drug information, self-assessment questionnaires, multimedia textbooks, patient simulations, clinical decision aids, educational software, and much more. Access to the Internet is widely available in universities and medical libraries; physicians working at home can gain access from a personal computer linked by a modem to a telephone line, by subscribing to an Internet service provider. PMID:9263971

  12. Internet Search Engines - Fluctuations in Document Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mettrop, Wouter; Nieuwenhuysen, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Reports an empirical investigation of the consistency of retrieval through Internet search engines. Evaluates 13 engines: AltaVista, EuroFerret, Excite, HotBot, InfoSeek, Lycos, MSN, NorthernLight, Snap, WebCrawler, and three national Dutch engines: Ilse, Search.nl and Vindex. The focus is on a characteristic related to size: the degree of…

  13. [Medical research using Internet questionnaire in Japan].

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Hideo; Ide, Hiroo; Imamura, Tomoaki; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2006-01-01

    As the method for questionnaire studies, mail survey and interview survey are frequently used. The utility and validity of applying the Internet method to medical studies have yet to be fully evaluated. For the present investigation, we reviewed 36 Japanese original articles using Internet questionnaire reported through to April 2005. Although original papers using the Internet method have been increasing in recent years, they are still limited in number. There is comparatively much research on disease with many patients in youth and early manhood, such as allergic ailments (allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and hives). As compared with conventional methods, the advantages of the Internet approach are convenience for both investigators and respondents and the ability to quickly collect data. The disadvantage is that the user's age range is more concentrated. Since samples are extracted from individuals who are registered as monitors, a greater sampling error may occur as compared with a random sampling method. However, it is to be expected that continued explosive growth of the Internet would decrease the limitation in user's age. If more elderly people participate in questionnaire studies using the web, research into more illnesses should be facilitated. Considering the inherent advantage, it is thought that Internet method can become the leading tool for sociomedical and clinical research in the near future. PMID:16502854

  14. Secured medical imaging over the Internet.

    PubMed

    Aslan, P; Lee, B; Kuo, R; Babayan, R K; Kavoussi, L R; Pavlin, K A; Preminger, G M

    1998-01-01

    The Internet has established itself as an affordable, extremely viable and ubiquitous communications network that can be easily accessed from virtually any point in the world. This makes it ideally suited for medical image communications. Issues regarding security and confidentiality of information on the Internet, however, need to be addressed for both occasional, individual users and consistent enterprise-wide users. In addition, the limited bandwidth of most Internet connections must be factored into the development of a realistic usermodel and resulting protocol. Open architecture issues must also be considered so that images can be communicated to recipients who do not have similar programs. Further, application-specific software is required to integrate image acquisition, encryption and transmission into a single, streamlined process. Using Photomailer software provided by PhysiTel Inc., the authors investigated the use of sending secured still images over the Internet. The scope of their investigation covered the use of the Internet for communicating images for consultation, referral, mentoring and education. Photomailer software was used at several local and remote sites. The program was used for both sending and receiving images. It was also used for sending images to recipients who did not have Photomailer, but instead relied on conventional email programs. The results of the investigation demonstrated that using products such as Photomailer, images could be quickly and easily communicated from one location to another via the Internet. In addition, the investigators were able to retrieve images off of their existing email accounts, thereby providing greater flexibility and convenience than other systems which require scheduled transmission of information on dedicated systems. We conclude that Photomailer and similar products may provide a significant benefit and improve communications among colleagues, providing an inexpensive means of sending secured

  15. An automatic indexing method for medical documents.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes MetaIndex, an automatic indexing program that creates symbolic representations of documents for the purpose of document retrieval. MetaIndex uses a simple transition network parser to recognize a language that is derived from the set of main concepts in the Unified Medical Language System Metathesaurus (Meta-1). MetaIndex uses a hierarchy of medical concepts, also derived from Meta-1, to represent the content of documents. The goal of this approach is to improve document retrieval performance by better representation of documents. An evaluation method is described, and the performance of MetaIndex on the task of indexing the Slice of Life medical image collection is reported. PMID:1807564

  16. Internet addiction and its determinants among medical students

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Bhushan; Menon, Preethi; Saldanha, Daniel; Tewari, Abhinav; Bhattacharya, Labhanya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Exponential use of internet has resulted in internet addiction in recent times. Students are particularly at risk because of their unique personal, social, and academic needs. Objectives: The study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of internet addiction and its determinants among medical students. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 282 medical students with the help of semi-structured questionnaire consisting of questions related to demographic information, information related to internet use, and Young's internet addiction test. Results: We found prevalence of internet addiction among medical students to be 58.87% (mild – 51.42%, moderate –7.45%) and significantly associated factors with internet addiction being male gender, staying in private accommodation, lesser age of first internet use, using mobile for internet access, higher expenditure on internet, staying online for longer time, and using internet for social networking, online videos, and watching website with sexual content. Conclusion: Medical students are vulnerable for internet addiction and efforts should be taken to increase awareness and prevent the problem of internet addiction in them. PMID:27212820

  17. Internet-Based Reference Services in Medical Libraries: A Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandyopadhyay, Aditi

    1997-01-01

    This study examines different applications of Internet (e-mail, Telnet, File Transfer Protocol, Gopher, World Wide Web) in medical library settings, emphasizing reference services. Discusses the role of the Internet in fulfilling National Network of Libraries of Medicine's objectives and analyzes the merits of using the Internet as a reference…

  18. [Optimizing performance documentation in gynecology--assistance from the internet].

    PubMed

    Woernle, F; Seufert, R; Brockerhoff, P; Lellé, R J

    1999-01-01

    The documentation of operations in the field of gynecology and obstetrics is regulated by social laws in Germany. Only by optimal encoding of diagnoses and procedures an efficient cashing with the health insurance's can be achieved. This requires profound knowledge of the invoice modalities and usually support by computer systems. The Internet offers in this respect some assistance, which in the following is pointed out and evaluated critically. PMID:10573827

  19. 42 CFR 130.20 - Form of medical documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Form of medical documentation. 130.20 Section 130... Form of medical documentation. In all instances in which medical documentation is referred to, medical documentation may be submitted in the following forms: (a) Copies of relevant portions of medical...

  20. [Integration of the Internet into medical education].

    PubMed

    Taradi, Suncana Kukolja

    2002-01-01

    The Internet promises dramatic changes in the way we learn and teach, the way we interact as a society. Networked technologies introduce interactivity and multimedia into the educational process. The student of the 21st century will use his/her PC as a learning station, as a tutoring system, as an information provider and as a communication center. Therefore the passive classroom (teacher-centered teaching) will evolve into active studio learning (student-centered learning). This will be achieved by new teaching techniques and standards of quality. The role of the new generation of educators is to create exploratory learning environments that offer a wide range of views on many subject areas and encourage active lifelong learning. This will be achieved by 1) placing courseware on the web where it can be accessed by remote students and by 2) finding and reviewing teaching materials obtained from www for possible integration into the local lecture material. The paper suggests strategies for introducing medical educators to networked teaching. PMID:12038098

  1. Exchanging Medical Information with Eastern Europe through the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Julie K.; Cronje, Ruth J.; Sokolowski, Beth C.

    1998-01-01

    Interviews foreign Information Coordinators who facilitate exchange of medical information over the Internet between healthcare providers in America and eastern Europe to learn how Internet technologies are being introduced, disseminated, and adopted in their institutions. Applies diffusion of innovations theory for interpretation. Shows technical…

  2. [The Traceability Management for Qualification Documents of Medical Instruments].

    PubMed

    Tang, Guoping; Hu, Liang; Xu, Xia; Fang, Zhiqiang; Hu, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The management for qualification documents of medical instruments is very important work to management department of medical instruments. Because the number of qualification documents of medical instruments is very large and they have an expiry date, it is difficult to manage them. This article discussed how to manage qualification documents of medical instruments, and an information management system that has a function of traceability management has been developed. This information management system standardizes management for qualification documents of medical instruments, and ensures that qualification documents of medical instruments are available and can be traced. Besides, it can reduce the amount of work for medical instruments management. PMID:27197505

  3. Drugs on the Internet, part II: antidepressant medication web sites.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Melissa; Montagne, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Antidepressant medications have been the fastest growing category of use of pharmaceutical products over the past decade. Selected Internet web sites providing information on antidepressant medications were identified and assessed using code of conduct criteria for posting health information on the Internet as developed by the Health on the Internet Foundation. Thirteen representative web sites were evaluated. Degree of compliance with each of the eight criterion varied by site, though all 13 sites met the criterion for legality of content and conduct on their web site. WebMD and FamilyDoctor.org met most of the criteria, while pharmaceutical company sites tended to meet the fewest criteria. PMID:21895517

  4. Prescription medication abuse and illegitimate internet-based pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Jena, Anupam B; Goldman, Dana P; Foster, Susan E; Califano, Joseph A

    2011-12-20

    Abuse of controlled prescription medications in the United States exceeds that of all illicit drugs combined except marijuana and has grown considerably in the past decade. Although available through traditional channels, controlled prescription medications can also be purchased on the Internet without a prescription. This issue has gained the attention of federal regulators, law enforcement, and the media, but physician awareness of the problem is scarce. This article describes the nature of the problem and its magnitude, discusses the challenges to federal and private efforts to combat illegitimate online pharmacies, and outlines strategies for physicians to recognize and minimize the unwarranted effects of the availability of these medications on the Internet. PMID:22184692

  5. [Documented nursing diagnoses for medical clinic patients].

    PubMed

    Fontes, Cassiana Mendes Bertoncello; da Cruz, Diná Almeida Lopes Monteiro

    2007-09-01

    This paper reports a descriptive study, based on nursing records, of nursing diagnoses documented three months after the implementation of the NANDA-I classification at the University of São Paulo's Hospital Universitário (HU-USP) and proposes outcomes and interventions for the 3 most frequent diagnoses. The convenience sample (34% of the month's admissions) consisted of 30 charts of patients admitted in the Medical Clinic in August of 2004 (60% female, average age 60.9 +/- 23.1 years, mean length of stay = 5.8 +/- 2.7 days). The diagnoses documented on the admission day were manually transcribed from the charts and analyzed according to their frequency. There were 144 diagnoses (31 categories), with an average of 4.8 +/- 4.0 diagnoses per patient (range = 1-10). The most frequent were: acute pain (66.7%), impaired tissue integrity (63.3%), ineffective airway clearance (43.3%), risk of impaired skin integrity (36.7%), and impaired skin integrity (33.3%). The proposed outcomes and interventions are presented. PMID:17977375

  6. Simulated Medical Learning Environments on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Dev, Parvati; Montgomery, Kevin; Senger, Steven; Heinrichs, W. Leroy; Srivastava, Sakti; Waldron, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    Learning anatomy and surgical procedures requires both a conceptual understanding of three-dimensional anatomy and a hands-on manipulation of tools and tissue. Such virtual resources are not available widely, are expensive, and may be culturally disallowed. Simulation technology, using high-performance computers and graphics, permits realistic real-time display of anatomy. Haptics technology supports the ability to probe and feel this virtual anatomy through the use of virtual tools. The Internet permits world-wide access to resources. We have brought together high-performance servers and high-bandwidth communication using the Next Generation Internet and complex bimanual haptics to simulate a tool-based learning environment for wide use. This article presents the technologic basis of this environment and some evaluation of its use in the gross anatomy course at Stanford University. PMID:12223496

  7. Trends in medical information retrieval on Internet.

    PubMed

    Baujard, O; Baujard, V; Aurel, S; Boyer, C; Appel, R D

    1998-09-01

    Information on the World Wide Web is unstructured, distributed, multimedia and multilingual. Many tools have been developed to help users search for useful information: subject hierarchies, general search engines, browsers and search assistants. Although helpful, they present serious limitations, mainly in terms of precision, multilingual indexing and distribution. In this paper, we cover some on-line solutions to medical information discovery and present our own approach, the MARVIN (multi-agent retrieval vagabond on information network) project, which tackles medical information research with specialized cooperative retrieval agents. We also draw some outlines for future extensions. PMID:9861514

  8. Wireless Internet Information System for Medical Response in Disasters (WIISARD)

    PubMed Central

    Lenert, Leslie; Chan, Theodore C.; Griswold, William; Killeen, James; Palmer, Douglas; Kirsh, David; Mishra, Rajesh; Rao, Ramesh

    2006-01-01

    The Wireless Internet Information System for Medical Response in Disasters (WIISARD) explores the use of scalable wireless networks to facilitate medical care at the site of a disaster. The focus of the project is care of victims of industrial accidents or terrorist attacks with traumatic injuries complicated by chemical, biological or radiological contamination. We report on developments of new architectures for mesh networks, RFID tracking and telemetry, mobile collaborative work, and command and control informed by deployments in large-scale exercises with the San Diego Regional Metropolitan Medical Strike Team.

  9. An Experimental Study in Automatically Categorizing Medical Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribeiro-Neto, Berthier; Laender, Alberto H. F.; de Lima, Luciano R. S.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluates the retrieval performance of an algorithm that automatically categorizes medical documents, which consists in assigning an International Code of Disease (ICD) based on well-known information retrieval techniques. Reports on experimental results that tested precision using a database of over 20,000 medical documents. (Author/LRW)

  10. Navigation in medical Internet image databases.

    PubMed

    Frankewitsch, T; Prokosch, U

    2001-01-01

    The world wide web (WWW) changes common ideas of database access. Hypertext Markup Language allows the simultaneous presentation of information from different sources such as static pages, results of queries from) databases or dynamically generated pages. 'Therefore, the metaphor of the WWW itself as a database was proposed by Mendelzon and Nlilo in 1998. Against this background the techniques of navigation within WWW-databases and the semantic types of their queries has e been analysed. Forty eight image repositories of different types and content, but all concerning medical essence, have been found by search-engines. Many different techniques are offered to enable navigation ranging from simple HTML-link-lists to complex applets. The applets in particular promise an improvement for navigation. Within the meta-information for querying, only ACR- and UMLS-encoding were found, but not standardized vocabularies like ICD10 or Terminologia Anatomica. UMLS especially shows that a well defined thesaurus can improve navigation. However, of the analysed databases only the UMLS 'metathesaurus' is currently implemented without providing additional navigation support based on the UMLS 'semantic network'. Including the information about relationships between the concepts of the metathesaurus or using the UMLS semantic network could provide a much easier navigation within a network of concepts pointing to multimedia files stored somewhere in the WWW. PMID:11583404

  11. [Cardiology online: impact and pitfalls of Internet medical news].

    PubMed

    Wood, Shelley M; Topol, Eric J

    2012-01-01

    Twenty years ago, the main sources for physicians seeking information on new procedures, drugs, or devices were meetings and medical journals. The dawn of the Internet radically transformed how news and information is delivered and absorbed, beginning with the launch of online journals back in the mid-1990s. A decade and a half later, physicians can learn about new innovations the moment they are made public, and they can get that news from their phones and tablets, their Twitter or Facebook accounts, or via their favorite blog or medical news web site. Along with the clear advantages of accessing new medical information any time of day comes the need for physicians to be aware of the pitfalls of online medical content and to have a heightened sense of responsibility when it comes to integrating information gleaned online into their medical practices. PMID:22322467

  12. Managing Medical System Development Through Documentation

    PubMed Central

    Hanmer, Jean

    1980-01-01

    Health Care administrators managing a computer system development project need tools to control the project. This paper describes the concept of management control, its purpose and techniques for exercising it. Preparation of system documentation provides a vehicle for management control which can guide the behavior of the contractor, the institution's managers and staff. Techniques for managing and reviewing documentation in a management control framework are presented.

  13. [LaMedica. The medical education academy on the internet].

    PubMed

    Melamed, R J; Friedl, R; Engl, T; Lanwert, S; Preisack, M B; Jonas, D; Bickeböller, R

    2002-01-01

    At present, "modern media" are still a novelty in medical education. The "LaMedica Project"--a program supported by the Federal Ministry for Education and Research--intends to provide an Internet-based education and training system for the entire field of medicine, using all available media resources. This online educational program will provide subjects for medical laypersons as well as medical experts. Various styles of learning and different learning requests will be promoted. The project presented mirrors the cutting edge of database technology, computer-based training and media didactics, critical content processing as well as supplying individual subjects. This report summarizes our 10 months of experience with this program at the Department for Urology and Pediatric Urology of the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University of Frankfurt Main. PMID:11963770

  14. 42 CFR 130.20 - Form of medical documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Form of medical documentation. 130.20 Section 130.20 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Documentation Required for Complete Petitions §...

  15. 42 CFR 130.20 - Form of medical documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Form of medical documentation. 130.20 Section 130.20 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Documentation Required for Complete Petitions §...

  16. 42 CFR 130.20 - Form of medical documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Form of medical documentation. 130.20 Section 130.20 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Documentation Required for Complete Petitions §...

  17. 42 CFR 130.20 - Form of medical documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Form of medical documentation. 130.20 Section 130.20 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Documentation Required for Complete Petitions §...

  18. Medical Device Integration Model Based on the Internet of Things

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Aiyu; Wang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    At present, hospitals in our country have basically established the HIS system, which manages registration, treatment, and charge, among many others, of patients. During treatment, patients need to use medical devices repeatedly to acquire all sorts of inspection data. Currently, the output data of the medical devices are often manually input into information system, which is easy to get wrong or easy to cause mismatches between inspection reports and patients. For some small hospitals of which information construction is still relatively weak, the information generated by the devices is still presented in the form of paper reports. When doctors or patients want to have access to the data at a given time again, they can only look at the paper files. Data integration between medical devices has long been a difficult problem for the medical information system, because the data from medical devices are lack of mandatory unified global standards and have outstanding heterogeneity of devices. In order to protect their own interests, manufacturers use special protocols, etc., thus causing medical decices to still be the "lonely island" of hospital information system. Besides, unfocused application of the data will lead to failure to achieve a reasonable distribution of medical resources. With the deepening of IT construction in hospitals, medical information systems will be bound to develop towards mobile applications, intelligent analysis, and interconnection and interworking, on the premise that there is an effective medical device integration (MDI) technology. To this end, this paper presents a MDI model based on the Internet of Things (IoT). Through abstract classification, this model is able to extract the common characteristics of the devices, resolve the heterogeneous differences between them, and employ a unified protocol to integrate data between devices. And by the IoT technology, it realizes interconnection network of devices and conducts associate matching

  19. Medical Device Integration Model Based on the Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Hao, Aiyu; Wang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    At present, hospitals in our country have basically established the HIS system, which manages registration, treatment, and charge, among many others, of patients. During treatment, patients need to use medical devices repeatedly to acquire all sorts of inspection data. Currently, the output data of the medical devices are often manually input into information system, which is easy to get wrong or easy to cause mismatches between inspection reports and patients. For some small hospitals of which information construction is still relatively weak, the information generated by the devices is still presented in the form of paper reports. When doctors or patients want to have access to the data at a given time again, they can only look at the paper files. Data integration between medical devices has long been a difficult problem for the medical information system, because the data from medical devices are lack of mandatory unified global standards and have outstanding heterogeneity of devices. In order to protect their own interests, manufacturers use special protocols, etc., thus causing medical decices to still be the "lonely island" of hospital information system. Besides, unfocused application of the data will lead to failure to achieve a reasonable distribution of medical resources. With the deepening of IT construction in hospitals, medical information systems will be bound to develop towards mobile applications, intelligent analysis, and interconnection and interworking, on the premise that there is an effective medical device integration (MDI) technology. To this end, this paper presents a MDI model based on the Internet of Things (IoT). Through abstract classification, this model is able to extract the common characteristics of the devices, resolve the heterogeneous differences between them, and employ a unified protocol to integrate data between devices. And by the IoT technology, it realizes interconnection network of devices and conducts associate matching

  20. Medical emergencies on board commercial airlines: is documentation as expected?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to perform a descriptive, content-based analysis on the different forms of documentation for in-flight medical emergencies that are currently provided in the emergency medical kits on board commercial airlines. Methods Passenger airlines in the World Airline Directory were contacted between March and May 2011. For each participating airline, sample in-flight medical emergency documentation forms were obtained. All items in the sample documentation forms were subjected to a descriptive analysis and compared to a sample "medical incident report" form published by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). Results A total of 1,318 airlines were contacted. Ten airlines agreed to participate in the study and provided a copy of their documentation forms. A descriptive analysis revealed a total of 199 different items, which were summarized into five sub-categories: non-medical data (63), signs and symptoms (68), diagnosis (26), treatment (22) and outcome (20). Conclusions The data in this study illustrate a large variation in the documentation of in-flight medical emergencies by different airlines. A higher degree of standardization is preferable to increase the data quality in epidemiologic aeromedical research in the future. PMID:22397530

  1. 28 CFR 79.5 - Requirements for medical documentation, contemporaneous records, and other records or documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Requirements for medical documentation, contemporaneous records, and other records or documents. 79.5 Section 79.5 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT General § 79.5 Requirements...

  2. 28 CFR 79.5 - Requirements for medical documentation, contemporaneous records, and other records or documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Requirements for medical documentation, contemporaneous records, and other records or documents. 79.5 Section 79.5 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT General § 79.5 Requirements...

  3. 28 CFR 79.5 - Requirements for medical documentation, contemporaneous records, and other records or documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requirements for medical documentation, contemporaneous records, and other records or documents. 79.5 Section 79.5 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT General § 79.5 Requirements...

  4. 28 CFR 79.5 - Requirements for medical documentation, contemporaneous records, and other records or documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requirements for medical documentation, contemporaneous records, and other records or documents. 79.5 Section 79.5 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT General § 79.5 Requirements...

  5. Easy Medic: an Internet application for the general practitioner.

    PubMed

    Arnone, G; Bianchi, A; Della Pietra, B; Sernicola, R; Sparacino, E; Vitolo, R

    1998-01-01

    A research project has been carried out to develop a client server application which supplies the general practitioner (GP) with a 'personal digital assistant' (hand-held mobile computer) to connect to Web servers at a hospital site through the Internet. This allows the doctor to book medical examinations, hospital admissions and manage patient data. The application used advanced object-oriented techniques, on both the client and the server side. The connection to a Web server was achieved through GSM wireless cellular telephones using standard Internet protocols (HTTP, TCP/IP and CGI). Conventional telephone lines can be used as well. Other application modules on the client side provided patients medical record supervision, GP schedule management, general information about hospitals and clinics, and pharmacy consultation. These services should help GPs in their daily work. Moreover, the quality of health-care resource management and cost supervision should improve, since each GP 'transaction' is automatically entered in realtime into a database at the server. The services are under test in the health-care system of an urban area in southern Italy. PMID:9640752

  6. Combination of visual and textual similarity retrieval from medical documents.

    PubMed

    Eggel, Ivan; Müller, Henning

    2009-01-01

    Medical visual information retrieval has been an active research area over the past ten years as an increasing amount of images are produced digitally and have become available in patient records, scientific literature, and other medical documents. Most visual retrieval systems concentrate on images only, but it has become apparent that the retrieval of similar images alone is of limited interest, and rather the retrieval of similar documents is an important domain. Most medical institutions as well as the World Health Organization (WHO) produce many complex documents. Searching them, including a visual search, can help finding important information and also facilitates the reuse of document content and images. The work described in this paper is based on a proposal of the WHO that produces large amounts of documents from studies but also for training. The majority of these documents are in complex formats such as PDF, Microsoft Word, Excel, or PowerPoint. Goal is to create an information retrieval system that allows easy addition of documents and search by keywords and visual content. For text retrieval, Lucene is used and for image retrieval the GNU Image Finding Tool (GIFT). A Web 2.0 interface allows for an easy upload as well as simple searching. PMID:19745431

  7. How are our medical students using the computer and internet? A study from a medical college of north India

    PubMed Central

    Maroof, Khan Amir; Parashar, Pawan; Bansal, Rahul

    2012-01-01

    Background: In today's world, use of Internet has become indispensable. Medical students have much to gain from the Internet technology that has revolutionized the medical field. There is a very rapid change in the way communication technology is being handled and our medical students should also be ready to embrace it. Very few studies have been done on this topic in India. The aim was to find out the knowledge, practice, and barriers of Internet use among the medical undergraduates of Subharti Medical College, Meerut. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among the MBBS students belonging to the first, second, third, and fourth years of their course during August to October 2009. A pretested questionnaire was used collecting information on their Internet usage patterns, knowledge about information technology, and barriers to using it. Data were entered in Microsoft Excel and appropriate statistical tests were applied for analysis. Results: The proportion of respondents having a laptop were more in cohort of students belonging to the admission year 2009 (65.8%) followed by 2008 (54.7%), 2007 (53.0%), and 2006 (38.0%), i.e., a gradual increase in newer cohorts. About half (57.4%) of the students had some sort of formal training in computer and Internet use. Knowledge about Internet was more among the junior cohorts compared to the senior cohorts (P<0.0001). Only about one-fifths of the respondents used Internet for searching literature for projects from medical journals on the Internet. Majority of the respondents accessed Internet for less than 3 hours per week. About one-tenth (8.0%) of the students felt that Internet is totally useless in medical field. The major barrier (54.4% of the respondents) to using Internet was lack of time. Conclusions: Further research should focus on designing and implementing computer and Internet training for medical students. PMID:23271853

  8. A classification of errors in lay comprehension of medical documents

    PubMed Central

    Keselman, Alla; Smith, Catherine Arnott

    2012-01-01

    Emphasis on participatory medicine requires that patients and consumers participate in tasks traditionally reserved for healthcare providers. This includes reading and comprehending medical documents, often but not necessarily in the context of interacting with Personal Health Records (PHRs). Research suggests that while giving patients access to medical documents has many benefits (e.g., improved patient-provider communication), lay people often have difficulty understanding medical information. Informatics can address the problem by developing tools that support comprehension; this requires in-depth understanding of the nature and causes of errors that lay people make when comprehending clinical documents. The objective of this study was to develop a classification scheme of comprehension errors, based on lay individuals’ retellings of two documents containing clinical text: a description of a clinical trial and a typical office visit note. While not comprehensive, the scheme can serve as a foundation of further development of a taxonomy of patients’ comprehension errors. Eighty participants, all healthy volunteers, read and retold two medical documents. A data-driven content analysis procedure was used to extract and classify retelling errors. The resulting hierarchical classification scheme contains nine categories and twenty-three subcategories. The most common error made by the participants involved incorrectly recalling brand names of medications. Other common errors included misunderstanding clinical concepts, misreporting the objective of a clinical research study and physician’s findings during a patient’s visit, and confusing and misspelling clinical terms. A combination of informatics support and health education is likely to improve the accuracy of lay comprehension of medical documents. PMID:22925723

  9. Computer program and user documentation medical data tape retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J.

    1971-01-01

    This volume provides several levels of documentation for the program module of the NASA medical directorate mini-computer storage and retrieval system. A biomedical information system overview describes some of the reasons for the development of the mini-computer storage and retrieval system. It briefly outlines all of the program modules which constitute the system.

  10. Exploiting domain information for Word Sense Disambiguation of medical documents

    PubMed Central

    Agirre, Eneko; Soroa, Aitor

    2011-01-01

    Objective Current techniques for knowledge-based Word Sense Disambiguation (WSD) of ambiguous biomedical terms rely on relations in the Unified Medical Language System Metathesaurus but do not take into account the domain of the target documents. The authors' goal is to improve these methods by using information about the topic of the document in which the ambiguous term appears. Design The authors proposed and implemented several methods to extract lists of key terms associated with Medical Subject Heading terms. These key terms are used to represent the document topic in a knowledge-based WSD system. They are applied both alone and in combination with local context. Measurements A standard measure of accuracy was calculated over the set of target words in the widely used National Library of Medicine WSD dataset. Results and discussion The authors report a significant improvement when combining those key terms with local context, showing that domain information improves the results of a WSD system based on the Unified Medical Language System Metathesaurus alone. The best results were obtained using key terms obtained by relevance feedback and weighted by inverse document frequency. PMID:21900701

  11. Medical Internet of Things and Big Data in Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A number of technologies can reduce overall costs for the prevention or management of chronic illnesses. These include devices that constantly monitor health indicators, devices that auto-administer therapies, or devices that track real-time health data when a patient self-administers a therapy. Because they have increased access to high-speed Internet and smartphones, many patients have started to use mobile applications (apps) to manage various health needs. These devices and mobile apps are now increasingly used and integrated with telemedicine and telehealth via the medical Internet of Things (mIoT). This paper reviews mIoT and big data in healthcare fields. Methods mIoT is a critical piece of the digital transformation of healthcare, as it allows new business models to emerge and enables changes in work processes, productivity improvements, cost containment and enhanced customer experiences. Results Wearables and mobile apps today support fitness, health education, symptom tracking, and collaborative disease management and care coordination. All those platform analytics can raise the relevancy of data interpretations, reducing the amount of time that end users spend piecing together data outputs. Insights gained from big data analysis will drive the digital disruption of the healthcare world, business processes and real-time decision-making. Conclusions A new category of "personalised preventative health coaches" (Digital Health Advisors) will emerge. These workers will possess the skills and the ability to interpret and understand health and well-being data. They will help their clients avoid chronic and diet-related illness, improve cognitive function, achieve improved mental health and achieve improved lifestyles overall. As the global population ages, such roles will become increasingly important. PMID:27525156

  12. Documentation of Nursing Practice Using a Computerized Medical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Carol

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses a definition of the content of the computerized nursing data base developed by the Nursing Department for the Clinical Center Medical Information System at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. The author describes the theoretical framework for the content and presents a model to describe the organization of the nursing data components in relation to the process of nursing care delivery. Nursing documentation requirements of Nurse Practice Acts, American Nurses Association Standards of Practice and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals are also addressed as they relate to this data base. The advantages and disadvantages of such an approach to computerized documentation are discussed.

  13. Evaluation of internet access and utilization by medical students in Lahore, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The internet is increasingly being used worldwide in imparting medical education and improving its delivery. It has become an important tool for healthcare professionals training but the data on its use by medical students in developing countries is lacking with no study on the subject from Pakistan. This study was, therefore, carried out with an aim to evaluate the pattern of internet access and utilization by medical students in Pakistan. Methods A structured pre-tested questionnaire was administered to a group of 750 medical students in clinical years studying at various public and private medical colleges in Lahore. The questions were related to patterns of internet access, purpose of use and self reported confidence in performing various internet related tasks, use of health related websites to supplement learning and the problems faced by students in using internet at the institution. Results A total of 532 medical students (70.9%) returned the questionnaire. The mean age of study participants was 21.04 years (SD 1.96 years). Majority of the respondents (84.0%) reported experience with internet use. About half of the students (42.1%) were using internet occasionally with 23.1%, 20.9% and 13.9% doing so frequently, regularly and rarely respectively. About two third of the students (61.0%) stated that they use internet for both academic and professional activities. Most of the participants preferred to use internet at home (70.5%). Self reported ability to search for required article from PubMed and PakMedinet was reported by only 34.0% of the entire sample. Students were moderately confident in performing various internet related tasks including downloading medical books from internet, searching internet for classification of diseases and downloading full text article. Health related websites were being accessed by 55.1% students to supplement their learning process. Lack of time, inadequate number of available computers and lack of support from

  14. A medical review approach to Medicare outpatient documentation.

    PubMed

    Allen, C; Foto, M; Moon-Sperling, T; Wilson, D

    1989-12-01

    Blue Cross of California has recognized the problem of reimbursement delays due to Medicare claims that have been returned or denied. The information in this article applies to the medical review process and suggests an interpretation of the new Medicare outpatient guidelines used by the Blue Cross of California Medicare reviewers. As a solution to the problem of delayed reimbursement, medical reviewers--who are also practicing occupational therapists--offer an explanation of the Medicare review process and suggestions for correcting technical billing errors. Methods for keeping complete and timely medical records are discussed, with the suggestion that clinicians follow these methods from the start of care. A process for documentation is presented that will clearly prove to the medical reviewer the need for the special skills of an occupational therapist. This article also proposes reasons for noncoverage because of insufficient medical necessity. It is important to note, however, that variance between fiscal intermediaries' interpretations and requirements exists nationwide. This article, therefore, represents only one fiscal intermediary's approach to reviewing claims and medical records. PMID:2694841

  15. Searching for information on the Internet using the UMLS and Medical World Search.

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, H. H.; Hao, X.; Chang, I. F.

    1997-01-01

    Medical World Search is a search engine for medical information on the Internet that distinguishes itself from other search engines by its built-in knowledge of medical terminology through its use of the National Library of Medicine's UMLS and its carefully selected but large database of medical sites. After discussing some of the previous uses of the UMLS for medical information retrieval, we describe the Medical World Search system. In October 1996, Medical World Search became operational on the World Wide Web at http:@www.mwsearch.poly.edu. It has been operating uninterrupted since then. We review our experiences with creating a search engine for medical information on the Internet and using the UMLS in this application. The UMLS has some clear advantages in this application. Some aspects of the UMLS also decrease its usefulness in information retrieval. Medical World Search's usage by medical information seekers is summarized. future directions for research are outlined. PMID:9357740

  16. Cardiovascular disease documentation and counseling in electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jaeyong; Huerta, Timothy R; Ford, Eric W

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between clinical reminders generated by electronic medical record (EMR) systems and providers giving prevention counseling to patients at-risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Data were extracted from the 2012 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS). Results indicate that the providers routinely using clinical reminders are significantly more likely to document height and weight data to determine risk and provide the recommended counseling to patients that merit the intervention. The findings are important for policymakers and managers that have been promoting the adoption of more sophisticated EMR decision support functionalities across the care delivery spectrum. In particular, the ability to intervene prior to negative health events is an important feature of the movement to improve care quality and reduce costs. PMID:27002255

  17. Computer Program and User Documentation Medical Data Input System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J.

    1971-01-01

    Several levels of documentation are presented for the program module of the NASA medical directorate minicomputer storage and retrieval system. The biomedical information system overview gives reasons for the development of the minicomputer storage and retrieval system. It briefly describes all of the program modules which constitute the system. A technical discussion oriented to the programmer is given. Each subroutine is described in enough detail to permit in-depth understanding of the routines and to facilitate program modifications. The program utilization section may be used as a users guide.

  18. Analysis of internet use behaviors among clinical medical students in China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The availability of internet-based information resources is increasing and the appropriate use of such resources is an important subject for clinical medical students. The aims of this study were to investigate the behaviors of clinical medical students regarding the use of internet-based activities, to analyze the behavior and characteristics of the students’ information demands, and to discuss the behaviors and time preferences related to internet use of students with different levels of education. Methods Librarians obtained real-time feedback from 999 clinical medical students to record online activities. The data was recorded in a standard form and then analyzed statistically. Results There were significant differences in the use of the internet for learning activities among the different groups of clinical medical students (P < 0.0001). Learning accounted for 73.5% of all internet use for doctoral candidates, 47.6% of internet use for master’s candidates, 28.7% of internet use for seven-year undergraduate students, and 14.1% of use for five-year undergraduate students. There was also a significant difference in the proportions of leisure and e-commerce activities among the student groups (P < 0.0001), with five-year students displaying the highest total proportion of these activities (59.4% and 18.8%). Internet use for entertainment activities was the same for all groups of clinical medical students. Time of day of internet use was consistent across all student groups, but internet use differed by day of the week (P < 0.01). There was no difference among the time of day of internet use for learning, leisure and entertainment activities during a single day (P > 0.05), but e-commerce activities varied according to time of day (P < 0.05). Learning and e-commerce activities by clinical medical students did not vary by day of the week (P > 0.05), but the distributions of leisure and entertainment activities were different

  19. Exploring the association of ego defense mechanisms with problematic internet use in a Pakistani medical school.

    PubMed

    Waqas, Ahmed; Rehman, Abdul; Malik, Aamenah; Aftab, Ramsha; Allah Yar, Aroosa; Allah Yar, Arooj; Rai, Aitzaz Bin Sultan

    2016-09-30

    The present study was designed to analyze association between problematic internet use and use of ego defense mechanisms in medical students. This cross-sectional study was undertaken at CMH Lahore Medical College (CMH LMC) in Lahore, Pakistan from 1st March, 2015 to 30th May, 2015. 522 medical and dental students were included in the study. The questionnaire consisted of three sections: a) demographic characteristics of respondent b) the Defense Style Questionnaire-40 (DSQ-40) and c) the Internet Addiction Test (IAT). All data were analyzed in SPSS v20. Chi square, Independent sample t test and One Way ANOVA were run to analyze association of different variables with scores on IAT. Multiple regression analysis was used to delineate ego defenses as predictors of problematic internet use. A total of 32 (6.1%) students reported severe problems with internet usage. Males had higher scores on IAT i.e had more problematic use of internet. Scores on internet addiction test (IAT) were negatively associated with sublimation and positively associated with projection, denial, autistic fantasy, passive aggression and displacement. There was a high prevalence of problematic use of internet among medical and dental students. It had significant associations with several defense mechanisms. PMID:27504797

  20. [The management of implantable medical device and the application of the internet of things in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Xu, Liang

    2011-11-01

    Implantable medical device is a special product which belongs to medical devices. It not only possesses product characteristics in common, but also has specificity for safety and effectiveness. Implantable medical device must be managed by the relevant laws and regulations of the State Food and Drug Administration. In this paper, we have used cardiac pacemakers as an example to describe the significance of the management of implantable medical device products and the application of the internet of things in hospitals. PMID:22379772

  1. Medical teleconference about thoracic surgery using free Internet software.

    PubMed

    Obuchi, Toshiro; Shiono, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Junichi; Kaga, Kichizo; Kurihara, Masatoshi; Iwasaki, Akinori

    2011-11-01

    Surgical teleconferences using advanced academic networks are becoming common; however, reports regarding Internet teleconferencing using free software packages such as Skype, USTREAM, and Dropbox are very rare. Teleconferences concerning mainly surgical techniques were held five times between Fukuoka University Hospital and other institutions from April to September 2010. These teleconferences used Skype and USTREAM as videophones to establish communication. Both PowerPoint presentations and surgical videos were made. These presentation files were previously sent to all stations via mail, e-mail, or Dropbox, and shared. A slide-show was simultaneously performed following the presenter's cue in each station. All teleconferences were successfully completed, even though there were minor instances of the Skype link being broken for unknown reasons during the telecommunication. Internet surgical teleconferences using ordinary software are therefore considered to be sufficiently feasible. This method will become more convenient and common as the Internet environments advance. PMID:21969167

  2. Introduction to an open source internet-based testing program for medical student examinations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Hwan

    2009-01-01

    The author developed a freely available open source internet-based testing program for medical examination. PHP and Java script were used as the programming language and postgreSQL as the database management system on an Apache web server and Linux operating system. The system approach was that a super user inputs the items, each school administrator inputs the examinees' information, and examinees access the system. The examinee's score is displayed immediately after examination with item analysis. The set-up of the system beginning with installation is described. This may help medical professors to easily adopt an internet-based testing system for medical education. PMID:20046457

  3. Computer and Internet Utilization among the Medical Students in Qassim University, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Aldebasi, Yousef Homood; Ahmed, Mohamed Issa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Computer-based training (CBT) and internet-based training (IBT) have become a vital part of the Medical Education. A cross-sectional study was carried out in Qassim University-Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), with the objective of assessing the pattern of the computer and Internet utilization among both male and female medical students. Methods: A total of 500 medical students from 4 different medical colleges of Qassim University participated in this study. A semi-structured, pre-tested questionnaire was used to collect the data and the data analysis was done by using SPSS, Version 17. Results: Forty two percent female and twenty four percent male students used computers to get general information, 80% of the students reported using computers for academic activities and 52% females and 22% males used computers for entertainment. Most of the females preferred using computers at home (84%), while 54% males used computers at cyber cafés. For the information retrieval, 84% males used the internet, followed by journals/library (36%) and textbooks (35%), while the females preferred textbooks (75%) and the internet (14%). Google was found to be most commonly used search engine. Conclusion: The internet creates an educational delivery system; it is highly needed to increase the credit hours for the university requirement courses in computer application and the internet use for both among the male and female students. PMID:23905114

  4. The Prevalence of Internet and Social Media Based Medication Information Seeking Behavior in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Bahkali, Salwa; Alfurih, Suha; Aldremly, Maha; Alzayyat, Ma'an; Alsurimi, Khaled; Househ, Mowafa

    2016-01-01

    The internet has become an important resource to help people search for online medication information. This study aims to report the prevalence and profile of Saudi online medication seeking behavior. Conducted via a web-based survey with Twitter participants between January-February, 2015, the primary outcome measures were the self-reported rates of using the internet to search for medication related information. A valid sample of 4847 participants was collected over the period of the study. Out of the total participants, 68.3% (n=3311) were found to seek online medication related information frequently. Most of the social media users were female 83.5% (n=2766). The majority of respondents 63.6% (n= 3081) used Google, followed by Twitter 28.7% (n= 1392), Snapchat 21%, (n=1019), WhatsApp 13.8% (n= 670), Instagram 11.4%, (n= 553), and Facebook 5.5 % (n= 267), with few searching YouTube 1.3% (n=65) to access online medication information. Findings indicate that the Saudi population actively uses the internet and social media to obtain medication information. Further studies are needed to explore the influence of the internet and social media on user perception, attitude, and behavior with the use of online medication information. PMID:27350524

  5. Internet-Based Medical Visit and Diagnosis for Common Medical Problems: Experience of First User Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Shevchik, Grant J.; Paone, Suzanne; Martich, G. Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective Internet-based medical visits, or “structured e-Visits,” allow patients to report symptoms and seek diagnosis and treatment from their doctor over a secure Web site, without calling or visiting the physician's office. While acceptability of e-Visits has been investigated, outcomes associated with e-Visits, that is, whether patients receiving diagnoses receive appropriate care or need to return to the doctor, remain unexplored. Materials and Methods: The first 156 e-Visit users from a large family medicine practice were surveyed regarding their experience with the e-Visit and e-Visit outcomes. In addition, medical records for patients making e-Visits were reviewed to examine need for follow-up care within 7 days. Results: Interviews were completed with 121 patients (77.6% participation). The most common type of e-Visit was for “other” symptoms or concerns (37%), followed by sinus/cold symptoms (35%). Back pain, urinary symptoms, cough, diarrhea, conjunctivitis, and vaginal irritation were each less frequent (<10%). A majority, 61% completed e-Visits with their own physician. The majority of patients (57.0%) reported receipt of a diagnosis without need for follow-up beyond a prescription; 75% of patients thought the e-Visit was as good as or better than an in-person visit, and only 11.6% felt that their concerns or questions were incompletely addressed. In a review of medical records, 16.9% had a follow-up visit within 7 days, mostly for the same condition. Four of these were on the same day as the e-Visit, including one emergency department visit. Conclusions: Outcomes for the e-Visit suggest that it is an appropriate and potentially cost-saving addition to in-person delivery of primary care. PMID:21457013

  6. Direct-to-consumer advertisements of prescription medications over the Internet.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Joshua; Novick, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This study sought data on the impact of direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertisements and both intentions and frequency to seek more information about the drug being advertised. Data were collected from 498 college students regarding intention to seek and how frequently they obtained more information about prescription medications. For intentions, grocery or pharmacy and radio advertisements were associated with lesser intentions. For frequency, Internet advertisements were associated, while newspaper and spam e-mail advertisements were not. Types of sources associated with seeking additional information were doctor, Internet, and 1-800 information numbers. A significant interaction existed for seeing Internet advertisements for drugs and then seeking additional information from a doctor and not from the Internet. In conclusion, Internet advertising is associated with seeking additional information from a reliable source such as a doctor. PMID:19916099

  7. Medical informatics on the Internet: creating the sci.med. informatics newsgroup.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, A M; Sittig, D F

    1995-01-01

    A Usenet newsgroup, sci.med.informatics, has been created to serve as an international electronic forum for discussion of issues related to medical informatics. The creation process follows a set of administrative rules set out by the Usenet administration on the Internet and consists of five steps: 1) informal discussion, 2) request for formal discussion, 3) formal discussion, 4) voting, and 5) posting of results. The newsgroup can be accessed using any news reader via the Internet. PMID:7583645

  8. Internet addiction in a group of medical students: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, T; Sherpa, M T; Shrestha, R

    2012-03-01

    The use of Internet for education, recreation and communication is increasing day by day. Nevertheless, the possibility of exploitation and addiction leading to impairment in academic performance and emotional balance cannot be denied, especially among young population. The study was aimed to measure the degree of Internet addiction among a group of medical students. Internet addiction test questionnaire developed by Young was used to assess mild, moderate and severe addiction. Amongst the study population (n=130, age 19-23 years), 40% had mild addiction. Moderate and severe addiction was found in 41.53% and 3.07% of the participants respectively. The study revealed that 24% often and 19.2% always found themselves using Internet longer than they had planned or thought. Late night Internet surfing leading to sleep deprivation was found in 31.53% of the participants. Almost one fourth of them (25.38%) occasionally tried to cut down the time they spent on the Internet but failed and 31.53% sometimes experienced restlessness when deprived of Internet access. Results reflected that a significant number of participants suffered from mild to moderate addiction. The role of counseling and education should be emphasized for prevention of Internet addiction. PMID:23441494

  9. Informal education of medical doctors on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Physicians achieve parts of their knowledge informally on the Internet. In a first study we analyzed the quality of online content of prenatal screening and diagnosis on elements like Wikipedia, Twitter or YouTube. Furthermore, own content was published on blogs, forums and static pages, and visitor's data was measured. The second study consists of three surveys among physicians: Doctors use public pages like blogs or Wikipedia rather than professional or scientific communities and talk about patients via mailing lists or direct messages. PMID:23823386

  10. Perceived barriers to information access among medical residents in Iran: obstacles to answering clinical queries in settings with limited Internet accessibility.

    PubMed

    Mazloomdoost, Danesh; Mehregan, Shervineh; Mahmoudi, Hilda; Soltani, Akbar; Embi, Peter J

    2007-01-01

    Studies performed in the US and other Western countries have documented that physicians generate many clinical questions during a typical day and rely on various information sources for answers. Little is known about the information seeking behaviors of physicians practicing in other countries, particularly those with limited Internet connectivity. We conducted this study to document the perceived barriers to information resources used by medical residents in Iran. Our findings reveal that different perceived barriers exist for electronic versus paper-based resources. Notably, paper-based resources are perceived to be limited by resident time-constraints and availability of resources, whereas electronic resources are limited by cost decentralized resources (such as PDAs) and accessibility of centralized, Internet access. These findings add to the limited literature regarding health information-seeking activities in international healthcare settings, particularly those with limited Internet connectivity, and will supplement future studies of and interventions in such settings. PMID:18693891

  11. International Internet-2 performance and automatic tuning protocol for medical imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lawrence W C; Zhou, Michael Z; Hau, S K; Law, Maria Y Y; Tang, F H; Documet, J

    2005-01-01

    Internet-2 is an advanced computer network, which has been widely used for medical imaging applications such as teleradiology and teleconsultation, since Internet-2 can fulfill the requirements for high-speed data transmission and short turn-around time with low operation cost once installed. However, such high performance of Internet-2 may not be retained for global access from international network peers. Considering the international Internet-2 connection between the PolyU and the IPI/USC, there exist two major factors, network looping in the US and bottleneck of the connection, raising the round-trip time and limiting the available bandwidth, respectively. The available bandwidth will be further underutilized if the TCP/IP parameters at the sending and receiving computers are not appropriately chosen. This paper proposes a repeatable and consistent protocol to automatically tune these parameters for the clinical applications. PMID:15755530

  12. [Introduction of accompanying documents on the new EMC standard of medical electrical equipment].

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiming

    2013-07-01

    The article introduces the requirements of accompanying documents on the new EMC standard of medical electrical equipment (YY 0505-2012), hope it can be useful for the manufacturers of medical electrical equipment. PMID:24195399

  13. eLearning: A Review of Internet-Based Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wutoh, Rita; Boren, Suzanne Austin; Balas, E. Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: The objective was to review the effect of Internet-based continuing medical education (CME) interventions on physician performance and health care outcomes. Methods: Data sources included searches of MEDLINE (1966 to January 2004), CINAHL (1982 to December 2003), ACP Journal Club (1991 to July/August 2003), and the Cochrane Database…

  14. Physician Internet Medical Information Seeking and On-line Continuing Education Use Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casebeer, Linda; Bennett, Nancy; Kristofco, Robert; Carillo, Anna; Centor, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 2,200 physicians indicated that nearly all have Internet access and use it primarily for medical information and professional development, not for communicating with patients. Credibility of source, speed, accessibility, and searching ease were most important. Barriers included information overload and too little information…

  15. Usage of medical internet and e-health services by the elderly.

    PubMed

    Bujnowska-Fedak, Maria M; Mastalerz-Migas, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Internet and e-health services have a substantial potential to support efficient and effective care for the elderly. The aim of the study was to investigate the use of Internet for health-related purposes among Polish elderly, the frequency and reasons of use, the importance of e-health services, and factors affecting their use. A total of 242 elderly at the age of ≥60 years were selected from the Polish population by random sampling. Data collection was carried out by phone interviews in October-November 2012. The study shows that the Internet was ever used by 32% of the elderly and 1/5 claimed a regular use. Among the Internet users, 81% of older people used it to obtain information about health or illness. The Internet was one of the less important sources of information (important for 27% of respondents), face to face contact with health professionals and family and friends are still the most required source of medical information (75%). Only 7% of elderly Internet users approached the family physician, specialists, or other health professionals over the Internet. Factors that positively affected the use of Internet among elderly were male gender, younger age, higher education, living with family, mobile phone use, and a subjective assessment of one's own health as good. The doctor's provision of Internet-based services was important in the opinion of approximately 1/4 of older people. We conclude that the development of information and communications technology (ICT) tools increasingly meets the evolving needs of patients in the field of e-health. More and more elderly become beneficiaries of these services. PMID:25315621

  16. Giving Patients Access to Their Medical Records via the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Masys, Daniel; Baker, Dixie; Butros, Amy; Cowles, Kevin E.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The Patient-Centered Access to Secure Systems Online (pcasso) project is designed to apply state-of-the-art-security to the communication of clinical information over the Internet. Design: The authors report the legal and regulatory issues associated with deploying the system, and results of its use by providers and patients. Human subject protection concerns raised by the Institutional Review Board focused on three areas—unauthorized access to information by persons other than the patient; the effect of startling or poorly understood information; and the effect of patient access to records on the record-keeping behavior of providers. Measurements: Objective and subjective measures of security and usability were obtained. Results: During its initial deployment phase, the project enrolled 216 physicians and 41 patients; of these, 68 physicians and 26 patients used the system one or more times. The system performed as designed, with no unauthorized information access or intrusions detected. Providers rated the usability of the system low because of the complexity of the secure login and other security features and restrictions limiting their access to those patients with whom they had a professional relationship. In contrast, patients rated the usability and functionality of the system favorably. Conclusion: High-assurance systems that serve both patients and providers will need to address differing expectations regarding security and ease of use. PMID:11861633

  17. [Modern information and communication technology in medical rehabilitation. Enhanced sustainability through Internet-delivered aftercare].

    PubMed

    Kordy, H; Theis, F; Wolf, M

    2011-04-01

    Internet and mobile phones open new avenues for the optimization of health services in medical rehabilitation. Various models of Internet-delivered aftercare after psychosomatic inpatient treatment have shown promising results. The focus of this report is on the experience in translating one of the promising models, the Internet-Bridge ("Internet-Brücke"), to every day health care. Effectiveness was estimated through comparison of 254 patients who were treated in a hospital specialized in psychosomatic medicine and who participated in the Internet-Bridge as well as in the 1-year follow-up in the frame of standard quality assurance between 2003-2010 with 364 patients of the same hospital who also participated in the 1-year follow-up, but did not utilize the aftercare. Sustainable, reliable, and clinically significant improvements were more frequent in participants of the Internet-Bridge, especially with regard to psychological well-being, social problems, and psychosocial competence-at small additional costs. Results are understood as encouragement to start translation to routine care accompanied by research. PMID:21465402

  18. Internet supply ordering. Helping medical group practices improve business operations.

    PubMed

    Mayer, D

    2000-01-01

    Technology has opened the door to a new world of management tools in the physician practice environment. Productivity aids on the Web promise to alter forever the way we do everything--from interacting with vendors to caring for patients. Online medical, surgical and pharmaceutical supply acquisition sites, for example, already offer more efficient alternatives to phone and fax ordering, back-order challenges and supply cost monitoring. Not all sites are the same, however, and physicians and practice administrators must compare and contrast their needs with site offerings. PMID:11345667

  19. An eight-year study of internet-based remote medical counselling.

    PubMed

    Labiris, G; Coertzen, I; Katsikas, A; Karydis, A; Petounis, A

    2002-01-01

    We carried out a prospective study of an Internet-based remote counselling service. A total of 15456 Internet users visited the Website over eight years. From these, 1500 users were randomly selected for analysis. Medical counselling had been granted to 901 of the people requesting it (60%). One hundred and sixty-four physicians formed project groups to process the requests and responded using email. The distribution of patients using the service was similar to the availability of the Internet: 78% were from the European Union, North America and Australia. Sixty-seven per cent of the patients lived in urban areas and the remainder were residents of remote rural areas with limited local medical coverage. Sixty-five per cent of the requests were about problems of internal medicine and 30% of the requests concerned surgical issues. The remaining 5% of the patients sought information about recent developments, such molecular medicine or aviation medicine. During the project, our portal became inaccessible five times, and counselling was not possible on 44 days. There was no hacking of the Website. Internet-based medical counselling is a helpful addition to conventional practice. PMID:12217105

  20. "Did They Actually Really Believe This?" Authentic Medical Documents as a Window on the Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Julie

    1999-01-01

    Presents an assignment in which students choose a historical medical document, focusing on bloodletting techniques, tendon repair in the calf, or phrenology, and then convince the doctor or specialist who wrote the document that he was incorrect or did not use the best medical treatment. Provides historical background on phrenology. (CMK)

  1. Medical teleconferencing with high-definition video presentation on the 'usual' Internet.

    PubMed

    Obuchi, Toshiro; Shima, Hiroji; Iwasaki, Akinori

    2013-06-01

    Although medical teleconferences on advanced academic networks have been common (Telemed J E Health 15:112-117, 1; Asian J Endosc Surg 3:185-188, 2; Surg Today 41:1579-1581, 3; Telemedicine development center of Asia. http://www.aqua.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp/eg/index.html . Accessed 6 March 2013, 4), reports regarding 'usual' Internet teleconferences or tele-lectures employing a telecommunication system for business use are very rare. Medical teleconferences and tele-lectures on the Internet were held three times between our institutions and other institutions, using the 'HD Com' made by Panasonic (HD Com. http://panasonic.biz/com/visual/ . Accessed 6 March 2013, 5), which is a high-definition telecommunication system for business tele-meeting. All of our medical telecommunications were successfully completed without any troubles. This system allows for all kinds of presentations using personal computers to be made from each station, so that discussions with high-definition surgical video presentation, which has recently been developed, could be effortlessly established despite the distance between institutions. Unlike telecommunication using advanced academic networks, this system can run without any need for specific engineering support, on the usual Internet. Medical telecommunication employing this system is likely to become common among ordinary hospitals in the near future. PMID:23604847

  2. Challenges in Exchanging Medication Information: Identifying Gaps in Clinical Document Exchange and Terminology Standards

    PubMed Central

    Phansalkar, Shobha; Robinson, George; Getty, George; Shalaby, James; Tao, David; Broverman, Carol

    2009-01-01

    The availability of accurate medication history information is invaluable for making sound therapeutic decisions. The Continuity of Care Document (CCD) could serve as a mechanism for exchanging interoperable medication information between EHRs. We evaluate the feasibility of representing a medication and its underlying components in a Healthcare Information Technology Standards Panel (HITSP) compliant CCD. Our evaluation resulted in successfully mapping 94% of medication entries and greater than 92% of medication component mappings to CCD constraints. We identify gaps and provide recommendations for improving the representational adequacy of the Federal Medication Terminology (FMT) to fully represent orderable medication concepts. PMID:20351911

  3. Challenges in exchanging medication information: identifying gaps in clinical document exchange and terminology standards.

    PubMed

    Phansalkar, Shobha; Robinson, George; Getty, George; Shalaby, James; Tao, David; Broverman, Carol

    2009-01-01

    The availability of accurate medication history information is invaluable for making sound therapeutic decisions. The Continuity of Care Document (CCD) could serve as a mechanism for exchanging interoperable medication information between EHRs. We evaluate the feasibility of representing a medication and its underlying components in a Healthcare Information Technology Standards Panel (HITSP) compliant CCD. Our evaluation resulted in successfully mapping 94% of medication entries and greater than 92% of medication component mappings to CCD constraints. We identify gaps and provide recommendations for improving the representational adequacy of the Federal Medication Terminology (FMT) to fully represent orderable medication concepts. PMID:20351911

  4. Reflections on Summarizing and Abstracting: Implications for Internet Web Documents, and Standardized Library Cataloging Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jizba, Laurel

    1997-01-01

    Examines the traditional, historical applications of abstracts and summary notes by individual authors in typical databases in order to assess and develop applications for Internet information retrieval. Highlights include information seeking; guidelines for writers; models of abstracts and summary notes; metadata; and Internet standards,…

  5. 28 CFR 79.5 - Requirements for medical documentation, contemporaneous records, and other records or documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... indicia of authenticity or a sufficient guarantee of trustworthiness. The Program shall not accept as proof of any criterion of eligibility any document that does not bear sufficient indicia of...

  6. Document Delivery Policy. Region 2 [Regional Medical Library Network].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeastern/Atlantic Regional Medical Library Services, Baltimore, MD.

    Standardized policies and procedures for interlibrary loan and resource sharing in the Southeastern/Atlantic Region of the Regional Medical Library (RML) Network are presented in this policy statement. RML network institutions, which are divided into categories based on their ability and willingness to assume responsibility for interlibrary…

  7. Service-Oriented Security Framework for Remote Medical Services in the Internet of Things Environment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Dong; Yoon, Tae Sik; Chung, Seung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Remote medical services have been expanding globally, and this is expansion is steadily increasing. It has had many positive effects, including medical access convenience, timeliness of service, and cost reduction. The speed of research and development in remote medical technology has been gradually accelerating. Therefore, it is expected to expand to enable various high-tech information and communications technology (ICT)-based remote medical services. However, the current state lacks an appropriate security framework that can resolve security issues centered on the Internet of things (IoT) environment that will be utilized significantly in telemedicine. Methods This study developed a medical service-oriented frame work for secure remote medical services, possessing flexibility regarding new service and security elements through its service-oriented structure. First, the common architecture of remote medical services is defined. Next medical-oriented secu rity threats and requirements within the IoT environment are identified. Finally, we propose a "service-oriented security frame work for remote medical services" based on previous work and requirements for secure remote medical services in the IoT. Results The proposed framework is a secure framework based on service-oriented cases in the medical environment. A com parative analysis focusing on the security elements (confidentiality, integrity, availability, privacy) was conducted, and the analysis results demonstrate the security of the proposed framework for remote medical services with IoT. Conclusions The proposed framework is service-oriented structure. It can support dynamic security elements in accordance with demands related to new remote medical services which will be diversely generated in the IoT environment. We anticipate that it will enable secure services to be provided that can guarantee confidentiality, integrity, and availability for all, including patients, non-patients, and medical

  8. Platform-independent software for medical image processing on the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Michael E.; Pathak, Sayan D.; Kim, Yongmin

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a software tool for image processing over the Internet. The tool is a general purpose, easy to use, flexible, platform independent image processing software package with functions most commonly used in medical image processing.It provides for processing of medical images located wither remotely on the Internet or locally. The software was written in Java - the new programming language developed by Sun Microsystems. It was compiled and tested using Microsoft's Visual Java 1.0 and Microsoft's Just in Time Compiler 1.00.6211. The software is simple and easy to use. In order to use the tool, the user needs to download the software from our site before he/she runs it using any Java interpreter, such as those supplied by Sun, Symantec, Borland or Microsoft. Future versions of the operating systems supplied by Sun, Microsoft, Apple, IBM, and others will include Java interpreters. The software is then able to access and process any image on the iNternet or on the local computer. Using a 512 X 512 X 8-bit image, a 3 X 3 convolution took 0.88 seconds on an Intel Pentium Pro PC running at 200 MHz with 64 Mbytes of memory. A window/level operation took 0.38 seconds while a 3 X 3 median filter took 0.71 seconds. These performance numbers demonstrate the feasibility of using this software interactively on desktop computes. Our software tool supports various image processing techniques commonly used in medical image processing and can run without the need of any specialized hardware. It can become an easily accessible resource over the Internet to promote the learning and of understanding image processing algorithms. Also, it could facilitate sharing of medical image databases and collaboration amongst researchers and clinicians, regardless of location.

  9. Medical Information on the Internet: A Tool for Measuring Consumer Perception of Quality Aspects

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Most of adult Internet users have searched for health information on the Internet. The Internet has become one of the most important sources for health information and treatment advice. In most cases, the information found is not verified with a medical doctor, but judged by the “online-diagnosers” independently. Facing this situation, public health authorities raise concern over the quality of medical information laypersons can find on the Internet. Objective The objective of the study was aimed at developing a measure to evaluate the credibility of websites that offer medical advice and information. The measure was tested in a quasi-experimental study on two sleeping-disorder websites of different quality. Methods There were 45 survey items for rating the credibility of websites that were tested in a quasi-experimental study with a random assignment of 454 participants to either a high- or a low-quality website exposure. Using principal component analysis, the original items were reduced to 13 and sorted into the factors: trustworthiness, textual deficits of the content, interferences (external links on the Web site), and advertisements. The first two factors focus more on the provided content itself, while the other two describe the embedding of the content into the website. The 45 survey items had been designed previously using exploratory observations and literature research. Results The final scale showed adequate power and reliability for all factors. The loadings of the principal component analysis ranged satisfactorily (.644 to .854). Significant differences at P<.001 were found between the low- and high-quality groups. Advertisements on the website were rated as disturbing in both experimental conditions, meaning that they do not differentiate between good and bad information. Conclusions The scale reliably distinguished high- and low-quality of medical advice given on websites. PMID:25835333

  10. Medicine and the Internet.

    PubMed Central

    Akatsu, H; Kuffner, J

    1998-01-01

    Practicing physicians are frequently overwhelmed by the amount of new medical information. The internet is increasingly becoming an important vehicle for accessing that information with a variety of online resources for medical professionals. In its current state, however, the internet abounds with misleading information, making it difficult to sort out what is both meaningful and accurate from among the thousands of electronic documents. In this article, we list medical web sites that we have found to be useful, accurate, and easy to navigate. We also give an overview of the internet and World Wide Web to provide a starting point for novice users, and we briefly discuss how internet policy relates to medical practice. PMID:9830368

  11. Clinical Documents Clustering Based on Medication/Symptom Names Using Multi-View Nonnegative Matrix Factorization.

    PubMed

    Ling, Yuan; Pan, Xuelian; Li, Guangrong; Hu, Xiaohua

    2015-07-01

    Clinical documents are rich free-text data sources containing valuable medication and symptom information, which have a great potential to improve health care. In this paper, we build an integrating system for extracting medication names and symptom names from clinical notes. Then we apply nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) and multi-view NMF to cluster clinical notes into meaningful clusters based on sample-feature matrices. Our experimental results show that multi-view NMF is a preferable method for clinical document clustering. Moreover, we find that using extracted medication/symptom names to cluster clinical documents outperforms just using words. PMID:26011887

  12. The Use of the Internet in Geriatrics Education: Results of a National Survey of Medical Geriatrics Academic Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajjar, Ihab M.; Ruiz, Jorge G.; Teasdale, Thomas A.; Mintzer, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    In order to characterize use of the Internet in medical geriatrics education programs, 130 medical education programs in the U.S. that train medical students, interns, residents, fellows and practicing physicians were asked to complete a survey developed by the Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction (CELGI). Sixty-eight programs…

  13. [Some medical documents written by Ahmed Cevdet Pasha].

    PubMed

    Izgoer, A Z

    1998-01-01

    The assumption that civilization was originated in the East, was one of the most important points emphasized by the intelligentsia of the late Ottoman reign. This conviction was appreciated in the thought of Ahmed Cevdet Pasha (1823 - 1895), a famous figure of the period. Cevdet Pasha, who believed that the source of science and education was started in the East, claimed that Europe was acquainted with Islamic science during the Crusades. In this paper Cevdet Pasha's ideas related with small-pox, cholera, plague, poisons and microbes are mentioned. This study is based on Cevdet Pasha's documents related with these subjects; and the transcriptions of the texts are given. PMID:11624179

  14. Self-rated Health and Internet Addiction in Iranian Medical Sciences Students; Prevalence, Risk Factors and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Valizadeh, Farzaneh; Mirshojaee, Seyede Roqaie; Ahmadli, Robabeh; Mokhtari, Mohsen; Ghaderi, Ebrahim; Ahmadi, Ali; Rezaei, Heshmatollah; Ansari, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Self-rated health is a brief measure for general health. It is a comprehensive and sensitive index for prediction of health in future. Due to the high internet usage in medical students, the current study designed to evaluate the self-rated health (SRH) in relationship with internet addiction risk factors in medical students. Methods: This cross sectional study conducted on 254 students of Qom University of Medical Sciences 2014. Participants selected by two stage sampling method including stratified and simple random sampling. The Young’s questionnaire of internet addiction and SRH question used for data collection. Chi-square, t-test, and logistic regression used in data analysis. Results: More than 79.9% of students reported their general health good and very good. The student’s mean score of general health was higher than the average. In addition, the prevalence of internet addiction was 28.7%. An inverse significant correlation observed between SRH and internet addiction score (r=-0.198, p=0.002). Using internet for Entertainment, using private Email and chat rooms were the most important predictors of affecting to internet addiction. Moreover, internet addiction is the most predictors of SRH and increased the odds of bad SRH. Conclusion: The good SRH of medical students was higher than general population but in health faculty’ students were lower than others. Due to the effect of internet addiction on SRH and increasing trend of internet use in medical students, as well as low age of participants, attention to psychological aspects and the job expectancy in future, can effective on increasing the good SRH. PMID:27493592

  15. 42 CFR 102.60 - Documentation an eligible requester seeking medical benefits must submit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Documentation an eligible requester seeking medical benefits must submit. 102.60 Section 102.60 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES SMALLPOX COMPENSATION PROGRAM Required Documentation for Eligible Requesters...

  16. 42 CFR 102.60 - Documentation an eligible requester seeking medical benefits must submit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Documentation an eligible requester seeking medical benefits must submit. 102.60 Section 102.60 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES SMALLPOX COMPENSATION PROGRAM Required Documentation for Eligible Requesters...

  17. 42 CFR 102.60 - Documentation an eligible requester seeking medical benefits must submit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Documentation an eligible requester seeking medical benefits must submit. 102.60 Section 102.60 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES SMALLPOX COMPENSATION PROGRAM Required Documentation for Eligible Requesters...

  18. 42 CFR 102.60 - Documentation an eligible requester seeking medical benefits must submit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Documentation an eligible requester seeking medical benefits must submit. 102.60 Section 102.60 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES SMALLPOX COMPENSATION PROGRAM Required Documentation for Eligible Requesters To Receive Benefits § 102.60...

  19. 42 CFR 102.60 - Documentation an eligible requester seeking medical benefits must submit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Documentation an eligible requester seeking medical benefits must submit. 102.60 Section 102.60 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES SMALLPOX COMPENSATION PROGRAM Required Documentation for Eligible Requesters...

  20. [Establishment and management of documentation within QMS of medical device enterprises].

    PubMed

    Tian, Shaolei

    2013-09-01

    The objectives of QMS for quality assurance of products are achieved by formulation, implement, and management of document system. Document (includes record) system is important constituent part of QMS. In this paper, the important issues and relative requirements of GMP on the establishment and management of documentation within quality management system (QMS) of medical device enterprises are discussed with the aim of providing reference for relative enterprises to build and improve their QMS and to implement GMP. PMID:24409796

  1. Perception of Medical Faculties towards Early Clinical Exposure and MCI Vision 2015 Documents in Western Maharashtra

    PubMed Central

    Latti, Ramchandra G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Medical Council of India (MCI) has advocated early clinical exposure for students in medical colleges. In its ‘Vision-2015’ document for further reforms in undergraduate medical education, the MCI underlined the need for clinical teaching from first year onwards in medical colleges. Aim Our aim was to collect and analyse perception of medical faculties towards early clinical exposure and MCI Vision 2015 and to study the awareness, depth and interest among medical faculties towards these changes. Materials and Methods We used 10-item self developed survey questionnaires, which was validated from experts in medical education. 10–item questionnaire was based on awareness, depth and interest among medical faculties towards early clinical exposure and MCI Vision 2015 documents released by MCI in 2011. Qualitative data was assessed using percentage scale. We were approached to 182 preclinical medical faculties, however responses were received from 127 medical faculties from first year medical course subjects from six different college’s viz. two from Deemed University, two from Government sector and two from private sector but affiliated to Maharashtra University of Health sciences, Nasik, India. Results A 94.48% faculty members were aware regarding MCI Vision 2015 documents released by MCI in 2011. Average 12% faculties could answer specific approach MCQs based on MCI Vision 2015 documents. However, 82.67% faculties agreed early clinical exposure will be definitely helpful if implemented in curriculum. Conclusion The present work underlines need of special coaching and attention towards this important issue in medical education. PMID:26816885

  2. Documentation of Medical Records in Hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2014: a Quantitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Saravi, Benyamin Mohseni; Asgari, Zolaykha; Siamian, Hasan; Farahabadi, Ebrahim Bagherian; Gorji, Alimorad Heidari; Motamed, Nima; Fallahkharyeki, Mohammad; Mohammadi, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Documentation of patient care in medical record formats is always emphasized. These documents are used as a means to go on treating the patients, staff in their own defense, assessment, care, any legal proceedings and medical science education. Therefore, in this study, each of the data elements available in patients’ records are important and filling them indicates the importance put by the documenting teams, so it has been dealt with the documentation the patient records in the hospitals of Mazandaran province. Method: This cross-sectional study aimed to review medical records in 16 hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences (MazUMS). In order to collection data, a check list was prepared based on the data elements including four forms of the admission, summary, patients’ medical history and progress note. The data recording was defined as “Yes” with the value of 1, lack of recording was defined as “No” with the value of 2, and “Not applied” with the value of 0 for the cases in which the mentioned variable medical records are not applied. Results: The overall evaluation of the documentation was considered as 95-100% equal to “good”, 75-94% equal to “average” and below -75% equal to “poor”. Using the stratified random sample volume formula, 381 cases were reviewed. The data were analyzed by the SPSS version 19 and descriptive statistics. Results: The results showed that %62 of registration and all the four forms were in the “poor” category. There was no big difference in average registration among the hospitals. Among the educational groups Gynecology and Infectious were equal and had the highest average of documentation of %68. In the data categories, the highest documentation average belonged to the verification, %91. Conclusion: According to the overall assessment in which the rate of documentation was in the category “week”, we should make much more efforts to reach better conditions. Even if a data

  3. Documenting Internet Technology Competencies of Graduate Education Students through Web-Based Instruction and Electronic Portfolios.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mader, Sharon

    This practicum was designed to provide a means for students in the graduate education program at Nova Southeastern University (Florida) to demonstrate that they can successfully incorporate Internet information and communication technologies into teaching and professional development. Goals were: (1) to develop a means for assessing attainment of…

  4. Medical validation and CBIR of spine x-ray images over the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antani, Sameer; Cheng, Jing; Long, Jonathan; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2006-01-01

    As found in the literature, most Internet-based prototype Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) systems focus on stock photo collections and do not address challenges of large specialized image collections and topics such as medical information retrieval by image content. Even fewer have medically validated data to evaluate retrieval quality in terms of precision and relevance. To date, our research has reported over 75% relevant spine X-ray image retrieval tested on 888 validated vertebral shapes from 207 images using our prototype CBIR system operating within our local network. As a next step, we have designed and developed an Internet-based medical validation tool and a CBIR retrieval tool in MATLAB and JAVA that can remotely connect to our database. The retrieval tool supports hybrid text and image queries and also provides partial shape annotation for pathology-specific querying. These tools are initially developed for domain experts, such as radiologists and educators, to identify design issues for improved workflow. This article describes the tools and design considerations in their development.

  5. 20 CFR 30.113 - What are the requirements for written medical documentation, contemporaneous records, and other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the medical records containing a diagnosis and date of diagnosis of a covered medical condition no... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true What are the requirements for written medical... written medical documentation, contemporaneous records, and other records or documents? (a) All...

  6. 20 CFR 30.113 - What are the requirements for written medical documentation, contemporaneous records, and other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the medical records containing a diagnosis and date of diagnosis of a covered medical condition no... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What are the requirements for written medical... written medical documentation, contemporaneous records, and other records or documents? (a) All...

  7. Nazi Medical Experiment Report: Evidence from the Nuremberg Medical Trial. Teaching with Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haverkamp, Beth; Schamel, Wynell

    1995-01-01

    Describes the historical background to the Nuremberg War Trials. Asserts that there is a wealth of evidence in the National Archives documenting atrocities committed by the Nazis. Presents primary source documents used in the Trials and provides seven suggested teaching strategies. (CFR)

  8. A pilot study on the evaluation of medical student documentation: assessment of SOAP notes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was evaluation of the current status of medical students' documentation of patient medical records. Methods: We checked the completeness, appropriateness, and accuracy of 95 Subjective-Objective-Assessment-Plan (SOAP) notes documented by third-year medical students who participated in clinical skill tests on December 1, 2014. Students were required to complete the SOAP note within 15 minutes of an standard patient (SP)-encounter with a SP complaining rhinorrhea and warring about meningitis. Results: Of the 95 SOAP notes reviewed, 36.8% were not signed. Only 27.4% documented the patient’s symptoms under the Objective component, although all students completed the Subjective notes appropriately. A possible diagnosis was assessed by 94.7% students. Plans were described in 94.7% of the SOAP notes. Over half the students planned workups (56.7%) for diagnosis and treatment (52.6%). Accurate documentation of the symptoms, physical findings, diagnoses, and plans were provided in 78.9%, 9.5%, 62.1%, and 38.0% notes, respectively. Conclusion: Our results showed that third-year medical students’ SOAP notes were not complete, appropriate, or accurate. The most significant problems with completeness were the omission of students’ signatures, and inappropriate documentation of the physical examinations conducted. An education and assessment program for complete and accurate medical recording has to be developed. PMID:26996436

  9. Secure Internet video conferencing for assessing acute medical problems in a nursing facility.

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, M.; Schadow, G.; Lindbergh, D.; Warvel, J.; Abernathy, G.; Dexter, P.; McDonald, C. J.

    2001-01-01

    Although video-based teleconferencing is becoming more widespread in the medical profession, especially for scheduled consultations, applications for rapid assessment of acute medical problems are rare. Use of such a video system in a nursing facility may be especially beneficial, because physicians are often not immediately available to evaluate patients. We have assembled and tested a portable, wireless conferencing system to prepare for a randomized trial of the system s influence on resource utilization and satisfaction. The system includes a rolling cart with video conferencing hardware and software, a remotely controllable digital camera, light, wireless network, and battery. A semi-automated paging system informs physicians of patient s study status and indications for conferencing. Data transmission occurs wirelessly in the nursing home and then through Internet cables to the physician s home. This provides sufficient bandwidth to support quality motion images. IPsec secures communications. Despite human and technical challenges, this system is affordable and functional. Images Figure 1 PMID:11825286

  10. Analysis of Documentation Speed Using Web-Based Medical Speech Recognition Technology: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kaisers, Wolfgang; Wassmuth, Ralf; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical documentation has undergone a change due to the usage of electronic health records. The core element is to capture clinical findings and document therapy electronically. Health care personnel spend a significant portion of their time on the computer. Alternatives to self-typing, such as speech recognition, are currently believed to increase documentation efficiency and quality, as well as satisfaction of health professionals while accomplishing clinical documentation, but few studies in this area have been published to date. Objective This study describes the effects of using a Web-based medical speech recognition system for clinical documentation in a university hospital on (1) documentation speed, (2) document length, and (3) physician satisfaction. Methods Reports of 28 physicians were randomized to be created with (intervention) or without (control) the assistance of a Web-based system of medical automatic speech recognition (ASR) in the German language. The documentation was entered into a browser’s text area and the time to complete the documentation including all necessary corrections, correction effort, number of characters, and mood of participant were stored in a database. The underlying time comprised text entering, text correction, and finalization of the documentation event. Participants self-assessed their moods on a scale of 1-3 (1=good, 2=moderate, 3=bad). Statistical analysis was done using permutation tests. Results The number of clinical reports eligible for further analysis stood at 1455. Out of 1455 reports, 718 (49.35%) were assisted by ASR and 737 (50.65%) were not assisted by ASR. Average documentation speed without ASR was 173 (SD 101) characters per minute, while it was 217 (SD 120) characters per minute using ASR. The overall increase in documentation speed through Web-based ASR assistance was 26% (P=.04). Participants documented an average of 356 (SD 388) characters per report when not assisted by ASR and 649 (SD

  11. The sensitivity of medical diagnostic decision-support knowledge bases in delineating appropriate terms to document in the medical record.

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, M. J.; Barnett, G. O.; Morgan, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    A pertinent, legible and complete medical record facilitates good patient care. The recording of the symptoms, signs and lab findings which are relevant to a patient's condition contributes importantly to the medical record. The consideration and documentation of other disease states known to be related to the patient's primary illness provide further enhancement. We propose that developing sets of disease-specific core elements which a physician may want to document in the medical record can have many benefits. We hypothesize that for a given disease, terms with high importance (TI) and frequency (TF) in the DX-plain, QMR and Iliad knowledge bases (KBs) are terms which are used commonly in the medical record, and may be, in fact, terms which physicians would find useful to document. A study was undertaken to validate ten such sets of disease-specific core elements. For each of ten prevalent diseases, high TI and TF terms from the three KBs mentioned were pooled to derive the set of core elements. For each disease, all patient records (range 385 to 16,972) from a computerized ambulatory medical record database were searched to document the actual use by physicians of each of these core elements. A significant percentage (range 50 to 86%) of each set of core elements was confirmed as being used by the physicians. In addition, all medical concepts from a selection of full text records were identified, and an average of 65% of the concepts were found to be core elements.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1807600

  12. Chaplain Documentation and the Electronic Medical Record: A Survey of ACPE Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Alexander; Dodd-McCue, Diane; Ford, Timothy; Demm, Charles; Hassell, Alma

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the extent to which chaplaincy departments at ACPE-accredited residency programs make use of the electronic medical record (EMR) for documentation and training. Survey data solicited from 219 programs with a 45% response rate and interview findings from 11 centers demonstrate a high level of usage of the EMR as well as an expectation that CPE residents document each patient/family encounter. Centers provided considerable initial training, but less ongoing monitoring of chaplain documentation. Centers used multiple sources to develop documentation tools for the EMR. One center was verified as having created the spiritual assessment component of the documentation tool from a peer reviewed published model. Interviews found intermittent use of the student chart notes for educational purposes. One center verified a structured manner of monitoring chart notes as a performance improvement activity. Findings suggested potential for the development of a standard documentation tool for chaplain charting and training. PMID:26168408

  13. Identification of general characteristics, motivation, and satisfaction of internet-based medical consultation service users in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Klinar, Ivana; Balažin, Ana; Baršić, Bruno; Tiljak, Hrvoje

    2011-01-01

    Aim To identify users’ reasons to look for physician consultation on the internet instead of visiting a physician and to explore their general characteristics, motivation, and satisfaction with internet medical consultation service ‘Your Questions.’ Methods Users of a free internet medical consultation service ‘Your Questions’ (www.plivazdravlje.hr) were invited to participate in a web-based survey designed to explore their general characteristics (age, sex, etc), reasons for using the service, the nature of their health problem or question, and their satisfaction with the service. Respondents were divided into two groups: users who consulted an internet physician only (Group I) and users who used internet consulting before or after visiting a physician (Group II). Results The response rate was 38% (1036/2747), with 79% female respondents. A fifth of the respondents (21%) consulted an internet physician only (Group I). Multivariate analysis revealed that the respondents in Group I were younger (median 24 vs 28 years in Group II), more interested into questions about pregnancy (odds ratio [OR], 1.984; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.203-3.272), more often embarrassed to talk to a physician in person (OR, 1.828; 95% CI, 1.119-2.989), and more motivated to protect their privacy (OR, 1.727; 95% CI, 1.252-2.380). They also had greater satisfaction with the service (77% vs 60%, P < 0.001). Conclusion The factors associated with the use of internet-based medical consultation services were younger age, need for privacy protection, avoidance of embarrassment at the physician’s office, and having a question related to pregnancy. This reveals the internet medical consultation service as a useful health promotion supplement that is particularly applicable for the population of young adults. PMID:21853551

  14. Comparison of advance medical directive inquiry and documentation for hospital inpatients in three medical services: implications for policy changes.

    PubMed

    Anunobi, Echezona; Detweiler, Mark B; Sethi, Roopa; Thomas, Reena; Lutgens, Brian; Detweiler, Jonna G

    2015-01-01

    Following the introduction of the Patient Self-Determination Act of 1990, the Veterans Health Administration developed its own advance medical directive (AMD) policy, which most recently states that documentation is mandatory for all hospital patients in all settings. The object of this study was to assess the effectiveness of AMD documentation at a local Veterans Affairs Medical Center. AMD documentation was compared among three inpatient services: surgery, medicine, and psychiatry. Retrospective in nature, 594 inpatient cases were compared. Results revealed that, overall, the rate of AMD documentation was 37.7%. AMD documentation on surgery was statistically more frequent (45.6%) than for either medicine (33.2%) or psychiatry (34.5%). The difference between the numbers of days to AMD documentation for all three services was not statistically significant. While there was no statistically significant difference across gender, Caucasians had AMDs documented more frequently than African Americans (p < .001). Logistic regression reveals that social worker and physician intervention, not patient-specific variables, are the primary predictors of AMD incidence. Policy makers may need to consider the realities of hospital care, especially in emergency settings, and be more specific in the steps of implementation of the policy in the evenings, weekends, and holidays. True adherence to policy implementation may require hospital administrators to increase staff and educational efforts so that the concept of AMD communication and documentation is completely explained to all staff and patients. Policy should include an electronic record reminder that is renewed every 3 years and provisions for accommodating patients who arrive on weekends and holidays, with special awareness of the particular communication needs of minority groups. The study conclusions are that further inquiry is needed to understand these policy nuances to enable the Veterans Affairs Administration to

  15. Treatment of medical databases and their graphical representation on the internet.

    PubMed

    Conde, Pedro; Alonso, Talía; Garau, Isabel; Roca, Pilar; Oliver, Jordi

    2006-09-01

    The use of new information technologies could facilitate enormously work to process and spread knowledge from medical data and, in particular, epidemiological data from cancer registries. Cancer registries are official institutions that collect information on the occurrence and outcome of cancer in defined population groups (city, region, or country). The aim of the present project was to design and develop a graphical web system to offer clear information about medical information, in this case cancer incidence, using Internet technology. A protocol and a system to process, manipulate, and represent medical data, epidemiological cancer data, from the Epidemiology Unit and Cancer Registry of the Balearic Islands, has been developed. All the steps to change the data format to obtain a medical data graphical representation database have been described. The result of the project is an application built in graphical web format that can be accessed at the following URL: http://gmein.uib.es/registro/resultados/resultados2.htm PMID:16954056

  16. Internet marketing of bariatric surgery: contemporary trends in the medicalization of obesity.

    PubMed

    Salant, Talya; Santry, Heena P

    2006-05-01

    In the context of political, economic, and scientific anxiety around the 'epidemic' rise in obesity in the US, the social and historical forces engendering the medicalization of obesity have been widely discussed. However, the recent growth of bariatric-weight loss-surgery and the expanding presence of advertising for bariatric surgery on the Internet suggest the possible emergence of new loci and languages of medicalization. We sought to identify the nature and extent to which web advertising of bariatric surgery contributes to the medicalization of obesity by examining the design and textual content of 100 bariatric surgery center websites. We found that websites, through strategic use of text and images, consistently describe obesity as a serious disease that requires professional ascertainment and supervision, entails substantial individual suffering, and is remedied through the transformative yet low risk effects of bariatric surgery. In the process, social normalcy and risk reduction come to replace physical criteria as the basis for determining health. Further, websites draw upon contradictory discourses of medicalization; that is, they insist upon 'external' (e.g. genetics, environment) causes of obesity to legitimize surgical intervention while implicating individual behaviors in surgical failure. From this, we suggest that the economic and professional motivations underlying website advertisements for bariatric surgery may result in confusing messages being sent to prospective patients as well as the perpetuation of gendered notions of obesity and the entrenchment of health disparities. PMID:16289735

  17. [What language is your doctor speaking? Facing the problems of translating medical documents into English].

    PubMed

    Mićović, Dragoslava

    2013-01-01

    What is translation--a craft, an art, a profession or a job? Although one of the oldest human activities, translation has not still been fully defined, and it is still young in terms of an academic discipline. The paper defines the difference between translation and interpreting and then attempts to find the answer to the question what characteristics, knowledge and skills a translator must have, particularly the one involved in court translation, and where his/her place in the communication process (both written and oral communication) is. When translating medical documentation, a translator is set within a medical language environment as an intermediary between two doctors (in other words, two professionals) in the process of communication which would be impossible without him, since it is conducted in two different languages. The paper also gives an insight into types of medical documentation and who they are intended for. It gives practical examples of the problems faced in the course of translation of certain types of medical documentation (hospital discharge papers, diagnoses, case reports,...). Is it possible to make this kind of communication between professionals (doctors) standardized, which would subsequently make their translation easier? Although great efforts are made in Serbia regarding medical language and medical terminology, the conclusion is that specific problems encountered by translators can hardly be overcome using only dictionaries and translation manuals. PMID:24073570

  18. Medical devices; obstetrical and gynecological devices; classification of the breast lesion documentation system. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2003-07-28

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the breast lesion documentation system into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to this device are discussed later in this document. The agency is taking this action in response to a petition submitted under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 (the amendments), the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990, and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA). The agency is classifying this device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is publishing a notice of availability of a guidance document that is the special control for this device. PMID:12884877

  19. [Structural requirements of computer-based medical documentation in a hospital setting].

    PubMed

    Thoma, W; Kurth, A; Hovy, L

    1999-03-01

    During the last years physicians are confronted with a significant increase of their duties in clinical documentation. By law the medical diagnoses and procedures were linked with the aspect of liquidation. In consequence it is very important that physicians work out a detailed list of options concerning the features of the medical database, which has to cover the complete clinical data input and deliver flexible utilities for detailed evaluation. Beside documentation the system has to perform as an essential tool of clinical organisation and quality control to optimize the medical and commercial efficiency of the hospital. An open interface technology should be postulated to avoid a stand alone system in the long run. PMID:10326205

  20. Using Internet Search Engines to Obtain Medical Information: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liupu; Wang, Juexin; Wang, Michael; Li, Yong; Liang, Yanchun

    2012-01-01

    Background The Internet has become one of the most important means to obtain health and medical information. It is often the first step in checking for basic information about a disease and its treatment. The search results are often useful to general users. Various search engines such as Google, Yahoo!, Bing, and Ask.com can play an important role in obtaining medical information for both medical professionals and lay people. However, the usability and effectiveness of various search engines for medical information have not been comprehensively compared and evaluated. Objective To compare major Internet search engines in their usability of obtaining medical and health information. Methods We applied usability testing as a software engineering technique and a standard industry practice to compare the four major search engines (Google, Yahoo!, Bing, and Ask.com) in obtaining health and medical information. For this purpose, we searched the keyword breast cancer in Google, Yahoo!, Bing, and Ask.com and saved the results of the top 200 links from each search engine. We combined nonredundant links from the four search engines and gave them to volunteer users in an alphabetical order. The volunteer users evaluated the websites and scored each website from 0 to 10 (lowest to highest) based on the usefulness of the content relevant to breast cancer. A medical expert identified six well-known websites related to breast cancer in advance as standards. We also used five keywords associated with breast cancer defined in the latest release of Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) and analyzed their occurrence in the websites. Results Each search engine provided rich information related to breast cancer in the search results. All six standard websites were among the top 30 in search results of all four search engines. Google had the best search validity (in terms of whether a website could be opened), followed by Bing, Ask.com, and Yahoo!. The search

  1. Documentation of Contraception and Pregnancy When Prescribing Potentially Teratogenic Medications for Reproductive-Age Women

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla; Postlethwaite, Debbie A.; Hung, Yun-Yi; Armstrong, Mary Anne

    2010-01-01

    Background Certain medications are identified by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as class D or X because they increase the risk for birth defects if used during pregnancy. Objective To assess pregnancy rates and the frequency of contraceptive counseling documented with prescriptions for class D or X drugs filled by women of reproductive age. Design Description of prescriptions filled in 2001. Setting A large health maintenance organization in northern California in 2001. Patients 488 175 women age 15 to 44 years who filled a total of 1 011 658 class A, B, D, or X prescriptions. Measurements Medications dispensed, contraceptive counseling, and pregnancy testing. Results A class D or X prescription was filled by 1 of every 6 women studied. Women who filled a prescription for class D or X medications were no more likely than women who filled prescriptions for safer, class A or B medications to have received contraceptive counseling, filled a contraceptive prescription, or been sterilized (48% vs. 51% of prescriptions). There was little variation by clinical indication in rates of contraceptive counseling with class D or X prescriptions, except for isotretinoin. Women who filled a class D or X prescription were only slightly less likely to have a pregnancy documented within 3 months than women filling a class A or B prescription (1.0% vs. 1.4% of prescriptions). Limitations International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes underestimate contraceptive counseling. Documentation of a positive pregnancy test after filling a prescription may overestimate medication use in early pregnancy. Women who filled several prescriptions are overrepresented in prescription analyses. Conclusion Prescriptions for potentially teratogenic medications are frequently filled by women of childbearing age without documentation of contraceptive counseling. PMID:17876020

  2. Natural Language Processing Versus Content-Based Image Analysis for Medical Document Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Névéol, Aurélie; Deserno, Thomas M.; Darmoni, Stéfan J.; Güld, Mark Oliver; Aronson, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    One of the most significant recent advances in health information systems has been the shift from paper to electronic documents. While research on automatic text and image processing has taken separate paths, there is a growing need for joint efforts, particularly for electronic health records and biomedical literature databases. This work aims at comparing text-based versus image-based access to multimodal medical documents using state-of-the-art methods of processing text and image components. A collection of 180 medical documents containing an image accompanied by a short text describing it was divided into training and test sets. Content-based image analysis and natural language processing techniques are applied individually and combined for multimodal document analysis. The evaluation consists of an indexing task and a retrieval task based on the “gold standard” codes manually assigned to corpus documents. The performance of text-based and image-based access, as well as combined document features, is compared. Image analysis proves more adequate for both the indexing and retrieval of the images. In the indexing task, multimodal analysis outperforms both independent image and text analysis. This experiment shows that text describing images can be usefully analyzed in the framework of a hybrid text/image retrieval system. PMID:19633735

  3. [What Psychiatrists Should Know about the Medical Documentation They Issue: Admission for Medical Care and Protection, Medical Treatment for Persons with Disabilities, Mental Health Disability Certification, etc].

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatrists issue a wide variety of documentation, among which are torms such as Registration of Admission for Medical Care and Protection, Periodic Report of Condition, Certification of Medical Treatment for Persons with Disabilities, and Mental Health Disability Certification, which are required under laws such as the Act on Mental Health and Welfare for the Mentally Disabled. These documents are important in that they are related to protecting the human rights of people with mental disorders, as well as securing appropriate medical and welfare services for them. However, in the course of reviewing and evaluating documentation at our Mental Health and Welfare Center, we encounter forms which are incomplete, or which contain inappropriate content. In order to protect the human rights of people with mental disorders, and to ensure the provision of appropriate medical and welfare services for them, I call on psychiatrists to issue carefully written and appropriate documentation. In this talk I will focus primarily on what psychiatrists should know when filling in forms in the course of their day-to-day clinical work. PMID:26552320

  4. A Comparison of Internet-Based Learning and Traditional Classroom Lecture to Learn CPR for Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmati, Nima; Omrani, Soghra; Hemmati, Naser

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the satisfaction and effectiveness of Internet-based learning (IBL) and traditional classroom lecture (TCL) for continuing medical education (CME) programs by comparing final resuscitation exam results of physicians who received the newest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) curriculum guidelines training…

  5. [Recommendations for documentation of incidents with medical devices in orthopaedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Kluess, D; Bader, R; Zenk, K; Mittelmeier, W

    2012-12-01

    The growing number of revisions in orthopaedic surgery as well as the multifactorial reasons for implant failure give cause for taking a closer look at the clinical documentation of adverse events. Based on our long-term experience it is our goal to present recommendations for an adequate documentation and filing. In the framework of the introduction of a quality management system (ISO 9001:2008) in our hospital, a process was developed for reportable incidents with medical devices regulating adequate documentation. Therefore, specific forms were developed. The retrievals are stored for subsequent damage analyses and are available for possible legal claims and tracking. A file should be opened for each reportable incident containing information about the event, a copy of the obligatory BfArM report, surgery report, medical device labels, radiographs and photographs. Declarations of agreement as well as handover certificates should be maintained in order to keep record of the retrievals. In order to assure consistent documentation, we recommend use of specific forms as presented in this paper. Identification of risk factors for implant failure and a long-term reduction of damage cases will only be possible under consequent incident reporting and responsible documentation of adverse events. Processing of cases of damage is accelerated and simplified by the presented recommendations and forms. Together with the newly established joint replacement registry, a higher quality of patient treatment and implant safety should be obtained. PMID:23296561

  6. The use of interactive graphical maps for browsing medical/health Internet information resources

    PubMed Central

    Boulos, Maged N Kamel

    2003-01-01

    As online information portals accumulate metadata descriptions of Web resources, it becomes necessary to develop effective ways for visualising and navigating the resultant huge metadata repositories as well as the different semantic relationships and attributes of described Web resources. Graphical maps provide a good method to visualise, understand and navigate a world that is too large and complex to be seen directly like the Web. Several examples of maps designed as a navigational aid for Web resources are presented in this review with an emphasis on maps of medical and health-related resources. The latter include HealthCyberMap maps , which can be classified as conceptual information space maps, and the very abstract and geometric Visual Net maps of PubMed (for demos). Information resources can be also organised and navigated based on their geographic attributes. Some of the maps presented in this review use a Kohonen Self-Organising Map algorithm, and only HealthCyberMap uses a Geographic Information System to classify Web resource data and render the maps. Maps based on familiar metaphors taken from users' everyday life are much easier to understand. Associative and pictorial map icons that enable instant recognition and comprehension are preferred to geometric ones and are key to successful maps for browsing medical/health Internet information resources. PMID:12556244

  7. Designing and implementing medical web portals: spreading educational and research materials on the Internet.

    PubMed Central

    Joubert, M.; Aymard, S.; Staccini, P.; Fieschi, M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To design and implement a medical web portal providing access to well qualified and high-quality information in the framework of universities and hospitals. METHOD: Based on the authors experience and the published literature, a model is proposed which describes the properties of documents in an object-oriented way. This model clearly separates from usual properties: the subject of a document as keywords, and information concerning its type, format, and location. RESULTS: An implementation has been done with an existing software that allows the capability to organize and index a web site according to the model. Experiments have been conducted which demonstrate the feasibility and the utility of such an approach. DISCUSSION: The benefits for the users, both designers and end users, of using such a portal are discussed. Forthcoming works are described. PMID:11825199

  8. Digitization of Full-Text Documents Before Publishing on the Internet: A Case Study Reviewing the Latest Optical Character Recognition Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClean, Clare M.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews strengths and weaknesses of five optical character recognition (OCR) software packages used to digitize paper documents before publishing on the Internet. Outlines options available and stages of the conversion process. Describes the learning experience of Eurotext, a United Kingdom-based electronic libraries project (eLib). (PEN)

  9. Morpheme-based, cross-lingual indexing for medical document retrieval.

    PubMed

    Schulz, S; Hahn, U

    2000-09-01

    The increasing availability of machine-readable medical documents is not really matched with the sophistication of currently used retrieval facilities to deal with a variety of critical natural language phenomena. Still most popular are string-matching methods which encounter problems for the medical sublanguage, in particular, concerning the wide-spread use of complex word forms such as noun compounds. We introduce a methodology for the segmentation of complex compounds into medically motivated morphemes. Given the sublanguage patterns in our data these morphemes derive from German, Greek and Latin roots. For indexing and retrieval purposes, such a morpheme dictionary may be further structured by defining the semantic relations among morpheme sets in order to build up a multilingual morpheme thesaurus. We present a tool for thesaurus compilation and management, and outline a methodology for the proper construction and maintenance of a multilingual morpheme thesaurus. PMID:10978912

  10. Medical Individualism or Medical Familism? A Critical Analysis of China's New Guidelines for Informed Consent: The Basic Norms of the Documentation of the Medical Record.

    PubMed

    Bian, Lin

    2015-08-01

    Modern Western medical individualism has had a significant impact on health care in China. This essay demonstrates the ways in which such Western-style individualism has been explicitly endorsed in China's 2010 directive: The Basic Norms of the Documentation of the Medical Record. The Norms require that the patient himself, rather than a member of his family, sign each informed consent form. This change in clinical practice indicates a shift toward medical individualism in Chinese healthcare legislation. Such individualism, however, is incompatible with the character of Chinese familism that is deeply rooted in the Chinese ethical tradition. It also contradicts family-based patterns of health care in China. Moreover, the requirement for individual informed consent is incompatible with numerous medical regulations promulgated in the past two decades. This essay argues that while Chinese medical legislation should learn from relevant Western ideas, it should not simply copy such practices by importing medical individualism into Chinese health care. Chinese healthcare policy is properly based on Chinese medical familist resources. PMID:26070661

  11. Mass Gathering Medical Care: Resource Document for the National Association of EMS Physicians Position Statement.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Brian; Nafziger, Sarah; Milsten, Andrew; Luk, Jeffrey; Yancey, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Mass gatherings are heterogeneous in terms of size, duration, type of event, crowd behavior, demographics of the participants and spectators, use of recreational substances, weather, and environment. The goals of health and medical services should be the provision of care for participants and spectators consistent with local standards of care, protection of continuing medical service to the populations surrounding the event venue, and preparation for surge to respond to extraordinary events. Pre-event planning among jurisdictional public health and EMS, acute care hospitals, and event EMS is essential, but should also include, at a minimum, event security services, public relations, facility maintenance, communications technicians, and the event planners and organizers. Previous documented experience with similar events has been shown to most accurately predict future needs. Future work in and guidance for mass gathering medical care should include the consistent use and further development of universally accepted consistent metrics, such as Patient Presentation Rate and Transfer to Hospital Rate. Only by standardizing data collection can evaluations be performed that link interventions with outcomes to enhance evidence-based EMS services at mass gatherings. Research is needed to evaluate the skills and interventions required by EMS providers to achieve desired outcomes. The event-dedicated EMS Medical Director is integral to acceptable quality medical care provided at mass gatherings; hence, he/she must be included in all aspects of mass gathering medical care planning, preparations, response, and recovery. Incorporation of jurisdictional EMS and community hospital medical leadership, and emergency practitioners into these processes will ensure that on-site care, transport, and transition to acute care at appropriate receiving facilities is consistent with, and fully integrated into the community's medical care system, while fulfilling the needs of event

  12. Step-by-step mark-up of medical guideline documents.

    PubMed

    Svátek, Vojtech; Růzicka, Marek

    2003-07-01

    Approaches to formalization of medical guidelines can be divided into model-centric and document-centric. While model-centric approaches dominate in the development of clinical decision support applications, document-centric, mark-up-based formalization is suitable for application tasks requiring the 'literal' content of the document to be transferred into the formal model. Examples of such tasks are logical verification of the document or compliance analysis of health records. The quality and efficiency of document-centric formalization can be improved using a decomposition of the whole process into several explicit steps. We present a methodology and software tool supporting the step-by-step formalization process. The knowledge elements can be marked up in the source text, refined to a tree structure with increasing level of detail, rearranged into an XML knowledge base, and, finally, exported into the operational representation. User-definable transformation rules enable to automate a large part of the process. The approach is being tested in the domain of cardiology. For parts of the WHO/ISH Guidelines for Hypertension, the process has been carried out through all the stages, to the form of executable application, generated automatically from the XML knowledge base. PMID:12909185

  13. Building Internet accessible medical education software using the World Wide Web.

    PubMed Central

    Kruper, J. A.; Lavenant, M. G.; Maskay, M. H.; Jones, T. M.

    1994-01-01

    We describe work to enhance existing software protocols and develop a suite of new software utilities based upon a set of standards known as the World Wide Web (WWW). Specifically, we have developed an effective X-windows based WYSIWYG WWW browser/editor and a prototype for integrated wide-area authentication and authorization support for delivery and maintenance of WWW service. These software development activities, along with parallel work in content development, are empowering individuals to better use the Internet as a resource to easily author, publish, and access materials. As an illustrative application, we describe one Web-based self-instructional unit designed to increase users' knowledge of hazardous substances in the environment. This on-line monograph was adapted from a series of paper-based case studies developed by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. The on-line version illustrates many of the innovative features provided by the Web, and demonstrates how such materials can significantly impact medical education at all levels. PMID:7949942

  14. Heart Failure Medications Detection and Prescription Status Classification in Clinical Narrative Documents.

    PubMed

    Meystre, Stéphane M; Kim, Youngjun; Heavirland, Julia; Williams, Jenifer; Bray, Bruce E; Garvin, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors (ACEI) and Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers (ARB) are two common medication classes used for heart failure treatment. The ADAHF (Automated Data Acquisition for Heart Failure) project aimed at automatically extracting heart failure treatment performance metrics from clinical narrative documents, and these medications are an important component of the performance metrics. We developed two different systems to detect these medications, rule-based and machine learning-based. The rule-based system used dictionary lookups with fuzzy string searching and showed successful performance even if our corpus contains various misspelled medications. The machine learning-based system uses lexical and morphological features and produced similar results. The best performance was achieved when combining the two methods, reaching 99.3% recall and 98.8% precision. To determine the prescription status of each medication (i.e., active, discontinued, or negative), we implemented a SVM classifier with lexical features and achieved good performance, reaching 95.49% accuracy, in a five-fold cross-validation evaluation. PMID:26262123

  15. A Cross-Sectional Study on the Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Ill Effects of Internet Addiction Among Medical Students in Northeastern India

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Kamal; Naskar, Subrata; Victor, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate Internet addiction among medical students in northeastern India and gain detailed knowledge about the prevalence, risk factors, and ill effects commonly associated with the disorder. Method The cross-sectional study sample comprised 188 medical students from Silchar Medical College and Hospital (Silchar, Assam, India). Students completed a sociodemographic form and an Internet use questionnaire, both created for this study, and the Young’s 20-Item Internet Addiction Test after they received brief instructions. Data were collected during a10-day period in June 2015. Results Of the 188 medical students, 46.8% were at increased risk of Internet addiction. Those who were found to be at increased risk had longer years of Internet exposure (P = .046) and always online status (P = .033). Also, among this group, the men were more prone to develop an online relationship. Excessive Internet usage also led to poor performance in college (P < .0001) and feeling moody, anxious, and depressed (P < .0001). Conclusions The ill effects of Internet addiction include withdrawal from real-life relationships, deterioration in academic activities, and a depressed and nervous mood. Internet use for nonacademic purposes is increasing among students, thus there is an immediate need for strict supervision and monitoring at the institutional level. The possibility of becoming addicted to the Internet should be emphasized to students and their parents through awareness campaigns so that interventions and restrictions can be implemented at the individual and family levels. PMID:27486546

  16. Simple prescribing errors and allergy documentation in medical hospital admissions in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Barton, Lorna; Futtermenger, Judith; Gaddi, Yash; Kang, Angela; Rivers, Jon; Spriggs, David; Jenkins, Paul F; Thompson, Campbell H; Thomas, Josephine S

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to quantify and compare the prevalence of simple prescribing errors made by clinicians in the first 24 hours of a general medical patient's hospital admission. Four public or private acute care hospitals across Australia and New Zealand each audited 200 patients' drug charts. Patient demographics, pharmacist review and pre-defined prescribing errors were recorded. At least one simple error was present on the medication charts of 672/715 patients, with a linear relationship between the number of medications prescribed and the number of errors (r = 0.571, p < 0.001). The four sites differed significantly in the prevalence of different types of simple prescribing errors. Pharmacists were more likely to review patients aged > or = 75 years (39.9% vs 26.0%; p < 0.001) and those with more than 10 drug prescriptions (39.4% vs 25.7%; p < 0.001). Patients reviewed by a pharmacist were less likely to have inadequate documentation of allergies (13.5% vs 29.4%, p < 0.001). Simple prescribing errors are common, although their nature differs from site to site. Clinical pharmacists target patients with the most complex health situations, and their involvement leads to improved documentation. PMID:22586784

  17. Appropriate and safe utilization of helicopter emergency medical services: a joint position statement with resource document.

    PubMed

    Floccare, Douglas J; Stuhlmiller, David F E; Braithwaite, Sabina A; Thomas, Stephen H; Madden, John F; Hankins, Daniel G; Dhindsa, Harinder; Millin, Michael G

    2013-01-01

    This position statement with accompanying resource document is the result of a collaborative effort of a writing group comprised of members of the Air Medical Physician Association (AMPA), the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), the National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP), and the American Academy of Emergency Medicine (AAEM). This document has been jointly approved by the boards of all four organizations. Patients benefit from the appropriate utilization of helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS). EMS and regional health care systems must have and follow guidelines for HEMS utilization to facilitate proper patient selection and ensure clinical benefit. Clinical benefit can be provided by Meaningfully shortening the time to delivery of definitive care to patients with time-sensitive medical conditions Providing necessary specialized medical expertise or equipment to patients before and/or during transport Providing transport to patients inaccessible by other means of transport The decision to use HEMS is a medical decision, separate from the aviation determination whether a transport can be completed safely. Physicians with specialized training and experience in EMS and air medical transport must be integral to HEMS utilization decisions, including guideline development and quality improvement activities. Safety management systems must be developed, adopted, and adhered to by air medical operators when making decisions to accept and continue every HEMS transport. HEMS must be fully integrated within the local, regional, and state emergency health care systems. HEMS programs cannot operate independently of the surrounding health care environment. The EMS and health care systems must be involved in the determination of the number of HEMS assets necessary to provide appropriate coverage for their region. Excessive resources may lead to competitive practices that can affect utilization and negatively impact safety. Inadequate resources will

  18. The "Profiles" document: a modern revision of the objectives of undergraduate medical studies in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Pierre-André; Jucker-Kupper, Patrick; The Profiles Working Group

    2016-01-01

    The Joint Commission of the Swiss Medical Schools (SMIFK/CIMS) decided in 2000 to establish a Swiss Catalogue of Learning Objectives (SCLO) for undergraduate medical training, which was adapted from a similar Dutch blueprint. A second version of the SCLO was developed and launched in 2008. The catalogue is a prerequisite for the accreditation of the curricula of the six Swiss medical faculties and defines the contents of the Federal Licensing Examination (FLE). Given the evolution of the field of medicine and of medical education, the SMIFK/CIMS has decided to embark on a total revision of the SCLO. This article presents the proposed structure and content of Profiles, a new document which, in the future, will direct the format of undergraduate studies and of the FLE. Profiles stands for the Principal Relevant Objectives for Integrative Learning and Education in Switzerland. It is currently being developed by a group of experts from the six Swiss faculties as well as representatives of other institutions involved in these developments. The foundations of Profiles are grounded in the evolution of medical practice and of public health and are based on up-to-date teaching concepts, such as EPAs (entrustable professional activities). An introduction will cover the concepts and a tutorial will be displayed. Three main chapters will provide a description of the seven 2015 CanMEDS roles, a list of core EPAs and a series of ≈250 situations embracing the most frequent and current conditions affecting health. As Profiles is still a work in progress, it is hoped that this paper will attract the interest of all individuals involved in the training of medical students. PMID:26829005

  19. Impact of a New Medical Record System for Emergency Departments Designed to Accelerate Clinical Documentation

    PubMed Central

    Inokuchi, Ryota; Sato, Hajime; Iwagami, Masao; Komaru, Yohei; Iwai, Satoshi; Gunshin, Masataka; Nakamura, Kensuke; Shinohara, Kazuaki; Kitsuta, Yoichi; Nakajima, Susumu; Yahagi, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recording information in emergency departments (EDs) constitutes a major obstacle to efficient treatment. A new electronic medical records (EMR) system focusing on clinical documentation was developed to accelerate patient flow. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of a new EMR system on ED length of stay and physician satisfaction. We integrated a new EMR system at a hospital already using a standard system. A crossover design was adopted whereby residents were randomized into 2 groups. Group A used the existing EMR system first, followed by the newly developed system, for 2 weeks each. Group B followed the opposite sequence. The time required to provide overall medical care, length of stay in ED, and degree of physician satisfaction were compared between the 2 EMR systems. The study involved 6 residents and 526 patients (277 assessed using the standard system and 249 assessed with the new system). Mean time for clinical documentation decreased from 133.7 ± 5.1 minutes to 107.5 ± 5.4 minutes with the new EMR system (P < 0.001). The time for overall medical care was significantly reduced in all patient groups except triage level 5 (nonurgent). The new EMR system significantly reduced the length of stay in ED for triage level 2 (emergency) patients (145.4 ± 13.6 minutes vs 184.3 ± 13.6 minutes for standard system; P = 0.047). As for the degree of physician satisfaction, there was a high degree of satisfaction in terms of the physical findings support system and the ability to capture images and enter negative findings. The new EMR system shortened the time for overall medical care and was associated with a high degree of resident satisfaction. PMID:26131837

  20. Taking the physician out of "physician shopping": a case series of clinical problems associated with Internet purchases of medication.

    PubMed

    Lineberry, Timothy W; Bostwick, J Michael

    2004-08-01

    In the United States, psychoactive prescription medications rank second only to marijuana as drugs of abuse (if tobacco and alcohol are discounted). Physician shopping--visiting multiple physicians simply to procure prescriptions--has been a traditional method for acquiring drugs illicitly. As community-based efforts to curtail physician shopping have expanded, drug abusers have turned increasingly to the Internet. Illegal Internet pharmacies, increasing rapidly in number during the past decade and requiring neither prescription nor physician oversight, offer minimal interference to obtaining drugs. With no physician involved, patients cease to be patients. Instead, they become consumers able to buy prescription medications, even controlled substances, from anonymous providers offering no ongoing treatment relationship and taking no responsibility for the drugs dispensed. When complications occur, these consumers become patients, turning back to the traditional medical system to manage overdoses, addictions, and drug adverse effects and interactions. We present a case series illustrating some of the medical problems that resulted from drugs bought on-line illegally. PMID:15301331

  1. The Documentation of Health Problems in Relation to Prescribed Medication in People with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Heide, D. C.; van der Putten, A. A. J.; van den Berg, P. B.; Taxis, K.; Vlaskamp, C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) suffer from a wide range of health problems and use a wide range of different drugs. This study investigated for frequently used medication whether there was a health problem documented in the medical notes for the drug prescribed. Method: Persons with PIMD with an…

  2. Taking aim at medical identity theft. Document security key element to comply with government regulations.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Colette

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive paper documents, such as patient records, customer data, and legal information, must be securely stored and destroyed when no longer needed. This is not only a good business practice that reduces costs and protects reputations, but also a legal and regulatory imperative. According to some experts, medical identity theft is the fastest-growing form of identity theft in North America. The Federal Trade Commission's Red Flags Rule, due to take effect June 1, 2010, requires banks; credit card companies; and, in some situations, retailers, hospitals, insurance companies, health clinics, and other organizations to store confidential personal information that can expose consumers to significant identity theft risks. This also includes healthcare providers and other organizations that are considered creditors according to their billing/payment procedures. This article highlights the steps healthcare providers must take to ensure data security. PMID:20695253

  3. A novel classification and online platform for planning and documentation of medical applications of additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Tuomi, Jukka; Paloheimo, Kaija-Stiina; Vehviläinen, Juho; Björkstrand, Roy; Salmi, Mika; Huotilainen, Eero; Kontio, Risto; Rouse, Stephen; Gibson, Ian; Mäkitie, Antti A

    2014-12-01

    Additive manufacturing technologies are widely used in industrial settings and now increasingly also in several areas of medicine. Various techniques and numerous types of materials are used for these applications. There is a clear need to unify and harmonize the patterns of their use worldwide. We present a 5-class system to aid planning of these applications and related scientific work as well as communication between various actors involved in this field. An online, matrix-based platform and a database were developed for planning and documentation of various solutions. This platform will help the medical community to structurally develop both research innovations and clinical applications of additive manufacturing. The online platform can be accessed through http://www.medicalam.info. PMID:24616012

  4. Wound emergencies: the importance of assessment, documentation, and early treatment using a wound electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Golinko, Michael S; Clark, Sunday; Rennert, Robert; Flattau, Anna; Boulton, Andrew J M; Brem, Harold

    2009-05-01

    Chronic wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, venous ulcers, and pressure ulcers are a major source of morbidity and mortality. To describe wound characteristics associated with a wound emergency, the Wound Electronic Medical Records (WEMR) of 200 consecutive admissions (139 patients, average number of admissions 1.4) to a dedicated inpatient wound healing unit over a period of 5 months were retrospectively reviewed. Patient mean age was 62 +/- 16 years, 59% were men, 27% had a foot ulcer and diabetes mellitus, and 29% had venous ulcers. Presenting signs and symptoms included wound pain, cellulitis, nonpurulent drainage, and undermining, but few presented with classic local clinical signs of infection. Treatment consisted of sharp debridement with deep tissue culture and pathology from the wound base and/or systemic antibiotics. Twenty-percent (20%) of patients had pathology-confirmed and 38% had pathology- or radiology-confirmed osteomyelitis on admission, supporting that new or increasing wound pain, cellulitis, and/or nonpurulent drainage or presence of significant undermining may be indicative of an invasive infection and that patients presenting with these signs and symptoms require an immediate treatment plan and consideration of hospital admission. Use of an objective documentation system such as the WEMR may help alert clinicians to subtle wound changes that require aggressive treatment; thereby, avoiding emergency room visits and hospital admissions. Future research is needed utilizing the WEMR across multiple medical centers to further define criteria for a chronic wound emergency. PMID:19471049

  5. Usage experience with the document archiving and communication system for the storage and retrieval of medical records.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Toshihiro; Ueda, Kanayo; Manabe, Shiro; Teramoto, Kei; Mihara, Naoki; Matsumura, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Standard Japanese electronic medical record (EMR) systems are associated with major shortcomings. For example, they do not assure lifelong readability of records because each document requires its own viewing software program, a system that is difficult to maintain over long periods of time. It can also be difficult for users to comprehend a patient's clinical history because different classes of documents can only be accessed from their own window. To address these problems, we developed a document-based electronic medical record that aggregates all documents for a patient in a PDF or DocuWorks format. We call this system the Document Archiving and Communication System (DACS). There are two types of viewers in the DACS: the Matrix View, which provides a time line of a patient's history, and the Tree View, which stores the documents in hierarchical document classes. We placed 2,734 document classes into 11 categories. A total of 22,3972 documents were entered per month. The frequency of use of the DACS viewer was 268,644 instances per month. The DACS viewer was used to assess a patient's clinical history. PMID:23920795

  6. The development of MML (Medical Markup Language) version 3.0 as a medical document exchange format for HL7 messages.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinqiu; Takada, Akira; Tanaka, Koji; Sato, Junzo; Suzuki, Muneou; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Nakashima, Yusei; Araki, Kenji; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2004-12-01

    Medical Markup Language (MML), as a set of standards, has been developed over the last 8 years to allow the exchange of medical data between different medical information providers. MML Version 2.21 used XML as a metalanguage and was announced in 1999. In 2001, MML was updated to Version 2.3, which contained 12 modules. The latest version--Version 3.0--is based on the HL7 Clinical Document Architecture (CDA). During the development of this new version, the structure of MML Version 2.3 was analyzed, subdivided into several categories, and redefined so the information defined in MML could be described in HL7 CDA Level One. As a result of this development, it has become possible to exchange MML Version 3.0 medical documents via HL7 messages. PMID:15615281

  7. Cognitive analyses of a paper medical record and electronic medical record on the documentation of two nursing tasks: patient education and adherence assessment of insulin administration.

    PubMed Central

    Rinkus, Susan M.; Chitwood, Ainsley

    2002-01-01

    The incorporation of electronic medical records into busy physician clinics has been a major development in the healthcare industry over the past decade. Documentation of key nursing activities, especially when interacting with patients who have chronic diseases, is often lacking or missing from the paper medical record. A case study of a patient with diabetes mellitus was created. Well established methods for the assessment of usability in the areas of human-computer interaction and computer supported cooperative work were employed to compare the nursing documentation of two tasks in a commercially available electronic medical record (eRecord) and in a paper medical record. Overall, the eRecord was found to improve the timeliness and quality of nursing documentation. With certain tasks, the number of steps to accomplish the same task was higher, which may result in the perception by the end user that the tool is more complex and therefore difficult to use. Recommendations for the eRecord were made to expand the documentation of patient teaching and adherence assessment and to incorporate web technology for patient access to medical records and healthcare information. PMID:12463905

  8. In the Words of the Medical Tourist: An Analysis of Internet Narratives by Health Travelers to Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients regularly travel to the West for advanced medical care, but now the trend is also shifting in the opposite direction. Many people from Western countries now seek care outside of their country. This phenomenon has been labeled medical tourism or health travel. Information regarding health travelers’ actual outcomes, experiences, and perceptions is lacking or insufficient. However, advanced Internet technology and apps provide information on medical tourism and are a vehicle for patients to share their experiences. Turkey has a large number of internationally accredited hospitals, is a top tourism destination, and is positioning itself to attract international patients. Objective The objective of this research was to identify the important individual characteristics of health travelers, outline the push and pull factors for seeking health care in Turkey, identify satisfaction with the outcomes and the results of these individuals’ treatments, and note positive and negative factors influencing their perceptions and overall experiences about patients’ health travel. Methods This research uses qualitative data from Internet narratives of medical tourists to Turkey. Ethical considerations of using Internet narratives were reviewed. Narratives for analysis were obtained by using the Google search engine and using multiple search terms to obtain publicly posted blogs and discussion board postings of health travelers via purposeful sampling. Narratives were included if they were written in English, described travel to Turkey for health care, and were publicly accessible. Exclusion criteria included narratives that were on medical tourism facilitator or provider promotional websites, not in English, and did not describe an experience of a medical tourist. Medical tourists’ written words were analyzed in an iterative analytic process using narrative analysis theory principles. Three stages of coding (open, axial, and selective) were conducted to

  9. 10 years experience with pioneering open access publishing in health informatics: the Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR).

    PubMed

    Eysenbach, Gunther

    2010-01-01

    Peer-reviewed journals remain important vehicles for knowledge transfer and dissemination in health informatics, yet, their format, processes and business models are changing only slowly. Up to the end of last century, it was common for individual researchers and scientific organizations to leave the business of knowledge transfer to professional publishers, signing away their rights to the works in the process, which in turn impeded wider dissemination. Traditional medical informatics journals are poorly cited and the visibility and uptake of articles beyond the medical informatics community remain limited. In 1999, the Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR; http://www.jmir.org) was launched, featuring several innovations including 1) ownership and copyright retained by the authors, 2) electronic-only, "lean" non-for-profit publishing, 3) openly accessible articles with a reversed business model (author pays instead of reader pays), 4) technological innovations such as automatic XML tagging and reference checking, on-the-fly PDF generation from XML, etc., enabling wide distribution in various bibliographic and full-text databases. In the past 10 years, despite limited resources, the journal has emerged as a leading journal in health informatics, and is presently ranked the top journal in the medical informatics and health services research categories by impact factor. The paper summarizes some of the features of the Journal, and uses bibliometric and access data to compare the influence of the Journal on the discipline of medical informatics and other disciplines. While traditional medical informatics journals are primarily cited by other Medical Informatics journals (33%-46% of citations), JMIR papers are to a more often cited by "end-users" (policy, public health, clinical journals), which may be partly attributable to the "open access advantage". PMID:20841900

  10. Assessing Quality of Life and Medical Care in Chronic Angina: An Internet Survey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Angina is a clinical syndrome whose recognition relies heavily on self-report, so its identification can be challenging. Most data come from cohorts identified by physicians and nurses at the point of care; however, current widespread access to the Internet makes identification of community cohorts feasible and offers a complementary picture of angina. Objective To describe a population self-identified as experiencing chronic angina by use of an Internet survey. Methods Using email and an Internet portal, we invited individuals with a diagnosis of angina and recent symptoms to complete an Internet survey on treatment and quality of life (QOL). In total, 1147 surveys were received. The main analysis was further limited to those reporting a definite coronary heart disease (CHD) history (N=646, 56% of overall). Results Overall, about 15% reported daily angina and 40% weekly angina. Those with more frequent angina were younger, more often depressed, and reported a shorter time since diagnosis. They also had substantially worse treatment satisfaction, physical function, and overall QOL. Fewer than 40% were on ≥ 2 anti-anginals, even with daily angina. The subjects without a history of definite CHD had unexpectedly low use of antianginal and evidence-based medicines, suggesting either a lack of specificity in the use of self-reported angina to identify patients with CHD or lack of access to care. Conclusions Use of inexpensive electronic tools can identify community-based angina cohorts for clinical research. Limitation to subjects with a definite history of CHD lends diagnostic face validity to the approach; however, other symptomatic individuals are also identified. PMID:27125492

  11. EFFECTS OF MEDICAL DISPUTES ON INTERNET COMMUNICATIONS OF NEGATIVE EMOTIONS AND NEGATIVE ONLINE WORD-OF-MOUTH.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Chih; Wu, Wei-Li

    2015-08-01

    Emotions play an important role in human behavior. Negative emotions resulting from medical disputes are problems for medical personnel to solve but also have a significant impact on a hospital's reputation and people's trust in the hospital. One medical dispute case was chosen from an Internet news source to assess the correlation between people's negative emotions and negative online word-of-mouth. Convenience sampling was used in school faculties and university students who had shared their medical treatment experiences online were the research participants. A total of 221 Taiwanese participants volunteered (158 women, 63 men; ages: 26.7% under 19, 22.6% 20-29, 30.8% 30-39,19.9% over 40). Four negative emotions were measured using rating scales: uncertainty, anger, disappointment, and sadness. Four negative online word-of-mouth measures were: venting, advice search, helping receiver, and revenge. A modeled relationship was assessed by partial least square method (PLS). Then, people's positive emotions were further analyzed to assess changes after spreading negative word-of-mouth. The results showed that uncertainty had a positive effect on venting and advice search. People who felt anger or regret spread word-of-mouth in order to help the receiver. Disappointment may trigger the revenge behavior of negative word-of-mouth. Negative emotions could be relieved after engaging in the behavior of helping the receiver. PMID:26226491

  12. A multi-agent softbot to retrieve medical information on Internet.

    PubMed

    Baujard, O; Baujard, V; Aurel, S; Boyer, C; Appel, R D

    1998-01-01

    World-Wide Web is a media where information is unstructured, distributed, multimedia and multilingual. Many tools have been developed to help users search for information: subject hierarchies, general search engines, browsers and search assistants. Although helpful, they show serious limitations, mainly in terms of precision, multilingual indexing and distribution. The M.A.R.V.I.N. project (Multi Agent Retrieval Vagabond on Information Networks) proposes solutions with a distribution of the indexing task in agents specialized in a given domain. M.A.R.V.I.N. has been successfully applied to the medical domain. The medical index and its associated search engine MedHunt (Medical Hunter) demonstrate the interest of such an approach with currently 50,000 indexed medical sites and more than 100,000 accesses each month. PMID:10384437

  13. Electronic Documentation Support Tools and Text Duplication in the Electronic Medical Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrenn, Jesse

    2010-01-01

    In order to ease the burden of electronic note entry on physicians, electronic documentation support tools have been developed to assist in note authoring. There is little evidence of the effects of these tools on attributes of clinical documentation, including document quality. Furthermore, the resultant abundance of duplicated text and…

  14. A Curriculum Guide for Medical Record Education. Educational Resource Document. October 1, 1980- December 31, 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biglow, Laura Anne; File, Christine E.

    This curriculum guide consists of guidelines and materials for use in developing a competency-based medical record education course for students in a medical record administration or technician program. Covered in the individual chapters are curriculum design; the role and responsibilities of medical record practitioners; the affective domain and…

  15. Admission Control Over Internet of Vehicles Attached With Medical Sensors for Ubiquitous Healthcare Applications.

    PubMed

    Lin, Di; Labeau, Fabrice; Yao, Yuanzhe; Vasilakos, Athanasios V; Tang, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Wireless technologies and vehicle-mounted or wearable medical sensors are pervasive to support ubiquitous healthcare applications. However, a critical issue of using wireless communications under a healthcare scenario rests at the electromagnetic interference (EMI) caused by radio frequency transmission. A high level of EMI may lead to a critical malfunction of medical sensors, and in such a scenario, a few users who are not transmitting emergency data could be required to reduce their transmit power or even temporarily disconnect from the network in order to guarantee the normal operation of medical sensors as well as the transmission of emergency data. In this paper, we propose a joint power and admission control algorithm to schedule the users' transmission of medical data. The objective of this algorithm is to minimize the number of users who are forced to disconnect from the network while keeping the EMI on medical sensors at an acceptable level. We show that a fixed point of proposed algorithm always exists, and at the fixed point, our proposed algorithm can minimize the number of low-priority users who are required to disconnect from the network. Numerical results illustrate that the proposed algorithm can achieve robust performance against the variations of mobile hospital environments. PMID:25974956

  16. Association of Medical Directors of Information Systems consensus on inpatient electronic health record documentation.

    PubMed

    Shoolin, J; Ozeran, L; Hamann, C; Bria, W

    2013-01-01

    In 2013, electronic documentation of clinical care stands at a crossroads. The benefits of creating digital notes are at risk of being overwhelmed by the inclusion of easily importable detail. Providers are the primary authors of encounters with patients. We must document clearly our understanding of patients and our communication with them and our colleagues. We want to document efficiently to meet without exceeding documentation guidelines. We copy and paste documentation, because it not only simplifies the documentation process generally, but also supports meeting coding and regulatory requirements specifically. Since the primary goal of our profession is to spend as much time as possible listening to, understanding and helping patients, clinicians need information technology to make electronic documentation easier, not harder. At the same time, there should be reasonable restrictions on the use of copy and paste to limit the growing challenge of 'note bloat'. We must find the right balance between ease of use and thoughtless documentation. The guiding principles in this document may be used to launch an interdisciplinary dialogue that promotes useful and necessary documentation that best facilitates efficient information capture and effective display. PMID:23874365

  17. Association of Medical Directors of Information Systems Consensus on Inpatient Electronic Health Record Documentation

    PubMed Central

    Shoolin, J.; Ozeran, L.; Hamann, C.; Bria II, W.

    2013-01-01

    In 2013, electronic documentation of clinical care stands at a crossroads. The benefits of creating digital notes are at risk of being overwhelmed by the inclusion of easily importable detail. Providers are the primary authors of encounters with patients. We must document clearly our understanding of patients and our communication with them and our colleagues. We want to document efficiently to meet without exceeding documentation guidelines. We copy and paste documentation, because it not only simplifies the documentation process generally, but also supports meeting coding and regulatory requirements specifically. Since the primary goal of our profession is to spend as much time as possible listening to, understanding and helping patients, clinicians need information technology to make electronic documentation easier, not harder. At the same time, there should be reasonable restrictions on the use of copy and paste to limit the growing challenge of ‘note bloat’. We must find the right balance between ease of use and thoughtless documentation. The guiding principles in this document may be used to launch an interdisciplinary dialogue that promotes useful and necessary documentation that best facilitates efficient information capture and effective display. PMID:23874365

  18. End-to-end performance measurement of Internet based medical applications.

    PubMed Central

    Dev, P.; Harris, D.; Gutierrez, D.; Shah, A.; Senger, S.

    2002-01-01

    We present a method to obtain an end-to-end characterization of the performance of an application over a network. This method is not dependent on any specific application or type of network. The method requires characterization of network parameters, such as latency and packet loss, between the expected server or client endpoints, as well as characterization of the application's constraints on these parameters. A subjective metric is presented that integrates these characterizations and that operates over a wide range of applications and networks. We believe that this method may be of wide applicability as research and educational applications increasingly make use of computation and data servers that are distributed over the Internet. PMID:12463816

  19. Medical imaging document sharing solutions for various kinds of healthcare services based on IHE XDS/XDS-I profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Yang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Kai; Sun, Jianyong; Ling, Tonghui; Wang, Tusheng; Wang, Mingqing; Bak, Peter

    2014-03-01

    One key problem for continuity of patient care is identification of a proper method to share and exchange patient medical records among multiple hospitals and healthcare providers. This paper focuses in the imaging document component of medical record. The XDS-I (Cross- Enterprise Document Sharing - Image) Profile based on the IHE IT-Infrastructure extends and specializes XDS to support imaging "document" sharing in an affinity domain. We present three studies about image sharing solutions based on IHE XDS-I Profile. The first one is to adopt the IHE XDS-I profile as a technical guide to design image and report sharing mechanisms between hospitals for regional healthcare service in Shanghai. The second study is for collaborating image diagnosis in regional healthcare services. The latter study is to investigate the XDS-I based clearinghouse for patient controlled image sharing in the RSNA Image Sharing Network Project. We conclude that the IHE XDS/XDS-I profiles can be used as the foundation to design medical image document sharing for Various Healthcare Services.

  20. [Medical research in the US armed Forces (review of foreign internet-publications)].

    PubMed

    Agapitov, A A; Aleĭnikov, S I; Bolekhan, V I; Ivchenko, E V; Krassiĭ, A B; Nagibovich, O A; Petrov, S V; Rezvantsev, M V; Soldatov, E A; Shalakhin, R A; Sheppli, E V

    2012-10-01

    The present review is dedicated to organization and management of medical research in the US Armed Forces. At the beginning of the review a brief description of the US Armed Forces and their medical services is presented. Then.the main research organizations are successively presented: in the first part--from the Office of the Secretary of Defense, in the second--from the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, in the third through fifth--from the US Army, US Navy, US Air Force and US Coast Guard. In conclusion the current state of the US Armed Forces scientific research is appraised. PMID:23213775

  1. HelpfulMed: Intelligent Searching for Medical Information over the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsinchun; Lally, Ann M.; Zhu, Bin; Chau, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of the information needs of medical professionals and researchers focuses on the architecture of a Web portal designed to integrate advanced searching and indexing algorithms, an automatic thesaurus, and self-organizing map technologies to provide searchers with fine-grained results. Reports results of evaluation of spider algorithms…

  2. [The German Medical Devices Information System containing over 100,000 documents].

    PubMed

    Laby, R; Hummel, P

    2009-06-01

    The legal foundations, the aims, and the set up of the German Medical Devices Information System are presented. The functioning of the online registration system is demonstrated on hand of the electronic reports relating to certification with respect to section sign 18 Medical Devices Act (MPG). Using the email-based message system, the electronic routes for information are explained. The large amount of data in the medical devices database illustrates the high performance of the continuously developing information system. The future national and European perspectives of the German Medical Devices Information System are described. PMID:19458914

  3. Accessing and managing open medical resources in Africa over the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Rada; Khalifa, Aly; Jimenez-Castellanos, Ana; de la Calle, Guillermo; Ramirez-Robles, Maximo; Crespo, Jose; Perez-Rey, David; Garcia-Remesal, Miguel; Anguita, Alberto; Alonso-Calvo, Raul; de la Iglesia, Diana; Barreiro, Jose M.; Maojo, Victor

    2014-10-01

    Recent commentaries have proposed the advantages of using open exchange of data and informatics resources for improving health-related policies and patient care in Africa. Yet, in many African regions, both private medical and public health information systems are still unaffordable. Open exchange over the social Web 2.0 could encourage more altruistic support of medical initiatives. We have carried out some experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of using this approach to disseminate open data and informatics resources in Africa. After the experiments we developed the AFRICA BUILD Portal, the first Social Network for African biomedical researchers. Through the AFRICA BUILD Portal users can access in a transparent way to several resources. Currently, over 600 researchers are using distributed and open resources through this platform committed to low connections.

  4. The meaning of behavioral medicine in the public health field-a review of documents related to medical education in Japan.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    International standardization of medical education requires Japanese medical schools to restructure their curricula to include "behavioral science." Two influential documents for Japanese medical education, the "Model Core Curriculum for Medical Education in Japan" and the "Scope of the Japanese National Examination for Medical Doctors" include some key terms regarding behavioral science. However, they are not systematic and the phrase "behavioral science" itself could not be found in these documents. The new global standards for medical education, the "Basic Medical Education WFME Global Standards," require medical schools to include behavioral science in their curricula. The definition of "behavioral science" in the global standards emphasizes social aspects and determinants of health, which is also a key concept of public health. From the view point of public health, it is hoped that the systematic introduction of behavioral science into Japanese medical education will strengthen the public health mindset of medical doctors, which in turn will support the healthcare system in communities. PMID:26937252

  5. Distributing medical images with internet technologies: a DICOM web server and a DICOM java viewer.

    PubMed

    Fernàndez-Bayó, J; Barbero, O; Rubies, C; Sentís, M; Donoso, L

    2000-01-01

    With the advent of filmless radiology, it becomes important to be able to distribute radiologic images digitally throughout an entire hospital. A new approach based on World Wide Web technologies was developed to accomplish this objective. This approach involves a Web server that allows the query and retrieval of images stored in a Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) archive. The images can be viewed inside a Web browser with use of a small Java program known as the DICOM Java Viewer, which is executed inside the browser. The system offers several advantages over more traditional picture archiving and communication systems (PACS): It is easy to install and maintain, is platform independent, allows images to be manipulated and displayed efficiently, and is easy to integrate with existing systems that are already making use of Web technologies. The system is user-friendly and can easily be used from outside the hospital if a security policy is in place. The simplicity and flexibility of Internet technologies makes them highly preferable to the more complex PACS workstations. The system works well, especially with magnetic resonance and computed tomographic images, and can help improve and simplify interdepartmental relationships in a filmless hospital environment. PMID:10715352

  6. An Internet supported workflow for the publication process in UMVF (French Virtual Medical University).

    PubMed

    Renard, Jean-Marie; Bourde, Annabel; Cuggia, Marc; Garcelon, Nicolas; Souf, Nathalie; Darmoni, Stephan; Beuscart, Régis; Brunetaud, Jean-Marc

    2007-01-01

    The " Université Médicale Virtuelle Francophone" (UMVF) is a federation of French medical schools. Its main goal is to share the production and use of pedagogic medical resources generated by academic medical teachers. We developed an Open-Source application based upon a workflow system, which provides an improved publication process for the UMVF. For teachers, the tool permits easy and efficient upload of new educational resources. For web masters it provides a mechanism to easily locate and validate the resources. For librarian it provide a way to improve the efficiency of indexation. For all, the utility provides a workflow system to control the publication process. On the students side, the application improves the value of the UMVF repository by facilitating the publication of new resources and by providing an easy way to find a detailed description of a resource and to check any resource from the UMVF to ascertain its quality and integrity, even if the resource is an old deprecated version. The server tier of the application is used to implement the main workflow functionalities and is deployed on certified UMVF servers using the PHP language, an LDAP directory and an SQL database. The client tier of the application provides both the workflow and the search and check functionalities. A unique signature for each resource, was needed to provide security functionality and is implemented using a Digest algorithm. The testing performed by Rennes and Lille verified the functionality and conformity with our specifications. PMID:17344092

  7. The Vanuatu medical supply system – documenting opportunities and challenges to meet the Millennium Development Goals

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Andrew; Gilbert, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Limited human resources are widely recognised as a barrier to achieve health-related Millennium Development Goals. Availability of medical supplies and suitably trained health personnel are crucial to ensuring a well-functioning medical supply system. The objective of this paper is to identify the factors which influence the availability of medical supplies within the health facilities of Vanuatu. Methods: A qualitative triangulated strategy using semi-structured interviews, observational workplace surveys and semi-structured focus groups was developed. This research was approved by the Human Ethics Committee of the University of Canberra and was funded through a direct grant from the United Nations Population Fund Suva, Pacific sub regional office. Results: During two weeks of data collection, 21 interviews were conducted, observational workplace surveys were completed in 19 facilities and 22 personnel participated in three focus groups across three provinces. The interviewees had a wide range of primary professional groupings and were representative of the Vanuatu health workforce. A complex array of medical supply issues are described from within the three tiered structure of the medical supply system. Conclusion: The results of this research have further informed our understanding of the competencies required by healthcare personnel to conduct medical supply management activities effectively in Pacific Island countries. As a result of this research, a platform is provided for the government of Vanuatu to engage development partners to work toward a sustainable medical supply system. PMID:23093895

  8. Internet-Based Survey Evaluating Use of Pain Medications and Attitudes of Radiation Oncology Patients Toward Pain Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, Charles B. Vapiwala, Neha; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Metz, James M.

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Pain is a common symptom among cancer patients, yet many patients do not receive adequate pain management. Few data exist quantifying analgesic use by radiation oncology patients. This study evaluated the causes of pain in cancer patients and investigated the reasons patients fail to receive optimal analgesic therapy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based questionnaire assessing analgesic use and pain control was posted on the OncoLink (available at (www.oncolink.org)) Website. Between November 2005 and April 2006, 243 patients responded. They were predominantly women (73%), white (71%), and educated beyond high school (67%) and had breast (38%), lung (6%), or ovarian (6%) cancer. This analysis evaluated the 106 patients (44%) who underwent radiotherapy. Results: Of the 106 patients, 58% reported pain from their cancer treatment, and 46% reported pain directly from their cancer. The pain was chronic in 51% and intermittent in 33%. Most (80%) did not use medication to manage their pain. Analgesic use was significantly less in patients with greater education levels (11% vs. 36%, p = 0.002), with a trend toward lower use by whites (16% vs. 32%, p 0.082) and women (17% vs. 29%, p = 0.178). The reasons for not taking analgesics included healthcare provider not recommending medication (87%), fear of addiction or dependence (79%), and inability to pay (79%). Participants experiencing pain, but not taking analgesics, pursued alternative therapies for relief. Conclusions: Many radiation oncology patients experience pain from their disease and cancer treatment. Most study participants did not use analgesics because of concerns of addiction, cost, or failure of the radiation oncologist to recommend medication. Healthcare providers should have open discussions with their patients regarding pain symptoms and treatment.

  9. Evaluating Aspects of Online Medication Safety in Long-Term Follow-Up of 136 Internet Pharmacies: Illegal Rogue Online Pharmacies Flourish and Are Long-Lived

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A growing number of online pharmacies have been established worldwide. Among them are numerous illegal websites selling medicine without valid medical prescriptions or distributing substandard or counterfeit drugs. Only a limited number of studies have been published on Internet pharmacies with regard to patient safety, professionalism, long-term follow-up, and pharmaceutical legitimacy verification. Objective In this study, we selected, evaluated, and followed 136 Internet pharmacy websites aiming to identify indicators of professional online pharmacy service and online medication safety. Methods An Internet search was performed by simulating the needs of potential customers of online pharmacies. A total of 136 Internet pharmacy websites were assessed and followed for four years. According to the LegitScript database, relevant characteristics such as longevity, time of continuous operation, geographical location, displayed contact information, prescription requirement, medical information exchange, and pharmaceutical legitimacy verification were recorded and evaluated. Results The number of active Internet pharmacy websites decreased; 23 of 136 (16.9%) online pharmacies ceased operating within 12 months and only 67 monitored websites (49.3%) were accessible at the end of the four-year observation period. However, not all operated continuously, as about one-fifth (31/136) of all observed online pharmacy websites were inaccessible provisionally. Thus, only 56 (41.2%) Internet-based pharmacies were continuously operational. Thirty-one of the 136 online pharmacies (22.8%) had not provided any contact details, while only 59 (43.4%) displayed all necessary contact information on the website. We found that the declared physical location claims did not correspond to the area of domain registration (according to IP address) for most websites. Although the majority (120/136, 88.2%) of the examined Internet pharmacies distributed various prescription

  10. Joint source-channel coding: secured and progressive transmission of compressed medical images on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Babel, Marie; Parrein, Benoît; Déforges, Olivier; Normand, Nicolas; Guédon, Jean-Pierre; Coat, Véronique

    2008-06-01

    The joint source-channel coding system proposed in this paper has two aims: lossless compression with a progressive mode and the integrity of medical data, which takes into account the priorities of the image and the properties of a network with no guaranteed quality of service. In this context, the use of scalable coding, locally adapted resolution (LAR) and a discrete and exact Radon transform, known as the Mojette transform, meets this twofold requirement. In this paper, details of this joint coding implementation are provided as well as a performance evaluation with respect to the reference CALIC coding and to unequal error protection using Reed-Solomon codes. PMID:18289830

  11. Google Glass for Documentation of Medical Findings: Evaluation in Forensic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Google Glass is a promising premarket device that includes an optical head-mounted display. Several proof of concept reports exist, but there is little scientific evidence regarding its use in a medical setting. Objective The objective of this study was to empirically determine the feasibility of deploying Glass in a forensics setting. Methods Glass was used in combination with a self-developed app that allowed for hands-free operation during autopsy and postmortem examinations of 4 decedents performed by 2 physicians. A digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera was used for image comparison. In addition, 6 forensic examiners (3 male, 3 female; age range 23-48 years, age mean 32.8 years, SD 9.6; mean work experience 6.2 years, SD 8.5) were asked to evaluate 159 images for image quality on a 5-point Likert scale, specifically color discrimination, brightness, sharpness, and their satisfaction with the acquired region of interest. Statistical evaluations were performed to determine how Glass compares with conventionally acquired digital images. Results All images received good (median 4) and very good ratings (median 5) for all 4 categories. Autopsy images taken by Glass (n=32) received significantly lower ratings than those acquired by DSLR camera (n=17) (region of interest: z=–5.154, P<.001; sharpness: z=–7.898, P<.001; color: z=–4.407, P<.001, brightness: z=–3.187, P=.001). For 110 images of postmortem examinations (Glass: n=54, DSLR camera: n=56), ratings for region of interest (z=–8.390, P<.001) and brightness (z=–540, P=.007) were significantly lower. For interrater reliability, intraclass correlation (ICC) values were good for autopsy (ICC=.723, 95% CI .667-.771, P<.001) and postmortem examination (ICC=.758, 95% CI .727-.787, P<.001). Postmortem examinations performed using Glass took 42.6 seconds longer than those done with the DSLR camera (z=–2.100, P=.04 using Wilcoxon signed rank test). The battery charge of Glass quickly decreased

  12. Medical Devices; Gastroenterology-Urology Devices; Classification of the Prostate Lesion Documentation System. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-11-23

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the prostate lesion documentation system into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the prostate lesion documentation system classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. PMID:26595945

  13. Collaborative medical informatics research using the Internet and the World Wide Web.

    PubMed Central

    Shortliffe, E. H.; Barnett, G. O.; Cimino, J. J.; Greenes, R. A.; Huff, S. M.; Patel, V. L.

    1996-01-01

    The InterMed Collaboratory is an interdisciplinary project involving six participating medical institutions. There are two broad mandates for the effort. The first is to further the development, sharing, and demonstration of numerous software and system components, data sets, procedures and tools that will facilitate the collaborations and support the application goals of these projects. The second is to provide a distributed suite of clinical applications, guidelines, and knowledge-bases for clinical, educational, and administrative purposes. To define the interactions among the components, datasets, procedures, and tools that we are producing and sharing, we have identified a model composed of seven tiers, each of which supports the levels above it. In this paper we briefly describe those tiers and the nature of the collaborative process with which we have experimented. PMID:8947641

  14. Basic Internet Software Toolkit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Larry

    1998-01-01

    Once schools are connected to the Internet, the next step is getting network workstations configured for Internet access. This article describes a basic toolkit comprising software currently available on the Internet for free or modest cost. Lists URLs for Web browser, Telnet, FTP, file decompression, portable document format (PDF) reader,…

  15. Offering an American Graduate Medical HIV Course to Health Care Workers in Resource-Limited Settings via the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Michael H.; Severynen, Anneleen O.; Hals, Matthew P.; Harrington, Robert D.; Spach, David H.; Kim, H. Nina

    2012-01-01

    Background Western accredited medical universities can offer graduate-level academic courses to health care workers (HCWs) in resource-limited settings through the internet. It is not known whether HCWs are interested in these online courses, whether they can perform as well as matriculated students, or whether such courses are educationally or practically relevant. Methods and Findings In 2011, the University of Washington (UW) Schools of Medicine and Nursing offered the graduate course, “Clinical Management of HIV”, to HCWs that included a demographic survey, knowledge assessment, and course evaluation. UW faculty delivered HIV clinical topics through ten 2-hour weekly sessions from the perspectives of practicing HIV medicine in developed and developing settings. HCWs viewed lectures through Adobe Acrobat Connect Pro (Adobe Systems, San Jose, CA), and completed online homework on HIV Web Study (http://depts.washington.edu/hivaids/) and online quizzes. HCWs, who met the same passing requirements as UW students by attending 80% lectures, completing ≥90% homework, and achieving a cumulative ≥70% grade on quizzes, were awarded a certificate. 369 HCWs at 33 sites in 21 countries joined the course in 2011, a >15-fold increase since the course was first offered in 2007. The majority of HCWs came from Africa (72%), and most were physicians (41%), nurses (22%), or midlevel practitioners (20%). 298 HCWs (81%) passed all requirements and earned a certificate. In a paired analysis of pre- and post-course HIV knowledge assessments, 56% of HCWs improved their post-course score (p<0.0001) with 27% improving by at least 30%. In the course evaluation, most HCWs rated the course as excellent (53%) or very good (39%). Conclusions This online HIV course demonstrated that opening a Western graduate medical and nursing curriculum to HCWs in resource-limited settings is feasible, popular, and valuable, and may address logistic and economic barriers to the provision of high

  16. Automatically Detecting Medications and the Reason for their Prescription in Clinical Narrative Text Documents

    PubMed Central

    Meystre, Stéphane M.; Thibault, Julien; Shen, Shuying; Hurdle, John F.; South, Brett R.

    2011-01-01

    An important proportion of the information about the medications a patient is taking is mentioned only in narrative text in the electronic health record. Automated information extraction can make this information accessible for decision-support, research, or any other automated processing. In the context of the “i2b2 medication extraction challenge,” we have developed a new NLP application called Textractor to automatically extract medications and details about them (e.g., dosage, frequency, reason for their prescription). This application and its evaluation with part of the reference standard for this “challenge” are presented here, along with an analysis of the development of this reference standard. During this evaluation, Textractor reached a system-level overall F1-measure, the reference metric for this challenge, of about 77% for exact matches. The best performance was measured with medication routes (F1-measure 86.4%), and the worst with prescription reasons (F1-measure 29%). These results are consistent with the agreement observed between human annotators when developing the reference standard, and with other published research. PMID:20841823

  17. Human Rights, Humanitarianism, and State Violence: Medical Documentation of Torture in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Can, Başak

    2016-09-01

    State authorities invested in developing official expert discourses and practices to deny torture in post-1980 coup d'état Turkey. Documentation of torture was therefore crucial for the incipient human rights movement there in the 1980s. Human rights physicians used their expertise not only to treat torture victims but also to document torture and eventually found the Human Rights Foundation of Turkey (HRFT) in 1990. Drawing on an ethnographic and archival research at the HRFT, this article examines the genealogy of anti-torture struggles in Turkey and argues that locally mediated intimacies and/or hostilities between victims of state violence, human rights physicians, and official forensics reveal the limitations of certain universal humanitarian and human rights principles. It also shows that locally mediated long-term humanitarian encounters around the question of political violence challenge forensic denial of violence and remake the legitimate levels of state violence. PMID:26435482

  18. Medical Data GRIDs as approach towards secure cross enterprise document sharing (based on IHE XDS).

    PubMed

    Wozak, Florian; Ammenwerth, Elske; Breu, Micheal; Penz, Robert; Schabetsberger, Thomas; Vogl, Raimund; Wurz, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    Quality and efficiency of health care services is expected to be improved by the electronic processing and trans-institutional availability of medical data. A prototype architecture based on the IHE-XDS profile is currently being developed. Due to legal and organizational requirements specific adaptations to the IHE-XDS profile have been made. In this work the services of the health@net reference architecture are described in details, which have been developed with focus on compliance to both, the IHE-XDS profile and the legal situation in Austria. We expect to gain knowledge about the development of a shared electronic health record using Medical Data Grids as an Open Source reference implementation and how proprietary Hospital Information systems can be integrated in this environment. PMID:17108551

  19. The war on malaria and Nora Heysen's documentation of Australian medical research through art between 1943 and 1945.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Cherie L; Clark, Ian A

    2011-04-18

    With the expansion of the Second World War into the Pacific in 1941, and due to the deleterious impact of malarial infection on fighting capacity, the Australian Army devoted significant resources to new research into the prevention and treatment of malaria between 1943 and 1945 by forming the Land Headquarters Medical Research Unit in Cairns, Queensland. The documentation of this research became a significant subject for leading Australian artist Nora Heysen, when she was commissioned as the first female war artist by the Australian War Memorial in 1943. PMID:21495946

  20. A workshop on developing risk assessment methods for medical use of radioactive material. Volume 2: Supporting documents

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, J.P.

    1995-08-01

    A workshop was held at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, August 16--18, 1994 on the topic of risk assessment on medical devices that use radioactive isotopes. Its purpose was to review past efforts to develop a risk assessment methodology to evaluate these devices, and to develop a program plan and a scoping document for future methodology development. This report contains presentation material and a transcript of the workshop. Participants included experts in the fields of radiation oncology, medical physics, risk assessment, human-error analysis, and human factors. Staff from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) associated with the regulation of medical uses of radioactive materials and with research into risk-assessment methods participated in the workshop. The workshop participants concurred in NRC`s intended use of risk assessment as an important technology in the development of regulations for the medical use of radioactive material and encouraged the NRC to proceed rapidly with a pilot study. Specific recommendations are included in the executive summary and the body of this report.

  1. [Research and implementation of a real-time monitoring system for running status of medical monitors based on the internet of things].

    PubMed

    Li, Yiming; Qian, Mingli; Li, Long; Li, Bin

    2014-07-01

    This paper proposed a real-time monitoring system for running status of medical monitors based on the internet of things. In the aspect of hardware, a solution of ZigBee networks plus 470 MHz networks is proposed. In the aspect of software, graphical display of monitoring interface and real-time equipment failure alarm is implemented. The system has the function of remote equipment failure detection and wireless localization, which provides a practical and effective method for medical equipment management. PMID:25330600

  2. [Up-to=date view on medical documentation in surgical clinic].

    PubMed

    Kriger, A G; Nechipaĭ, A M; Fedorov, A V; Glushkov, P S

    2000-01-01

    Computer variants of the fragments of clinical records were developed. They represent the parts: "Title-page", "Examination of surgical patient in the admission department", "Protocol of laparoscopic cholecystectomy". During modelling of the intellectual contents of the modules the principle of the formalized protocol was used, which has been realized with use of a context-depending menu. According to the authors opinion, newly developed programs provide objective and correct reflection of any clinical and surgical situation, use of standardized terminology and classifications, save the surgeons the trouble of "scribbling" and decrease time-consuming registration of medical records, provide specialized information, prevent possible diagnostic and technical errors, and give physicians, legal defence. PMID:10684200

  3. The internet

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shahi, R; Sadler, M; Rees, G; Bateman, D

    2002-01-01

    The growing use of email and the world wide web (WWW), by the public, academics, and clinicians—as well as the increasing availability of high quality information on the WWW—make a working knowledge of the internet important. Although this article aims to enhance readers' existing use of the internet and medical resources on the WWW, it is also intelligible to someone unfamiliar with the internet. A web browser is one of the central pieces of software in modern computing: it is a window on the WWW, file transfer protocol sites, networked newsgroups, and your own computer's files. Effective use of the internet for professional purposes requires an understanding of the best strategies to search the WWW and the mechanisms for ensuring secure data transfer, as well as a compendium of online resources including journals, textbooks, medical portals, and sites providing high quality patient information. This article summarises these resources, available to incorporate into your web browser as downloadable "Favorites" or "Bookmarks" from www.jnnp.com, where there are also freely accessible hypertext links to the recommended sites. PMID:12438460

  4. The internet.

    PubMed

    Al-Shahi, R; Sadler, M; Rees, G; Bateman, D

    2002-12-01

    The growing use of email and the world wide web (WWW), by the public, academics, and clinicians-as well as the increasing availability of high quality information on the WWW-make a working knowledge of the internet important. Although this article aims to enhance readers' existing use of the internet and medical resources on the WWW, it is also intelligible to someone unfamiliar with the internet. A web browser is one of the central pieces of software in modern computing: it is a window on the WWW, file transfer protocol sites, networked newsgroups, and your own computer's files. Effective use of the internet for professional purposes requires an understanding of the best strategies to search the WWW and the mechanisms for ensuring secure data transfer, as well as a compendium of online resources including journals, textbooks, medical portals, and sites providing high quality patient information. This article summarises these resources, available to incorporate into your web browser as downloadable "Favorites" or "Bookmarks" from www.jnnp.com, where there are also freely accessible hypertext links to the recommended sites. PMID:12438460

  5. Document Management on Display.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimshaw, Anne

    1998-01-01

    Describes some of the products displayed at the United Kingdom's largest document management, imaging and workflow exhibition (Document 97, Birmingham, England, October 7-9, 1997). Includes recognition technologies; document delivery; scanning; document warehousing; document management and retrieval software; workflow systems; Internet software;…

  6. Indian Council of Medical Research consensus document for the management of gall bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Hari Shankar; Sirohi, Bhawna; Behari, Anu; Sharma, Atul; Majumdar, Jahar; Ganguly, Manomoy; Tewari, Mallika; Kumar, Sandeep; Saini, Sunil; Sahni, Peush; Singh, Tomcha; Kapoor, Vinay Kumar; Sucharita, V; Kaur, Tanvir; Shukla, Deepak Kumar; Rath, Goura Kishor

    2015-01-01

    The document is based on consensus among the experts and best available evidence pertaining to Indian population and is meant for practice in India.All postcholecystectomy gallbladder specimens should be opened and examined carefully by the operating surgeon and be sent for histopathological examination.All "incidental" gall bladder cancers (GBCs) picked up on histopathological examination should have an expert opinion.Evaluation of a patient with early GBC should include essential tests: A computed tomography (CT) scan (multi-detector or helical) of the abdomen and pelvis for staging with a CT chest or chest X-ray, and complete blood counts, renal and liver function tests. magnetic resonance imaging/positron emission tomography (PET)-CT are not recommended for all patients.For early stage disease (up to Stage IVA), surgery is recommended. The need for adjuvant treatment would be guided by the histopathological analysis of the resected specimen.Patients with Stage IVB/metastatic disease must be assessed for palliative e.g. endoscopic or radiological intervention, chemotherapy versus best supportive care on an individual basis. These patients do not require extensive workup outside of a clinical trial setting.There is an urgent need for multicenter trials from India covering various aspects of epidemiology (viz., identification of population at high-risk, organized follow-up), clinical management (viz., bile spill during surgery, excision of all port sites, adjuvant/neoadjuvant therapy) and basic research (viz., what causes GBC). PMID:26157282

  7. A systematic approach to finding answers over the Internet.

    PubMed

    Potter, L A

    1995-07-01

    New users often are surprised at how chaotic the Internet appears. They have heard so much about it and then find that it is a jumble of menus and resources. Even so, it is possible to find answers to reference questions on the Internet. This paper outlines a method for doing so. The method involves five steps: gather information and tools, learn the terminology, assemble a manual, write a strategy, and make bookmarks. The paper offers medical reference scenarios that illustrate how to search a database, find a program, find a document, and telnet to another site on the Internet. PMID:7581183

  8. Indian Council of Medical Research consensus document for the management of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Sirohi, Bhawna; Barreto, Savio G; Chacko, Raju T; Parikh, Purvish M; Pautu, Jeremy; Arya, Supreeta; Patil, Prachi; Chilukuri, Srinivas C; Ganesh, B; Kaur, Tanvir; Shukla, Deepak; Rath, Goura Shankar

    2014-10-01

    The document is based on consensus among the experts and best available evidence pertaining to Indian population and is meant for practice in India.Evaluation of a patient with newly diagnosed gastric cancer should include essential tests: A standard white light endoscopy with multiple biopsies from the tumor for confirmation of the diagnosis, a computed tomography (CT) scan (multi-detector or helical) of the abdomen and pelvis for staging with a CT chest or chest X-ray, and complete blood counts, renal and liver function tests. Endoscopic ultrasonography/ magnetic resonance imaging/positron emission tomography-CT is not recommended for all patients.For early stage disease (IA/B, N0), surgery alone is recommended. The need for adjuvant treatment would be guided by the histopathological analysis of the resected specimen.For locally advanced stage (IB, N(+) to IIIC), neoadjuvant chemotherapy may be considered to downstage the disease followed by surgery. This may be followed by adjuvant chemotherapy (as part of the peri-operative chemotherapy regimen)Patients with stage IV/metastatic disease must be assessed for chemotherapy versus best supportive care on an individual basis.Clinical examination including history and physical examination are recommended at each follow-up visit, with a yearly CT scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis.HER2 testing should be considered in patients with metastatic disease.5-FU may be replaced with capecitabine if patients do not have gastric outlet obstruction. Cisplatin may be replaced with oxaliplatin in the regimens. PMID:25538398

  9. Indian Council of Medical Research consensus document for the management of tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    D’Cruz, Anil K.; Sharma, Shilpi; Agarwal, Jaiprakash P.; Thakar, Alok; Teli, Ashraf; Arya, Supreeta; Desai, Chirag; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Sebastian, Paul; Verghese, Bipin T.; Kane, Shubhada; Sucharita, V; Kaur, Tanvir; Shukla, D. K.; Rath, Goura Kishor

    2015-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The document is based on consensus among the experts and best available evidence pertaining to Indian population and is meant for practice in India.Early diagnosis is imperative in improving outcomes and preserving quality of life. High index of suspicion is to be maintained for leukoplakia (high risk site).Evaluation of a patient with newly diagnosed tongue cancer should include essential tests: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is investigative modality of choice when indicated. Computed tomography (CT) scan is an option when MRI is unavailable. In early lesions when imaging is not warranted ultrasound may help guide management of the neck.Early stage cancers (stage I & II) require single modality treatment – either surgery or radiotherapy. Surgery is preferred. Adjuvant radiotherapy is indicated for T3/T4 cancers, presence of high risk features [lymphovascular emboli (LVE), perineural invasion (PNI), poorly differentiated, node +, close margins). Adjuvant chemoradiation (CTRT) is indicated for positive margins and extranodal disease.Locally advanced operable cancers (stage III & IVA) require combined multimodality treatment - surgery + adjuvant treatment. Adjuvant treatment is indicated in all and in the presence of high risk features as described above.Locally advanced inoperable cancers (stage IVB) are treated with palliative chemo-radiotherapy, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or symptomatic treatment depending upon the performance status. Select cases may be considered for neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical salvage.Metastatic disease (stage IVC) should be treated with a goal for palliation. Chemotherapy may be offered to patients with good performance status. Local treatment in the form of radiotherapy may be added for palliation of symptoms.Intense follow-up every 3 months is required for initial 2 years as most recurrences occur in the first 24 months. After 2nd year follow up is done at 4-6 months interval. At each follow up

  10. Indian Council of Medical Research consensus document for the management of tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    D'Cruz, Anil K; Sharma, Shilpi; Agarwal, Jaiprakash P; Thakar, Alok; Teli, Ashraf; Arya, Supreeta; Desai, Chirag; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Sebastian, Paul; Verghese, Bipin T; Kane, Shubhada; Sucharita, V; Kaur, Tanvir; Shukla, D K; Rath, Goura Kishor

    2015-01-01

    The document is based on consensus among the experts and best available evidence pertaining to Indian population and is meant for practice in India.Early diagnosis is imperative in improving outcomes and preserving quality of life. High index of suspicion is to be maintained for leukoplakia (high risk site).Evaluation of a patient with newly diagnosed tongue cancer should include essential tests: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is investigative modality of choice when indicated. Computed tomography (CT) scan is an option when MRI is unavailable. In early lesions when imaging is not warranted ultrasound may help guide management of the neck.Early stage cancers (stage I & II) require single modality treatment - either surgery or radiotherapy. Surgery is preferred. Adjuvant radiotherapy is indicated for T3/T4 cancers, presence of high risk features [lymphovascular emboli (LVE), perineural invasion (PNI), poorly differentiated, node +, close margins). Adjuvant chemoradiation (CTRT) is indicated for positive margins and extranodal disease.Locally advanced operable cancers (stage III & IVA) require combined multimodality treatment - surgery + adjuvant treatment. Adjuvant treatment is indicated in all and in the presence of high risk features as described above.Locally advanced inoperable cancers (stage IVB) are treated with palliative chemo-radiotherapy, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or symptomatic treatment depending upon the performance status. Select cases may be considered for neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical salvage.Metastatic disease (stage IVC) should be treated with a goal for palliation. Chemotherapy may be offered to patients with good performance status. Local treatment in the form of radiotherapy may be added for palliation of symptoms.Intense follow-up every 3 months is required for initial 2 years as most recurrences occur in the first 24 months. After 2(nd) year follow up is done at 4-6 months interval. At each follow up screening for local

  11. Are computer-based educational materials recognized as publications? An analysis of promotion documents at American medical colleges.

    PubMed Central

    Bader, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    A generalized perception exists that faculty will not be properly rewarded for efforts in developing computer-based educational materials. Faculty governed by traditional promotion and tenure systems thus may be reluctant to devote energies towards development of these materials. Recent national panels on educational reform have called for a reexamination of academic reward structures to insure that faculty receive appropriate scholarly recognition for materials developed in these new formats. A study of policy documents from accredited medical colleges in the United States was conducted to determine the extent to which academic health science institutions have adopted policies to grant recognition of computer-based materials equivalent to that accorded traditional print publications. Results revealed that while some progress has been made by leading-edge institutions, in three-quarters of the institutions, development of computer-based educational materials is considered evidence in support of teaching, not the more highly rewarded research or scholarly activity. PMID:8130576

  12. Service providers and users discover the Internet.

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, E M; Backus, J E; Lyon, B J

    1994-01-01

    Although the Internet has evolved over more than twenty years, resources useful to health information professionals have become available on the Internet only recently. A survey conducted by the Regional Medical Libraries of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine in the fall of 1993 indicates that libraries at academic institutions are much more likely to have access to the Internet (72%) than are libraries in hospital environments (24%). Health information professionals who take on the challenge and exploit the Internet's resources find rewards for themselves and their clients. The basic electronic mail capability of the Internet allows colleagues to collaborate, communicate, and participate in daily continuing education. Internet terminal and file-transfer capabilities provide improved access to traditional resources and first-time access to new electronic resources. Through the Internet, online catalogs are available worldwide, and document delivery is faster, cheaper, and more reliable than ever before. Institutions can make organizational, full-text, online, and publication information available through Internet tools such as direct file-transfer protocol (FTP), menu-based Gopher, and hypertext-based Mosaic. The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is among organizations finding new ways to provide service through the Internet. NLM now uses electronic mail to communicate with users, FTP service to distribute publications, and tools such as Gopher and Mosaic to distribute publications and graphics and connect users to online services. The Internet allows service providers and health sciences information professionals to work in a rich, new medium whose potential is just beginning to be explored. At the same time, its characteristics--including lack of formal organization, standards, quality control, and permanence--pose a challenge. PMID:7841912

  13. How To Find Medical Information on the Internet: A Print and Online Tutorial for the Healthcare Professional and Consumer. Internet Workshop Series Number 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacs, Diane K.; Carlson, Ann L.

    Whether one is a specialist working in any of the fields of health and medicine or someone who wants nontechnical answers to health- or medical-related questions, this book guides users through the search methods to the materials, people, or other resources they seek. Included in this book are step-by-step instructions in finding health and…

  14. [Internet addiction].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hideki; Higuchi, Susumu

    2015-09-01

    Internet technologies have made a rapid progress, bringing convenience to daily life. On the other hand, internet use disorder and internet addiction (IA) have become reportedly serious health and social problems. In 2013, internet gaming disorder criteria have been proposed in the section of Conditions for Further Study of DSM-5. Existing epidemiological studies by questionnaire methods have reported that the prevalence of IA ranges between 2.8% and 9.9% among youths in Japan. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), sleeping disorders, depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, and phobic anxiety disorder are extremely common comorbid mental disorders with IA. Some psychotherapies (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing) and medical treatments (e.g., antidepressant drugs, methylphenidate) for comorbid mental disorders as well as rehabilitation (e.g., treatment camp) are effective for IA remission. However, some serious cases of IA may be difficult to treat, and prevention is very important. In future, the prevention, rehabilitations and treatments for IA will be more required in Japan. PMID:26394521

  15. If You Didn’t Document It, It Didn’t Happen: Rates of Documentation of Discussion of Fertility Risk in Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Oncology Patients’ Medical Record

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Block, Rebecca; Clayman, Marla L.; Kelvin, Joanne; Arvey, Sarah R; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Reinecke, Joyce; Sehovic, Ivana; Jacobsen, Paul B.; Reed, Damon; Gonzalez, Luis; Vadaparampil, Susan T; Laronga, Christine; Lee, M Catherine; Pow-Sang, Julio; Eggly, Susan; Franklin, Anna; Shah, Bijal; Fulp, William J; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) community is an underserved population due to unique quality of life and late-effect issues, particularly future fertility. This study sought to establish rates of documentation of discussion of risk of infertility, fertility preservation (FP) options, and referrals to fertility specialists in AYA patients’ medical records at four cancer centers. Methods All centers reviewed randomized medical records within the four most common disease sites among AYAs (breast, leukemia/lymphoma, sarcoma, and testicular). Eligible patient records included: 1) diagnosed in 2011 with no prior gonadotoxic therapy; 2) ages 18–45; 3) no multiple primary cancers; and 4) not second opinions. Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) methods were used to evaluate documentation of: a) discussion of risk of infertility; b) discussion of FP options; and c) referral to a fertility specialist. Results A total of 231 records were analyzed. Overall, 61 (26%) of records documented item a; 56 (24%) documented item b; and 31 (13%) documented item c. Female (p = 0.030; p = 0.004) and breast cancer (p = 0.021; p < 0.001) records were less likely to contain evidence of a and b. Conclusion The overall rate of documentation is low and results show disparities among specific groups. While greater numbers of discussions may be occurring, there is need to create interventions to improve documentation. Rates may improve with increased provider education and other intervention efforts. PMID:25549654

  16. Improving and measuring inpatient documentation of medical care within the MS-DRG system: education, monitoring, and normalized case mix index.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Benjamin P; Lorenz, Robert R; Luther, Ralph B; Knowles-Ward, Lisa; Kelly, Dianne L; Weil, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Documentation of the care delivered to hospitalized patients is a ubiquitous and important aspect of medical care. The majority of references to documentation and coding are based on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Medicare Severity Diagnosis Related Group (MS-DRG) inpatient prospective payment system (IPPS). We educated the members of a clinical care team in a single department (neurosurgery) at our hospital. We measured subsequent documentation improvements in a simple, meaningful, and reproducible fashion. We created a new metric to measure documentation, termed the "normalized case mix index," that allows comparison of hospitalizations across multiple unrelated MS-DRG groups. Compared to one year earlier, the traditional case mix index, normalized case mix index, severity of illness, and risk of mortality increased one year after the educational intervention. We encourage other organizations to implement and systematically monitor documentation improvement efforts when attempting to determine the accuracy and quality of documentation achieved. PMID:25214820

  17. Improving and Measuring Inpatient Documentation of Medical Care within the MS-DRG System: Education, Monitoring, and Normalized Case Mix Index

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Benjamin P.; Lorenz, Robert R.; Luther, Ralph B.; Knowles-Ward, Lisa; Kelly, Dianne L.; Weil, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Documentation of the care delivered to hospitalized patients is a ubiquitous and important aspect of medical care. The majority of references to documentation and coding are based on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Medicare Severity Diagnosis Related Group (MS-DRG) inpatient prospective payment system (IPPS). We educated the members of a clinical care team in a single department (neurosurgery) at our hospital. We measured subsequent documentation improvements in a simple, meaningful, and reproducible fashion. We created a new metric to measure documentation, termed the “normalized case mix index,” that allows comparison of hospitalizations across multiple unrelated MS-DRG groups. Compared to one year earlier, the traditional case mix index, normalized case mix index, severity of illness, and risk of mortality increased one year after the educational intervention. We encourage other organizations to implement and systematically monitor documentation improvement efforts when attempting to determine the accuracy and quality of documentation achieved. PMID:25214820

  18. Quality of documentation on antibiotic therapy in medical records: evaluation of combined interventions in a teaching hospital by repeated point prevalence survey.

    PubMed

    Vercheval, C; Gillet, M; Maes, N; Albert, A; Frippiat, F; Damas, P; Van Hees, T

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to improve the quality of documentation on antibiotic therapy in the computerized medical records of inpatients. A prospective, uncontrolled, interrupted time series (ITS) study was conducted by repeated point prevalence survey (PPS) to audit the quality of documentation on antibiotic therapy in the medical records before and after a combined intervention strategy (implementation of guidelines, distribution of educational materials, educational outreach visits, group educational interactive sessions) from the antimicrobial stewardship team (AST) in the academic teaching hospital (CHU) of Liège, Belgium. The primary outcome measure was the documentation rate on three quality indicators in the computerized medical records: (1) indication for treatment, (2) antibiotics prescribed, and (3) duration or review date. Segmented regression analysis was used to analyze the ITS. The medical records of 2306 patients receiving antibiotics for an infection (1177 in the pre-intervention period and 1129 in the post-intervention period) were analyzed. A significant increase in mean percentages in the post-intervention period was observed as compared with the pre-intervention period for the three quality indicators (indication documented 83.4 ± 10.4 % vs. 90.3 ± 6.6 %, p = 0.0013; antibiotics documented 87.9 ± 9.0 % vs. 95.6 ± 5.1 %, p < 0.0001; and duration or review date documented 31.9 ± 15.4 % vs. 67.7 ± 15.2 %, p < 0.0001). The study demonstrated the successful implementation of a combined intervention strategy from the AST. This strategy was associated with significant changes in the documentation rate in the computerized medical records for the three quality indicators. PMID:27255220

  19. Evaluation of an internet-based aftercare program to improve vocational reintegration after inpatient medical rehabilitation: study protocol for a cluster-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mental disorders are the main reasons for rising proportions of premature pension in most high-income countries. Although inpatient medical rehabilitation has increasingly targeted work-related stress, there is still a lack of studies on the transfer of work-specific interventions into work contexts. Therefore, we plan to evaluate an online aftercare program aiming to improve vocational reintegration after medical rehabilitation. Methods Vocationally strained patients (n = 800) aged between 18 and 59 years with private internet access are recruited in psychosomatic, orthopedic and cardiovascular rehabilitation clinics in Germany. During inpatient rehabilitation, participants in stress management group training are cluster-randomized to the intervention or control group. The intervention group (n = 400) is offered an internet-based aftercare with weekly writing tasks and therapeutic feedback, a patient forum, a self-test and relaxation exercises. The control group (n = 400) obtains regular e-mail reminders with links to publicly accessible information about stress management and coping. Assessments are conducted at the beginning of inpatient rehabilitation, the end of inpatient rehabilitation, the end of aftercare, and 9 months later. The primary outcome is a risk score for premature pension, measured by a screening questionnaire at follow-up. Secondary outcome measures include level of vocational stress, physical and mental health, and work capacity at follow-up. Discussion We expect the intervention group to stabilize the improvements achieved during inpatient rehabilitation concerning stress management and coping, resulting in an improved vocational reintegration. The study protocol demonstrates the features of internet-based aftercare in rehabilitation. Trial registration International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Register (ISRCTN:ISRCTN33957202) PMID:23351836

  20. Application of portable CDA for secure clinical-document exchange.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Hsuan; Hsieh, Sung-Huai; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Lai, Feipei; Hsieh, Sheau-Ling; Lee, Hsiu-Hui

    2010-08-01

    Health Level Seven (HL7) organization published the Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) for exchanging documents among heterogeneous systems and improving medical quality based on the design method in CDA. In practice, although the HL7 organization tried to make medical messages exchangeable, it is still hard to exchange medical messages. There are many issues when two hospitals want to exchange clinical documents, such as patient privacy, network security, budget, and the strategies of the hospital. In this article, we propose a method for the exchange and sharing of clinical documents in an offline model based on the CDA-the Portable CDA. This allows the physician to retrieve the patient's medical record stored in a portal device, but not through the Internet in real time. The security and privacy of CDA data will also be considered. PMID:20703907

  1. Impact of Scientific Versus Emotional Wording of Patient Questions on Doctor-Patient Communication in an Internet Forum: A Randomized Controlled Experiment with Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Bientzle, Martina; Griewatz, Jan; Küppers, Julia; Cress, Ulrike; Lammerding-Koeppel, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical expert forums on the Internet play an increasing role in patient counseling. Therefore, it is important to understand how doctor-patient communication is influenced in such forums both by features of the patients or advice seekers, as expressed in their forum queries, and by characteristics of the medical experts involved. Objective In this experimental study, we aimed to examine in what way (1) the particular wording of patient queries and (2) medical experts’ therapeutic health concepts (for example, beliefs around adhering to a distinctly scientific understanding of diagnosis and treatment and a clear focus on evidence-based medicine) impact communication behavior of the medical experts in an Internet forum. Methods Advanced medical students (in their ninth semester of medical training) were recruited as participants. Participation in the online forum was part of a communication training embedded in a gynecology course. We first measured their biomedical therapeutic health concept (hereinafter called “biomedical concept”). Then they participated in an online forum where they answered fictitious patient queries about mammography screening that either included scientific or emotional wording in a between-group design. We analyzed participants’ replies with regard to the following dimensions: their use of scientific or emotional wording, the amount of communicated information, and their attempt to build a positive doctor-patient relationship. Results This study was carried out with 117 medical students (73 women, 41 men, 3 did not indicate their sex). We found evidence that both the wording of patient queries and the participants’ biomedical concept influenced participants’ response behavior. They answered emotional patient queries in a more emotional way (mean 0.92, SD 1.02) than scientific patient queries (mean 0.26, SD 0.55; t 74=3.48, P<.001, d=0.81). We also found a significant interaction effect between participants’ use of

  2. The more it changes; the more it remains the same: a Foucauldian analysis of Canadian policy documents relevant to student selection for medical school.

    PubMed

    Razack, Saleem; Lessard, David; Hodges, Brian D; Maguire, Mary H; Steinert, Yvonne

    2014-05-01

    Calls to increase the demographic representativeness of medical classes to better reflect the diversity of society are part of a growing international trend. Despite this, entry into medical school remains highly competitive and exclusive of marginalized groups. To address these questions, we conducted a Foucauldian discourse analysis of 15 publically available policy documents from the websites of Canadian medical education regulatory bodies, using the concepts of "excellence" (institutional or in an applicant), "diversity," and "equity" to frame the analysis. In most documents, there were appeals to broaden definitions of institutional excellence to include concerns for greater social accountability. Equity concerns tended to be represented as needing to be dealt with by people in positions of authority in order to counter a "hidden curriculum." Diversity was represented as an object of value, situated within a discontinuous history. As a rhetorical strategy, documents invoked complex societal shifts to promote change toward a more humanistic medical education system and profession. "Social accountability" was reified as an all-encompassing solution to most issues of representation. Although the policy documents proclaimed rootedness in an ethos of improving the societal responsiveness of the medical profession, our analysis takes a more critical stance towards the discourses identified. On the basis of our research findings, we question whether these calls may contribute to the maintenance of the specific power relations they seek to address. These conclusions lead us to consider the possibility that the discourses represented in the documents might be reframed to take into account issues of power distribution and its productive and reproductive features. A reframing of discourses could potentially generate greater inclusiveness in policy development processes, and afford disadvantaged and marginalized groups more participatory roles in the discussion. PMID

  3. 20 CFR 30.113 - What are the requirements for written medical documentation, contemporaneous records, and other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the medical records containing a diagnosis and date of diagnosis of a covered medical condition no longer exist, then OWCP may consider other evidence to establish a diagnosis and date of diagnosis of...

  4. 20 CFR 30.113 - What are the requirements for written medical documentation, contemporaneous records, and other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the medical records containing a diagnosis and date of diagnosis of a covered medical condition no longer exist, then OWCP may consider other evidence to establish a diagnosis and date of diagnosis of...

  5. The RAFT network: 5 years of distance continuing medical education and tele-consultations over the Internet in French-speaking Africa.

    PubMed

    Geissbuhler, Antoine; Bagayoko, Cheick Oumar; Ly, Ousmane

    2007-01-01

    Continuing education of healthcare professionals is a key element for the quality and efficiency of a health system. In developing countries, this activity is usually limited to capitals, and delocalized professionals do not have access to such opportunities, or to didactic material adapted to their needs. This limits the interest of such professionals to remain active in the periphery, where they are most needed to implement effective strategies for prevention and first-line healthcare. Telemedicine tools enable the communication and sharing of medical information in electronic form, and thus facilitate access to remote expertise. A physician located far from a reference center can consult its colleagues remotely in order to resolve a difficult case, follow a continuous education course over the Internet, or access medical information from digital libraries or knowledge bases. These same tools can also be used to facilitate exchanges between centers of medical expertise: health institutions of a same country as well as across borders. Since 2000, the Geneva University Hospitals have been involved in coordinating the development of a network for eHealth in Africa (the RAFT, Réseau en Afrique Francophone pour la Télémédecine), first in Mali, and now extending to 10 French-speaking African countries. The core activity of the RAFT is the webcasting of interactive courses. These sessions put the emphasis on knowledge sharing across care professionals, usually in the form of presentations and dialogs between experts in different countries. The technology used for the webcasting works with a slow (25 kbits/s) internet connection. Other activities of the RAFT network include visioconferences, teleconsultations based on the iPath system, collaborative knowledge bases development, support for medical laboratories quality control, and the evaluation of the use of telemedicine in rural areas (via satellite connections) in the context of multisectorial development. Finally

  6. A Case of Intractable Left Forearm Congenital Arteriovenous Fistula Ending with Amputation: Importance of New Medical Information Obtained via the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiajia; Shimada, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to consider the importance of medical information obtained via the Internet for difficult cases in hospitals, especially in those located in rural areas. We report here a case of congenital arteriovenous fistula (AVF) in the upper extremities. Patient: A 30-year-old lady was transported to our hospital by ambulance due to massive bleeding in her left hand. She was seen by our current cardiovascular surgery team for the first time, although she had been diagnosed with congenital AVF of the left arm 9 years previously. Because it was asymptomatic, she was followed up by observation. During 5 years of observation, symptoms such as cyanosis, pain, and refractory ulcers gradually developed. When she was 26 years old, she was referred to a university hospital in Akita, but surgery had already been judged to be impossible. When she was 30 years old, traumatic bleeding in her left hand and hemorrhagic shock led her to be taken to our hospital by ambulance. Using the Internet, we found an institution that had treated a large number of cases of AVF. After controlling the bleeding, we referred her to that institution. However, she could not be treated without an above-elbow amputation. Conclusion: Congenital AVF in the upper extremities is a rare vascular anomaly and has been generally accepted to be an extremely difficult disease to treat. Treatment should be started as early as possible before the presence of any symptoms. When a specialist is not available near the hospital, precise information must be found using the Internet and the patient should be referred without any delay. PMID:25650050

  7. Self-reported influence of television-based direct-to-consumer advertising on patient seasonal allergy and asthma medication use: An internet survey

    PubMed Central

    Khanfar, Nile M.; Clauson, Kevin A.; Polen, Hyla H.; Shields, Kelly M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Direct-to-consumer advertising (DDTCA) of medications, a marketing tool used by the pharmaceutical industry to increase patient awareness of products, affects both consumer behavior and, ultimately, physician prescribing practices. Billions of dollars are budgeted each year for DTCA, and its influence is far-reaching. However, little information is available about patient-initiated physician interactions in which television-bbased DTCA has played a role in consumer behavior. Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the influence of television-based DTCA on treatment changes in patient-initiated medication use. Methods: A 68-item survey instrument consisting of dichotomous, multiple-choice, and open-ended questions was constructed and sent to a convenience sample of US residents during 3 consecutive months ending in February 2005. The survey, which was accessed through an Internet link provided in the e-mail, was designed to capture data about patient perceptions and behaviors regarding television-based DTCA of prescription medications used for seasonal allergy and asthma as well as demographic information. Inferential and descriptive analyses were performed. Key tests included Crosstabs analysis and normal approximation to the binomial test with the z score. Results: Surveys were sent to 2500 individuals. A total of 427 valid surveys were returned for a 17.1% response rate. Of the 402 respondents (94.1%) who stated that they had seen DTCA for seasonal allergy medication, 50 (12.4%) said they had discussed the advertised medication with their physician and 22 of those discussions (44.0%) resulted in a change in treatment. Three hundred forty-two respondents (80.1%) stated that they had viewed DTCA for prescription asthma medications, and 23 of those respondents (6.7%) said that they had discussed the brand of asthma medication viewed on television with their physician. Those discussions resulted in a change in treatment for 9 respondents (39

  8. An Internet-based exercise as a component of an overall training program addressing medical aspects of radiation emergency management.

    PubMed

    Levy, K; Aghababian, R V; Hirsch, E F; Screnci, D; Boshyan, A; Ricks, R C; Samiei, M

    2000-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation and radioactive materials continues to increase worldwide in industry, medicine, agriculture, research, electrical power generation, and nuclear weaponry. The risk of terrorism using weapons of mass destruction or simple radiological devices also has increased, leading to heightened concerns. Radiation accidents occur as a consequence of errors in transportation of radionuclides, use of radiation in medical diagnosis and therapy, industrial monitoring and sterilization procedures, and rarely, nuclear power generation. Compared to other industries, a small number of serious radiation accidents have occurred over the last six decades with recent cases in the Republic of Georgia, Peru, Japan, and Thailand. The medical, psychological, and political consequences of such accidents can be considerable. A number of programs designed to train medical responders in the techniques of radiation accident management have been developed and delivered in many countries. The low frequency of serious radiation accidents requires constant re-training, as skills are lost and medical staff turnover occurs. Not all of the training involves drills or exercises in which responders demonstrate learning or communication over the broad spectrum of medical response capabilities. Medical preparedness within the context of a total emergency response program is lacking in many parts of the world, particularly in Central and Eastern Europe and the Newly Independent States. This paper describes an effort to enhance medical preparedness in the context of a total program of international cooperation and conventions facilitated by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The paper concludes that novel application of telecommunications technology as part of a training activity in radiation accident preparedness can help address gaps in training in this field in which preparedness is essential but experience and practical field exercises are lacking. PMID:11183457

  9. Community child psychiatric medication experiences measured by an internet-based, prospective parent survey of retail pharmacy customers.

    PubMed

    Hilt, Robert; Wolf, Christine; Koprowicz, Kent; Thomas, Elizabeth; Chandler, Mary; Hao, Xiao Lei; Russell, Matthew; Le, Tung; Hooks, Lee; King, Bryan

    2014-02-01

    One thousand five hundred parents filling a psychiatric prescription for their 6-18 year old child with a multi-state retail pharmacy chain received a single mailed invitation to complete a detailed online survey. 276 parents responded (18.4%). 60% of children on medications had a parent rated CBCL scale score in the clinically significant range at enrollment (T score ≥65), with a similar frequency of clinically significant CBCL scores through 15 months of survey followup. 47% of medication regimens were noted to be causing persistent side effects. This simple community based data collection method can offer a unique way to investigate naturalistic treatment outcomes. PMID:24323138

  10. Internet-based ICRP resource for healthcare providers on the risks and benefits of medical imaging that uses ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Demeter, S; Applegate, K E; Perez, M

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Committee 3 Working Party was to update the 2001 web-based module 'Radiation and your patient: a guide for medical practitioners' from ICRP. The key elements of this task were: to clearly identify the target audience (such as healthcare providers with an emphasis on primary care); to review other reputable sources of information; and to succinctly publish the contribution made by ICRP to the various topics. A 'question-and-answer' format addressing practical topics was adopted. These topics included benefits and risks of imaging using ionising radiation in common medical situations, as well as pertaining to specific populations such as pregnant, breast-feeding, and paediatric patients. In general, the benefits of medical imaging and related procedures far outweigh the potential risks associated with ionising radiation exposure. However, it is still important to ensure that the examinations are clinically justified, that the procedure is optimised to deliver the lowest dose commensurate with the medical purpose, and that consideration is given to diagnostic reference levels for particular classes of examinations. PMID:27012846

  11. Enabling collaborative medical diagnosis over the Internet via peer-to-peer distribution of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Maglogiannis, Ilias; Constantinos, Delakouridis; Kazatzopoulos, Leonidas

    2006-04-01

    Recent developments in networking and computing technologies and the expansion of the electronic health record system have enabled the possibility of online collaboration between geographically distributed medical personnel. In this context, the paper presents a Web-based application, which implements a collaborative working environment for physicians by enabling the peer-to-peer exchange of electronic health records. The paper treats technological issues such as Video, Audio and Message Communication, Workspace Management, Distributed Medical Data Management and exchange, while it emphasizes on the Security issues arisen, due to the sensitive and private nature of the medical information. In the paper, we present initial results from the system in practice and measurements regarding transmission times and bandwidth requirements. A wavelet based image compression scheme is also introduced for reducing network delays. A number of physicians were asked to use the platform for testing purposes and for measuring user acceptance. The system was considered by them to be very useful, as they found that the platform simulated very well the personal contact between them and their colleagues during medical meetings. PMID:16705995

  12. Hierarchical Concept Indexing of Full-Text Documents in the Unified Medical Language System Information Sources Map.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Lawrence W.; Nardini, Holly K. Grossetta; Aronson, Alan R.; Rindflesch, Thomas C.

    1999-01-01

    Describes methods for applying natural-language processing for automatic concept-based indexing of full text and methods for exploiting the structure and hierarchy of full-text documents to a large collection of full-text documents drawn from the Health Services/Technology Assessment Text database at the National Library of Medicine. Examines how…

  13. [The decipher, annotation and textual researches of 7 anti-dysentery prescriptions in the Tangut medical documents unearthed in Khara-Khoto].

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Long; Liu, Jing-Yun; Zhang, Ru-Qing

    2013-05-01

    There were 7 anti-dysentery prescriptions in the Tangut medical documents unearthed in Khara-Khoto, preserved in Russia, which were deciphered, annotated and textually researched based on the Tangut tool books like Wenhai (Word Ocean), Tongyin (Homophones), and Fan han he shi zhang zhong zhu (A Tangut-Chinese Timely Gem Dictionary), combining with classical medical documents and application of knowledge of ancient Chinese language. It can be sure that these prescriptions came from the central plains of China during the Song Dynasty, which were made use of by the prescriptions as they were by the physicians of the Western Xia regime, either made modifications and adjustments or without any change. For example, local foods like local sugar and cheese were added. As for the administration and dosage, again, they were applied by following the original one or changing a little according to the local diet customs. PMID:24060025

  14. Introducing the Internet.

    PubMed

    Pallen, M

    1995-11-25

    The benefits to medical practitioners of using the Internet are growing rapidly as the Internet becomes easier to use and ever more biomedical resources become available on line. The Internet is the largest computer network in the world; it is also a virtual community, larger than many nation states, with its own rules of behaviour or "netiquette." There are several types of Internet connection and various ways of acquiring a connection. Once connected, you can obtain, free of charge, programs that allow easy use of the Internet's resources and help on how to use these resources; you can access many of these resources through the hypertext references in the on line version of this series (go to http:@www.bmj.com/bmj/ to reach the electronic version). You can then explore the various methods for accessing, manipulating, or disseminating data on the Internet, such as electronic mail, telnet, file transfer protocol, and the world wide web. Results from a search of the world wide web for information on the rare condition of Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis illustrate the breadth of medical information available on the Internet. PMID:8520280

  15. Introducing the Internet.

    PubMed Central

    Pallen, M.

    1995-01-01

    The benefits to medical practitioners of using the Internet are growing rapidly as the Internet becomes easier to use and ever more biomedical resources become available on line. The Internet is the largest computer network in the world; it is also a virtual community, larger than many nation states, with its own rules of behaviour or "netiquette." There are several types of Internet connection and various ways of acquiring a connection. Once connected, you can obtain, free of charge, programs that allow easy use of the Internet's resources and help on how to use these resources; you can access many of these resources through the hypertext references in the on line version of this series (go to http:@www.bmj.com/bmj/ to reach the electronic version). You can then explore the various methods for accessing, manipulating, or disseminating data on the Internet, such as electronic mail, telnet, file transfer protocol, and the world wide web. Results from a search of the world wide web for information on the rare condition of Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis illustrate the breadth of medical information available on the Internet. Images p1424-a PMID:8520280

  16. Can Online Consumers Contribute to Drug Knowledge? A Mixed-Methods Comparison of Consumer-Generated and Professionally Controlled Psychotropic Medication Information on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, David

    2011-01-01

    more consumers posting on professionally controlled websites reported symptom improvement (32.7% or 72/220 versus 21.4% or 47/220, P = .008). Professional descriptions more frequently listed physical adverse effects and warnings about suicidal ideation while consumer reviews emphasized effects disrupting daily routines and provided richer descriptions of effects in context. The most recent 20 consumer reviews on each drug from each website (n = 80) were comparable to the full sample of reviews in the frequency of commonly reported effects. Conclusion Consumer reviews and professional medication descriptions generally reported similar effects of two psychotropic medications but differed in their descriptions and in frequency of reporting. Professional medication descriptions offer the advantage of a concise yet comprehensive listing of drug effects, while consumer reviews offer greater context and situational examples of how effects may manifest in various combinations and to varying degrees. The dispersion of consumer reviews across websites limits their integration, but a brief browsing strategy on the two target medications nonetheless retrieved representative consumer content. Current strategies for filtering online health searches to return only trusted or approved websites may inappropriately address the challenge to identify quality health sources on the Internet because such strategies unduly limit access to an entire complementary source for health information. PMID:21807607

  17. Internet addiction in young people.

    PubMed

    Ong, Say How; Tan, Yi Ren

    2014-07-01

    In our technology-savvy population, mental health professionals are seeing an increasing trend of excessive Internet use or Internet addiction. Researchers in China, Taiwan and Korea have done extensive research in the field of Internet addiction. Screening instruments are available to identify the presence of Internet addiction and its extent. Internet addiction is frequently associated with mental illnesses such as anxiety, depression, conduct disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Treatment modalities include individual and group therapies, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), family therapy and psychotropic medications. A significant proportion of Singapore adolescents engaging in excessive Internet use are also diagnosed to have concomitant Internet addiction. Despite the presence of a variety of treatment options, future research in this area is needed to address its growing trend and to minimise its negative psychological and social impact on the individuals and their families. PMID:25142474

  18. Internet Guidance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Frank X.

    1999-01-01

    States that children need proper guidance and boundaries to reap the benefits of the Internet. Focuses on two issues: how parents can protect their children from the Internet's potential dangers and how they can help their children use the Internet to get work done. Includes suggestions for teachers to help parents meet these challenges. (VWC)

  19. User Manuals for a Primary Care Electronic Medical Record System: A Mixed Methods Study of User- and Vendor-Generated Documents

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Rustam; Barnsley, Jan; Tu, Karen; Domb, Sharon; Jadad, Alejandro R.; Lemieux-Charles, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Research problem Tutorials and user manuals are important forms of impersonal support for using software applications including electronic medical records (EMRs). Differences between user- and vendor documentation may indicate support needs, which are not sufficiently addressed by the official documentation, and reveal new elements that may inform the design of tutorials and user manuals. Research question What are the differences between user-generated tutorials and manuals for an EMR and the official user manual from the software vendor? Literature review Effective design of tutorials and user manuals requires careful packaging of information, balance between declarative and procedural texts, an action and task-oriented approach, support for error recognition and recovery, and effective use of visual elements. No previous research compared these elements between formal and informal documents. Methodology We conducted an mixed methods study. Seven tutorials and two manuals for an EMR were collected from three family health teams and compared with the official user manual from the software vendor. Documents were qualitatively analyzed using a framework analysis approach in relation to the principles of technical documentation described above. Subsets of the data were quantitatively analyzed using cross-tabulation to compare the types of error information and visual cues in screen captures between user- and vendor-generated manuals. Results and discussion The user-developed tutorials and manuals differed from the vendor-developed manual in that they contained mostly procedural and not declarative information; were customized to the specific workflow, user roles, and patient characteristics; contained more error information related to work processes than to software usage; and used explicit visual cues on screen captures to help users identify window elements. These findings imply that to support EMR implementation, tutorials and manuals need to be customized and

  20. [Internet and medicine].

    PubMed

    De Fiore, L

    1995-10-01

    The World Wide Web creates world-circling medical information bridges connecting all the world. Web sites maintained by universities and institutes are prime sources for hard scientific data about medical research. These sites are more and more informative and usually readable. For some commentators the Web is the greatest advance in information transfer since the invention of the printing press. Some people believe that electronic medical publishing will fundamentally change the way that science gets done. However, an explicit policy is needed for the medical sites on the Internet because of its enormous capacity to transmit information. PMID:7501907

  1. Variables associated with seeking information from doctors and the internet after exposure to direct-to-consumer advertisements for prescription medications.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Joshua; Teichman, Chaim

    2014-01-01

    This study examines variables associated with seeking information from doctors, the Internet, and a combination of both doctors and Internet after exposure to direct-to-consumer advertisements. Data were analyzed from 462 college students. Younger age, women, and health insurance were associated with greater odds for doctor; women, subjective norms, intentions, and greater time since seen doctor were associated with greater odds for Internet; and African American, Hispanic, subjective norms, intentions, and health insurance were associated with greater odds for both doctor and Internet. Marketers of direct-to-consumer advertisements can use these findings for tailoring and targeting direct-to-consumer advertisements. PMID:24878404

  2. Library resources on the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Nancy L.

    1995-07-01

    Library resources are prevalent on the Internet. Library catalogs, electronic books, electronic periodicals, periodical indexes, reference sources, and U.S. Government documents are available by telnet, Gopher, World Wide Web, and FTP. Comparatively few copyrighted library resources are available freely on the Internet. Internet implementations of library resources can add useful features, such as full-text searching. There are discussion lists, Gophers, and World Wide Web pages to help users keep up with new resources and changes to existing ones. The future will bring more library resources, more types of library resources, and more integrated implementations of such resources to the Internet.

  3. Medical ethnobotany of the Zapotecs of the Isthmus-Sierra (Oaxaca, Mexico): documentation and assessment of indigenous uses.

    PubMed

    Frei, B; Baltisberger, M; Sticher, O; Heinrich, M

    1998-09-01

    The Zapotec inhabitants of the Sierra de Oaxaca foothills (Mexico) live in an area of great botanic diversity. In daily subsistence and in response to illness, plants play a major role. An inventory of the Zapotec medicinal ethnobotany was carried out during 17 months of fieldwork. A total of 3611 individual responses concerning medicinal and non-medicinal uses for 445 different species of plants were documented. For the subsequent semi-quantitative analysis of data, the uses were grouped into ten categories and the responses for each species were summed up in each of these ten groups to yield rank-ordered lists. For the high rank-ordered and, hence, culturally important species, an assessment of the therapeutic potential was conducted using ethnobotanical, phytochemical and pharmacological data in the literature. Studies confirming the attributed properties or a scientific explanation of therapeutic use, as well as toxicological data, are still lacking for many of these species. The quantitative approach described will be the basis for future studies on the pharmacology and phytochemistry of Zapotec medicinal species. Finally, these data should also serve as a basis for biodiversity conservation and community development. PMID:9741887

  4. Internet Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehr, William H.; Pupillo, Lorenzo Maria

    The Internet is now widely regarded as essential infrastructure for our global economy and society. It is in our homes and businesses. We use it to communicate and socialize, for research, and as a platform for E-commerce. In the late 1990s, much was predicted about what the Internet has become at present; but now, we have actual experience living with the Internet as a critical component of our everyday lives. Although the Internet has already had profound effects, there is much we have yet to realize. The present volume represents a third installment in a collaborative effort to highlight the all-encompassing, multidisciplinary implications of the Internet for public policy. The first installment was conceived in 1998, when we initiated plans to organize an international conference among academic, industry, and government officials to discuss the growing policy agenda posed by the Internet. The conference was hosted by the European Commission in Brussels in 1999 and brought together a diverse mix of perspectives on what the pressing policy issues would be confronting the Internet. All of the concerns identified remain with us today, including how to address the Digital Divide, how to modify intellectual property laws to accommodate the new realities of the Internet, what to do about Internet governance and name-space management, and how to evolve broadcast and telecommunications regulatory frameworks for a converged world.

  5. The commerce of ideas: Internets and Intranets.

    PubMed

    Frisse, M E

    1996-07-01

    Academic physicians pride themselves on their intelligent use of medical technology, their innovativeness, and their ability to market their excellence to the public. Although this pride is extraordinarily justified in the areas of clinical medicine, biomedical research, and health sciences education, academic physicians have less reason to be proud of their accomplishments in the area of information management. In years past, a lack of attention to coherent information management had few consequences so long as there were foci of excellence in clinical disciplines, libraries, core research laboratories, and selected training programs. But the widespread adoption of network-based communications has changed both the priorities of faculty and the information infrastructure necessary to maintain a competitive advantage. In the arena of health care information technology, many medical centers have chosen indiscriminate consumption over focused leadership. This essay speculates on how technologies based on the World Wide Web (WWW) may affect academic medicine through both the greater penetration of the Internet and a wider use of internal "intranets." The Internet is transforming the landscape of biomedical publishing, biomedical education, and the hospital library. The intranet is becoming a vital means of providing documents to support the administration of academic medicine and, in many circumstances, the delivery of patient-specific information. Although there is great potential for transformation, many academic medical centers have not yet fully demonstrated either the wisdom to advance a great information-technology vision or the will necessary to turn a vision into a coherent plan of action. PMID:9158343

  6. [The current state-of-the-art of the expert evaluation of medical documentation pertaining to the cases of death from an injury inflicted in a healthcare facility in the late; post-traumatic period].

    PubMed

    Kkovalev, A V; Naletova, D M; Belyansky, K D

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a concise review of the literature data concerning the modern methods for the expert evaluation of medical documentation as an object of forensic medical examination. The authors lay special emphasis on the practical significance of this issue for the scientifically sound substantiation of the results of forensic medical expertise carried out for the elucidation of the causes of death and the relationship between the injury and the outcome of the medical aid provided for its treatment. The expert evaluation of medical documentation is equally important for the assessment of the harm to health and the cause of death as a consequence of a thermal and/or mechanical injury inflicted during the hospital stay and in the late post-traumatic period. PMID:27358931

  7. Internet Censorship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyotsna; Kapil; Aayush

    2012-09-01

    Censorship on Internet has always wet its hands in the water of controversies, It is said to go in with synonym of "FILTERING THE NET" i.e. Either done to protect minors or for nationís privacy, some take it as snatching their freedom over internet and some take it as an appropriate step to protect minor, It has its supporters as well as opponents.Google has reported a whooping number of requests from Governments of U.K, China, Poland, Spain, and Canada to remove videos and search links that led to harassment, sensitive issues or suspicious people. This paper deals with the cons of censorship on internet and to make people aware of the fact that Internet is not a single body owned by an org. but an open sky of information shared equally by all. Research done has found out many unseen aspects of different people's view point.

  8. [Internet addiction].

    PubMed

    Korkeila, Jyrki

    2012-01-01

    Internet addiction is defined as uncontrolled and harmful use of Internet, which manifests in three forms: gaming, various sexual activities and excessive use of emails, chats or SMS messaging. Several studies have found that abuse of alcohol and other substances, depression and other health problems are associated with Internet addiction. In boys and men depression may be more a consequence of the addiction than a cause for it. ADHD seems to be a significant background factor for developing the condition. Because it is almost impossible to lead a life without Internet and computers nowadays, it is unrealistic to aim towards full abstinence. Treatment has generally followed the guidelines adapted for pathological gambling. PMID:22612024

  9. Internet health information use and e‐mail access by parents attending a paediatric emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, R D; Macpherson, A

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To document internet access and health related usage patterns by families of children in a large paediatric emergency department (ED), and to discover if parents want the internet to become a tool for transferring medical test results. Methods This was a pre‐tested, 21 item, interview conducted with parents at the paediatric ED in Toronto over 3 months. Descriptive statistics and frequency distributions were calculated and variables associated with parents wishing to access results electronically were examined. Results In total, 950 parents completed the interview (93%), of whom 87% reported routine internet access, 75% reported having an e‐mail account, and 60% accessed their e‐mail once or more a day. Over half (56%) reported searching the internet for health related information, with 8.5% of these searching immediately preceding their visit. Nearly three quarters (73%) indicated they would like to receive an e‐mail containing the results of tests conducted in the ED; 66% of all respondents and 89% of those with e‐mail indicated that they would like their child's primary care provider to receive information electronically. Conclusion The majority of families have internet access and most want to receive medical information electronically and to send it to the primary provider. The vast use of internet for health related information emphasises the need to guide parents regarding reliable resources online, possibly as part of their ED visit. PMID:16627833

  10. Online Collaborative Documents for Research and Coursework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Karen L.; Cifuentes, Lauren; Shih, Yu-Chih Doris

    Online collaborative documents can be used effectively for conducting collaborative research and for learning collaboratively via the Internet. Collaborative documents are dedicated online workspaces that allow individuals or groups to use the Internet to share their work with others, edit it, and finalize it. This paper identifies Basic Support…

  11. "Medical bookmarks--a virtual medical library".

    PubMed

    Vassallo, D J; Rowe, M

    2002-06-01

    How does one go about finding specific medical information on the internet? Medical Bookmarks is the name of an easily remembered website (http://www.medical-bookmarks.org.uk) set up as a virtual library by the librarian at the Royal Hospital Haslar. It is specifically designed to give easy access to all the important medical sites on the internet, doing away with the need to remember the exact addresses of other websites, and as such it is relevant to civilian and military doctors in both industrialised and developing nations. It also interlinks sites of particular relevance to military doctors, including military medical sites and a NATO Defence Medical Services site. PMID:12174565

  12. German Experts' Views and Ideas about Information on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voigt, Kristina; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Reflects ideas about the Internet presented by four German experts: possibilities and applications of chemistry; environmental informatics and documentation on the World Wide Web; views of a research-oriented pharmaceutical company; and the commercialization of the Internet. (LRW)

  13. [Patients, doctors and the internet].

    PubMed

    Jeannot, Jean Gabriel; Bischoff, Thomas

    2015-05-13

    The majority of the Swiss population uses the internet to seek information about health. The objective is to be better informed, before or after the consultation. Doctors can advise their information-seeking patients about high quality websites, be it medical portals or websites dedicated to a specific pathology. Doctors should not see the internet as a threat but rather as an opportunity to strengthen the doctor-patient relationship. PMID:26118229

  14. Internet resources for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Anthes, D. L.; Berry, R. E.; Lanning, A.

    1997-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: The internet has experienced tremendous growth over the past few years and has many resources in the field of family medicine. However, many family physicians remain unaware of how the Internet can be used to enhance their practice and of how to gain access to this powerful tool. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To characterize components of the Internet, to explore how family physicians can use the Internet to enhance practice, and to increase awareness of how to gain access to Internet sites relevant to family medicine. MAIN COMPONENTS OF THE PROGRAM: An on-line search through the World Wide Web was conducted using multiple search engines including Lycos, WebCrawler, OpenText, and Yahoo as well as a conventional MEDLINE search of Internet publications for the past 5 years. A website containing an evolving selection of resources can be found at http:@dfcm 18.med.utoronto.ca/anthes/hpgdfcm1.htm. CONCLUSION: The Internet has useful applications and resources for family physicians including rapid communication between physicians, access to medical literature, continuing medical education programs, and lists of patient support and discussion groups. PMID:9189299

  15. The risk and consequences of clinical miscoding due to inadequate medical documentation: a case study of the impact on health services funding.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ping; Gilchrist, Annette; Robinson, Kerin M; Paul, Lindsay

    2009-01-01

    As coded clinical data are used in a variety of areas (e.g. health services funding, epidemiology, health sciences research), coding errors have the potential to produce far-reaching consequences. In this study the causes and consequences of miscoding were reviewed. In particular, the impact of miscoding due to inadequate medical documentation on hospital funding was examined. Appropriate reimbursement of hospital revenue in the casemix-based (output-based) funding system in the state of Victoria, Australia relies upon accurate, comprehensive, and timely clinical coding. In order to assess the reliability of these data in a Melbourne tertiary hospital, this study aimed to: (a) measure discrepancies in clinical code assignment; (b) identify resultant Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) changes; (c) identify revenue shifts associated with the DRG changes; (d) identify the underlying causes of coding error and DRG change; and (e) recommend strategies to address the aforementioned. An internal audit was conducted on 752 surgical inpatient discharges from the hospital within a six-month period. In a blind audit, each episode was re-coded. Comparisons were made between the original codes and the auditor-assigned codes, and coding errors were grouped and statistically analysed by categories. Changes in DRGs and weighted inlier-equivalent separations (WIES) were compared and analysed, and underlying factors were identified. Approximately 16% of the 752 cases audited reflected a DRG change, equating to a significant revenue increase of nearly AU$575,300. Fifty-six percent of DRG change cases were due to documentation issues. Incorrect selection or coding of the principal diagnosis accounted for a further 13% of the DRG changes, and missing additional diagnosis codes for 29%. The most significant of the factors underlying coding error and DRG change was poor quality of documentation. It was concluded that the auditing process plays a critical role in the identification of causes

  16. Measuring the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molyneux, Robert E.; Williams, Robert V.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the literature that measures characteristics of the Internet. Discusses: conclusions about the Internet measurement literature; definition of the Internet from a technical standpoint; history of Internet measurement; nature of the Internet data environment; Internet technical characteristics; information measurement and the Internet;…

  17. Reclassification and Documentation in a Medium-sized Medical Center Library: The MTST System in the Simultaneous Production of Catalog Cards and a Computer Stored Record

    PubMed Central

    Love, Erika; Butzin, Diane; Robinson, Robert E.; Lee, Soo

    1971-01-01

    A project to recatalog and reclassify the book collection of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine Library utilizing the Magnetic Tape/Selectric Typwriter system for simultaneous catalog card production and computer stored data acquisition marks the beginning of eventual computerization of all library operations. A keyboard optical display system will be added by late 1970. Major input operations requiring the creation of “hard copy” will continue via the MTST system. Updating, editing and retrieval operations as well as input without hard copy production will be done through the “on-line” keyboard optical display system. Once the library's first data bank, the book catalog, has been established the computer may be consulted directly for library holdings from any optical display terminal throughout the medical center. Three basic information retrieval operations may be carried out through “on-line” optical display terminals. Output options include the reproduction of part or all of a given document, or the generation of statistical data, which are derived from two Acquisition Code lines. The creation of a central bibliographic record of Bowman Gray Faculty publications patterned after the cataloging program is presently under way. The cataloging and computer storage of serial holdings records will begin after completion of the reclassification project. All acquisitions added to the collection since October 1967 are computer-stored and fully retrievable. Reclassification of older titles will be completed in early 1971. PMID:5542915

  18. Internet bullying.

    PubMed

    Donnerstein, Ed

    2012-06-01

    There is substantial literature on the impact of the mass media on children's and adolescents' health and development. The question of what role new technology plays in the media's influence is now a subject of both review and discussion, particularly regarding health risks and intervention. This article takes a brief look at online usage and the theoretical mechanisms that might make Internet access more problematic in terms of risks, compared with more traditional media such as television and film. One of these risks, known today as cyberbullying or Internet harassment, is scrutinized in detail. PMID:22643169

  19. Internet Sexualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Nicola

    The term “internet sexuality” (or OSA, online sexual activities) refers to sexual-related content and activities observable on the internet (cf. Adams, Oye, & Parker, 2003; Cooper, McLoughlin, & Campbell, 2000; Leiblum & Döring, 2002). It designates a variety of sexual phenomena (e.g., pornography, sex education, sexual contacts) related to a wide spectrum of online services and applications (e.g., websites, online chat rooms, peer-to-peer networks). If an even broader range of computer networks - such as the Usenet or bulletin board systems - is included in this extensional definition, one speaks of “online sexuality” or “cybersexuality.”

  20. The Health Care Financing Administration's new examination documentation criteria: minimum auditing standards for the neurologic examination to be used by Medicare and other payors. Report from the American Academy of Neurology Medical Economics and Management Subcommittee.

    PubMed

    Nuwer, M R; Sigsbee, B

    1998-02-01

    Medicare recently announced the adoption of minimum documentation criteria for the neurologic examination. These criteria are added to existing standards for the history and medical decision-making. These criteria will be used in compliance audits by Medicare and other payors. Given the current federal initiative to eliminate fraud in the Medicare program, all neurologists need to comply with these standards. These criteria are for documentation only. Neurologic standards of care require a more complex and diverse examination pertinent to the problem(s) under consideration. Further guidance as to the content of a neurologic evaluation is outlined in the article "Practice guidelines: Neurologic evaluation" (Neurology 1990; 40: 871). The level of history and examination required for specific services is defined in the American Medical Association current procedural terminology book. Documentation standards for examination of children are not yet defined. PMID:9484379

  1. Internet 101.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noguchi, Kay

    The Internet, a worldwide network of computer networks, is a noncommercial service with acceptable use restricted to the advancement of education and research. Although it has been in existence for quite a while, it is still new to most elementary and secondary educators in the Pacific region and elsewhere. This report is an introduction to the…

  2. Internet India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pahl, Ronald H.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews a number of Internet sites containing information on every aspect of life in Modern India. The various sites provide information on such diverse topics as the Indian film industry, politics, the booming Indian computer industry, changing status of women, and financial and political issues. (MJP)

  3. Using the Internet in Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seguin, Armand

    This document contains ideas and information regarding using the Internet in the professional development of vocational education teachers. Presented first is basic information about what the Internet is and its value as a tool for professional development (including its role as a vehicle for accessing the ERIC database, taking online classes, and…

  4. The Internet: Logon to Lesson Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalmbacher, Staci

    1996-01-01

    Encourages teachers to follow their students' example of learning to use and exploit the capabilities of the Internet by logging on, exploring the possibilities for researching a topic, documenting sources, and utilizing new types of information. Gives list of valuable Internet sites by subject area to aid in lesson planning and assignments. (ET)

  5. [INTERNET AIDS FOR THE GASTROENTEROLOGIST

    PubMed

    Curioso, W H; Curioso, W I

    2000-01-01

    The medical Internet is growing in paralell with the online information explotion. The aim of this study is to identify the online resources available to gastroenterologists, both in English and Spanish on the Internet.We searched the internet using the following resources: general and medical search engines, biomedical databases, books and listservs.We included for analisis the websites that fulfilled the following criteria: content, autorship, attribution, currency and disclosure.We identified 46 websites in Spanish and 104 in English that met the inclussion criteria. We further categorized these sites into six categories: digestive diseases search resources, professionals organizations, academic department sites, sites with focused areas of interest to gastroenterologists, on line journals and discussion groups (listservs).A variety of very useful web sites related to digestive diseases exist on the Internet, and their numbers are growing. Many of these sites have valuable information that can be used to improve patient care, promote medical education, and facilitate research. The Internet represents a useful source of information of increasing utility for daily gastroenterologic practice. PMID:12138388

  6. Office gynecology in the internet age.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Robert L

    2012-09-01

    Historically, the stethoscope is representative of the type of medical tool that dominated the clinician-patient interaction. In the future, electronic tools will dominate the clinician-patient interaction. Most electronic tools will be accessed through the internet. The internet will become a key portal for enhancing the doctor-patient relationship. PMID:22828092

  7. Wonderful Wikis and Internet Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Sami

    2009-01-01

    Wikis are collaborative websites where visitors can edit anything they want, anytime they want. Essentially online "whiteboards," wikis allow groups of people to create documents and projects together. Internet forums, also known as message boards or discussion boards, are web applications that provide online discussions. Like wikis, your forum…

  8. Internet 2 Health Sciences Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2003-01-01

    The Internet 2 (I2) health sciences initiative (I2HSI) involves the formulation of applications and supporting technologies, and guidelines for their use in the health sciences. Key elements of I2HSI include use of visualization, collaboration, medical informatics, telemedicine, and educational tools that support the health sciences. Specific…

  9. Schizophrenia, drug companies and the internet.

    PubMed

    Read, John

    2008-01-01

    To investigate differences in the content of websites funded, and not funded, by drug companies, the top 50 websites about 'schizophrenia' in Google and Yahoo were analysed in relation to five variables: three scales relating to causes, treatments and violence, and two categorical variables about the condition being extremely severe and about linking coming off medication to violence. Fifty eight percent of the websites analysed received funding from drug companies. Drug company funded websites were significantly more likely to espouse bio-genetic rather than psycho-social causal explanations, to emphasise medication rather than psycho-social treatments, to portray 'schizophrenia' as a debilitating, devastating and long-term illness, and to link violence to coming off medication. They were neither more nor less likely to describe 'schizophrenics' as violent. These results suggest that the documented influence of the pharmaceutical industry over research, professional organisations, teaching institutions, clinical practice and regulatory bodies may now extend to public promotion, via the internet, of perspectives conducive to maximisation of sales. PMID:17826878

  10. Diabetes and the internet.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Kenneth J

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines what the World Wide Web has to offer patients, families and professionals in relation to diabetes. The potential pitfalls and dangers are discussed, leading to a wider debate on how the Internet can be expected to impact upon diabetes and other health care provision in the near future, and how health care professionals' practices will have to change. Themes include: the World Wide Web (finding material, assessing authenticity, pitfalls for patients, personalized pages, chat rooms, security); e-mail consultation (benefits, risks, minimizing risk, what to tell patients, legal constraints, security); telemedicine (telemetry, surveillance, security); search engines (journals, etc.); looking ahead (digital television, web-based medical records). PMID:11979038

  11. Medical Content Searching, Retrieving, and Sharing Over the Internet: Lessons Learned From the mEducator Through a Scenario-Based Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Spachos, Dimitris; Mylläri, Jarkko; Giordano, Daniela; Dafli, Eleni; Mitsopoulou, Evangelia; Schizas, Christos N; Pattichis, Constantinos; Nikolaidou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background The mEducator Best Practice Network (BPN) implemented and extended standards and reference models in e-learning to develop innovative frameworks as well as solutions that enable specialized state-of-the-art medical educational content to be discovered, retrieved, shared, and re-purposed across European Institutions, targeting medical students, doctors, educators and health care professionals. Scenario-based evaluation for usability testing, complemented with data from online questionnaires and field notes of users’ performance, was designed and utilized for the evaluation of these solutions. Objective The objective of this work is twofold: (1) to describe one instantiation of the mEducator BPN solutions (mEducator3.0 - “MEdical Education LINnked Arena” MELINA+) with a focus on the metadata schema used, as well as on other aspects of the system that pertain to usability and acceptance, and (2) to present evaluation results on the suitability of the proposed metadata schema for searching, retrieving, and sharing of medical content and with respect to the overall usability and acceptance of the system from the target users. Methods A comprehensive evaluation methodology framework was developed and applied to four case studies, which were conducted in four different countries (ie, Greece, Cyprus, Bulgaria and Romania), with a total of 126 participants. In these case studies, scenarios referring to creating, sharing, and retrieving medical educational content using mEducator3.0 were used. The data were collected through two online questionnaires, consisting of 36 closed-ended questions and two open-ended questions that referred to mEducator 3.0 and through the use of field notes during scenario-based evaluations. Results The main findings of the study showed that even though the informational needs of the mEducator target groups were addressed to a satisfactory extent and the metadata schema supported content creation, sharing, and retrieval from an end

  12. Dermatology resources on the internet.

    PubMed

    George, Dean D; Wainwright, Brent D

    2012-09-01

    Both patients and medical professionals are increasingly accessing the Internet for health information. Today's Web enables features that facilitate information sharing in a social and collaborative manner, thus transforming the way we access data and communicate with our patients and colleagues. The visual nature of the field of dermatology lends itself to the use of the Internet for reference and educational purposes. To generate a list of Web sites commonly used by academic dermatologists, the authors polled the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Dermatology Program Directors for their top 3 Web resources. The purpose of this article is to identify resources used by dermatologists as well as patients and examine factors that can influence Internet search results. Concerns regarding professionalism in the era of social media are also explored. As the volume of health information on the Internet continues to increase, it is essential for physicians to be aware of what is available in cyberspace. Reference and learning tools for the physician, learning and support tools for the patient, and physician Internet presence are key aspects of modern dermatology practice. PMID:22929356

  13. The More It Changes; the More It Remains the Same: A Foucauldian Analysis of Canadian Policy Documents Relevant to Student Selection for Medical School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razack, Saleem; Lessard, David; Hodges, Brian D.; Maguire, Mary H.; Steinert, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Calls to increase the demographic representativeness of medical classes to better reflect the diversity of society are part of a growing international trend. Despite this, entry into medical school remains highly competitive and exclusive of marginalized groups. To address these questions, we conducted a Foucauldian discourse analysis of 15…

  14. Assessment of ADHD Documentation from Candidates Requesting Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Accommodations for the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners COMLEX Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joy, Javed A.; Julius, Rose J.; Akter, Rashida; Baron, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Every year increasing numbers of candidates request special accommodations for high-stakes medical licensing examinations, due to ADHD, on the basis of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This poses significant challenges for both the applicant and the medical boards and has significant financial, legal, and ethical implications.…

  15. DXplain on the Internet.

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, G. O.; Famiglietti, K. T.; Kim, R. J.; Hoffer, E. P.; Feldman, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    DXplain, a computer-based medical education, reference and decision support system has been used by thousands of physicians and medical students on stand-alone systems and over communications networks. For the past two years, we have made DXplain available over the Internet in order to provide DXplain's knowledge and analytical capabilities as a resource to other applications within Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and at outside institutions. We describe and provide the user experience with two different protocols through which users can access DXplain through the World Wide Web (WWW). The first allows the user to have direct interaction with all the functionality of DXplain where the MGH server controls the interaction and the mode of presentation. In the second mode, the MGH server provides the DXplain functionality as a series of services, which can be called independently by the user application program. PMID:9929291

  16. The Internet for Louisiana physicians.

    PubMed

    Ellis, M S

    2000-09-01

    Fewer than 50% of Louisiana physicians actively use the Internet, and many of them confine their usage to e-mailing among family and friends. The purpose of this article is to acquaint the reader with many of the benefits of exploiting the incredible potential of this technological invention. I provide addresses and information about sites that I believe warrant usage by our colleagues. Of the vast smorgasbord of data available we highlight educational Web sites for professionals and the public, how to determine credibility of information, clinical research of scientific articles, computer security, federal and state government sites, newspapers, political and socioeconomic functions, medical supply shops, e-mail and other computerized communication, electronic medical records, personal or professional Web sites, and future medical internet uses. It is hoped that this process will encourage nonparticipating colleagues to begin using this modality while also supplying sites that current users may not yet have discovered. PMID:11064554

  17. Internet-Based Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2014-01-01

    Google the question, "How is the Internet changing the way we communicate?," and you will find no shortage of opinions, or fears, about the Internet altering the way we communicate. Although the Internet is not necessarily making communication briefer (neither is the Internet making communication less formal), the Internet is manifesting…

  18. The Internet and You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smigielski, Alan

    1997-01-01

    This issue of "Art to Zoo" examines the "mysteries" surrounding the Internet and offers simple "pointers" on how to access the Smithsonian's teaching materials. Many of the materials are available online. Articles include: (1) "What is the Internet?"; (2) "Connecting to the Internet"; (3) "Internet Shopping List"; (4) "Internet Terms"; (5) "A…

  19. Perceptions of document relevance

    PubMed Central

    Bruza, Peter; Chang, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a study of how humans perceive and judge the relevance of documents. Humans are adept at making reasonably robust and quick decisions about what information is relevant to them, despite the ever increasing complexity and volume of their surrounding information environment. The literature on document relevance has identified various dimensions of relevance (e.g., topicality, novelty, etc.), however little is understood about how these dimensions may interact. We performed a crowdsourced study of how human subjects judge two relevance dimensions in relation to document snippets retrieved from an internet search engine. The order of the judgment was controlled. For those judgments exhibiting an order effect, a q–test was performed to determine whether the order effects can be explained by a quantum decision model based on incompatible decision perspectives. Some evidence of incompatibility was found which suggests incompatible decision perspectives is appropriate for explaining interacting dimensions of relevance in such instances. PMID:25071622

  20. Internet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukose, Rajan Mathew

    The World Wide Web and the Internet are rapidly expanding spaces, of great economic and social significance, which offer an opportunity to study many phenomena, often previously inaccessible, on an unprecedented scale and resolution with relative ease. These phenomena are measurable on the scale of tens of millions of users and hundreds of millions of pages. By virtue of nearly complete electronic mediation, it is possible in principle to observe the time and ``spatial'' evolution of nearly all choices and interactions. This cyber-space therefore provides a view into a number of traditional research questions (from many academic disciplines) and creates its own new phenomena accessible for study. Despite its largely self-organized and dynamic nature, a number of robust quantitative regularities are found in the aggregate statistics of interesting and useful quantities. These regularities can be understood with the help of models that draw on ideas from statistical physics as well as other fields such as economics, psychology and decision theory. This thesis develops models that can account for regularities found in the statistics of Internet congestion and user surfing patterns and discusses some practical consequences. practical consequences.

  1. Next Generation Internet Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    desJardins, R.

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with next generation Internet are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Internet architecture; 2) NASA's advanced networking; 3) Internet capability, capacity and applications; and 4) Systems engineering.

  2. FES Documentation - Cancer Imaging Program

    Cancer.gov

    The FES documentation files are presented in Adobe Acrobat or Word files, either in executable or ZIP format to be maximally compatible with the computer system being downloaded into. The files are large in any format and should be downloaded with a fast Internet link.

  3. GUIDANCE DOCUMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Defn: Guidance Document - A peer-reviewed document stating overarching principles and practices to be followed (also includes handbook documents).

    Impact of an Online Medical Internet Site on Knowledge and Practice of Health Care Providers: A Mixed Methods Study of the Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Evidence Project

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Vanessa K; Townson, Andrea F; Higgins, Caroline E; Rogers, Jess; Wolfe, Dalton L

    2014-01-01

    Background It is not known whether ongoing access to a broad-based Internet knowledge resource can influence the practice of health care providers. We undertook a study to evaluate the impact of a Web-based knowledge resource on increasing access to evidence and facilitating best practice of health care providers. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate (1) the impact of the Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Evidence (SCIRE) project on access to information for health care providers and researchers and (2) how SCIRE influenced health care providers' management of clients. Methods A 4-part mixed methods evaluation was undertaken: (1) monitoring website traffic and utilization using Google Analytics, (2) online survey of users who accessed the SCIRE website, (3) online survey of targeted end-users, that is, rehabilitation health care providers known to work with spinal cord injury (SCI) clients, as well as researchers, and (4) focus groups with health care providers who had previously accessed SCIRE. Results The online format allowed the content for a relatively specialized field to have far reach (eg, 26 countries and over 6500 users per month). The website survey and targeted end-user survey confirmed that health care providers, as well as researchers perceived that the website increased their access to SCI evidence. Access to SCIRE not only improved knowledge of SCI evidence but helped inform changes to the health providers’ clinical practice and improved their confidence in treating SCI clients. The SCIRE information directly influenced the health providers’ clinical decision making, in terms of choice of intervention, equipment needs, or assessment tool. Conclusions A Web-based knowledge resource may be a relatively inexpensive method to increase access to evidence-based information, increase knowledge of the evidence, inform changes to the health providers’ practice, and influence their clinical decision making. PMID:25537167

  4. Internet Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, Rafael; Argyle, R. W.

    Amateur astronomers can carry out scientific research in many different ways. Some activities require expensive telescopes, cameras, and often access to dark skies. But those who live in highly polluted areas, or do not have access to very specialized equipment, still have many possibilities; amongst which is using the online resources available from the internet. In this chapter we explore Aladin, Simbad, and VizieR, three resources created and maintained by the Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg (CDS). Although these applications are intended for professional astronomers, they are also freely available for amateurs. They allow us to find and measure old neglected difficult pairs, discover new double stars, and in general have a better understanding of those tiny pairs of points of light that we love to observe, photograph and measure.

  5. Poultry Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheok, Adrian David

    Poultry are one of the most badly treated animals in the modern world. It has been shown that they have high levels of both cognition and feelings, and as a result there has been a recent trend of promoting poultry welfare. There is also a tradition of keeping poultry as pets in some parts of the world. However, in modern cities and societies, it is often difficult to maintain contact with pets, particularly for office workers. We propose and describe a novel cybernetics system to use mobile and Internet technology to improve human-pet interaction. It can also be used for people who are allergic to touching animals and thus cannot stroke them directly. This interaction encompasses both visualization and tactile sensation of real objects.

  6. 39 CFR 3001.11 - General contents of documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... subscribed and executed in the capacity specified in the document with full power and authority so to do... delay. (1) For a document filed via the Internet by an account holder, the subscription requirement...

  7. 39 CFR 3001.11 - General contents of documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... subscribed and executed in the capacity specified in the document with full power and authority so to do... delay. (1) For a document filed via the Internet by an account holder, the subscription requirement...

  8. 14 CFR 13.210 - Filing of documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Rules of Practice in FAA Civil Penalty Actions § 13.210 Filing of... action requested in the document. (e) Internet accessibility of documents filed in the Hearing Docket....

  9. Does Query Expansion Limit Our Learning? A Comparison of Social-Based Expansion to Content-Based Expansion for Medical Queries on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Pentoney, Christopher; Harwell, Jeff; Leroy, Gondy

    2014-01-01

    Searching for medical information online is a common activity. While it has been shown that forming good queries is difficult, Google’s query suggestion tool, a type of query expansion, aims to facilitate query formation. However, it is unknown how this expansion, which is based on what others searched for, affects the information gathering of the online community. To measure the impact of social-based query expansion, this study compared it with content-based expansion, i.e., what is really in the text. We used 138,906 medical queries from the AOL User Session Collection and expanded them using Google’s Autocomplete method (social-based) and the content of the Google Web Corpus (content-based). We evaluated the specificity and ambiguity of the expansion terms for trigram queries. We also looked at the impact on the actual results using domain diversity and expansion edit distance. Results showed that the social-based method provided more precise expansion terms as well as terms that were less ambiguous. Expanded queries do not differ significantly in diversity when expanded using the social-based method (6.72 different domains returned in the first ten results, on average) vs. content-based method (6.73 different domains, on average). PMID:25954406

  10. Does query expansion limit our learning? A comparison of social-based expansion to content-based expansion for medical queries on the internet.

    PubMed

    Pentoney, Christopher; Harwell, Jeff; Leroy, Gondy

    2014-01-01

    Searching for medical information online is a common activity. While it has been shown that forming good queries is difficult, Google's query suggestion tool, a type of query expansion, aims to facilitate query formation. However, it is unknown how this expansion, which is based on what others searched for, affects the information gathering of the online community. To measure the impact of social-based query expansion, this study compared it with content-based expansion, i.e., what is really in the text. We used 138,906 medical queries from the AOL User Session Collection and expanded them using Google's Autocomplete method (social-based) and the content of the Google Web Corpus (content-based). We evaluated the specificity and ambiguity of the expansion terms for trigram queries. We also looked at the impact on the actual results using domain diversity and expansion edit distance. Results showed that the social-based method provided more precise expansion terms as well as terms that were less ambiguous. Expanded queries do not differ significantly in diversity when expanded using the social-based method (6.72 different domains returned in the first ten results, on average) vs. content-based method (6.73 different domains, on average). PMID:25954406

  11. Essential key indicators for disaster medical response suggested to be included in a national uniform protocol for documentation of major incidents: a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Registration of data from a major incident or disaster serves several purposes such as to record data for evaluation of response as well as for research. Data needed can often be retrieved after an incident while other must be recorded during the incident. There is a need for a consensus on what is essential to record from a disaster response. The aim of this study was to identify key indicators essential for initial disaster medical response registration. By this is meant nationally accepted processes involved, from the time of the emergency call to the emergency medical communication centre until medical care is provided at the emergency department. Methods A three round Delphi study was conducted. Thirty experts with a broad knowledge in disaster and emergency response and medical management were invited. In this study we estimated 30 experts to be approximately one third of the number in Sweden eligible for recruitment. Process, structure and outcome indicators for the initial disaster medical response were identified. These were based on previous research and expressed as statements and were grouped into eight categories, and presented to the panel of experts. The experts were instructed to score each statement, using a five point Likert scale, and were also invited to include additional statements. Statements reaching a predefined consensus level of 80% were considered as essential to register. Results In total 97 statements were generated, 77 statements reached consensus. The 77 statements covered parts of all relevant aspects involved in the initial disaster medical response. The 20 indicators that did not reach consensus mostly concerned patient related times in hospital, types of support systems and security for health care staff. Conclusions The Delphi technique can be used for reaching consensus of data, comprising process, structure and outcome indicators, identified as essential for recording from major incidents and disasters. PMID

  12. An online interactive simulation system for medical imaging education.

    PubMed

    Dikshit, Aditya; Wu, Dawei; Wu, Chunyan; Zhao, Weizhao

    2005-09-01

    This report presents a recently developed web-based medical imaging simulation system for teaching students or other trainees who plan to work in the medical imaging field. The increased importance of computer and information technology widely applied to different imaging techniques in clinics and medical research necessitates a comprehensive medical imaging education program. A complete tutorial of simulations introducing popular imaging modalities, such as X-ray, MRI, CT, ultrasound and PET, forms an essential component of such an education. Internet technologies provide a vehicle to carry medical imaging education online. There exist a number of internet-based medical imaging hyper-books or online documentations. However, there are few providing interactive computational simulations. We focus on delivering knowledge of the physical principles and engineering implementation of medical imaging techniques through an interactive website environment. The online medical imaging simulation system presented in this report outlines basic principles underlying different imaging techniques and image processing algorithms and offers trainees an interactive virtual laboratory. For education purposes, this system aims to provide general understanding of each imaging modality with comprehensive explanations, ample illustrations and copious references as its thrust, rather than complex physics or detailed math. This report specifically describes the development of the tutorial for commonly used medical imaging modalities. An internet-accessible interface is used to simulate various imaging algorithms with user-adjustable parameters. The tutorial is under the MATLAB Web Server environment. Macromedia Director MX is used to develop interactive animations integrating theory with graphic-oriented simulations. HTML and JavaScript are used to enable a user to explore these modules online in a web browser. Numerous multiple choice questions, links and references for advanced study are

  13. The physician and the Internet.

    PubMed

    Wang, K K; Wong Kee Song, L M

    1997-01-01

    The Internet is one of the greatest developments in informational exchange during the past century. It allows almost anyone to access information available throughout the world. Nonetheless, the Internet is often misunderstood by physicians. It can be considered a super computer network that allows users to transfer a wide variety of information at a low cost. The information can be transferred through functions such as electronic mail, file transfer protocols, the Usenet, or the most widely recognized World Wide Web. Electronic mail functions like the usual postal service but is carried through the Internet, and delivery is usually within the hour. It can serve as a method of communication between physicians and patients. File transfer protocols function as a method for transferring large amounts of information such as software through the Internet. The Usenet acts like an international bulletin board service, allowing users anywhere to post messages and to respond to messages from other users. Several patient support groups have Usenet sites for exchanging specific disease information. The World Wide Web has received the greatest attention because most of the information on the Internet is text, sound, or pictures. Numerous medical organizations have established Web sites. This article attempts to describe each of these functions and the benefits to physicians. PMID:9005289

  14. Responsible Internet Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truett, Carol; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Provides advice for making school Internet-use guidelines. Outlines responsible proactive use of the Internet for educators and librarians, discusses strengths and weaknesses of Internet blocking software and rating systems, and describes acceptable-use policies (AUP). Lists resources for creating your own AUP, Internet filtering software, and…

  15. Evaluating Internet Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    The following four papers focus on the topic of evaluating Internet information services: "Some Evaluation Criteria To Assess Internet Information Services" (Carmel Galvin); "The Teacher Librarian's Role as Evaluator of Internet Information Services" (Pru Mitchell); "How Students Evaluate Internet Information Services" (Ross Todd); and "Internet…

  16. Internet Addiction among Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargin, Nurten

    2012-01-01

    Each innovation brings along many risks. One of the risks related with the Internet use is Internet addiction. The aim of this study is to examine Internet addiction in adolescence in terms of gender, Internet access at home and grades. The research design used was survey method. The study population consisted of second stage students attending…

  17. Computer-using patients want Internet services from family physicians.

    PubMed

    Grover, Fred; Wu, H David; Blanford, Christal; Holcomb, Sherry; Tidler, Diana

    2002-06-01

    Patients are increasingly using the Internet to obtain medical information. Few practice Web sites provide services beyond information about the clinic and common medical diseases. We surveyed computer-using patients at 4 family medicine clinics in Denver, Colorado, by assessing their desire for Internet services from their providers. Patients were especially interested in getting e-mail reminders about appointments, online booking of appointments in real time, and receiving updates about new advances in treatment. Patients were also interested in virtual visits for simple and chronic medical problems and for following chronic conditions through virtual means. We concluded that computer-using patients desire Internet services to augment their medical care. As growth and communication via the Internet continue, primary care physicians should move more aggressively toward adding services to their practices' Internet Web sites beyond the simple provision of information. PMID:12100783

  18. Declassified Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Karen M.

    Journalists and other investigators are daily using declassified government documents to shed light on historical and current events, but few have discovered how to tap the wealth of documents once classified but now in the public realm. An executive order from President Reagan eliminating declassification procedures and allowing released…

  19. Termination Documentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Mike; Hill, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined 11 workplaces to determine how they handle termination documentation, an empirically unexplored area in technical communication and rhetoric. We found that the use of termination documentation is context dependent while following a basic pattern of infraction, investigation, intervention, and termination. Furthermore,…

    1. Document control and document management.

      PubMed

      Djemal, K K

      1999-12-01

      Most schemes for the accreditation (e.g. United Kingdom Accreditation Service) and certification (e.g. BS EN ISO 9002) of laboratories include a requirement to establish and maintain procedures for the management and control of documents generated internally. Such documents include policy statements, procedures, specifications, and some notices and memoranda. Organisations benefit from using agreed and approved information and from knowing that staff are using agreed and approved methods in their operating procedures. Document control systems are likely to become compulsory as accreditation schemes, such as Clinical Pathology Accreditation (CPA) for clinical microbiology laboratories, align with international standards. The Technical Services Division (TSD) in PHLS Headquarters has been developing a control system for various documents that it issues to the PHLS and control of documentation that forms the TSD quality system. The document control system has recently developed into a document management system that provides a mechanism for managing all documents generated or received by the division. TSD's approach is described here to provide laboratories and other organisations with ideas for how they could set up or develop their own document management system to improve accessibility to information. PMID:10598395

    2. 10 CFR 55.27 - Documentation.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

      2010-01-01

      ... REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES Medical Requirements § 55.27 Documentation. The facility licensee shall document and maintain the results of medical qualifications data, test results, and each operator's or senior operator's medical history for the current license period and provide...

    3. 10 CFR 55.27 - Documentation.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

      2011-01-01

      ... REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES Medical Requirements § 55.27 Documentation. The facility licensee shall document and maintain the results of medical qualifications data, test results, and each operator's or senior operator's medical history for the current license period and provide...

    4. Secure HL7 transactions using Internet mail (Internet draft).

      PubMed

      Schadow, Gunther; Tucker, Mark; Rishel, Wes

      2002-01-01

      The document describes the applicability of the Internet standardisation efforts on secure electronic data interchange (EDI) transactions for Health Level-7 (HL7), an EDI standard for Healthcare used world-wide. The document heavily relies on the work in progress by the IETF EDIINT working group. It is in most parts a restatement of the EDIINTs requirements document and application statement 1 (AS#1) tailored to the needs of the HL7 audience. The authors tried to make the document as self consistent as possible. The goal is to give to the reader who is not a security or Internet standards expert enough foundational and detail information to enable him to build communication software that complies to the Internet standards. Even though the authors rely on and promote the respective Internet standards and drafts, they did not withstand from commenting on and criticising the work where they see upcoming problems in use with HL7 or other EDI protocols that have not been in the initial focus of the EDIINT working group. The authors make suggestions to add parameters to the specification of the MIME type for EDI messages in RFC 1767 in order to enhance functionality. The authors give use cases for a larger subset of disposition types and modifiers of message disposition notifications. One key issue where the document goes beyond the current EDIINT drafts is the concept of non-repudiation of commitment to an EDI transaction. Secure EDI transactions should be regarded as "distributed contracts," i.e. not only the sending and receiving of single messages should be non-refutable but also the connection between messages interchanges. In anticipation of this requirement HL7 usually requires a response message to be sent to acknowledge every transaction. The authors therefore have the requirement to securely couple an EDI response message to its request message. Given the current shape of RFC 1767 this is generally possible only if a response message is coupled with an MDN

    5. [Medical record management and risk management processes. State of the art and new normative guidelines about the organization and the management of the sanitary documentation in the National Health System or Hospital Trusts].

      PubMed

      Spolaore, P; Murolo, G; Sommavilla, M

      2003-01-01

      Recent health care reforms, the start of accreditation processes of health institutions, and the introduction also in the health system of risk management concepts and instruments, borrowed from the enterprise culture and the emphasis put on the protection of privacy, render evident the need and the urgency to define and to implement improvement processes of the organization and management of the medical documentation in the hospital with the aim of facilitation in fulfilment of regional and local health authorities policies about protection of the safety and improvement of quality of care. Currently the normative context that disciplines the management of medical records inside the hospital appears somewhat fragmentary, incomplete and however not able to clearly orientate health operators with the aim of a correct application of the enforced norms in the respect of the interests of the user and of local health authority. In this job we individuate the critical steps in the various phases of management process of the clinical folder and propose a new model of regulations, with the purpose to improve and to simplify the management processes and the modalities of compilation, conservation and release to entitled people of all clinical documentation. PMID:15049537

    6. Internet-Based Communication

      PubMed Central

      Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

      2015-01-01

      Google the question, “How is the Internet changing the way we communicate?,” and you will find no shortage of opinions, or fears, about the Internet altering the way we communicate. Although the Internet is not necessarily making communication briefer (neither is the Internet making communication less formal), the Internet is manifesting our preference for writing over speaking. I propose that our preference for communicating through Internet-based text derives from a fundamental feature of writing: In contrast to speech, which is most often synchronous, text is most often asynchronous. PMID:26330702

    7. [Internet in medicine--development and perspectives].

      PubMed

      Dezelić, Gjuro

      2002-01-01

      Internet is one of information technologies marking the transition from the second to the third millennium. The present role and expansion of Internet in medicine and healthcare is reviewed together with the perspective of further development. The beginning and initial expansion of the use of Internet in medicine are described. The World Wide Web (WWW or Web) is recognized as a major reason for this expansion, reaching a state described as a Web-pandemic. The rapid increase of the number of papers dealing with Internet in medical literature is presented as well as the appearance of several journals dedicated to Internet in medicine. First specialized symposia, among them MEDNET world conferences, are noted. First uses of Internet in medicine comprised databases, discussion groups, electronic newsletters, software archives and online public access catalogues. The appearance of the Web has led to a significant improvement of the Internet use in medicine, which is reflected in an exponential increase in the number of publications. It is noted that Internet allows "to do old things in new ways", but also "to do new things". It has become clear that the information revolution evoked by the internet shall leave a deep trace in medicine, as health information has become accessible to the public and ceased to be in exclusive control of health professionals. New medical fields--telemedicine and cybermedicine--appeared as the result of the development and global expansion of information and communication technologies, with cybermedicine dealing more specifically with the use of Internet. The advantages and disadvantages of cybermedicine are discussed, and major problems related to the quality of health information are highlighted. Several systems for quality criteria of health related Web-sites are described, indicating that Websites have to conform with the quality criteria such as transparency and honesty, accountability, privacy and data protection, currency

    8. Internet and Internet Use: Teacher Trainees' Perspective

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Akinoglu, Orhan

      2009-01-01

      The aim of this study is to present the development and issues of internet and internet use. The study has a descriptive survey design and 185 randomly selected teacher trainees at Marmara University, Ataturk Education Faculty in the 2001-2002 academic year constitute the sample. Data were collected via a questionnaire prepared by the researcher…

    9. [The internet--possibilities and risk for gynecology].

      PubMed

      Seufert, R; Molitor, N; Knapstein, P G

      1997-01-01

      The Internet is a rapid growing world wide computer cluster using the TCP/IP communication protocol. In case of scientific data exchange Internet communication is of extraordinary value. Low data security and low data transfer rates are still problems for medical data exchange. New Internet tools--specially new cryptological techniques--are able to improve the communication security for obstetrical and gynecological data. PMID:9381842

    10. Document Monitor

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      1988-01-01

      The charters of Freedom Monitoring System will periodically assess the physical condition of the U.S. Constitution, Declaration of Independence and Bill of Rights. Although protected in helium filled glass cases, the documents are subject to damage from light vibration and humidity. The photometer is a CCD detector used as the electronic film for the camera system's scanning camera which mechanically scans the document line by line and acquires a series of images, each representing a one square inch portion of the document. Perkin-Elmer Corporation's photometer is capable of detecting changes in contrast, shape or other indicators of degradation with 5 to 10 times the sensitivity of the human eye. A Vicom image processing computer receives the data from the photometer stores it and manipulates it, allowing comparison of electronic images over time to detect changes.

    11. History, structure, and function of the Internet.

      PubMed

      Glowniak, J

      1998-04-01

      The Internet stands at the forefront of telecommunications in medicine. This worldwide system of computers had its beginnings in networking projects in the United States and western Europe in the 1960s and 1970s. The precursor of the Internet was ARPANET, a long-distance telecommunication network funded by the Department of Defense that linked together computers throughout the United States. In the 1980s, ARPANET was superseded by NSFNET, a series of networks created by the National Science Foundation, which established the present-day structure of the Internet. The physical structure of the Internet resembles and is integrated with the telephone system. Long-distance data transport services are provided by large telecommunication companies, called network service providers (NSPs), through high-capacity, high-speed national and international fiber optic cables. These transport services are accessed through Internet service providers, ISPs. ISPs, the equivalent of regional Bell operating companies, provide the physical link to the NSPs for individuals and organizations. Telecommunications on the Internet are standardized by a set of communications protocols, the TCP/IP protocol suite, that describe routing of messages over the Internet, computer naming conventions, and commonly used Internet services such as e-mail. At present, the Internet consists of over 20 million computer worldwide and is continuing to grow at a rapid rate. Along with the growth of the Internet, higher speed access methods are offering a range of new services such as real-time video and voice communications. Medical education, teaching, and research, as well as clinical practice, will be affected in numerous different ways by these advances. PMID:9579415

    12. Medication for older patients.

      PubMed

      2016-09-01

      A growing body of literature documents multiple morbidities and multiple medication use among older people with intellectual disabilities. In Ireland in 2012, 8.6% of all medication-related adverse events were reported from the disability sector. PMID:27581916

    13. Using the Internet To Create Primary Source Teaching Packets.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      VanFossen, Phillip J.; Shiveley, James M.

      2000-01-01

      Describes strategies and guidelines for creating age- and content-appropriate primary source documents using the Internet. Discusses the value of using topic-specific primary source teaching packets, or jackdaws. Provides three Internet generated jackdaws: New Deal/FDR, Home Front during World War II, and the Gilded Age. Addresses fair use issues.…

    14. The Internet in Education.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Neubarth, Michael, Ed.

      1995-01-01

      This special theme issue of "Internet World" contains 10 articles on the role of the Internet in education. The articles are: "Internet Cum Laude" (Eric C. Richardson)--technological developments in college and university services; "Campus Connections" (Michael A. Arnzen)--guidelines for taking full advantage of on-campus access; "Major Links"…

    15. Internet Addiction and Psychopathology

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Koc, Mustafa

      2011-01-01

      This study examined the relationships between university students' internet addiction and psychopathology in Turkey. The study was based on data drawn from a national survey of university students in Turkey. 174 university students completed the SCL-90-R scale and Addicted Internet Users Inventory. Results show that students who use internet six…

    16. The Internet Scout Project.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Calcari, Susan

      1997-01-01

      Describes the Internet Scout Project which provides Internet users, particularly those in higher education, with current, selective, and well-annotated pointers to information about resources, network tools, and Internet news items. Offered through regular e-mail updates, titles include The Scout Report, The Scout Report Signpost, Net-Happenings,…

    17. Internet-Savvy Students.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Van Horn, Royal

      2003-01-01

      Describes national study of the attitudes and behaviors of middle and high school students who use the Internet. Finds that Internet-savvy students use the Internet as a virtual book and reference library, a tutor and study shortcut, a study group, a guidance counselor, and a locker, backpack, and notebook. Offers several explanations about the…

    18. The Next Generation Internet.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Wodarz, Nan

      1999-01-01

      Internet II will take three to five years to develop, will be 1,000 times faster than Internet I, and will cost at least $500 million. Key developers are universities, several federal agencies, and leading computer and telecommunications firms. Internet II will support face-to-face communications technology to facilitate "real-time" networking.…

    19. Advertising on the Internet.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Jugenheimer, Donald W.

      1996-01-01

      States that although many advertisers have intentions of utilizing the Internet for advertising, which can provide specific audience targeting and buyer/seller interactivity, few have been successful. Explains advantages and disadvantages of using the Internet for advertising purposes. Cites special problems with Internet advertising and successes…

    20. Scientific Documentation.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Pieper, Gail W.

      1980-01-01

      Describes how scientific documentation is taught in three 50-minute sessions in a technical writing course. Tells how session one distinguishes between in-text notes, footnotes, and reference entries; session two discusses the author-year system of citing references; and session three is concerned with the author-number system of reference…

    1. Internet Point of Care Learning at a Community Hospital

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Sinusas, Keith

      2009-01-01

      Introduction: Internet point of care (PoC) learning is a relatively new method for obtaining continuing medical education credits. Few data are available to describe physician utilization of this CME activity. Methods: We describe the Internet point of care system we developed at a medium-sized community hospital and report on its first year of…

    2. Internet Queries and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Surveillance

      PubMed Central

      Dukic, Vanja M.; David, Michael Z.

      2011-01-01

      The Internet is a common source of medical information and has created novel surveillance opportunities. We assessed the potential for Internet-based surveillance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and examined the extent to which it reflects trends in hospitalizations and news coverage. Google queries were a useful predictor of hospitalizations for methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections. PMID:21749772

    3. Many employees reluctant to use Internet for health information.

      PubMed

      Fine, Allan

      2004-01-01

      While many people may use the Internet to research buying a new car or planning a vacation, they may be less likely to use it for obtaining information on a medical condition. Those who do use the Internet to gather health information are more likely to be white, well-educated, and higher-paid. PMID:15685815

    4. Understanding Medical Words Tutorial: Download Instructions

      MedlinePlus

      ... nih.gov/medlineplus/medwords/medicalwordsdownload.html Understanding Medical Words Tutorial: Download Instructions To use the sharing features ... no Internet connection is available. Download: Understanding Medical Words [16MB zip file] Download instructions : Click on the ...

    5. Parents, ADHD and the internet.

      PubMed

      Terbeck, Sylvia; Chesterman, L Paul

      2012-09-01

      The objective of this study is to examine the potential impact of using the internet on medical consultations by analysing the attitudes, attributions, and emotional responses of parents who have been informed by specialists that their child does not have attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and to examine the nature of the feedback they obtained from members of online internet support groups. Over 40,000 messages from the five most popular international internet forums discussing children with ADHD were analysed. Messages from parents who reported that they had seen at least one specialist (e.g. paediatrician, psychiatrist or psychologist) because of their concerns that their child had ADHD were identified. The children included boys and girls with an age range from 2 to 16 years. Of these, we analysed messages where the parents additionally reported that the specialist had excluded a diagnosis of ADHD. Using these criteria, 91 messages from parents who had consulted over 200 different specialists and 398 replies to these messages were identified for content analysis. The replies to concerned parents were analysed to determine whether they were offered impartial advice. A majority of the parents reported that they did not believe the specialist and were unhappy about their child not being diagnosed with ADHD. They expressed dissatisfaction with the professional's opinions and the implication that their child's conduct was caused by their poor parenting skills. Importantly, 87.6 % of the responses that these parents received, from other members of online forums, reinforced the parent's negative attitude towards the professional's judgement. It was generally suggested that the parents should not believe the expert and should seek a further opinion. The use of the internet may encourage "doctor shopping" and mistrust in health services. Medical professionals and others may need to be aware of this, and parents may need more support than is generally

    6. Shortcomings of health information on the Internet.

      PubMed

      Benigeri, Mike; Pluye, Pierre

      2003-12-01

      Disseminating health and medical information on the Internet can improve knowledge transfer from health professionals to the population, and help individuals to maintain and improve their health. There are currently several medical information websites that directly target the general population with the aim of providing information about health problems, self-care and prevention. However, this new technology also hides several shortcomings, such as: (i) uneven quality of medical information available on the Internet; (ii) difficulties in finding, understanding and using this information; (iii) lack of access for the unconnected population; and (iv) the potential for harm and risks of over-consumption. To be able to overcome these dangers, it is important that public health practitioners and health professionals be involved in the design, dissemination and evaluation of Web-based health and medical information. PMID:14695369

    7. Sexual assault documentation program.

      PubMed

      Willoughby, Vickie; Heger, Astrid; Rogers, Christopher; Sathyavagiswaran, Lakshmanan

      2012-03-01

      Since 2001, the Los Angeles County Department of Coroner has collaborated with Los Angeles County-University of Southern California Medical Center Violence Intervention Program and their Sexual Assault Center. The partnership was established at the suggestion of the district attorney's office to enhance the clinical recognition of sexual assault in the medical examiner's office using the extensive experience of experts in the field of sexual assault. As of December 2008, over 5 dozen victims of sexual assault have been evaluated with this collaboration. The partnership relied on the expertise of 2 pediatricians who are established clinical experts in the field of sexual abuse and assault, in collaboration with the staff of the medical examiner's office. In cases of suspected sexual assault, a joint evaluation by the clinical experts and the medical examiner was made. The goal of the project was for the medical examiners to become more confident in their observations and documentation of crimes of sexual abuse. Even though they are still available upon request, consultations with the sexual assault experts have decreased as the skills of the medical examiner to evaluate sexual assault cases have increased. PMID:22442832

    8. An overview of the medical informatics curriculum in medical schools.

      PubMed Central

      Espino, J. U.; Levine, M. G.

      1998-01-01

      As medical schools incorporate medical informatics into their curriculum the problems of implementation arise. Because there are no standards regarding a medical informatics curriculum, medical schools are implementing the subjects in various ways. A survey was undertaken to amass an overview of the medical informatics curriculum nationally. Of the responding schools, most have aspects of medical informatics incorporated into current courses and utilize existing faculty. Literature searching, clinical decision-making, and Internet are the basic topics in the current curricula. The trend is for medical informatics to be incorporated throughout all four years of medical school. Barriers are the difficulties in faculty training, and slow implementation. PMID:9929263

    9. Electronic Journals, the Internet, and Scholarly Communication.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Kling, Rob; Callahan, Ewa

      2003-01-01

      Examines the role of the Internet in supporting scholarly communication via electronic journals. Topics include scholarly electronic communication; a typology of electronic journals; models of electronic documents and scholarly communication forums; publication speed; costs; pricing; access and searching; citations; interactivity; archiving and…

    10. Internet Resources for Civic Educators. ERIC Digest.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Pinhey, Laura A.

      The Internet is an important resource for K-12 citizenship education teachers. Curriculum guides, lesson plans, government documents, conference proceedings, databases, photographs, and multimedia files provide the classroom teacher with a variety of materials including many primary sources. An annotated list of 15 World Wide Web sites are…

    11. The Internet and medicine: past, present, and future.

      PubMed Central

      Doyle, D. J.; Ruskin, K. J.; Engel, T. P.

      1996-01-01

      The enormous growth of the Internet and the World Wide Web has made these two technologies an important potential adjunct to cost-effective health care research and delivery. This article surveys some recent developments in telecommunications, networking and artificial intelligence that are likely to have a significant impact on improving the efficiency and quality of future health care. Issues discussed include: clinical record keeping on the Internet, Internet-assisted medical diagnosis, privacy and security matters, financial transactions, digital money, bandwidth concerns, multimedia (music, audio and video) information delivery via the Internet, intellectual property, and the concept of Information Philanthropy. PMID:9381738

    12. Case Study: The Internet as a Developmental Tool in an Adolescent Boy with Psychosis.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Daley, Melita L.; Becker, Daniel F.; Flaherty, Lois T.; Harper, Gordon; King, Robert A.; Lester, Patricia; Milosavljevic, Nada; Onesti, Silvio J.; Rappaport, Nancy; Schwab-Stone, Mary

      2005-01-01

      The Internet has become an increasingly important part of teen culture; however, there still remains little in the medical/psychiatric literature pertaining to the impact of the Internet on adolescent development. Despite the potential problems associated with communication online, the Internet offers a variety of positive opportunities for teens.…

    13. Electronic Document Management Using Inverted Files System

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Suhartono, Derwin; Setiawan, Erwin; Irwanto, Djon

      2014-03-01

      The amount of documents increases so fast. Those documents exist not only in a paper based but also in an electronic based. It can be seen from the data sample taken by the SpringerLink publisher in 2010, which showed an increase in the number of digital document collections from 2003 to mid of 2010. Then, how to manage them well becomes an important need. This paper describes a new method in managing documents called as inverted files system. Related with the electronic based document, the inverted files system will closely used in term of its usage to document so that it can be searched over the Internet using the Search Engine. It can improve document search mechanism and document save mechanism.

    14. Medical tourism.

      PubMed

      Reed, Christie M

      2008-11-01

      Searches of the literature or Internet using the term "medical tourism" produce two sets of articles: travel for the purpose of delivering health care or travel for the purpose of seeking health care. The first usage primarily appears in the medical literature and is beyond the scope of this article, which focuses on travel to seek health care. Still, there are some aspects these two topics have in common: both are affected by ease and speed of international travel and communication associated with globalization, and both raise questions about continuity of care as well as issues related to cultural, language, and legal differences; both also raise questions about ethics. This article describes some of the motivating factors, contributing elements, and challenges in elucidating trends, as well as implications for clinicians who provide pretravel advice and those who care for ill returning travelers. PMID:19061760

    15. 14 CFR 302.3 - Filing of documents.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

      2011-01-01

      ... facilitate automated processing in document sheet feeders, documents of more than one page should be held... set at the DOT Dockets Management System (DMS) internet website. (2) Such documents will be deemed to... 11/2 inches; all other margins must be at least 1 inch. The title page and first page must bear...

    16. Navigating the internet maze.

      PubMed

      Singer, K P; Tan, B K

      2000-08-01

      The 'internet-driven information age' is a term in common usage, implying that everyone can access all the information they need, when they need it. The purpose of this brief paper is to outline some web sources that highlight the possibilities and potential for accessing web-based knowledge. From this the clinician will be encouraged to follow leads along the labyrinth of links to a greater appreciation of how this resource can be used to shape their practice. Examples of web links are provided for: search engines; library-based sources, including medical databases and electronic journals; evidence-based practice databases, mail-groups; electronic conferences; research centres; and general health sources. Importantly, this review does not aspire to be all-inclusive, for the web changes, chameleon-like, to the seasons. The web is here to stay. It will provide the framework for much education and will guide clients to a greater appreciation of their disease or disability than ever before. It may ultimately be the tool through which health fund agents will promote best practice, including self-help to clients, and therefore direct discriminating individuals to select health practitioners who have been endorsed by professional and fund agencies as providing a contemporary service which conforms to evidence-based practice. PMID:11034887

    17. Web-based document image processing

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Walker, Frank L.; Thoma, George R.

      1999-12-01

      Increasing numbers of research libraries are turning to the Internet for electron interlibrary loan and for document delivery to patrons. This has been made possible through the widespread adoption of software such as Ariel and DocView. Ariel, a product of the Research Libraries Group, converts paper-based documents to monochrome bitmapped images, and delivers them over the Internet. The National Library of Medicine's DocView is primarily designed for library patrons are beginning to reap the benefits of this new technology, barriers exist, e.g., differences in image file format, that lead to difficulties in the use of library document information. To research how to overcome such barriers, the Communications Engineering Branch of the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, an R and D division of NLM, has developed a web site called the DocMorph Server. This is part of an ongoing intramural R and D program in document imaging that has spanned many aspects of electronic document conversion and preservation, Internet document transmission and document usage. The DocMorph Server Web site is designed to fill two roles. First, in a role that will benefit both libraries and their patrons, it allows Internet users to upload scanned image files for conversion to alternative formats, thereby enabling wider delivery and easier usage of library document information. Second, the DocMorph Server provides the design team an active test bed for evaluating the effectiveness and utility of new document image processing algorithms and functions, so that they may be evaluated for possible inclusion in other image processing software products being developed at NLM or elsewhere. This paper describes the design of the prototype DocMorph Server and the image processing functions being implemented on it.

    18. Navigating the Internet.

      PubMed Central

      Powsner, S M; Roderer, N K

      1994-01-01

      Navigating any complex set of information resources requires tools for both browsing and searching. A number of tools are available today for using Internet resources, and more are being developed. This article reviews existing navigational tools, including two developed at the Yale University School of Medicine, and points out their strengths and weaknesses. A major shortcoming of the present Internet navigation methods is the lack of controlled descriptions of the available resources. As a result, navigating the Internet is very difficult. PMID:7841913

    19. [Use of the Internet in otorhinolaryngology].

      PubMed

      Górriz, C; González, F M; Trinidad, A; García, J R; Pinilla, M T; López Cortijo, C; Arellano, B

      1997-05-01

      The Internet is considered by some as one of the most important advances of the late 20th century. The Internet is the functional linking of personal computers via telephone lines to a worldwide network of millions of other computers, which enables them to exchange information freely. Although the Internet crops up in daily conversation, many persons are not aware of its usefulness and relevance for ear, nose and throat specialists. The Internet is accessed by special software that maximizes the potential of this vast computer network. The most important tools are e-mail and the World Wide Web. These tools make it possible to consult multimedia medical publications, access Medline, and carry out information searches, etc. The Internet and its most important uses in otolaryngology are summarized and a list of useful addresses is given. Although its advantages still are not widely appreciated, widespread Internet use is imminent and we think that it is a useful technology to know and use. Moreover, access is becoming easier and cheaper. PMID:9376133

    20. Anticipatory ethics for a future Internet: analyzing values during the design of an Internet infrastructure.

      PubMed

      Shilton, Katie

      2015-02-01

      The technical details of Internet architecture affect social debates about privacy and autonomy, intellectual property, cybersecurity, and the basic performance and reliability of Internet services. This paper explores one method for practicing anticipatory ethics in order to understand how a new infrastructure for the Internet might impact these social debates. This paper systematically examines values expressed by an Internet architecture engineering team-the Named Data Networking project-based on data gathered from publications and internal documents. Networking engineers making technical choices also weigh non-technical values when working on Internet infrastructure. Analysis of the team's documents reveals both values invoked in response to technical constraints and possibilities, such as efficiency and dynamism, as well as values, including privacy, security and anonymity, which stem from a concern for personal liberties. More peripheral communitarian values espoused by the engineers include democratization and trust. The paper considers the contextual and social origins of these values, and then uses them as a method of practicing anticipatory ethics: considering the impact such priorities may have on a future Internet. PMID:24407888

    1. Orbitmpi Documentation

      SciTech Connect

      Lisa L. Lowe

      2000-10-05

      Orbitmpi is a parallelized version of Roscoe White's Orbit code. The code has been parallelized using MPI, which makes it portable to many types of machines. The guidelines used for the parallelization were to increase code performance with minimal changes to the code's original structure. This document gives a general description of how the parallel sections of the code run. It discusses the changes made to the original code and comments on the general procedure for future additions to Orbitmpi, as well as describing the effects of a parallelized random number generator on the code's output. Finally, the scaling results from Hecate and from Puffin are presented. Hecate is a 64-processor Origin 2000 machine, with MIPS R12000 processors and 16GB of memory, and Puffin is a PC cluster with 9 dual-processor 450 MHz Pentium III (18 processors max.), with 100Mbits ethernet communication.

    2. Everything you might want to know about the Internet but are afraid to ask!. A new users resource

      SciTech Connect

      Thiel, E.

      1993-09-01

      This document is a guide to accessing the Internet and the services available on Internet. The document contains a short explanation of the Internet by E. Kroll and E. Hoffman, brief descriptions of the primary access tools, a glossary, answers to frequently asked questions about the Internet, J. Martin`s `Search for Internet Treasure` and other helpful information. The data access tools discussed in this document include Gopher, World Wide Web, WAIS, ASTRA, ARCHIE, WHOIS, NETSERV, and TRICKLE. The file transfer tool discussed is BITFTP. The two communication services discussed are NETNEWS and LISTSERV.

    3. Use and Documentation of Electronic Information: A Survey of Eastern Regional Technology Education Collegiate Association Students.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Ndahi, Hassan

      2003-01-01

      Responses from 130 of 156 technology education students indicated that 93% found the Internet an important research tool but 70% used it primarily for e-mail; only 14 had formal Internet training; 78% were unaware of the need to document Internet information sources; 74.2% believed this is public information; most said instructors did not teach…

    4. Psychiatric patients' internet use corresponds to the internet use of the general public.

      PubMed

      Trefflich, Friederike; Kalckreuth, Sophie; Mergl, Roland; Rummel-Kluge, Christine

      2015-03-30

      The use of Internet has grown in the past number of years, including the increased application of various therapy programs for psychiatric patients which can be accessed online. Few studies investigating psychiatric patients' Internet use exist. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the number of psychiatric patients that use the Internet in comparison to the general population. Since patients with mental health disorders frequently suffer from a variety of disadvantages in society, it was evaluated whether psychiatric patients were disadvantaged particularly concerning the use and access of the Internet. Three hundred and thirty-seven patients participated in the study and completed a 29-item questionnaire. A response rate of 66% was achieved. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance and binary logistic regression analysis were used. Out of the participants, 79.5% were Internet users. This number corresponds to the Internet use of the general population. Young patients in particular were found to use online information, using mostly search engines to seek medical information. The results show that psychiatric patients do not rank below the general population concerning the frequency of Internet use, which is especially important for accessing health related information online or participating in online programs. PMID:25623020

    5. 20 CFR 405.333 - Submitting documents.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

      2010-04-01

      ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Submitting documents. 405.333 Section 405.333... DISABILITY CLAIMS Administrative Law Judge Hearing § 405.333 Submitting documents. All documents prepared and submitted by you, i.e., not including medical or other evidence that is prepared by persons other than...

    6. Organising European technical documentation to avoid duplication.

      PubMed

      Donawa, Maria

      2006-04-01

      The development of comprehensive accurate and well-organised technical documentation that demonstrates compliance with regulatory requirements is a resource-intensive, but critically important activity for medical device manufacturers. This article discusses guidance documents and method of organising technical documentation that may help avoid costly and time-consuming duplication. PMID:16736662

    7. Human Research Program Requirements Document

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Rieger, Gabe

      2007-01-01

      The purpose of this document is to define, document, and allocate the Human Research Program (HRP) requirements to the HRP Program elements. It establishes the flow-down of requirements from Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) and Office of the Chief Health and Medical Officer (OCHMO) to the various Program Elements of the HRP to ensure that human research and technology countermeasure investments are made to insure the delivery of countermeasures and technologies that satisfy ESMD s and OCHMO's exploration mission requirements.

    8. Online Collaborative Documents for Research and Coursework

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Murphy, Karen L.; Cifuentes, Lauren; Shih, Yu-Chih Doris

      2004-01-01

      The increased use of the internet in higher education has helped researchers conduct collaborative research and enabled faculty to provide opportunities for students to work collaboratively in their courses. The authors of this article use online collaborative documents for conducting collaborative research and for learning collaboratively via the…

    9. Annex II technical documentation assessed.

      PubMed

      van Drongelen, A W; Roszek, B; van Tienhoven, E A E; Geertsma, R E; Boumans, R T; Kraus, J J A M

      2005-12-01

      Annex II of the Medical Device Directive (MDD) is used frequently by manufacturers to obtain CE-marking. This procedure relies on a full quality assurance system and does not require an assessment of the individual medical device by a Notified Body. An investigation into the availability and the quality of technical documentation for Annex II devices revealed severe shortcomings, which are reported here. PMID:16419921

    10. Creating Pupils' Internet Magazine

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Bognar, Branko; Šimic, Vesna

      2014-01-01

      This article presents an action research, which aimed to improve pupils' literary creativity and enable them to use computers connected to the internet. The study was conducted in a small district village school in Croatia. Creating a pupils' internet magazine appeared to be an excellent way for achieving the educational aims of almost all…

    11. Understanding the Internet.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Oblinger, Diana

      The Internet is an international network linking hundreds of smaller computer networks in North America, Europe, and Asia. Using the Internet, computer users can connect to a variety of computers with little effort or expense. The potential for use by college faculty is enormous. The largest problem faced by most users is understanding what such…

    12. Banking on the Internet.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Internet Research, 1996

      1996-01-01

      Electronic ground was broken in 1995 with the development of the completely Internet-based bank Security First Network Bank. This article discusses the need for developing online services, outlines the reasons for the formation of an Internet-based bank and argues that to remain competitive financial services providers must provide easier customer…

    13. Addiction to internet replies.

      PubMed

      Lee, Ook

      2009-01-01

      This research introduces a new addictive behavior in cyberspace, which is called Internet Reply Addiction. This phenomenon was found and empirically investigated in Korea where addictive behavior on Internet reply is common. This research suggests that the cause of this kind of addiction can be inferred from the Confucian cultural tradition that oppresses free expressions of individuals in real life settings. PMID:19592737

    14. Internet and forensic science

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Chamakura, Reddy P.

      1997-02-01

      The Internet is a very powerful and inexpensive tool that was created for the free distribution of knowledge and information. The Internet is a learning tool, a research tool, a virtual library without borders and membership requirements, a journal with instant publication, a help desk, and a newspaper/journal with current information. Very soon, when live audio and video transmission is perfected, the Internet also will be a live classroom and everyday conference. Forensic scientists, laboratories and colleges should make use of information already available on the Internet. They also should actively participate and contribute. Very few forensic scientists and laboratories have made their presence felt by setting up their home pages/web pages. But, there is tremendous growth during the past year. Immense benefits from Internet to forensic community are discussed along with the author's personal experience. Creating on-line searchable data bases in all specialties of forensic science is an urgent need. Leading forensic journals should take a lead and create on-line searchable indexes with abstracts. On line electronic publishing, collaborative research/paper publishing or editing is easy, fast, economical and convenient through the use of the Internet. Creation of Internet repositories of unpublished papers is an idea worth looking into. Internet also can be used to give training, re-training or advanced training to students/forensic scientists.

    15. job.search@internet.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Allen, Claudia.

      1995-01-01

      Presents job-hunting options and career opportunities available by searching the Internet, as well as tips for consulting others in a field of interest through a listserv or usenet news group. A collection of Internet addresses providing access to information on job search strategies or job availability is provided. (JPS)

    16. Internet Basics. ERIC Digest.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Tennant, Roy

      The Internet is a worldwide network of computer networks. In the United States, the National Science Foundation Network (NSFNet) serves as the Internet "backbone" (a very high speed network that connects key regions across the country). The NSFNet will likely evolve into the National Research and Education Network (NREN) as defined in the High…

    17. Regulating the Internet

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Anderson, Byron

      2007-01-01

      The Internet's breakthrough to primetime usage beginning in the mid-1990s evolved in an era of openness. Unfettered access seemed key to Internet development. An important foundation for the 1996 Telecommunications Act was the theory that the telecom industry would work best if it were free of government regulation, a guiding principle that has…

    18. Lessons on Using Internet.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Lemme, Bobbi; Donovan, Terri

      Intended for beginning Internet users and adult basic education instructors, this manual presents a very basic, instructional approach to exploring the Internet, with explicit instructions on what to do, places to go, and interesting things to try. An introduction on getting started is followed by sections on electronic mail, including using the…

    19. Internet Relay Chat.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Simpson, Carol

      2000-01-01

      Describes Internet Relay Chats (IRCs), electronic conversations over the Internet that allow multiple users to write messages, and their applications to educational settings such as teacher collaboration and conversations between classes. Explains hardware and software requirements, IRC organization into nets and channels, and benefits and…

    20. Making the Internet Connection.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Descy, Don E.

      1995-01-01

      Provides information on commercial connections to the Internet via gateways as opposed to direct connection or through a modem. Hardware and software requirements are described; and commercial online services offering an Internet gateway are discussed, including America Online, CompuServe, Delphi, GEnie, and Prodigy. (LRW)

    1. Interlinguistics and the Internet.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Fettes, Mark

      1997-01-01

      Argues that the Internet offers new opportunities for the development, use, and study of planned languages. Notes that while most Web pages on "constructed" languages are the work of individual hobbyists, a few projects have small communities of users. The paper concludes that the use of Esperanto on the Internet reflects increased socialization…

    2. The Future of the Internet in Science

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Guice, Jon; Duffy, Robert

      2000-01-01

      How are scientists going to make use of the Internet several years from now? This is a case study of a leading-edge experiment in building a 'virtual institute'-- using electronic communication tools to foster collaboration among geographically dispersed scientists. Our experience suggests: Scientists will want to use web-based document management systems. There will be a demand for Internet-enabled meeting support tools. While internet videoconferencing will have limited value for scientists, webcams will be in great demand as a tool for transmitting pictures of objects and settings, rather than "talking heads." and a significant share of scientists who do fieldwork will embrace mobile voice, data and video communication tools. The setting for these findings is a research consortium called the NASA Astrobiology Institute.

    3. Domain oriented information extraction from the Internet

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Arens, Andreas; Blaesius, Karl H.

      2003-01-01

      Information retrieval and knowledge acquisition represent the basis of the modern information age. The internet provides the possibility of nearly worldwide unlimited information search. However, for a user searching the internet the huge mass of electronic information offerings requires a lot of time and effort to find the desired information. Because of the lack of context awareness, traditional internet search engines cannot satisfy the growing need for a selective high qualitative filtering and extraction of topic and user oriented information. The aim of the project INFOX-I at the University of Applied Sciences Trier, is to develop concepts to support the user searching information in the WWW. Therefore, there is an urgent need for methods that make it possible to automatically select relevant information on a given domain. Methods from the field of document analysis and knowledge based systems are used. In this paper we outline the concepts and the current state of the project.

    4. Value of the internet in emergency response.

      SciTech Connect

      Herzenberg, C. L.; Newsom, D. E.; Swietlik, C. E.

      1999-05-26

      Can the Internet be of value in emergency response? The answer is yes, judging by its use in the Kobe earthquake in Japan in 1995, ice storms in the US and Canada in 1998, and other disasters. Current and future areas of application are numerous, including exchanging messages, documents, and data files via e-mail; accessing operational data on-line; visualizing events via photos and maps; providing backup communications in lieu of broadcast media, exchanging information between crisis managers and responders; and providing information to media and the public. However, the Internet has some drawbacks, such as hardware/software requirements, computer literacy requirements, traffic jams, dependence on power and communication networks, and risks to information integrity and security. This paper examines some of the advantages, drawbacks, concerns, and potential uses of the Internet for emergency response.

    5. Omega documentation

      SciTech Connect

      Howerton, R.J.; Dye, R.E.; Giles, P.C.; Kimlinger, J.R.; Perkins, S.T.; Plechaty, E.F.

      1983-08-01

      OMEGA is a CRAY I computer program that controls nine codes used by LLNL Physical Data Group for: 1) updating the libraries of evaluated data maintained by the group (UPDATE); 2) calculating average values of energy deposited in secondary particles and residual nuclei (ENDEP); 3) checking the libraries for internal consistency, especially for energy conservation (GAMCHK); 4) producing listings, indexes and plots of the library data (UTILITY); 5) producing calculational constants such as group averaged cross sections and transfer matrices for diffusion and Sn transport codes (CLYDE); 6) producing and updating standard files of the calculational constants used by LLNL Sn and diffusion transport codes (NDFL); 7) producing calculational constants for Monte Carlo transport codes that use group-averaged cross sections and continuous energy for particles (CTART); 8) producing and updating standard files used by the LLNL Monte Carlo transport codes (TRTL); and 9) producing standard files used by the LANL pointwise Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (MCPOINT). The first four of these functions and codes deal with the libraries of evaluated data and the last five with various aspects of producing calculational constants for use by transport codes. In 1970 a series, called PD memos, of internal and informal memoranda was begun. These were intended to be circulated among the group for comment and then to provide documentation for later reference whenever questions arose about the subject matter of the memos. They have served this purpose and now will be drawn upon as source material for this more comprehensive report that deals with most of the matters covered in those memos.

    6. Internet Addiction and Antisocial Internet Behavior of Adolescents

      PubMed Central

      Ma, Hing Keung

      2011-01-01

      Internet addiction and the moral implication of antisocial Internet behavior will be investigated in this paper. More and more people use the Internet in their daily life. Unfortunately the percentage of people who use the internet excessively also increases. The concept of Internet addiction or pathological use of Internet is discussed in detail, and the characteristics of Internet addicts are also delineated. The social (especially the antisocial) use of Internet is discussed. It is argued that the behavior of Internet use is similar to daily life social behavior. In other words, Internet behavior is a kind of social behavior. Kohlberg's theory of moral development is employed to delineate the moral reasoning of the antisocial Internet behavior. The following behaviors are regarded as antisocial Internet behavior: (1) the use of Internet to carry out illegal activities such as selling faked products or offensive pornographic materials, (2) the use of Internet to bully others (i.e., cyberbullying) such as distributing libelous statements against a certain person, (3) the use of Internet to cheat others, and (4) the use of Internet to do illegal gambling. The characteristics of the moral stages that are associated with these antisocial Internet behaviors are investigated in detail. PMID:22125466

    7. AGWA DESIGN DOCUMENTATION: MIGRATING TO ARCGIS AND THE INTERNET

      EPA Science Inventory

      Rapid post-fire watershed assessment to identify potential trouble spots for erosion and flooding can potentially aid land managers and Burned Area Emergency Rehabilitation (BAER) teams in deploying mitigation and rehabilitation resources.

      These decisions are inherently co...

    8. [Data sources for continual quality improvement in medical rehabilitation- the QS-Reha procedure of the statutory health insurance funds and the Eva-Reha documentation system of MDK Rhineland-palatinate].

      PubMed

      Bassler, M; Nosper, M; Follert, P; Böwering, L; Polak, U

      2007-06-01

      Rehabilitation centers in Germany with a care supply contract according to section 111 Social Code Book Five - statutory health insurance (SGB V) are legally obligated to implement an internal quality management and to participate in comprehensive measures of external quality assurance which particularly aim at improving outcome quality ( section 135a SGB V). The legislator has left it to the central associations of health insurance funds and to the relevant umbrella organisations of care providers to develop these measures as well as the basic requirements on internal quality management in order to reach a joint agreement about it (cf. section 137d [1] and [1a] SGB V). The corresponding agreement was concluded on April 1, 2004. Whereas configuration of the internal quality management to a large extend lies in the discretion of the individual rehabilitation center, although it has to be geared to the objectives and principles set out in the agreement under section 137d SGB V, participation in the external quality assurance procedures of the central associations of health insurance funds (QS-Reha procedure) is obligatory for all rehabilitation centers with a care supply contract according to section 111 or 111a. The QS-Reha procedure comprises a survey of the central quality dimensions (structural, process and outcome quality as well as patient satisfaction) and permits related quality comparisons, which are utilized by the health insurance funds for quality oriented patient allocation and remuneration. The QS-Reha procedure had been developed to implement the legal requirements for external quality assurance in the field of medical rehabilitation ( section 135a in conjunction with section 137d SGB V) as well as to create a basis for quality focussed remuneration and patients allocation, whereas the Eva-Reha database had been developed by the Medical Service of Health Insurances in Rheinland-Pfalz for single case documentation with the objective of utilizing these

    9. How Patients With Schizophrenia Use the Internet: Qualitative Study

      PubMed Central

      Sibitz, Ingrid; Unger, Annemarie; Amering, Michaela

      2010-01-01

      Background The Internet is an important source of health information for people with psychiatric conditions. Little is known about the way patients with schizophrenia use the Internet when it comes to issues related to their illness. Data on their specific needs, difficulties, and the consequences related to Internet use are lacking. Objective Our objective was to investigate the nature and subjective consequences of health-related Internet use among patients with schizophrenia. Methods In all, 26 individual semistructured interviews were conducted and analyzed qualitatively in groups of 4 until theoretical saturation was achieved. Results Study results suggest that the Internet is an influential source of illness-related information for patients with schizophrenia. Many aspects of their behavior around the Internet resemble those of individuals not afflicted by mental illness. Importantly, problems specific to patients with schizophrenia were stimulus overflow, an inability to deal with the abundance of information, difficulties with concentration, lack of energy, paranoid ideas, symptom provocation, and the need to distance themselves from illness-related topics as part of the recovery process. Internet information was subjectively perceived as having the potential to significantly change patients’ attitudes toward medication and their relationships with doctors. Conclusions These findings provide insight into how individuals with schizophrenia handle illness-related Internet information. The data could contribute to the continuous development of Internet-based interventions and offer novel approaches to optimizing traditional treatment options. PMID:21169176

    10. Internet Cum Laude.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Richardson, Eric C.

      1995-01-01

      Discusses the Internet's role in colleges and universities. Topics include network development, accessing the library's online catalog; attracting students, electronic student handbooks, coursework information, and program listings, teleconferencing, distance education, independent study and online degrees, electronic field trips, journalism…

    11. [Impact of the internet on physician-patient relationship].

      PubMed

      Gaal, Ilona

      2016-04-24

      Internet became an inevitable phenomenon in the physician-patient relationship. The author analyzes it in two theoretical models: the effects on the medical profession and the interference with the decision making process. These will help to explain why patients search the internet for information about their illness, cure and their doctors. Some physicians dislike this, and they are not just worried about the patient, but about their own position and time. This fear is groundless, even if the internet patient can be hard to tackle in the daily routine. Internet can be seen not only as a necessary evil, but with proper communication skills physicians can benefit from their patients' passion to internet. PMID:27084443

    12. Healthcare organizations and the Internet: impact on federal tax exemption.

      PubMed

      Woods, LaVerne; Osborne, Michele

      2002-01-01

      Tax-exempt healthcare organizations have turned to the Internet as a powerful tool in communicating with the public, medical staff, and patients. Activities as diverse as providing links to the Web sites of other organizations, selling goods and services, soliciting contributions, and hosting forums on the Internet raise unresolved questions concerning the impact of Internet use on such organizations' tax-exempt status. The Internal Revenue Service has provided no guidance to date regarding the manner in which a nonprofit organizations' use of the Internet may affect its tax-exempt status or subject it to federal income tax on some sources of funds. This article suggests analytical approaches for applying existing law in the Internet context and identifies areas that are ripe for additional guidance. PMID:11974519

    13. Point-of-care clinical documentation: assessment of a bladder cancer informatics tool (eCancerCareBladder): a randomized controlled study of efficacy, efficiency and user friendliness compared with standard electronic medical records

      PubMed Central

      Bostrom, Peter J; Toren, Paul J; Xi, Hao; Chow, Raymond; Truong, Tran; Liu, Justin; Lane, Kelly; Legere, Laura; Chagpar, Anjum; Zlotta, Alexandre R; Finelli, Antonio; Fleshner, Neil E; Grober, Ethan D

      2011-01-01

      Objective To compare the use of structured reporting software and the standard electronic medical records (EMR) in the management of patients with bladder cancer. The use of a human factors laboratory to study management of disease using simulated clinical scenarios was also assessed. Design eCancerCareBladder and the EMR were used to retrieve data and produce clinical reports. Twelve participants (four attending staff, four fellows, and four residents) used either eCancerCareBladder or the EMR in two clinical scenarios simulating cystoscopy surveillance visits for bladder cancer follow-up. Measurements Time to retrieve and quality of review of the patient history; time to produce and completeness of a cystoscopy report. Finally, participants provided a global assessment of their computer literacy, familiarity with the two systems, and system preference. Results eCancerCareBladder was faster for data retrieval (scenario 1: 146 s vs 245 s, p=0.019; scenario 2: 306 vs 415 s, NS), but non-significantly slower to generate a clinical report. The quality of the report was better in the eCancerCareBladder system (scenario 1: p<0.001; scenario 2: p=0.11). User satisfaction was higher with the eCancerCareBladder system, and 11/12 participants preferred to use this system. Limitations The small sample size affected the power of our study to detect differences. Conclusions Use of a specific data management tool does not appear to significantly reduce user time, but the results suggest improvement in the level of care and documentation and preference by users. Also, the use of simulated scenarios in a laboratory setting appears to be a valid method for comparing the usability of clinical software. PMID:21816957

    14. Saving the internet.

      PubMed

      Zittrain, Jonathan

      2007-06-01

      The Internet goose has laid countless golden eggs, along with a growing number of rotten ones. But it's the rotten ones that now tempt commercial, governmental, and consumer interests to threaten the Internet's uniquely creative power. The expediently selected, almost accidentally generative properties of the Internet - its technical openness, ease of access and mastery, and adaptability - have combined, especially when coupled with those of the PC, to produce an unsurpassed environment for innovative experiment. Those same properties, however, also make the Internet hospitable to various forms of wickedness: hacking, porn, spam, fraud, theft, predation, and attacks on the network itself. As these undesirable phenomena proliferate, business, government, and many users find common cause for locking down Internet and PC architecture in the interests of security and order. PC and Internet security vulnerabilities are a legitimate menace. However, the most likely reactions - if they are not forestalled - will be at least as unfortunate as the security problems themselves. Consider the growing profusion of "tethered appliances" - devices whose functions cannot readily be altered by their owners (think TiVo). Such appliances take Internet innovations and wrap them up in a neat, easy-to-use package, which is good - but only if the Internet and PC can remain sufficiently in the center of the digital ecosystem to produce the next round of innovations and to generate competition. People buy these devices for their convenience or functionality and may appreciate the fact that they are safer to use (they limit the damage users can do through ignorance or carelessness). But the risk is that users, by migrating to such appliances, will unwittingly trade away the future benefits of generativity - a loss that will go unappreciated even as innovation tapers off. PMID:17580647

    15. Acne and the Internet.

      PubMed

      Zeichner, Joshua A; Del Rosso, James Q

      2016-04-01

      The Internet provides both education and miseducation for acne patients. Although some sites provide disease background information and objective treatment guidance, support networks, and research findings, others may seem to be objective on the surface, but are in reality run by untrained, self-proclaimed experts or are promotional in nature. Providers must be aware of the potential benefits and pitfalls the Internet provides for those suffering with acne. PMID:27015772

    16. Strategy and the Internet.

      PubMed

      Porter, M E

      2001-03-01

      Many of the pioneers of Internet business, both dot-coms and established companies, have competed in ways that violate nearly every precept of good strategy. Rather than focus on profits, they have chased customers indiscriminately through discounting, channel incentives, and advertising. Rather than concentrate on delivering value that earns an attractive price from customers, they have pursued indirect revenues such as advertising and click-through fees. Rather than make trade-offs, they have rushed to offer every conceivable product or service. It did not have to be this way--and it does not have to be in the future. When it comes to reinforcing a distinctive strategy, Michael Porter argues, the Internet provides a better technological platform than previous generations of IT. Gaining competitive advantage does not require a radically new approach to business; it requires building on the proven principles of effective strategy. Porter argues that, contrary to recent thought, the Internet is not disruptive to most existing industries and established companies. It rarely nullifies important sources of competitive advantage in an industry; it often makes them even more valuable. And as all companies embrace Internet technology, the Internet itself will be neutralized as a source of advantage. Robust competitive advantages will arise instead from traditional strengths such as unique products, proprietary content, and distinctive physical activities. Internet technology may be able to fortify those advantages, but it is unlikely to supplant them. Porter debunks such Internet myths as first-mover advantage, the power of virtual companies, and the multiplying rewards of network effects. He disentangles the distorted signals from the marketplace, explains why the Internet complements rather than cannibalizes existing ways of doing business, and outlines strategic imperatives for dot-coms and traditional companies. PMID:11246925

    17. Model primary content type for multipurpose internet mail extensions

      SciTech Connect

      Nelson, S.; Parks, C.

      1997-01-01

      The purpose of this memo is to propose an update to Internet RFC 2045 to include a new primary content-type to be known as `model`. RFC 2045 [1] describes mechanisms for specifying and describing the format of Internet Message Bodies via content-type/subtype pairs. We believe that `model` defines a fundamental type of content with unique presentational, hardware, and processing aspects. Various subtypes of this primary type are immediately anticipated but will be covered under separate documents.

    18. Association between internet gambling and problematic internet use among adolescents.

      PubMed

      Tsitsika, Artemis; Critselis, Elena; Janikian, Mari; Kormas, George; Kafetzis, Dimitrios A

      2011-09-01

      The study objectives were to evaluate the correlates and psychosocial implications of internet gambling among adolescents, as well as the association between internet gambling and problematic internet use. A cross-sectional study design was applied among a random sample (N = 484) of adolescents (71.2% boys; 28.8% girls; mean age ± standard deviation, SD = 14.88 ± 0.55 years). Self-completed questionnaires, including internet gambling practices, internet use characteristics, Young Internet Addiction Test, and Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire were utilized. The prevalence of internet gambling was 15.1%. Internet gambling was associated with psychosocial maladjustment, including Abnormal Conduct Problems (gender adjusted odds ratio, AOR = 3.83; 95% confidence interval, 95% CI: 1.86-7.92) and Borderline Peer Problems (AOR = 2.04; 95% CI: 1.09-3.85). The likelihood of concomitant problematic internet use was significantly higher among internet gamblers (AOR = 1.81; 95% CI: 1.03-3.19). Multivariate regression analyses indicated that among all characteristics of internet use assessed, utilizing the internet for the purposes of gambling practices was independently associated with problematic internet use among adolescents (AOR = 3.43; 95% CI: 1.40-8.39). Thus, the study findings suggest that adolescents who participate in internet gambling practices are more likely to concomitantly present with problematic internet use. PMID:20953681

    19. Experimental Internet Environment Software Development

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Maddux, Gary A.

      1998-01-01

      Geographically distributed project teams need an Internet based collaborative work environment or "Intranet." The Virtual Research Center (VRC) is an experimental Intranet server that combines several services such as desktop conferencing, file archives, on-line publishing, and security. Using the World Wide Web (WWW) as a shared space paradigm, the Graphical User Interface (GUI) presents users with images of a lunar colony. Each project has a wing of the colony and each wing has a conference room, library, laboratory, and mail station. In FY95, the VRC development team proved the feasibility of this shared space concept by building a prototype using a Netscape commerce server and several public domain programs. Successful demonstrations of the prototype resulted in approval for a second phase. Phase 2, documented by this report, will produce a seamlessly integrated environment by introducing new technologies such as Java and Adobe Web Links to replace less efficient interface software.

    20. Interfacing computers and the internet with your allergy practice.

      PubMed

      Bernstein, Jonathan A

      2004-10-01

      Computers and the internet have begun to play a prominent role in the medical profession and, in particular, the allergy specialty. Computer technology is being used more frequently for patient and physician education, asthma management in children and adults, including environmental control, generating patient databases for research and clinical practice and in marketing and e-commerce. This article will review how computers and the internet have begun to interface with the allergy subspecialty practice in these various areas. PMID:15576895

    1. Legal examination of physician advertising on the internet.

      PubMed

      Carroll, Jenny

      2006-02-01

      The Internet provides an invaluable resource to physicians seeking to market healthcare services to consumers. No longer considered an unethical practice, physician advertising has transformed over the years into an indispensable business tool in the medical community. While the Internet creates opportunities to reach vast numbers of individuals in a timely and cost-effective manner, physicians must be vigilant in adhering to laws, rules, and regulations designed to protect the public from false and deceptive practices. PMID:16732508

    2. Commercial Document Delivery Services "Challenged" as EBSCO Drops Service.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Machovec, George S.

      1998-01-01

      Discusses the EBSCO decision to stop its traditional commercial document delivery business. High prices for copyright clearance, government subsidized services, electronic formats available on the Internet, Web-based services, and consortium-based licensing activities are discussed as influencing the market for document delivery. (LRW)

    3. Cue-induced craving for Internet among Internet addicts.

      PubMed

      Niu, Geng-Feng; Sun, Xiao-Jun; Subrahmanyam, Kaveri; Kong, Fan-Chang; Tian, Yuan; Zhou, Zong-Kui

      2016-11-01

      Intense craving is a core feature of addictive disorder, and cue-induced craving is believed to be a key factor in the maintenance and relapse of addictive behaviors. With the rapid development of the Internet, Internet addiction has become a widespread behavioral problem accompanied by many negative effects. This study used the cue-reactivity paradigm to examine cue-induced craving for the Internet among Internet addicts and non-addicts. Participants were exposed to Internet-related words, and asked to report their craving for the Internet. Results indicated that Internet-related words aroused cue-induced craving for the Internet among both Internet addicts and non-addicts; however, the craving was more intense among Internet addicts. These results suggest that craving may not be a unipolar, all or none state found only in addicts, but may also be present among non-addicts. They indicate that Internet-related words may be able to induce craving for the Internet, and that Internet addiction and other addictions may share similar underlying mechanisms. This finding has important implications for designing interventions for Internet addiction. PMID:27305097

    4. Internet Based Remote Operations

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Chamberlain, James

      1999-01-01

      This is the Final Report for the Internet Based Remote Operations Contract, has performed payload operations research support tasks March 1999 through September 1999. These tasks support the GSD goal of developing a secure, inexpensive data, voice, and video mission communications capability between remote payload investigators and the NASA payload operations team in the International Space Station (ISS) era. AZTek has provided feedback from the NASA payload community by utilizing its extensive payload development and operations experience to test and evaluate remote payload operations systems. AZTek has focused on use of the "public Internet" and inexpensive, Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) Internet-based tools that would most benefit "small" (e.g., $2 Million or less) payloads and small developers without permanent remote operations facilities. Such projects have limited budgets to support installation and development of high-speed dedicated communications links and high-end, custom ground support equipment and software. The primary conclusions of the study are as follows: (1) The trend of using Internet technology for "live" collaborative applications such as telescience will continue. The GSD-developed data and voice capabilities continued to work well over the "public" Internet during this period. 2. Transmitting multiple voice streams from a voice-conferencing server to a client PC to be mixed and played on the PC is feasible. 3. There are two classes of voice vendors in the market: - Large traditional phone equipment vendors pursuing integration of PSTN with Internet, and Small Internet startups.The key to selecting a vendor will be to find a company sufficiently large and established to provide a base voice-conferencing software product line for the next several years.

    5. Risks and threats from internet access: Protecting the institution

      SciTech Connect

      Kallman, E.A.

      1994-12-31

      The Internet provides a number of capabilities to users. They can be divided into four general categories: (1) Email - to virtually anyone on an Internet node. (2) Telnet - a direct connection to remote computers on the Internet, providing access to files, indices and other information resources at those locations. (3) File Transfer Protocol (FTP) - a procedure which enables copying of files (documents, programs, pictures) between computing systems at different Internet locations. The ability to search for and retrieve files on the Internet may be accomplished with a variety of techniques having names like Gopher, Archie and Veronica. For our purposes, these fall into the FTP category. (4) News Groups - thousands of electronic discussion groups through which messages are disseminated to subscribing users at Internet locations. Each of these categories poses some threat to the institution providing Internet access to users. Those responsible for this resource must understand the threats and take appropriate action to protect both the resource and the institution. At Bentley College an Internet Policy (see Appendix A) is in place, which along with other policies and practices meets these challenges.

    6. Munchausen by Internet: Current Research and Future Directions

      PubMed Central

      Taylor, Jacqui

      2012-01-01

      Background The Internet has revolutionized the health world, enabling self-diagnosis and online support to take place irrespective of time or location. Alongside the positive aspects for an individual’s health from making use of the Internet, debate has intensified on how the increasing use of Web technology might have a negative impact on patients, caregivers, and practitioners. One such negative health-related behavior is Munchausen by Internet. Objective Munchausen by Internet occurs when medically well individuals fake recognized illnesses in virtual environments, such as online support groups. This paper focuses on the aspect of Munchausen by Internet in which individuals actively seek to disrupt groups for their own satisfaction, which has not yet been associated with the wider phenomena of Internet trolls (users who post with the intention of annoying someone or disrupting an online environment). Methods A wide-ranging review was conducted to investigate the causes and impacts of online identity deception and Munchausen by Internet drawing on academic research and case studies reported online and in the media. Results The limited research relating to motivation, opportunity, detection, effects, and consequences of Munchausen by Internet is highlighted and it is formally linked to aspects of trolling. Case studies are used to illustrate the phenomenon. What is particularly worrying is the ease with which the deception can be carried out online, the difficulty in detection, and the damaging impact and potential danger to isolated victims. Conclusions We suggest ways to deal with Munchausen by Internet and provide advice for health group facilitators. We also propose that Munchausen by Internet and Munchausen by Internet trolling should be formally acknowledged in a revised version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual DSM-5. This will assist in effectively identifying and minimizing the growth of this behavior as more people seek reassurance and support

    7. Teratogen risk counselling by internet: a prospective cohort study.

      PubMed

      Han, J-Y; Yang, J H; Chung, J H; Choi, J S; Ahn, H K; Ryu, H M; Kim, M Y; Cho, S I; Nava-Ocampo, A A

      2005-07-01

      Although the internet may play a role in providing proper teratogen-risk counselling for pregnant women, the experience with this type of service has not been reported. We aimed to compare the pregnancy outcome of women counselled by the internet to women that received typically in-clinic teratogen risk counselling in the clinic. In a prospective cohort design, 1,011 patients were counselled in the clinic and 235 patients were counselled via the internet. Teratogen risk counselling was provided according with the information obtained from medical literature and specialised software. Information about pregnancy outcome (delivery, spontaneous abortion, or termination of pregnancy and major malformations) was obtained from 903 (89.3%) patients from the clinic group and 141 (60%) from the internet group. The amount of alcohol, cigarettes smoked, and millirads of X-ray were greater ( p < 0.05) in patients counselled by internet than in clinic. The rate of deliveries, ongoing pregnancies, pregnancy terminations, and spontaneous abortions were similar between clinic and internet (chi2 = 1.32; p = 0.7). Of 498 babies born to mothers counselled in the clinic, major malformations were identified in 3.6%. Of 67 babies born to mothers counselled by internet, major malformations were present in 1.5% ( p = 0.6). Teratogen-risk counselling by internet and clinic seems to have a similar efficacy in pregnancy outcome. PMID:16183573

    8. Ethical challenges of medicine and health on the Internet: a review.

      PubMed

      Dyer, K A

      2001-01-01

      Knowledge and capabilities, particularly of a new technology or in a new area of study, frequently develop faster than the guidelines and principles needed for practitioners to practice ethically in the new arena; this is particularly true in medicine. The blending of medicine and healthcare with e-commerce and the Internet raises many questions involving what sort of ethical conduct should be expected by practitioners and developers of the medical Internet. Some of the early pioneers in medical and healthcare Web sites pushed the ethical boundaries with questionable, even unethical, practices. Many involved with the medical Internet are now working to reestablish patient and consumer trust by establishing guidelines to determine how the fundamentals of the medical code of ethical conduct can best be adapted for the medical/healthcare Internet. Ultimately, all those involved in the creation, maintenance, and marketing of medical and healthcare Web sites should be required to adhere to a strict code of ethical conduct, one that has been fairly determined by an impartial international organization with reasonable power to regulate the code. This code could also serve as a desirable, recognizable label-of-distinction for ethical Web sites within the medical and healthcare Internet community. One challenge for those involved with the medical and healthcare Internet will be to determine what constitutes "Medical Internet Ethics" or "Healthcare Internet Ethics," since the definition of medical ethics can vary from country to country. Therefore, the emerging field of Medical/ Healthcare Internet Ethics will require careful thought and insights from an international collection of ethicists in many contributing areas. This paper is a review of the current status of the evolving field of Medical/Healthcare Internet Ethics, including proposed definitions and identification of many diverse areas that may ultimately contribute to this multidisciplinary field. The current role

    9. Ethical Challenges of Medicine and Health on the Internet: A Review

      PubMed Central

      2001-01-01

      Knowledge and capabilities, particularly of a new technology or in a new area of study, frequently develop faster than the guidelines and principles needed for practitioners to practice ethically in the new arena; this is particularly true in medicine. The blending of medicine and healthcare with e-commerce and the Internet raises many questions involving what sort of ethical conduct should be expected by practitioners and developers of the medical Internet. Some of the early pioneers in medical and healthcare Web sites pushed the ethical boundaries with questionable, even unethical, practices. Many involved with the medical Internet are now working to reestablish patient and consumer trust by establishing guidelines to determine how the fundamentals of the medical code of ethical conduct can best be adapted for the medical/healthcare Internet. Ultimately, all those involved in the creation, maintenance, and marketing of medical and healthcare Web sites should be required to adhere to a strict code of ethical conduct, one that has been fairly determined by an impartial international organization with reasonable power to regulate the code. This code could also serve as a desirable, recognizable label-of-distinction for ethical Web sites within the medical and healthcare Internet community. One challenge for those involved with the medical and healthcare Internet will be to determine what constitutes "Medical Internet Ethics" or "Healthcare Internet Ethics," since the definition of medical ethics can vary from country to country. Therefore, the emerging field of Medical/ Healthcare Internet Ethics will require careful thought and insights from an international collection of ethicists in many contributing areas. This paper is a review of the current status of the evolving field of Medical/Healthcare Internet Ethics, including proposed definitions and identification of many diverse areas that may ultimately contribute to this multidisciplinary field. The current role

    10. Internet Technology on Spacecraft

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Rash, James; Parise, Ron; Hogie, Keith; Criscuolo, Ed; Langston, Jim; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

      2000-01-01

      The Operating Missions as Nodes on the Internet (OMNI) project has shown that Internet technology works in space missions through a demonstration using the UoSAT-12 spacecraft. An Internet Protocol (IP) stack was installed on the orbiting UoSAT-12 spacecraft and tests were run to demonstrate Internet connectivity and measure performance. This also forms the basis for demonstrating subsequent scenarios. This approach provides capabilities heretofore either too expensive or simply not feasible such as reconfiguration on orbit. The OMNI project recognized the need to reduce the risk perceived by mission managers and did this with a multi-phase strategy. In the initial phase, the concepts were implemented in a prototype system that includes space similar components communicating over the TDRS (space network) and the terrestrial Internet. The demonstration system includes a simulated spacecraft with sample instruments. Over 25 demonstrations have been given to mission and project managers, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Department of Defense (DoD), contractor technologists and other decisions makers, This initial phase reached a high point with an OMNI demonstration given from a booth at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Inspection Day 99 exhibition. The proof to mission managers is provided during this second phase with year 2000 accomplishments: testing the use of Internet technologies onboard an actual spacecraft. This was done with a series of tests performed using the UoSAT-12 spacecraft. This spacecraft was reconfigured on orbit at very low cost. The total period between concept and the first tests was only 6 months! On board software was modified to add an IP stack to support basic IP communications. Also added was support for ping, traceroute and network timing protocol (NTP) tests. These tests show that basic Internet functionality can be used onboard spacecraft. The performance of data was measured to show no degradation from current

    11. Internet resources for diabetes.

      PubMed

      Yadav, Hariom; Jain, Shalini; Kapila, Suman; Prasad, Gbks

      2005-01-01

      Internet is transforming lives of many people in the world. Nowadays Internet has become one of the most common media to extract information of interest to researchers. The Internet is composed of a large number of smaller interconnected networks called Intranets. These Intranets connect thousands computers enabling them to share information with each other and to share various resources such as powerful super computers, software and databases of information. It has made it possible for people all over the world to effectively and inexpensively communicate with each other. The Internet has become world's biggest library where retrieval of scientific resources is only a mouse click away. The geometric growth in Internet usage is mainly due to the great success of "World Wide Web". Various useful databases on diabetes are already on 'the Net' and many more being added regularly. The present article is an attempt to provide a review of several sites that may be of great significance to the diabetes researchers before execution for new assignment/project. PMID:15681892

    12. Our Commitment to Reliable Health and Medical Information

      MedlinePlus

      ... below: The commitment to reliable health and medical information on the internet HON was founded to encourage the dissemination of ... and trustworthy code for medical and health related information available on Internet.The HONcode is designed for three target audiences: ...

    13. The Internet for Librarians

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Grothkopf, U.

      Librarianship is currently undergoing major changes. New information sources, accessible via the "network of networks", the Internet, offer opportunities which were previously unknown, but which require continuous ongoing learning. The Internet seems to be organized badly or not at all. The poor appearance might lead to an underestimation of its value. In the following, an introduction to the main functions will be given in order to facilitate understanding and use of the Internet. E-Mail, FTP (File Transfer Protocol) and Telnet will be covered, as well as Mailing lists, Newsgroups and the tools Archie, Gopher, Veronica, WAIS (Wide Area Information Server) and the World Wide Web (WWW). Examples will be given to show possible applications for library services.

    14. Internet Performance to Africa

      SciTech Connect

      Cottrell, L

      2003-10-01

      We report the first results ever for real-time Internet performance to Africa using the PingER methodology. Multiple monitoring hosts were used to enable comparisons with performance from different parts of the world. From these preliminary measurements, we have found that Internet packet losses to some African sites in recent months range from very poor to bad (> 12%), some getting better, others are holding steady or getting worse. This, together with the average monthly Round Trip Times, imply end-to-end maximum TCP throughputs that are order of magnitudes different between countries in the region. Africa is shown to be far from the Internet performance in industrialized nations due to the poor infrastructure in place today. These monitoring efforts can provide valuable information to analyze the relative rates of future improvement and today they help us to quantify the digital divide and can provide quantitative information to policy makers.

    15. The Internet and drug safety: what are the implications for pharmacovigilance?

      PubMed

      Cobert, B; Silvey, J

      1999-02-01

      Use of the Internet is becoming widespread throughout the world. Its use in the domain of drug safety and pharmacovigilance is spreading rapidly. Governments and industry have taken the lead in developing extensive web sites. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA) and other agencies have developed sites containing enormous amounts of information both on pharmacovigilance in general and on specific drugs in particular. Under the US 'Freedom of Information Act' the FDA has put major parts of its adverse event database on line. Regulatory documents are also available from the FDA site or from hyperlinks described in the site. The US Center for Drug Evaluation and Research updates its site most days and maintains a free automated e-mail announcement service of these updates. Similarly, the EMEA updates its site frequently and publishes extensive material including regulatory documents, guidelines, European Public Assessment Reports on newly approved medications and other useful information. A free update service by e-mail is also available. Although English is the primary language used on the EMEA site, some of the information is available in other languages. Pharmaceutical companies are not using the Internet for pharmacovigilance yet. Rather, the Internet is being used for promotion of their products and for informing consumers on general information on diseases, for financial and investor data and for employment opportunities, etc. Other organisations such as lobbies, consumer groups and medical journals are also beginning to use the Internet. The electronic transmission of safety information, using the standards developed by the International Conference on Harmonization, is currently being tested for the transmission of individual patient adverse event information between companies and governments. In addition, the FDA has begun to accept adverse events from healthcare providers and consumers

    16. A Pharmacotherapy Capstone Course to Advance Pharmacy Students’ Clinical Documentation Skills

      PubMed Central

      Ahmed, Ghada F.

      2012-01-01

      Objective. To implement and assess the effectiveness of a capstone pharmacotherapy course designed to integrate in-class curriculum using patient cases and drug-information questions. The course was intended to improve third-year doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students' clinical documentation skills in preparation for beginning advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Design. This 2-credit, semester-long course consisted of 6 patient cases and 12 drug-information questions posted electronically on an Internet-based medical chart, a public health presentation, a knowledge examination, and an objective standardized performance assessment. In class, students engaged in active-learning exercises and clinical problem-solving. Students worked outside of class in small groups to retrieve and discuss assigned articles and review medication information in preparation for in-class discussions. Assessment. A rubric was used to assess the patient cases and questions that students completed and submitted individually. Data for 4 consecutive course offerings (n=622) were then analyzed. A significant improvement was found in the “misplaced” but not the “missing” documentation ratings for both assessment and plan notes in the final assessment compared with baseline. In course evaluations, the majority of students agreed that the course integrated material across the curriculum (97%) and improved their clinical writing skills (80.5%). Conclusion. A capstone pharmacy course was successful in integrating and reviewing much of the material covered across the PharmD curriculum and in improving students’ clinical documentation skills. PMID:23049106

    17. Internet Access to Spacecraft

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Rash, James; Parise, Ron; Hogie, Keith; Criscuolo, Ed; Langston, Jim; Jackson, Chris; Price, Harold; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

      2000-01-01

      The Operating Missions as Nodes on the Internet (OMNI) project at NASA's Goddard Space flight Center (GSFC), is demonstrating the use of standard Internet protocols for spacecraft communication systems. This year, demonstrations of Internet access to a flying spacecraft have been performed with the UoSAT-12 spacecraft owned and operated by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL). Previously, demonstrations were performed using a ground satellite simulator and NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). These activities are part of NASA's Space Operations Management Office (SOMO) Technology Program, The work is focused on defining the communication architecture for future NASA missions to support both NASA's "faster, better, cheaper" concept and to enable new types of collaborative science. The use of standard Internet communication technology for spacecraft simplifies design, supports initial integration and test across an IP based network, and enables direct communication between scientists and instruments as well as between different spacecraft, The most recent demonstrations consisted of uploading an Internet Protocol (IP) software stack to the UoSAT- 12 spacecraft, simple modifications to the SSTL ground station, and a series of tests to measure performance of various Internet applications. The spacecraft was reconfigured on orbit at very low cost. The total period between concept and the first tests was only 3 months. The tests included basic network connectivity (PING), automated clock synchronization (NTP), and reliable file transfers (FTP). Future tests are planned to include additional protocols such as Mobile IP, e-mail, and virtual private networks (VPN) to enable automated, operational spacecraft communication networks. The work performed and results of the initial phase of tests are summarized in this paper. This work is funded and directed by NASA/GSFC with technical leadership by CSC in arrangement with SSTL, and Vytek Wireless.

    18. Cataloging Internet resources.

      PubMed

      Flannery, M R

      1995-04-01

      The number of resources available on the Internet continues to expand exponentially, but finding appropriate resources is still a fragmented, hit-or-miss operation. Traditional library expertise in bibliographic description and access should be applied to the management of this emerging body of material. In the process, catalogers will be able to assess the adequacy of current tools (e.g., cataloging codes, machine-readable cataloging formats, integrated library systems) for providing access to Internet resources and will contribute credibly to design or redesign of access tools. This paper outlines the major issues that must be considered in cataloging electronic resources. PMID:7599587

    19. NILDE, Network Inter Library Document Exchange: An Italian Document Delivery System

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Brunetti, F.; Gasperini, A.; Mangiaracina, S.

      2007-10-01

      This poster presents NILDE, a document delivery system supporting the exchange of documents via the internet. The system has been set up by the Central Library of the National Research Council of Bologna (Italy) in order to make use of new internet technology, to promote cooperation between Italian university libraries and research libraries, and to achieve quick response times in satisfying DD requests. The Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory Library was the first astronomical library to join the NILDE project from its earliest days in 2002. Many were the reasons for this choice: automation of the DD processes, security and reliability of the network, creation of usage statistics and reports, reduction of DD System management costs and so on. This work describes the benefits of NILDE and discusses the role of an organized document delivery system as an important tool to cope with the difficult constraints of the publishing market.

    20. Emergency Medical Technician.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

      This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of emergency medical technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 4 units specific to the occupation of emergency medical technician. The following…

    1. Medical Veteran Utilization Manual.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Nathan (Robert R.) Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

      This manual is intended to encourage policy makers, administrators, and personnel officers in hospitals and other health facilities to recruit and hire the thousands of well-trained, experienced men and women who leave the military medical services each year. The document lists the advantages to the medical institution when employing medically…

    2. Medical Laboratory Technician.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

      This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of medical laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units specific to the occupation of medical laboratory technician. The following…

    3. Computer-Based Medical System

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      1998-01-01

      SYMED, Inc., developed a unique electronic medical records and information management system. The S2000 Medical Interactive Care System (MICS) incorporates both a comprehensive and interactive medical care support capability and an extensive array of digital medical reference materials in either text or high resolution graphic form. The system was designed, in cooperation with NASA, to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of physician practices. The S2000 is a MS (Microsoft) Windows based software product which combines electronic forms, medical documents, records management, and features a comprehensive medical information system for medical diagnostic support and treatment. SYMED, Inc. offers access to its medical systems to all companies seeking competitive advantages.

    4. Digestive disease resources on the Internet.

      PubMed

      Gumber, S C; O'Doherty, J E

      1999-08-01

      The aim of this study is to help digestive disease professionals fully utilize the resources available on the Internet for patient care, education, and research. The following search resources were employed to locate websites: general search engines--Lycos, Metacrawler, Webcrawler, and Yahoo!; medical search engines--HealthWeb, MedMatrix, MedWeb, and MedWebPlus; website links; and publications. The inclusion of web sites was based on their content. Each site was evaluated with respect to its authorship, attribution, currency, and disclosure. All digestive disease professional organizations and academic centers that met the above criteria were included. Only nutrition sites with relevance to digestive diseases were included. A variety of very useful web sites related to digestive diseases exist on the Internet, and their numbers are growing. Many of these sites have valuable information that can be used to improve patient care, promote medical education, and facilitate research. Digestive disease professionals should adopt the Internet and address the many issues raised by this technology. PMID:10445523

    5. Filtering the Internet: The Children's Internet Protection Act. Legal Update

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      McCarthy, Martha M.

      2004-01-01

      Accompanying the explosive growth of the Internet have been concerns about protecting children from viewing pornographic and other harmful images through cyberspace. In the past few years, Congress has passed several acts to censor Internet sites available to children, but only the Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA) has received Supreme…

    6. Internet Abuse and Internet Addiction in the Workplace

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Griffiths, Mark

      2010-01-01

      Purpose: This paper seeks to overview the issues, concerns and challenges relating to internet abuse and internet addiction in the workplace. Design/methodology/approach: Using psychological literature, the paper outlines a number of important and inter-related areas including brief overviews of internet abuse, and the most extreme form of…

    7. Internet Resources on Aging: Parts of the Internet.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Post, Joyce A.

      1996-01-01

      Provides a brief history of the Internet and a listing of various resources on aging that can be obtained through the Internet. Components of the Internet discussed are electronic-mail applications (listservs, USENET Newsgroups, Bulletin Board Systems, Freenets, and Commercial Services); File Transfer Protocol; Telnet/Remote Login; Gophers; Wide…

    8. Internet 2 and the Next Generation Internet: A Realistic Assessment.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Preston, Cecilia M.

      1999-01-01

      Describes new developments, such as Internet 2 and the Next Generation Internet (NGI) initiative, as well as other potential advances in high-performance applications that these new electronic resources will create. Relates these developments to the evolution of the Internet, and looks ahead to their likely impact beyond the higher education and…

    9. Internet Use for Health Information

      MedlinePlus

      ... Health Services Utilization > Internet use for Health Information Internet use for Health Information Narrative Due in part to the growth in high-speed broadband, wireless networks, and mobile ...

    10. Teaching and the Internet

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Simpson, Carol

      2005-01-01

      Problems involved in distance learning where teachers utilizing public chat sites and interactive software crosses the Internet students online are examined. The provisions of the TEACH Act that became law in 2002 and provides guidelines on the use of copyright-protected material are discussed.

    11. Collaborative Internet Learning.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Tate, Joanne

      This paper describes pioneering in the area of telecommunications and the use of the Internet across the curriculum in Australian schools through the I*EARN (International Education and Resource Network). Topics discussed include: (1) changes to the traditional learning approach and school structure, including the role of the teacher and resource…

    12. Internet 2 Access Grid.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Simco, Greg

      2002-01-01

      Discussion of the Internet 2 Initiative, which is based on collaboration among universities, businesses, and government, focuses on the Access Grid, a Computational Grid that includes interactive multimedia within high-speed networks to provide resources to enable remote collaboration among the research community. (Author/LRW)

    13. Commercialization of the Internet.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Weis, Allan H.

      1992-01-01

      Traces the growth of the Internet from its beginnings as the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency's ARPAnet. Discusses key issues facing network service providers including: acceptable use policies, liability exposure, the integration of research and production networks, the commercialization of the networks, and the need for global planning.…

    14. Reading the Internet

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      McPherson, Keith

      2005-01-01

      Similar trends are occurring in schools. Lenhart, Simoin, and Graziano (2001) found that 94% of teens online use the Internet for school research projects, and according to the U.S. Department of Education (2004), "even students from low-income groups without access to technology at home seek and find it-using computers at schools, libraries, or…

    15. Internet Issues in Reference.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Tenopir, Carol

      1995-01-01

      Discusses the impact of Internet access on library reference services based on 1994 interviews with almost two dozen university librarians. Highlights include library policy, overcrowded workstations and methods of controlling use, recreational use of terminals that interferes with more formal library use, restriction as a form of censorship, and…

    16. Internet Training Needs Inventory.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Weglarz, Shirley

      The Office of Institutional Research at Johnson County Community College (JCCC), Kansas, conducted a survey to help determine the level of interest in Internet training courses. Surveys were mailed in November 1998 to 9,982 individuals selected from six lists representing the JCCC Business and Industry Division's current and potential clients. A…

    17. Cataloguing the Internet.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      O'Daniel, Heather B.

      1999-01-01

      This paper discusses problems and opportunities, presented by the information explosion and the growth of the Internet, for libraries to apply and augment traditional methods of cataloging. The first section provides an overview of how the process of cataloging evolved, including the development of the Anglo-American Cataloging Rules (AACR),…

    18. Modeling the Internet

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Ángeles Serrano, M.; Boguñá, M.; Díaz-Guilera, A.

      2006-03-01

      We model the Internet as a network of interconnected Autonomous Systems which self-organize under an absolute lack of centralized control. Our aim is to capture how the Internet evolves by reproducing the assembly that has led to its actual structure and, to this end, we propose a growing weighted network model driven by competition for resources and adaptation to maintain functionality in a demand and supply balance. On the demand side, we consider the environment, a pool of users which need to transfer information and ask for service. On the supply side, ASs compete to gain users, but to be able to provide service efficiently, they must adapt their bandwidth as a function of their size. Hence, the Internet is not modeled as an isolated system but the environment, in the form of a pool of users, is also a fundamental part which must be taken into account. ASs compete for users and big and small come up, so that not all ASs are identical. New connections between ASs are made or old ones are reinforced according to the adaptation needs. Thus, the evolution of the Internet can not be fully understood if just described as a technological isolated system. A socio-economic perspective must also be considered.

    19. Glossary of Internet Terms.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Microcomputers for Information Management, 1995

      1995-01-01

      Provides definitions for 71 terms related to the Internet, including Archie, bulletin board system, cyberspace, e-mail (electronic mail), file transfer protocol, gopher, hypertext, integrated services digital network, local area network, listserv, modem, packet switching, server, telnet, UNIX, WAIS (wide area information servers), and World Wide…

    20. Internet's critical path horizon

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Valverde, S.; Solé, R. V.

      2004-03-01

      Internet is known to display a highly heterogeneous structure and complex fluctuations in its traffic dynamics. Congestion seems to be an inevitable result of user's behavior coupled to the network dynamics and it effects should be minimized by choosing appropriate routing strategies. But what are the requirements of routing depth in order to optimize the traffic flow? In this paper we analyse the behavior of Internet traffic with a topologically realistic spatial structure as described in a previous study [S.-H. Yook et al., Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 99, 13382 (2002)]. The model involves self-regulation of packet generation and different levels of routing depth. It is shown that it reproduces the relevant key, statistical features of Internet's traffic. Moreover, we also report the existence of a critical path horizon defining a transition from low-efficient traffic to highly efficient flow. This transition is actually a direct consequence of the web's small world architecture exploited by the routing algorithm. Once routing tables reach the network diameter, the traffic experiences a sudden transition from a low-efficient to a highly-efficient behavior. It is conjectured that routing policies might have spontaneously reached such a compromise in a distributed manner. Internet would thus be operating close to such critical path horizon.

    1. The Global Internet Pandemic

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Carter, Deborah Joy

      2009-01-01

      The global rise of Internet-based education is discussed in relation to models drawn from social studies and epidemiology. Experiential and data density models are highlighted, also the capacity for technological change, and phenomena observed in the spread of disease. The lesson of these illustrations is that even apparently permanent phenomena…

    2. Internet Technology Resources.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Roy, Loriene, Comp.

      Part of a larger report on the Four Directions Project, an American Indian technology innovation project, this section includes six "pathfinders" to locating information on Internet resources. The pathfinders were designed by students in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Texas at Austin in response to…

    3. The Geoscience Internet of Things

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Lehnert, K.; Klump, J.

      2012-04-01

      Internet of Things is a term that refers to "uniquely identifiable objects (things) and their virtual representations in an Internet-like structure" (Wikipedia). We here use the term to describe new and innovative ways to integrate physical samples in the Earth Sciences into the emerging digital infrastructures that are developed to support research and education in the Geosciences. Many Earth Science data are acquired on solid earth samples through observations and experiments conducted in the field or in the lab. The application and long-term utility of sample-based data for science is critically dependent on (a) the availability of information (metadata) about the samples such as geographical location where the sample was collected, time of sampling, sampling method, etc. (b) links between the different data types available for individual samples that are dispersed in the literature and in digital data repositories, and (c) access to the samples themselves. Neither of these requirements could be achieved in the past due to incomplete documentation of samples in publications, use of ambiguous sample names, and the lack of a central catalog that allows researchers to find a sample's archiving location. New internet-based capabilities have been developed over the past few years for the registration and unique identification of samples that make it possible to overcome these problems. Services for the registration and unique identification of samples are provided by the System for Earth Sample Registration SESAR (www.geosamples.org). SESAR developed the International Geo Sample Number, or IGSN, as a unique identifier for samples and specimens collected from our natural environment. Since December 2011, the IGSN is governed by an international organization, the IGSN eV (www.igsn.org), which endorses and promotes an internationally unified approach for registration and discovery of physical specimens in the Geoscience community and is establishing a new modular and

    4. Public Libraries and the Internet: Study Results, Policy Issues, and Recommendations. Final Report.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      McClure, Charles R.; And Others

      This document is the final report of the NCLIS (National Commission on Libraries and Information Science) study on public libraries and the Internet. The purpose of this study was to determine the nature, extent, and form of public library involvement with the Internet. Data were obtained from a survey of a national sample of public libraries…

    5. 77 FR 6527 - Internet Publication of Administrative Seizure and Forfeiture Notices

      Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

      2012-02-08

      ... procedures as Internet publication would reach a broader range of the public and provide access to more... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection 19 CFR Part 162 RIN 1651-AA94 Internet Publication of... Participation'' heading of the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section of this document. Docket: For access to...

    6. [Diagnostic use of Internet: google the spider].

      PubMed

      Soonawala, Darius; Brienen, Eric A T; Visser, Leo G

      2009-01-01

      A 23-year-old woman was working in a factory unpacking jars of Spanish olives when a spider bit her finger. She presented to the emergency outpatient department carrying the spider in a box. She was worried and wanted to know whether the spider, which may have originated from Spain, was poisonous. After a ten minute Internet search the spider was identified as Segestria florentina. It can inject neurotoxins causing temporary local numbness and pain. The patient was reassured and discharged without further treatment. Later, experts confirmed the species. Internet-based search engines can draw attention to unusual diagnoses which otherwise may easily be overlooked. A general search engine can also provide access to subjects that fall outside the scope of the more usual medical sources. PMID:19785819

    7. Toward a Standardized Internet Measurement.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Chen, Hsiang; Tan, Zixiang

      This paper investigates measurement issues related to elements of the Internet and calls for a standardized measuring scheme to resolve the problem of the measurement. The dilemmas in measuring the elements of the Internet are identified, and previous studies are reviewed. Elements of the Internet are categorized into population, usage, protocol…

    8. Gaining Access to the Internet.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Notess, Greg R.

      1992-01-01

      Discusses Internet services and protocols (i.e., electronic mail, file transfer, and remote login) and provides instructions for retrieving guides and directories of the Internet. Services providing access to the Internet are described, including bulletin board systems, regional networks, nationwide connections, and library organizations; and a…

    9. Internet Resources for General Music.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Thompson, Keith P.

      1999-01-01

      Describes Internet tools that can be incorporated into the general music class structure and are appropriate for upper elementary and middle school students: (1) electronic music dictionaries and encyclopedias; (2) Internet practice-and-drill web sites; and (3) virtual learning centers. Discusses the structure of Internet projects and the use of…

    10. Student Use of the Internet

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Malaney, Gary D.

      2004-01-01

      This article explores Internet use among undergraduates, especially at one public research university where researchers have studied students' self-reported Internet use for several years. Analysis of data from a survey administered to 490 undergraduates in Fall 2000 and a survey of 593 undergraduates in Fall 2003 revealed that Internet use is…

    11. Internet in the Indian Context.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Rao, Sizigendi Subba

      This paper presents briefly the concept of the Internet and lists the Internet service providers in India (Education and Research Network from Department of Electronics, National Informatics Network from National Informatics Center, Gateway Internet Access Service from Videsh Sanchar Nigam Limited, and SOFTNET from Software Technology Parks India)…

    12. The Internet Serving Personal Communication.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Correia, Isabel

      1998-01-01

      Discusses the use of information technology, particularly the Internet, and the teacher's role. Describes the Macau-Portugal-Internet-Schools (MPIS) program that was developed to promote activities among schools via the Internet that would encourage a cultural exchange between Macau (Portuguese territory down the coast from Hong Kong scheduled to…

    13. Internet Accessibility in Latin America.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Haymond, Ruel

      1998-01-01

      Addresses the problems that prohibit expanded Internet access and possible solutions to these problems, particularly with respect to the country of Chile. The three main problems that block Internet usage in Latin America are high demand and poor infrastructure; high costs for Internet access; and high preliminary costs for computers, modems, and…

    14. Demystifying the Internet. Practitioner File.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult, Career, and Vocational Education, Columbus, OH.

      This practitioner file is designed to provide information for adult, career, and vocational educators who have little or no experience using the Internet. Discussed first are the history of the Internet's development and its content and scope. Ways of obtaining an Internet connection are described. Next, annotated descriptions of eight sources of…

    15. [CISMeF: catalog and index of French-speaking medical sites].

      PubMed

      Darmoni, S J; Leroy, J P; Baudic, F; Douyère, M; Piot, J; Thirion, B

      1999-01-01

      The Internet has now become a major source of health information. The aim of CISMeF is to catalogue and index the main French-speaking sites and documents concerning health. This project was initiated by Rouen University Hospital. Its URL is http://www.chu-rouen.fr/cismef. CISMeF covers all areas of health care and medical sciences, and is indexed both alphabetically and according to subject. It was set up on a Sun workstation under the Sun UNIX operating system and is entirely based on static HTML. By May 1999, the number of sites and documents indexed was already over 6,500, with a mean of 75 new sites added each week. CISMeF is updated via a five-step process: resource collection, filtering, description, classification, and indexing. The Net Scoring criteria are used to assess the quality of health information on the Internet. These criteria concern eight categories: credibility, content, links, design, interactivity, quantitative aspects, ethics and accessibility. CISMeF uses two standard tools to organize information: the MeSH (medical subject heading) thesaurus from the Medline reference database (National Library of Medicine, USA) and the Dublin core metadata format. The sites and documents included in CISMeF are described using the following elements from the Dublin core project: title, author or creator, subject and keywords, description, publisher, date, resource type, format, identifier, and language. PMID:10377501

    16. COSMIC program documentation experience

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Kalar, M. C.

      1970-01-01

      A brief history of COSMIC as it relates to the handling of program documentation is summarized; the items that are essential for computer program documentation are also discussed. COSMIC documentation and program standards handbook is appended.

    17. The Internet and the pediatrician: should there be a connection?

      PubMed

      Fikar, C R

      1996-05-01

      The Internet, an extensive network of interlinked computers storing immense quantities of information, is growing exponentially. The author was interested in discovering what sources of information exist on this network that might be of importance to the pediatric health care provider. To accomplish this aim, a literature review was undertaken, relevant articles were studied, and the Internet and its own resources were used to seek out information that might be helpful to pediatric practitioners. Many interesting resources of potential importance to the pediatric health care provider were found and are described in this paper. Besides being an important storehouse of documents, images, and factual information, the Internet has, in addition, communication facilities, such as e-mail and Listserv, that make it a particularly useful resource. It seems prudent that all pediatric practitioners should have some form of access to the Internet. PMID:8804540

    18. Social bonds and internet pornographic exposure among adolescents.

      PubMed

      Mesch, Gustavo S

      2009-06-01

      Concern has grown regarding possible harm to the social and psychological development of children and adolescents exposed to Internet pornography. Parents, academics and researchers have documented pornography from the supply side, assuming that its availability explains consumption satisfactorily. The current paper explored the user's dimension, probing whether pornography consumers differed from other Internet users, as well as the social characteristics of adolescent frequent pornography consumers. Data from a 2004 survey of a national representative sample of the adolescent population in Israel were used (n=998). Adolescent frequent users of the Internet for pornography were found to differ in many social characteristics from the group that used the Internet for information, social communication and entertainment. Weak ties to mainstream social institutions were characteristic of the former group but not of the latter. X-rated material consumers proved to be a distinct sub-group at risk of deviant behaviour. PMID:18694593

    19. Body Mass Index and the Use of the Internet for Health Information

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Faith, Jennifer; Thorburn, Sheryl; Smit, Ellen

      2016-01-01

      Objective: Individuals who experience or anticipate negative interactions from medical providers related to conditions such as obesity may preferentially use the Internet for health information. Our objectives in this study were to (1) examine the association between body mass index (BMI) and Internet health information-seeking and (2) examine…

    20. Nurses' Motivations for Web-Based Learning and the Role of Internet Self-Efficacy

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Liang, Jyh-Chong; Wu, Szu-Hsien

      2010-01-01

      The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical nurses' Internet self-efficacy and motivations toward Web-based learning. The sample consisted of 256 volunteer nurses from one selected medical centre in Taiwan. This study used the Internet Self-efficacy Survey (ISS) and the Motivations about Web-based Continuing Learning Survey (MWCL) for…

    1. Guide to the Internet. Logging in, fetching files, reading news.

      PubMed Central

      Pallen, M.

      1995-01-01

      Aside from email and the world wide web, there are several other systems for distributing information on the Internet. Telnet is a system that allows you to log on to a remote computer from anywhere on the Internet and affords access to many useful biomedical sites on the Internet. File transfer protocol (FTP) is a method of transferring files from one computer to another over the Internet. It can be used to download files, including software, from numerous publiclly accessible "anonymous FTP archives" around the world. Such archives can be searched using a tool known as Archie. Network News is a system of electronic discussion groups covering almost every imaginable subject, including many areas of medicine and the biomedical sciences; MOOs are virtual environments that allow real time electronic conferencing and teaching over the Internet. It is difficult to predict the future of medicine on the Internet. However, the net opens up many possibilities not available through previous technologies. It is now up to medical practitioners to realise the Internet's full potential. PMID:8555810

    2. Generic safety documentation model

      SciTech Connect

      Mahn, J.A.

      1994-04-01

      This document is intended to be a resource for preparers of safety documentation for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico facilities. It provides standardized discussions of some topics that are generic to most, if not all, Sandia/NM facilities safety documents. The material provides a ``core`` upon which to develop facility-specific safety documentation. The use of the information in this document will reduce the cost of safety document preparation and improve consistency of information.

    3. Burns first aid information on the Internet.

      PubMed

      Tiller, G; Rea, S; Silla, R; Wood, F

      2006-11-01

      The Internet is an increasingly important source of health-related information. However, the growth of the Internet and its use as a medical delivery tool should be viewed with caution. One of the key concerns is that although the volume of information is huge, the quality, accuracy and completeness of the information is questionable. The aim of this study was to evaluate burns first aid information on the Internet. The search term used was "first aid for burns" and the first 25 hits from each search engine were analysed by one of the observers. We gathered basic information on the web sites--such as the country of origin, language in which the information was offered, accessibility, relevance and whether the site was commercial, organisational or academic. Quality and technicality of the web sites were assessed and scored. The mean quality score was 4.7/15 (31.5%) The mean technical score was 6.1 of 12 (51.1%). When the total score was categorised by percentage, none of the web sites ranked in the excellent category, 1 was very good, 4 were good, 6 were fair and the majority, 36, were poor. Based on the quality score only, two web sites were in the excellent category and two were very good. For technicality one web site was excellent and three were very good. This study has shown first aid information on the Internet is largely of poor quality, that the technical information provided is inadequate and that the sites include a significant amount of grossly inaccurate information. The few sites that contain excellent technical information make up a very small proportion of what is available. Therefore, the average Internet user may not encounter these resources, instead gaining knowledge from sites of questionable value. PMID:17005324

    4. The Health On the Net Code of Conduct for medical and health Websites.

      PubMed

      Boyer, C; Selby, M; Scherrer, J R; Appel, R D

      1998-09-01

      Internet has become one of the most used communication media. This and the fact that no constraining information publishing policy exists have created an urgent need to control the quality of information circulating through this media. To this purpose, the Health On the Net Foundation has initiated the Code of Conduct (HONcode) for the health/medical domain. This initiative proposes guidelines to information providers, with the aim, on the one hand, of raising the quality of data available on the Net and, on the other hand, of helping to identify Internet sites that are maintained by qualified people and contain reliable data. The HONcode mainly includes the following ethical aspects: the author's credentials, the date of the last modification with respect to clinical documents, confidentiality of data, source data reference, funding and the advertising policy. This article presents the HONcode and its evolution since it was launched in 1996. PMID:9861515

    5. [Implementation of ECG Monitoring System Based on Internet of Things].

      PubMed

      Lu, Liangliang; Chen, Minya

      2015-11-01

      In order to expand the capabilities of hospital's traditional ECG device and enhance medical staff's work efficiency, an ECG monitoring system based on internet of things is introduced. The system can monitor ECG signals in real time and analyze data using ECG sensor, PDA, Web servers, which embeds C language, Android systems, .NET, wireless network and other technologies. After experiments, it can be showed that the system has high reliability and stability and can bring the convenience to medical staffs. PMID:27066681

    6. 75 FR 36071 - Framework for Broadband Internet Service

      Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

      2010-06-24

      ...This document begins an open, public process to consider the adequacy of the current legal framework within which the Commission promotes investment and innovation in, and protects consumers of, broadband Internet service. Recent developments--including a decision of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and affirmation from Congress that the Commission plays......

    7. Social Bonds and Internet Pornographic Exposure among Adolescents

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Mesch, Gustavo S.

      2009-01-01

      Concern has grown regarding possible harm to the social and psychological development of children and adolescents exposed to Internet pornography. Parents, academics and researchers have documented pornography from the supply side, assuming that its availability explains consumption satisfactorily. The current paper explored the user's dimension,…

    8. Schools (Students) Exchanging CAD/CAM Files over the Internet.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Mahoney, Gary S.; Smallwood, James E.

      This document discusses how students and schools can benefit from exchanging computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) files over the Internet, explains how files are exchanged, and examines the problem of selected hardware/software incompatibility. Key terms associated with information search services are defined, and several…

    9. Automated document analysis system

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Black, Jeffrey D.; Dietzel, Robert; Hartnett, David

      2002-08-01

      A software application has been developed to aid law enforcement and government intelligence gathering organizations in the translation and analysis of foreign language documents with potential intelligence content. The Automated Document Analysis System (ADAS) provides the capability to search (data or text mine) documents in English and the most commonly encountered foreign languages, including Arabic. Hardcopy documents are scanned by a high-speed scanner and are optical character recognized (OCR). Documents obtained in an electronic format bypass the OCR and are copied directly to a working directory. For translation and analysis, the script and the language of the documents are first determined. If the document is not in English, the document is machine translated to English. The documents are searched for keywords and key features in either the native language or translated English. The user can quickly review the document to determine if it has any intelligence content and whether detailed, verbatim human translation is required. The documents and document content are cataloged for potential future analysis. The system allows non-linguists to evaluate foreign language documents and allows for the quick analysis of a large quantity of documents. All document processing can be performed manually or automatically on a single document or a batch of documents.

    10. Electronic medical record and glaucoma medications: connecting the medication reconciliation with adherence

      PubMed Central

      Bacon, Thomas S; Fan, Kenneth C; Desai, Manishi A

      2016-01-01

      Purpose To evaluate consistency in documentation of glaucoma medications in the electronic medical record and identify which regimen patients adhere to when inconsistencies exist. Factors contributing to medication nonadherence are also explored. Methods Retrospective chart review of medication adherence encompassing 200 patients from three glaucoma physicians at a tertiary referral center over a 1-month period. Adherence was determined by the consistency between a patients stated medication regimen and either the active medication list in the electronic medical record, or the physicians planned medication regimen in the preceding clinic visit. Patient charts were also reviewed for patient sex, age, primary language, race, and total number of medications. Results A total of 160 charts showed consistency in documentation between the physician note and electronic medication reconciliation. Of those patients, 83.1% reported adherence with their glaucoma medication schedule. When there was a discrepancy in documentation (40 charts), 72.5% patients followed the physician-stated regimen vs 20% who followed neither vs 7.5% who followed the medical record (P<0.01). No difference in adherence was observed based on sex (P=0.912) or total number of medications taken (P=0.242). Language, both English- (P=0.075) and Haitian (P=0.10) -speaking populations, as well as race, Caucasian (P=0.31), African-American (P=0.54), and Hispanic (P=0.58), had no impact on medication adherence. Patients over 80 years of age were more nonadherent as compared to other decades (P=0.04). Conclusion Inconsistent documentation between the electronic medical record physician note and medication regimen may contribute to patient medication nonadherence. Patients over 80 years of age were associated with higher rates of nonadherence, while sex, total number of medications, race, and language had no interaction with medication adherence. PMID:26869756

    11. Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects)

      MedlinePlus

      ... Toggle navigation Careers Certification Publications Events Advocacy Continuing Education Practice Management Research Home / Information for the Public / Hearing and Balance Ototoxic Medications ( ...

    12. Internet and Advertisement.

      PubMed

      Moustafa, Khaled

      2016-02-01

      The Internet has revolutionized the way knowledge is currently produced, stored and disseminated. A few finger clicks on a keyboard can save time and many hours of search in libraries or shopping in stores. Online trademarks with an (e-) prefix such as e-library, e-business, e-health etc., are increasingly part of our daily professional vocabularies. However, the Internet has also produced multiple negative side effects, ranging from an unhealthy dependency to a dehumanization of human relationships. Fraudulent, unethical and scam practices are also flourishing through for example misleading online advertising methods. Some social and professional networks gather users' profiles for selling and advertising purposes, sometimes by making it technically difficult to unsubscribe. Here, I discuss some of these unethical aspects and propose some potential solutions to reduce them. PMID:25842044

    13. Internet Business Solutions

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      1997-01-01

      Cogent Software, Inc. was formed in January 1995 by David Atkinson and Irene Woerner, both former employees of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Several other Cogent employees also worked at JPL. Atkinson headed JPL's Information Systems Technology section and Woerner lead the Advanced User Interfaces Group. Cogent's mission is to help companies organize and manage their online content by developing advanced software for the next generation of online directories and information catalogs. The company offers a complete range of Internet solutions, including Internet access, Web site design, local and wide-area networks, and custom software for online commerce applications. Cogent also offers DesignSphere Online, an electronic community for the communications arts industry. Customers range from small offices to manufacturers with thousands of employees, including Chemi-Con, one of the largest manufacturers of capacitors in the world.

    14. Internet Versus Mailed Questionnaires: A Controlled Comparison (2)

      PubMed Central

      Leece, Pam; Sprague, Sheila; Swiontkowski, Marc F; Schemitsch, Emil H; Tornetta, Paul; Devereaux, PJ; Guyatt, Gordon H

      2004-01-01

      Background Low response rates among surgeons can threaten the validity of surveys. Internet technologies may reduce the time, effort, and financial resources needed to conduct surveys. Objective We investigated whether using Web-based technology could increase the response rates to an international survey. Methods We solicited opinions from the 442 surgeon–members of the Orthopaedic Trauma Association regarding the treatment of femoral neck fractures. We developed a self-administered questionnaire after conducting a literature review, focus groups, and key informant interviews, for which we used sampling to redundancy techniques. We administered an Internet version of the questionnaire on a Web site, as well as a paper version, which looked similar to the Internet version and which had identical content. Only those in our sample could access the Web site. We alternately assigned the participants to receive the survey by mail (n=221) or an email invitation to participate on the Internet (n=221). Non-respondents in the mail arm received up to three additional copies of the survey, while non-respondents in the Internet arm received up to three additional requests, including a final mailed copy. All participants in the Internet arm had an opportunity to request an emailed Portable Document Format (PDF) version. Results The Internet arm demonstrated a lower response rate (99/221, 45%) than the mail questionnaire arm (128/221, 58%) (absolute difference 13%, 95% confidence interval 4%-22%, P<0.01). Conclusions Our Internet-based survey to surgeons resulted in a significantly lower response rate than a traditional mailed survey. Researchers should not assume that the widespread availability and potential ease of Internet-based surveys will translate into higher response rates. PMID:15631963

    15. Internet Versus Mailed Questionnaires: A Randomized Comparison (2)

      PubMed Central

      Leece, Pam; Sprague, Sheila; Swiontkowski, Marc F; Schemitsch, Emil H; Tornetta, Paul; Devereaux, PJ; Guyatt, Gordon H

      2004-01-01

      Background Low response rates among surgeons can threaten the validity of surveys. Internet technologies may reduce the time, effort, and financial resources needed to conduct surveys. Objective We investigated whether using Web-based technology could increase the response rates to an international survey. Methods We solicited opinions from the 442 surgeon–members of the Orthopaedic Trauma Association regarding the treatment of femoral neck fractures. We developed a self-administered questionnaire after conducting a literature review, focus groups, and key informant interviews, for which we used sampling to redundancy techniques. We administered an Internet version of the questionnaire on a Web site, as well as a paper version, which looked similar to the Internet version and which had identical content. Only those in our sample could access the Web site. We alternately assigned the participants to receive the survey by mail (n=221) or an email invitation to participate on the Internet (n=221). Non-respondents in the mail arm received up to three additional copies of the survey, while non-respondents in the Internet arm received up to three additional requests, including a final mailed copy. All participants in the Internet arm had an opportunity to request an emailed Portable Document Format (PDF) version. Results The Internet arm demonstrated a lower response rate (99/221, 45%) than the mail questionnaire arm (129/221, 58%) (absolute difference 13%, 95% confidence interval 4%-22%, P<0.01). Conclusions Our Internet-based survey to surgeons resulted in a significantly lower response rate than a traditional mailed survey. Researchers should not assume that the widespread availability and potential ease of Internet-based surveys will translate into higher response rates. PMID:15471756

    16. Payload Documentation Enhancement Project

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Brown, Betty G.

      1999-01-01

      In late 1998, the Space Shuttle Program recognized a need to revitalize its payload accommodations documentation. As a result a payload documentation enhancement project was initiated to review and update payload documentation and improve the accessibility to that documentation by the Space Shuttle user community.

    17. A multilingual medical thesaurus browser for patients and medical content managers.

      PubMed

      Göbel, G; Andreatta, S; Masser, J; Pfeiffer, K P

      2001-01-01

      This paper introduces a user-friendly browser interface which integrates multilingual search and browsing functionalities within medical thesauri via the internet. The tool is being developed as part of the GIN Austria Patient Information System and is based on an adapted datamodel of the MeSH thesaurus. A prototype offers the possibility to build up queries and export lists of MeSH main headings collected during browsing the relevant MeSH trees. The thesaurus browser can be used both by patients and citizens to build queries based on a controlled vocabulary to match them with existing documents within GIN and by medical information managers to find out appropriate keywords for interactive tagging or indexing of medical contents. A key component of this tool is the flexible choice of different languages of the MeSH datasource as well as of the user interface. Both can be changed independently at any point during a session. Another central aspect is the use of the UMLS Metathesaurus in combination with localized Thesaurus versions due to existing international character set problems. PMID:11604758

    18. Internet minimal group paradigm.

      PubMed

      Amichai-Hamburger, Yair

      2005-04-01

      Over many years, social psychologists have sought to understand what causes individuals to form themselves into groups. Initially, it was believed that groups were formed when people bonded around a common goal. Later, it was found that, when individuals were divided into groups on a random basis, this in itself was sufficient for them to feel part of a group and show a preference for their own group over others. Since the environment in cyberspace is different from that of the offline world, for example, there is no physical proximity between participants; it may be assumed that it would be difficult to achieve feelings of affiliation among potential or actual group members. This pioneer study seeks to discover which components are requisite to the creation of a group identity among individuals surfing the Internet. For this experiment, 24 people were divided into two Internet chat groups according to their intuitive preference in a decision-making task. It was found that group members perceived their own group performance as superior on a cognitive task as compared with that of the other group. These results demonstrate that for surfers, the Internet experience is very real and even a trivial allocation of people to a group is likely to create a situation of ingroup favoritism. PMID:15938653

    19. Internet Cancer Support Groups

      PubMed Central

      Chee, Wonshik; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Lin, Li-Chen; Cheng, Ching-Yu

      2006-01-01

      Internet Cancer Support Groups (ICSGs) are an emerging form of support group on Internet specifically for cancer patients. Previous studies have indicated the effectiveness of ICSGs as a research setting or a data-collection method. Yet recent studies have also indicated that ICSGs tend to serve highly educated, high-income White males who tend to be at an early stage of cancer. In this article, a total of 317 general ICSGs and 229 ethnic-specific ICSGs searched through Google.com, Yahoo.com, http://Msn.com, AOL.com, and ACOR.org are analyzed from a feminist perspective. The written records of group discussions and written memos by the research staff members were also analyzed using content analysis. The idea categories that emerged about these groups include (a) authenticity issues; (b) ethnicity and gender issues; (c) intersubjectivity issues; and (d) potential ethical issues. The findings suggest that (a) researchers adopt multiple recruitment strategies through various Internet sites and/or real settings; (b) researchers raise their own awareness of the potential influences of the health-related resources provided by ICSGs and regularly update their knowledge related to the federal and state standards and/or policies related to ICSGs; and (c) researchers consider adopting a quota-sampling method. PMID:15681976

    20. Hispanics' use of Internet health information: an exploratory study*

      PubMed Central

      Peña-Purcell, Ninfa

      2008-01-01

      Purpose: The research examined use of the Internet to seek health information among Hispanics in the United States. Methods: A secondary analysis used the Impact of the Internet and Advertising on Patients and Physicians, 2000–2001, survey data. Pearson's χ2 test, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), analysis of variance (ANOVA), and independent samples t tests were conducted to test for relationships and differences between facets of Hispanic and non-Hispanic white online health information seeking. Results: Findings indicated lower Internet health information seeking among Hispanics (28.9%, n=72) than non-Hispanic whites (35.6%, n=883). On a scale of 1 (strongly agree) to 4 (strongly disagree), Hispanics were likely to agree that Internet health information improves understanding of medical conditions and treatments (M=1.65), gives patients confidence to talk to doctors about health concerns (M=1.67), and helps patients get treatment they would not otherwise receive (M=2.23). Hispanics viewed their skills in assessing Internet health information as good. Overall ratings were also positive for items related to sharing Internet health information with a doctor. Conflicting with these findings, Hispanics (M=3.33) and non-Hispanic whites (M=3.46) reported that physician-patient relationships worsened as a result of bringing online health information to a visit (scale 1=a lot better to 5=a lot worse). Conclusion: This study provides further evidence of differences in Internet health information seeking among Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites. Cultural discordance may be a possible explanation for Hispanics' view that the Internet negatively impacts physician-patient relationships. Strategies to increase Hispanics' access to Internet health information will likely help them become empowered and educated consumers, potentially having a favorable impact on health outcomes. PMID:18379664

    1. WEBCAP: Web Scheduler for Distance Learning Multimedia Documents with Web Workload Considerations

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Habib, Sami; Safar, Maytham

      2008-01-01

      In many web applications, such as the distance learning, the frequency of refreshing multimedia web documents places a heavy burden on the WWW resources. Moreover, the updated web documents may encounter inordinate delays, which make it difficult to retrieve web documents in time. Here, we present an Internet tool called WEBCAP that can schedule…

    2. Techniques of Document Management: A Review of Text Retrieval and Related Technologies.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Veal, D. C.

      2001-01-01

      Reviews present and possible future developments in the techniques of electronic document management, the major ones being text retrieval and scanning and OCR (optical character recognition). Also addresses document acquisition, indexing and thesauri, publishing and dissemination standards, impact of the Internet, and the document management…

    3. Evolution and Structure of the Internet

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Vespignani, Alessandro

      2007-09-01

      Preface; List of abbreviations; 1. A brief history of the Internet; 2. How the Internet works; 3. Measuring the global Internet; 4. The Internet's large-scale topology; 5. Modeling the Internet; 6. Internet robustness; 7. Virtual and social networks in the Internet; 8. Searching and walking on the Internet; 9. Epidemics in the Internet; 10. Beyond the Internet's skeleton: traffic and global performance; 11. Outlook; Appendix I: graph theory applied to topology analysis; Appendix II: interface resolution and router topology; Appendix III: numerical analysis of heavy-tailed distributions; Appendix IV: degree correlations; Appendix V: scale-free networks: scaling relations; Appendix VI: the SIR model of virus propagation; References; Index.

    4. Evolution and Structure of the Internet

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Vespignani, Alessandro

      2004-02-01

      Preface; List of abbreviations; 1. A brief history of the Internet; 2. How the Internet works; 3. Measuring the global Internet; 4. The Internet's large-scale topology; 5. Modeling the Internet; 6. Internet robustness; 7. Virtual and social networks in the Internet; 8. Searching and walking on the Internet; 9. Epidemics in the Internet; 10. Beyond the Internet's skeleton: traffic and global performance; 11. Outlook; Appendix I: graph theory applied to topology analysis; Appendix II: interface resolution and router topology; Appendix III: numerical analysis of heavy-tailed distributions; Appendix IV: degree correlations; Appendix V: scale-free networks: scaling relations; Appendix VI: the SIR model of virus propagation; References; Index.

    5. New Interfaces to Web Documents and Services

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Carlisle, W. H.

      1996-01-01

      This paper reports on investigations into how to extend capabilities of the Virtual Research Center (VRC) for NASA's Advanced Concepts Office. The work was performed as part of NASA's 1996 Summer Faculty Fellowship program, and involved research into and prototype development of software components that provide documents and services for the World Wide Web (WWW). The WWW has become a de-facto standard for sharing resources over the internet, primarily because web browsers are freely available for the most common hardware platforms and their operating systems. As a consequence of the popularity of the internet, tools, and techniques associated with web browsers are changing rapidly. New capabilities are offered by companies that support web browsers in order to achieve or remain a dominant participant in internet services. Because a goal of the VRC is to build an environment for NASA centers, universities, and industrial partners to share information associated with Advanced Concepts Office activities, the VRC tracks new techniques and services associated with the web in order to determine the their usefulness for distributed and collaborative engineering research activities. Most recently, Java has emerged as a new tool for providing internet services. Because the major web browser providers have decided to include Java in their software, investigations into Java were conducted this summer.

    6. Computer software documentation

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Comella, P. A.

      1973-01-01

      A tutorial in the documentation of computer software is presented. It presents a methodology for achieving an adequate level of documentation as a natural outgrowth of the total programming effort commencing with the initial problem statement and definition and terminating with the final verification of code. It discusses the content of adequate documentation, the necessity for such documentation and the problems impeding achievement of adequate documentation.

    7. 25 CFR 39.406 - What documentation must the school maintain for additional services it provides?

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

      2011-04-01

      ... INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Accountability § 39.406 What documentation must... services, distance courses, Internet courses or college services.) The school must certify, and its records... by certified educational personnel; (b) Each student taking college, distance or internet courses...

    8. 25 CFR 39.406 - What documentation must the school maintain for additional services it provides?

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

      2014-04-01

      ... INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Accountability § 39.406 What documentation must... services, distance courses, Internet courses or college services.) The school must certify, and its records... by certified educational personnel; (b) Each student taking college, distance or internet courses...

    9. 25 CFR 39.406 - What documentation must the school maintain for additional services it provides?

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

      2010-04-01

      ... INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Accountability § 39.406 What documentation must... services, distance courses, Internet courses or college services.) The school must certify, and its records... by certified educational personnel; (b) Each student taking college, distance or internet courses...

    10. An Automated Storage and Retrieval System for Clinical Pharmaceutical Research Documents

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Weaver, Barbara N.; And Others

      1970-01-01

      The Clinical Documentation Section of Schering Corporation's Medical Information Center has developed an automated document storage and retrieval system capable of generating indexes to all documents in the system, summaries, and reports for management by computer. (MF)

    11. Degraded document image enhancement

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Agam, G.; Bal, G.; Frieder, G.; Frieder, O.

      2007-01-01

      Poor quality documents are obtained in various situations such as historical document collections, legal archives, security investigations, and documents found in clandestine locations. Such documents are often scanned for automated analysis, further processing, and archiving. Due to the nature of such documents, degraded document images are often hard to read, have low contrast, and are corrupted by various artifacts. We describe a novel approach for the enhancement of such documents based on probabilistic models which increases the contrast, and thus, readability of such documents under various degradations. The enhancement produced by the proposed approach can be viewed under different viewing conditions if desired. The proposed approach was evaluated qualitatively and compared to standard enhancement techniques on a subset of historical documents obtained from the Yad Vashem Holocaust museum. In addition, quantitative performance was evaluated based on synthetically generated data corrupted under various degradation models. Preliminary results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

    12. Internet informs parents about growth hormone

      PubMed Central

      Cousounis, Pamela; Lipman, Terri H.; Ginsburg, Kenneth; Grimberg, Adda

      2013-01-01

      Background Parent knowledge influences decisions regarding medical care for their children. Methods Parents of pediatric primary care patients aged 9-14 years, irrespective of height, participated in open focus groups (OFG). Moderators asked, “How do people find out about growth hormone (GH)?” Because many parents cited the Internet, the top 10 results from the Google searches, growth hormone children and parents of children who take growth hormone, were examined as representative. Three investigators independently performed content analysis, then reached consensus. Results were tabulated via summary statistics. Results Eighteen websites were reviewed, most with the purpose of education (56%) and many funded by commercial sources (44%). GH treatment information varied, with 33% of sites containing content only about U.S Food and Drug Administration-approved indications. Fifty-six percent of sites included information about psychosocial benefits from treatment, 44% acknowledging them as controversial. Although important to OFG participants, risks and costs were each omitted from 39% of websites. Conclusion Parents often turn to the Internet for GH-related information for their children, though its content may be incomplete and/or biased. Clinicians may want to provide parents with tools for critically evaluating Internet-based information, a list of pre-reviewed websites, or their own educational materials. PMID:23942255

    13. 25 CFR 39.406 - What documentation must the school maintain for additional services it provides?

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

      2012-04-01

      ... EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Accountability § 39.406 What documentation must the school... additional services. (Additional services include homebound services, institutional services, distance... educational personnel; (b) Each student taking college, distance or internet courses is in physical...

    14. Scalable ranked retrieval using document images

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Jain, Rajiv; Oard, Douglas W.; Doermann, David

      2013-12-01

      Despite the explosion of text on the Internet, hard copy documents that have been scanned as images still play a significant role for some tasks. The best method to perform ranked retrieval on a large corpus of document images, however, remains an open research question. The most common approach has been to perform text retrieval using terms generated by optical character recognition. This paper, by contrast, examines whether a scalable segmentation-free image retrieval algorithm, which matches sub-images containing text or graphical objects, can provide additional benefit in satisfying a user's information needs on a large, real world dataset. Results on 7 million scanned pages from the CDIP v1.0 test collection show that content based image retrieval finds a substantial number of documents that text retrieval misses, and that when used as a basis for relevance feedback can yield improvements in retrieval effectiveness.

    15. Developing a section labeler for clinical documents.

      PubMed

      Haug, Peter J; Wu, Xinzi; Ferraro, Jeffery P; Savova, Guergana K; Huff, Stanley M; Chute, Christopher G

      2014-01-01

      Natural language processing (NLP) technologies provide an opportunity to extract key patient data from free text documents within the electronic health record (EHR). We are developing a series of components from which to construct NLP pipelines. These pipelines typically begin with a component whose goal is to label sections within medical documents with codes indicating the anticipated semantics of their content. This Clinical Section Labeler prepares the document for further, focused information extraction. Below we describe the evaluation of six algorithms designed for use in a Clinical Section Labeler. These algorithms are trained with N-gram-based feature sets extracted from document sections and the document types. In the evaluation, 6 different Bayesian models were trained and used to assign one of 27 different topics to each section. A tree-augmented Bayesian network using the document type and N-grams derived from section headers proved most accurate in assigning individual sections appropriate section topics. PMID:25954369

    16. Physiological anthropology and the Internet.

      PubMed

      Karelović, D; Ognjenović, M; Cekić-Arambasin, A; Tadin, I

      1998-12-01

      The Internet is the greatest computer network with many services like Web, FTP, Gopher, E-mail Discussion Groups, and Usenet Discussion Groups, that provides a rapid and the cheapest exchange of information. The benefits to anthropologists of using the Internet are growing rapidly, as the Internet becomes easier to use and ever more anthropological resources become available on line. Physiological anthropology is concerned with the evolution and biological features of human population and it's sources on the Internet are growing continuously. However, in that enormous number of data, is not easy to find a needed information. Currently, number of indexed physiological anthropology related sites on Web only is 233990 (October 98). This paper provides informations about Internet and needed hardware and software for using it. It also describes and lists the most important physiological anthropology addresses, together with physiological anthropology-related journals on the Internet, as well as the ways of searching them. PMID:9951133

    17. Is Involvement in Sex Work Associated with Engagement in HIV-Related Medical Care in Latin American Men Who Have Sex with Men? Results of a Large, Multinational Internet Survey.

      PubMed

      Biello, Katie B; Oldenburg, Catherine E; Rosenberger, Joshua; Mayer, Kenneth H; Novak, David; Mimiaga, Matthew J

      2016-06-01

      Men who have sex with men (MSM) who engage in transactional sex are at increased HIV risk, and face complex barriers to care seeking. Among 2,035 men recruited through an MSM social/sexual networking website in Latin America and who reported being HIV-infected, 186 (9.1%) reported being paid for sex with another man in the past year. Engagement in transactional sex was associated with decreased odds of receiving medical care for HIV (AOR=0.57, 95% CI=0.37-0.85). No significant differences were seen in being on antiretroviral therapy (ART) or ART adherence once in care. Interventions in this population should focus on reducing barriers to engagement in care. PMID:26789395

    18. Is Involvement in Sex Work Associated with Engagement in HIV-Related Medical Care in Latin American Men Who Have Sex with Men? Results of a Large, Multinational Internet Survey

      PubMed Central

      Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Rosenberger, Joshua; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Novak, David; Mimiaga, Matthew J.

      2016-01-01

      Abstract Men who have sex with men (MSM) who engage in transactional sex are at increased HIV risk, and face complex barriers to care seeking. Among 2,035 men recruited through an MSM social/sexual networking website in Latin America and who reported being HIV-infected, 186 (9.1%) reported being paid for sex with another man in the past year. Engagement in transactional sex was associated with decreased odds of receiving medical care for HIV (AOR=0.57, 95% CI=0.37–0.85). No significant differences were seen in being on antiretroviral therapy (ART) or ART adherence once in care. Interventions in this population should focus on reducing barriers to engagement in care. PMID:26789395

    19. The Silver Surfer: Trends of Internet Usage in the Over 65 and the Potential Health Benefits.

      PubMed

      Edwards, K; Duffy, R M; Kelly, B D

      2015-06-01

      The Internet provides medical information and interventions with promising benefits. This cross-sectional study explores trends in Internet use among the elderly in Ireland from 2002 to 2010 and considers possible implications for health benefit. Data were analysed on 1606 Irish individuals. Internet use in Ireland is increasing at similar rates to the rest of Europe; the percentage of over-65s using the Internet in Ireland nearly trebled from 2002 to 2010, from 26(8.3%) to 92 (24. 1%) (p < 0.001). Subgroups of this population displayed significantly higher rates of Internet usage; namely those with a better education, living with a partner, males and urban dwellers. Of those with good subjective general health, 230 (21%) had internet access, versus 36 (7.1%) with poor health. Web-based interventions targeting the elderly should become more available. These could be particularly useful in populations with limited access to transport and mobility. PMID:26182799

    20. Internet addiction: definition, assessment, epidemiology and clinical management.

      PubMed

      Shaw, Martha; Black, Donald W

      2008-01-01

      Internet addiction is characterized by excessive or poorly controlled preoccupations, urges or behaviours regarding computer use and internet access that lead to impairment or distress. The condition has attracted increasing attention in the popular media and among researchers, and this attention has paralleled the growth in computer (and Internet) access. Prevalence estimates vary widely, although a recent random telephone survey of the general US population reported an estimate of 0.3-0.7%. The disorder occurs worldwide, but mainly in countries where computer access and technology are widespread. Clinical samples and a majority of relevant surveys report a male preponderance. Onset is reported to occur in the late 20s or early 30s age group, and there is often a lag of a decade or more from initial to problematic computer usage. Internet addiction has been associated with dimensionally measured depression and indicators of social isolation. Psychiatric co-morbidity is common, particularly mood, anxiety, impulse control and substance use disorders. Aetiology is unknown, but probably involves psychological, neurobiological and cultural factors. There are no evidence-based treatments for internet addiction. Cognitive behavioural approaches may be helpful. There is no proven role for psychotropic medication. Marital and family therapy may help in selected cases, and online self-help books and tapes are available. Lastly, a self-imposed ban on computer use and Internet access may be necessary in some cases. PMID:18399706

    1. Medical Transcriptionists

      MedlinePlus

      ... equipment or software that is connected to their computer. However, technological advances have changed the way medical ... this section Medical transcriptionists must be comfortable using computers. Medical transcriptionists typically need postsecondary education. Prospective medical ...

    2. Medical marijuana

      MedlinePlus

      ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000899.htm Medical marijuana To use the sharing features on this page, ... have legalized marijuana for medical use. How Does Medical Marijuana Work? Medical marijuana may be: Smoked Vaporized Eaten ...

    3. Medical devices; classification for medical washer and medical washer-disinfector. Final rule.

      PubMed

      2002-11-15

      The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the medical washer and medical washer-disinfector intended for general medical purposes to clean and dry surgical instruments, decontaminate or disinfect anesthesia equipment, hollowware, and other medical devices into class II (special controls). FDA is also identifying the guidance document entitled "Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Medical Washers and Medical Washer-Disinfectors" (the guidance) as the special control that, in addition to general controls, the agency believes will reasonably ensure the safety and effectiveness of the device. This action is being taken under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 (the 1976 amendments), the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 (the SMDA), and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (the FDAMA). PMID:12437015

    4. Obtaining good quality medical information from the World Wide Web.

      PubMed

      Thom, Deone H; Polosa, Riccardo

      2002-01-01

      Despite the complexity of the Internet, it is surprisingly easy to search the World Wide Web for medical information. With the right skills you can save yourself a lot of time and effort making the Internet a highly effective tool for supporting your work in health and medicine. Internet offers great opportunities for interactive learning and can help you to plan lectures and create teaching materials. Moreover, physicians can find many Web resources that can assist with articles and assignments and support academic research. Evidence-based indications about medical treatments are also available. However, Internet users need to be aware of the dangers of misleading and inaccurate medical information. In this article, we intend to illustrate to physicians the pros and cons of the World Wide Web, how to apply basic critical appraisal techniques to gather good quality medical information, and a number of useful medical Web sites. PMID:11975112

    5. Anomaly detection for internet surveillance

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Bouma, Henri; Raaijmakers, Stephan; Halma, Arvid; Wedemeijer, Harry

      2012-06-01

      Many threats in the real world can be related to activity of persons on the internet. Internet surveillance aims to predict and prevent attacks and to assist in finding suspects based on information from the web. However, the amount of data on the internet rapidly increases and it is time consuming to monitor many websites. In this paper, we present a novel method to automatically monitor trends and find anomalies on the internet. The system was tested on Twitter data. The results showed that it can successfully recognize abnormal changes in activity or emotion.

    6. Documentation and knowledge acquisition

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Rochowiak, Daniel; Moseley, Warren

      1990-01-01

      Traditional approaches to knowledge acquisition have focused on interviews. An alternative focuses on the documentation associated with a domain. Adopting a documentation approach provides some advantages during familiarization. A knowledge management tool was constructed to gain these advantages.

    7. Web document engineering

      SciTech Connect

      White, B.

      1996-05-01

      This tutorial provides an overview of several document engineering techniques which are applicable to the authoring of World Wide Web documents. It illustrates how pre-WWW hypertext research is applicable to the development of WWW information resources.

    8. Intranet Document Management Systems.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Wen, H. Joseph; Yen, David C.; Lin, Binshan

      1998-01-01

      Explains how intranets facilitate documentation availability within a company at substantial cost savings. Topics include intranet document management systems (IDMS); publication costs for printed materials; hardware and software specifications; performance; and security. (Author/LRW)

    9. 42 CFR 457.238 - Documentation of payment rates.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

      2010-10-01

      ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Documentation of payment rates. 457.238 Section 457...; Reduction of Federal Medical Payments § 457.238 Documentation of payment rates. The CHIP agency must maintain documentation of payment rates and make it available to HHS upon request....

    10. Is the internet an integral part of general practice in Australia?

      PubMed

      Williams, P A; Maj, S P

      2001-01-01

      Computerisation has seen significant changes in information management and procedures in General Practice. Whilst the majority of changes to date, have been apparent in administration, the clinical aspect of primary care is now increasingly taking advantage of the computer and significantly, the Internet. The professional obligation to maintain currency in medical developments has provided an opportunity to use the Internet as a low cost method to access a wide range of medical research information worldwide. Furthermore traditional methods of communication within the medical community have the potential to be transformed by the availability and use of electronic communication techniques such as email. The incorporation of these new technologies in clinical practice is not without its challenges, and includes quality, timeliness, information management and attitudes to Internet based information. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study of GP's undertaken in Western Australia analysing the usage of, and attitude to, the Internet in clinical practice. PMID:11604771

    11. The Internet Guide for New Users.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Dern, Daniel P.

      This guide will help the new user get started on the Internet. It explains what the Internet is, how to use it, and how to think like an Internet user. Part 1, "Ramping Up, Getting Started," covers the basics of getting access to the Internet and general information about it. It includes a review of the history and technology of the Internet, some…

    12. An Exploration of Flow during Internet Use.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Rettie, Ruth

      2001-01-01

      Uses focus groups to facilitate identification and discussion of respondents' Internet experience. Explores respondents' awareness and experience of flow-identified in research as a key characteristic of Internet consumer behavior. Finds half the respondents recognized Internet flow experience and Internet flow seems to prolong Internet and Web…

    13. JSC document index

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      1988-01-01

      The Johnson Space Center (JSC) document index is intended to provide a single source listing of all published JSC-numbered documents their authors, and the designated offices of prime responsibility (OPR's) by mail code at the time of publication. The index contains documents which have been received and processed by the JSC Technical Library as of January 13, 1988. Other JSC-numbered documents which are controlled but not available through the JSC Library are also listed.

    14. Characterizing Internet Searchers of Smoking Cessation Information

      PubMed Central

      Graham, Amanda L

      2006-01-01

      active smokers (53%) indicated that they were planning to quit in the next 30 days. Smokers were more likely to seek information on how to quit and on medications; former smokers were more interested in how to cope with withdrawal. All participants rated withdrawal information and individually tailored information as being more useful, while displaying little interest in telephone counseling, expert support, or peer support. Publicly available data from large search engines suggest that 4 million Americans search for resources on smoking cessation each year. Conclusions This study adds to the limited data available on individuals who search for smoking cessation information on the Internet, supports the prior estimates of the size of the population, and indicates that these individuals are in appropriate stages for both active cessation interventions and aggressive relapse prevention efforts. Continued development and evaluation of online interventions is warranted, and organizations seeking to promote cessation should carefully evaluate the Internet as a possible modality for treatment and as a gateway to other traditional programs. PMID:17032633

    15. THE EFFECT OF THE INTERNET ADDICTION ON THE INFORMATION-SEEKING BEHAVIOR OF THE POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS

      PubMed Central

      Soleymani, Mohammad Reza; Garivani, Asieh; Zare-Farashbandi, Firoozeh

      2016-01-01

      Introduction: Internet addiction is a typical use of the internet that causes the psychological, social, educational, or occupational problems for the people. Students need the internet more than other people due to their educational or research needs. The rate and type of the internet use may affect their information-seeking behavior too. This study aims to investigate the effect of the internet addiction on the information-seeking behavior of the postgraduate students. Methods: This applied study that uses the correlation method. The research population composed of 1149 postgraduate students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, of which 284 were selected using the stratified random sampling as the sample. Yang’s internet addiction questionnaire and the researcher-developed questionnaire of the information-seeking behavior were used as the data collection instruments. Instrument validity was confirmed by the specialists of librarianship and medical sciences and its reliability was confirmed using the Cronbach’s alpha coefficient (0.86). Research data were analyzed using the descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation) and inferential statistics (independent-t tests, Pearson correlation coefficient, and variance analysis). Results: Based on the findings, there was no sign of internet addiction among the 86.6% of the students. However, 13% of the students were exposed to the internet addiction and only 0.4% of internet addiction was observed among the students. There was no significant difference between the information-seeking behavior of the male and female respondents. There was no sign of the internet addiction in any dimension of the information-seeking behavior of the students. Conclusion: This study showed that there is no relationship between the information-seeking behavior of the students and the age and the rate of the internet use. Promoting the network infrastructures and increasing the internet speed as well as facilitating the use of

    16. Internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy for depression and anxiety.

      PubMed

      2013-11-01

      Internet-based, or computerised, cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) can be used to treat patients with depression or anxiety. Patients are engaged in structured programs of care, with several programs available either at no cost or moderate cost. Internet CBT (iCBT) may be particularly suited to patients with mobility issues or living in rural or remote areas. Although there are no adverse effects, clinicians should assess patients for risk issues and the need for more immediate assistance before recommending iCBT. Monitoring effectiveness of any intervention for the patient is important. iCBT has National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Level I evidence of efficacy. PMID:24217103

    17. Internet in the workplace: censorship, liability, and freedom of speech.

      PubMed

      Sherwill-Navarro, P

      1998-01-01

      Most hospital medical libraries are supported by private, corporate funds and thus fall under the corporation's policies in regard to discrimination, harassment, and sexual harassment. With the free flow of information available on the Internet and through e-mail, it is mandatory to create a corporate policy for appropriate use and review of materials. Access to "questionable" or inappropriate Internet sites is not a freedom of speech issue in a private corporation; it is a potential liability for the corporation, the library, and the librarian. It is also a misuse of company resources. PMID:10187687

    18. 39 CFR 3001.9 - Filing of documents.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

      2010-07-01

      ... Commission, or by direction of the presiding officer shall be made using the Internet (Filing Online... 20268-0001 during regular business hours on a date no later than that specified for such filing. (b) Account holder. In order for a document to be accepted using Filing Online, it must be submitted to...

    19. Relevance of Web Documents:Ghosts Consensus Method.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Gorbunov, Andrey L.

      2002-01-01

      Discusses how to improve the quality of Internet search systems and introduces the Ghosts Consensus Method which is free from the drawbacks of digital democracy algorithms and is based on linear programming tasks. Highlights include vector space models; determining relevant documents; and enriching query terms. (LRW)

    20. Automated Management Of Documents

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Boy, Guy

      1995-01-01

      Report presents main technical issues involved in computer-integrated documentation. Problems associated with automation of management and maintenance of documents analyzed from perspectives of artificial intelligence and human factors. Technologies that may prove useful in computer-integrated documentation reviewed: these include conventional approaches to indexing and retrieval of information, use of hypertext, and knowledge-based artificial-intelligence systems.

    1. Documents and Civic Duties

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Potter, Lee Ann

      2005-01-01

      All of the documents featured in this article come from the holdings of the National Archives and Records Administration. Primary source documents illustrate what is meant by responsible citizenship. The people who create documents as well as those who are featured in them can serve as models of civic behavior--both appropriate and…

    2. Clinical document architecture.

      PubMed

      Heitmann, Kai

      2003-01-01

      The Clinical Document Architecture (CDA), a standard developed by the Health Level Seven organisation (HL7), is an ANSI approved document architecture for exchange of clinical information using XML. A CDA document is comprised of a header with associated vocabularies and a body containing the structural clinical information. PMID:15061557

    3. Document Conversion Methodology.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Bovee, Donna

      1990-01-01

      Discusses digital imaging technology and examines document database conversion considerations. Two types of document imaging systems are described: (1) a work in process system, and (2) a storage and retrieval system. Conversion methodology is outlined, and a document conversion scenario is presented as a practical guide to conversion. (LRW)

    4. Program analysis for documentation

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Lolmaugh, G. H.

      1970-01-01

      A program analysis for documentation (PAD) written in FORTRAN has three steps: listing the variables, describing the structure and writing the program specifications. Technical notes on editing criteria for reviewing program documentation, technical notes for PAD, and FORTRAN program analyzer for documentation are appended.

    5. Document Length Normalization.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Singhal, Amit; And Others

      1996-01-01

      Describes a study that investigated document retrieval relevance based on document length in an experimental text collection. Topics include term weighting and document ranking, retrieval strategies such as the vector-space cosine match, and a modified technique called the pivoted cosine normalization. (LRW)

    6. Documenting Employee Conduct

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Dalton, Jason

      2009-01-01

      One of the best ways for a child care program to lose an employment-related lawsuit is failure to document the performance of its employees. Documentation of an employee's performance can provide evidence of an employment-related decision such as discipline, promotion, or discharge. When properly implemented, documentation of employee performance…

    7. Internet Research: Implications for The Future of Health Care

      PubMed Central

      Shortliffe, Ted

      1999-01-01

      The phenomenal growth in Internet usage, largely due to the success of the World Wide Web, has stressed the international networking infrastructure in ways that were never contemplated when the early ARPAnet emerged from research laboratories in the 1970s. Some of the challenges are logistical and legal, and have to do with management of domain names, intellectual-property agreements, and international business activities. Others are technical, resulting both because we are envisioning applications that the current Internet cannot support, and because the existing infrastructure cannot scale to a world in which a huge portion of the world's population is online and individual homes and businesses may have IP addresses for tens of electronic devices, such as appliances, heating systems, or security alarms. In this presentation, I will discuss some of the US research and testbed activities that are currently underway in an effort to respond to the technical challenges. These include the Internet-2 testbed created by a consortium of academic institutions, and the federal government's Next Generation Internet research initiative. I will explain the difference between these two programs and identify some of the technical requirements other than a simple increase in bandwidth that have been identified for the evolving Internet. This will lead to a discussion of the limitations of the current Internet that have constrained its use in health care and that accordingly help to define the networking research agenda that is of greatest importance to the biomedical community. Policy and regulatory issues that arise because of health care's use of the Internet will also be discussed, as will those technical requirements that may be unique to biomedical applications. One goal of the discussion will be to motivate an international discussion of the ways in which the medical informatics community should be engaged in both basic and applied research in the area of networking and the

    8. Serving the Internet Public: The Internet Public Library.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Electronic Library, 1996

      1996-01-01

      Describes the Internet Public Library (IPL) which was developed at the School of Information and Library Studies at the University of Michigan to be a library for Internet users. Highlights include mission statement and goals, funding, staffing with volunteers, future possibilities, IPL services, and statement of principles. (LRW)

    9. Quality of internet access: barrier behind internet use statistics.

      PubMed

      Skinner, Harvey; Biscope, Sherry; Poland, Blake

      2003-09-01

      The rapid growth of the Internet is increasingly international with young people being the early adopters in most countries. However, the quality of Internet access looms as a major barrier hidden behind Internet use statistics. The goal of this study was to provide an in-depth evaluation of young people's perspectives on using the Internet to obtain health information and resources (e-health). Using an inductive qualitative research design, 27 focus groups were conducted in Ontario, Canada. The 210 young participants were selected to reflect diversity in age, sex, geographic location, cultural identity and risk. A major finding was how the quality of Internet access influenced young people's ability to obtain health information and resources. Quality of Internet access was affected by four key factors: 1. Privacy, 2. Gate-keeping, 3. Timeliness and 4. Functionality. Privacy was particularly relevant to these young people in getting access to sensitive health information (e.g. sexual activities). Variations in access quality also impacted participation in mutual support, fostering social networks and getting specific health questions answered. These results serve as a warning about using Internet penetration statistics alone as a measure of access. Concerted attention is needed on improving the quality of Internet access for achieving the potential of e-health. This is imperative for addressing the digital divide affecting populations both within countries and globally between countries. PMID:12850112

    10. [Excessive Internet use and Internet addiction: emerging public health issues.].

      PubMed

      Coniglio, Maria Anna; Muni, Viviana; Giammanco, Giuseppe; Pignato, Sarina

      2007-01-01

      A survey was performed among students of various faculties at the University of Catania (Italy) to examine the health effects of excessive Internet use and behaviour patterns of Internet dependency. Three hundred students were recruited through a non probabilistic quota sampling method and were asked to complete a questionnaire aimed at identifying attitudes and behaviours regarding Internet use, and the psychological and physical consequences of excessive use of the Internet. The most relevant findings that emerged from student responses regard: emotional dependency on the Internet (5% of students believe that Internet facilitates social relationships, 4% experiences euphoric feelings or excitement while on-line, 1% consider the Internet as a way of escaping from real life), the excessive amount of time spent on-line (8%) and the inability to end an on-line session(8%), lying to family members to conceal the nature of involvement with the Internet (3%), giving up sports (2%) or meals (1%), the negative impact on school grades (3%), lack of sleep (4%), and physical health problems such as backache (2%), arm or wrist pain (2%), vision disturbances (6%). PMID:18216888

    11. Internet Insights: How Academics Are Using the Internet.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Bane, Adele F.; Milheim, William D.

      1995-01-01

      Provides a brief history of the Internet, highlighting its academic roots, and describes a survey conducted to determine how and why academics use the Internet. Information gathered, presented in seven tables, shows frequency of use; types of resources accessed; levels of computer experience; use of nagivational aids; and reaction to the survey.…

    12. Astronomy. Internet site

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Maksimenko, Anatoly Vasilievich

      The Internet site covers a wide area of actual astronomical topics, including 1) Astronomical News 2) Didactics of Astronomy 3) Space Research (Cosmonautics) 4) That's interesting 5) A Handbook of an astronomer 6) The Solar system 7) A Photogalery 8) Works of Schoolars 9) History of Astronomy The most important of them is the section concerning Space Research (Cosmonautics). This section covers a wide range of topics, beginning with very complete Illustrated History of Soviet Space research , the building of Soviet Rockets, a complete list of Cosmonauts with biographies, a list of all the flies. The author of the site concerns much ineterest to recent and extraordinary astronomiucal phenomena, such as Hazardous asteroids, Comets, Solar and Moon Eclipses, Meteorites, as well as to correct from the scientifical point of view interpretation of the extraordinary astronomical phenomena. The section concerning the Solar system is richly illustrated and give detailed explanations to Solar System evolution and actual state, explains many phenomena in the Solar system. THe Internet site is designed for schoolars as well as to amateur and professional astronomers.

    13. Document Flowdown Tool

      Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

      2010-12-31

      DFTool performs the following: • A tool to conduct, capture, document, and manage a systematic review and flowdown of contractual requirements/documents to the site, facility, and project-level implementing documents. • Ability to alert/email document owners to impending changes/updates and impacts to upper-level linked documents. • Custom ability to generate reports and/or include custom functionalities based on other needs or consideration for site use. • Ability to be accessed by all personnel (particularly document owners). •more » Shows both document flow-up and flow-down. • Provides visibility where links/flowdown does not currently exist or is incorrect so it can be changed/updated (no visibility currently exists). • Ability to capture requirements and ultimately link to an existing/proven requirements-based commitment tracking system which can be used (electively) at the facility/organizational-level« less

    14. Document Flowdown Tool

      SciTech Connect

      2010-12-31

      DFTool performs the following: • A tool to conduct, capture, document, and manage a systematic review and flowdown of contractual requirements/documents to the site, facility, and project-level implementing documents. • Ability to alert/email document owners to impending changes/updates and impacts to upper-level linked documents. • Custom ability to generate reports and/or include custom functionalities based on other needs or consideration for site use. • Ability to be accessed by all personnel (particularly document owners). • Shows both document flow-up and flow-down. • Provides visibility where links/flowdown does not currently exist or is incorrect so it can be changed/updated (no visibility currently exists). • Ability to capture requirements and ultimately link to an existing/proven requirements-based commitment tracking system which can be used (electively) at the facility/organizational-level

    15. Accessing the Internet Via Satellite.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Jackson, Lisa M.

      1998-01-01

      Discusses the use of satellite technology as an option for public schools to access the Internet. Examines costs and available technology. Presents two examples of school-satellite usage, including its use by the Navajo Nation to provide Internet access for its students who are spread out across 26,000 square miles. (GR)

    16. Parent's Guide to the Internet.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Lee, Paulette

      This booklet provides parents with basic information about how to use the computer to find information and communicate with others. It describes what is needed to get started on the Internet and points to some of the many resources available online for parents and children. The book discusses: a brief definition of the Internet, including what the…

    17. Internet use among Turkish adolescents.

      PubMed

      Tahiroglu, Aysegul Yolga; Celik, Gonca G; Uzel, Mehtap; Ozcan, Neslihan; Avci, Ayse

      2008-10-01

      The aim of this study was to investigate Internet use habits and problematic Internet use (PIU) in Turkish adolescents. Participants were 3,975 undergraduate students, 7.6% of whom used the Internet for more than 12 hours weekly. The Online Cognition Scale (OCS) was used. The most common purpose for using the Internet was playing games, followed by general information search. Female users mostly preferred searching for general information; male users preferred playing games (p < 0.001, gamma = 995.205). The most preferred type of game was violent games. While preference for strategy and fantasy role-play (FRP) games increased with age, preference for other games decreased (p < 0.0001, gamma = 283.767). Participants who used the Internet mostly for general information searches and school-related searches had lower OCS scores (p < 0.0001). The highest OCS scores were related to violent games, followed by FRP, strategy, and sports and motor racing games. Computers and the Internet are useful, important inventions, but like other inventions, if used improperly, they may be harmful. Risk of harm raises concerns about who should use the Internet and computers, and where, when, and why the Internet and computers should be used. PMID:18785800

    18. Extending the Internet 2 Domain.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Simco, Greg

      2002-01-01

      Discussion of the Internet 2 community, formed from partnerships involving universities, businesses, and the government, focuses on the K-20 Initiative that extends Internet 2 developments to other nonmember environments, including elementary and secondary schools, community colleges, universities, libraries, and museums. Discusses networking and…

    19. Human Resources and the Internet.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Cohen, Suzanne; Joseph, Deborah

      Concerned about falling behind the technology curve, organizations are using the Internet or intranets to provide and communicate information to their employees and create more efficient workplaces. The Internet is not just a "network of computer networks," but a medium conveying a vast, diverse amount of information. This publication is an…

    20. Ethical Considerations for Internet Counseling.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Attridge, William C.

      With the advent of new technologies, the possibility for providing quality, Internet-based, therapeutic counseling services becomes more attainable and realistic every year. Since the National Board for Certified Counselors announced the adoption of voluntary standards for the practice of Internet-based counseling, a new dimension has been added…