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Sample records for interplanetary scintillation observations

  1. A decametric wavelength radio telescope for interplanetary scintillation observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronyn, W. M.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1975-01-01

    A phased array, electrically steerable radio telescope (with a total collecting area of 18 acres), constructed for the purpose of remotely sensing electron density irregularity structure in the solar wind, is presented. The radio telescope is able to locate, map, and track large scale features of the solar wind, such as streams and blast waves, by monitoring a large grid of natural radio sources subject to rapid intensity fluctuation (interplanetary scintillation) caused by the irregularity structure. Observations verify the performance of the array, the receiver, and the scintillation signal processing circuitry of the telescope.

  2. Interplanetary plasma scintillation parameters measurements retrieved from the spacecraft observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molera Calvés, Guifré; Pogrebenko, S. V.; Wagner, J.; Maccaferri, G.; Colucci, G.; Kronschnabl, G.; Scilliro, F.; Bianco, G.; Pérez Ayúcar, M.; Cosmovici, C. B.

    2010-05-01

    Measurement of the Interplanetary Scintillations (IPS) of radio signals propagating through the plasma in the Solar System by the radio astronomical instruments is a powerful tool to characterise and study the spatial and temporal variation of the electron density in the Solar wind. Several techniques based on the observation of natural and artificial radio sources have been developed during the last 50 years. Here we report our results of the IPS parameters measurement based on the multi-station observations of the planetary mission spacecraft. The ESA Venus Express spacecraft was observed at X-band (8.4 GHz) by several European VLBI stations - Metsähovi Radio Observatory (Aalto University , FI), Medicina (INAF-RA, IT), Matera (ASI, IT), Wettzell (BKG, DE), Noto (INAF-IRA, IT) and Yebes (OAN-IGN, ES) during a 2008-2010 campaign in a framework of the PRIDE (Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiments) project as a preparatory stage for the European Radio Astronomy VLBI facilities participation in the planned ESA planetary missions (EJSM, TESM, EVE and others). Observational data were processed at Metsähovi Radio Observatory with the on-purpose developed high performance, ultra-high spectral resolution and spacecraft tracking capable software spectrometer-correlator and analysed at the Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe (JIVE, NL). High quality of acquired and analysed data enables us to study and define several parameters of the S/C signal and accompanying "ranging" tones with milli-Hz accuracy, among which the phase fluctuations of the spacecraft signal carrier line can be used to characterise the interplanetary plasma density fluctuations along the signal propagation line at different spatial and temporal scales at different Solar elongations and which exhibits a near-Kolmogorov spectrum. Such essential parameters as the phase scintillation index and bandwidth of scintillations and their dependence on the solar elongation, distance to the target

  3. Interplanetary scintillation observations of the solar wind close to the Sun and out of the ecliptic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sime, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    A brief review is given of recent developments in the observation of the solar wind by the method of interplanetary scintillation. The emphasis is on observations of the velocity structure, the electron density and the effect of propagating disturbances in the interplanetary medium as detected principally by intensity and phase scintillation and by spectral broadening.

  4. Interplanetary scintillation observations with the Cocoa Cross radio telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronyn, W. M.; Shawhan, S. D.; Erskine, F. T.; Huneke, A. H.; Mitchell, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    Physical and electrical parameters for the 34.3-MHz Cocoa Cross radio telescope are given. The telescope is dedicated to the determination of solar-wind characteristics in and out of the ecliptic plane through measurement of electron-density irregularity structure as determined from IPS (interplanetary scintillation) of natural radio sources. The collecting area (72,000 sq m), angular resolution (0.4 deg EW by 0.6 deg NS), and spatial extent (1.3 km EW by 0.8 km NS) make the telescope well suited for measurements of IPS index and frequency scale for hundreds of weak radio sources without serious confusion effects.

  5. Determining source angular sizes from interplanetary-scintillation observations in the saturated regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyantsev, A. V.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Chashei, I. V.; Shishov, V. I.

    2013-07-01

    Interplanetary-scintillation observations of the radio source B0531+194 (J0534+1927) obtained over a wide range of elongations at 111 MHz using the Big Scanning Antenna of the Lebedev Physical Institute are presented. Near the Sun, the temporal spectra of the scintillations have a two-component form, corresponding to the superposition of refractive and diffractive scintillations that is characteristic of the saturated regime. A method for estimating the angular size of the scintillating component based on measurement of the break frequency in the diffractive part of the scintillation spectrum is presented. The scintillating component as a fraction of the total flux can be determined using the maximum scintillation index. The angular size of the scintillating component in B0531+194 is found to be 0.24″ ± 0.05″, and the ratio of the fluxes in the core and halo to be roughly one-third. The flux density in the compact radio component is 5 Jy. The estimated parameters of the angular structure of the source are compared with observations at other frequencies.

  6. Heliospheric tomography using interplanetary scintillation observations 1. Combined Nagoya and Cambridge data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, B. V.; Hick, P. L.; Kojima, M.; Yokobe, A.

    1998-06-01

    We have produced a computer assisted tomography program that optimizes a three-dimensional model to fit observational data. We have used this program with interplanetary scintillation data from Nagoya, Japan, and Cambridge, England. The program iterates to a least squares solution fit of observed data using solar rotation and solar wind motion to provide perspective views of each point in space accessible to the observations. We plot the optimized model as Carrington maps in velocity V and density Ne for the two data sets with resolutions of 10° in heliographic longitude and latitude. We map the model to 1 AU and compare this to in situ observations from the IMP spacecraft. From this comparison we find ΔNe~Ne0.3. We plot Carrington maps extrapolated to the solar surface to compare with Yohkoh Soft X ray Telescope (SXT), Sacramento Peak green line, and Mark III K-coronameter observations. High velocities modeled at the solar surface for individual rotations trace coronal holes (including polar ones) observed in SXT data. Regions of high density modeled from the Cambridge scintillation level data generally show a high correlation with regions of high solar activity observed as bright in Yohkoh SXT and green line observations. There is also a general correspondence of the regions of high density and the areas which are bright in K-coronameter observations.

  7. Three-dimensional exploration of the solar wind using observations of interplanetary scintillation

    PubMed Central

    TOKUMARU, Munetoshi

    2013-01-01

    The solar wind, a supersonic plasma flow continuously emanating from the Sun, governs the space environment in a vast region extending to the boundary of the heliosphere (∼100 AU). Precise understanding of the solar wind is of importance not only because it will satisfy scientific interest in an enigmatic astrophysical phenomenon, but because it has broad impacts on relevant fields. Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) of compact radio sources at meter to centimeter wavelengths serves as a useful ground-based method for investigating the solar wind. IPS measurements of the solar wind at a frequency of 327 MHz have been carried out regularly since the 1980s using the multi-station system of the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL) of Nagoya University. This paper reviews new aspects of the solar wind revealed from our IPS observations. PMID:23391604

  8. Three-dimensional exploration of the solar wind using observations of interplanetary scintillation.

    PubMed

    Tokumaru, Munetoshi

    2013-01-01

    The solar wind, a supersonic plasma flow continuously emanating from the Sun, governs the space environment in a vast region extending to the boundary of the heliosphere (∼100 AU). Precise understanding of the solar wind is of importance not only because it will satisfy scientific interest in an enigmatic astrophysical phenomenon, but because it has broad impacts on relevant fields. Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) of compact radio sources at meter to centimeter wavelengths serves as a useful ground-based method for investigating the solar wind. IPS measurements of the solar wind at a frequency of 327 MHz have been carried out regularly since the 1980s using the multi-station system of the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL) of Nagoya University. This paper reviews new aspects of the solar wind revealed from our IPS observations. PMID:23391604

  9. Observations of micro-turbulence in the solar wind near the sun with interplanetary scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Y.; Misawa, H.; Kojima, M.; Mori, H.; Tanaka, T.; Takaba, H.; Kondo, T.; Tokumaru, M.; Manoharan, P. K.

    1995-01-01

    Velocity and density turbulence of solar wind were inferred from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations at 2.3 GHz and 8.5 GHz using a single-antenna. The observations were made during September and October in 1992 - 1994. They covered the distance range between 5 and 76 solar radii (Rs). We applied the spectrum fitting method to obtain a velocity, an axial ratio, an inner scale and a power-law spectrum index. We examined the difference of the turbulence properties near the Sun between low-speed solar wind and high-speed solar wind. Both of solar winds showed acceleration at the distance range of 10 - 30 Rs. The radial dependence of anisotropy and spectrum index did not have significant difference between low-speed and high-speed solar winds. Near the sun, the radial dependence of the inner scale showed the separation from the linear relation as reported by previous works. We found that the inner scale of high-speed solar wind is larger than that of low-speed wind.

  10. The detection of coronal mass ejections in the interplanetary medium using scintillation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyantsev, A. V.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Chashei, I. V.; Shishov, V. I.

    2014-09-01

    Daily observations of scintillating radio sources obtained from July 2011 through June 2012 on the Big Scanning Antenna of the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute at 111 MHz using a 16 beams system are analyzed. Variations in the observed scintillation indices are compared with data on solar X-ray flares and geomagnetic disturbances. Comparison of the observed scintillation indices on successive days enables the detection of most propagating disturbances associated with coronal events of class M5.0 and higher.

  11. Bispectral analysis of meter wavelength interplanetary scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    The bispectrum of interplanetary scintillation is investigated. Rice-squared and lognormal point-source intensity probability density functions are used to derive model bispectra as functionals of the intensity autocovariance. Simultaneous observations of the source CTA 21 at 270, 340, and 470 MHz are analyzed to produce scintillation indices, skewness parameters, and bispectra, which are compared with the models for the cases of weak, intermediate, and strong scattering. The results obtained for CTA 21 are shown to rule out lognormal statistics for interplanetary scintillation over the frequency range from 340 to 470 MHz. It is found that the observed bispectra correspond well with the predictions of the Rice-squared model for weak and intermediate scattering, but are systematically different from model bispectra computed by assuming a point source in the case of strong scattering.

  12. Radial evolution of micro-turbulence in the solar wind observed with interplanetary scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Yohei; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Kojima, Masayoshi; Manoharan, P. K.; Esser, Ruth

    1999-06-01

    It is well known that the solar wind is a magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent flow. The MHD turbulence is considered to play an important role in energy transport and acceleration processes in the solar wind (see (1)). Some acceleration models in which the solar wind is primarily driven by the turbulence process caused by the damping of MHD waves have been proposed (e.g., (2)). Study of the turbulence in the solar wind is therefore crucial for understanding the solar wind acceleration mechanism. In this paper, we focused on the radial evolution of the turbulence in the solar wind, in particular the dissipation scale length of density fluctuations, the ``inner scale (si)'' from measurements of the solar wind with the IPS method. Our IPS observations were made at the Kashima Space Research, Communications Research Laboratory at 2 GHz and 8 GHz in 1994. The observations measure the solar wind at solar distances of 1 to 76 solar radii (Rs). To obtain the inner scale from the observations, we applied a spectrum-fitting method, in which a model power spectrum is fit to an observed scintillation power spectrum by adjusting the parameters of solar wind (e.g., (3)). Previous IPS measurements have reported that the size of the inner scale increases with heliocentric distance as si~(r/Rs)1.0+/-0.1 (e.g., (4)). However, our IPS observations carried out in 1994 have revealed that the inner scale inside of 25 Rs deviates from the linear relation and follows the radial profile as si~r+1.8 (see Figure 3 in (5)). We attempted to explain the radial profile of the observed inner scale in comparison with model calculations taking into account the line-of-sight integration effect. For the model calculations, we employed a solar wind acceleration model (6) and the inner scale model si=3/qi=3×VA/ωc=684N-1/2, which Coles and Harmon (7) have proposed suggesting the proton cyclotron damping acts as an effective dissipation mechanism. Here, VA is the Alfvén velocity, ωc is the proton

  13. Parameters of the turbulence of the interplanetary plasma derived from scintillation observations of the quasars 3C 48 and 3C 298 at the solar-activity maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glubokova, S. K.; Glyantsev, A. V.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Chashei, I. V.; Shishov, V. I.

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of temporal spectra of interplanetary scintillations of the radio sources 3C 48 and 3C 298 observed at 111 MHz on the Big Scanning Antenna of the Lebedev Physical Institute at the maximum of the 24th solar-activity cycle is reported. The measured temporal spectra of the scintillations are used to estimate the velocity of the in homogeneities and the index of the spatial spectrum of the turbulence. The dependence of the spectral index of the turbulence on the solar-wind speed persists in periods of high solar activity, when the global spatial structure of the solar wind is strongly modulated by the activity cycle.

  14. Parameters of the turbulence of the interplanetary plasma derived from scintillation observations of the quasar 3C 48 at the solar-activity minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glubokova, S. K.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Chashei, I. V.; Shishov, V. I.

    2013-08-01

    Temporal spectra of interplanetary scintillations of the strong radio source 3C 48 based on 111 MHz observations on the Large Scanning Antenna of the Lebedev Physical Institute obtained near the solar-activity minimum are analyzed. Measurements of the temporal spectrum of the scintillations are used to estimate the angular size of the source, the velocity of inhomogeneities, and the power-law index for the spatial spectrum of the turbulence in the interplanetary plasma. The mean angular size of the source is θ 0 = 0.326″ ± 0.016″, and the mean index for the three-dimensional turbulence spectrum is n = 3.7 ± 0.2. There is some evidence that n decreases in the transition from the fast, high-speed to the slow, low-latitude solar wind.

  15. Separating Nightside Interplanetary and Ionospheric Scintillation with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, R. A.; Bisi, M. M.; Forte, B.; Ulich, Th.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Mann, G.; Vocks, C.

    2016-09-01

    Observation of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) beyond Earth-orbit can be challenging due to the necessity to use low radio frequencies at which scintillation due to the ionosphere could confuse the interplanetary contribution. A recent paper by Kaplan et al. presenting observations using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) reports evidence of nightside IPS on two radio sources within their field of view. However, the low time cadence of 2 s used might be expected to average out the IPS signal, resulting in the reasonable assumption that the scintillation is more likely to be ionospheric in origin. To check this assumption, this Letter uses observations of IPS taken at a high time cadence using the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR). Averaging these to the same as the MWA observations, we demonstrate that the MWA result is consistent with IPS, although some contribution from the ionosphere cannot be ruled out. These LOFAR observations represent the first of nightside IPS using LOFAR, with solar wind speeds consistent with a slow solar wind stream in one observation and a coronal mass ejection expected to be observed in another.

  16. Simulation of interplanetary scintillation with SSSF and SSDF mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lijia; Peng, Bo

    2010-01-01

    The sun has the biggest effect on the Earth in many ways. Observing the solar wind is an important method to study the solar-earth environment. Ground-based interplanetary scintillation observations are an effective method of monitoring solar wind speed, studying the random fluctuations of the interplanetary plasma and the structures of radio sources. Two modes of single-station observations, namely, single station-single frequency (SSSF) and single station dual-frequency (SSDF), are briefly introduced and numerically simulated in this paper. The SSSF mode are easier to carry out and has been widely used. Although the observing system and data processing system of the SSDF mode are more complicated, it can measure the solar wind speed more accurately. A new SSDF system is under construction in Miyun, NAOC (the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences), with a 50 m telescope, which will serve the Meridian Project, and this paper is devoted to preparing for this new system.

  17. Observations of Heliospheric Faraday Rotation (FR) and Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS): Steps Towards Investigating Bz Propagation Between the Sun and the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, Mario M.; Fallows, Richard A.; Sobey, Charlotte; Eftekhari, Tarraneh; Jensen, Elizabeth A.; Jackson, Bernard V.; Yu, Hsiu-Shan; Hick, P. Paul; Odstrcil, Dusan; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Oyuki Chang, M. T.

    2016-04-01

    Space weather - analogous to terrestrial weather (describing the changing pressure, temperature, wind, and humidity conditions on Earth) - is essentially a description of the changes in velocity, density, magnetic field, high-energy particles, and radiation in the near-Earth space environment including the effects of such on the Earth. Space weather can be considered to have two main strands: (i) scientific research, and (ii) applications. The former is self-explanatory, but the latter covers operational aspects including forecasting. Understanding and forecasting space weather near the Earth is of critical importance to protecting our modern-day reliance on satellites, global-communications and navigation networks, high-altitude air travel (radiation concerns particularly on polar routes), long-distance power/oil/gas lines and piping, and for any future human exploration of space to list but a few. This includes both military and commercial considerations. Two ground-based radio-observing techniques that can add to and lead our understanding and forecasting of heliospheric space weather are those of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) and heliospheric Faraday rotation (FR). We present our latest progress using these two radio heliospheric-imaging remote-sensing techniques including the use of three-dimensional (3-D) modelling and reconstruction techniques using other, additional data as input to support and better-interpret individual case-study results.

  18. Scintillation of spacecraft radio signals on the interplanetary plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molera Calves, Guifre; Pogrebenko, Sergei; Cimo, Giuseppe; Duev, Dmitry; Bocanegra, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    Observations of planetary spacecraft radio signals within the solar system give a unique opportunity to study the temporal and spatial behaviour of the signal's phase fluctuations caused by its propagation through the interplanetary plasma and the Earth's ionosphere. The phase scintillation of the telemetry signal of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Venus Express (VEX) and Mars Express (MEX) spacecraft was observed at X-band with a number of radio telescopes of the European VLBI Network (EVN) in the period 2008-15, within the scope of Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) project. It was found that the phase scintillation spectra follow a Kolmogorov distribution with nearly constant spectral index of -2.42 for a full range of Venus orbital phases, from superior to inferior conjunctions and back. The solar wind plasma dominates the scintillation index and Doppler noise along the orbit from superior conjunction to the greatest elongation. Here, I will present the latest results of these observations, while approaching the inferior conjunction, where the Earth ionosphere starts to dominate, and also at the superior conjunction. Empirical coefficients for both contributions were estimated and compared for VEX and MEX.

  19. Observations of Heliospheric Faraday Rotation (FR) and Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) with the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR): Steps Towards Improving Space-Weather Forecasting Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, M. M.; Fallows, R. A.; Sobey, C.; Eftekhari, T.; Jensen, E. A.; Jackson, B. V.; Yu, H. S.; Hick, P. P.; Odstrcil, D.; Tokumaru, M.

    2015-12-01

    The phenomenon of space weather - analogous to terrestrial weather which describes the changing pressure, temperature, wind, and humidity conditions on Earth - is essentially a description of the changes in velocity, density, magnetic field, high-energy particles, and radiation in the near-Earth space environment including the effects of such changes on the Earth's magnetosphere, radiation belts, ionosphere, and thermosphere. Space weather can be considered to have two main strands: (i) scientific research, and (ii) applications. The former is self-explanatory, but the latter covers operational aspects which includes its forecasting. Understanding and forecasting space weather in the near-Earth environment is vitally important to protecting our modern-day reliance (militarily and commercially) on satellites, global-communication and navigation networks, high-altitude air travel (radiation concerns particularly on polar routes), long-distance power/oil/gas lines and piping, and for any future human exploration of space to list but a few. Two ground-based radio-observing remote-sensing techniques that can aid our understanding and forecasting of heliospheric space weather are those of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) and heliospheric Faraday rotation (FR). The LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) is a next-generation 'software' radio telescope centered in The Netherlands with international stations spread across central and northwest Europe. For several years, scientific observations of IPS on LOFAR have been undertaken on a campaign basis and the experiment is now well developed. More recently, LOFAR has been used to attempt scientific heliospheric FR observations aimed at remotely sensing the magnetic field of the plasma traversing the inner heliosphere. We present our latest progress using these two radio heliospheric-imaging remote-sensing techniques including the use of three-dimensional (3-D) modeling and reconstruction techniques using other, additional data as input

  20. Using Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) For Space-Weather Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, M. M.; Jackson, B. V.; Fallows, R. A.; Tokumaru, M.; Jensen, E. A.; Lee, J.; Harrison, R.; Hapgood, M. A.; Wu, C.; Davies, J.

    2013-12-01

    There have been several recent space-weather events where few or no signatures of an impending Earth-affecting large-scale heliospheric structure have been detected until the structure has impacted the Earth's space environment or is at least in close proximity. In addition, some of these (for example, the late-May/early-June 2013 geomagnetic storm) have been relatively-small coronal mass ejection (CME) ';like' structures complicated by stream-interaction and/or co-rotating features. Significant progress has been made over the last few years on the implementation of, and science resulting from, interplanetary scintillation (IPS) radio remote-sensing observations of the inner heliosphere. These observations of IPS have been undertaken using the European Incoherent SCATter (EISCAT) radar and the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) radio-telescope systems, as well as with the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL/STELab) IPS arrays and the new IPS system at the Korean Space Weather Center (KSWC). LOFAR is a low-frequency pathfinder for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which is expected to be the World's largest ever radio-telescope system. Here, we will primarily use the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) three-dimensional (3-D) tomography by incorporating STELab IPS data along with, where data are available, the use of additional targeted individual observations of IPS from other systems as well as 3-D MHD simulations. The overall aim is to try to ascertain how well current IPS methods can be used for space-weather forecasting (and aftcasting), particularly for events seemingly missed by other extant forecasting methods.

  1. Interplanetary scintillations of the radio source ensemble at the maximum of cycle 24 of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashei, I. V.; Shishov, V. I.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Subaev, I. A.

    2016-05-01

    The results of the interplanetary scintillation observations performed in the period of the maximum of solar activity from April 2013 to April 2014 on the BSA LPI radio telescope at the frequency 111MHz are presented. Fluctuations of the radio emission flux were recorded round the clock for all sources with a scintillating flux of more than 0.2 Jy falling in a strip of sky with a width of 50° over declinations corresponding to a 96-beam directional pattern of the radio telescope. The total number of sources observed during the day reaches 5000. The processing of the observational data was carried out on the assumption that a set of scintillating sources represents a homogeneous statistical ensemble. Daily two-dimensional maps of the distribution of the level of scintillations, whose analysis shows the strong nonstationarity and large-scale irregularity of the spatial distribution of solar wind parameters, were constructed. According to maps of the distribution of the level of scintillations averaged over monthly intervals, the global structure of the distribution of the solar wind was investigated in the period of the maximum of solar activity, which was found to be on the average close to spherically symmetric. The data show that on a spherically symmetric background an east-west asymmetry is observed, which indicates the presence of a large-scale structure of a spiral type in the solar wind.

  2. Remote sensing of interplanetary shocks using a scintillation method

    SciTech Connect

    Hewish, A.

    1987-05-01

    Energetic interplanetary disturbances originating at the Sun cause geomagnetic storms when they reach the Earth. The disturbances affect radio-communications, damage electrical power grid networks, increase the atmospheric density and drag on satellites, and are accompanied by showers of energetic particles which present radiation hazards to manned spacecraft. This paper describes a new ground-based method for locating and tracking transients in interplanetary space long before they reach the Earth. Continuous observations of transients during a two year period near support maximum have demonstrated the potential of the technique for predicting geomagnetic storms and given new information on the zones of the solar disk from which transients originate. The latter contradicts some widely held theories in solar-terrestrial physics and shows that a major revision of ideas is needed. Contrary to expectations, it has been found that open-magnetic field regions known as coronal holes are the dominant sources of the most powerful interplanetary shocks. This result conflicts with the solar flare theory of geomagnetic storms.

  3. Interplanetary phase scintillation and the search for very low frequency gravitational radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Woo, R.; Estabrook, F. B.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of radio-wave phase scintillation are reported which used the Viking spacecraft having an earth-spacecraft link very similar to that which will be used in very low-frequency (VLF) gravitational-wave searches. The phase power-spectrum level varies by seven orders of magnitude as the sun-earth-spacecraft (elongation) angle changes from 1 to 175 deg. It is noteworthy that a broad minimum in the S-band (2.3 GHz) phase fluctuation occurs in the antisolar direction; the corresponding fractional frequency stability (square root Allan variance) is about 3 x 10 to the -14th for 1000-s integration times. A simultaneous two-frequency two-station observation indicates that the contribution to the phase fluctuation from the ionosphere is significant but dominated by the contribution from the interplanetary medium. Nondispersive tropospheric scintillation was not detected (upper limit to fractional frequency stability about 5 x 10 to the -14th). Evidently, even observations in the antisolar direction will require higher radio frequencies, phase scintillation calibration, and correlation techniques in the data processing, for detection of gravitational bursts at the anticipated strain amplitude levels of no more than 10 to the -15th.

  4. Exploration of Solar Wind Acceleration Region Using Interplanetary Scintillation of Water Vapor Maser Source and Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Yamauchi, Yohei; Kondo, Tetsuro

    2001-01-01

    Single-station observations of interplanetary scintillation UPS) at three microwave frequencies 2, 8, and 22GHz, were carried out between 1989 and 1998 using a large (34-micro farad) radio telescope at the Kashima Space Research Center of the Communications Research Laboratory. The aim of these observations was to explore the near-sun solar wind, which is the key region for the study of the solar wind acceleration mechanism. Strong quasars, 3C279 and 3C273B, were used for the Kashima IPS observations at 2 and 8GHz, and a water-vapor maser source, IRC20431, was used for the IPS observations at 22GHz. Solar wind speeds derived from Kashima IPS data suggest that the solar wind acceleration takes place at radial distances between 10 and 30 solar radii (Rs) from the sun. The properties of the turbulence spectrum (e.g. anisotropy, spectral index, inner scale) inferred from the Kashima data were found to change systematically in the solar wind acceleration region. While the solar wind in the maximum phase appears to be dominated by the slow wind, fast and rarefied winds associated with the coronal holes were found to develop significantly at high latitudes as the solar activity declined. Nevertheless, the Kashima data suggests that the location of the acceleration region is stable throughout the solar cycle.

  5. Exploration of Solar Wind Acceleration Region Using Interplanetary Scintillation of Water Vapor Maser Source and Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Yamauchi, Yohei; Kondo, Tetsuro

    2001-01-01

    Single-station observations of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) at three microwave frequencies; 2 GHz, 8 GHz and 22 GHz have been carried out between 1989 and 1998 using a large (34 m farad) radio telescope at the Kashima Space Research Center of the Communications Research Laboratory. The aim of these observations is to explore the near-sun solar wind, which is the key region for the study of the solar wind acceleration mechanism. Strong quasars; 3C279 and 3C273B were used for Kashima IPS observations at 2 GHz and 8 GHz, and a water vapor maser source, IRC20431 was used for the IPS observations at 22 GHz. Solar wind velocities derived from Kashima IPS data suggest that the solar wind acceleration takes place at radial distances between 10 and 30 solar radii (R(sub s)) from the sun. Properties of the turbulence spectrum (e.g. anisotropy, spectral index, inner scale) inferred from Kashima data are found to change systematically in the solar wind acceleration region. While the solar wind in the maximum phase appears to be dominated by the slow wind, fast and rarefied winds associated with coronal holes are found to develop significantly at high latitudes as the solar activity declines. Nevertheless, Kashima data suggests that the location of the acceleration region is stable throughout the solar cycle.

  6. Interplanetary magnetic sector polarity inferred from polar geomagnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    In order to infer the interplanetary sector polarity from polar geomagnetic field diurnal variations, measurements were carried out at Godhavn and Thule (Denmark) Geomagnetic Observatories. The inferred interplanetary sector polarity was compared with the polarity observed at the same time by Explorer 33 and 35 magnetometers. It is shown that the polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field can be reliably inferred from observations of the polar cap geomagnetic fields.

  7. Interplanetary magnetic sector polarity inferred from polar geomagnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriss-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    With the use of a prediction technique it is shown that the polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field can be reliably inferred from observations of the polar geomagnetic field.

  8. Global Magnetospheric Response to an Interplanetary Shock: THEMIS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Hui; Sibeck, David G.; Zong, Q.-G.; McFadden, James P.; Larson, Davin; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the global response of geospace plasma environment to an interplanetary shock at approx. 0224 UT on May 28, 2008 from multiple THEMIS spacecraft observations in the magnetosheath (THEMIS B and C) and the mid-afternoon (THEMIS A) and dusk magnetosphere (THEMIS D and E). The interaction of the transmitted interplanetary shock with the magnetosphere has global effects. Consequently, it can affect geospace plasma significantly. After interacting with the bow shock, the interplanetary shock transmitted a fast shock and a discontinuity which propagated through the magnetosheath toward the Earth at speeds of 300 km/s and 137 km/s respectively. THEMIS A observations indicate that the plasmaspheric plume changed significantly by the interplanetary shock impact. The plasmaspheric plume density increased rapidly from 10 to 100/ cubic cm in 4 min and the ion distribution changed from isotropic to strongly anisotropic distribution. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves observed by THEMIS A are most likely excited by the anisotropic ion distributions caused by the interplanetary shock impact. To our best knowledge, this is the first direct observation of the plasmaspheric plume response to an interplanetary shock's impact. THEMIS A, but not D or E, observed a plasmaspheric plume in the dayside magnetosphere. Multiple spacecraft observations indicate that the dawn-side edge of the plasmaspheric plume was located between THEMIS A and D (or E).

  9. Spectral broadening and phase scintillation measurements using interplanetary spacecraft radio links during the peak of solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, David D.

    2009-12-01

    When an interplanetary spacecraft is in a solar superior conjunction configuration, the received radio signals are degraded by several effects that generally increase in magnitude as the angle between the spacecraft and the Sun (Sun-Earth-Probe or SEP angle) decreases as viewed by a terrestrial tracking station. During periods of quiescent solar activity, phase scintillation and spectral broadening follow well-defined trends as a function of solar impact distance (SEP angle) and link frequency. During active solar periods, the magnitudes of these effects increase above background levels predicted by the quiet period models. Several such events were observed during the solar superior conjunction of the Cassini spacecraft during the peak of solar cycle 23 in May 2000. Pronounced features in the spectral broadening data above the quiet background appear to be associated with Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), and last for extended periods of time ranging from ˜30 min to ˜4 h. These features are coincident with periods of increased activity seen in the region of the spacecraft signal source on coronal white light images, and tend to be related or matched with EIT flare events and possibly long-duration flare events seen in satellite X-ray data. Several such features were captured in the May 2000 Cassini solar conjunction phase scintillation and spectral broadening data at X band (8.4 GHz) and Ka band (32 GHz) radio frequencies, and are presented here. Such characterizations are beneficial in understanding the impact of such events in future interplanetary communication scenarios during solar conjunction periods.

  10. CME dynamics using coronagraph and interplanetary ejecta observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Lago, Alisson; Demítrio Gonzalez Alarcon, Walter; da Silva, Marlos; de Lucas, Aline; Braga, Carlos Roberto; Ramos Vieira, Lucas

    One of the key issues of Space Weather is the dynamics of coronal mass ejections, from their release from the Sun, their propagation throughout the interplanetary space, eventually im-pacting the earth and other planets. These impacts of CMEs are the most important drivers of space weather phenomena. A number of empirical and analytical studies have addressed this point so far, using observations from coronagraphs and interplanetary monitors, in order to correlate CMEs observed near the Sun and in situ (e.g. earth vincity). However, results are far from conclusive. Error bars in CME travel time predictions from the Sun to earth, are of the order of 1 day, which is considerably big for the typical time scale of 1 to 3 days of their travel time. After many years of intensive investigations of CMEs observed with the Large An-gle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO), abord the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), we found that the subset of interplanetary counterparts of CMEs, the ICMEs, with a well defined ejecta structure are those with best predictable behaviour. The prediction of these interplanetary ejecta travel time to earth, using coronagraph observations is the one with lowest error bar among other sets of events, such as interplanetary shock. We present a statistic study of all the CME-ejecta events observed by SOHO and by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite since 1997.

  11. Interplanetary dust and debris, as observed from the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. Chantal

    1994-06-01

    The visible trace of the interplanetary dust cloud, so-called the zodiacal light, has already been photographed from the Moon, more than twenty years ago (part 1). The interplanetary dust grains do not only scatter solar light; they produce a thermal emission in the near infrared domain; also they may impact the Earth and Moon system as they spiral towards the Sun (part 2). The main problems which can be anticipated for Moon based observations of faint astronomical sources are likely to be due to zodiacal light and zodiacal emission; the induced contamination would however be reduced by appropriate choices in the periods of observation (part 3).

  12. Multisatellite Observations of Interplanetary Field Enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Weimer, D. R.; Jian, L. K.; Lai, H. R.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2008-12-01

    Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs) are magnetic structures in the solar wind that have a cusp-shaped maximum in the field strength with a strong current sheet often near the central peak. These structures generally last an hour or more. They have a tendency to be seen more often at specific ecliptic longitudes, have been identified on occasion with particular small solar system bodies (asteroid 2201 Oljato and comet 122P/ De Vico) and attributed to the interaction of the solar wind with charged dust. On occasion they are detected nearly simultaneously by several spacecraft. Multispacecraft detection have been made with PVO, Venera-13 and Venera-14; with ISEE 1 and ISEE 3 and more recently with STEREO A and B, ACE and Wind. In this paper we use a delay matching algorithm developed by D. Weimer on the IFE of December 24, 2006 detected by 4 spacecraft. While the IFE is crossing the four spacecraft separated in Y by 90 Re and in X by 160 Re the measured delay was close to the calculated advection time. Along the apparent center line of the event the delay was close to 4 minutes. This event together with previous events are consistent with IFEs being magnetic structures that are convecting outward from the Sun with nearly, but slightly slower than, the solar wind velocity. We need to understand the occurrence rate of such structures and their physical cause because if this hypothesis is true, they may be responsible for accelerating dust out of the inner solar system.

  13. Scintillation Hole Observed by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shih Ping; Yenq Liu, Jann; Krishnanunni Rajesh, Panthalingal

    2013-04-01

    Ionospheric scintillations can significantly disturb satellite positioning, navigation, and communication. FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC provides the first 3-D global observation by solo instrument (radio occultation experiment, GOX). The GPS L-band amplitude fluctuation from 50Hz signal is received and recorded by F3/C GOX to calculate S4-index from 50-800km altitude. The global F3/C S4 index are subdivided and examined in various latitudes, longitudes, altitudes, and seasons during 2007-2012. The F-region scintillations in the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere start around post-sunset period and often persist till post-midnight hours (0300 MLT, magnetic local time) during the March and September equinox as well as December Solstice seasons. The E-region scintillations reveal a clear solar zenith effect and yield pronounced intensities in mid-latitudes during the Summer Solstice seasons, which are well correlated with occurrences of the sporadic E-layer. It is interesting to find there is no scintillation, which is termed "scintillation hole", in the E region ranging from 80 to 130km altitude over the South Africa region, and become the most pronounced in November-January (December Solstice seasons or summer months). Other space-borne and ground based observations are use to confirm the existence of the scintillation hole.

  14. Energetic Particle Pressure at Interplanetary Shocks: STEREO-A Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lario, D.; Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C.; Viñas, A.-F.

    2015-11-01

    We study periods of elevated energetic particle intensities observed by STEREO-A when the partial pressure exerted by energetic (≥83 keV) protons (PEP) is larger than the pressure exerted by the interplanetary magnetic field (PB). In the majority of cases, these periods are associated with the passage of interplanetary shocks. Periods when PEP exceeds PB by more than one order of magnitude are observed in the upstream region of fast interplanetary shocks where depressed magnetic field regions coincide with increases of energetic particle intensities. When solar wind parameters are available, PEP also exceeds the pressure exerted by the solar wind thermal population (PTH). Prolonged periods (>12 hr) with both PEP > PB and PEP > PTH may also occur when energetic particles accelerated by an approaching shock encounter a region well upstream of the shock characterized by low magnetic field magnitude and tenuous solar wind density. Quasi-exponential increases of the sum PSUM = PB + PTH + PEP are observed in the immediate upstream region of the shocks regardless of individual changes in PEP, PB, and PTH, indicating a coupling between PEP and the pressure of the background medium characterized by PB and PTH. The quasi-exponential increase of PSUM implies a radial gradient ∂PSUM/∂r > 0 that is quasi-stationary in the shock frame and results in an outward force applied to the plasma upstream of the shock. This force can be maintained by the mobile energetic particles streaming upstream of the shocks that, in the most intense events, drive electric currents able to generate diamagnetic cavities and depressed solar wind density regions.

  15. Helium at Interplanetary Discontinuities: ACE STEREO Observations and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Allegrini, F.; Desai, M.; Klecker, B.; Popecki, M.; Farrugia, C.; Galvin, A.; Bochsler, P.; Karrer, R.; Opitz, A.; Simunac, K.

    2007-12-01

    ACE/SEPICA observations showed that, on average, energetic He+ is after H+ and He2+ the third most abundant energetic particle species in the heliosphere. Depending on the type of the energetic population the He+/He2+ ratio can reach unusually high values in the energy range 250 - 800keV/n ratios up to unity. As a major source of energetic He+ interplanetary pickup ions have been identified that are preferentially accelerated at co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs), transient interaction regions (TIRs), and interplanetary traveling shocks. Most recent data from STEREO/PLASTIC in the energy range of 0.2-80keV/Q show clear evidence of abundant He+ at interplanetary discontinuities. Thus PLASTIC extends the energy range into injection region of the source. Furthermore, ACE/ULEIS and ACE/SEPICA measurements showed that very often 3He2+ and He+ are also accelerated simultaneously at CME-driven IP shocks. This is surprising because, these to species originate from different sources. However, this may indicate that the injection, or the acceleration efficiency of the accelerator for different source population may be similar. From observations, however, this cannot be differentiated easily. In numerical simulations this can be done because there is control over species and distribution functions. In a numerical study we applied test particle simulations and multi-dimensional hybrid simulations to address the contribution of source, injection and acceleration efficiency at shocks to the variability of the helium ratio. These, simulations with and without superimposed turbulence in the shock region will be compared with observations.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections and STEREO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odstrcil, D.

    2009-05-01

    Since numerical simulation of solar eruptions is still in research phase various empirically-based techniques have been developed for predicting arrivals of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at the Earth. These techniques take advantage of remote observations of CMEs in coronagraphs, fit their geometric and kinematic properties, and apply kinematic or numerical model to predict heliospheric propagation and evolution. Due to limited remote and in-situ observations, simple geometric structures have been assumed so far and the validation of such predictions has been limited. We use the 3-D numerical heliospheric code ENLIL to simulate propagation of well-observed interplanetary CMEs in 2007 and 2008. This heliospheric code uses the MAS or WSA coronal model for computing the structured background solar wind and the so-called CME cone model for specification of the geometric and kinematic parameters of the hydrodynamic transient disturbances. We use the ACE, MESSENGER, and STEREO in-situ observations to constrain the model predictions. We found that "traditional" approaches based on simple cone models over-predicts disturbances at those spacecraft. New geometric models of CMEs are clearly needed and we have incorporated rope-like hydrodynamic structure. We present result achieved by launching the cone-like and rope-like structures and compare the heliospheric predictions with the multi-spacecraft in-situ observations.

  17. Interplanetary flux enhancements - Comparison with cometary models and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Phillips, J. L.; Luhmann, J. G.; Fedder, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Interplanetary field enhancements (IFE's) are unusual nearly symmetric increases in the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field lasting tens of minutes to hours. Examples of interplanetary field enhancements are compared with MHD models and with the data obtained by the ICE spacecraft at Giacobini-Zinner. These comparisons suggest that the varying properties of IFE's are due to the fact that some events are due to passages in front of the nucleus, others in the near tail and yet others in the distant tail.

  18. Observations of Electromagnetic Whistler Precursors at Supercritical Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Koval, A.; Szabo, Adam; Breneman, A.; Cattell, C. A.; Goetz, K.; Kellogg, P. J.; Kersten, K.; Kasper, J. C.; Maruca, B. A.; Pulupa, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of electromagnetic precursor waves, identified as whistler mode waves, at supercritical interplanetary shocks using the Wind search coil magnetometer. The precursors propagate obliquely with respect to the local magnetic field, shock normal vector, solar wind velocity, and they are not phase standing structures. All are right-hand polarized with respect to the magnetic field (spacecraft frame), and all but one are right-hand polarized with respect to the shock normal vector in the normal incidence frame. They have rest frame frequencies f(sub ci) < f much < f(sub ce) and wave numbers 0.02 approx < k rho (sub ce) approx <. 5.0. Particle distributions show signatures of specularly reflected gyrating ions, which may be a source of free energy for the observed modes. In one event, we simultaneously observe perpendicular ion heating and parallel electron acceleration, consistent with wave heating/acceleration due to these waves. Al though the precursors can have delta B/B(sub o) as large as 2, fluxgate magnetometer measurements show relatively laminar shock transitions in three of the four events.

  19. Dual Observations of Interplanetary Shocks Associated with Stream Interaction Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Jian, L.; Ramirez Velez, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the characteristics of 10 interplanetary (IP) shocks associated with stream interaction regions (SIRs) observed by both STEREO-A and STEREO-B spacecraft during the years 2007-2008. IP shocks are responsible for several processes that modify the plasma ahead and behind them. As they propagate, IP shocks encounter solar wind with different characteristics (density, velocity) and different orientations of ambient magnetic field. Thus, it is interesting to compare dual observations of SIRs to identify changes in shock structure, strength, and orientation from two different spacecraft. We find that STEREO-A observed shocks with theta_bn ranging in the interval ~45 to ~80 degrees. In contrast, at STEREO-B the same shock fronts have a range of theta_bn between ~19 and ~80 degrees. The shock Mach numbers were similar in both observations, with values in the interval ~1.1 to ~2.2. The magnetic field jump values were also similar in the shocks observed by both spacecraft (~1.1 to ~2.25). Plasma beta values were larger in the shocks observed by STEREO-B than those observed by STEREO-A. The difference observed in shock parameters translate into different shock structure at the two spacecraft locations, and different extensions on the associated foreshocks in the upstream region. We study wave characteristics upstream and downstream of shocks in order to relate Mach number and theta_bn values with the kind of waves generated in these regions. We also determine the extension of the foreshock region.

  20. Coronal and interplanetary propagation, interplanetary acceleration, cosmic-ray observations by deep space network and anomalous component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose is to provide an overview of the contributions presented in sessions SH3, SH1.5, SH4.6 and SH4.7 of the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference. These contributed papers indicate that steady progress continues to be made in both the observational and the theoretical aspects of the transport and acceleration of energetic charged particles in the heliosphere. Studies of solar and interplanetary particles have placed emphasis on particle directional distributions in relation to pitch-angle scattering and magnetic focusing, on the rigidity and spatial dependence of the mean free path, and on new propagation regimes in the inner and outer heliosphere. Coronal propagation appears in need of correlative multi-spacecraft studies in association with detailed observation of the flare process and coronal magnetic structures. Interplanetary acceleration has now gone into a consolidation phase, with theories being worked out in detail and checked against observation.

  1. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Observed by MESSENGER and Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, S. W.; Forsyth, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed by the MESSENGER and Venus Express spacecraft have been catalogued and analysed. The ICMEs were identified by a relatively smooth rotation of the magnetic field direction consistent with a flux rope structure, coinciding with a relatively enhanced magnetic field strength. A total of 35 ICMEs were found in the surveyed MESSENGER data (primarily from March 2007 to April 2012), and 84 ICMEs in the surveyed Venus Express data (from May 2006 to December 2013). The ICME flux rope configurations have been determined. Ropes with northward leading edges were about four times more common than ropes with southward leading edges, in agreement with a previously established solar cycle dependence. Ropes with low inclinations to the solar equatorial plane were about four times more common than ropes with high inclinations, possibly an observational effect. Left- and right-handed ropes were observed in almost equal numbers. In addition, data from MESSENGER, Venus Express, STEREO-A, STEREO-B and ACE were examined for multipoint signatures of the catalogued ICMEs. For spacecraft separations below 15° in heliocentric longitude, the second spacecraft observed the ICME flux rope in 82 % of cases; this percentage dropped to 49 % for separations between 15 and 30°, to 18 % for separations between 30 and 45°, and to 12 % for separations between 45 and 60°. As the spacecraft separation increased, it became increasingly likely that only the sheath and not the flux rope of the ICME was observed, in agreement with the notion that ICME flux ropes are smaller in longitudinal extent than the shocks or discontinuities that they often drive. Furthermore, this study has identified 23 ICMEs observed by pairs of spacecraft close to radial alignment. A detailed analysis of these events could lead to a better understanding of how ICMEs evolve during propagation.

  2. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections from MESSENGER Orbital Observations at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, R. M.; Lugaz, N.; Philpott, L. C.; Schwadron, N.; Farrugia, C. J.; Anderson, B. J.; Smith, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    We use observations from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, in orbit around Mercury, to investigate interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) near 0.3 AU. MESSENGER, the first spacecraft since the 1980s to make in-situ measurements at distances < 0.5 AU, presents a unique opportunity for observing the innermost heliosphere. It also allows studies of ICME evolution as they expand and propagate outward, interacting with the solar wind. In order to catalog ICME events observed by MESSENGER, we design a strict set of selection criteria to identify them based on magnetic field observations only, since reliable solar wind plasma observations are not available from MESSENGER. We identify 61 ICME events observed by the MESSENGER Magnetometer between 2011 and 2014, and present statistical analyses of ICME properties at Mercury. In addition, using existing datasets of ICMEs at 1 AU we investigate key ICME property changes from Mercury to 1 AU. We find good agreement with previous studies for the magnetic field strength dependence on heliospheric distance, r. We have also established three different lines of evidence that ICME deceleration continues beyond the orbit of Mercury: 1) we find a shallow decrease with distance of ˜r-0.45 for the ICME shock speed from Mercury to 1 AU, 2) the average transit speed from the Sun to Mercury for ICMEs in our catalog is ˜20% faster than the average speed from the Sun to 1 AU, 3) the ICME transit time to 1 AU has a weaker dependence on the CME initial coronagraphic speed, as compared to what we predict based on our MESSENGER ICME catalog. Based on our results, future ICME propagation studies should account for ICME speed changes beyond Mercury's heliocentric distances to improve ICME arrival time forecasting. Our ICME database will also prove particularly useful for multipoint spacecraft studies of recent ICMEs, as well as for model validation of ICME properties.

  3. New observations of the low frequency interplanetary radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Recent Voyager 1 observations reveal reoccurrences of the low frequency interplanetary radio emissions. Three of the new events are weak transient events which rise in frequency from the range of 2-2.5 kHz to about 3 kHz with drift rates of approximately 1.5 kHz/year. The first of the transient events begins in mid-1989 and the more recent pair of events both were first detected in late 1991. In addition, there is an apparent onset of a 2-kHz component of the emission beginning near day 70 of 1991. The new transient emissions are barely detectable on Voyager 1 and are below the threshold of detectability on Voyager 2, which is less sensitive than Voyager 1. The new activity provides new opportunities to test various theories of the triggering, generation, and propagation of the outer heliospheric radio emissions and may signal a response of the source of the radio emissions to the increased solar activity associated with the recent peak in the solar cycle.

  4. Foreshocks ahead of interplanetary shocks observed by STEREO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cano, Xochitl; Kajdic, Primoz; Russell, Christopher T.; Jian, Lan K.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, Ernesto

    2015-04-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks can be driven in the solar wind by coronal mass ejections and stream interactions. Shocks can perturb large extensions of the heliosphere. In this work we study shocks observed by STEREO during the years 2007-2014. During this period IP shocks had Mach numbers MMs ~1.1-4, and the majority were quasi-perpendicular (θBn > 45° ) at the time of spacecraft crossing. We analyze wave properties in the foreshock regions that preced the shocks. We find that when the shock is very oblique with angle θBn > 60° a short region of the upstream side is permeated by whistler waves with frequency f~ 1 Hz. For some less oblique shocks (60° > θBn > 45° ), whistlers appear close to the shocks, and wave spectra show two extra peaks, with frequencies f~10-1, 10-2 Hz. The origin of these two wave components may be explained in terms of whistlers propagating from adjacent regions of the shock, or by local instabilities. When the shock is quasi-parallel (θBn

  5. Multispacecraft Observations of Interplanetary Shocks Associated with Stream Interaction Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Rodriguez, Ernesto; Blanco-Cano, Xochitl; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Jian, Lan; Ramirez Velez, Julio

    We investigate the characteristics of 10 interplanetary (IP) shocks associated with stream inter-action regions (SIRs) observed by both STEREO-A and STEREO-B spacecraft during the years 2007-2008. IP shocks are responsible for several processes that modify the plasma ahead and behind them. As they propagate, IP shocks encounter solar wind with different characteristics (density, velocity) and different orientations of ambient magnetic field. Thus, it is interesting to compare dual observations of SIRs to identify changes in shock structure, strength, and orientation from two different spacecraft. We find that STEREO-A observed shocks with ΘBn ranging in the interval ˜45 to ˜80 degrees. In contrast, at STEREO-B the same shock fronts have a range of ΘBn between ˜19 and ˜80 degrees. The shock Mach numbers were similar in both observations, with values in the interval ˜1.1 to ˜2.2. The magnetic field jump values were similar in the shocks observed by both spacecraft (˜1.1 to ˜2.25). Plasma beta values were larger in the shocks observed by STEREO-B than those observed by STEREO-A. We ex-plore the difference of beta values at STEREO-A and STEREO-B by analyzing the behaviour of beta and used parameters such as magnetic field, temperature and density as a function of the distance from the Sun. In the same way, we relate shock structure and its parameters as a function of beta. It may be that even as the SIR structure corotates, the shock may form, weaken, and reform constantly. This may be because the conditions for the shock to form are marginal at 1 AU. Hence, we compare magnetic field observations of ACE spacecraft with STEREO observations in order to get some insight about this possibility. Finally, we study wave characteristics upstream and downstream of shocks in order to relate Mach number and ΘBn values to the type of waves generated in these regions.

  6. A study of GPS ionospheric scintillations observed at Guilin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yuhua; Wang, Dongli

    2009-12-01

    The occurrence of strong ionospheric scintillations with S4>=0.2 was studied using global positioning system (GPS) measurements at Guilin (25.29°N, 110.33°E; geomagnetic: 15.04°N, 181.98°E), a station located near the northern crest of equatorial anomaly in China. The results are presented for data collected from January 2007 to December 2008. The results show that amplitude scintillations occurred only during the first five months of the considered years. Nighttime amplitude scintillations, observed mainly in the south of Guilin, always occurred with phase scintillations, total electron content (TEC) depletions, and Rate Of change of TEC (ROT) fluctuations. However, TEC depletions and ROT fluctuations were weak during daytime amplitude scintillations, and daytime amplitude scintillations usually occurred in most of the azimuth directions. GPS scintillation/TEC observations recorded at Guilin and signal-to-noise-ratio measurements obtained from GPS-COSMIC radio occultation indicate that nighttime and daytime scintillations are very likely caused by ionospheric F region irregularities and sporadic E, respectively.

  7. Observations of interactions between interplanetary and geomagnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Magnetospheric effects associated with variations of the north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field are examined in light of recent recent experimental and theoretical results. Although the occurrence of magnetospheric substorms is statistically related to periods of southward interplanetary magnetic field, the details of the interaction are not understood. In particular, attempts to separate effects resulting directly from the interaction between the interplanetary and geomagnetic fields from those associated with substorms have produced conflicting results. The transfer of magnetic flux from the dayside to the nightside magnetosphere is evidenced by equatorward motion of the polar cusp and increases of the magnetic energy density in the lobes of the geomagnetic tail. The formation of a macroscopic X-type neutral line at tail distances less than 35 R sub E appears to be a substorm phenomenon.

  8. Modeling Spectral Turnovers in Interplanetary Shocks Observed by ULYSSES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summerlin, E. J.; Baring, M. G.

    2009-12-01

    Interplanetary shocks in the heliosphere provide excellent test cases for the simulation and theory of particle acceleration at shocks thanks to the presence of in-situ measurements and a relatively well understood initial particle distribution. The Monte-Carlo test particle simulation employed in this work has been previously used to study injection and acceleration from thermal energies into the high energy power-law tail at co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the heliosphere presuming a steady state planar shock (Summerlin & Baring, 2006, Baring and Summerlin, 2008). These simulated power-spectra compare favorably with in-situ measurements from the ULYSSES spacecraft below 60 keV. However, to effectively model the high energy exponential cutoff at energies above 60 keV observed in these distributions, simulations must apply spatial or temporal constraints to the acceleration process. This work studies the effects of a variety of temporal and spatial co! nstraints (including spatial constraints on the turbulent region around the shock as determined by magnetometer data, spatial constraints related to the scale size of the shock and constraints on the acceleration time based on the known limits for the shock's lifetime) on the high energy cut-off and compares simulated particle spectra to those observed by the ULYSSES HI-SCALE instrument in an effort to determine which constraint is creating the cut-off and using that constraining parameter to determine additional information about the shock that can not, normally, be determined by a single data point, such as the spatial extent of the shock or how long the shock has been propagating through the heliosphere before it encounters the spacecraft. Shocks observed by multiple spacecraft will be of particular interest as their parameters will be better constrained than shocks observed by only one spacecraft. To achieve these goals, the simulation will be modified to include the re! trodictive approach of Jones

  9. Broadband meter-wavelength observations of ionospheric scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, R. A.; Coles, W. A.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Vierinen, J.; Virtanen, I. I.; Postila, M.; Ulich, Th.; Enell, C.-F.; Kero, A.; Iinatti, T.; Lehtinen, M.; Orispää, M.; Raita, T.; Roininen, L.; Turunen, E.; Brentjens, M.; Ebbendorf, N.; Gerbers, M.; Grit, T.; Gruppen, P.; Meulman, H.; Norden, M. J.; de Reijer, J.-P.; Schoenmakers, A.; Stuurwold, K.

    2014-12-01

    Intensity scintillations of cosmic radio sources are used to study astrophysical plasmas like the ionosphere, the solar wind, and the interstellar medium. Normally, these observations are relatively narrow band. With Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) technology at the Kilpisjärvi Atmospheric Imaging Receiver Array (KAIRA) station in northern Finland we have observed scintillations over a three-octave bandwidth. "Parabolic arcs," which were discovered in interstellar scintillations of pulsars, can provide precise estimates of the distance and velocity of the scattering plasma. Here we report the first observations of such arcs in the ionosphere and the first broadband observations of arcs anywhere, raising hopes that study of the phenomenon may similarly improve the analysis of ionospheric scintillations. These observations were made of the strong natural radio source Cygnus-A and covered the entire 30-250 MHz band of KAIRA. Well-defined parabolic arcs were seen early in the observations, before transit, and disappeared after transit although scintillations continued to be obvious during the entire observation. We show that this can be attributed to the structure of Cygnus-A. Initial results from modeling these scintillation arcs are consistent with simultaneous ionospheric soundings taken with other instruments and indicate that scattering is most likely to be associated more with the topside ionosphere than the F region peak altitude. Further modeling and possible extension to interferometric observations, using international LOFAR stations, are discussed.

  10. Regional Arctic observations of TEC gradients and scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durgonics, Tibor; Høeg, Per; Benzon, Hans-Henrik

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, there has been growing scientific interest in Arctic ionospheric properties and variations. However our understanding of the fundamental ionospheric processes present in this area is still incomplete. GNSS networks present in Greenland today make it possible to acquire near-real time observations of the state and variations of the high-latitude ionosphere. This data can be employed to obtain relevant geophysical variables and statistics. In our study GPS-derived total electron content (TEC) measurements have been complemented with amplitude scintillation indices (S4), and phase scintillation indices (σφ). The investigation of the relationship between these geophysical variables will likely lead to new ways to study the underlying physical processes and to build tools for monitoring and predicting large-scale patterns in Arctic TEC and scintillations. A number of specific ionosphere events will be presented and the underlying geophysical process will be identified and described. In particular, results will be presented where large-scale gradients in the regional TEC are compared with the growth of scintillations. The statistics of the scintillations will be investigated, with emphasis on how well the scintillations follow the Nakagami-m distribution. The spectra of both the intensities and phase will be calculated, and the corner frequency of these spectra will also be determined. These corner frequencies will be used to compute a number of important geophysical and ionospheric parameters. Furthermore, we will discuss how the spectral characteristics of the scintillations during large TEC gradients vary, and how values of the power spectra slopes change during increasing scintillations. These values will be validated against values found in prior studies. TEC and scintillation time-series and maps will also be presented over the Greenlandic region. We will show how the expansion of the auroral oval during geomagnetic storms can be detected from

  11. 3D Reconstruction of Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) Remote-Sensing Data: Global Solar Wind Boundaries for Driving 3D-MHD Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.-S.; Jackson, B. V.; Hick, P. P.; Buffington, A.; Odstrcil, D.; Wu, C.-C.; Davies, J. A.; Bisi, M. M.; Tokumaru, M.

    2015-09-01

    The University of California, San Diego, time-dependent analyses of the heliosphere provide three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of solar wind velocities and densities from observations of interplanetary scintillation (IPS). Using data from the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Japan, these reconstructions provide a real-time prediction of the global solar-wind density and velocity throughout the whole heliosphere with a temporal cadence of about one day (ips.ucsd.edu). Updates to this modeling effort continue: in the present article, near-Sun results extracted from the time-dependent 3D reconstruction are used as inner boundary conditions to drive 3D-MHD models ( e.g. ENLIL and H3D-MHD). This allows us to explore the differences between the IPS kinematic-model data-fitting procedure and current 3D-MHD modeling techniques. The differences in these techniques provide interesting insights into the physical principles governing the expulsion of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Here we detail for the first time several specific CMEs and an induced shock that occurred in September 2011 that demonstrate some of the issues resulting from these analyses.

  12. An auroral scintillation observation using precise, collocated GPS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, T. W.; Harris, R. B.; York, J. A.; Herbster, C. S.; Minter, C. F., III; Hampton, D. L.

    2011-02-01

    On 10 January 2009, an unusual ionospheric scintillation event was observed by a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver station in Fairbanks, Alaska. The receiver station is part of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency's (NGA) Monitoring Station Network (MSN). Each MSN station runs two identical geodetic-grade, dual-frequency, full-code tracking GPS receivers that share a common antenna. At the Fairbanks station, a third separate receiver with a separate antenna is located nearby. During the 10 January event, ionospheric conditions caused two of the receivers to loose lock on a single satellite. The third receiver tracked through the scintillation. The region of scintillation was collocated with an auroral arc and a slant total electron content (TEC) increase of 5.71 TECu (TECu = 1016/m2). The response of the full-code tracking receivers to the scintillation is intriguing. One of these receivers lost lock, but the other receiver did not. This fact argues that a receiver's internal state dictates its reaction to scintillation. Additionally, the scintillation only affected the L2 signal. While this causes the L1 signal to be lost on the semicodelessly receiver, the full-code tracking receiver only lost the L1 signal when the receiver attempted to reacquire the satellite link.

  13. Signatures of solar wind latitudinal structure in interplanetary Lyman-alpha emissions - Mariner 10 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, S.; Broadfoot, A. L.

    1979-01-01

    A detailed analysis is conducted which shows that signatures in the interplanetary Lyman-alpha emissions observed in three different data sets from Mariner 10 (corresponding to different locations of the spacecraft) provide firm evidence that the intensity departures are correlated with a decrease in solar wind flux with increasing latitude. It is suggested that observations of the interplanetary emission can be used to monitor average solar wind activity at high latitudes. The asymmetry in the solar radiation field as a source of observed departures in L-alpha data is considered and attention is given to the interstellar hydrogen and helium density.

  14. Multi-Spacecraft Observations of Interplanetary Shock Accelerated Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, G. C.; Lario, D.; Decker, R. B.; Desai, M. I.; Hu, Q.; Kasper, J.

    2006-01-01

    We use simultaneous measurements from the Wind and ACE spacecraft to determine the spatial properties of both interplanetary (IP) shocks and the shock-associated energetic particle events. We combine plasma, magnetic field and energetic particle data from ACE and Wind for 124 energetic storm particle (ESP) events from 1998 to 2003 and examine the spatial and temporal variations of these events in the Earth's vicinity. We find that even though the two spacecraft were occasionally separated by more than 400 RE, the plasma, field, and energetic particle time-intensity profiles during the events were very similar. In addition, we find that the ion composition and energy spectra in individual IP shock events are identical at the two spacecraft locations. We also use the fitted shock velocity along the normal from ACE and estimate the shock transit time to Wind location. In general, there is poor agreement between the estimated transit time and the actual measured transit time. Hence, our assumptions that a) the IP shock at 1 AU propagates radially, and/or b) the IP shock is spherically symmetric at 1 AU are not valid. In this paper, we will also study, for the first time, the anisotropy measurements of low-energy IP shock-associated ions at both ACE and Wind. We will then compare these new anisotropy analyses with locally measured shock parameters and identify possible signatures of different shock acceleration processes as predicted by the first-order Fermi and shock-drift models.

  15. Detection of interplanetary activity using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gothoskar, Pradeep; Khobragade, Shyam

    1995-12-01

    Early detection of interplanetary activity is important when attempting to associate, with better accuracy, interplanetary phenomena with solar activity and geomagnetic disturbances. However, for a large number of interplanetary observations to be done every day, extensive data analysis is required, leading to a delay in the detection of transient interplanetary activity. In particular, the interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations done with Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) need extensive human effort to reduce the data and to model, often subjectively, the scintillation power spectra. We have implemented an artificial neural network (ANN) to detect interplanetary activity using the power spectrum scintillation. The ANN was trained to detect the disturbed power spectra, used as an indicator of the interplanetary activity, and to recognize normal and strong scattering spectra from a large data base of IPS spectra. The coincidence efficiency of classification by the network compared with the experts' judgement to detect the normal, disturbed and strong scattering spectra was found to be greater than 80 per cent. The neural network, when applied during the IPS mapping programme to provide early indication of interplanetary activity, would significantly help the ongoing efforts to predict geomagnetic disturbances.

  16. Link between interplanetary & cometary dust: Polarimetric observations and space studies with Rosetta & Eye-Sat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Gaboriaud, Alain; Buil, Christian; Ressouche, Antoine; Lasue, J.; Palun, Adrien; Apper, Fabien; Elmaleh, Marc

    Intensity and linear polarization observations of the solar light scattered by interplanetary dust, the so-called zodiacal light, provide information on properties of the dust particles, such as their spatial density, local changes, morphology and albedo. Earth-based polarimetric observations, with a resolution of 5° or more, have been used to derive the polarization phase curve of interplanetary dust particles and to establish that the polarization at 90° phase angle increases with increasing solar distance, at least up to 1.5 au in the ecliptic, while the albedo decreases [1, 2]. Analysis of such studies will be revisited. Numerical simulations of the polarimetric behavior of interplanetary dust particles strongly suggest that, in the inner solar system, interplanetary dust particles consist of absorbing (e.g., organic compounds) and less absorbing (e.g., silicates) materials, that radial changes originate in a decrease of organics with decreasing solar distance (probably due to alteration processes), and that a significant fraction of the interplanetary dust is of cometary origin, in agreement with dynamical studies [3, 4]. The polarimetric behaviors of interplanetary dust and cometary dust particles seem to present striking similarities. The properties of cometary dust particles, as derived from remote polarimetric observations of comets including 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the target of the Rosetta rendezvous mission, at various wavelengths, will be summarized [5, 6]. The ground truth expected from Rosetta dust experiments, i.e., MIDAS, COSIMA, GIADA, about dust particles’ morphology, composition, and evolution (with distance to the nucleus before Philae release and with distance to the Sun before and after perihelion passage) over the year and a half of nominal mission, will be discussed. Finally, the Eye-Sat nanosatellite will be presented. This triple cubesat, developed by students from engineering schools working as interns at CNES, is to be launched

  17. Interplanetary Electric Field Control of Field-Aligned Currents: Polar Magnetometer Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, M.; Russell, C. T.

    2001-05-01

    ACE and Wind measurements of the solar wind velocity and interplanetary magnetic field have been used to calculate the interplanetary electric field during passages of the Polar spacecraft above the southern auroral oval. Periods of the quasi-steady interplanetary electric field have been identified when the Polar spacecraft was transiting the auroral and polar regions both just in front of the terminator above the lit ionosphere and just behind the terminator above the dark ionosphere. The east-west magnetic perturbation observed was then used as a measure of the local field-aligned current density and extrapolated to a common altitude. Independent of whether the interplanetary electric field (IEF) is from dawn to dusk or dusk to dawn a significant field-aligned current always exists. The magnitude of its perturbation field for dusk to dawn IEF is about 180 nT. For dawn to dusk IEF the magnetic perturbation is roughly proportional to the dawn-dusk component of the IEF. The strength of the field-aligned current does not depend on whether the ionosphere under the spacecraft is in sunlight or in darkness.

  18. Plasma wave phenomena observed at interplanetary shocks by the Ulysses URAP experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lengyel-Frey, D.; Macdowall, R. J.; Stone, R. G.; Hoang, S.; Pantellini, F.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a study of 24 interplanetary shocks observed by the Unified Radio and Plasma Wave Experiment (URAP) on the Ulysses spacecraft are presented. These shocks, observed between approximately 1 and 4 AU, display a variety of wave phenomena similar to those detected in earlier studies of shocks near 1 AU. The correspondence of the observed low frequency magnetic and electric field waves with the parallel index of refraction for whistler waves was investigated. Observed B/E ratios are found to be typically about a factor of 0.7 times the computed index of refraction, supporting the whistler interpretation of these waves, but also implying a prevalent electrostatic wave component which may be due to whistlers propagating at an angle to the interplanetary magnetic field. A statistical correlation of the amplitudes of the various types of waves with shock and solar wind properties is presented.

  19. Observation of Inertial Energy Cascade in Interplanetary Space Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Noullez, A.; Bruno, R.; Bavassano, B.

    2007-09-14

    Direct evidence for the presence of an inertial energy cascade, the most characteristic signature of hydromagnetic turbulence (MHD), is observed in the solar wind by the Ulysses spacecraft. After a brief rederivation of the equivalent of Yaglom's law for MHD turbulence, a linear relation is indeed observed for the scaling of mixed third-order structure functions involving Elsaesser variables. This experimental result firmly establishes the turbulent character of low-frequency velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind plasma.

  20. Observation of inertial energy cascade in interplanetary space plasma.

    PubMed

    Sorriso-Valvo, L; Marino, R; Carbone, V; Noullez, A; Lepreti, F; Veltri, P; Bruno, R; Bavassano, B; Pietropaolo, E

    2007-09-14

    Direct evidence for the presence of an inertial energy cascade, the most characteristic signature of hydromagnetic turbulence (MHD), is observed in the solar wind by the Ulysses spacecraft. After a brief rederivation of the equivalent of Yaglom's law for MHD turbulence, a linear relation is indeed observed for the scaling of mixed third-order structure functions involving Elsässer variables. This experimental result firmly establishes the turbulent character of low-frequency velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind plasma. PMID:17930445

  1. Comparison of inferred and observed interplanetary magnetic field polarities, 1970-1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. M.; Svalgaard, L.; Hedgecock, P. C.

    1975-01-01

    The inferred polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field at earth using polar observations of the geomagnetic field has been compared with spacecraft observations. A list published by Svalgaard (1974) of the inferred field polarities in the period from 1970 to 1972 is found to be correct on 82% of the days. A near real-time (same day) method of inferring the polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field using geomagnetic observations at Vostok and Thule is in use at the NOAA Space Environment Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado. During 1972, this method is found to be correct on 87% of the days. A list of 'well-defined' sector boundaries at earth from 1970 to 1972 is given.

  2. Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust Observed by the Wind/WAVES Electric Field Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malaspina, David; Horanyi, M.; Zaslavsky, A.; Goetz, K.; Wilson, L. B., III; Kersten, K.

    2014-01-01

    Observations of hypervelocity dust particles impacting the Wind spacecraft are reported here for the first time using data from the WindWAVES electric field instrument. A unique combination of rotating spacecraft, amplitude-triggered high-cadence waveform collection, and electric field antenna configuration allow the first direct determination of dust impact direction by any spacecraft using electric field data. Dust flux and impact direction data indicate that the observed dust is approximately micron-sized with both interplanetary and interstellar populations. Nanometer radius dust is not detected by Wind during times when nanometer dust is observed on the STEREO spacecraft and both spacecraft are in close proximity. Determined impact directions suggest that interplanetary dust detected by electric field instruments at 1 AU is dominated by particles on bound trajectories crossing Earths orbit, rather than dust with hyperbolic orbits.

  3. Observations of interplanetary energetic charged particles from gamma-ray line solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesses, M. E.; Gloeckler, G.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.

    1981-01-01

    Results from ISEE-3 experiments on interplanetary energetic charged particles on June 7, June 21, and July 1, 1980 dealing with gamma ray producing solar flares are reported. The data were gathered by the Ultra Low Energy Wide Angle Telescope, which comprises a thin window, flow through proportional counter/solid-state detector composition telescope. Evidence of a specified time delay from an observed flare and the recording of 0.44-1.3 MeV electrons on ISEE-3 combined with quiescent periods of at least two hours before the observations and recording provides a link between the events. The data indicates interplanetary energetic particle enhancement, and a second, similar set of occurrences was also observed. Protons were accelerated up to 10-20 MeV. No enrichment of either He-3 or Fe was found.

  4. Large-Amplitude Electrostatic Waves Observed at a Supercritical Interplanetary Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Cattell, C. A.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Kersten, K.; Kasper, J. C.; Szabo, A.; Wilber, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first observations at an interplanetary shock of large-amplitude (> 100 mV/m pk-pk) solitary waves and large-amplitude (approx.30 mV/m pk-pk) waves exhibiting characteristics consistent with electron Bernstein waves. The Bernstein-like waves show enhanced power at integer and half-integer harmonics of the cyclotron frequency with a broadened power spectrum at higher frequencies, consistent with the electron cyclotron drift instability. The Bernstein-like waves are obliquely polarized with respect to the magnetic field but parallel to the shock normal direction. Strong particle heating is observed in both the electrons and ions. The observed heating and waveforms are likely due to instabilities driven by the free energy provided by reflected ions at this supercritical interplanetary shock. These results offer new insights into collisionless shock dissipation and wave-particle interactions in the solar wind.

  5. Observation and Modeling of Ionospheric Scintillation Associated with Irregularities in the Polar Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshi, S.; Zhang, Q. H.; Ma, Y. Z.; Wang, Y.; Zanyang, X.

    2015-12-01

    It is well understood that Ionospheric scintillation is a consequence of random electron density fluctuations present in the ionosphere. They appear at all local time of the polar regions therefore, it is essential to understand their evolution and dynamics. Using Madrigal database and South Pole Scintillation Receiver data an empirical model of ionospheric scintillation has been proposed for South Pole. Model has been validated and compared with the observations. We have investigated some interesting scintillation patterns associated with polar patches and structured flux of precipitated electrons. Our results illustrate well the irregularity structures causing ionospheric scintillation at the polar ionosphere. Limitations of our modeling approach is discussed. Keywords: Ionospheric irregularities, polar patches, scintillation.

  6. Extreme ultraviolet photometer for observations of helium in interplanetary space.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, S; Freeman, J; Paresce, F; Lampton, M

    1977-03-01

    A four-channel photometer sensitive to two solar EUV lines which are resonantly scattered by helium gas was developed for flight on the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. Two channels observed the 58.4-nm line of He I and used helium gas resonant absorption cells to determine the intensities of the center and wings of that line. The other two channels observed the 30.4-nm line of He II. The instrument surveyed much of the celestial sphere during a series of slow rolling maneuvers by the Apollo spacecraft. The experiment operated properly, and usable data were obtained. Study of the distributions of flux seen, and of the ratio of 58.4-nm fluxes seen with gas cells full and empty, will refine current understanding of several poorly known properties of the local interstellar medium. Study of the 30.4-nm flux distribution will refine present knowledge of the structure of the earth's plasmasphere. PMID:20168575

  7. Multipoint observations of planar interplanetary magnetic field structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Lepping, R. P.; Dunlop, M. W.; Elliott, S.; Balogh, A.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Freeman, M. P.; Sibeck, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    IMF data made on November 1, 1984, by three spatially well-separated spacecraft in the solar wind are presented. The IMF measured by each of the spacecraft is found to consist of a multiplicity of structures within which the magnetic field varies in parallel planes. The orientations of these planes at the three spacecraft locations are similar. The planes are inclined at a large angle to the ecliptic, and they lie almost perpendicular to the nominal Parker spiral direction in the ecliptic. Intercomparisons of the measurements at the various spacecraft show that the IMF features at one spacecraft are clearly reproduced at another, with time delays required for signal propagation. From these time delays and the mutual separations of the spacecraft, it is inferred that the structures are convecting with the ambient flow. Simultaneous observations made downstream of the bow shock in the magnetosheath reveal that the magnetosheath magnetic field, too, is planar.

  8. Coronal Hole Influence on the Observed Structure of Interplanetary CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkelä, P.; Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Mohamed, A. A.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.

    2013-05-01

    We report on the coronal hole (CH) influence on the 54 magnetic cloud (MC) and non-MC associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) selected for studies during the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshops (CDAWs) focusing on the question if all CMEs are flux ropes. All selected CMEs originated from source regions located between longitudes 15E - 15W. Xie, Gopalswamy, and St. Cyr (2013, Solar Phys., doi:10.1007/s11207-012-0209-0) found that these MC and non-MC associated CMEs are on average deflected towards and away from the Sun-Earth line, respectively. We used a CH influence parameter (CHIP) that depends on the CH area, average magnetic field strength, and distance from the CME source region to describe the influence of all on-disk CHs on the erupting CME. We found that for CHIP values larger than 2.6 G the MC and non-MC events separate into two distinct groups where MCs (non-MCs) are deflected towards (away) from the disk center. Division into two groups was also observed when the distance to the nearest CH was less than 3.2×105 km. At CHIP values less than 2.6 G or at distances of the nearest CH larger than 3.2×105 km the deflection distributions of the MC and non-MCs started to overlap, indicating diminishing CH influence. These results give support to the idea that all CMEs are flux ropes, but those observed to be non-MCs at 1 AU could be deflected away from the Sun-Earth line by nearby CHs, making their flux rope structure unobservable at 1 AU.

  9. Electron dropout echoes induced by interplanetary shock: Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Y. X.; Zong, Q.-G.; Zhou, X.-Z.; Fu, S. Y.; Rankin, R.; Yuan, C.-J.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.

    2016-06-01

    On 23 November 2012, a sudden dropout of the relativistic electron flux was observed after an interplanetary shock arrival. The dropout peaks at ˜1 MeV and more than 80% of the electrons disappeared from the drift shell. Van Allen twin Probes observed a sharp electron flux dropout with clear energy dispersion signals. The repeating flux dropout and recovery signatures, or "dropout echoes", constitute a new phenomenon referred to as a "drifting electron dropout" with a limited initial spatial range. The azimuthal range of the dropout is estimated to be on the duskside, from ˜1300 to 0100 LT. We conclude that the shock-induced electron dropout is not caused by the magnetopause shadowing. The dropout and consequent echoes suggest that the radial migration of relativistic electrons is induced by the strong dusk-dawn asymmetric interplanetary shock compression on the magnetosphere.

  10. GPS Observations of Plasma Bubbles and Scintillations over Equatorial Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, C. S.; Valladares, C. E.; Semala, G. K.; Bridgwood, C. T.; Adeniyi, J.; Amaeshi, L. L.; Damtie, B.; D'Ujanga Mutonyi, F.; Ndeda, J. D.; Baki, P.; Obrou, O. K.; Okere, B.; Tsidu, G. M.

    2010-12-01

    Sponsored in part by the International Heliophysical Year (IHY) program, Boston College, Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), and several universities in Africa have collaborated to deploy a network of GPS receivers throughout equatorial Africa, a region which has been largely devoid of ground-based ionospheric monitoring instruments. High date-rate GPS receivers capable of measuring Total Electron Content (TEC) and GPS scintillations were installed at Abidjan, Ivory Coast (5.3°N, 4.0°W, dip 3.5°S); Addis Ababa (9.0°N, 38.8°E, dip 0.1°N ); Bahir Dar, Ethiopia (26.1°N, 50.6°E, dip 20.1°N); Cape Verde (16.6°S, 22.9°W, dip 4.9°N); Ilorin, Nigeria (8.4°S, 4.7°E, dip 1.9°S); Kampala, Uganda (0.3°S, 32.6°E, dip 9.2°S); Lagos, Nigeria (6.5°N, 3.4°E, dip 3.1°S); Nairobi, Kenya (1.3°S, 36.8°W, dip 10.7°S); Nsukka, Nigeria (6.8°S, 7.4°W, dip 3.0°S); and Zanzibar, Tanzania (6.2°S, 39.2°E, dip 15.9°S). In this paper we report on the longitudinal, local time and seasonal occurrence of plasma bubbles and L band scintillations over equatorial Africa in 2009 and 2010, as a first step toward establishing the climatology of ionospheric irregularities over Africa. The scintillation intensity is obtained by measuring the standard deviation of normalized GPS signal power. The plasma bubbles are detected using an automated technique, whereby the GPS TEC is detrended to remove the diurnal variation and excursions exceeding a particular threshold are extracted for further analysis. A harmonic analysis (FFT) of these extracted events is performed to exclude wavelike features indicative of gravity waves or traveling ionospheric disturbances, and the remaining events are identified as plasma bubbles. Our findings suggest that the occurrence of plasma bubbles and L band scintillations over Africa are well correlated, but that some discrepancies in their morphologies are evident. While plasma bubbles and scintillations are generally observed during equinoctial

  11. Multiple spacecraft observations of interplanetary shocks: Characteristics of the upstream ULF turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    All interplanetary shocks observed by ISEE-3 and either ISEE-1 or ISEE-2 or both in 1978 and 1979 are examined for evidence of upstream waves. In order to characterize the properties of these shocks it is necessary to determine accurate shock normals. An overdetermined set of equations were inverted to obtain shock normals, velocities and error estimates for all these shocks. Tests of the method indicate it is quite reliable. Using these normals the Mach number and angle were between the interplanetary magnetic field and the shock normal for each shock. The upstream waves were separated into two classes: whistler mode precursors which occur at low Mach numbers and upstream turbulence whose amplitude at Mach numbers greater than 1.5 is controlled by the angle of the field to the shock normal. The former waves are right hand circularly polarized and quite monochromatic. The latter waves are more linearly polarized and have a broadband featureless spectrum.

  12. Comparison Between Predictions & Observations of Induced Radioactive Background in Interplanetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, Clivea; Truscott, Peter; Evans, Howard; Evans, Larry; Trombka, Jacob

    1997-01-01

    Radioactivity induced in detector materials and their immediate surroundings is the major source of discrete-line, gamma-ray background and an important source of continuum background in the performance of remote-sensing, gamma-ray spectroscopy of planetary bodies. In interplanetary space the dominant sources of particles are cosmic rays and their secondaries arising from interactions with the spacecraft and the surface of the target body. In addition, certain future gamma-ray astronomy missions, such as INTEGRAL, are to be located so as to perform their observations in interplanetary space rather than in the traditional low earth orbits. Such location removes contributions from the earth's atmosphere and inner radiation belt at the expense of increased exposure to cosmic rays and solar particle events. Accurate prediction of the activation of key materials by cosmic rays is of the utmost importance for detector design and data interpretation.

  13. Low energy proton bidirectional anisotropies and their relation to transient interplanetary magnetic structures: ISEE-3 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, R. G.; Sanderson, T. R.; Wenzel, K. P.; Smith, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    It is known that the interplanetary medium in the period approaching solar maximum is characterized by an enhancement in the occurrence of transient solar wind streams and shocks and that such systems are often associated with looplike magnetic structures or clouds. There is observational evidence that bidirectional, field aligned flows of low energy particles could be a signature of such looplike structures, although detailed models for the magnetic field configuration and injection mechanisms do not exist at the current time. Preliminary results of a survey of low energy proton bidirectional anisotropies measured on ISEE-3 in the interplanetary medium between August 1978 and May 1982, together with magnetic field data from the same spacecraft are presented.

  14. New Horizons Cruise Observations of Lyman-α Emissions from the Interplanetary Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, G. Randall; Stern, S. Alan; Pryor, Wayne R.

    Initial results are presented for observations of interplanetary Lyman-α and Lyman-β emissions in the outer solar system obtained by the Alice ultraviolet spectrograph on the New Horizons spacecraft (the first new such data from outside the orbit of Saturn since the Voyager spacecraft). The observations consist of 6∘ ×360∘ great-circle swaths on the sky, centered on the ecliptic direction λ = 51. 3∘, β = 44. 8∘, which passes within ˜ 33∘ of the upstream and downstream directions of the interstellar wind. To date, three such scans have been acquired: on October 7, 2007, October 18, 2008, and June 19, 2010 (at which times the New Horizons spacecraft was 7.6, 11.3, and 17.0 AU from the Sun, respectively). The data compare fairly well with model simulations, although the brightness of interplanetary Lyman-α emissions falls off more slowly than expected with radial distance from the Sun. The ratio of Lyman-α/Lyman-β brightnesses in the interplanetary medium agrees well with previous measurements by the Voyager ultraviolet spectrometers.

  15. Observations of interplanetary energetic charged particles from gamma-ray line solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesses, M. E.; Klecker, B.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of interplanetary energetic ions from the 7 June, 21 June and 1 July 1980 gamma ray line solar flares are presented. The observations are from the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland Ultra Low Energy Wide Angle Telescope aboard the ISEE-3 spacecraft. Both June flares produced relatively low intensity proton events at earth with peak intensities at 10-20 MeV approximately 5 x .01 protons square cm sec sr MeV)-1. Neither flare showed evidence of being enriched in either 3He or Fe at approximately 1 MeV/nucleon. The 1 July flare produced no observable ion or electron enhancements.

  16. Jovian modulation of interplanetary electrons as observed with Voyagers 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schardt, A. W.; Mcdonald, F. B.; Trainor, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    The release of magnetospheric electrons from Jupiter into interplanetary space is modulated by the Jovian rotation period. The Voyager 1 and 2 observations showed that the modulation period agrees on the average with the synodic period of Jupiter (9h 55m 33.12s), but over intervals of weeks it can differ from the synodic period by several minutes. The lack of exact synchronization is attributed to changes of the plasma population in the Jovian magnetosphere. The Jovian modulation appears to be a persistent feature of the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere and the disappearance of the modulation away from Jupiter is attributed to interplanetary propagation conditions. This leads to the following limits on the diffuse coefficient for interplanetary electrons: kappa perpendicular is or = 8 x 10 to the 19th power sq cm/s and kappa parallel is or = 10 to the 21st power sq cm/s. Modulation was still detectable at 3.8 A.U. behind Jupiter in the far magnetotail. This requires a mean free path in the tail 0.75 A.U. and good field connection along the tail to Jupiter.

  17. Observations of artificially produced scintillations using satellite transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, J. H.; Fritz, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    The ionospheric modification experiment, utilizing a high-powered transmitter, provides an opportunity to study ionospheric irregularities under relatively known conditions. The irregularities were studied by means of transionospheric signals from the polar-orbiting satellite ESSA 8 transmitting at 137 MHz. These observations show that scintillations occur when the satellite to ground station geometry is such that the ray from the satellite passes through the region in the ionosphere under modification. In general, a cut across the illuminated volume is obtained; thus an active region of about 100 km in diameter is indicated. For the most part, the artificial scintillations appear to be similar to those obtained from naturally occurring irregularities, but a systematic change from 3 to 1 sec in the fluctuation period is usually observed as the satellite traverses from the northern to the southern portions of the active region. The change in period appears to be produced by a systematic change in irregularity scale size from about 4 to about 1 km.

  18. Voyager energetic particle observations at interplanetary shocks and upstream of planetary bow shocks - 1977-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimigis, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    The Voyager 1 and 2 vehicles include instrumentation that makes comprehensive electron and ion measurements in several energy channels with good energy, temporal, and compositional resolution. Data gathered from 1977 to 1988, including observations downstream and upstream of four planetary bow shocks (earth, Saturn, Uranus, Jupiter) and numerous interplanetary shocks to about 30 AU, are analyzed in the context of the Fermi and shock drift acceleration models. Overall results indicate that electrons and ions observed upstream of planetary bow shocks have their source inside the parent magnetosphere, with first order Fermi acceleration playing a secondary role at best.

  19. August 1972 solar-terrestrial events - Observations of interplanetary shocks at 2.2 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.; Davis, L., Jr.; Coleman, P. J., Jr.; Colburn, D. S.; Dyal, P.; Jones, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    Simultaneous magnetic field and plasma observations on Pioneer 10 were used to identify three shocks and a plasma driver (possible flare ejecta) at 2.2 AU caused by the four large solar flares of August 2-7, 1972. Two shocks, the first and third, were forward shocks, while the second was a reverse shock. The local inertial velocities of all three shocks were estimated under the assumption of quasi-perpendicularity, i.e., the shocks were assumed to be propagating principally across, rather than along, the interplanetary magnetic field.

  20. STEREO observations of waves near the ramp region of interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breneman, A. W.; Cattell, C. A.; Wilson, L. B., III; Kersten, K.; Goetz, K.; Paradise, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth's bowshock as well as interplanetary shocks host a variety of mechanisms that provide for the dissipation of bulk flow energy. Wilson et al., 2007 suggested that wave-particle interactions, in addition to previously suggested particle reflection, may be an important part of the energy dissipation at high mach number shocks. Supporting this idea, two recent papers have identified very large amplitude electrostatic waves upstream of the Earth's bowshock and an interplanetary shock. These waves are expected to contribute significantly to particle scattering and heating. Large amplitude turbulent electrostatic waveforms (up to 40 mV/m), identified as ion acoustic waves, were first observed by Hull et al., 2006 from Polar spacecraft data upstream of the Earth's bowshock during active solar wind conditions. Similar waveforms were observed on Wind by Wilson et al., 2010 (up to 100 mV/m) at a supercritical interplanetary shock and were identified as electron Bernstein waves. These studies were limited to two bowshock crossings and a single interplanetary shock, respectively. We present a preliminary study of a much larger data set of these waves from high time resolution STEREO, WIND and THEMIS burst waveform data. Over STEREO 200 burst capture electric field waveforms are seen in twelve separate groups on all four Earth swing-by orbits in 2006. Wave amplitudes range from ~20 to 200 mV/m. With this dataset we will provide statistical context to the observations of the aforementioned papers and attempt to resolve the discrepancy in wave identification. The results of this study will elucidate the plasma conditions under which these waves are generated and constrain possible generation mechanisms. The ubiquity of these waves, under a variety of solar wind conditions, suggests that they may indeed play an important role in the dissipation of energy at the bowshock. In addition, many of the waveforms show evidence of particle trap! ping suggesting that not only do

  1. Observations of Possible Injection of Interplanetary Oxygen into the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, J. D.; Manweiler, J. W.; Gerrard, A. J.; Bonnell, J. W.; Bounds, S. R.; Gkioulidou, M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    With the Advanced Composition Explorer's (ACE) Electron Proton and Alpha Monitor (EPAM) instrument being in a halo orbit about L1 and the Van Allen Probe's Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument being in an eccentric orbit through the inner magnetosphere, the two instruments are situated perfectly for observing the inner magnetospheric response to energetic interplanetary particle events. Both instruments are designed to measure electrons and ions with energies between tens of keV and a few MeV, depending upon particle species. Using a new data analysis technique we've developed, the EPAM instrument can provide high energy-resolution, species-resolved energy spectra for a number of ion species including helium and oxygen which RBSPICE is designed to observe. Between May 22nd and 26th of 2013, EPAM observed an energetic particle event with a nearly flat energy spectra and greatly enhanced helium and oxygen composition. RBSPICE measured a strong surge in oxygen flux, but saw no correspondingly strong increase in the helium flux. We present a detailed analysis and comparison of the energetic ion spectra, composition, and timing measured by the ACE and the Van Allen Probes instruments in conjunction with magnetic field and energetic particle measurements from other spacecraft for this event, and provide a discussion on the injection of interplanetary oxygen into the inner magnetosphere.

  2. Observations of possible injection of interplanetary oxygen into the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, James Douglas; Manweiler, Jerry Wayne; Gerrard, Andrew; Bonnell, John; Bounds, Scott; Gkioulidou, Matina; Mitchell, Donald G.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2015-04-01

    With the Advanced Composition Explorer's (ACE) Electron Proton and Alpha Monitor (EPAM) instrument being in a halo orbit about L1 and the Van Allen Probe's Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument being in an eccentric orbit through the inner magnetosphere, the two instruments are situated perfectly for observing the inner magnetospheric response to energetic interplanetary particle events. Both instruments are designed to measure electrons and ions with energies between tens of keV and a few MeV, depending upon particle species. Using a new data analysis technique we've developed, the EPAM instrument can provide high energy-resolution, species-resolved energy spectra for a number of ion species including helium and oxygen which RBSPICE is designed to observe. Between May 22nd and 26th of 2013, EPAM observed an energetic particle event with a nearly flat energy spectra and greatly enhanced helium and oxygen composition. RBSPICE measured a strong surge in oxygen flux, but saw no correspondingly strong increase in the helium flux. We present a detailed analysis and comparison of the energetic ion spectra, composition, and timing measured by the ACE and the Van Allen Probes instruments in conjunction with magnetic field and energetic particle measurements from other spacecraft for this event, and provide a discussion on the injection of interplanetary oxygen into the inner magnetosphere.

  3. Ionospheric scintillations at Guilin detected by GPS ground-based and radio occultation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yuhua

    2011-03-01

    The occurrence of ionospheric scintillations with S4 ⩾ 0.2 was studied using GPS measurements at Guilin, China (25.29°N, 110.33°E; geomagnetic: 15.04°N, 181.98°E), a station located near the northern crest of the equatorial anomaly. The results are presented for data collected from January 2009 to March 2010. The results show that nighttime amplitude scintillations only took place in February and March of the considered years, while daytime amplitude scintillations occurred in August and December of 2009. Nighttime amplitude scintillations, observed in the south of Guilin, always occurred with phase scintillations, TEC (Total Electron Content) depletions, and ROT (Rate Of change of TEC) fluctuations. However, TEC depletions and ROT fluctuations were weak during daytime amplitude scintillations, and daytime amplitude scintillations always took place simultaneously for most of the GPS satellites which appeared over Guilin in different azimuth directions. Ground-based GPS scintillation/TEC observations recorded at Guilin and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) measurements obtained from GPS-COSMIC radio occultation indicate that nighttime and daytime scintillations are very likely caused by ionospheric F region irregularities and sporadic E, respectively. Moreover, strong daytime amplitude scintillations may be associated with the plasma density enhancements in ionospheric E region caused by the Perseid and Geminid meteor shower activities.

  4. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Observed in the Heliosphere: 2. Model and Data Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappin, S. James; Howard, Timothy A.

    2009-10-01

    With the recent advancements in interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) imaging it is necessary to understand how heliospheric images may be interpreted, particularly at large elongation angles. Of crucial importance is how the current methods used for coronal mass ejection measurement in coronagraph images must be changed to account for the large elongations involved in the heliosphere. We present results comparing a new model of interplanetary disturbances with heliospheric image data, from the Solar Mass Ejection Imager. A database containing a range of ICMEs simulated with varying parameters describing its topology, orientation, location and speed was produced and compared with two ICMEs observed in February and December 2004. We identify the simulated ICME that best matches the data, and use the parameters required to identify their three-dimensional leading-edge structure, orientation and kinematics. By constant comparison with the data we are able to keep track of small changes to the ICME topology and kinematic properties, thus for the first time are able to monitor how the dynamic interaction between the ICME and the interplanetary medium affects ICME evolution. This is the second part of a series of three papers, where the theory behind the model is presented in an accompanying paper and the physical implications are discussed in the third part. The first part considers the effects of Thomson scattering across the entire span of the disturbance and includes its apparent geometry at large elongations. We find that the model converges reliably to a solution for both events, although we identify four separate structures during the December period. Comparing the 3-D trajectory and source location with known associated features identified with other spacecraft, we find a remarkable agreement between the model and data. We conclude with a brief discussion of the physical implications of the model.

  5. GNSS-based Observations and Simulations of Spectral Scintillation Indices in the Arctic Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durgonics, T.; Hoeg, P.; von Benzon, H. H.; Komjathy, A.

    2015-12-01

    During disturbed times, ionospheric scintillations can be severe and adversely impact satellite-based positioning and radio transmissions. The scintillation occurs in the amplitude, phase, polarization, and angle of arrival of the signal. Precise observation, classification, modeling, forecasting, and development of data-driven methodologies to accurately localize ionospheric irregularities and simulate GNSS scintillation signals are highly desired. Ionospheric scintillations have traditionally been quantified by amplitude (S4) and phase scintillations (σφ). Our study focuses on the Arctic, where scintillations, especially phase scintillations, are prominent. We will present observations acquired from a network of Greenlandic GNSS stations, including 2D amplitude and phase scintillation index maps for representative calm and storm periods. In addition to the traditional indices described above, we are exploring a set of indices derived from the power spectra of the signals. The observed corner frequency of the power spectrum is a function of the Fresnel radius and the drift speed of the irregularities, while the slope of the power spectrum is related to the Fresnel oscillations. We will demonstrate how spectral characteristics of the scintillations act under large total electron content (TEC) gradients and how physical parameters can be extracted from the power spectra, and will present how these parameters of the corner frequencies and power spectra slopes vary during ionospheric storms. The observations will then be compared to properties of simulated GNSS signals computed by the Fast Scintillation Mode (FSM). The FSM was developed to simulate ionospheric scintillations under different geophysical conditions, and is used to simulate GNSS signals with known scintillation characteristics. This comparison could lead to a better understanding of the observed ionospheric state.

  6. Radio observations of interplanetary magnetic field structures out of the ecliptic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzenreiter, R. J.; Fainberg, J.; Weber, R. R.; Alvarez, H.; Haddock, F. T.; Potter, W. H.

    1976-01-01

    New observations of the out-of-the ecliptic trajectories of type 3 solar radio bursts have been obtained from simultaneous direction finding measurements on two independent satellite experiments, IMP-6 with spin plane in the ecliptic, and RAE-2 with spin plane normal to the ecliptic. Burst exciter trajectories were observed which originated at the active region and then crossed the ecliptic plane at about 0.8 AU. A considerable large scale north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field is followed by the exciters. The apparent north-south and east-west angular source sizes observed by the two spacecraft are approximately equal, and range from 25 deg at 600 KHz to 110 deg at 80 KHz.

  7. Magnetospheric Response to Interplanetary Field Enhancements: Coordinated Space-based and Ground-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Peter; Russell, Christopher; Lai, Hairong

    2014-05-01

    In general, asteroids, meteoroids and dust do not interact with the plasma structures in the solar system, but after a collision between fast moving bodies the debris cloud contains nanoscale dust particles that are charged and behave like heavy ions. Dusty magnetic clouds are then accelerated to the solar wind speed. While they pose no threat to spacecraft because of the particle size, the coherency imposed by the magnetization of the cloud allows the cloud to interact with the Earth's magnetosphere as well as the plasma in the immediate vicinity of the cloud. We call these clouds Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs). These IFEs are a unique class of interplanetary field structures that feature cusp-shaped increases and decreases in the interplanetary magnetic field and a thin current sheet. The occurrence of IFEs is attributed to the interaction between the solar wind and dust particles produced in inter-bolide collisions. Previous spacecraft observations have confirmed that IFEs move with the solar wind. When IFEs strike the magnetosphere, they may distort the magnetosphere in several possible ways, such as producing a small indentation, a large scale compression, or a glancing blow. In any event if the IFE is slowed by the magnetosphere, the compression of the Earth's field should be seen in the ground-based magnetic records that are continuously recorded. Thus it is important to understand the magnetospheric response to IFE arrival. In this study, we investigate the IFE structure observed by spacecraft upstream of the magnetosphere and the induced magnetic field perturbations observed by networks of ground magnetometers, including the THEMIS, CARISMA, McMAC arrays in North America and the IMAGE array in Europe. We find that, in a well-observed IFE event on December 24, 2006, all ground magnetometer stations observed an impulse at approximately 1217 UT when the IFE was expected to arrive at the Earth's magnetopause. These ground stations spread across many

  8. Solar and Interplanetary Origins of the Forbush Decrease observed in June 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremm, Tiago; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Dal Lago, Alisson; Da Silva, Marlos; Deggeroni, Vinicíus

    Many solar transients are important for Space Wheather, such as solar flares (flares) and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). CMEs have typically a most intense magnetic field than the Interplanetary Medium and when interacting with the magnetosphere can cause strong fluctuations in Terrestrial Magnetic Field, denominated Geomagnetic Storms. Due to its magnetic field the structures block the passage of charged particles such as primary cosmic rays, causing generally a decrease in the particle count. The Muons are a result from the decay of cosmic rays with the primary constituents of the atmosphere, reaching the ground. When there occurs a geomagnetic storm, there is an overall decrease in particle counts, called Forbush decrease. This work aims to analyze the solar and interplanetary origin of the Forbush decrease observed in the period of June 2012, using data from plasma parameters provided by the ACE satellite (Advanced Composition Explorer) and muon data, provided by the Multidirectional Muon Detector - MMD. The MMD is installed at the Southern Space Observatory - SSO / CRS / CCR / INPE-MCTI in São Martinho da Serra, RS, Brazil.

  9. Interplanetary shock-bow shock interaction: Comparison of a global MHD model and observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, O.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.

    2015-09-01

    A fast forward shock passing through the bow shock would generate a train of new discontinuities that differ with the distance from the Sun-Earth line. However, interplanetary (IP) shocks are often followed by a rotation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) over a large angle and a presence of this rotation can modify the interaction process. The present paper analyzes in detail one IP shock where data measured by Wind are used as an input to a global BATS-R-US MHD model and the model prediction is compared with Geotail magnetosheath observations. The study is based on three runs of the global MHD model that use different modifications of upstream conditions. We have found that (1) about 45% of IP shocks is followed by a significant IMF rotation within 15 min after the shock ramp; (2) the IMF rotation modifies the dynamics of the magnetospheric response to the IP shock arrival; (3) a train of new discontinuities created by an interaction of the IP shock with bow shock can be identified in MHD simulations as well as in the experimental data; and (4) a new discontinuity is created by the interaction of the IMF rotation with the bow shock.

  10. Wind Observations of Wave Heating and/or Particle Energization at Supercritical Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Lynn Bruce, III; Szabo, Adam; Koval, Andriy; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Kellogg, Paul J.; Goetz, Keith; Breneman, Aaron; Kersten, Kris; Kasper, Justin C.; Pulupa, Marc

    2011-01-01

    We present the first observations at supercritical interplanetary shocks of large amplitude (> 100 mV/m pk-pk) solitary waves, approx.30 mV/m pk-pk waves exhibiting characteristics consistent with electron Bernstein waves, and > 20 nT pk-pk electromagnetic lower hybrid-like waves, with simultaneous evidence for wave heating and particle energization. The solitary waves and the Bernstein-like waves were likely due to instabilities driven by the free energy provided by reflected ions [Wilson III et al., 2010]. They were associated with strong particle heating in both the electrons and ions. We also show a case example of parallel electron energization and perpendicular ion heating due to a electromagnetic lower hybrid-like wave. Both studies provide the first experimental evidence of wave heating and/or particle energization at interplanetary shocks. Our experimental results, together with the results of recent Vlasov [Petkaki and Freeman, 2008] and PIC [Matsukyo and Scholer, 2006] simulations using realistic mass ratios provide new evidence to suggest that the importance of wave-particle dissipation at shocks may be greater than previously thought.

  11. Observation of nonuniform structure of the earth's bow shock correlated with interplanetary field orientation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.

    1972-01-01

    Explorer 33 and 35 magnetometers, on the western and eastern flanks of the earth's bow shock, respectively, observed the boundary concurrently between 0130 and 0430 UT, Oct. 30, 1968. Contrasting shock structures were recorded. Explorer 35 saw a quiet abrupt shock, whereas Explorer 33 saw an irregular noisy boundary with much upstream wave activity. The interplanetary field was roughly in the average archimedean spiral angle and was therefore approximately tangent to the shock at Explorer 35 and normal to the shock at Explorer 33. Gross motions and variable tilting of the aberrated shock probably contributed to the peculiar sequence of shock crossings at the two spacecraft. The observations support a model of the shock in which perpendicular and oblique collisionless structures coexist and form a nonuniform magnetosheath outer boundary.

  12. Redefining the Boundaries of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections from Observations at the Ecliptic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, C.; Palacios, J.; Saiz, E.; Guerrero, A.

    2016-09-01

    On 2015 January 6–7, an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) was observed at L1. This event, which can be associated with a weak and slow coronal mass ejection, allows us to discuss the differences between the boundaries of the magnetic cloud and the compositional boundaries. A fast stream from a solar coronal hole surrounding this ICME offers a unique opportunity to check the boundaries’ process definition and to explain differences between them. Using Wind and ACE data, we perform a complementary analysis involving compositional, magnetic, and kinematic observations providing relevant information regarding the evolution of the ICME as travelling away from the Sun. We propose erosion, at least at the front boundary of the ICME, as the main reason for the difference between the boundaries, and compositional signatures as the most precise diagnostic tool for the boundaries of ICMEs.

  13. The effect of the interplanetary magnetic field on sidereal variations observed at medium depth underground detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humble, J. E.; Fenton, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    It has been known for some years that the intensity variations in sidereal time observed by muon detectors at moderate underground depths are sensitive to the polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field (ipmf) near the Earth. There are differences in the response to these anisotropies as observed in the Norhtern and southern hemispheres. When fully understood, the nature of the anisotropy seems likely to provide information on the 3-dimensional structure of the heliomagnetosphere, its time variations, and its linking with the local interstellar field. The summation harmonic dials for the sidereal diurnal variation during 1958 to 1982 show that there is a strong dependence on whether the ipmf near the Earth is directed outwards from the Sun or inwards it.

  14. EVIDENCE FOR LOCAL ACCELERATION OF SUPRATHERMAL HEAVY ION OBSERVATIONS DURING INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gruesbeck, Jacob R.; Lepri, Susan T.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Christian, Eric R.

    2015-01-20

    Suprathermal particles are an important seed population for a variety of energetic particles found throughout the heliosphere, but their origin is in debate. We present, for the first time, high-cadence observations of suprathermal heavy ions during interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), from the Suprathermal Ion Composition Spectrometer on board the Wind spacecraft, and investigate their ionic composition and compare it to the bulk solar wind plasma composition, observed from the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer on board the Advanced Composition Explorer. We find that the composition of the suprathermal plasma is related to the local bulk solar wind plasma and not to the plasma upstream of the ICME. This implies that the suprathermal plasma is accelerated from the local bulk solar wind plasma and not the upstream solar wind plasma.

  15. Ulysses observations of wave activity at interplanetary shocks and implications for type II radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Lengyel-Frey, D. |; Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R.J.; Stone, R.G.; Phillips, J.L. |

    1997-02-01

    We present the first quantitative investigation of interplanetary type II radio emission in which in situ waves measured at interplanetary shocks are used to compute radio wave intensities for comparison with type II observations. This study is based on in situ measurements of 42 in-ecliptic forward shocks as well as 10 intervals of type II emission observed by the Ulysses spacecraft between 1 AU and 5 AU. The analysis involves comparisons of statistical properties of type II bursts and in situ waves. Most of the 42 shocks are associated with the occurrence of electrostatic waves near the time of shock passage at Ulysses. These waves, which are identified as electron plasma waves and ion acoustic-like waves, are typically most intense several minutes before shock passage. This suggests that wave-wave interactions might be of importance in electromagnetic wave generation and that type II source regions are located immediately upstream of the shocks. We use the in situ wave measurements to compute type II brightness temperatures, assuming that emission at the fundamental of the electron plasma frequency is generated by the merging of electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves or the decay of electron plasma waves into ion acoustic and transverse waves. Second harmonic emission is assumed to be produced by the merging of electron plasma waves. The latter mechanism requires that a portion of the electron plasma wave distribution is backscattered, presumably by density inhomogeneities in regions of observed ion acoustic wave activity. The computed type II brightness temperatures are found to be consistent with observed values for both fundamental and second harmonic emission, assuming that strong ({approx_equal}10{sup {minus}4}V/m) electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves are coincident and that the electron plasma waves have phase velocities less than about 10 times the electron thermal velocity. (Abstract Truncated)

  16. The Scintillation Prediction Observations Research Task (SPORT) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, James; Swenson, Charles; Durão, Otavio; Loures, Luis; Heelis, Rod; Bishop, Rebecca; Le, Guan; Abdu, Mangalathayil; Krause, Linda; Nardin, Clezio; Fonseca, Eloi

    2016-04-01

    Structure in the charged particle number density in the equatorial ionosphere can have a profound impact on the fidelity of HF, VHF and UHF radio signals that are used for ground-to-ground and space-to-ground communication and navigation. The degree to which such systems can be compromised depends in large part on the spatial distribution of the structured regions in the ionosphere and the background plasma density in which they are embedded. In order to address these challenges it is necessary to accurately distinguish the background ionospheric conditions that favor the generation of irregularities from those that do not. Additionally we must relate the evolution of those conditions to the subsequent evolution of the irregular plasma regions themselves. The background ionospheric conditions are conveniently described by latitudinal profiles of the plasma density at nearly constant altitude, which describe the effects of ExB drifts and neutral winds, while the appearance and growth of plasma structure requires committed observations from the ground from at least one fixed longitude. This talk will present an international collaborative CubeSat mission called SPORT that stands for the Scintillation Prediction Observations Research Task. This mission will advance our understanding of the nature and evolution of ionospheric structures around sunset to improve predictions of disturbances that affect radio propagation and telecommunication signals. The science goals will be accomplished by a unique combination of satellite observations from a nearly circular middle inclination orbit and the extensive operation of ground based observations from South America near the magnetic equator. This approach promises Explorer class science at a CubeSat price.

  17. The Scintillation Prediction Observations Research Task (SPORT) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, James; Le, Guan; Swenson, Charles; Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Bishop, Rebecca L.; Abdu, Mangalathayil A.; Cupertino Durao, Otavio S.; Heelis, Roderick; Loures, Luis; Krause, Linda; Fonseca, Eloi

    2016-07-01

    Structure in the charged particle number density in the equatorial ionosphere can have a profound impact on the fidelity of HF, VHF and UHF radio signals that are used for ground-to-ground and space-to-ground communication and navigation. The degree to which such systems can be compromised depends in large part on the spatial distribution of the structured regions in the ionosphere and the background plasma density in which they are embedded. In order to address these challenges it is necessary to accurately distinguish the background ionospheric conditions that favor the generation of irregularities from those that do not. Additionally we must relate the evolution of those conditions to the subsequent evolution of the irregular plasma regions themselves. The background ionospheric conditions are conveniently described by latitudinal profiles of the plasma density at nearly constant altitude, which describe the effects of ExB drifts and neutral winds, while the appearance and growth of plasma structure requires committed observations from the ground from at least one fixed longitude. This talk will present an international collaborative CubeSat mission called SPORT that stands for the Scintillation Prediction Observations Research Task. This mission will advance our understanding of the nature and evolution of ionospheric structures around sunset to improve predictions of disturbances that affect radio propagation and telecommunication signals. The science goals will be accomplished by a unique combination of satellite observations from a nearly circular middle inclination orbit and the extensive operation of ground based observations from South America near the magnetic equator. This approach promises Explorer class science at a CubeSat price.

  18. The Scintillation Prediction Observations Research Task (SPORT) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, J. F.; Swenson, C.; Durão, O.; Loures, L.; Heelis, R. A.; Bishop, R. L.; Le, G.; Abdu, M. A.; Habash Krause, L.; De Nardin, C. M.; Fonseca, E.

    2015-12-01

    Structure in the charged particle number density in the equatorial ionosphere can have a profound impact on the fidelity of HF, VHF and UHF radio signals that are used for ground-to-ground and space-to-ground communication and navigation. The degree to which such systems can be compromised depends in large part on the spatial distribution of the structured regions in the ionosphere and the background plasma density in which they are embedded. In order to address these challenges it is necessary to accurately distinguish the background ionospheric conditions that favor the generation of irregularities from those that do not. Additionally we must relate the evolution of those conditions to the subsequent evolution of the irregular plasma regions themselves. The background ionospheric conditions are conveniently described by latitudinal profiles of the plasma density at nearly constant altitude, which describe the effects of ExB drifts and neutral winds, while the appearance and growth of plasma structure requires committed observations from the ground from at least one fixed longitude. This talk will present an international collaborative CubeSat mission called SPORT that stands for Scintillation Prediction Observations Research Task. This mission that will advance our understanding of the nature and evolution of ionospheric structures around sunset to improve predictions of disturbances that affect radio propagation and telecommunication signals. The science goals will be accomplished by a unique combination of satellite observations from a nearly circular middle inclination orbit and the extensive operation of ground based observations from South America near the magnetic equator. This approach promises Explorer class science at a CubeSat price.

  19. MAVEN observations of the response of Mars to an interplanetary coronal mass ejection.

    PubMed

    Jakosky, B M; Grebowsky, J M; Luhmann, J G; Connerney, J; Eparvier, F; Ergun, R; Halekas, J; Larson, D; Mahaffy, P; McFadden, J; Mitchell, D F; Schneider, N; Zurek, R; Bougher, S; Brain, D; Ma, Y J; Mazelle, C; Andersson, L; Andrews, D; Baird, D; Baker, D; Bell, J M; Benna, M; Chaffin, M; Chamberlin, P; Chaufray, Y-Y; Clarke, J; Collinson, G; Combi, M; Crary, F; Cravens, T; Crismani, M; Curry, S; Curtis, D; Deighan, J; Delory, G; Dewey, R; DiBraccio, G; Dong, C; Dong, Y; Dunn, P; Elrod, M; England, S; Eriksson, A; Espley, J; Evans, S; Fang, X; Fillingim, M; Fortier, K; Fowler, C M; Fox, J; Gröller, H; Guzewich, S; Hara, T; Harada, Y; Holsclaw, G; Jain, S K; Jolitz, R; Leblanc, F; Lee, C O; Lee, Y; Lefevre, F; Lillis, R; Livi, R; Lo, D; Mayyasi, M; McClintock, W; McEnulty, T; Modolo, R; Montmessin, F; Morooka, M; Nagy, A; Olsen, K; Peterson, W; Rahmati, A; Ruhunusiri, S; Russell, C T; Sakai, S; Sauvaud, J-A; Seki, K; Steckiewicz, M; Stevens, M; Stewart, A I F; Stiepen, A; Stone, S; Tenishev, V; Thiemann, E; Tolson, R; Toublanc, D; Vogt, M; Weber, T; Withers, P; Woods, T; Yelle, R

    2015-11-01

    Coupling between the lower and upper atmosphere, combined with loss of gas from the upper atmosphere to space, likely contributed to the thin, cold, dry atmosphere of modern Mars. To help understand ongoing ion loss to space, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft made comprehensive measurements of the Mars upper atmosphere, ionosphere, and interactions with the Sun and solar wind during an interplanetary coronal mass ejection impact in March 2015. Responses include changes in the bow shock and magnetosheath, formation of widespread diffuse aurora, and enhancement of pick-up ions. Observations and models both show an enhancement in escape rate of ions to space during the event. Ion loss during solar events early in Mars history may have been a major contributor to the long-term evolution of the Mars atmosphere. PMID:26542576

  20. Plasma properties of driver gas following interplanetary shocks observed by ISEE-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwickl, R. D.; Ashbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Gosling, J. T.; Smith, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    Plasma fluid parameters calculated from solar wind and magnetic field data obtained on ISEE 3 were studied. The characteristic properties of driver gas following interplanetary shocks was determined. Of 54 shocks observed from August 1978 to February 1980, nine contained a well defined driver gas that was clearly identifiable by a discontinuous decrease in the average proton temperature across a tangential discontinuity. While helium enhancements were present in all of nine of these events, only about half of them contained simultaneous changes in the two quantities. Often the He/H ratio changed over a period of minutes. Simultaneous with the drop in proton temperature the helium and electron temperature decreased abruptly. In some cases the proton temperature depression was accompanied by a moderate increase in magnetic field magnitude with an unusually low variance and by an increase in the ratio of parallel to perpendicular temperature. The drive gas usually displayed a bidirectional flow of suprathermal solar wind electrons at higher energies.

  1. MAVEN observations of the response of Mars to an interplanetary coronal mass ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakosky, B. M.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Luhmann, J. G.; Connerney, J.; Eparvier, F.; Ergun, R.; Halekas, J.; Larson, D.; Mahaffy, P.; McFadden, J.; Mitchell, D. F.; Schneider, N.; Zurek, R.; Bougher, S.; Brain, D.; Ma, Y. J.; Mazelle, C.; Andersson, L.; Andrews, D.; Baird, D.; Baker, D.; Bell, J. M.; Benna, M.; Chaffin, M.; Chamberlin, P.; Chaufray, Y.-Y.; Clarke, J.; Collinson, G.; Combi, M.; Crary, F.; Cravens, T.; Crismani, M.; Curry, S.; Curtis, D.; Deighan, J.; Delory, G.; Dewey, R.; DiBraccio, G.; Dong, C.; Dong, Y.; Dunn, P.; Elrod, M.; England, S.; Eriksson, A.; Espley, J.; Evans, S.; Fang, X.; Fillingim, M.; Fortier, K.; Fowler, C. M.; Fox, J.; Gröller, H.; Guzewich, S.; Hara, T.; Harada, Y.; Holsclaw, G.; Jain, S. K.; Jolitz, R.; Leblanc, F.; Lee, C. O.; Lee, Y.; Lefevre, F.; Lillis, R.; Livi, R.; Lo, D.; Mayyasi, M.; McClintock, W.; McEnulty, T.; Modolo, R.; Montmessin, F.; Morooka, M.; Nagy, A.; Olsen, K.; Peterson, W.; Rahmati, A.; Ruhunusiri, S.; Russell, C. T.; Sakai, S.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Seki, K.; Steckiewicz, M.; Stevens, M.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Stiepen, A.; Stone, S.; Tenishev, V.; Thiemann, E.; Tolson, R.; Toublanc, D.; Vogt, M.; Weber, T.; Withers, P.; Woods, T.; Yelle, R.

    2015-11-01

    Coupling between the lower and upper atmosphere, combined with loss of gas from the upper atmosphere to space, likely contributed to the thin, cold, dry atmosphere of modern Mars. To help understand ongoing ion loss to space, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft made comprehensive measurements of the Mars upper atmosphere, ionosphere, and interactions with the Sun and solar wind during an interplanetary coronal mass ejection impact in March 2015. Responses include changes in the bow shock and magnetosheath, formation of widespread diffuse aurora, and enhancement of pick-up ions. Observations and models both show an enhancement in escape rate of ions to space during the event. Ion loss during solar events early in Mars history may have been a major contributor to the long-term evolution of the Mars atmosphere.

  2. Substorm aurora and magnetic tail dynamics during interplanetary shock compression: THEMIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2012-07-01

    Fast and forward interplanetary shocks compress and squeeze the Earth magnetosphere and cause a series of magnetospheric and ionospheric reactions. In addition to the enhancement of chorus, electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves and magnetospheric hiss, the ionospheric convection is enhanced as well. Shock aurora is generated, which is a phenomenon first an auroral brightness onset near local noon right after the shock impingement then followed by a fast anti-sunward auroral propagation along the oval. It has been found that substorm auroral activity can be significantly intensified by the shock compression when the shock upstream magnetic field was in southward in a certain period of time. This paper will present recent results based on the THEMIS spacecraft and ground-based observations. With multiple spacecraft in the magnetotail, the complex dynamics of the compressed tail is identified and analyzed. Correlations between the tail dynamics and substorm auroral variations will be discussed. *On-leave from Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  3. Using ACE Observations of Interplanetary Particles and Magnetic Fields as Possible Contributors to Variations Observed at Van Allen Probes during Major events in 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, T. P.; Manweiler, J. W.; Gerrard, A. J.; Gkioulidou, M.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Patterson, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Observations from ACE EPAM including energy spectra of protons, helium, and oxygen will be prepared for coordinated use in estimating the direct and indirect access of energetic particles to inner and outer geomagnetic trapping zones. Complete temporal coverage from ACE at 12 seconds, 5 minutes, 17 minutes, hourly and daily cadences will be used to catalog interplanetary events arriving at Earth including interplanetary magnetic field sector boundaries, interplanetary shocks, and interplanetary coronal mass ejections, ICMEs. The first 6 months of 2013 have included both highly disturbed times, March 17 and May 22, and extended quiet periods of little or no variations. Among the specific questions that ACE and Van Allen Probes coordinated observations may aid in resolving are: 1. How much, if any, direct capture of interplanetary energetic particles occurs and what conditions account for it? 2. How much influence do interplanetary field and particle variations have on energization and/or loss of geomagnetically trapped populations? The poster will also present important links and describe methods and important details of access to numerically expressed ACE EPAM and Van Allen Probes RBSPICE observations that can be flexibly and easily accessed via the internet for student and senior researcher use.

  4. Observations of an Interplanetary Intermediate Shock Associated with a Magnetic Reconnection Exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, H. Q.; Li, Q. H.; Wang, J. M.; Zhao, G. Q.

    2016-07-01

    Two intermediate shocks (ISs) in interplanetary space have been identified via one spacecraft observation. However, Feng et al. suggested that the analysis using a single spacecraft observation based only on the Rankine–Hugoniot (R-H) relations could misinterpret a tangential discontinuity (TD) as an IS. The misinterpretation can be fixed if two spacecraft observations are available. In this paper, we report an IS-like discontinuity associated with a magnetic reconnection exhaust, which was observed by Wind on 2000 August 9 at 1 au. We investigated this discontinuity by fitting the R-H relations and referring to the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) observations. As a result, we found that the observed magnetic field and plasma data satisfy the R-H relations well, and the discontinuity satisfies all the requirements of the 2\\to 3 type IS. Although the discontinuity cannot be identified strictly by using two spacecraft observations, in light of the ACE observations we consider that the discontinuity should be an IS rather than a TD.

  5. Scintillation Observations and Response of The Ionosphere to Electrodynamics (SORTIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Scintillation Observations and Response of The Ionosphere to Electrodynamics, or SORTIE, mission is a 6U NASA Heliophysics CubeSat designed to study the ionosphere at altitudes below 400km. The SORTIE mission is being developed by a team including ASTRA (lead institution), AFRL, University of Texas at Dallas (UTD), COSMIAC (Satellite Integrator), and Boston College. SORTIE will address cutting-edge science in the area of ionospheric dynamics. The SORTIE mission will address the following science questions: Q1) Discover the sources of wave-like plasma perturbations in the F-region ionosphere. Q2) Determine the relative role of dynamo action and more direct mechanical forcing in the formation of wave-like plasma perturbations. To address these questions we plan to fly a CubeSat with novel sensors that measure key plasma parameters in a circular, low to middle inclination orbit near 350-400 km altitude. The sensors include an ion velocity meter (built by UTD) and a Planar Langmuir Probe (built by AFRL). The SORTIE mission plan is to describe the distribution of wave-like structures in the plasma density of the ionospheric F-region. In doing so, the SORTIE team will determine the possible role of these perturbations in aiding the growth of plasma instabilities. SORTIE will provide (1) the initial spectrum of wave perturbations which are the starting point for the RT calculation; (2) measured electric fields which determine the magnitude of the instability growth rate near the region where plasma bubbles are generated; (3) initial observations of irregularities in plasma density which result from RT growth. SORTIE results will be used as input to PBMOD, an assimilative first-principles physical model of the ionosphere, in order to predict evolution of EPBs. In this presentation, we will review the science objectives, provide an overview of the spacecraft and instrument design, and present a concept of operations plan.

  6. DIRECT OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF FILAMENT MATERIAL WITHIN INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T. H. E-mail: thomasz@umich.ed

    2010-11-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are explosive events that escape the Sun's corona carrying solar material and energy into the heliosphere. The classic picture of a CME observed in the corona presents a 'three-part structure', including a bright front at the leading edge indicating dense plasma, a low-density cavity, the possible signature of an embedded magnetic flux rope, and the so-called core, a high-density region observed to be associated with an erupting filament. Although there are experimental analogs to the first two parts of the CME when observed in situ, there are only a handful of in situ observations of cold, filament-type plasma. This has been a source of major uncertainty and qualitative disagreement between remote and in situ observations of these ejecta. We present the first comprehensive and long-term survey of such low charge states observed by the Advanced Composition Explorer Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer, using a novel data analysis process developed to identify ions with low ionic charge states. Using a very stringent set of observational signatures, we find that more than 4% of detected interplanetary CMEs have significant contributions of ions with low charge states. These time periods of low-charge ions often occur concurrent with some of the hottest ions, previously interpreted to be affected by flare heating during the CME initiation.

  7. SCION: CubeSat Mission Concept to Observe Midlatitude Small-Scale Irregularities and Scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, T.; Moldwin, M.

    2014-12-01

    The SCintillation and Ionospheric Occultation NanoSats (SCION) mission concept is to deploy two low-cost CubeSat spacecraft that maintain a separation distance <1 km to measure scintillation and associated small-scale density irregularities in the midlatitude ionosphere. Each spacecraft is equipped with a dual frequency GPS receiver to measure total electron content (TEC) and the S4 scintillation index along raypaths from the receiver to the GPS constellation. Scintillation causing small-scale density irregularities are increasingly observed in the vicinity of large TEC gradients associated with storm enhanced density (SED) regions. Detection of irregularities of the scale that cause GPS and VHF scintillation has previously relied on assumptions about their structural stability and drift speed. Space-based, multipoint observations would provide broad, regional coverage and disambiguation of temporal and spatial density fluctuations in order to detect small-scale irregularities without these assumptions.

  8. Solar cycle variation of interplanetary shocks, coronal mass ejections, and stream interactions observed at 0.7 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, G. M.; Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.; Gazis, P.

    1995-01-01

    A survey of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) magnetometer and plasma data from 1979-1980, shows that the occurrence frequency of interplanetary shocks, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and stream interactions observed at 0.7 AU exhibits a solar cycle variation. As previously found at 1 AU, the observed number of both interplanetary shocks and CMEs peaks during solar maximum (approximately 16 and approximately 27 per year, respectively) and reaches a low during solar minimum (approximately 0 and approximately 7 per year, respectively), in phase with the variation in smoothed sunspot number. The number of stream interactions observed varies in the opposite manner, having a minimum during solar maximum (approximately 15 per year) and a maximum during solar minimum (approximately 34 per year). The percentage of CMEs and stream interactions producing interplanetary shocks also varies during the solar-cycle and exhibits interesting behavior during the declining phase. While the number of CMEs observed during this phase is decreasing, the percentage of CMEs producing interplanetary shocks reaches a maximum. Also, while the number of stream interactions observed is increasing, but has not reached maximum during the declining phase, the percentage of stream interactions producing interplanety shocks is at a maximum.

  9. Bi-directional streaming of halo electrons in interplanetary plasma clouds observed between 0.3 and 1 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivory, K.; Schwenn, R.

    1995-01-01

    The solar wind data obtained from the two Helios solar probes in the years 1974 to 1986 were systematically searched for the occurrence of bi-directional electron events. Most often these events are found in conjunction with shock associated magnetic clouds. The implications of these observations for the topology of interplanetary plasma clouds are discussed.

  10. Ionospheric irregularities during a substorm event: Observations of ULF pulsations and GPS scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Clauer, C. R.; Deshpande, K.; Lessard, M. R.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Bust, G. S.; Crowley, G.; Humphreys, T. E.

    2014-07-01

    Plasma instability in the ionosphere is often observed as disturbances and distortions of the amplitude and phase of the radio signals, which are known as ionospheric scintillations. High-latitude ionospheric plasma, closely connected to the solar wind and magnetospheric dynamics, produces very dynamic and short-lived Global Positioning System (GPS) scintillations, making it challenging to characterize them. It is observed that scintillations in the high-latitude ionosphere occur frequently during geomagnetic storms and substorms. In addition, it is well known that Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) pulsations (Pi2 and Pi1B) are closely associated with substorm activity. This study reports simultaneous observations of Pi2 and Pi1B pulsations and GPS phase scintillations during a substorm using a newly designed Autonomous Adaptive Low-Power Instrument Platform (AAL-PIP) installed at the South Pole. The magnetic field and GPS data from the instruments appear to be associated in terms of their temporal and spectral features. Moreover, the scintillation events were observed near the auroral latitudes where Pi1B pulsations are commonly detected. The temporal, spectral and spatial association between the scintillation and geomagnetic pulsation events suggests that the magnetic field perturbations and enhanced electric fields caused by substorm currents could contribute to the creation of plasma instability in the high-latitude ionosphere, leading to GPS scintillations.

  11. Observations of Global and Regional Ionospheric Irregularities and Scintillation Using GNSS Tracking Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pi, Xiaoqing; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Valant-Spaight, Bonnie; Bar-Sever, Yoaz; Romans, Larry J.; Skone, Susan; Sparks, Lawrence; Hall, G. Martin

    2013-01-01

    The rate of TEC index (ROTI) is a measurement that characterizes ionospheric irregularities. It can be obtained from standard GNSS dual-frequency phase data collected using a geodetic type of GNSS receiver. By processing GPS data from ground-based networks of International GNSS Service and Continuously Operating Reference Station (CORS), ROTI maps have been produced to observe global and regional scintillation activities. A major mid-latitude scintillation event in the contiguous United States is reported here that was captured in ROTI maps produced using CORS GPS data collected during a space weather storm. The analyses conducted in this work and previously by another group indicate that ROTI is a good occurrence indicator of both amplitude and phase scintillations of GPS L-band signals, even though the magnitudes of ROTI, S4, and sigma(sub phi) can be different. For example, our analysis indicates that prominent ROTI and the L1 phase scintillation (sigma(sub phi)) are well correlated temporally in the polar region while L1 amplitude scintillation rarely occurs. The differences are partially attributed to physics processes in different latitude regions, such as high-speed plasma convection in the polar region that can suppress the amplitude scintillation. An analysis of the impact of ionospheric scintillation on precise positioning, which requires use of dual-frequency phase data, is also conducted. The results indicate that significant (more than an order of magnitude) positioning errors can occur under phase scintillation conditions.

  12. Efficiency of particle acceleration at interplanetary shocks: Statistical study of STEREO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresing, N.; Theesen, S.; Klassen, A.; Heber, B.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Among others, shocks are known to be accelerators of energetic charged particles. However, many questions regarding the acceleration efficiency and the required conditions are not fully understood. In particular, the acceleration of electrons by shocks is often questioned. Aims: In this study we determine the efficiency of interplanetary shocks for <100 keV electrons, and for ions at ~0.1 and ~2 MeV energies, as measured by the Solar Electron and Proton Telescope (SEPT) instruments aboard the twin Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. Methods: We employ an online STEREO in situ shock catalog that lists all shocks observed between 2007 and mid 2014 (observed by STEREO A) and until end of 2013 (observed by STEREO B). In total 475 shocks are listed. To determine the particle acceleration efficiency of these shocks, we analyze the associated intensity increases (shock spikes) during the shock crossings. For the near-relativistic electrons, we take into account the issue of possible ion contamination in the SEPT instrument. Results: The highest acceleration efficiency is found for low energy ions (0.1 MeV), which show a shock-associated increase at 27% of all shocks. The 2 MeV ions show an associated increase only during 5% of the shock crossings. In the case of the electrons, the shocks are nearly ineffective. Only five shock-associated electron increases were found, which correspond to only 1% of all shock crossings.

  13. Polarimetry of Dust in Optically Thin Clouds: Observations and Experimental Simulations of Cometary and Interplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadamcik, E.; Renard, J.; Levasseur-Regourd, A.; Lasue, J.

    2013-12-01

    Remote polarimetric observations are used to tentatively infer the physical properties of the dust particles in cometary and interplanetary environments. To interpret the results, numerical and experimental simulations are necessary. Light scattering measurements on levitating particles with the PROGRA2 experiment -in dedicated microgravity flights or in the laboratory for low-density particles- provide relevant simulations of the scattering properties of real particles, which can present large size distributions and a large variety of structures and materials (Renard et al., 2002; Hadamcik et al., 2009). Previous systematic experiments, together with numerical models and laboratory analysis of cosmic particles (e.g. Stardust samples) allow to optimize dust particles' properties -such as their structures, sizes, size distributions, and silicate to organics ratios- (Hadamcik et al. 2007a; Zubko et al., 2009; Lasue et al., 2010). We present intensity and polarization images of cometary comae providing evidence for changes in the polarization properties in the internal regions of the coma, linked to the variation of particles properties with nucleus distance and/or rotation phase (Hadamcik et al., 2007a; Hadamcik et al., 2013a; 2013b) and preliminary results of 2013 observations. Associated experimental simulations help us to interpret how particles evolve within different coma regions and at different solar distances (Hadamcik et al. 2007b; 2009; 2011). We expect in situ confirmation of our results during the Rosetta mission to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014-2015 (Hadamcik et al., 2010). Analyses of observations of the zodiacal light scattered by the interplanetary dust cloud particles have shown local polarisation changes with the solar distance (Levasseur-Regourd et al., 2001). Such changes are interpreted through numerical models to be related to variations in the composition and physical properties of the particles through various processes including

  14. L-Band Ionosphere Scintillations Observed by A GNSS Receiver Array at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.; Pelgrum, W.; van Graas, F.

    2011-12-01

    As we enter a new solar maximum period, GNSS receivers, especially the ones operating in high latitude and equatorial regions, are facing an increasing threat from ionosphere scintillations. The increased solar activities, however, also offer a great opportunity to collect scintillation data to gain better understandings of scintillation effects on GNSS signals. During the past decade, many GPS receivers have been deployed around the globe to monitor ionosphere scintillations. Most of these GPS receivers are commercial receivers whose tracking mechanisms are not designed to operate under ionosphere scintillation. When strong scintillations occur, these receivers will either generate erroneous outputs or completely lose lock. Even when the scintillation is mild, the tracking loop outputs are not true representation of the signal parameters due the tracking loop transfer function. High quality, unprocessed GNSS receiver front end raw IF samples collected during ionosphere scintillations are necessary to produce realistic scintillation signal parameter estimations. In this presentation, we will update our effort in establishing a unique GNSS receiver array at HAARP, Alaska to collect GPS and GLONASS satellite signals at various stages of the GNSS receiver processing. Signal strength, carrier phase, and relative TEC measurements generated by the receiver array as well as additional on-site diagnostic instrumentation measurements obtained from two active heating experiment campaigns conducted in 2011 will be presented. Additionally, we will also highlight and contrast the artificial heating experiment results with observations of natural scintillation events captured by our receivers using an automatic event trigger mechanism during the past year. These interesting results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our experimental data collection system in providing insightful details of ionosphere responses to active perturbations and natural disturbances.

  15. The Bastille Day Magnetic Clouds and Upstream Shocks: Near Earth Interplanetary Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Berdichevsky, D. B.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lazarus, A. J.; Kasper, J.; Desch, M. D.; Wu, C.-C.; Reames, D. V.; Singer, H. J.; Singer, H. J.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The energetic charged particle, interplanetary magnetic field, and plasma characteristics of the 'Bastille Day' shock and ejecta/magnetic cloud events at 1 AU occurring over the days 14-16 July 2000 are described. Profiles of MeV (WIND/LEMT) energetic ions help to organize the overall sequence of events from the solar source to 1 AU. Stressed are analyses of an outstanding magnetic cloud (MC2) starting late on 15 July and its upstream shock about 4 hours earlier in WIND magnetic field and plasma data. Also analyzed is a less certain, but likely, magnetic cloud (MC1) occurring early on 15 July; this was separated from MC2 by its upstream shock and many heliospheric current sheet (HCS) crossings. Other HCS crossings occurred throughout the 3-day period. Overall this dramatic series of interplanetary events caused a large multi-phase magnetic storm with min Dst lower than -300 nT. The very fast solar wind speed (greater than or equal to 1100 km/s) in and around the front of MC2 (for near average densities) was responsible for a very high solar wind ram pressure driving in the front of the magnetosphere to geocentric distances estimated to be as low as approx. 5 R(sub E), much lower than the geosynchronous orbit radius. This was consistent with magnetic field observations from two GOES satellites which indicated they were in the magnetosheath for extended times. A static force free field model is used to fit the two magnetic cloud profiles providing estimates of the clouds' physical and geometrical properties. MC2 was much larger than MCI, but their axes were nearly antiparallel, and their magnetic fields had the same left-handed helicity. MC2's axis and its upstream shock normal were very close to being perpendicular to each other, as might be expected if the cloud were driving the shock at the time of observation. The estimated axial magnetic flux carried by MC2 was 52 x 10(exp 20) Mx, which is about 5 times the typical magnetic flux estimated for other magnetic

  16. Interplanetary shocks and foreshocks observed by STEREO during 2007-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cano, X.; Kajdič, P.; Aguilar-Rodríguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Jian, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2016-02-01

    Interplanetary shocks in the heliosphere modify the solar wind through which they pass. In particular, shocks play an important role in particle acceleration. During the extended solar minimum (2007-2010) STEREO observed 65 forward shocks driven by stream interactions (SI), with magnetosonic Mach numbers Mms ≈ 1.1-4.0 and shock normal angles θBN ~ 20-87°. We analyze the waves associated with these shocks and find that the region upstream can be permeated by whistler waves (f ~ 1 Hz) and/or ultra low frequency (ULF) waves (f ~ 10-2-10-1 Hz). While whistlers appear to be generated at the shock, the origin of ULF waves is most probably associated with local kinetic ion instabilities. We find that when the Mach number (Mms) is low and the shock is quasi-perpendicular (θBN > 45°) whistler waves remain close to the shock. As Mms increases, the shock profile changes and can develop a foot and overshoot associated with ion reflection and gyration. Whistler precursors can be superposed on the foot region, so that some quasi-perpendicular shocks have characteristics of both subcritical and supercritical shocks. When the shock is quasi-parallel (θBN < 45°) a large foreshock with suprathermal ions and waves can form. Upstream, there are whistler trains at higher frequencies whose characteristics can be slightly modified probably by reflected and/or leaked ions and by almost circularly polarized waves at lower frequencies that may be locally generated by ion instabilities. In contrast with planetary bow shocks, most of the upstream waves studied here are mainly transverse and no steepening occurs. Some quasi-perpendicular shocks (45° < θBN < 60°) are preceded by ULF waves and ion foreshocks. Fluctuations downstream of quasi-parallel shocks tend to have larger amplitudes than waves in the sheath of quasi-perpendicular shocks. We compare SI-driven shock properties with those of shocks generated by interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). During the same years

  17. ULF cusp pulsations: Diurnal variations and interplanetary magnetic field correlations with ground-based observations

    SciTech Connect

    McHarg, M.G.; Olson, J.V.; Newell, P.T.

    1995-10-01

    In this paper the authors establish the Pc 5 magnetic pulsation signatures of the cusp and boundary regions for the high-latitude dayside cusp region. These signatures were determined by comparing spectrograms of the magnetic pulsations with optical observations of particle precipitation regions observed at the cusp. The ULF pulsations have a diurnal variation, and a cusp discriminant is proposed using a particular narrow-band feature in the pulsation spectrograms. The statistical distribution of this pattern over a 253-day period resembles the statistical cusp description using particle precipitation data from the Defense Meterological Satellite Program (DMSP). The distribution of the ground-based cusp discriminant is found to peak 1 hour earlier than the DMSP cusp distribution. This offset is due to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) being predominantly negative B{sub y} for the period when the data were collected. The authors find the diurnal variations so repeatable that only three main categories have statistically different IMF distributions. The identification of the signatures in the magnetic spectrograms of the boundary regions and central cusp allows the spectrogram to be used as a {open_quotes}time line{close_quotes} that shows when the station passed under different regions of the dayside oval. 36 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Observed in the Heliosphere: 1. Review of Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Timothy A.; Tappin, S. James

    2009-10-01

    With the recent advancements in interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) imaging it is necessary to understand how heliospheric images may be interpreted, particularly at large elongation angles. Of crucial importance is how the current methods used for coronal mass ejection measurement in coronagraph images must be changed to account for the large elongations involved in the heliosphere. In this review of theory we build up a picture of ICME appearance and evolution at large elongations in terms of how it would appear to an observer near 1 AU from the Sun. We begin by revisiting the basics of Thomson scattering describing how ICMEs are detected, in this we attempt to clarify a number of common misconceptions. We then build up from a single electron to an integrated line of sight, consider the ICME as a collection of lines of sight and describe how a map of ICME appearance may be developed based on its appearance relative to each line of sight. Finally, we discuss how the topology of the ICME affects its observed geometry and kinematic properties, particularly at large elongations. This review is the first of a three-part series of papers, where a review of theory is presented here and a model is developed and used in subsequent papers.

  19. Observations of an extreme storm in interplanetary space caused by successive coronal mass ejections.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying D; Luhmann, Janet G; Kajdič, Primož; Kilpua, Emilia K J; Lugaz, Noé; Nitta, Nariaki V; Möstl, Christian; Lavraud, Benoit; Bale, Stuart D; Farrugia, Charles J; Galvin, Antoinette B

    2014-01-01

    Space weather refers to dynamic conditions on the Sun and in the space environment of the Earth, which are often driven by solar eruptions and their subsequent interplanetary disturbances. It has been unclear how an extreme space weather storm forms and how severe it can be. Here we report and investigate an extreme event with multi-point remote-sensing and in situ observations. The formation of the extreme storm showed striking novel features. We suggest that the in-transit interaction between two closely launched coronal mass ejections resulted in the extreme enhancement of the ejecta magnetic field observed near 1 AU at STEREO A. The fast transit to STEREO A (in only 18.6 h), or the unusually weak deceleration of the event, was caused by the preconditioning of the upstream solar wind by an earlier solar eruption. These results provide a new view crucial to solar physics and space weather as to how an extreme space weather event can arise from a combination of solar eruptions. PMID:24642508

  20. COMPOSITION STRUCTURE OF INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS FROM MULTISPACECRAFT OBSERVATIONS, MODELING, AND COMPARISON WITH NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Reinard, Alysha A.; Mulligan, Tamitha E-mail: blynch@ssl.berkeley.edu

    2012-12-20

    We present an analysis of the ionic composition of iron for two interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed on 2007 May 21-23 by the ACE and STEREO spacecraft in the context of the magnetic structure of the ejecta flux rope, sheath region, and surrounding solar wind flow. This analysis is made possible due to recent advances in multispacecraft data interpolation, reconstruction, and visualization as well as results from recent modeling of ionic charge states in MHD simulations of magnetic breakout and flux cancellation coronal mass ejection (CME) initiation. We use these advances to interpret specific features of the ICME plasma composition resulting from the magnetic topology and evolution of the CME. We find that, in both the data and our MHD simulations, the flux ropes centers are relatively cool, while charge state enhancements surround and trail the flux ropes. The magnetic orientations of the ICMEs are suggestive of magnetic breakout-like reconnection during the eruption process, which could explain the spatial location of the observed iron enhancements just outside the traditional flux rope magnetic signatures and between the two ICMEs. Detailed comparisons between the simulations and data were more complicated, but a sharp increase in high iron charge states in the ACE and STEREO-A data during the second flux rope corresponds well to similar features in the flux cancellation results. We discuss the prospects of this integrated in situ data analysis and modeling approach to advancing our understanding of the unified CME-to-ICME evolution.

  1. Structure of ionospheric irregularities from amplitude and phase scintillation observations

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, A.; Rastogi, R.G. )

    1991-04-01

    The mutual coherence function Gamma 2, or the second moment of the complex amplitude of a radio wave which traverses through equatorial F region irregularities, is computed from amplitude and phase scintillation data. Theoretically, the equation satisfied by the coherence function has an analytic solution over the whole range of scintillation strength. This solution is directly related to the structure function for the phase fluctuations produced by the irregularities. Hence, the shape of the correlation function for variations in the total electron content along the signal path can be derived from the computed values of Gamma 2. With a suitable power-law model for the irregularities, an 'intermediate break scale', this scale, as well as the rms density fluctuation are deduced from a comparison of computed values for short-time lags with those expected from theory. During a postsunset scintillation event, this scale is found to increase with local time. In the context of the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which is the likely source of the irregularities, this increase may be attributed to a decline in the effective electric field prevailing in the region of the irregularities. 26 refs.

  2. Observations of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections and its Geoeffectiveness During 1996-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Y.; Shen, C.; Wang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    A solar coronal mass ejection (CME) is a large-scale eruption of plasma and magnetic fields from the Sun. It is believed to be the main source of strong interplanetary disturbances that may cause intense geomagnetic storms. We use observations from WIND spacecraft to study solar wind conditions from 1996 to 2013, corresponding to complete Solar Cycle 23 and the increasing and maximum phases of Solar Cycle 24, and summarize their basic properties. We identified 444 ICMEs in the near-Earth solar wind during this period. The ICME occurrence rate increases (from 9 in 1996 to 49 in 2001) with solar activity. We compare the properties (magnetic, velocity, southward magnetic field Bs, proton temperature, plasma thermal pressures) of ICMEs in increasing phases of Solar Cycle 23 to those in increasing phase of Solar Cycle 24. We can see clearly that the properties of ICME in Solar Cycle 24 is weaker than those in Solar Cycle 23. We also analyse the ICME's geoeffectiveness. There are only 7 strong geomagnetic storms (minDst< -100nT) in Solar Cycle 24, nearly one order of magnitude smaller than that found in Solar Cycle 23. This may be caused by the weaker ICME properties in Solar Cycle 24.

  3. Propagation and Evolution of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds: Global Simulations and Comparisons with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, P.; Ben-Nun, M.; Linker, J.; Torok, T.; Lionello, R.; Downs, C.

    2014-12-01

    In this talk, we explore the evolution of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), and fast magnetic clouds (MCs) in particular. We address three specific issues. First, What are the large-scale forces acting on ejecta as they travel from the Sun to 1 AU through a realistic ambient solar wind, and how does they affect the large-scale structure of the event? Second, what are the dominant waves/shocks associated with fast ICMEs? And third, how are the properties of ICMEs different during cycle 24 than during the previous cycle? To accomplish these objectives, we employ a variety of numerical approaches, including global resistive MHD models that incorporate realistic energy transport processes. We also compare and contrast model results with both remote solar and in-situ measurements of ICMEs at 1 AU and elsewhere, including the so-called ``Bastille Day'' event of July 14, 2000, and the more recent ``extreme ICME'' observed by STEREO-A on July 23, 2012.

  4. Reconstruction of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Using Multi-spacecraft Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, D. J.; Hu, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) originating at the solar corona sometimes propagate outward through space in the form of magnetic clouds (MCs). A common model for an MC is a helical magnetic flux rope with uniformity along its axis. These interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) are characterized as having an elevated magnetic field magnitude, a smooth rotation of magnetic field direction and a decreased plasma beta. Using one-dimensional in-situ data, the geometric and physical properties of a flux rope can be deduced using the Grad-Shafranov (GS) reconstruction technique. Using a GS solver written in MATLAB, we reconstructed three separate ICME events using a cylindrical model. The event used were seen by the ACE spacecraft, positioned at Earth's L1 point, as well as either STEREO A or B, positioned ahead and behind of Earth in its orbit respectively. These events occurred between 2007 and 2009, while the longitudinal separations of the STEREO crafts with respect to each other, as well as with respect to ACE, were increasing. As a means of viewing one event at different points along its axis, reconstructed STEREO data was compared to observed ACE data. As expected, later events had larger disagreements of results because of the larger spatial separation of measurements.

  5. Observations and experimental simulations of cometary and interplanetary dust by imaging polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadamcik, E.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Renard, J.-B.; Lasue, J.

    2012-04-01

    To interpret the physical properties of cometary and Interplanetary Dust Cloud (IDC) particles, we use remote light scattering observations. The scattered light is partially linearly polarized with a polarization degree depending on the physical properties of the dust, on the geometry (phase angle) and wavelength of observations. To interpret the results, numerical and experimental models are necessary. Laboratory scattering measurements with the PROGRA2 experiment (in A300- CNES and ESA dedicated microgravity flights or on ground for low-density particles) offer an alternative to simulate the scattering properties of real particles particularly for structures too large or too complex for numerical simulations [1]. Experimental samples can present large size distributions (nanometers to hundreds of micrometers) and a large variety of structures and materials, similar to those suspected to compose cometary comae particles and interplanetary dust particles. To optimize the choice of samples and size distributions, we consider the in-situ captured particles results [2,3] and previous experimental works with systematic studies of numerous samples underlying the characteristics of the polarimetric phase curves such as maximum and minimum polarization as a function of the properties of the particles (grains and particles size distribution, structure, refractive index) [4]. Numerical models can guide our choice of ratios of the different components and particles structures. For example, to fit the polarimetric observations of cometary comae, fluffy particles are numerically simulated by fractal aggregates and compact particles by ellipsoids [5]. Observations are fitted with two parameters: the particles size distribution and the ratio of low-absorbing silicates over high-absorbing organics. From the light scattering properties of the particles, their equilibrium temperature can be calculated for different structures and composition [6,7]. The variations in composition and

  6. Observations of Particle Acceleration Associated with Small-Scale Magnetic Islands Downstream of Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga V.; Zank, Gary P.; Li, Gang; Malandraki, Olga E.; le Roux, Jakobus A.; Webb, Gary M.

    2016-04-01

    We have recently shown both theoretically (Zank et al. 2014, 2015; le Roux et al. 2015) and observationally (Khabarova et al. 2015) that dynamical small-scale magnetic islands play a significant role in local particle acceleration in the supersonic solar wind. We discuss here observational evidence for particle acceleration at shock waves that is enhanced by the recently proposed mechanism of particle energization by both island contraction and the reconnection electric field generated in merging or contracting magnetic islands downstream of the shocks (Zank et al. 2014, 2015; le Roux et al. 2015). Both observations and simulations suppose formation of magnetic islands in the turbulent wake of heliospheric or interplanetary shocks (ISs) (Turner et al. 2013; Karimabadi et al. 2014; Chasapis et al. 2015). A combination of the DSA mechanism with acceleration by magnetic island dynamics explain why the spectra of energetic particles that are supposed to be accelerated at heliospheric shocks are sometimes harder than predicted by DSA theory (Zank et al. 2015). Moreover, such an approach allows us to explain and describe other unusual behaviour of accelerated particles, such as when energetic particle flux intensity peaks are observed downstream of heliospheric shocks instead of peaking directly at the shock according to DSA theory. Zank et al. (2015) predicted the peak location to be behind the heliospheric termination shock (HTS) and showed that the distance from the shock to the peak depends on particle energy, which is in agreement with Voyager 2 observations. Similar particle behaviour is observed near strong ISs in the outer heliosphere as observed by Voyager 2. Observations show that heliospheric shocks are accompanied by current sheets, and that IS crossings always coincide with sharp changes in the IMF azimuthal angle and the IMF strength, which is typical for strong current sheets. The presence of current sheets in the vicinity of ISs acts to magnetically

  7. Gigahertz scintillation observations at 22. 0 deg N magnetic latitude in the Indian zone

    SciTech Connect

    Dabas, R.S.; Banerjee, P.K.; Bhattacharya, Sumana; Reddy, B.M.; Singh, J. )

    1991-06-01

    The morphological aspect of gigahertz nighttime scintillations is considered, including their characteristics, seasonal and diurnal behavior, and dependence on solar activity. In addition, the association of low-altitude scintillations with the equatorial belt width is analyzed by comparing simultaneous observations from two sites taken during equinoctial months of a high-sunspot year. The intensities of scintillation at these locations are compared and discussed from the point of view of the background ionization and the geometry of ray paths. Scintillation activity is found to be suppressed during geomagnetic disturbances but enhanced in the postmidnight hours of the same night for those magnetic storms whose recovery phase starts between the midnight and dawn local time sector. 45 refs.

  8. Simultaneous observations of SBAS and GPS amplitude scintillations over the African and American equatorial ionosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akala, Andrew; Oyeyemi, Elijah; Doherty, Patricia

    2016-07-01

    We simultaneously observed the SBAS (EGNOS and WAAS)and GPS amplitude scintillations over the African and American equatorial ionosphere during the solar maximum of year 2013. Data from 4 stations, namely, Addis Ababa (Lat 9.03 deg N, Lon 38.77 deg E, Mag lat 0.18 deg N) ETHIOPIA, Dakar (Lat 14.75 deg N, Lon 17.45 deg W, Mag lat 5.88 deg N) SENEGAL, Cape Verde (Lat 16.73 deg N, Lon 22.93 deg W, Mag lat 4.74 deg N), and Natal (Lat 5.78 deg S, Lon 35.2 deg W, Mag lat 10 deg S) BRAZIL were used for the study. Scintillations were majorly localized within the hours of 2200-2400 LT. On a monthly scale, April and October recorded the highest occurrences of scintillation, while June recorded the least. Seasonally, equinoxes recorded the highest occurrences, while June solstice recorded the least. Lastly, we observed that during active days of scintillations, SBAS satellites' signals scintillated correspondingly with GPS satellites' signals.The SBAS scintillations commenced around the time of local sunset terminator to form plateaus which vanished around local midnight.

  9. Average Spatial Distribution of Cosmic Rays behind the Interplanetary Shock—Global Muon Detector Network Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, M.; Munakata, K.; Kato, C.; Kuwabara, T.; Rockenbach, M.; Dal Lago, A.; Schuch, N. J.; Braga, C. R.; Mendonça, R. R. S.; Jassar, H. K. Al; Sharma, M. M.; Duldig, M. L.; Humble, J. E.; Evenson, P.; Sabbah, I.; Tokumaru, M.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) density and its spatial gradient in Forbush Decreases (FDs) observed with the Global Muon Detector Network (GMDN) and neutron monitors (NMs). By superposing the GCR density and density gradient observed in FDs following 45 interplanetary shocks (IP-shocks), each associated with an identified eruption on the Sun, we infer the average spatial distribution of GCRs behind IP-shocks. We find two distinct modulations of GCR density in FDs, one in the magnetic sheath and the other in the coronal mass ejection (CME) behind the sheath. The density modulation in the sheath is dominant in the western flank of the shock, while the modulation in the CME ejecta stands out in the eastern flank. This east–west asymmetry is more prominent in GMDN data responding to ∼60 GV GCRs than in NM data responding to ∼10 GV GCRs, because of the softer rigidity spectrum of the modulation in the CME ejecta than in the sheath. The geocentric solar ecliptic-y component of the density gradient, G y , shows a negative (positive) enhancement in FDs caused by the eastern (western) eruptions, while G z shows a negative (positive) enhancement in FDs caused by the northern (southern) eruptions. This implies that the GCR density minimum is located behind the central flank of IP-shocks and propagating radially outward from the location of the solar eruption. We also confirmed that the average G z changes its sign above and below the heliospheric current sheet, in accord with the prediction of the drift model for the large-scale GCR transport in the heliosphere.

  10. Intense interplanetary magnetic fields observed by geocentric spacecraft during 1963-1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; King, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    In the present paper, interplanetary magnetic field and plasma data are reviewed over a period exceeding one full solar cycle for intervals in which the magnetic intensity was greater than 13 gammas. One hundred forty nine intervals of this type, with almost complete plasma and magnetic field data, are identified. Most (79%) of these enhancements could be associated either with interplanetary shocks or with high-speed stream interfaces. Half of the remaining 21% of the enhancements could be identified as cold magnetic enhancements, while the other half could not be associated with a single shock, interface, or cold magnetic enhancement.

  11. Dynamic response of the cusp morphology to the interplanetary magnetic field changes: An example observed by Viking

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R.; Potemra, T.A.

    1995-05-01

    In this article the authors discuss a unique obsevation made in the cusp region by the IMP 8 satellite of ion signatures during a step change in the interplanetary magnetic field from southward to northward, and back southward. The solar wind was relatively steady in density and velocity during this stepwise change. The ion population is observed to have two independent populations, well separated in energy, along the same field lines.

  12. Study of equatorial E region irregularities using rare daytime VHF scintillation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, V.; Kakad, B.; Pant, T. K.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Prasad, D. S. V. V. D.

    2015-10-01

    Scintillations on VHF radio signal are sparsely observed during daytime due to unavailability of strong electron density irregularities in equatorial E or F region. Type I/II irregularities observed at E region altitudes during the daytime are linked with either two-stream or gradient drift instability. The occurrence of these irregularities in presence of strong blanketing Es (Esb) can produce weak-moderate scintillations on VHF signal during daytime. Such sparse daytime VHF scintillations are used in the present study to retrieve information about E region irregularities, which are generally examined with radar observations. We use spaced receiver scintillation observations on 251 MHz signal transmitted from geostationary satellite UFO2 (71.2°E) and recorded at Tirunelveli (8.5°N, 77.8°E, dip latitude 0.6°N). Ionosonde data from Trivandrum (8.5°N, 76.6°E, dip latitude 0.5°N) during 2003-2005 is used to confirm the association of daytime scintillations with Esb. The daytime scintillations last for 15-45 min during postnoon hours. Their occurrence closely matches the peak occurrence time of Esb. For the first time, spatial scale lengths of E region irregularities are obtained using the technique introduced by Bhattacharyya et al. (2003). The observed spatial scales are validated using theoretical model. The theoretical model manifests 6-19% density fluctuations in the E region to produce weak scintillations (0.15 ≤S4≤ 0.4) on 251 MHz. The study reveals that scale lengths of E region irregularities are smaller on counter equatorial electrojet (CEEJ) days than non-CEEJ days, which could be resulting from lower electron temperatures in E region on CEEJ days.

  13. MESSENGER observations of the response of Mercury's magnetosphere to northward and southward interplanetary magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, James

    M. H. Acũa (2), B. J. Anderson (3), D. N. Baker (4), M. Benna (2), S. A. Boardsen (1), G. n Gloeckler (5), R. E. Gold (3), G. C. Ho (3), H. Korth (3), S. M. Krimigis (3), S. A. Livi (6), R. L. McNutt Jr. (3), J. M. Raines (5), M. Sarantos (1), D. Schriver (7), S. C. Solomon (8), P. Travnicek (9), and T. H. Zurbuchen (5) (1) Heliophysics Science Division, NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA, (2) Solar System Exploration Division, NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA, (3) The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723, USA, (4) Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303, USA, (5) Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA (6) Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 28510, USA, (7) Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA, (8) Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, DC 20015, USA, and (9) Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Prague, Czech Republic, 14131 MESSENGER's 14 January 2008 encounter with Mercury has provided new observations of the solar wind interaction with this planet. Here we report initial results concerning this miniature magnetosphere's response to the north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). This is the component of the IMF that is expected to exert the greatest influence over the structure of the magnetopause and the processes responsible for energy transfer into the magnetosphere. The IMF was northward immediately prior to and following the passage of the MESSENGER spacecraft through this small magnetosphere. However, several-minute episodes of southward IMF were observed in the magnetosheath during the inbound portion of the encounter. Evidence for reconnection at the dayside magnetopause in the form of welldeveloped flux transfer events (FTEs) was observed in the magnetosheath following some of

  14. Geo-effectiveness and GCR-effectiveness of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Observed during the Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, O. P. M.; Badruddin, B.

    2016-07-01

    We study the geomagnetic and Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) response of Interplanetary Coronal Mass ejections (ICMEs) observed for the period of 2010 - 2015. We identify the distinct features of ICMEs during their passage. We analyze the hourly resolution data of geomagnetic indices and ground based neutron monitors, with the simultaneous and same time resolution data of interplanetary plasma and field parameters to identify the features of ICMEs and solar wind parameters during their passage when GCR intensity is affected to its maximum level. Similarly, we identify features of ICMEs and solar wind parameters during their passage when geo-effectiveness is at its maximum level. We discuss the similarities and distinctions in the Geo-effectiveness and GCR-effectiveness of the same ICME structure in the light of plasma and field variations, and physical mechanism(s) playing important role in influencing the GCR intensity and geomagnetic activity.

  15. Global control of merging by the interplanetary magnetic field: Cluster observations of dawnside flank magnetopause reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Elkington, S. R.; Phan, T. D.; Petrinec, S. M.; RèMe, H.; Dunlop, M. W.; Wiltberger, M.; Balogh, A.; Ergun, R. E.; André, M.

    2004-12-01

    Detailed Cluster observations of flank magnetopause reconnection are presented for two events on the Northern and the Southern Hemispheric dawnside flanks when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) clock angle ? = arctan(By/Bz) is within ˜45° of the equatorial plane. The event selection is based on the relative proximity between the Cluster spacecraft 1 position and the predicted magnetospheric sash where antiparallel merging is expected to develop. MHD simulations performed for the two events indicate that the Cluster spacecraft were passing through the MHD sash region in the Northern Hemisphere on 30 June 2001, while crossing the magnetopause equatorward of the Southern Hemispheric sash on 29 May 2001. Accelerated and decelerated plasma flows relative to the magnetosheath velocity were detected by Cluster on both occasions. The Walén test confirms that the observed ΔV is directly correlated with the predicted magnetic field rotation ΔB/? with the expected direction of the normal magnetic field and so we interpret them as speed changes due to magnetic reconnection. The observed directions of ΔV compare very well with the location of the simulated MHD sash relative to Cluster. The magnetic field shear in the locally tangential plane of the magnetopause ranges between 171° and 177° for the 30 June event in good agreement with antiparallel merging at the MHD sash. The corresponding local field shear for the 29 May event is only 144°, either suggesting a component merging site in the direction of the sash or indicating that Cluster is farther away from the location where the neutral line was initially formed as compared with the 30 June event. A comparison between the projected regions of antiparallel and component merging onto the magnetopause and the quasi-steady direction of plasma acceleration detected by Cluster on 29 May and 30 June support the view that the IMF controls the expected global location of magnetic reconnection at limited regions of the

  16. Cosmic ray decreases caused by interplanetary shocks observed by the Brazilian Southern Space Observatory's Multidirectional Muon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deggeroni, Vinicíus; Echer, Ezequiel; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Dal Lago, Alisson; Da Silva, Marlos; Bremm, Tiago

    The space between the planets in the Solar System is continuously permeated by the supermagnetosonic expansion of the solar atmosphere - the solar wind. This is a magnetized plasma that carries outward the sun’s magnetic field. Furthermore, the Sun’s sporadically emits huge coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that disturb the solar wind. When the interplanetary remnants of these CMEs are faster than the local plasma magnetosonic wave speed, shock waves are driven. These shock waves are observed as abrupt variations in solar wind plasma and magnetic field parameters. As one consequence, when these shock waves pass by Earth, cosmic ray decreases are observed by ground based cosmic ray detectors. It is the aim of this work to study interplanetary shock waves effects on cosmic rays measured at ground level. Interplanetary shocks are identified and their parameters determined using the plasma and magnetic field instruments of the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE). Cosmic rays decreases are studied using the Multidirectional Muon Detector (MMD), in operation at the Southern Space Observatory - SSO/CRS/INPE-MCTI, in São Martinho da Serra, RS, Southern Brazil. The period of analysis is from January 2006 to July 2011. In this study it is calculated the shock strength, the magnetic field and plasma density compression ratio across the shocks. Besides, the cosmic ray decrease due to the shocks is determined. Further, the amplitude of cosmic ray decreases is correlated to the shock strength. The results are compared with previous published works.

  17. Refractive scattering evidence from multifrequency scintillation spectra observed at auroral latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, B.

    2008-04-01

    During October 2003 major geomagnetic storm, intensity scintillations on radio signals at 150 MHz and 400 MHz transmitted coherently from Tsykada beacon satellites have been observed. Through the analysis of intensity fluctuation spectra, evidence of refractive scattering from large scale ionospheric irregularities in the spatial plasma density distribution is found. The events can indeed be explained by using the refractive scattering theory developed by Booker and MajidiAhi (1981). The presence of refractive scattering is particularly evident in strong scintillation events, where spectral saturation may well occur. The observed intensity spectra fit the shape of theoretical predictions of the refractive theory. This provides useful insights about spectral slope, Fresnel scale, and the scale of irregularities producing the observed intensity scintillations actually present in the ionosphere.

  18. Characterization of Ionospheric Scintillation Using Simultaneous Formosat-3/COSMIC Radio Occultation Observations and AFRL SCINDA Ground Scintillation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starks, M. J.; Lin, C. S.; Groves, K. M.; Pedersen, T. R.; Basu, S.; Syndergaard, S.; Rocken, C.

    2007-05-01

    Ionospheric scintillation at low latitudes has been studied using ionospheric radio occultation (RO) measurements by the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC micro-satellites in conjunction with ground-based data from the Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) station at Kwajalein Atoll. The Air Force Research Laboratory has developed the SCINDA network for monitoring low-latitude ionospheric total electron content (TEC) and scintillation associated with equatorial spread F. The network currently consists of sixteen stations distributed around the globe and the data have been used to conduct numerous studies on the characteristics and climatology of equatorial scintillation. The present study focuses on COSMIC RO and SCINDA data during the three COSMIC campaigns in 2006. Radio occultation events are selected by requiring that ionospheric scintillation was detected by the SCINDA VHF scintillation monitor at Kwajalein, and that the occultation ray path intersected the Kwajalein longitude below the satellite altitude, which varied from 500 to 800 km for the six FORMOSAT-3 satellites. In order to exclude tropospheric effects, only GPS signal amplitudes from FORMOSAT-3 with ray path tangent altitudes above 100 km are considered. Locations of ionospheric scintillation are estimated by triangulation using the satellites and the SCINDA ground station. Airglow images at Kwajalein are also used to confirm occurrence of equatorial ionospheric scintillations. For the selected events, large amplitude L1 and L2 scintillations tend to occur at altitudes below 200 km at frequencies around 0.5 Hz. The results are discussed as a potential path toward better specifying the occurrence of equatorial scintillations.

  19. Inferring Sources in the Interplanetary Dust Cloud, from Observations and Simulations of Zodiacal Light and Thermal Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Lasue, J.

    2011-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles physical properties may be approached through observations of the solar light they scatter, specially its polarization, and of their thermal emission. Results, at least near the ecliptic plane, on polarization phase curves and on the heliocentric dependence of the local spatial density, albedo, polarization and temperature are summarized. As far as interpretations through simulations are concerned, a very good fit of the polarization phase curve near 1.5 AU is obtained for a mixture of silicates and more absorbing organics material, with a significant amount of fluffy aggregates. In the 1.5-0.5 AU solar distance range, the temperature variation suggests the presence of a large amount of absorbing organic compounds, while the decrease of the polarization with decreasing solar distance is indeed compatible with a decrease of the organics towards the Sun. Such results are in favor of the predominance of dust of cometary origin in the interplanetary dust cloud, at least below 1.5 AU. The implication of these results on the delivery of complex organic molecules on Earth during the LHB epoch, when the spatial density of the interplanetary dust cloud was orders of magnitude greater than today, is discussed.

  20. East-west asymmetric of scintillation occurrence in Indonesia using GPS and GLONASS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadi, P.; Otsuka, Y.; Shiokawa, K.; Saito, S.; Husin, A.; Dear, V.; Anggarani, S.

    2015-12-01

    By using GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) receiver to collect amplitude scintillation at L1 frequency from GPS and GLONASS, we investigated ionospheric scintillation occurrence at equator anomaly in Indonesia from July 2014 to June 2015. The receiver is installed at Bandung (6.9 deg S, 107.6 deg E; 9.9 deg S mag. latitude), Indonesia. In this study, we grouped our analysis into two groups based on duration of observation, (1) July-December 2014 (monthly F10.7 ranged from 124.7-158.7) which is named autumn equinox and (2) January-June 2015 (monthly F10.7 ranged from 120.1-141.7) which is named spring equinox. Our preliminary results can be summarized as follows; (1) the intensity of scintillations at spring equinox is higher than at autumn equinox although solar activity at autumn equinox is higher than at spring equinox, see Figure 1 and (2) as shown in Figure 2, the directional distribution of scintillation occurrences at spring equinox mostly concentrate in the western sky, so we see east-west asymmetric, but the distribution at autumn equinox doesn't show clearly east-west asymmetric. Previous studies have reported that occurrence rate of the scintillation at spring equinox season is higher than at autumn equinox. Our results suggest that equinoctial asymmetry of scintillation occurrence can be also as an asymmetric of scintillation intensity and east-west asymmetric of scintillation occurrence between spring and autumn equinox. In general, plasma bubble is tilted westward as it vertically develop due to vertical shear in the eastward plasma drift in F region, and consequently, it will be tilted westward as it extends in latitude. Scintillation intensity will be stronger when signal propagation tend to be parallel with structure of the plasma bubble. Figure 2 also imply that the latitudinal extension of plasma bubble is higher at spring equinox than at autumn equinox. More the bubble extends in latitude, more the bubble structure exists in the western

  1. Variations in elemental composition of several MEV/nucleon ions observed in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, R. E.; Vonrosenvinge, T. T.; Reames, D. V.

    1985-01-01

    Six years of accumulated ISEE-3 and IMP-8 data to study variations in elemental relative abundances among the different populations of energetic ions seen in interplanetary space are surveyed. Evidence suggesting that heavy ion enrichments may be organized by a rigidity scaling factor A/Z over the range H to Fe is presented. Data to support the hypothesis that shock-associated particles are probably accelerated from ambient energetic fluxes are shown.

  2. Observational signatures of the influence of the interplanetary shocks on the associated low-energy particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heras, A. M.; Sanahuja, B.; Sanderson, T. R.; Marsden, R. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1994-01-01

    We have analyzed the temporal evolution of the upstream particle fluxes and anisotropies in a set of particle events associated with interplanetary shocks, detected by International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE) 3 during the period 1978-1980 in the 147-238 and 620-1000 keV energy ranges. In particular, we have studied those features that can perhaps be used as signatures of the history of the influence of the shock on the particle event. We have paid special attention to the evolution of the flux anisotropy that can carry relevant information on the contribution of shock accelerated particles to the total observed flux. Our analysis shows that during most events, long-lasting (between 5 and 36 hours) large anisotropies are observed upstream of the shock, supporting the hypothesis of continuous injection of shock accelerated paricles in the interplanetary medium while the shock is propagating outward from the Sun. The evolution of the anisotropy throughout each event shows a dependence on the longitude of the parent solar source. We have interpreted the observations considering that shock accelerated particles contribute significantly to the total observed flux from the time when the shock intersects the magnetic field line that connects with the observer. The heliocentric distance of this initial intersection point has been derived from the flux anisotropy observations for each event. The values obtained show a distribution with respect to the longitude of the solar source that can be reproduced with a simple model, which assumes a spherical shock with an angular extension approximately equals 100 deg and an archimedian spiral structure for the interplanetary magnetic field. The results of this work provide a further insight into both the importance of shock acceleration, as well as the influence of the large-scale shock structure in low-energy particle events.

  3. Large-scale interplanetary magnetic fields: Voyager 1 and 2 observations between 1 AU and 9.5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Klein, L. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Behannon, K. W.

    1984-01-01

    The large-scale radial and temporal variations of the interplanetary magnetic field strength B observed by Voyagers 1 and 2 are discussed. Two components of the magnetic field strength were considered: (1) an average component, B sub zero, based on solar rotation averages, and (2) a fluctuation component, delta B, expressed by 10- or 24-hour averages of B normalized by the best-fit average field for the corresponding time and distance. Observations of the sector structure, interfaces, and shocks are presented to further describe magnetic field strength.

  4. Plasma wave phenomena at interplanetary shocks observed by the Ulysses URAP experiment. [Unified Radio and Plasma Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lengyel-Frey, D.; Macdowall, R. J.; Stone, R. G.; Hoang, S.; Pantellini, F.; Harvey, C.; Mangeney, A.; Kellogg, P.; Thiessen, J.; Canu, P.

    1992-01-01

    We present Ulysses URAP observations of plasma waves at seven interplanetary shocks detected between approximately 1 and 3 AU. The URAP data allows ready correlation of wave phenomena from .1 Hz to 1 MHz. Wave phenomena observed in the shock vicinity include abrupt changes in the quasi-thermal noise continuum, Langmuir wave activity, ion acoustic noise, whistler waves and low frequency electrostatic waves. We focus on the forward/reverse shock pair of May 27, 1991 to demonstrate the characteristics of the URAP data.

  5. Observation of EAS Core with the Small Scintillation Detector at Taro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuyama, H.; Kuramochi, Hiroshi; Obara, Hitoshi; Ono, Shunichi; Origasa, Satoru; Mochida, Akinori; Sakayama, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Noboru

    2003-07-01

    We have observed the core structure of extensive air showers(EAS) that primary energy above 1016 eV. To measure the more detail and the correct density of the incident particles near EAS core, we installed 100 small scintillation detectors (using plastic scintillator : 15cm × 15cm × 2.5cm) that are placed on a lattice 10 × 10, and 40cm separation, at Taro Cosmic Ray Lab oratory, at autumn 2002. We report the detail of the small detector, and preliminary results.

  6. Spatial correlations in intense ionospheric scintillations - comparison between numerical computation and observation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, H.

    1987-06-01

    The spatial correlations in intense ionospheric scintillations were analyzed by comparing numerical results with observational ones. The observational results were obtained by spaced-receiver scintillation measurements of VHF satellite radiowave. The numerical computation was made by using the fourth-order moment equation with fairly realistic ionospheric irregularity models, in which power-law irregularities with spectral index 4, both thin and thick slabs, and both isotropic and anisotropic irregularities, were considered. Evolution of the S(4) index and the transverse correlation function was computed. The numerical result that the transverse correlation distance decreases with the increase in S(4) was consistent with that obtained in the observation, suggesting that multiple scattering plays an important role in the intense scintillations observed. The anisotropy of irregularities proved to act as if the density fluctuation increased. This effect, as well as the effect of slab thickness, was evaluated by the total phase fluctuations that the radiowave experienced in the slab. On the basis of the comparison, the irregularity height and electron-density fluctuation which is necessary to produce a particular strength of scintillation were estimated. 30 references.

  7. Observations of interplanetary Lyman-alpha with the Galileo Ultraviolet Spectrometer: Multiple scattering effects at solar maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, J. M.; Pryor, W. R.; Barth, C. A.; Hord, C. W.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Simmons, K. E.; Hall, D. T.

    1994-01-01

    The Galileo Ultravilet Spectrometer Experiment (UVS) obtained a partial celestial sphere map of interplanetary Lyman-alpha (IP L alpha) on 13-14 December 1990 during the first Earth encounter. The Galileo spacecraft was near the downwind axis of the local interstellar medium flow. These UVS measurements sampled the downwind, anti-sunward hemisphere. The data were modeled using a hot model of the interplanetary hydrogen density distribution with the goal of studying multiple scattering effects in the inner solar system. The derived ratio in the downwind direction of the observed brightness and a single scattering model brightness, both normalized to unity in the upwind direction, is 1.82 +/- 0.2. This brightness ratio requires a multiple scattering correction which is 36% larger than can be accounted for by theoretical calculations. The hot model may require: (1) a temperature perturbation of the interstellar wind velocity distribution or (2) an additional downstream source of interplanetary hydrogen. However, a more likely exlanation which affects the hot model is the latitude dependence of the radiation pressure. This dependence, based on the known solar L alpha flux latitude variation at solar maximum, causes a downwind brightness enhancement by preferential focusing of H-atoms with trajectory planes containing the solar poles. This result implies that radiation pressure near the solar poles is nearly independent of solar cycle and is insufficient to lead to a net repulsion of hydrogen atoms by the sun, as can occur near the ecliptic plane during the solar maximum. In addition, the UVS performed 13 observations of IP L alpha while in cruise between Venus and the Earth in 3 directions fixed in ecliptic coordinates.

  8. Observations of a groove in the interplanetary Lyman alpha pattern as the signature of enhanced ionisation in the neutral sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertaux, J. L.; Quemerais, E.; Lallement, R.; Summanen, T.; Kyrola, E.

    1995-06-01

    We report several observations of the Lyman alpha interplanetary emission recorded by a photometer flown in 1976-1977 on board the Soviet spacecraft Prognoz-5 and Prognoz-6. Several scans made in a plane perpendicular to the sun were cutting through the maximum emission region. where the interstellar hydrogen is approaching nearest to the sun (upwind region). On each of these scans is observed a dip in the intensity curve near the ecliptic plane. about 30 deg wide and approximately equals 10% deep. They reveal the presence of a new feature of the interplanetary emission. a 'groove' aligned approximately with the ecliptic plane. This groove is present only near the upwind direction, and is interpreted as the result of enhanced ionisation of interstellar H by charge-exchange with the solar wind in a sheet of approximately 30 deg around the average position of the neutral sheet at this time of solar this Lyman alpha groove is a prime target for future observations with SWAN experiment on SOHO.

  9. Observations of a groove in the interplanetary Lyman alpha pattern as the signature of enhanced ionisation in the neutral sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertaux, J. L.; Quemerais, E.; Lallement, R.; Summanen, T.; Kyrola, E.

    1995-01-01

    We report several observations of the Lyman alpha interplanetary emission recorded by a photometer flown in 1976-1977 on board the Soviet spacecraft Prognoz-5 and Prognoz-6. Several scans made in a plane perpendicular to the sun were cutting through the maximum emission region. where the interstellar hydrogen is approaching nearest to the sun (upwind region). On each of these scans is observed a dip in the intensity curve near the ecliptic plane. about 30 deg wide and approximately equals 10% deep. They reveal the presence of a new feature of the interplanetary emission. a 'groove' aligned approximately with the ecliptic plane. This groove is present only near the upwind direction, and is interpreted as the result of enhanced ionisation of interstellar H by charge-exchange with the solar wind in a sheet of approximately 30 deg around the average position of the neutral sheet at this time of solar this Lyman alpha groove is a prime target for future observations with SWAN experiment on SOHO.

  10. On the Effect of Local Plasma Parameters on Interplanetary Nanodust Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LE CHAT, G.; Issautier, K.; Zaslavsky, A.; Pantellini, F. G. E.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Belheouane, S.; Maksimovic, M.

    2014-12-01

    Dust particles provide an important fraction of the matter composing the interplanetary medium, their mass density at 1 AU being comparable to the one of the solar wind. Among them, dust grains of nanometer size-scale can be detected using radio and plasma wave instruments, because they move at roughly the solar wind speed. The high velocity impact of a dust particle generates a small crater on the spacecraft: the dust particle and the crater material are vaporized. This produces a plasma cloud whose associated electrical charge induces an electric pulse measured with radio and plasma instruments. Since their first detection in the interplanetary medium (Meyer-Vernet et al. 2009), nanodust particles have been routinely measured using STEREO/WAVES instrument (Zaslavsky et al. 2012, Le Chat et al. 2013). From the physical process at the origin of the voltage pulse (Pantellini et al 2013), an effect of the local plasma density is expected. We present the nanodust properties measured using STEREO/WAVES/Low Frequency Receiver (LFR) data between 2007 and 2014, and show the effect of the local plasma density on the measurement. We also, for the first time, present evidence of Coronal Mass Ejection effects on the nanodust flux at 1 AU.

  11. Observations and modeling of ionospheric scintillations at South Pole during six X-class solar flares in 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshi, S.; Zhang, Q.-H.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Wang, Y.; Xing, Z.-Y.

    2016-06-01

    Using two B-spline basis functions of degree 4 and the ionospheric scintillation data from a Global Positioning Satellite System (GPS) scintillation receiver at South Pole, we reproduced ionospheric scintillation indices for the periods of the six X-class solar flares in 2013. These reproduced indices have filled the data gaps, and they are serving as a smooth replica of the real observations. In either event, these modeled scintillation indices are minimizing the geometrical effects between GPS satellite and the receiver. Six X-class solar flares have been studied during the summer and winter months, using the produced scintillation indices based on the observations from the GPS receiver at South Pole and the in situ plasma measurement from the associated passing of Defense Meteorological Satellite Program. Our results show that the solar flare peak suppresses the scintillation level and builds time-independent scintillation patterns; however, after a certain time from the solar flare peak, complicated scintillation patterns develop at high-latitude ionosphere and spread toward the polar cap boundary region. Substantial consistency has been found between moderate proton fluxes and scintillation enhancement.

  12. An interpretation of Mariner 10 helium /584 A/ and hydrogen /1216 A/ interplanetary emission observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of the interplanetary emissions of both He(584 A) and H(1216 A) on January 28, 1974, a time of solar minimum, are reported and discussed. An analysis of the Mariner 10 ultraviolet spectrometer data shows that a simultaneous measurement of both emissions results in a self-consistent determination of the physical properties of the interstellar wind. With the aid of a model the number densities of helium and hydrogen outside the solar system were found to be 0.008 + or - 0.003/cu cm and 0.04 (+0.03, -0.02)/cu cm, respectively, which indicates a He/H ratio of 0.20 (+0.30, -0.13). Values characterizing the helium cone, interstellar wind temperature, effective lifetime of hydrogen atoms in the solar system, and downstream direction of the interstellar wind are presented.

  13. Observation and analysis of abrupt changes in the interplanetary plasma velocity and magnetic field.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. N.; Belcher, J. W.; Lazarus, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents a limited study of the physical nature of abrupt changes in the interplanetary plasma velocity and magnetic field based on 19 day's data from the Pioneer 6 spacecraft. The period was chosen to include a high-velocity solar wind stream and low-velocity wind. Abrupt events were accepted for study if the sum of the energy density in the magnetic field and velocity changes was above a specified minimum. A statistical analysis of the events in the high-velocity solar wind stream shows that Alfvenic changes predominate. This conclusion is independent of whether steady state requirements are imposed on conditions before and after the event. Alfvenic changes do not dominate in the lower-speed wind. This study extends the plasma field evidence for outwardly propagating Alfvenic changes to time scales as small as 1 min (scale lengths on the order of 20,000 km).

  14. On the acceleration of ions by interplanetary shock waves. 3: High time resolution observations of CIR proton events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesses, M. E.; Vanallen, J. A.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Observations within + or - 3 hours of corotating interaction region (CIR) shock waves of proton intensities, pitch angle distribution and crude differential energy spectra of the range of 0.6 E sub p 3.4 MeV are presented. The principle result is the evidence for the persistent flow of particles away from the shock. The observations are found to be in good agreement with the hypothesis of local interplanetary shock acceleration by the shock drift and compression mechanisms. The same set of observations strongly suggest that transit time damping does not play an important role in the acceleration of protons to 1 MeV in the immediate vicinity of CIR shocks.

  15. Interplanetary Charged Dust Magnetic Clouds Striking the Magnetosphere: Coordinated Space-based and Ground-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Chi, Peter; Lai, Hairong

    In general, asteroids, meteoroids and dust do not interact with the plasma structures in the solar system, but after a collision between fast moving bodies the debris cloud contains nanoscale dust particles that are charged and behave like heavy ions. Dusty magnetic clouds are then accelerated to the solar wind speed. While they pose no threat to spacecraft because of the particle size, the coherency imposed by the magnetization of the cloud allows the cloud to interact with the Earth’s magnetosphere as well as the plasma in the immediate vicinity of the cloud. We call these clouds Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs). These IFEs are a unique class of interplanetary field structures that feature cusp-shaped increases and decreases in the interplanetary magnetic field and a thin current sheet. The occurrence of IFEs is attributed to the interaction between the solar wind and dust particles produced in inter-bolide collisions. Previous spacecraft observations have confirmed that IFEs move with the solar wind. When IFEs strike the magnetosphere, they may distort the magnetosphere in several possible ways, such as producing a small indentation, a large scale compression, or a glancing blow. In any event if the IFE is slowed by the magnetosphere, the compression of the Earth’s field should be seen in the ground-based magnetic records that are continuously recorded. Thus it is important to understand the magnetospheric response to IFE arrival. In this study, we investigate the IFE structure observed by spacecraft upstream of the magnetosphere and the induced magnetic field perturbations observed by networks of ground magnetometers, including the THEMIS, CARISMA, McMAC arrays in North America and the IMAGE array in Europe. We find that, in a well-observed IFE event on December 24, 2006, all ground magnetometer stations observed an impulse at approximately 1217 UT when the IFE was expected to arrive at the Earth’s magnetopause. These ground stations spread across

  16. Four years of zodiacal light observations from the Helios space probes - Evidence for a smooth distribution of interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leinert, C.; Richter, I.; Pitz, E.; Hanner, M.

    1980-01-01

    Zodiacal light experiments on Helios 2 that has been operating continually since January 1976 are discussed, with the purpose of elucidating the distribution of interplanetary dust. Results for the observed gradient of zodiacal light intensity between 1 A.U. and perihelion at 0.3 A.U. show that for all elongations, from 17.5 deg to 135 deg from the sun, the exponent of intensity increase is -2.3 plus or minus 0.1. Color investigations show no systematic variation with heliocentric distance, but a slight reddening is present, increasing towards small elongations. The degree of polarization is found to be higher at 1 A.U. than given previously and decreases towards the sun, even if no correction for electron scattering is made. All results thus fit the hypothesized power law for radial distribution of dust. It is concluded from the stability of zodiacal intensity that the distribution of interplanetary dust is rather simple in space and quite constant in time.

  17. Near- and far-infrared observations of interplanetary dust bands from the COBE diffuse infrared background experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiesman, William J.; Hauser, Michael G.; Kelsall, Thomas; Lisse, Carey M.; Moseley, S. Harvey, Jr.; Reach, William T.; Silverberg, Robert F.; Stemwedel, Sally W.; Weiland, Janet L.

    1995-01-01

    Data from the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) instrument aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) spacecraft have been used to examine the near and far infrared signatures of the interplanetary dust (IPD) bands. Images of the dust band pairs at ecliptic latitudes of +/- 1.4 deg and +/- 10 deg have been produced at DIRBE wavelengths from 1.25 to 100 micrometers. The observations at the shorter wavelengths provide the first evidence of scattered sunlight from particles responsible for the dust bands. It is found that the grains in the bands and those in the smooth IPD cloud have similar spectral energy distributions, suggesting similar compositions and possibly a common origin. The scattering albedos from 1.25 to 3.5 micrometers for the grains in the dust bands and those in the IPD cloud are 0.22 and 0.29, respectively. The 10 deg band pair is cooler (185 +/- 10 K) than the smooth interplanetary dust cloud (259 +/- 10 K). From both parallactic and thermal analyses, the implied location of the grains responsible for the peak brightness of the 10 deg band pair is 2.1 +/- 0.1 AU the Sun A parallactic distance of 1.4 +/- 0.2 AU is found for the peak of the 1.4 deg band pair.

  18. Analysis and synthesis of coronal and interplanetary energetic particle, plasma, and magnetic field observations over three solar rotations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelof, E. C.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    In a previous paper (Krimigis et al., 1971), simultaneous observations in 1967 of solar particle events at low (less than 1 MeV) energies were presented. In the present paper, the full complement of simultaneous plasma, magnetic field, and energetic particle data is combined, and a complete analysis is made of all the events discussed in the original paper. The essential concept of 'collimated convection' is introduced, whereby the bulk velocity along the field lines of low-energy solar particles is independent of solar local plasma velocity, and the particles are strongly collimated along the field line with no transverse velocity component other than that of the field line itself. Collimated convection effects are shown to exist in small-scale convection and large-scale evolution of particle fluxes; the particle fluxes are, in turn, used to delineate the small-scale and large-scale evolution of the interplanetary magnetic field. Use of collimated convection is made in demonstrating a technique whereby energetic particle intensity profiles in the interplanetary medium can be related to equatorial high coronal magnetic field structures, by using the instantaneous solar wind velocity. This technique is applied in mapping particle intensities from Mariner 5 onto H alpha synoptic charts of chromospheric magnetic field structures for Carrington rotations 1523 to 1525.

  19. Ionospheric Irregularities at High Latitudes During Geomagnetic Storms and Substorms: Simultaneous Observations of Magnetic Field Perturbations and GPS Scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Deshpande, K.; Clauer, C. R.; Bust, G. S.; Crowley, G.; Humphreys, T. E.; Kim, L.; Lessard, M.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Zachariah, T. P.

    2012-12-01

    Plasma instability in the ionosphere is often observed as disturbance and distortion of the amplitude and phase of radio signals, which are known as ionospheric scintillations. High-latitude ionospheric plasma, closely connected to solar wind and magnetospheric dynamics, produce very dynamic and short-lived GPS scintillations, making it challenging to characterize them. This study reports simultaneous observations of geomagnetic pulsations and GPS signal scintillations during geomagnetic storms and substorms using a newly designed Autonomous Adaptive Low-Power Instrument Platform (AAL-PIP) installed at the South Pole. A statistical investigation of the AAL-PIP data recorded from January through May 2012 is presented to study local time distribution of scintillation events and a correlation between GPS scintillation and magnetic field perturbations. This report discusses a possible connection between magnetic field perturbations associated with the ionospheric currents and the creation of plasma instability by examining relative contribution of storm/substorm activity to ionospheric irregularities.

  20. INTERPLANETARY PROPAGATION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE HEAVY IONS OBSERVED AT 1 AU AND THE ROLE OF ENERGY SCALING

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, G. M.; Haggerty, D. K.; Li, G.; Zank, G. P.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Desai, M. I.

    2012-12-20

    We have studied {approx}0.3 to >100 MeV nucleon{sup -1} H, He, O, and Fe in 17 large western hemisphere solar energetic particle events (SEP) to examine whether the often observed decrease of Fe/O during the rise phase is due to mixing of separate SEP particle populations, or is an interplanetary transport effect. Our earlier study showed that the decrease in Fe/O nearly disappeared if Fe and O were compared at energies where the two species interplanetary diffusion coefficient were equal, and therefore their kinetic energy nucleon{sup -1} was different by typically a factor {approx}2 ({sup e}nergy scaling{sup )}. Using an interplanetary transport model that includes effects of focusing, convection, adiabatic deceleration, and pitch angle scattering we have fit the particle spectral forms and intensity profiles over a broad range of conditions where the 1 AU intensities were reasonably well connected to the source and not obviously dominated by local shock effects. The transport parameters we derive are similar to earlier studies. Our model follows individual particles with a Monte Carlo calculation, making it possible to determine many properties and effects of the transport. We find that the energy scaling feature is preserved, and that the model is reasonably successful at fitting the magnitude and duration of the Fe/O ratio decrease. This along with successfully fitting the observed decrease of the O/He ratio leads us to conclude that this feature is best understood as a transport effect. Although the effects of transport, in particular adiabatic deceleration, are very significant below a few MeV nucleon{sup -1}, the spectral break observed in these events at 1 AU is only somewhat modified by transport, and so the commonly observed spectral breaks must be present at injection. For scattering mean free paths of the order of 0.1 AU adiabatic deceleration is so large below {approx}200 keV nucleon{sup -1} that ions starting with such energies at injection are

  1. Electron impact ionization rates for interstellar neutral H and He atoms near interplanetary shocks: Ulysses observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Phillips, J. L.; Gosling, J. T.; Isenberg, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    During average solar wind flow conditions at 1 AU, ionization rates of interstellar neutrals that penetrate into the inner heliosphere are dominated by charge exchange with solar wind protons for H atoms, and by photoionization for He atoms. During occurrences of strong, coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven interplanetary shock waves near 1 AU, electron impact ionization can make substantial, if not dominating, contributions to interstellar neutral ionization rates in the regions downstream of the shocks. However, electron impact ionization is expected to be relatively less important with increasing heliocentric distance because of the decrease in electron temperature. Ulysses encountered many CME-driven shocks during its journey to and beyond Jupiter, and in addition, encountered a number of strong corotating interaction region (CIR) shocks. These shocks generally occur only beyond approximately 2 AU. Many of the CIR shocks were very strong rivalling the Earth's bow shock in electron heating. We have compared electron impact ionization rates calculated from electron velocity distributions measured downstream from CIR shocks using the Ulysses SWOOPS experiment to charge-exchange rates calculated from measured proton number fluxes and the photoionization rate estimated from an assumed solar photon spectrum typical of solar maximum conditions. We find that, although normally the ratio of electron-impact ionization rates to charge-exchange (for H) and to photoionization (for He) rates amounts to only about one and a few tens of percent, respectively, downstream of some of the stronger CIR shocks they amount to more than 10% and greater than 100%, respectively.

  2. The August 1972 solar-terrestrial events - Interplanetary magnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    Interplanetary-magnetic-field measurements made by Pioneers 9 and 10, HEOS 2, and Explorer 41 during early August 1972 are reviewed. It is noted that the two Pioneers were nearly radially aligned during the flare events, with Pioneer 9 at a distance of 0.78 AU from the sun and Pioneer 10 at a distance of 2.2 AU. The data obtained by Pioneer 9, Pioneer 10, and the two near-earth satellites are analyzed separately, and the major flare-associated shocks are identified. An attempt is made to identify corresponding shocks at the different locations and to determine their propagation velocities in the region between 0.8 and 2.2 AU. It is found that there was an obvious tendency for the average shock velocities to decrease with increasing radial distance from the sun and that the local velocities at the Pioneer locations were significantly smaller than the appropriate average values. A comparison of these local velocities indicates that there was a large deceleration of the shocks between the sun and some distance within 0.8 AU but little, if any, deceleration beyond that distance. A plot of average shock velocities from the sun to 1.0 AU as a function of longitude separation between the flares and Pioneer 9 is shown to suggest a pronounced deviation of the shock fronts from spherical symmetry.

  3. Three-dimensional interaction of interplanetary shock waves with the bow shock and magnetopause - A comparison of theory with ISEE observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhuang, H. C.; Russell, C. T.; Smith, E. J.; Gosling, J. T.

    1981-01-01

    The reported investigation is concerned with the propagation of the interplanetary shock waves in the solar wind and their three-dimensional interaction with the bow shock and magnetosheath. Formulae are deduced to predict the new position and orientation of the bow shock front after the interaction. To test the understanding of the interplanetary portion of the shock propagation, the obtained results are compared with observations on August 18, 1978, when both ISEE 1 and ISEE 3 were in the solar wind. Two examples of an interplanetary shock wave penetrating into the magnetosphere on October 4, 1978, and August 27, 1978, are examined, taking into account a simple model of the magnetosheath. The results agree with the observed values of the ISEE satellite data within experimental uncertainties.

  4. The observation of scintillation in a hydrated inorganic compound: CeCl3 6H2O

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A; Neal, John S; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Custelcean, Radu

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported the discovery of a new family of rare-earth metal-organic single-crystal scintillators based on Ce3+ as the activator ion. Starting with the CeCl3(CH3OH)4 prototype, this family of scintillators has recently been extended to include complex metal-organic adducts produced by reacting CeCl3 with heavier organics (e.g., isomers of propanol and butanol). Some of these new rare-earth metal-organic materials incorporated waters of hydration in their structures, and the observation of scintillation in these hydrated compounds was an original finding for any solid scintillator. In the present work, we now report what is apparently the initial observation of gamma-ray-excited scintillation in an inorganic hydrated material, namely single-crystal monoclinic CeCl3 6H2O. This observation shows that the mechanisms of the various scintillation energy-transfer processes are not blocked by the presence of waters of hydration in an inorganic material and that the observation of scintillation in other hydrated inorganic compounds is not precluded.

  5. Thermospheric and geomagnetic responses to interplanetary coronal mass ejections observed by ACE and GRACE: Statistical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, S.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A.; Baur, O.; Lammer, H.

    2015-10-01

    For the period July 2003 to August 2010, the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) catalogue maintained by Richardson and Cane lists 106 Earth-directed events, which have been measured in situ by plasma and field instruments on board the ACE satellite. We present a statistical investigation of the Earth's thermospheric neutral density response by means of accelerometer measurements collected by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, which are available for 104 ICMEs in the data set, and its relation to various geomagnetic indices and characteristic ICME parameters such as the impact speed (vmax), southward magnetic field strength (Bz). The majority of ICMEs causes a distinct density enhancement in the thermosphere, with up to a factor of 8 compared to the preevent level. We find high correlations between ICME Bz and thermospheric density enhancements (≈0.9), while the correlation with the ICME impact speed is somewhat smaller (≈0.7). The geomagnetic indices revealing the highest correlations are Dst and SYM-H(≈0.9); the lowest correlations are obtained for Kp and AE (≈0.7), which show a nonlinear relation with the thermospheric density enhancements. Separating the response for the shock-sheath region and the magnetic structure of the ICME, we find that the Dst and SYM-H reveal a tighter relation to the Bz minimum in the magnetic structure of the ICME, whereas the polar cap indices show higher correlations with the Bz minimum in the shock-sheath region. Since the strength of the Bz component—either in the sheath or in the magnetic structure of the ICME—is highly correlated (≈0.9) with the neutral density enhancement, we discuss the possibility of satellite orbital decay estimates based on magnetic field measurements at L1, i.e., before the ICME hits the Earth magnetosphere. These results are expected to further stimulate progress in space weather understanding and applications regarding satellite operations.

  6. Interplanetary dust particles collected in the stratosphere: observations of atmospheric heating and constraints on their interrelationships and sources.

    PubMed

    Sandford, S A; Bradley, J P

    1989-01-01

    The majority of the interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere belong to one of three major classes, the first two dominated by the anhydrous minerals olivine and pyroxene, and the third by hydrous layer-lattice silicates. Infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies show that the different IDP classes represent different types of dust that exist as individual particles in interplanetary space. The majority of the collected IDPs smaller than 30 micrometers in diameter in the layer-lattice silicate and pyroxene classes appear not to have been heated to temperatures above 600 degrees C during atmospheric entry. The relatively low maximum temperatures experienced by these IDPs during atmospheric entry imply that they arrive at the top of the atmosphere with low geocentric encounter velocities. This limits the possible encounter trajectories for these particles to relatively circular, prograde orbits. As a result, it is unlikely that these IDPs are from Earth-crossing comets or asteroids. Asteroids, and comets having low inclinations and perihelia outside 1.2 AU, appear to be the best candidates for the parent bodies of the pyroxene and layer-lattice silicate particles. Chemical and mineralogical information suggests that the pyroxene-rich IDPs are from comets and the layer-lattice silicate-rich IDPs are from asteroids. The collected IDPs dominated by olivine appear to include a larger fraction of particles heating above 600 degrees C, suggesting that these particles were captured from more eccentric orbits. This, and the observation of the infrared spectral features of olivine in several comets suggest these particles have a cometary origin. Since much of the collected dust has apparently been captured from nearly circular, prograde orbits and since there are no appropriate parent bodies presently in such orbits, these results provide an experimental confirmation that the Poynting-Robertson effect exists as a

  7. On the interplanetary evolution of CME-driven shocks: a comparison between remote sensing observations and in-situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpes, Laura; Bothmer, Volker

    2015-08-01

    Fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are a prime driver of major space weather effects and strong geomagnetic storms. When the CME propagation speed is higher than the Alfvén speed a shock forms in front of the CME leading edge. CME-driven shocks are observed in in-situ data and, with the advent of increasingly sensitive imaging instruments, also in remote sensing observations in the form of bright fronts ahead of the CMEs.In this work we present the study of 4 Earth-directed CMEs which drove shocks detected in STEREO COR 2 and HI observations. For each event we identify the source region and the signatures of CME eruption such as waves, EUV dimmings, flare and prominence eruptions. The shock and CME interplanetary evolution is determined from COR2 and HI observations via an application of triangulation techniques. Furthermore, propagation speed and arrival times are inferred. The CME geometry is modelled in COR2 via the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model and the assumption on self-similar expansion is tested by expanding the flux rope to the HI1 field of view. A combination of these results with models for the shock location allows to infer the time evolution of the compression ratio ρd/ρu across the shock and of the upstream Mach number M at locations where no direct plasma measurements are available. These values, as well as the arrival time and speed, are compared to ACE in-situ measurements to validate the results. For the 03 April 2010 event, e.g., the values of the Mach number and the compression ratio extrapolated to the position of ACE are respectively 2.1 < ρd/ρu < 2.4 and 2.3 < M < 2.5, in good agreement with the in-situ values found in literature, ρd/ρu = 2.84 and M = 2.2. This study is carried out in conjunction to simulations of CME initiation. Combined results from observations and simulations allow to connect the interplanetary and near-Earth properties of CMEs to those of their source regions, and to the mechanisms of CME onset.

  8. Three-Dimensional Tomography of Interplanetary Disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Bernard V.; Hick, P. Paul

    2004-09-01

    We have developed a Computer Assisted Tomography (CAT) program that modifies a three-dimensional kinematic heliospheric model to fit interplanetary scintillation (IPS) or Thomson scattering observations. The tomography program iteratively changes this global model to least-squares fit the data. Both a corotating and time-dependent model can be reconstructed. The short time intervals of the time-dependent modeling (to shorter than 1 day) force the heliospheric reconstructions to depend on outward solar wind motion to give perspective views of each point in space accessible to the observations, allowing reconstruction of interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) as well as corotating structures. We show these models as velocity or density Carrington maps and remote views. We have studied several events, including the 2000 July 14 Bastille-Day halo CME and several intervals using archival Cambridge IPS data, and we have also used archival Helios photometer data to reproduce the heliosphere. We check our results by comparison with additional remote-sensing observations, and in-situ observations from near-Earth spacecraft. A comparison of these observations and the Earth forecasts possible using them is available in real time on the World Wide Web using IPS data from the Solar Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Japan.

  9. Direct observations of the full Dungey convection cycle in the polar ionosphere for southward interplanetary magnetic field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.-H.; Lockwood, M.; Foster, J. C.; Zhang, S.-R.; Zhang, B.-C.; McCrea, I. W.; Moen, J.; Lester, M.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    2015-06-01

    Tracking the formation and full evolution of polar cap ionization patches in the polar ionosphere, we directly observe the full Dungey convection cycle for southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. This enables us to study how the Dungey cycle influences the patches' evolution. The patches were initially segmented from the dayside storm enhanced density plume at the equatorward edge of the cusp, by the expansion and contraction of the polar cap boundary due to pulsed dayside magnetopause reconnection, as indicated by in situ Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) observations. Convection led to the patches entering the polar cap and being transported antisunward, while being continuously monitored by the globally distributed arrays of GPS receivers and Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radars. Changes in convection over time resulted in the patches following a range of trajectories, each of which differed somewhat from the classical twin-cell convection streamlines. Pulsed nightside reconnection, occurring as part of the magnetospheric substorm cycle, modulated the exit of the patches from the polar cap, as confirmed by coordinated observations of the magnetometer at Tromsø and European Incoherent Scatter Tromsø UHF radar. After exiting the polar cap, the patches broke up into a number of plasma blobs and returned sunward in the auroral return flow of the dawn and/or dusk convection cell. The full circulation time was about 3 h.

  10. Propagation and Evolution of CMEs in the Interplanetary Medium: Analysis of Remote Sensing and In situ Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Vourlidas, Angelos; Gomez-Herrero, Raul; Malandraki, Olga; Szabo, Adam; Dresing, Nina; Davila, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    EUV disk imagers and white light coronagraphs have provided for many years information on the early formation and evolution of corona) mass ejections (CMEs). More recently, the novel heliospheric imaging instruments aboard the STEREO mission are providing crucial remote sensing information on the interplanetary evolution of these events while in situ instruments complete the overall characterization of the interplanetary CMEs. In this work, we present an analysis of CMEs from the Sun to the interplanetary medium using combined data from THE SOHO, STEREO, WIND, and ACE spacecraft. The events were selected to cover the widest possible spectrum of different ambient solar wind, magnetic field configurations, plasma parameters, etc. to allow uncovering those aspects that are important in understanding the propagation and evolution mechanisms of CMEs in the interplanetary medium.

  11. Interferometric observation of Cygnus-A discrete radiosource scintillations at Irkutsk Incoherent Scatter radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Globa, Mariya; Vasilev, Roman; Kushnaryov, Dmitriy; Medvedev, Andrey

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new method for analysis of data from Irkutsk Incoherent Scatter Radar. The method allows us to accomplish interferometric observation of discrete cosmic radio source characteristics. In this study, we analyzed ionospheric scintillations of the radio source Cygnus-A. Observations were made in 2013 during regular radar sessions within 5-15 days for different seasons, and the effective time of observation was 15-30 minutes per day. For interferometric analysis, the properties of correlation (coherence) coefficient of two independent recording channels were used. The statistical analysis of data from independent channels allows us to construct two-dimensional histograms of radio source brightness distribution with period of 18 s and to determine parameters (the maximum position and the histogram width) representing position and angular size of radio source for each histogram. It is shown that the change of statistical characteristics does not correlate with fluctuations in power (scintillations) of the signal caused by radio wave propagation through ionospheric irregularities.

  12. Large-scale variations of the interplanetary magnetic field: Voyager 1 and 2 observations between 1-5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Behannon, K. W.; Klein, L. W.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    Observations by the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft of the interplanetary magnetic field between 1 and 5 AU were used to investigate the large scale structure of the IMF in a period of increasing solar activity. The Voyager spacecraft found notable deviations from the Parker axial model. These deviations are attributed both to temporal variations associated with increasing solar activity, and to the effects of fluctuations of the field in the radial direction. The amplitude of the latter fluctuations were found to be large relative to the magnitude of the radial field component itself beyond approximately 3 AU. Both Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 observed decreases with increasing heliocentric distance in the amplitude of transverse fluctuations in the averaged field strength (B) which are consistent with the presence of predominantly undamped Alfven waves in the solar wind, although and necessarily implying the presence of them. Fluctuations in the strength of B (relative to mean field strength) were found to be small in amplitude, with a RMS which is approximately one third of that for the transverse fluctuations and they are essentially independent of distance from the Sun.

  13. OBSERVATIONS OF THE INTERPLANETARY HYDROGEN DURING SOLAR CYCLES 23 AND 24. WHAT CAN WE DEDUCE ABOUT THE LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM?

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, Frédéric E.; Quémerais, Eric; Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi; Harris, Walter M.; Clarke, John

    2014-06-20

    Observations of interstellar helium atoms by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) spacecraft in 2009 reported a local interstellar medium (LISM) velocity vector different from the results of the Ulysses spacecraft between 1991 and 2002. The interplanetary hydrogen (IPH), a population of neutrals that fills the space between planets inside the heliosphere, carries the signatures of the LISM and its interaction with the solar wind. More than 40 yr of space-based studies of the backscattered solar Lyα emission from the IPH provided limited access to the velocity distribution, with the first temporal evolution map of the IPH line-shift during solar cycle 23. This work presents the results of the latest IPH observations made by the Hubble Space Telescope's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph during solar cycle 24. These results have been compiled with previous measurements, including data from the Solar Wind Anisotropies instrument on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. The whole set has been compared to physically realistic models to test both sets of LISM physical parameters as measured by Ulysses and IBEX, respectively. This comparison shows that the LISM velocity vector has not changed significantly since Ulysses measurements.

  14. Comparison of interplanetary type 2 radio burst observations by ISEE-3, Ulysses, and WIND with applications to space weather prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Klimas, A. J.; Lengyel-Frey, D.; Stone, R. G.; Thejappa, G.

    1997-01-01

    Interplanetary (IP) type 2 radio bursts are produced by IP shocks driven by solar ejecta, presumably involving shock acceleration of electrons that leads to radio emission. These radio bursts, which can be detected remotely by a sensitive spacecraft radio receiver, provide a method of tracking the leading edge of solar ejecta moving outward from the sun. Consequently, observations of these bursts sometimes provide advance warning of one or more days prior to the onset of geomagnetic activity induced by the solar ejecta. A robust lower limit on the fraction of intense geomagnetic storms, that are preceded by IP type 2 bursts, is provided. It is shown that 41 percent of the geomagnetic storms occurring during the interval September 1978 to February 1983 were preceded by type 2 events in this catalog, and reasons why the fraction is not larger are addressed. Differences in the observing capabilities of the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE) 3, Ulysses, and WIND, to explain why each of these similar spacecraft radio investigations provides a different perspective of IP type 2 emissions are reviewed.

  15. Interplanetary shock waves associated with solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, J. K.; Sakurai, K.

    1974-01-01

    The interaction of the earth's magnetic field with the solar wind is discussed with emphasis on the influence of solar flares. The geomagnetic storms are considerered to be the result of the arrival of shock wave generated by solar flares in interplanetary space. Basic processes in the solar atmosphere and interplanetary space, and hydromagnetic disturbances associated with the solar flares are discussed along with observational and theoretical problems of interplanetary shock waves. The origin of interplanetary shock waves is also discussed.

  16. Interplanetary particles and fields, November 22 - December 6, 1977: Helios, Voyager, and IMP observations between 0.6 AU and 1.6 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Weber, R.; Armstrong, T.; Goodrich, C.; Sullivan, J.; Gurnett, D.; Kellogg, P.; Keppler, E.; Mariani, F.

    1979-01-01

    The principal interplanetary events observed are described and analyzed. Three flow systems were observed: (1) a corotating stream and a stream interface associated with a coronal hole; (2) a shock wave and an energetic particle event associated with a 2-B flare; and (3) an isolated shock wave of uncertain origin. Data from 28 experiments and 6 spacecraft provide measurements of solar wind plasma, magnetic fields, plasma waves, radio waves, energetic electrons, and low energy protons.

  17. Coordinated study of scintillations recorded by Chinese FY-2 geostationary meteorological satellite and VHF coherent radar observations over south china

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Xiaomin; Yu, Tao; Xia, Chunliang; Huang, Jiang; Xu, Jie

    2016-09-01

    The first scintillation observations of Chinese FY-2 geostationary meteorological satellite (86.5°E) observed at Guangzhou (23.2°N, 113.3°E, dip 18°N) and simultaneous VHF (47.5 MHz) coherent radar measurements from Sanya (18.3°N, 109.6°E, dip 13°N) during equinoctial months of 2011 and 2012 have been presented here. The observations are used for a coordinated study for the relationship between the L-band scintillation patches on the propagation path of FY-2 satellite and the extended 3-m irregularity structures known as plumes over South China. The statistical results showed that the plumes and the scintillation patches have nearly a one-to-one correspondence. In case study, the zonal drift velocity of the irregularities was estimated by comparison of the onset times of the scintillation and plume and the irregularities were found to drift eastwards at a speed ranging about tens of meters to one hundred meters per second. From the derived value of drift speed and duration of scintillation events, the irregularity patches were found to have east-west extent about a few hundred kilometers. On the other hand, the scintillation did not always occur following the appearance of plume which might be due to the associated irregularities occurring at lower altitudes failing to reach the region of the ionosphere through which the satellite to ground link passes. In addition, weak scintillations were observed on FY-2 link without any plume structure on radar backscatter maps occasionally.

  18. Interplanetary Lyman-alpha observations with UVS on Voyager - Data, first analysis, implications for the ionization lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallement, R.; Bertaux, J. L.; Chassefiere, E.; Sandel, B.

    1991-01-01

    A fraction of the measurements of the interplanetary Lyman-alpha background collected by the Ultraviolet Spectrometer during the cruise of Voyager 1 and 2 between 1977 and 1983 is presented and compared with results from current models of the interaction between the sun and the neutral interstellar gas. An analysis of two sets of data indicates that the same H atom lifetime cannot fit all the data. The actual ionization rate is inferred from the intensity gradient in the maximum emissivity region observed from a sidewind Voyager position at 6 AU, yielding a lifetime of about 1 exp 6 s at 1 AU, whereas the upwind/downwind intensity ratio in the inner solar system favors 2 x 10 exp 6 s, as measured by Voyager, Prognoz, and Pioneer Venus instruments. It is proposed that there is an excess of Ly-alpha emission in the downwind region which forces the model toward excessively high values of the lifetime. Possible explanations are discussed, like incorrect modeling or an additional source of H atoms.

  19. Interplanetary Lyman-alpha observations with UVS on Voyager - Data, first analysis, implications for the ionization lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallement, R.; Bertaux, J. L.; Chassefiere, E.; Sandel, B.

    1991-12-01

    A fraction of the measurements of the interplanetary Lyman-alpha background collected by the Ultraviolet Spectrometer during the cruise of Voyager 1 and 2 between 1977 and 1983 is presented and compared with results from current models of the interaction between the sun and the neutral interstellar gas. An analysis of two sets of data indicates that the same H atom lifetime cannot fit all the data. The actual ionization rate is inferred from the intensity gradient in the maximum emissivity region observed from a sidewind Voyager position at 6 AU, yielding a lifetime of about 1 exp 6 s at 1 AU, whereas the upwind/downwind intensity ratio in the inner solar system favors 2 x 10 exp 6 s, as measured by Voyager, Prognoz, and Pioneer Venus instruments. It is proposed that there is an excess of Ly-alpha emission in the downwind region which forces the model toward excessively high values of the lifetime. Possible explanations are discussed, like incorrect modeling or an additional source of H atoms.

  20. Pitch Angle Scattering of Solar Flare Electrons in the Interplanetary Medium: Observations and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock, B.; Kontar, E.; Agueda, N.

    2015-12-01

    In the past decade, analysis of near-relativistic (~27 keV - 300 keV) electron events at 1 AU have highlighted two transport effects which require explanation. Firstly, several events feature delayed electron arrival with respect to solar radio and hard x-ray emission, and secondly, the peak-flux spectrum of electrons at 1 AU does not match the predicted spectrum from hard x-ray observations. We analyse several near-relativistic electron events observed via both RHESSI hard x-ray observations at the Sun and in-situ measurements from the Wind/3DP detector at 1 AU. Numerical simulations of electron transport outwards from the Sun are made, which take the electron injection time and peak-flux spectrum from RHESSI data, and the flux subsequently passing 1 AU is calculated. We consider the effects of adiabatic focusing and pitch angle diffusion on the particle transport, and a momentum and distance dependent form of the parallel mean free path for electrons is employed. The simulated lightcurves, peak-flux spectrum, pitch angle distribution, and delay times are then compared with Wind observations. We find that, for higher energy electrons (>40 keV), the simulated flux matches well with observations, showing that stochastic pitch angle scattering is able to explain apparent delayed particle injection at the Sun. The lower energy observations, however, remain unmatched by models, which predict much more impulsive events at Earth than are observed. We also find that pitch angle scattering is too weak to vary the peak-flux spectrum sufficiently, thus requiring further exploration.

  1. Large-scale variations of the interplanetary magnetic field: Voyager 1 and 2 observations between 1-5 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Burlaga, L.F.; Lepping, R.P.; Behannon, K.W.; Klein, L.W.; Neubauer, F.M.

    1982-06-01

    Observations by the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft of the interplanetary magnetic field between 1 and 5 AU have been used to investigate the large-scale structure of the IMF in the years 1977 to 1979, a period of increasing solar activity. This complements the Pioneer 10, 11 investigation between 1 and 8.5 AU during 1972--1976 when the sun was less active. In contrast to the good agreement of the Pioneer observations with the ideal field configuration of the Parker spiral model during near solar minimum conditions, the Voyager spacecraft found notable deviations from that configuration. We attribute these deviations both to temporal variations associated with increasing solar activity, and to the effects of fluctuations of the field in the radial direction. The amplitude of the latter fluctuations was found to be large relative to the magnitude of the radial field component itself beyond approximately 3 AU. The IMF sector structure was generally not well-developed during the period of this study. Notable differences were found between Voyager 1 and 2 observations. Differences in the region 1--2 AU are attributed to the substantially different latitudes of the two spacecraft during much of the period. Later differences are most likely associated with the fact that the Voyagers moved through the region between 4 and 5 AU at different times. Both Voyager 1 and 2 observed decreases with increasing heliocentric distance in the amplitude of 'transverse' fluctuations in B that are consistent with the presence of predominantly undamped Alfven waves in the solar wind although not necessarily implying the presence of them. The presence of convective structures, compressive modes, and/or a saturated instability of Alfven waves cannot be excluded by these Voyager results.

  2. Theoretical interpretation of the observed interplanetary magnetic field radial variation in the outer solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Thomas, B. T.; Nerney, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of the azimuthal component of the IMF are evaluated through the use of an MHD model which shows the effect of magnetic flux tubes opening in the outer solar system. It is demonstrated that the inferred meridional transport of magnetic flux is consistent with predictions by the MHD model. The computed azimuthal and radial magnetic flux deficits are almost identical to the observations. It is suggested that the simplest interpretation of the observations is that meridional flows are created by a direct body force on the plasma. This is consistent with the analytic model of Nerney and Suess (1975), in which such flux deficits in the IMF arise naturally from the meridional gradient in the spiralling field.

  3. Type 2 solar radio events observed in the interplanetary medium. Part 1: General characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Stone, R. G.; Fainberg, J.; Steinberg, J. L.; Hoang, S.

    1980-01-01

    Twelve type 2 solar radio events were observed in the 2 MHz to 30 kHz frequency range by the radio astronomy experiment on the ISEE-3 satellite over the period from September 1978 to December 1979. These data provide the most comprehensive sample of type 2 radio bursts observed at kilometer wavelengths. Dynamic spectra of a number of events are presented. Where possible, the 12 events were associated with an initiating flare, ground based radio data, the passage of a shock at the spacecraft, and the sudden commencement of a geomagnetic storm. The general characteristics of kilometric type 2 bursts are discussed.

  4. Observational study of ionospheric irregularities and GPS scintillations associated with the 2012 tropical cyclone Tembin passing Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhe; Liu, Zhizhao

    2016-05-01

    This study presents the ionospheric responses observed in Hong Kong to a Typhoon, namely, Tembin, from the aspects of the occurrence of ionospheric irregularities and scintillations, using Global Positioning System (GPS) observations from a ground-based GPS scintillation monitoring station in Hong Kong and from GPS receivers on board the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) satellites. The ionospheric irregularities and scintillations are characterized by the rate of total electron content variation index (ROTI) and the amplitude scintillation index S4, respectively. The typhoon Tembin formed over the western North Pacific during 18-30 August 2012 and approached Hong Kong during 24-27 August 2012 with the closest distance 290 km from Hong Kong at around 17 universal time (UT) on 25 August 2012. The ground-based observations indicate that in the nighttime period of 20:00-02:00 local time (LT = UT + 8 h) on 26 August when Tembin passed closely to Hong Kong, the ionospheric irregularities and scintillations of GPS signals were observed in the south of Hong Kong, over the area of 13°N ~ 23°N in latitude and 110°E ~ 120°E in longitude. From the COSMIC observations, it shows that the number of radio occultation scintillation events peaks on 26 August 2012 during the passage of Tembin. Without the presence of strong geomagnetic or solar activity, it is suspected that gravity waves might be generated in the lower atmosphere and likely seed the formation of ionospheric plasma irregularities. This work for the first time from Hong Kong observes the sign of coupling between the lower atmosphere and ionosphere in a tropical cyclone event, combining both ground- and space-based GPS observation data.

  5. Ground Observation of the Hayabusa Reentry: The Third Opportunity of Man-made Fireball from Interplanetary Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Hiramatsu, Y.; Furumoto, M.; Fujita, K.

    2010-12-01

    After 7 years and 6,000,000,000 km of challenging cruise in the solar system, the Hayabusa did come back to the Earth on June 13, 2010. The Hayabusa, the first sample-return explorer to NEA, landed on 25243 Itokawa in 2005, capturing surface particles on the S-type asteroid into its sample return capsule (SRC). Following to the reentries of the Genesis in 2004 and the Stardust in 2006, the return of the Hayabusa SRC was the third direct reentry event from the interplanetary transfer orbit to the Earth at a velocity of over 11.2 km/s. In addition, it was world first case of direct reentry of spacecraft from interplanetary transfer orbit. After the successful resumption of the SRC, it was carefully sent to ISAS/JAXA, and at present, small particles expected to be the first sample-return materials from the minor planet are carefully investigated. In order to obtain precise trajectory information to ensure the quick procedure for the Hayabusa SRC resumption team, we observed the Hayabusa SRC reentry by optically in Australian night sky. High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy were carried out with several high-sensitivity instruments to investigate thermal-protection process of thermal protection ablator (TPA) as well as interaction process between SRC surface materials and upper atmospheric neutral and plasma components. Moreover, shockwaves were observed by infrasound/seismic sensor arrays on ground to investigate reentry related shockwaves as well as air-to-ground coupling process at the extremely rare opportunity. With respect to nominal trajectory of the Hayabusa SRC reentry, four optical stations were set inside and near the Woomera Prohibited Area, Australia, targeting on peak-heat and/or front-heat profiles of ablating TPA for engineering aspect. Infrasound and seismic sensors were also deployed as three arrayed stations and three single stations to realize direction findings of sonic boom type shockwaves from the SRC and spacecraft and point source type

  6. UPDATED ANALYSIS OF THE UPWIND INTERPLANETARY HYDROGEN VELOCITY AS OBSERVED BY THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE DURING SOLAR CYCLE 23

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, Frederic E.; Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi; Harris, Walter M.

    2011-09-10

    The interplanetary hydrogen (IPH), a population of neutrals that fill the space between planets inside the heliosphere, carries the signature of the interstellar medium (ISM) and the heliospheric interface. As the incoming ISM-ionized component deflects at the heliopause, charge exchange reactions decelerate the bulk motion of the neutrals that penetrate the heliosphere. Inside the heliosphere, the IPH bulk velocity is further affected by solar gravity, radiation pressure, and ionization processes, with the latter two processes dependent on solar activity. Solar cycle 23 provided the first partial temporal map of the IPH velocity, including measurements from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectrometers (Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS)) and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Wind ANisotropies (SWAN) instrument. We present an updated analysis of IPH velocity measurements from GHRS and STIS and compare these results with those of SWAN and two different time-dependent models. Our reanalysis of STIS data reveals a significant change in IPH velocity relative to earlier reports, because of the contamination by geocoronal oxygen that was not accounted for. While current models of the heliospheric interface predict the observed IPH velocity for solar maximum, they are not consistent with data covering solar minimum. With updates to the HST data points, we now find that all data can be fit by the existing models to within 1{sigma}, with the exception of SWAN observations taken at solar minimum (1997/1998). We conclude that the current data lack the temporal coverage and/or precision necessary to determine the detailed characteristics of the solar cycle dependence. Hence, new observations are merited.

  7. Powerful non-geoeffective interplanetary disturbance of July 2012 observed by muon hodoscope URAGAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astapov, I. I.; Barbashina, N. S.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Shutenko, V. V.; Veselovsky, I. S.

    2015-12-01

    The most powerful coronal mass ejection of the 24th solar cycle took place on the opposite side of the Sun on July 23, 2012 and had no geomagnetic consequences. Nevertheless, as a result of passing of the ejection through the heliosphere, variations of galactic cosmic rays flux were observed on the Earth. These variations were registered by the muon hodoscope URAGAN (MEPhI, Moscow). Muon flux angular distributions on the Earth's surface are reported and analyzed.

  8. On The Collocation of the Cusp Aurora and the GPS Phase Scintillation: A Statistical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Y.; Moen, J.; Miloch, W.

    2015-12-01

    The climatology map of the GPS phase scintillation identifies two regions of high scintillation occurrences at high latitudes: around magnetic noon and around magnetic midnight. The scintillation occurrence rate is higher around magnetic noon, while the scintillation level is stronger around magnetic midnight. This study focuses on the dayside scintillation region. In order to resolve the role of the cusp auroral processes in the production of irregularities, we put the GPS phase scintillation in the context of the observed auroral morphology. Results show that the occurrence rate of the GPS phase scintillation is highest inside the auroral cusp, regardless of the scintillation strength and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). On average the scintillation occurrence rate in the cusp region is about 5 times as high as in the region immediately poleward of it. The scintillation occurrence rate is higher when the IMF BZ is negative. When partitioning the scintillation data by the IMF BY, the distribution of the scintillation occurrence rate around magnetic noon is similar to that of the poleward moving auroral form (PMAF) statistics: there is a higher occurrence rate at earlier (later) magnetic local time when the IMF BY is positive (negative). This indicates that the irregularities which give rise to scintillations follow the IMF BY controlled East-West motion of the aurora and plasma. Furthermore, the scintillation occurrence rate is higher when IMF BY is positive when the cusp is shifted towards the post-noon sector where it may get easier access to the higher density plasma. This suggests that the combined auroral activities (e.g., PMAF) and the density of the intake solar EUV ionized plasma are crucial for the production of scintillations.

  9. Lagrangian MHD Particle-in-Cell simulations of coronal interplanetary shocks driven by observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Bacchini, Fabio; Bemporad, Alessandro; Susino, Roberto; Olshevskyi, Vyacheslav

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we compare the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters along the June 11, 1999 CME-driven shock front with the results obtained from a CME-like event simulated with the FLIPMHD3D code, based on the FLIP-MHD Particle-in-Cell (PiC) method. The observational data are retrieved from the combination of white-light (WL) coronagraphic data (for the upstream values) and the application of the Rankine-Hugoniot (RH) equations (for the downstream values). The comparison shows a higher compression ratio X and Alfvénic Mach number MA at the shock nose, and a stronger magnetic field deflection d towards the flanks, in agreement with observations. Then, we compare the spatial distribution of MA with the profiles obtained from the solutions of the shock adiabatic equation relating MA, X, and the angle between the upstream magnetic field and the shock front normal for the special cases of parallel and perpendicular shock, and with a semi-empirical expression for a generically oblique shock. The semi-empirical curve approximates the actual values of MA very well, if the effects of a non-negligible shock thickness and plasma-to magnetic pressure ratio are taken into account throughout the computation. Moreover, the simulated shock turns out to be supercritical at the nose and sub-critical at the flanks. Finally, we develop a new 1D Lagrangian ideal MHD method based on the GrAALE code, to simulate the ion-electron temperature decoupling due to the shock transit. Two models are used, a simple solar wind model and a variable-gamma model. Both produce results in agreement with observations, the second one being capable of introducing the physics responsible for the additional electron heating due to secondary effects (collisions, Alfvén waves, etc.). Work supported by the European Commission under the SWIFF project (swiff.eu)

  10. Magnetic loop behind an interplanetary shock: Voyager, Helios and IMP-8 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L.; Sittler, E.; Mariani, F.; Schwenn, R.

    1981-01-01

    The shock was followed by a turbulent sheath in which there were large fluctuations in both the strength and direction of the magnetic field. This in turn was followed by a region (magnetic cloud) in which the magnetic field vectors were observed to change by rotating nearly parallel to a plane, consistent with the passage of a magnetic loop. This loop extended at least 30 deg in longitude between 1-2 AU, and its radial dimension was approximately 0.5 AU. In the cloud the field strength was high and the density and temperature were relatively low. Thus, the dominant pressure in the cloud was that of the magnetic field.

  11. LARGE-AMPLITUDE ALFVEN WAVE IN INTERPLANETARY SPACE: THE WIND SPACECRAFT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xin; He Jiansen; Tu Chuanyi; Zhang Lei; Marsch, Eckart; Chao, Jih-Kwin

    2012-02-20

    We present, for the first time, measurements of arc-polarized velocity variations together with magnetic field variations associated with a large-amplitude Alfven wave as observed by the Wind satellite. The module of the magnetic field variance is larger than the magnitude of the average magnetic field, indicating the large amplitude of these fluctuations. When converting to the deHoffman-Teller frame, we find that the magnetic field and velocity vector components, in the plane perpendicular to the minimum-variance direction of the magnetic field, are arc-polarized, and their tips almost lie on the same circle. We also find that the normalized cross helicity and Alfven ratio of the wave are both nearly equal to unity, a result which has not been reported in previous studies at 1 AU. It is worthy to stress here that pure Alfven waves can also exist in the solar wind even near the Earth at 1 AU, but not only near 0.3 AU. Further study could be done to help us know more about the properties of pure Alfven wave at 1 AU that could not be figured out easily before because of the contaminations (e.g., Alfven waves propagating in different directions, magnetic structures, and other compressional waves) on previously reported Alfven wave cases.

  12. Solar Sources and Geospace Consequences of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds Observed During Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Michalek, G.; Lepping, R. P.

    2007-01-01

    We present results of a statistical investigation of 99 magnetic clouds (MCs) observed during 1995-2005. The MC-associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are faster and wider on the average and originate within +/-30deg from the solar disk center. The solar sources of MCs also followed the butterfly diagram. The correlation between the magnetic field strength and speed of MCs was found to be valid over a much wider range of speeds. The number of south-north (SN) MCs was dominant and decreased with solar cycle, while the number of north-south (NS) MCs increased confirming the odd-cycle behavior. Two-thirds of MCs were geoeffective; the Dst index was highly correlated with speed and magnetic field in MCs as well as their product. Many (55%) fully northward (FN) MCs were geoeffective solely due to their sheaths. The non-geoeffective MCs were slower (average speed approx. 382 km/s), had a weaker southward magnetic field (average approx. -5.2nT), and occurred mostly during the rise phase of the solar activity cycle.

  13. Proceedings of the Symposium on the Study of the Sun and Interplanetary Medium in Three Dimensions. [space mission planning and interplanetary trajectories by NASA and ESA to better observe the sun and solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, L. A. (Editor); Axford, W. I. (Editor)

    1976-01-01

    A series of papers are presented from a symposium attended by over 200 European and American scientists to examine the importance of exploring the interplanetary medium and the sun by out-of-the-ecliptic space missions. The likely scientific returns of these missions in the areas of solar, interplanetary, and cosmic ray physics is examined. Theoretical models of the solar wind and its interaction with interplanetary magnetic fields are given.

  14. Observations of quasi-periodic scintillations and their possible relation to the dynamics of Es plasma blobs

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Takashi )

    1991-06-01

    Quasi-periodic scintillations at a mid-latitude station, Wakkanai, Japan, are examined using 136-MHz geostationary satellite transmissions. Observations are compared with the ionospheric parameter obtained at the same station and random scintillation records. The results indicate that the quasi-periodic scintillations are most likely produced by plasma blobs within the sporadic E layers. Discussion focuses on characteristics of the ringing pattern which precedes and follows the primary deep fade-out, in field strength. In the majority of events the ringing pattern tends to develop after the distinct deep fade-out, i.e., the pattern is asymmetric. Quasi-periodic scintillation patterns are produced by the movement of plasma blobs in the case of geostationary satellite experiments. Thus the shape of the blob must be deformed so that a steep density gradient is attained on the backside. When the blob is highly deformed by the plasma instability which grows at the steep density gradient, burstlike random scintillations may be produced by the blob. 16 refs.

  15. Physical interpretation of interdisciplinary solar/interplanetary observations relevant to the 27-29 June 1980 SMY/STIP event No. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Mckenna-Lawlor, S.M.P.; Richter, A.K.

    1982-01-01

    A physical interpretation is presented for a sequence of six well defined interplanetary structures (magnetic clouds) identified in the solar wind and magnetic field measurements of Helios-1 from 29 June-1 July 1980 (location 0.64-0.67 AU, C. Long. approximately 165 degrees, C. Lat. approximately 5.8 degrees). Among the characteristics of these structures were a large northward directed solar wind flow, well defined directional discontinuities of mainly the tangential-type at their beginnings and ends, some increase in proton and very pronounced increases in alpha particle number densities, some times an increase in magnetic field strength, and values of N-alpha/Np typical of the inner solar atmosphere. Results indicate that the structures were ejections from a succession (29-29 June 1980) of Type II producing flares in Hale Region 16923 whose coronograph and X-ray data were determined to constitute a family of transient producing events. Only two interplanetary shocks were found in the relevant Helios-1 data and it is suggested that some of these shocks could have been missed by the spacecraft. This result indicates that the correlation of an observed interplanetary shock wave with a solar Type II burst may not always lead to a unique result.

  16. Impact of Ionospheric Scintillation on Spaceborne SAR Observations Studied Using GNSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pi, Xiaoqing; Meyer, Franz J.; Chotoo, Kancham; Freeman, Anthony; Caton, Ronald G.; Bridgewood, Christopher T.

    2012-01-01

    A survey of artifacts seen in JAXA's Phase Array type L-band synthetic aperture radar (PALSAR) data over South America during a low solar activity year is reported in this paper. A significant impact on the radar data is revealed: about 14% of the surveyed PALSAR images (totally 2779) are affected by the artifacts during a month and the artifacts occur on 74.2% of the surveyed days. The characteristics of the artifacts have led to a consideration that the artifacts are the effects of ionospheric scintillation. This raises not only a concern about scintillation effects on radar but also a question about active scintillation conditions during a low solar activity year. To assess and verify the scintillation conditions, GPS data collected from the constellation of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites and three ground-based GPS networks are processed and analyzed. The GPS data provides a global context and regional dense converge, respectively, of ionospheric irregularity and scintillation measurements. It is concluded tat even during a low solar activity year, L-band scintillation at low latitudes can occur frequently and affect L-band SAR significantly.

  17. Skylab experiments. Volume 5: Astronomy and space physics. [Skylab observations of galactic radiation, solar energy, and interplanetary composition for high school level education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The astronomy and space physics investigations conducted in the Skylab program include over 20 experiments in four categories to explore space phenomena that cannot be observed from earth. The categories of space research are as follows: (1) phenomena within the solar system, such as the effect of solar energy on Earth's atmosphere, the composition of interplanetary space, the possibility of an inner planet, and the X-ray radiation from Jupiter, (2) analysis of energetic particles such as cosmic rays and neutrons in the near-earth space, (3) stellar and galactic astronomy, and (4) self-induced environment surrounding the Skylab spacecraft.

  18. Interplanetary dust particles collected in the stratosphere - Observations of atmospheric heating and constraints on their interrelationships and sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bradley, John P.

    1989-01-01

    TEM and IR spectroscopy investigations of the interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere have shown the majority of IDPs in the layer-lattice silicate and pyroxene classes to not have been heated to temperatures above 600 C during atmospheric entry. This implies that they arrive at the upper atmosphere with low geocentric encounter velocities, and limits the possible encounter trajectories for these particles to relatively circular prograde orbits. On this basis, it is judged unlikely that these IDPs are from earth-crossing comets or asteroids; collected IDPs dominated by olivine include a larger portion of above-600 C-heated particles, suggesting their capture from more eccentric orbits.

  19. Measurements of the magnetic field orientation in the Jovian ionosphere deduced from Pioneer 10 and 11 scintillation observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.; Yang, F.-C.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper the S band scintillations observed during the Pioneer 10 and 11 occultation measurements of Jupiter are analyzed. It is found that while the electron density irregularities are isotropic in the collision-dominated lower ionosphere, they are anisotropic in the upper ionosphere because of alignment along the magnetic field. By using Rytov's approximation the frequency spectrum of the log-amplitude scintillations is derived for a wave propagating in an anisotropic turbulent medium. It is shown that the spectrum depends to a large extent on the direction of anisotropy and is therefore useful for measuring the orientation of the magnetic field in regions that have not yet been probed by direct measurements. This new technique is applied to the Pioneer 10 and 11 observations, and is used to deduce the first measurements of magnetic field orientation in the ionosphere of Jupiter.

  20. Lyman-alpha observations of the interplanetary hydrogen: support of a NASA sounding rocket program and study of the local interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Frederic

    2013-10-01

    Our proposal is to use the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph {HST /STIS} over a single orbit to make Lyman-alpha observations of the interplanetary hydrogen {IPH} during the April period of this year {2014}.These measurements will provide wavelength and flux calibration, in order to support the HYPE instrument {Hydrogen Polarimetric Explorer} that is planned to make spectro-polarimetric observations in April during a suborbital flight of a NASA sounding rocket {grant NNX08AI98G}. Cross-calibration will also be made with the SWAN instrument {Solar Wind Anisotropies} on the SOHO satellite {Solar and Heliospheric Observatory}. SWAN can provide flux calibration but without any spectral information, so only HST/STIS can provide the wavelength calibration.Moreover the scientific controversy on the physical properties of the local interstellar medium {LISM} is still going on. The recent observations of interstellar helium atoms by IBEX {Interstellar Boundaries Explorer} suggest that the LISM velocity vector may vary over time. Such a change should impact the bulk velocity of interplanetary hydrogen and should be detected by HST /STIS.

  1. Analysis of the interplanetary origin of the largest Forbush decreases from 2007-2013 observed by three neutron monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés-Galicia, Jose F.; Gonzalez-Esparza, Americo; Musalem, Omar; Ontiveros, Veronica

    2016-07-01

    We developed a database of Forbush decreases (Fds), during the period 2007-2013. To analyze the Fds, we used data from three neutron monitors representing low, medium and high cutoff rigidities: Oulu (Finland), Moscow (Russia) and Mexico City. To consider the events to be analyzed in detail, we took a decrease lower limit of 5.5% in Oulu, since this station has the lowest cutoff. In this manner we found 9 events, from those we selected 3 to make a detailed discussion in the paper, these were: the two largest in the period, and the most complex. With the available Interplanetary data (near-Earth data from OMNI), we identified that the 9 events are associated with Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs), even the most complex. We additionally found that for these large events, the two crucial factors are a parameter we defined as the radial thickness of the sheath and ICME interaction with the Earth and the intensity of the magnetic field (considering that the maximum could be in the sheath or in the ICME). A general overview for the causes and a discussion of the nine events will be presented.

  2. Excitonic processes and their contribution to nonproportionality observed in the light yield of inorganic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jai; Koblov, Alexander

    2013-02-01

    Using the derived expression for the light yield in a scintillator, the influence of linear radiative and non-radiative (quenching) rates on the nonproportionality in light yield is studied. It is found that if the excitation created within the electron track initiated by a γ-photon incident on a scintillator remains mainly excitonic, then nonproportionality can be minimised by inventing a scintillator material with linear radiative rate >107 s-1, linear quenching rate <106 s-1 and track radius ≥70 nm along with maintaining the rates of other nonlinear processes as discovered earlier. If one can increase the linear radiative rate to 109 s-1, then the nonproportionality can be eliminated at a track radius >20 nm.

  3. Study of equatorial scintillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomalaza, J.; Woodman, R.; Tisnado, G.; Nakasone, E.

    1972-01-01

    Observations of the amplitude scintillations produced by the F-region in equatorial areas are presented. The equipment used for conducting the observations is described. The use of transmissions from the ATS-1, ATS-3, and ATS-5 for obtaining data is described. The two principal subjects discussed are: (1) correlation between satellite and incoherent radar observations of scintillations and (2) simultaneous observations of scintillations at 136 MHz and 1550 MHz.

  4. Coordinated THEMIS spacecraft and all-sky imager observations of interplanetary shock effects on plasma sheet flow bursts, poleward boundary intensifications, and streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Chao; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Lyons, Larry R.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Donovan, Eric F.; Shi, Quanqi; Yao, Zhonghua; Bonnell, John W.

    2013-06-01

    order to characterize plasma sheet and nightside auroral disturbances in response to interplanetary shocks, we have examined three interplanetary shock events that occurred when multiple Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft were located in the plasma sheet near midnight while ground-based aurora data were available near the spacecraft footprints. Large-scale responses we found are that the magnetotail magnetic pressure started to increase within ~2 min of the SYM-H jump, and the diffuse aurora near the auroral equatorward boundary intensified over a wide magnetic local time range, due to the shock compressional effect, on average 3 min after the shock arrival. In addition, we also identified plasma sheet and auroral disturbances that are more transient and localized. Earthward or equatorward flow bursts are observed in the near-Earth plasma sheet on average 5 min after the SYM-H increase. We find that these fast flows, originating downtail of the near-Earth spacecraft, form a localized channel, since only some of the spacecraft detected the flow bursts. Poleward boundary intensifications (PBIs) and subsequent north-south directed auroral streamers are then formed, while no substorm activity was detected. Those auroral forms are also localized in space near midnight and around the footprint of the spacecraft. These results indicate that the fast flows are azimuthally localized channels and are the magnetotail counterpart of the PBIs and streamers and that such localized disturbances are triggered by the interplanetary shocks in addition to the large-scale compression of the magnetosphere.

  5. Using ionospheric scintillation observations for studying the morphology of equatorial ionospheric bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandekar, B. S.; Groves, K. M.

    2004-06-01

    For a study of the equatorial ionosphere, ionospheric scintillation data at VHF and L-band frequencies have been routinely collected by ground-based receivers at Ancon, Peru, Antofagasta, Chile, and Ascension Island, UK, since May 1994. The receivers routinely monitor VHF transmissions from two geosynchronous satellites located at 100°W longitude and 23°W longitude, and L-band signals from satellites located at 75°W longitude and 15°W longitude. This combination provides a network of seven usable, reasonably separated links for monitoring ionospheric equatorial bubble activity in the South American longitude sector. A data set of seven years covering the period from 1995 to 2001 was studied to determine the temporal, diurnal, and seasonal behavior of equatorial bubbles. The results of our statistical study are presented here. In general the equatorial ionospheric bubble activity shows a strong systematic and primary dependence in temporal, diurnal, and seasonal variation, and a secondary weak dependence on geomagnetic and solar flux activity. At present, the dependence on solar and magnetic activity is not usable for near-time and short-term prediction of the equatorial bubble activity. Equatorial bubbles usually start 1 hour after sunset, the activity peaks before local midnight, and vanishes by early morning. The activity peaks in the months of November and January-February and is practically absent (weak) from May to August. On a daily basis on the average one sees 1 to 3 bubbles. The duration of bubbles is about 70 min, and the time spacing between the bubbles is 1 to 2 hours. The bubble activity in general follows the phase of solar cycle activity. The observed systematic behavior of the equatorial bubbles allows for a now cast and short-term forecast of the bubble activity in the South American sector.

  6. Scintillation noise power spectrum and its impact on high-redshift 21-cm observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedantham, H. K.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2016-05-01

    Visibility scintillation resulting from wave propagation through the turbulent ionosphere can be an important source of noise at low radio frequencies (ν ≲ 200 MHz). Many low-frequency experiments are underway to detect the power spectrum of brightness temperature fluctuations of the neutral-hydrogen 21-cm signal from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR: 12 ≳ z ≳ 7, 100 ≲ ν ≲ 175 MHz). In this paper, we derive scintillation noise power spectra in such experiments while taking into account the effects of typical data processing operations such as self-calibration and Fourier synthesis. We find that for minimally redundant arrays such as LOFAR and MWA, scintillation noise is of the same order of magnitude as thermal noise, has a spectral coherence dictated by stretching of the snapshot uv-coverage with frequency, and thus is confined to the well-known wedge-like structure in the cylindrical (two-dimensional) power spectrum space. Compact, fully redundant (dcore ≲ rF ≈ 300 m at 150 MHz) arrays such as HERA and SKA-LOW (core) will be scintillation noise dominated at all baselines, but the spatial and frequency coherence of this noise will allow it to be removed along with spectrally smooth foregrounds.

  7. Dependence of the location of the Martian magnetic lobes on the interplanetary magnetic field direction: Observations from Mars Global Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanelli, N.; Bertucci, C.; Gómez, D.; Mazelle, C.

    2015-09-01

    We use magnetometer data from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft during portions of the premapping orbits of the mission to study the variability of the Martian-induced magnetotail as a function of the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The time spent by MGS in the magnetotail lobes during periods with positive solar wind flow-aligned IMF component B∥IMF suggests that their location as well as the position of the central polarity reversal layer (PRL) are displaced in the direction antiparallel to the IMF cross-flow component B⊥IMF. Analogously, in the cases where B∥IMF is negative, the lobes are displaced in the direction of B⊥IMF. This behavior is compatible with a previously published analytical model of the IMF draping, where for the first time, the displacement of a complementary reversal layer (denoted as IPRL for inverse polarity reversal layer) is deduced from first principles.

  8. L-Band Ionosphere Scintillations Observed by A Spaced GPS Receiver Array during Recent Active Experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.; Pelgrum, W.; van Graas, F.; Gunawardena, S.; Charney, D.; Peng, S.; Triplett, J.; Vikram, P.; Vemuru, A.

    2010-12-01

    L-Band Ionosphere Scintillations Observed by A Spaced GPS Receiver Array during Recent Active Experiments at HAARP Jade Morton*, Wouter Pelgrum**, Sanjeev Gunawardena**, Frank van Graas**, Dan Charney*, Senlin Peng***, Jeff Triplett*, Ajay Vemuru** * Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Miami University ** Avionics Engineering Center, Ohio University *** Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech Ionosphere irregularities can cause scintillation of satellite-based radio communication, navigation, and surveillance signals. While these scintillation effects will impact the corresponding receiver and system performance, carefully recovered signal parameters serve as a means of studying the background state and dynamics of the ionosphere. In this presentation, we will describe our recent effort in establishing a unique spaced GNSS receiver array at HAARP, Alaska to collect GPS and GLONASS satellite signals at various stages of the GNSS receiver processing. Preliminary receiver processing results as well as additional on-site diagnostic instrumentation measurements obtained from two active heating experiment campaigns will be presented to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our experimental data collection system in providing insightful details of ionosphere responses to active perturbations.

  9. Turbulence-induced scintillation on Gaussian-beam waves: theoretical predictions and observations from a laser-illuminated satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, John D.

    1995-10-01

    Expressions for the variance and the power spectral density of turbulence-induced log-amplitude fluctuations are derived for Gaussian-beam waves in the regime of weak scattering. This formulation includes effects that are due to turbulence strength variations along the propagation path, offset of the observation point from the beam axis, and sensitivity to focus and beam diameter. Comparison of theoretical results with observed scintillation during experiments with a laser-illuminated satellite reveals good agreement. Copyright (c) 1995 Optical Society of America

  10. Dual-Frequency Observations of 140 Compact, Flat-Spectrum Active Galactic Nuclei for Scintillation-Induced Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koay, J. Y.; Macquart, J.- P.; Rickett, B. J.; Bignall, H. E.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Reynolds, C.; Jauncey, D. L.; Pursimo, T.; Kedziora-Chudczer, L.; Ojha, R.

    2012-01-01

    The 4.9 GHz Micro-Arcsecond Scintillation-Induced Variability (MASIV) Survey detected a drop in Interstellar Scintillation (ISS) for sources at red shifts z > or approx. 2, indicating an apparent increase in angular diameter or a decrease in flux density of the most compact components of these sources, relative to their extended emission. This can result from intrinsic source size effects or scatter broadening in the Intergalactic Medium (IGM) , in excess of the expected (1+z)1/2 angular diameter scaling of brightness temperature limited sources resulting from cosmological expansion. We report here 4.9 GHz and 8.4 GHz observations and data analysis for a sample of 140 compact, fiat-spectrum sources which may allow us to determine the origin of this angular diameter-redshift relation by exploiting their different wavelength dependences. In addition to using ISS as a cosmological probe, the observations provide additional insight into source morphologies and the characteristics of ISS. As in the MASIV Survey, the variability of the sources is found to be significantly correlated with line-of-sight H(alpha) intensities, confirming its link with ISS. For 25 sources, time delays of about 0.15 to 3 days are observed between the scintillation patterns at both frequencies, interpreted as being caused by a shift in core positions when probed at different optical depths. Significant correlation is found between ISS amplitudes and source spectral index; in particular, a large drop in ISS amplitudes is observed at alpha < -0.4 confirming that steep spectrum sources scintillate less. We detect a weakened redshift dependence of ISS at 8.4 GHz over that at 4.9 GHz, with the mean variance at 4-day timescales reduced by a factor of 1.8 in the z > 2 sources relative to the z < 2 sources, as opposed to the factor of 3 decrease observed at 4.9 GHz. This suggests scatter broadening in the IGM, but the interpretation is complicated by subtle selection effects that will be explored

  11. DUAL-FREQUENCY OBSERVATIONS OF 140 COMPACT, FLAT-SPECTRUM ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FOR SCINTILLATION-INDUCED VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Koay, J. Y.; Macquart, J.-P.; Bignall, H. E.; Reynolds, C.; Rickett, B. J.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Jauncey, D. L.; Pursimo, T.; Kedziora-Chudczer, L.; Ojha, R.

    2011-10-15

    The 4.9 GHz Micro-Arcsecond Scintillation-Induced Variability (MASIV) Survey detected a drop in interstellar scintillation (ISS) for sources at redshifts z {approx}> 2, indicating an apparent increase in angular diameter or a decrease in flux density of the most compact components of these sources relative to their extended emission. This can result from intrinsic source size effects or scatter broadening in the intergalactic medium (IGM) in excess of the expected (1 + z){sup 1/2} angular diameter scaling of brightness temperature limited sources resulting from cosmological expansion. We report here 4.9 GHz and 8.4 GHz observations and data analysis for a sample of 140 compact, flat-spectrum sources which may allow us to determine the origin of this angular diameter-redshift relation by exploiting their different wavelength dependences. In addition to using ISS as a cosmological probe, the observations provide additional insight into source morphologies and the characteristics of ISS. As in the MASIV Survey, the variability of the sources is found to be significantly correlated with line-of-sight H{alpha} intensities, confirming its link with ISS. For 25 sources, time delays of about 0.15-3 days are observed between the scintillation patterns at both frequencies, interpreted as being caused by a shift in core positions when probed at different optical depths. Significant correlation is found between ISS amplitudes and source spectral index; in particular, a large drop in ISS amplitudes is observed at {alpha} < -0.4 confirming that steep spectrum sources scintillate less. We detect a weakened redshift dependence of ISS at 8.4 GHz over that at 4.9 GHz, with the mean variance at four-day timescales reduced by a factor of 1.8 in the z > 2 sources relative to the z < 2 sources, as opposed to the factor of three decrease observed at 4.9 GHz. This suggests scatter broadening in the IGM, but the interpretation is complicated by subtle selection effects that will be

  12. Interplanetary magnetic holes: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Lemaire, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Magnetic holes in the interplanetary medium are explained as stationary, non-propagating, equilibrium structures in which there are field-aligned enhancements of the plasma density and/or temperature. Magnetic anti-holes are considered to be associated with depressions in the plasma pressure. In this model, the observed changes in the magnetic field intensity and direction are due to diamagnetic currents that are carried by ions which drift in a sheath as the result of gradients in the magnetic field and in the plasma pressure within the sheath. The thickness of the sheaths considered is approximately a few ion Larmor radii. An electric field is normal to the magnetic field in the sheath. Solutions of Vlasov's equation and Maxwell's equations are presented which account for several types of magnetic holes, including null-sheets, that were observed.

  13. Equatorial plasma bubble rise velocities in the Indian sector determined from multistation scintillation observations

    SciTech Connect

    Dabas, R.S.; Reddy, B.M. )

    1990-04-01

    The velocity of plasma-bubble rise over the magnetic equator is calculated on the basis of simultaneous measurements of the onset times of postsunset VHF scintillations from the Japanese satellite ETS-2, obtained at a meridian array of four Indian stations during February 1980. The data and calculation results are presented in tables and graphs and discussed in detail. It is found that bubble velocities increase with altitude, varying in the ranges 128-416, 38-327, and 15-200 m/sec at altitudes 450-550, 550-1140, and 1140-1270 km, respectively. These results are shown to be in good agreement with satellite and radar measurements and with F-layer vertical drift velocities. 17 refs.

  14. Observations and modeling of UHF-band scintillation occurrence probability over the low-latitude region of China during the maximum activity of solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Liu, Y.; Wu, J.; Xu, T.; Sheng, D.

    2015-01-01

    The climatological characteristics of UHF-band scintillations over the low-latitude region of China were investigated by analyzing the observations recorded at three stations of our regional network of satellite-beacon-based scintillation monitoring in 2013. The three stations are Hainan (geographic 20.0° N, 110.3° E; geomagnetic 10.1° N, 177.4° W, dip 28.2°), Guangzhou (geographic 23.0° N, 113.0° E; geomagnetic 13.1° N, 174.8° W, dip 33.9°) and Kunming (geographic 25.6° N, 103.7° E; geomagnetic 15.7° N, 176.4° E, dip 39.0°), located at low latitudes of China. The variations of UHF-band scintillation occurrence with latitude, time and season are presented in detail to understand the morphology and climatology of ionospheric scintillations over the low-latitude region of China. An equinoctial asymmetry in the occurrences of scintillation and an obvious difference of the onset time of scintillations between Hainan and Kunming is noted in this data set. Subsequently, the ionosonde data are utilized to study the possible causes of the asymmetry between two equinoxes. The observations suggest that the mean critical frequency (foF2) at 20:00 LT (12:00 UT) in the autumnal equinoctial months (September and October) and the vernal equinoctial months (March and April) has a similar asymmetry. The ratio of the mean foF2 between two equinoxes is proportional to the ratio between the maximum scintillation occurrence in the autumnal equinox and in the vernal equinox. Therefore, this ratio can act as a proxy for the equinoctial asymmetry in the occurrences of scintillation over the low-latitude region of China, and can be used to model the equinoctial asymmetry in our empirical climatological model of scintillation occurrence probability (CMSOP). The CMSOP can provide the predictions of the occurrences of scintillation over the low-latitude region of China and was validated in this study.

  15. Analyses of Phase Scintillation Observations Made by a Static Triple Frequency GPS-based Monitor Located Near the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly Peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paula, E. R.; Moraes, A. D. O.; Costa, E.; Rodrigues, F. S.; Abdu, M. A.; Oliveira, K.

    2015-12-01

    We present analyses of phase scintillation measurements made during a 5-month period (November 2014 - March 2015) by a triple-frequency (L1, L2C and L5) GPS receiver located in São José dos Campos, Brazil near the peak of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly. The location of the receiver and the large number of observations available for this study provide an opportunity to investigate different scintillation scenarios, including those associated with highly disturbed ionospheric events. Phase scintillation has been widely investigated at high latitudes but little has been reported in terms of observations at equatorial and low latitudes. We characterize the observed phase scintillation events according to the σφ index and investigate its relation with the amplitude scintillation index S4. The correlation between σφ for the three different frequencies are also investigated. We will present and discuss the results of our analysis and the likely implications for the GPS receivers under similar ionospheric conditions.

  16. Helium in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Helium and neon were extracted from fragments of individual stratosphere-collected interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) by subjecting them to increasing temperature by applying short-duration pulses of power in increasing amounts to the ovens containing the fragments. The experiment was designed to see whether differences in release temperatures could be observed which might provide clues as to the asteroidal or cometary origin of the particles. Variations were observed which show promise for elucidating the problem.

  17. Measuring the Relationship between Stellar Scintillation and Altitude: A Simple Discovery-Based Observational Exercise Used in College Level Non-Major Astronomy Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Russell D.

    2013-01-01

    A simple naked eye observational exercise is outlined that teaches non-major astronomy students basic observational and critical thinking skills but does not require complex equipment or extensive knowledge of the night sky. Students measure the relationship between stellar scintillation and the altitude of a set of stars. Successful observations…

  18. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  19. Comparison of interplanetary CME arrival times and solar wind parameters based on the WSA-ENLIL model with three cone types and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Soojeong; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Jae-Ok; Na, Hyeonock

    2014-09-01

    We have made a comparison between coronal mass ejection (CME)-associated shock propagations based on the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)-ENLIL model using three cone types and in situ observations. For this we use 28 full-halo CMEs, whose cone parameters are determined and their corresponding interplanetary shocks were observed at the Earth, from 2001 to 2002. We consider three different cone types (an asymmetric cone model, an ice cream cone model, and an elliptical cone model) to determine 3-D CME cone parameters (radial velocity, angular width, and source location), which are the input values of the WSA-ENLIL model. The mean absolute error of the CME-associated shock travel times for the WSA-ENLIL model using the ice-cream cone model is 9.9 h, which is about 1 h smaller than those of the other models. We compare the peak values and profiles of solar wind parameters (speed and density) with in situ observations. We find that the root-mean-square errors of solar wind peak speed and density for the ice cream and asymmetric cone model are about 190 km/s and 24/cm3, respectively. We estimate the cross correlations between the models and observations within the time lag of ± 2 days from the shock travel time. The correlation coefficients between the solar wind speeds from the WSA-ENLIL model using three cone types and in situ observations are approximately 0.7, which is larger than those of solar wind density (cc ˜0.6). Our preliminary investigations show that the ice cream cone model seems to be better than the other cone models in terms of the input parameters of the WSA-ENLIL model.

  20. Viking observations of a reverse convection cell developing in response to a northward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, M.G.; Murphree, J.S.

    1996-04-15

    The authors report the development of a reverse sense convection cell in the polar ionosphere from auroral images coming from UV Viking probes. The cell was observed to grow on the dusk side of the north polar oval, near the transpolar arcs. As it grew it seemed to displace the arc system toward dawn. They compare their observations with a model in which magnetic merging in the magnetopause produces such convection cells, typically associated with horse-collar or teardrop auroral features.

  1. Observations of the interplanetary magnetic field between 0.46 and 1 A.U. by the Mariner 10 spacecraft. Ph.D. Thesis - Catholic Univ. of Am.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.

    1976-01-01

    Almost continuous measurement of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) at a sampling rate of 25 vectors/sec was performed by the magnetic field experiment onboard the Mariner 10 spacecraft during the period November 3, 1973 to April 14, 1974, comprising approximately 5-2/3 solar rotations and extending in radial distance from the sun from 1 to 0.46 AU. A clearly discernible two-sector pattern of field polarity was observed during the last 3-1/2 months of the period, with the dominant polarity toward the sun below the solar equatorial plane. Two compound high-speed solar wind streams were also present during this period, one in each magnetic field sector. Relative fluctuations of the field in magnitude and direction were found to have large time variations, but on average the relative magnitude fluctuations were approximately constant over the range of heliocentric distance covered while the relative directional fluctuations showed a slight decrease on average with increasing distance. The occurrence rate of directional discontinuities was also found to decrease with increasing radial distance from the sun.

  2. High-latitude dayside electric fields and currents during strong northward interplanetary magnetic field - Observations and model simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. Robert; Friis-Christensen, Eigil

    1988-01-01

    On July 23, 1983 the IMF turned strongly northward, becoming about 22 nT for several hours. Using a combined data set of ionospheric convection measurements made by the Sondre Stromfjord incoherent scatter radar and convection inferred from Greenland magnetometer measurements, the onset of the reconfiguration of the high-latitude ionospheric currents is found to occur about 3 min after the northward IMF encounters the magnetopause. The large-scale reconfiguration of currents, however, appears to evolve over a period of about 22 min. These observations and the results of numerical simulations indicate that the dayside polar-cap electric field observed during strong northward IMF is produced by a direct electrical current coupling with the solar wind.

  3. Relationship of the interplanetary electric field to the high-latitude ionospheric electric field and currents Observations and model simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. R.; Banks, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    The electrical coupling between the solar wind, magnetosphere, and ionosphere is studied. The coupling is analyzed using observations of high-latitude ion convection measured by the Sondre Stromfjord radar in Greenland and a computer simulation. The computer simulation calculates the ionospheric electric potential distribution for a given configuration of field-aligned currents and conductivity distribution. The technique for measuring F-region in velocities at high time resolution over a large range of latitudes is described. Variations in the currents on ionospheric plasma convection are examined using a model of field-aligned currents linking the solar wind with the dayside, high-latitude ionosphere. The data reveal that high-latitude ionospheric convection patterns, electric fields, and field-aligned currents are dependent on IMF orientation; it is observed that the electric field, which drives the F-region plasma curve, responds within about 14 minutes to IMF variations in the magnetopause. Comparisons of the simulated plasma convection with the ion velocity measurements reveal good correlation between the data.

  4. The First in situ Observation of Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves at High-Latitude Magnetopause during Strongly Dawnward Interplanetary Magnetic Field Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, K.-J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Wang, Y.; Vinas, A. F.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2012-01-01

    We report the first in situ observation of high-latitude magnetopause (near the northern duskward cusp) Kelvin-Helmholtz waves (KHW) by Cluster on January 12, 2003, under strongly dawnward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. The fluctuations unstable to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) are found to propagate mostly tailward, i.e., along the direction almost 90 deg. to both the magnetosheath and geomagnetic fields, which lowers the threshold of the KHI. The magnetic configuration across the boundary layer near the northern duskward cusp region during dawnward IMF is similar to that in the low-latitude boundary layer under northward IMF, in that (1) both magnetosheath and magnetospheric fields across the local boundary layer constitute the lowest magnetic shear and (2) the tailward propagation of the KHW is perpendicular to both fields. Approximately 3-hour-long periods of the KHW during dawnward IMF are followed by the rapid expansion of the dayside magnetosphere associated with the passage of an IMF discontinuity that characterizes an abrupt change in IMF cone angle, Phi = acos (B(sub x) / absolute value of Beta), from approx. 90 to approx. 10. Cluster, which was on its outbound trajectory, continued observing the boundary waves at the northern evening-side magnetopause during sunward IMF conditions following the passage of the IMF discontinuity. By comparing the signatures of boundary fluctuations before and after the IMF discontinuity, we report that the frequencies of the most unstable KH modes increased after the discontinuity passed. This result demonstrates that differences in IMF orientations (especially in f) are associated with the properties of KHW at the high-latitude magnetopause due to variations in thickness of the boundary layer, and/or width of the KH-unstable band on the surface of the dayside magnetopause.

  5. ARRIVAL TIME CALCULATION FOR INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS WITH CIRCULAR FRONTS AND APPLICATION TO STEREO OBSERVATIONS OF THE 2009 FEBRUARY 13 ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Moestl, C.; Rollett, T.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Biernat, H. K.; Lugaz, N.; Farrugia, C. J.; Galvin, A. B.; Davies, J. A.; Harrison, R. A.; Crothers, S.; Luhmann, J. G.; Zhang, T. L.; Baumjohann, W.

    2011-11-01

    One of the goals of the NASA Solar TErestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) mission is to study the feasibility of forecasting the direction, arrival time, and internal structure of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from a vantage point outside the Sun-Earth line. Through a case study, we discuss the arrival time calculation of interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) in the ecliptic plane using data from STEREO/SECCHI at large elongations from the Sun in combination with different geometric assumptions about the ICME front shape [fixed-{Phi} (FP): a point and harmonic mean (HM): a circle]. These forecasting techniques use single-spacecraft imaging data and are based on the assumption of constant velocity and direction. We show that for the slow (350 km s{sup -1}) ICME on 2009 February 13-18, observed at quadrature by the two STEREO spacecraft, the results for the arrival time given by the HM approximation are more accurate by 12 hr than those for FP in comparison to in situ observations of solar wind plasma and magnetic field parameters by STEREO/IMPACT/PLASTIC, and by 6 hr for the arrival time at Venus Express (MAG). We propose that the improvement is directly related to the ICME front shape being more accurately described by HM for an ICME with a low inclination of its symmetry axis to the ecliptic. In this case, the ICME has to be tracked to >30{sup 0} elongation to obtain arrival time errors < {+-} 5 hr. A newly derived formula for calculating arrival times with the HM method is also useful for a triangulation technique assuming the same geometry.

  6. Observations of the 3-D distribution of interplanetary electrons and ions from solar wind plasma to low energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Anderson, K. A.; Ashford, S.; Carlson, C.; Curtis, D.; Ergun, R.; Larson, D.; McFadden, J.; McCarthy, M.; Parks, G. K.

    1995-01-01

    The 3-D Plasma and Energetic Particle instrument on the GGS Wind spacecraft (launched November 1, 1994) is designed to make measurements of the full three-dimensional distribution of suprathermal electrons and ions from solar wind plasma to low energy cosmic rays, with high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, good energy and angular resolution, and high time resolution. Three pairs of double-ended telescopes, each with two or three closely sandwiched passivated ion implanted silicon detectors measure electrons and ions from approximately 20 keV to greater than or equal to 300 keV. Four top-hat symmetrical spherical section electrostatic analyzers with microchannel plate detectors, a large and a small geometric factor analyzer for electrons and a similar pair for ions, cover from approximately 3 eV to 30 keV. We present preliminary observations of the electron and ion distributions in the absence of obvious solar impulsive events and upstream particles. The quiet time electron energy spectrum shows a smooth approximately power law fall-off extending from the halo population at a few hundred eV to well above approximately 100 keV The quiet time ion energy spectrum also shows significant fluxes over this energy range. Detailed 3-D distributions and their temporal variations will be presented.

  7. Erratum to "Solar Sources and Geospace Consequences of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds Observed During Solar Cycle 23-Paper 1" [J. Atmos. Sol.-Terr. Phys. 70(2-4) (2008) 245-253

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Michalek, G.; Lepping, R. P.

    2009-01-01

    One of the figures (Fig. 4) in "Solar sources and geospace consequences of interplanetary magnetic Clouds observed during solar cycle 23 -- Paper 1" by Gopalswamy et al. (2008, JASTP, Vol. 70, Issues 2-4, February 2008, pp. 245-253) is incorrect because of a software error in t he routine that was used to make the plot. The source positions of various magnetic cloud (MC) types are therefore not plotted correctly.

  8. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1994-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  9. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  10. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  11. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1992-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  12. Interplanetary Fast Shocks and Associated Drivers Observed through the Twenty-Third Solar Minimum by WIND Over its First 2.5 Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariani, F.; Berdichevsky, D.; Szabo, A.; Lepping, R. P.; Vinas, A. F.

    1999-01-01

    A list of the interplanetary (IP) shocks observed by WIND from its launch (in November 1994) to May 1997 is presented. Forty two shocks were identified. The magnetohydrodynamic nature of the shocks is investigated, and the associated shock parameters and their uncertainties are accurately computed using a practical scheme which combines two techniques. These techniques are a combination of the "pre-averaged" magnetic-coplanarity, velocity-coplanarity, and the Abraham-Schrauner-mixed methods, on the one hand, and the Vinas and Scudder [1986] technique for solving the non-linear least-squares Rankine-Hugoniot shock equations, on the other. Within acceptable limits these two techniques generally gave the same results, with some exceptions. The reasons for the exceptions are discussed. It is found that the mean strength and rate of occurrence of the shocks appears to correlated with the solar cycle. Both showed a decrease in 1996 coincident with the time of the lowest ultraviolet solar radiance, indicative of solar minimum and start of solar cycle 23, which began around June 1996. Eighteen shocks appeared to be associated with corotating interaction regions (CIRs). The distribution of their shock normals showed a mean direction peaking in the ecliptic plane and with a longitude (phi(sub n)) in that plane between perpendicular to the Parker spiral and radial from the Sun. When grouped according to the sense of the direction of propagation of the shocks the mean azimuthal (longitude) angle in GSE coordinates was approximately 194 deg for the fast-forward and approximately 20 deg for the fast-reverse shocks. Another 16 shocks were determined to be driven by solar transients, including magnetic clouds. These shocks had a broader distribution of normal directions than those of the CIR cases with a mean direction close to the Sun-Earth line. Eight shocks of unknown origin had normal orientation well off the ecliptic plane. No shock propagated with longitude phi(sub n) >= 220

  13. The 3 January 1978 interplanetary shock event as observed by energetic particle, plasma and magnetic field devices on board of Helios-1, Helios-2 and Prognoz-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, A. K.; Keppler, E.; Rosenbauer, H.; Verigin, M. I.; Gringauts, K. I.; Kurt, V. G.; Stolpovskii, V. G.; Neubauer, F. M.; Gombosi, T.; Somogyi, A.

    The paper investigates different characteristics of the interplanetary medium and of secondary enhancements in the energetic particle fluxes in regions before, at and after a flare generated interplanetary shock wave. The shock exhibits the properties of both an R- and F-type shock event, and the pre-shock intensity enhancements of energetic particles can be explained by a cumulative first-order Fermi acceleration process of successive reflections of the particles at the shock. Post-shock intensity enhancements of energetic particles are due to an acceleration of the particles by the shockwave and/or a trapping of the particles in the downstream region. The energetic particle enhancements at the shock cannot be explained uniquely by the shock drift accleration mechanism, and highly oblique shocks can be accompanied by energetic particle intensity increases.

  14. Lunar components in Lunping scintillations

    SciTech Connect

    Koster, J.R.; Lue, H.Y.; Wu, Hsi-Shu; Huang, Yinn-Nien

    1993-08-01

    The authors report on an anlysis of a 14 year data set of ionospheric scintillation data for 136 MHz signals transmitted from a Japanese satellite. They use a lunar age superposition method to analyze this data, breaking the data into blocks by seasons of the year. They observe a number of different scintillation types in the record, as well as impacts of lunar tides on the time record. They attempt to provide an origin for the different scintillation types.

  15. Interplanetary Lyman-beta emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paresce, F.

    1973-01-01

    Derivation of the intensity of the diffuse hydrogen Lyman-beta glow at 1025 A which is due to resonance scattering of the solar H I 1025 A line by interstellar and interplanetary hydrogen. Two sources of neutral hydrogen are considered: the local interstellar medium interacting with the solar system, and the dust deionization of the H(+) component of the solar wind. It is shown that if the dust geometrical factor is less than or equal to five quintillionths per cm, observations of backscattered Lyman-beta radiation will provide a unique determination of the density and temperature of the local interstellar medium.

  16. A plastic scintillation counter prototype.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Etsuko; Kawano, Takao

    2015-10-01

    A new prototype device for beta-ray measurement, a plastic scintillation counter, was assembled as an alternative device to liquid scintillation counters. This device uses plastic scintillation sheets (PS sheets) as a sample applicator without the use of a liquid scintillator. The performance was evaluated using tritium labeled compounds, and good linearity was observed between the activity and net count rate. The calculated detection limit of the device was 0.01 Bq mL(-1) after 10 h measurement for 2 mL sample. PMID:26164628

  17. Study of cosmic ray scintillations from 5-minute data of the scintillations telescope Izmran and world-wide network stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulinsky, O. V.; Dorman, L. I.; Libin, I. Y.; Prilutsky, R. E.; Yudakhin, K. F.

    1985-01-01

    During cosmic ray propagation in interplanetary space there appear characteristic cosmic-ray intensity scintillations which are due to charged particle scattering on random inhomogeneities of the interplanetary magnetic field. The power spectra of cosmic ray scintillations on the Earth during some intervals from 1977 to 1982 (for quiet periods, for solar flares and Forbush decreases due to power shock waves) have been calculated from five-minute, one and two-hour values of the cosmic-ray intensity measured by the scintillator supertelescope IZMIRAN. The spectra were estimated by the methods of spectral analysis and by autoregressive methods which mutually control each other and make it possible not only to analyze scintillation powers at distinguished frequencies, but also to determine the behavior of spectrum slopes in some frequency ranges.

  18. "Driverless" Shocks in the Interplanetary Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Kaiser, M. L.; Lara, A.

    1999-01-01

    Many interplanetary shocks have been detected without an obvious driver behind them. These shocks have been thought to be either blast waves from solar flares or shocks due to sudden increase in solar wind speed caused by interactions between large scale open and closed field lines of the Sun. We investigated this problem using a set of interplanetary shock detected {\\it in situ} by the Wind space craft and tracing their solar origins using low frequency radio data obtained by the Wind/WAVES experiment. For each of these "driverless shocks" we could find a unique coronal mass ejections (CME) event observed by the SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) coronagraphs. We also found that these CMEs were ejected at large angles from the Sun-Earth line. It appears that the "driverless shocks" are actually driver shocks, but the drivers were not intercepted by the spacecraft. We conclude that the interplanetary shocks are much more extended than the driving CMEs.

  19. The Interplanetary GRB Network in 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, T. L.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Hurley, K. C.; Anfimov, D.; Mitrofanov, I.; Golenetskii, S.; Mazets, E.; Crew, G.; Ricker, G.; Frontera, F.; Montanari, E.; Guidorzi, C.; Feroci, M.

    2002-04-01

    The Interplanetary GRB Network (IPN) has been recently enhanced with the successful addition of the Mars Odyssey mission. This compensates for the loss in 2001 of the asteroid mission NEAR, reconstituting a fully long-baseline interplanetary triangle with Ulysses, also in deep space, and with GGS-Wind, BeppoSAX and HETE-2, near the Earth. The operation of the renewed IPN has been demonstrated with the detection of many SGR and solar events in recent months, and with an appropriate detection rate of GRBs. The observations to date and the afterglow detections that the IPN has enabled will be outlined, and the future performance will be discussed.

  20. GPS phase scintillation at high latitudes during geomagnetic storms of 7-17 March 2012 - Part 2: Interhemispheric comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikryl, P.; Ghoddousi-Fard, R.; Spogli, L.; Mitchell, C. N.; Li, G.; Ning, B.; Cilliers, P. J.; Sreeja, V.; Aquino, M.; Terkildsen, M.; Jayachandran, P. T.; Jiao, Y.; Morton, Y. T.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Thomas, E. G.; Zhang, Y.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Alfonsi, L.; De Franceschi, G.; Romano, V.

    2015-06-01

    During the ascending phase of solar cycle 24, a series of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) in the period 7-17 March 2012 caused geomagnetic storms that strongly affected high-latitude ionosphere in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. GPS phase scintillation was observed at northern and southern high latitudes by arrays of GPS ionospheric scintillation and TEC monitors (GISTMs) and geodetic-quality GPS receivers sampling at 1 Hz. Mapped as a function of magnetic latitude and magnetic local time (MLT), the scintillation was observed in the ionospheric cusp, the tongue of ionization fragmented into patches, sun-aligned arcs in the polar cap, and nightside auroral oval and subauroral latitudes. Complementing a companion paper (Prikryl et al., 2015a) that focuses on the high-latitude ionospheric response to variable solar wind in the North American sector, interhemispheric comparison reveals commonalities as well as differences and asymmetries between the northern and southern high latitudes, as a consequence of the coupling between the solar wind and magnetosphere. The interhemispheric asymmetries are caused by the dawn-dusk component of the interplanetary magnetic field controlling the MLT of the cusp entry of the storm-enhanced density plasma into the polar cap and the orientation relative to the noon-midnight meridian of the tongue of ionization.

  1. Interplanetary medium data book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Unresolved questions on the physics of solar wind and its effects on magnetospheric processes and cosmic ray propagation were addressed with hourly averaged interplanetary plasma and magnetic field data. This composite data set is described with its content and extent, sources, limits of validity, and the mutual consistency studies and normalizations to which the input data were subjected. Hourly averaged parameters were presented in the form of digital listings and 27-day plots. The listings are contained in a separately bound appendix.

  2. Multipoint study of interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cano, Xochitl; Kajdic, Primoz; Russell, Christopher T.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, Ernesto; Jian, Lan K.; Luhmann, Janet G.

    2016-04-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks are driven in the heliosphere by Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) and Stream Interaction Regions (SIRs). These shocks perturb the solar wind plasma, and play an active role in the acceleration of ions to suprathermal energies. Shock fronts evolve as they move from the Sun. Their surfaces can be far from uniform and be modulated by changes in the ambient solar wind (magnetic field orientation, flow velocity), shocks rippling, and perturbations upstream and downstream from the shocks, i.e., electromagnetic waves. In this work we use multipoint observations from STEREO, WIND, and MESSENGER missions to study shock characteristics at different helio-longitudes and determine the properties of the waves near them. We also determine shock longitudinal extensions and foreshock sizes. The variations of geometry along the shock surface can result in different extensions of the wave and ion foreshocks ahead of the shocks, and in different wave modes upstream and downtream of the shocks. We find that the ion foreshock can extend up to 0.2 AU ahead of the shock, and that the upstream region with modified solar wind/waves can be very asymmetric.

  3. The interplanetary and solar magnetic field sector structures, 1962 - 1968

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field sector structure was observed from late 1962 through 1968. During this time it has been possible to study the manner in which the sector pattern and its relation to the photospheric magnetic field configuration changes from solar minimum to solar maximum. Observations were also made relating sector boundaries to specific regions on the solar disk. These and other observations related to the solar origin of the interplanetary field are briefly reviewed.

  4. Infrared emission from interplanetary dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temi, P.; de Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.; Moreno, G.; Salama, A.

    1989-02-01

    Standard models of the interplanetary dust emission fail to account satisfactorily for IR observations. A new model of the dust, based on very simple assumptions on the grain structure (spherical and homogeneous) and chemical composition (astronomical silicates, graphite, blackbodies) is developed. Updated values of the refractive indexes have been included in the analysis. The predictions of the model (absolute values of the fluxes, spectral shape, elongation dependence of the emission) have then been compared with all the available IR observations performed by the ARGO (balloon-borne experiment by University of Rome), AFGL and Zodiacal Infrared Project (ZIP) (rocket experiments by Air Force Geophysics Laboratory, Bedford, Mass.), and IRAS satellite. Good agreement is found when homogeneous data sets from single experiments (e.g., ZIP and ARGO) are considered separately.

  5. Preliminary investigation of interplanetary shock structure: Quasi-parallel shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.

    1974-01-01

    Pioneer 9's magnetic field and plasma data were studied to develop arguments for or against the observation of oblique interplanetary shocks. Structural classifications are defined, and the justification for seeking these classifications in the solar wind are presented.

  6. Ion bombardment of interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    It is thought that a fraction of the interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) collected in the stratosphere by high-flying aircraft represent materials ejected from comets. An investigation is conducted regarding the effects of ion bombardment on these particles, taking into account information on ion tracks and carbon in IDP's and laboratory data on charged particle bombardment of surfaces. It is found that the observational discovery of particle tracks in certain IDP's clearly indicates the exposure of these particles to approximately 10,000 years of 1-AU equivalent solar-particle fluences. If some erasure of the tracks occurs, which is likely when an IDP enters the upper atmosphere, then somewhat longer times are implied. The effects of the erosion and enhanced adhesion produced by ions are considered.

  7. Analysis of interplanetary dust collections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Pilachowski, L.; Olszewski, E.; Hodge, P. W.

    1980-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles collected in the form of micrometeorites in the stratosphere and meteor ablation spherules in deep sea sediments are possibly a relatively unbiased sample of the micrometeoroid complex near 1 AU. Detailed laboratory analysis of the particles has provided information on physical properties which may be useful in modeling a variety of aspects of interplanetary dust.

  8. Interplanetary Field Enhancements: The Interaction between Solar Wind and Interplanetary Dusty Plasma Released by Interplanetary Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Hairong

    Interplanetary field enhancements (IFEs) are unique large-scale structures in the solar wind. During IFEs, the magnetic-field strength is significantly enhanced with little perturbation in the solar-wind plasma. Early studies showed that IFEs move at nearly the solar-wind speed and some IFEs detected at 0.72AU by Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) are associated with material co-orbiting with asteroid Oljato. To explain the observed IFE features, we develop and test an IFE formation hypothesis: IFEs result from interactions between the solar wind and clouds of nanoscale charged dust particles released in interplanetary collisions. This hypothesis predicts that the magnetic field drapes and the solar wind slows down in the upstream. Meanwhile the observed IFE occurrence rate should be comparable with the detectable interplanetary collision rate. Based on this hypothesis, we can use the IFE occurrence to determine the spatial distribution and temporal variation of interplanetary objects which produce IFEs. To test the hypothesis, we perform a systematic survey of IFEs in the magnetic-field data from many spacecraft. Our datasets cover from 1970s to present and from inner than 0.3AU to outer than 5 AU. In total, more than 470 IFEs are identified and their occurrences show clustering features in both space and time. We use multi-spacecraft simultaneous observations to reconstruct the magnetic-field geometry and find that the magnetic field drapes in the upstream region. The results of a superposed epoch study show that the solar wind slows down in the upstream and there is a plasma depletion region near the IFE centers. In addition, the solar-wind slowdown and plasma depletion feature are more significant in larger IFEs. The mass contained in IFEs can be estimated by balancing the solar-wind pressure force exerted on the IFEs against the solar gravity. The solar-wind slowdown resultant from the estimated mass is consistent with the result in superposed epoch study. The

  9. Observations of celestial X-ray sources above 20 keV with the high-energy scintillation spectrometer on board OSO 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Dolan, J. H.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.; Beall, J. H.; Maurer, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    High-energy X-ray spectra of the Crab Nebula, Cyg- XR-1, and Cen A were determined from observations with the scintillation spectrometer on board the OSO-8 satellite, launched in June, 1975. Each of these sources was observed over two periods of 8 days or more, enabling a search for day-to-day and year to year variations in the spectral and temporal characteristics of the X-ray emission. No variation in the light curve of the Crab pulsar was found from observations which span a 15-day period in March 1976, with demonstrable phase stability. Transitions associated with the binary phase of Cyg XR-1 and a large change in the emission from Con A are reported.

  10. Outflow Structure of the Quiet Sun Corona Probed by Spacecraft Radio Scintillations in Strong Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Takeshi; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Isobe, Hiroaki; Shiota, Daikou; Ando, Hiroki; Miyamoto, Mayu; Toda, Tomoaki; Häusler, Bernd; Pätzold, Martin; Nabatov, Alexander; Asai, Ayumi; Yaji, Kentaro; Yamada, Manabu; Nakamura, Masato

    2014-06-01

    Radio scintillation observations have been unable to probe flow speeds in the low corona where the scattering of radio waves is exceedingly strong. Here we estimate outflow speeds continuously from the vicinity of the Sun to the outer corona (heliocentric distances of 1.5-20.5 solar radii) by applying the strong scattering theory to radio scintillations for the first time, using the Akatsuki spacecraft as the radio source. Small, nonzero outflow speeds were observed over a wide latitudinal range in the quiet-Sun low corona, suggesting that the supply of plasma from closed loops to the solar wind occurs over an extended area. The existence of power-law density fluctuations down to the scale of 100 m was suggested, which is indicative of well-developed turbulence which can play a key role in heating the corona. At higher altitudes, a rapid acceleration typical of radial open fields is observed, and the temperatures derived from the speed profile show a distinct maximum in the outer corona. This study opened up a possibility of observing detailed flow structures near the Sun from a vast amount of existing interplanetary scintillation data.

  11. Outflow structure of the quiet sun corona probed by spacecraft radio scintillations in strong scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, Takeshi; Ando, Hiroki; Toda, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Masato; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Shiota, Daikou; Isobe, Hiroaki; Asai, Ayumi; Miyamoto, Mayu; Häusler, Bernd; Pätzold, Martin; Nabatov, Alexander; Yaji, Kentaro; Yamada, Manabu

    2014-06-20

    Radio scintillation observations have been unable to probe flow speeds in the low corona where the scattering of radio waves is exceedingly strong. Here we estimate outflow speeds continuously from the vicinity of the Sun to the outer corona (heliocentric distances of 1.5-20.5 solar radii) by applying the strong scattering theory to radio scintillations for the first time, using the Akatsuki spacecraft as the radio source. Small, nonzero outflow speeds were observed over a wide latitudinal range in the quiet-Sun low corona, suggesting that the supply of plasma from closed loops to the solar wind occurs over an extended area. The existence of power-law density fluctuations down to the scale of 100 m was suggested, which is indicative of well-developed turbulence which can play a key role in heating the corona. At higher altitudes, a rapid acceleration typical of radial open fields is observed, and the temperatures derived from the speed profile show a distinct maximum in the outer corona. This study opened up a possibility of observing detailed flow structures near the Sun from a vast amount of existing interplanetary scintillation data.

  12. Large-scale properties of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.

    1972-01-01

    Early theoretical work of Parker is presented along with the observational evidence supporting his Archimedes spiral model. Variations present in the interplanetary magnetic field from the spiral angle are related to structures in the solar wind. The causes of these structures are found to be either nonuniform radial solar wind flow or the time evolution of the photospheric field. Coronal magnetic models are related to the connection between the solar magnetic field and the interplanetary magnetic field. Direct extension of the solar field-magnetic nozzle controversy is discussed along with the coronal magnetic models. Effects of active regions on the interplanetary magnetic field is discussed with particular reference to the evolution of interplanetary sectors. Interplanetary magnetic field magnitude variations are shown throughout the solar cycle. The percentage of time the field magnitude is greater than 10 gamma is shown to closely parallel sunspot number. The sun's polar field influence on the interplanetary field and alternative views of the magnetic field structure out of the ecliptic plane are presented. In addition, a variety of significantly different interplanetary field structures are discussed.

  13. SCINTILLATION SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Francis, J.E.

    1960-06-21

    A portable scintillation spectrometer is described which is especially useful in radio-biological studies for determining the uptake and distribution of gamma -emitting substances in tissue. The spectrometer includes a collimator having a plurality of apertures that are hexagonal in cross section. Two crystals are provided: one is activated to respond to incident rays from the collimator; the other is not activated and shields the first from external radiation.

  14. Plastic scintillation dosimetry: Optimal selection of scintillating fibers and scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, Louis; Arsenault, Jean; Gingras, Luc; Sam Beddar, A.; Roy, Rene; Beaulieu, Luc

    2005-07-15

    Scintillation dosimetry is a promising avenue for evaluating dose patterns delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans or for the small fields involved in stereotactic radiosurgery. However, the increase in signal has been the goal for many authors. In this paper, a comparison is made between plastic scintillating fibers and plastic scintillator. The collection of scintillation light was measured experimentally for four commercial models of scintillating fibers (BCF-12, BCF-60, SCSF-78, SCSF-3HF) and two models of plastic scintillators (BC-400, BC-408). The emission spectra of all six scintillators were obtained by using an optical spectrum analyzer and they were compared with theoretical behavior. For scintillation in the blue region, the signal intensity of a singly clad scintillating fiber (BCF-12) was 120% of that of the plastic scintillator (BC-400). For the multiclad fiber (SCSF-78), the signal reached 144% of that of the plastic scintillator. The intensity of the green scintillating fibers was lower than that of the plastic scintillator: 47% for the singly clad fiber (BCF-60) and 77% for the multiclad fiber (SCSF-3HF). The collected light was studied as a function of the scintillator length and radius for a cylindrical probe. We found that symmetric detectors with nearly the same spatial resolution in each direction (2 mm in diameter by 3 mm in length) could be made with a signal equivalent to those of the more commonly used asymmetric scintillators. With augmentation of the signal-to-noise ratio in consideration, this paper presents a series of comparisons that should provide insight into selection of a scintillator type and volume for development of a medical dosimeter.

  15. Evolution of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComas, D. J.

    Remote observations of magnetic field topologies in the solar corona and in situ observations of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in interplanetary space are used to examine the temporal evolution of the spatial distribution of open and closed field regions emanating from the Sun. The simple 'open' configuration of inward and outward pointing sectors in the IMF is periodically disrupted by magnetically distinct coronal mass ejections (CME's) which erupt from previously closed magnetic field regions in the corona into interplanetary space. At 1 AU, CME's contain counterstreaming halo electrons which indicate their distinct magnetic topologies. This topology is generally thought to be one of the following: plasmoids that are completely disconnected from the Sun; magnetic 'bottles,' still tied to the corona at both ends; or flux ropes which are only partially disconnected. Fully disconnected plasmoids would have no long term effect on the amount of open flux; however, both in situ observations of details of the halo electron distributions and remote coronagraph observations of radial fields following CME's indicate that CME's generally do retain at least partial attached to the Sun. Both the magnetic-bottle and flux rope geometries require some mitigating process to close off previously open fields in order to avoid a flux catastrophe. In addition, the average amount of magnetic flux observed in interplanetary space varies over the solar cycle, also indicating that there must be ways in which new flux is opened and previously open flux is closed off. The most likely scenario for closing off open magnetic fields is for reconnection to occur above helmet streamers, where oppositely directed field regions are juxtaposed in the corona. These events would serve to return closed field arches to the Sun and release open, U-shaped structures into the solar wind.

  16. Evolution of the interplanetary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Remote observations of magnetic field topologies in the solar corona and in situ observations of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in interplanetary space are used to examine the temporal evolution of the spatial distribution of open and closed field regions emanating from the Sun. The simple open'' configuration of inward and outward pointing sectors in the IMF is periodically disrupted by magnetically distinct coronal mass ejections (CMEs) which erupt from previously closed magnetic field regions in the corona into interplanetary space. At 1 AU, CMEs contain counterstreaming halo electrons which indicate their distinct magnetic topologies. This topology is generally thought to be: plasmoids that are completely disconnected from the Sun; magnetic bottles,'' still tied to the corona at both ends; or flux ropes which are only partially disconnected. Fully disconnected plasmoids would have no long term effect on the amount of open flux; however, both in situ observations of details of the halo electron distributions and remote coronagraph observations of radial fields following CMEs indicate that CMEs generally do retain at least partial attached to the Sun. Both the magnetic-bottle and flux rope geometries require some mitigating process to close off previously open fields in order to avoid a flux catastrophe. In addition, the average amount of magnetic flux observed in interplanetary space varies over the solar cycle, also indicating that there must be ways in which new flux is opened and previously open flux is closed off. The most likely scenario for closing off open magnetic fields is for reconnection to occurs above helmet streamers, where oppositely directed field regions are juxtaposed in the corona. These events would serve to return closed field arches to the Sun and release open, U-shaped structures into the solar wind.

  17. Evolution of the interplanetary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.

    1993-05-01

    Remote observations of magnetic field topologies in the solar corona and in situ observations of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in interplanetary space are used to examine the temporal evolution of the spatial distribution of open and closed field regions emanating from the Sun. The simple ``open`` configuration of inward and outward pointing sectors in the IMF is periodically disrupted by magnetically distinct coronal mass ejections (CMEs) which erupt from previously closed magnetic field regions in the corona into interplanetary space. At 1 AU, CMEs contain counterstreaming halo electrons which indicate their distinct magnetic topologies. This topology is generally thought to be: plasmoids that are completely disconnected from the Sun; magnetic ``bottles,`` still tied to the corona at both ends; or flux ropes which are only partially disconnected. Fully disconnected plasmoids would have no long term effect on the amount of open flux; however, both in situ observations of details of the halo electron distributions and remote coronagraph observations of radial fields following CMEs indicate that CMEs generally do retain at least partial attached to the Sun. Both the magnetic-bottle and flux rope geometries require some mitigating process to close off previously open fields in order to avoid a flux catastrophe. In addition, the average amount of magnetic flux observed in interplanetary space varies over the solar cycle, also indicating that there must be ways in which new flux is opened and previously open flux is closed off. The most likely scenario for closing off open magnetic fields is for reconnection to occurs above helmet streamers, where oppositely directed field regions are juxtaposed in the corona. These events would serve to return closed field arches to the Sun and release open, U-shaped structures into the solar wind.

  18. The Third Interplanetary Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, K.; Golenetskii, S.; Aptekar, R.; Mazets, E.; Pal'Shin, V.; Frederiks, D.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D.; Kozyrev, A.; Litvak, M.; Sanin, A. B.; Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K.; Starr, R.; von Kienlin, A.; Rau, A.; Yamaoka, K.; Ohno, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Tashiro, M.; Terada, Y.; Murakami, T.; Makishima, K.; Barthelmy, S.; Cummings, J.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H.; Cline, T.; Goldsten, J.; Del Monte, E.; Feroci, M.; Marisaldi, M.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Meegan, C.; Smith, D. M.; Wigger, C.; Hajdas, W.

    2011-08-01

    The 3rd interplanetary network (IPN), which has been in operation since 1990, presently consists of 9 spacecraft: AGILE, Fermi, RHESSI, Suzaku, and Swift, in low Earth orbit; INTEGRAL, in eccentric Earth orbit with apogee 0.5 light-seconds Wind, up to ~7 light-seconds from Earth; MESSENGER, en route to Mercury; and Mars Odyssey, in orbit around Mars. The IPN operates as a full-time, all-sky monitor for transients down to a threshold of about 6×10-7 erg cm-2 or 1 photon cm-2 s-1. It detects ~335 cosmic gamma-ray bursts per year. These events are generally not the same ones detected by narrower field of view instruments such as Swift, INTEGRAL IBIS, SuperAGILE, and MAXI; the localization accuracy is in the several arcminute and above range. The data are publicly available and can be utilized for a wide variety of studies.

  19. The interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Large-scale properties of the interplanetary magnetic field as determined by the solar wind velocity structure are examined. The various ways in which magnetic fields affect phenomena in the solar wind are summarized. The dominant role of high and low velocity solar wind streams that persist, with fluctuations and evolution, for weeks or months is emphasized. It is suggested that for most purposes the sector structure is better identified with the stream structure than with the magnetic polarity and that the polarity does not necessarily change from one velocity sector to the next. Several mechanisms that might produce the stream structure are considered. The interaction of the high and low velocity streams is analyzed in a model that is steady state when viewed in a frame that corotates with the sun.

  20. Charging kinetics of dust in interplanetary space plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.

    2013-07-01

    A theoretical kinetic model for the physical understanding of the charging of dust particles in the interplanetary space plasma has been developed. In contrast to earlier studies, the present analysis incorporates (i) uniform potential theory for complex plasmas with size distribution of the dust particles, (ii) charge, number and energy balance of the constituents and (iii) appropriate expressions for photoelectric emission from a positively charged particle with inherent charge neutrality of the interplanetary space plasma. Further utilizing the population balance equation (given by Matsoukas and Russel) for the interplanetary dust particles, the fluctuations in steady-state charge (or electric potential) has also been investigated. For the illustration purpose, the computations have been performed for the interplanetary space plasma at 1 au from the sun; for this distance, reasonably good information on the gaseous and dust components are available. As an interesting feature, the theoretical predictions are in reasonably good agreement with observations and earlier estimates.

  1. The Analysis of Data from Voyager's Ultraviolet Spectrometers: The Trend of Observed Interplanetary Lyman-alpha Intensity with Increasing Heliocentric Distance for Multiple Viewing Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, C. R.; Fayock, B.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Zank, G. P.

    2014-12-01

    The motivation for this project was simple: to reduce raw data from the Ultraviolet Spectrometers on both Voyager Spacecraft to verify the results of a simulation of Lyman-alpha radiative transfer within a 3D MHD kinetic-neutral model of the heliosphere created at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The heliospheric model, which self-consistently includes the interaction between ionized and neutral hydrogen, outputs a density map of neutral hydrogen. The Monte Carlo radiative transfer model then simulates the propagation and scattering of millions of photons through this density map and outputs the relative number of photons that should be seen by spacecraft at any point within 1000 AU of the sun. My project was to learn how to analyze the raw Voyager data and compare it to these simulations. There were several stages of analysis necessary to reduce to useful data. Records containing signals from sources other than the interplanetary medium, such as stars and planets, were discarded. The remaining records were averaged along regional lines of sight to achieve better signal to noise. The spectra were then corrected for inherent device flaws, such as channel-to-channel variations in sensitivity (fixed-pattern noise), dark counts due to the radioisotope thermal electric generator, and imperfections in the scattering of the diffraction grating. Records were then sorted and averaged to create a full-sky map consisting of 18 regions for each specified radial bin to match the cell spacing of the radiative transfer model. The results were then normalized to solar minimum to reduce variations in the data due to solar cycle oscillations. Initial results indicate an unexpected deviation from the models, but more analysis must be performed to determine if the discrepancy comes from the normalization of the data, insufficient angular resolution of the radiative transfer model, or the physics of the models themselves. Future work involves increasing the resolution of the

  2. Tin in a chondritic interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.

    1989-03-01

    Submicron platey Sn-rich grains are present in chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (IDP) W7029 A and it is the second occurrence of a tin mineral in a stratospheric micrometeorite. Selected Area Electron Diffraction data for the Sn-rich grains match with Sn2O3 and Sn3O4. The oxide(s) may have formed in the solar nebula when tin metal catalytically supported reduction of CO or during flash heating on atmospheric entry of the IDP. The presence of tin is consistent with enrichments for other volatile trace elements in chondritic IDPs and may signal an emerging trend toward nonchondritic volatile element abundances in chondritic IDPs. The observation confirms small-scale mineralogical heterogeneity in fine-grained chondritic porous interplanetary dust.

  3. Tin in a chondritic interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Submicron platey Sn-rich grains are present in chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (IDP) W7029 A and it is the second occurrence of a tin mineral in a stratospheric micrometeorite. Selected Area Electron Diffraction data for the Sn-rich grains match with Sn2O3 and Sn3O4. The oxide(s) may have formed in the solar nebula when tin metal catalytically supported reduction of CO or during flash heating on atmospheric entry of the IDP. The presence of tin is consistent with enrichments for other volatile trace elements in chondritic IDPs and may signal an emerging trend toward nonchondritic volatile element abundances in chondritic IDPs. The observation confirms small-scale mineralogical heterogeneity in fine-grained chondritic porous interplanetary dust.

  4. Autonomous interplanetary constellation design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Cornelius Channing, II

    According to NASA's integrated space technology roadmaps, space-based infrastructures are envisioned as necessary ingredients to a sustained effort in continuing space exploration. Whether it be for extra-terrestrial habitats, roving/cargo vehicles, or space tourism, autonomous space networks will provide a vital communications lifeline for both future robotic and human missions alike. Projecting that the Moon will be a bustling hub of activity within a few decades, a near-term opportunity for in-situ infrastructure development is within reach. This dissertation addresses the anticipated need for in-space infrastructure by investigating a general design methodology for autonomous interplanetary constellations; to illustrate the theory, this manuscript presents results from an application to the Earth-Moon neighborhood. The constellation design methodology is formulated as an optimization problem, involving a trajectory design step followed by a spacecraft placement sequence. Modeling the dynamics as a restricted 3-body problem, the investigated design space consists of families of periodic orbits which play host to the constellations, punctuated by arrangements of spacecraft autonomously guided by a navigation strategy called LiAISON (Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation). Instead of more traditional exhaustive search methods, a numerical continuation approach is implemented to map the admissible configuration space. In particular, Keller's pseudo-arclength technique is used to follow folding/bifurcating solution manifolds, which are otherwise inaccessible with other parameter continuation schemes. A succinct characterization of the underlying structure of the local, as well as global, extrema is thus achievable with little a priori intuition of the solution space. Furthermore, the proposed design methodology offers benefits in computation speed plus the ability to handle mildly stochastic systems. An application of the constellation design

  5. New interplanetary proton fluence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan; Armstrong, T. P.; Dao-Gibner, L.; Silverman, S.

    1990-01-01

    A new predictive engineering model for the interplanetary fluence of protons with above 10 MeV and above 30 MeV is described. The data set used is a combination of observations made from the earth's surface and from above the atmosphere between 1956 and 1963 and observations made from spacecraft in the vicinity of earth between 1963 and 1985. The data cover a time period three times as long as the period used in earlier models. With the use of this data set the distinction between 'ordinary proton events' and 'anomalously large events' made in earlier work disappears. This permitted the use of statistical analysis methods developed for 'ordinary events' on the entire data set. The greater than 10 MeV fluences at 1 AU calculated with the new model are about twice those expected on the basis of models now in use. At energies above 30 MeV, the old and new models agree. In contrast to earlier models, the results do not depend critically on the fluence from any one event and are independent of sunspot number. Mission probability curves derived from the fluence distribution are presented.

  6. Morphology of auroral zone radio wave scintillation

    SciTech Connect

    Rino, C.L.; Matthews, S.J.

    1980-08-01

    This paper describes the morphology of midnight sector and morning sector auroral zone scintillation observations made over a two-year period using the Wideband satelite, which is in a sun-synchronous, low-altitude orbit. No definitive seasonal variation was found. The nighttime data showed the highest scintillation ocurrence levels, but significant amounts of morning scintillation were observed. For the most part the scintillation activity followed the general pattern of local magnetic activity. The most prominent feature in the nightime data is a localized amplitude and phase scintillation enhancement at the point where the propagation vector lies within an L shell. A geometrical effect due to a dynamic slab of sheetlike structures in the F region is hypothesized as the source of his enhancement. The data have been sorted by magnetic activity, proximity to local midnight, and season. The general features of the data are in agreement with the accepted morphology of auroral zone scintillation.

  7. High Amplitude Events in relation to Interplanetary disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rajesh Kumar; Agarwal Mishra, Rekha

    2012-07-01

    The Sun emits the variable solar wind which interacts with the very local interstellar medium to form the heliosphere. Hence variations in solar activity strongly influence interplanetary space, from the Sun's surface out to the edge of the heliosphere. Superimposed on the solar wind are mass ejections from the Sun and/or its corona which, disturb the interplanetary medium - hence the name "interplanetary disturbances". Interplanetary disturbances are the sources of large-scale particle acceleration, of disturbances in the Earth's magnetosphere, of modulations of galactic cosmic rays in short, they are the prime focus for space weather studies. The investigation deals with the study of cosmic ray intensity, solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field parameters variation due to interplanetary disturbances (magnetic clouds) during an unusual class of days i.e. high amplitude anisotropic wave train events. The high amplitude anisotropic wave train events in cosmic ray intensity has been identified using the data of ground based Goose Bay neutron monitor and studied during the period 1981-94. Even though, the occurrence of high amplitude anisotropic wave trains does not depend on the onset of interplanetary magnetic clouds. But the possibility of occurrence of these events cannot be overlooked during the periods of interplanetary magnetic cloud events. It is observed that solar wind velocity remains higher (> 300) than normal and interplanetary magnetic field B remains lower than normal on the onset of interplanetary magnetic cloud during the passage of these events. It is also noted from the superposed epoch analysis of cosmic ray intensity and geomagnetic activity for high amplitude anisotropic wave train events during the onset of interplanetary magnetic clouds that the increase in cosmic ray intensity and decrease in geomagnetic activity start not at the onset of magnetic clouds but after few days. The north south component of IMF (Bz), IMF (B), proton

  8. Discovery of nuclear tracks in interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J. P.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    Prior to capture by the Earth's atmosphere individual interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) have allegedly spent up to 10 to the 5th power years as discrete bodies within the interplanetary medium. Observation of tracks in IDP's in the form of solar flare tracks would provide hitherto unknown data about micrometeorites such as: (1) whether an IDP existed in space as an individual particle or as part of a larger meteroid; (2) the degree to which a particle was heated during the trauma of atmospheric entry; (3) residence time of an IDP within the interplanetary medium; and (4) possible hints as to the pre-accretional exposure of component mineral grains to solar or galactic irradiation. Using transmission electron microscopy tracks in several micrometeorites have been successfully identified. All of the studied particles had been retrieved from the stratosphere by U-2 aircraft. Three pristine IDP's (between 5 and 15 micro m diameter) have so far been searched for solar flare tracks, and they have been found in the two smaller particles U2-20B11 (11 micro m) and U2-20B37 (8 micro m).

  9. Dusty Plasma Effects in the Interplanetary Medium?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ingrid; Issautier, Karine; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Le Chat, Gaétan; Czechowski, Andrzej; Zaslavsky, Arnaud; Zouganelis, Yannis; Belheouane, Soraya

    Cosmic dust particles exist in a variety of compositions and sizes in the interplanetary medium. There is little direct information on the composition, but those interplanetary dust particles that are collected in the upper Earth’s atmosphere and can be studied in the laboratory typically have an irregular, sometimes porous structure on scales <100 nm. They contain magnesium-rich silicates and silicon carbide, iron-nickel and iron-sulfur compounds, calcium- and aluminum oxides, and chemical compounds that contain a large mass fraction of carbon (e.g. carbonaceous species). A fraction of the dust originates from comets, but because of their bulk material temperature of about 280 K near 1 AU, most icy compounds have disappeared. The dust particles are embedded in the solar wind, a hot plasma with at 1 AU kinetic temperatures around 100 000 K and flow direction nearly radial outward from the Sun at supersonic bulk velocities around 400 km/s. Since the dust particles carry an electric surface charge they are subject to electromagnetic forces and the nanodust particles are efficiently accelerated to velocities of order of solar wind speed. The acceleration of the nanodust is similar, but not identical to the formation of pick-up ions. The S/WAVES radio wave instrument on STEREO measured a flux of nanodust at 1 AU [1]. The nanodust probably forms in the region inward of 1 AU and is accelerated by the solar wind as discussed. We also discuss the different paths of dust - plasma interactions in the interplanetary medium and their observations with space experiments. Comparing these interactions we show that the interplanetary medium near 1 AU can in many cases be described as “dust in plasma" rather than "dusty plasma”. [1] S. Belheouane, N. Meyer-Vernet, K. Issautier, G. Le Chat, A. Zaslavsky, Y. Zouganelis, I. Mann, A. Czechowski: Dynamics of nanoparticles detected at 1 AU by S/WAVES onboard STEREO spacecraft, in this session.

  10. Interplanetary Microlaser Transponders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.

    1999-01-01

    The feasibility of an asynchronous (i.e. independently firing) interplanetary laser transponder, capable of ranging between Earth and Mars and using the automated SLR2000 Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) system as an Earth base station, has been suggested. Since that time, we have received a small amount of discretionary funding to further explore the transponder concept and to develop and test an engineering breadboard. Candidate operational scenarios for acquiring and tracking the opposite laser terminal over interplanetary distances have been developed, and breadboard engineering parameters were chosen to reflect the requirements of an Earth-Mars link Laboratory tests have been devised to simulate the Earth- Mars link between two independent SLR2000 transceivers and to demonstrate the transfer of range and time in single photon mode. The present paper reviews the concept of the asynchronous microlaser transponder, the transponder breadboard design, an operational scenario recently developed for an asteroid rendezvous, and the laboratory test setup. The optical head of the transponder breadboard fits within a cylinder roughly 15 cm in diameter and 32 cm in length and is mounted in a commercial two axis gimbal driven by two computer-controlled stepper motors which allows the receiver optical axis to be centered on a simulated Earth image. The optical head is built around a small optical bench which supports a 14.7 cm diameter refractive telescope, a prototype 2 kHz SLR2000 microlaser transmitter, a quadrant microchannel plate photomultiplier (MCP/PMT), a CCD array camera, spatial and spectral filters, assorted lenses and mirrors, and protective covers and sun shields. The microlaser is end-pumped by a fiber-coupled diode laser array. An annular mirror is employed as a passive transmit/receive (T/R) switch in an aperture-sharing arrangement wherein the transmitted beam passes through the central hole and illuminates only the central 2.5 cm of the common telescope

  11. Interplanetary magnetic clouds: Topology and driving mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, James; Garren, David A.

    1993-11-01

    A model is developed to study the origin and propagation of magnetic clouds. Starting with an equilibrium current loop embedded in an ambient plasma consistent with the solar corona, magnetic energy is injected by increasing the loop current. This causes the loop to rise, propelling plasma and magnetic field away from the Sun. Using a simple model of the interplanetary medium, the subsequent dynamics of the loop is calculated to 1 AU and beyond. The macroscopic properties of the resulting structures at 1 AU closely resemble those of observed magnetic clouds. Thermal effects indicate that clouds remain magnetically connected to the Sun in order to yield observed temperatures near 1 AU.

  12. Radio wave scintillations at equatorial regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poularikas, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Radio waves, passing through the atmosphere, experience amplitude and phase fluctuations know as scintillations. A characterization of equatorial scintillation, which has resulted from studies of data recorded primarily in South America and equatorial Africa, is presented. Equatorial scintillation phenomena are complex because they appear to vary with time of day (pre-and postmidnight), season (equinoxes), and magnetic activity. A wider and more systematic geographical coverage is needed for both scientific and engineering purposes; therefore, it is recommended that more observations should be made at earth stations (at low-geomagnetic latitudes) to record equatorial scintillation phenomena.

  13. Ionosphere scintillations associated with features of equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, H.; Vats, H. O.; Sethia, G.; Deshpande, M. R.; Rastogi, R. G.; Sastri, J. H.; Murthy, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Amplitude scintillations of radio beacons aboard the ATS-6 satellite on 40 MHz, 140 MHz and 360 MHz recorded during the ATS-6 phase II at an equatorial station Ootacamund (dip 4 deg N) and the ionograms at a nearby station Kodaikanal (dip 3.5 deg N) are examined for scintillation activity. Only sporadic E events, other than Es-q, Es-c or normal E are found to be associated with intense daytime scintillations. Scintillations are also observed during night Es conditions. The amplitude spread is associated with strong scintillations on all frequencies while frequency spread causes weaker scintillations and that mainly at 40 MHz.

  14. Spacecraft Radio Scintillation and Solar System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    1993-01-01

    When a wave propagates through a turbulent medium, scattering by the random refractive index inhomogeneities can lead to a wide variety of phenomena that have been the subject of extensive study. The observed scattering effects include amplitude or intensity scintillation, phase scintillation, angular broadening, and spectral broadening, among others. In this paper, I will refer to these scattering effects collectively as scintillation. Although the most familiar example is probably the twinkling of stars (light wave intensity scintillation by turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere), scintillation has been encountered and investigated in such diverse fields as ionospheric physics, oceanography, radio astronomy, and radio and optical communications. Ever since planetary spacecraft began exploring the solar system, scintillation has appeared during the propagation of spacecraft radio signals through planetary atmospheres, planetary ionospheres, and the solar wind. Early studies of these phenomena were motivated by the potential adverse effects on communications and navigation, and on experiments that use the radio link to conduct scientific investigations. Examples of the latter are radio occultation measurements (described below) of planetary atmospheres to deduce temperature profiles, and the search for gravitational waves. However,these concerns soon gave way to the emergence of spacecraft radio scintillation as a new scientific tool for exploring small-scale dynamics in planetary atmospheres and structure in the solar wind, complementing in situ and other remote sensing spacecraft measurements, as well as scintillation measurements using natural (celestial) radio sources. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe and review the solar system spacecraft radio scintillation observations, to summarize the salient features of wave propagation analyses employed in interpreting them, to underscore the unique remote sensing capabilities and scientific relevance of

  15. Estimation of interplanetary electric field conditions for historical geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Veenadhari, B.; Tulasi Ram, S.; Selvakumaran, R.; Mukherjee, Shyamoli; Singh, Rajesh; Kadam, B. D.

    2015-09-01

    Ground magnetic measurements provide a unique database in understanding space weather. The continuous geomagnetic records from Colaba-Alibag observatories in India contain historically longest and continuous observations from 1847 to present date. Some of the super intense geomagnetic storms that occurred prior to 1900 have been revisited and investigated in order to understand the probable interplanetary conditions associated with intense storms. Following Burton et al. (1975), an empirical relationship is derived for estimation of interplanetary electric field (IEFy) from the variations of Dst index and ΔH at Colaba-Alibag observatories. The estimated IEFy values using Dst and ΔHABG variations agree well with the observed IEFy, calculated using Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite observations for intense geomagnetic storms in solar cycle 23. This study will provide the uniqueness of each event and provide important insights into possible interplanetary conditions for intense geomagnetic storms and probable frequency of their occurrence.

  16. Interplanetary MeV electrons of Jovian origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Mcdonald, F. B.; Trainor, J. H.; Webber, W. R.; Roelof, E. C.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of low energy electron increases observed in interplanetary space on Pioneer 10 are reported as it approached Jupiter. These discrete bursts were several hundred times the normal quiet-time electron flux, and became more frequent as one approached Jupiter resulting in the quasi-continuous presence of large fluxes of these electrons in interplanetary space. It is noted that the integrated flux from quiet-time electrons is comparable to the integrated ambient electron flux itself. In addition, the spectrum of electrons observed in Jupiter's magnetosphere, on Pioneer 10 in interplanetary space near Jupiter, for the quiet-time increases near the earth, and for the ambient electron spectrum are all remarkably similar. These two lines of evidence suggest the possibility that Jupiter could be the source of most of the ambient electrons at low energies.

  17. Evolution and interaction of large interplanetary streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1985-01-01

    A computer simulation for the evolution and interaction of large interplanetary streams based on multi-spacecraft observations and an unsteady, one-dimensional MHD model is presented. Two events, each observed by two or more spacecraft separated by a distance of the order of 10 AU, were studied. The first simulation is based on the plasma and magnetic field observations made by two radially-aligned spacecraft. The second simulation is based on an event observed first by Helios-1 in May 1980 near 0.6 AU and later by Voyager-1 in June 1980 at 8.1 AU. These examples show that the dynamical evolution of large-scale solar wind structures is dominated by the shock process, including the formation, collision, and merging of shocks. The interaction of shocks with stream structures also causes a drastic decrease in the amplitude of the solar wind speed variation with increasing heliocentric distance, and as a result of interactions there is a large variation of shock-strengths and shock-speeds. The simulation results shed light on the interpretation for the interaction and evolution of large interplanetary streams. Observations were made along a few limited trajectories, but simulation results can supplement these by providing the detailed evolution process for large-scale solar wind structures in the vast region not directly observed. The use of a quantitative nonlinear simulation model including shock merging process is crucial in the interpretation of data obtained in the outer heliosphere.

  18. Polarization of the Interplanetary Dust Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasue, J.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Hadamcik, E.

    2015-12-01

    The interplanetary dust cloud is visible through its scattered light (the zodiacal light) at visible wavelengths. Brightness observations lead to equilibrium temperature and albedo of the particles and their variation as a function of the heliocentric distance. The light scattered by this optically thin medium is linearly polarized with negative values of the degree of linear polarization, PQ, in the backscattering region. We will review the zodiacal light photopolarimetric observations from the whole line-of-sight integrated values to the local values retrieved by inversion. Whenever available, the local PQ variation as a function of the phase angle presents a phase curve with a small negative branch and large positive branch similar to comets or asteroids. PQ does not seem to show a wavelength variation. The maximum of polarization decreases with decreasing heliocentric distance. A circular polarization signal may be present in parts of the sky. Both numerical simulations and laboratory experiments of light scattering by irregular particles have been performed to constrain the interplanetary dust properties based on their polarimetric signature. These studies indicate that mixtures of low-absorption (Mg-silicates) and high-absorption (carbonaceous) particles can explain the intensity and polarimetric observations of the zodiacal cloud. The variations with the heliocentric distance may be due to decreasing carbonaceous content of the dust cloud. Such models would favor a significant proportion of aggregates and absorbing particles in the interplanetary dust medium, indicative of a major cometary dust contribution. The exact origin (asteroidal, cometary, interstellar) and physical properties of the dust particles contributing to the zodiacal cloud is still debated and will be more constrained with future observations. New high-resolution systems will monitor the zodiacal light from the ground and new results are expected from upcoming space missions.

  19. Interplanetary Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2011-01-01

    Although more than ten thousand coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are produced during each solar cycle at the Sun, only a small fraction hits the Earth. Only a small fraction of the Earth-directed CMEs ultimately arrive at Earth depending on their interaction with the solar wind and other large-scale structures such as coronal holes and CMEs. The interplanetary propagation is essentially controlled by the drag force because the propelling force and the solar gravity are significant only near the Sun. Combined remote-sensing and in situ observations have helped us estimate the influence of the solar wind on the propagation of CMEs. However, these measurements have severe limitations because the remote-sensed and in-situ observations correspond to different portions of the CME. Attempts to overcome this problem are made in two ways: the first is to model the CME and get the space speed of the CME, which can be compared with the in situ speed. The second method is to use stereoscopic observation so that the remote-sensed and in-situ observations make measurements on the Earth-arriving part of CMEs. The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission observed several such CMEs, which helped understand the interplanetary evolution of these CMEs and to test earlier model results. This paper discusses some of these issues and updates the CME/shock travel time estimates for a number of CMEs.

  20. Equitorial scintillations: Advances since ISEA-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, S.

    1985-01-01

    Since the last equatorial aeronomy meeting in 1980, our understanding of the morphology of equatorial scintillations has advanced greatly due to more intensive observations at the equatorial anomaly locations in the different longitude zones. The unmistakable effect of the sunspot cycle in controlling irregularity belt width and electron concentration responsible for strong scintillation in the GHz range has been demonstrated. The fact that night-time F-region dynamics is an important factor in controlling the magnitude of scintillations has been recognized by interpreting scintillation observations in the light of realistic models of total electron content at various longitudes. A hypothesis based on the alignment of the solar terminator with the geomagnetic flux tubes as an indicator of enhanced scintillation occurrence and another based on the influence of a transequatorial thermospheric neutral wind have been postulated to describe the observed longitudinal variation.

  1. Characteristics of small-scale ionospheric irregularities as deduced from scintillation observations of radio signals from satellites ETS-2 and Polar Bear 4 at Irkutsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afraimovich, E. L.; Zherebtsov, G. A.; Zvezdin, V. N.; Franke, S. J.

    1994-07-01

    This paper presents some new results on the small-scale inhomogeneous ionospheric structure obtained at a facility for spaced-antenna reception of transionospheric signals from ETS-2 and Polar Bear 4 near Irkutsk (Eastern Siberia, 52 deg N, 104 deg E). A technique based on transferring time spectra of scintillations to spatial spectra using measured horizontal irregularity drift velocities is used to obtain an estimate of the mean spatial spectrum of midlatitude scintillations. Two different methods were used to determine the inclination index of the scintillation spectrum, which was found to be equal to -2, in agreement with the value recently predicted for small-scale F region irregularities generated through mapping of small-scale, turbulent electric fields from the E region to the F region. Drift velocities of the diffraction pattern, and also the altitudes at which ionospheric irregularities are located, agree well with results obtained by other authors for midlatitudes. Using simultaneous measurements for a geostationary satellite and an orbiting satellite, the supposition about the existence of the southern boundary of the scintillation region has been confirmed. Finally, analysis of quasi-periodic (QP) scintillations and simultaneously determined diffraction pattern velocities is used to show that the height of isolated irregularities giving rise to QP scintillations corresponds to the maximum of the ionospheric F2 region.

  2. Search Coil vs. Fluxgate Magnetometer Measurements at Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L.B., III

    2012-01-01

    We present magnetic field observations at interplanetary shocks comparing two different sample rates showing significantly different results. Fluxgate magnetometer measurements show relatively laminar supercritical shock transitions at roughly 11 samples/s. Search coil magnetometer measurements at 1875 samples/s, however, show large amplitude (dB/B as large as 2) fluctuations that are not resolved by the fluxgate magnetometer. We show that these fluctuations, identified as whistler mode waves, would produce a significant perturbation to the shock transition region changing the interpretation from laminar to turbulent. Thus, previous observations of supercritical interplanetary shocks classified as laminar may have been under sampled.

  3. The Distribution of Interplanetary Dust between 0.96 and 1.04 au as Inferred from Impacts on the STEREO Spacecraft Observed by the Heliospheric Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. J.; Davis, J. A.; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Crothers, S.; Lintott, C.; Smith, A.; Bamford, S.; Baeten, E. M. L.; SaintCyr, O. C.; Campbell-Brown, M.; Skelt, A.; Kaiser, M.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of dust in the ecliptic plane between 0.96 and 1.04 au has been inferred from impacts on the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft through observation of secondary particle trails and unexpected off-points in the heliospheric imager (HI) cameras. This study made use of analysis carried out by members of a distributed webbased citizen science project Solar Stormwatch. A comparison between observations of the brightest particle trails and a survey of fainter trails shows consistent distributions. While there is no obvious correlation between this distribution and the occurrence of individual meteor streams at Earth, there are some broad longitudinal features in these distributions that are also observed in sources of the sporadic meteor population. The different position of the HI instrument on the two STEREO spacecraft leads to each sampling different populations of dust particles. The asymmetry in the number of trails seen by each spacecraft and the fact that there are many more unexpected off-points in the HI-B than in HI-A indicates that the majority of impacts are coming from the apex direction. For impacts causing off-points in the HI-B camera, these dust particles are estimated to have masses in excess of 10 (exp-17) kg with radii exceeding 0.1 µm. For off-points observed in the HI-A images, which can only have been caused by particles travelling from the anti-apex direction, the distribution is consistent with that of secondary 'storm' trails observed by HI-B, providing evidence that these trails also result from impacts with primary particles from an anti-apex source. Investigating the mass distribution for the off-points of both HI-A and HI-B, it is apparent that the differential mass index of particles from the apex direction (causing off-points in HI-B) is consistently above 2. This indicates that the majority of the mass is within the smaller particles of this population. In contrast, the differential mass

  4. Mineralogy of chondritic interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, I. D. R.; Rietmeijer, F. J. M.

    1987-08-01

    This paper presents a synopsis of current investigations on the mineralogy of chondritic micrometeorites obtained from the lower stratosphere using flat-plate collection surfaces attached to high-flying aircraft. A compilation of detailed mineralogical analyses for 30 documented chondritic interplanetary dust particles indicates a wide variety of minerals present in assemblages which, as yet, are poorly defined. Two possible assemblages are: (1) carbonaceous phases and layer silicates and (2) carbonaceous and chain silicates or nesosilicates. Particles with both types of silicate assemblages are also observed.

  5. THREE-DIMENSIONAL FEATURES OF THE OUTER HELIOSPHERE DUE TO COUPLING BETWEEN THE INTERSTELLAR AND INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELDS. IV. SOLAR CYCLE MODEL BASED ON ULYSSES OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Suess, S. T.; Borovikov, S. N.; Ebert, R. W.; McComas, D. J.

    2013-07-20

    The solar cycle has a profound influence on the solar wind (SW) interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) on more than one timescales. Also, there are substantial differences in individual solar cycle lengths and SW behavior within them. The presence of a slow SW belt, with a variable latitudinal extent changing within each solar cycle from rather small angles to 90 Degree-Sign , separated from the fast wind that originates at coronal holes substantially affects plasma in the inner heliosheath (IHS)-the SW region between the termination shock (TS) and the heliopause (HP). The solar cycle may be the reason why the complicated flow structure is observed in the IHS by Voyager 1. In this paper, we show that a substantial decrease in the SW ram pressure observed by Ulysses between the TS crossings by Voyager 1 and 2 contributes significantly to the difference in the heliocentric distances at which these crossings occurred. The Ulysses spacecraft is the source of valuable information about the three-dimensional and time-dependent properties of the SW. Its unique fast latitudinal scans of the SW regions make it possible to create a solar cycle model based on the spacecraft in situ measurements. On the basis of our analysis of the Ulysses data over the entire life of the mission, we generated time-dependent boundary conditions at 10 AU from the Sun and applied our MHD-neutral model to perform a numerical simulation of the SW-LISM interaction. We analyzed the global variations in the interaction pattern, the excursions of the TS and the HP, and the details of the plasma and magnetic field distributions in the IHS. Numerical results are compared with Voyager data as functions of time in the spacecraft frame. We discuss solar cycle effects which may be reasons for the recent decrease in the TS particles (ions accelerated to anomalous cosmic-ray energies) flux observed by Voyager 1.

  6. Three-dimensional Features of the Outer Heliosphere due to Coupling between the Interstellar and Interplanetary Magnetic Fields. IV. Solar Cycle Model Based on Ulysses Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelov, N. V.; Suess, S. T.; Borovikov, S. N.; Ebert, R. W.; McComas, D. J.; Zank, G. P.

    2013-07-01

    The solar cycle has a profound influence on the solar wind (SW) interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) on more than one timescales. Also, there are substantial differences in individual solar cycle lengths and SW behavior within them. The presence of a slow SW belt, with a variable latitudinal extent changing within each solar cycle from rather small angles to 90°, separated from the fast wind that originates at coronal holes substantially affects plasma in the inner heliosheath (IHS)—the SW region between the termination shock (TS) and the heliopause (HP). The solar cycle may be the reason why the complicated flow structure is observed in the IHS by Voyager 1. In this paper, we show that a substantial decrease in the SW ram pressure observed by Ulysses between the TS crossings by Voyager 1 and 2 contributes significantly to the difference in the heliocentric distances at which these crossings occurred. The Ulysses spacecraft is the source of valuable information about the three-dimensional and time-dependent properties of the SW. Its unique fast latitudinal scans of the SW regions make it possible to create a solar cycle model based on the spacecraft in situ measurements. On the basis of our analysis of the Ulysses data over the entire life of the mission, we generated time-dependent boundary conditions at 10 AU from the Sun and applied our MHD-neutral model to perform a numerical simulation of the SW-LISM interaction. We analyzed the global variations in the interaction pattern, the excursions of the TS and the HP, and the details of the plasma and magnetic field distributions in the IHS. Numerical results are compared with Voyager data as functions of time in the spacecraft frame. We discuss solar cycle effects which may be reasons for the recent decrease in the TS particles (ions accelerated to anomalous cosmic-ray energies) flux observed by Voyager 1.

  7. Interplanetary particles and fields, November 22 to December 6, 1977 - Helios, Voyager and Imp observations between 0.6 and 1.6 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L.; Lepping, R.; Weber, R.; Armstrong, T.; Goodrich, C.; Sullivan, J.; Gurnett, D.; Kellogg, P.; Keppler, E.; Mariani, F.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents a wealth of data obtained at approximately 0.6, 1, and 1.6 AU by Helios 1 and 2, Voyager 1 and 2, and Imp 7 and 8, describing the evolution and interactions of particles, flows, and fields in the period 22 November to 6 December 1977. Three flow systems were observed in the period under consideration: (1) a corotating stream and a stream interface associated with a coronal hole; (2) a shock wave and an energetic particle event associated with a 2B flare; and (3) an isolated shock wave of uncertain origin. These phenomena are discussed in some detail.

  8. Radio scintillations observed during atmospheric occultations of Voyager: Internal gravity waves at Titan and magnetic field orientations at Jupiter and Saturn. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinson, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    The refractive index of planetary atmospheres at microwave frequencies is discussed. Physical models proposed for the refractive irregularities in the ionosphere and neutral atmosphere serve to characterize the atmospheric scattering structures, and are used subsequently to compute theoretical scintillation spectra for comparison with the Voyager occultation measurements. A technique for systematically analyzing and interpreting the signal fluctuations observed during planetary occultations is presented and applied to process the dual-wavelength data from the Voyager radio occultations by Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan. Results concerning the plasma irregularities in the upper ionospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are reported. The measured orientation of the irregularities is used to infer the magnetic field direction at several locations in the ionospheres of these two planets; the occultation measurements conflict with the predictions of Jovian magnetic field models, but generally confirm current models of Saturn's field. Wave parameters, including the vertical fluxes of energy and momentum, are estimated, and the source of the internal gravity waves discovered in Titan's upper atmosphere is considered.

  9. Investigation of interplanetary dust from out-of-ecliptic space probes. [astronomical models of interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fechtig, H.; Giese, R. H.; Hanner, M. S.; Zook, H. A.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of interplanetary dust via zodiacal light observations and direct detection are discussed for an out-of-ecliptic space probe. Particle fluxes and zodiacal light brightnesses were predicted for three models of the dust distribution. These models predict that most of the information will be obtained at space probe distances less than 1 A.U. from the ecliptic plane. Joint interpretation of the direct particle measurements and the zodiacal light data can yield the best knowledge of the three-dimensional particle dynamics, spatial distribution, and physical characteristics of the interplanetary dust. Such measurements are important for an understanding of the origin and role of the dust in relation to meteoroids, asteroids, and comets, as well as the interaction of the dust with solar forces.

  10. Observed distribution functions of H, He, C, O, and Fe in corotating energetic particle streams: Implications for interplanetary acceleration and propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.; Fisk, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    Distribution functions for H, He, C, O, and Fe derived from our IMP 8 measurements of approximately 0.15 to approximately 8 MeV/nucleon particles in three corotating streams observed near earth are shown to have a simple exponential dependence on the particle speed. The e-folding speed, v sub o, is typically 0.01c, is found to be the same for the distribution functions of all elements examined, and varies little from one corotating event to the next. The relative abundances of energetic particles in these events resemble most closely the solar coronal composition and, thus, presumably that of the solar wind. These results may imply that the acceleration of these particles, which occurs in corotating interaction regions at several AU from the sun, is by a statistical process.

  11. USING COORDINATED OBSERVATIONS IN POLARIZED WHITE LIGHT AND FARADAY ROTATION TO PROBE THE SPATIAL POSITION AND MAGNETIC FIELD OF AN INTERPLANETARY SHEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Ming; Feng, Xueshang; Liu, Ying D.; Davies, Jackie A.; Harrison, Richard A.; Owens, Mathew J.; Davis, Chris J.

    2013-11-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can be continuously tracked through a large portion of the inner heliosphere by direct imaging in visible and radio wavebands. White light (WL) signatures of solar wind transients, such as CMEs, result from Thomson scattering of sunlight by free electrons and therefore depend on both viewing geometry and electron density. The Faraday rotation (FR) of radio waves from extragalactic pulsars and quasars, which arises due to the presence of such solar wind features, depends on the line-of-sight magnetic field component B{sub ∥} and the electron density. To understand coordinated WL and FR observations of CMEs, we perform forward magnetohydrodynamic modeling of an Earth-directed shock and synthesize the signatures that would be remotely sensed at a number of widely distributed vantage points in the inner heliosphere. Removal of the background solar wind contribution reveals the shock-associated enhancements in WL and FR. While the efficiency of Thomson scattering depends on scattering angle, WL radiance I decreases with heliocentric distance r roughly according to the expression I∝r {sup –3}. The sheath region downstream of the Earth-directed shock is well viewed from the L4 and L5 Lagrangian points, demonstrating the benefits of these points in terms of space weather forecasting. The spatial position of the main scattering site r{sub sheath} and the mass of plasma at that position M{sub sheath} can be inferred from the polarization of the shock-associated enhancement in WL radiance. From the FR measurements, the local B{sub ∥sheath} at r{sub sheath} can then be estimated. Simultaneous observations in polarized WL and FR can not only be used to detect CMEs, but also to diagnose their plasma and magnetic field properties.

  12. Using Coordinated Observations in Polarized White Light and Faraday Rotation to Probe the Spatial Position and Magnetic Field of an Interplanetary Sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ming; Davies, Jackie A.; Feng, Xueshang; Owens, Mathew J.; Harrison, Richard A.; Davis, Chris J.; Liu, Ying D.

    2013-11-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can be continuously tracked through a large portion of the inner heliosphere by direct imaging in visible and radio wavebands. White light (WL) signatures of solar wind transients, such as CMEs, result from Thomson scattering of sunlight by free electrons and therefore depend on both viewing geometry and electron density. The Faraday rotation (FR) of radio waves from extragalactic pulsars and quasars, which arises due to the presence of such solar wind features, depends on the line-of-sight magnetic field component B ∥ and the electron density. To understand coordinated WL and FR observations of CMEs, we perform forward magnetohydrodynamic modeling of an Earth-directed shock and synthesize the signatures that would be remotely sensed at a number of widely distributed vantage points in the inner heliosphere. Removal of the background solar wind contribution reveals the shock-associated enhancements in WL and FR. While the efficiency of Thomson scattering depends on scattering angle, WL radiance I decreases with heliocentric distance r roughly according to the expression Ivpropr -3. The sheath region downstream of the Earth-directed shock is well viewed from the L4 and L5 Lagrangian points, demonstrating the benefits of these points in terms of space weather forecasting. The spatial position of the main scattering site r sheath and the mass of plasma at that position M sheath can be inferred from the polarization of the shock-associated enhancement in WL radiance. From the FR measurements, the local B ∥sheath at r sheath can then be estimated. Simultaneous observations in polarized WL and FR can not only be used to detect CMEs, but also to diagnose their plasma and magnetic field properties.

  13. Magnetic Reconnection in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermo, R. L.; Opher, M.; Drake, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a ubiquitous phenomenon in many varied space and astrophysical plasmas, and as such plays an important role in the dynamics of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). It is widely regarded that reconnection is instrumental in the formation and ejection of the initial CME flux rope, but reconnection also continues to affect the dynamics as it propagates through the interplanetary medium. For example, reconnection on the leading edge of the ICME, by which it interacts with the interplanetary medium, leads to flux erosion. However, recent in situ observations by Gosling et al. found signatures of reconnection exhausts in the interior. In light of this data, we consider the stability properties of systems with this flux rope geometry with regard to their minimum energy Taylor state. Variations from this state will result in the magnetic field relaxing back towards the minimum energy state, subject to the constraints that the toroidal flux and magnetic helicity remain invariant. In reversed field pinches, this relaxation is mediated by reconnection in the interior of the system, as has been shown theoretically and experimentally. By treating the ICME flux rope in a similar fashion, we show analytically that the the elongation of the flux tube cross section in the latitudinal direction will result in a departure from the Taylor state. The resulting relaxation of the magnetic field causes reconnection to commence in the interior of the ICME, in agreement with the observations of Gosling et al. We present MHD simulations in which reconnection initiates at a number of rational surfaces, and ultimately produces a stochastic magnetic field. If the time scales for this process are shorter than the propagation time to 1 AU, this result explains why many ICME flux ropes no longer exhibit the smooth, helical flux structure characteristic of a magnetic cloud.

  14. Microstructure of the Interplanetary Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.

    1972-01-01

    High time resolution measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field and plasma reveal a complex microstructure which includes hydromagnetic wave and discontinuities. The identification of hydromagnetic waves and discontinuities, their statistical properties, their relation to large-scale structure, and their relative contribution to power spectra are discussed.

  15. Interplanetary Trajectories, Encke Method (ITEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, F. H.; Wolfe, H.; Lefton, L.; Levine, N.

    1972-01-01

    Modified program has been developed using improved variation of Encke method which avoids accumulation of round-off errors and avoids numerical ambiguities arising from near-circular orbits of low inclination. Variety of interplanetary trajectory problems can be computed with maximum accuracy and efficiency.

  16. Scintillators and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard T.

    2014-07-15

    Scintillators of various constructions and methods of making and using the same are provided. In some embodiments, a scintillator comprises at least one radiation absorption region and at least one spatially discrete radiative exciton recombination region.

  17. Scintillators and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Richard T.

    2015-09-01

    Scintillators of various constructions and methods of making and using the same are provided. In some embodiments, a scintillator comprises at least one radiation absorption region and at least one spatially discrete radiative exciton recombination region.

  18. Measurement of radiation damage of water-based liquid scintillator and liquid scintillator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bignell, L. J.; Diwan, M. V.; Hans, S.; Jaffe, D. E.; Rosero, R.; Vigdor, S.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-10-19

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of 5% scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of 1.74 ± 0.55 % andmore » 1.31 ± 0.59 % after ≈ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical context, a scintillating phantom used for proton therapy treatment plan verification would exhibit a systematic light yield reduction of approximately 0.1% after a year of operation.« less

  19. Measurement of radiation damage of water-based liquid scintillator and liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bignell, L. J.; Diwan, M. V.; Hans, S.; Jaffe, D. E.; Rosero, R.; Vigdor, S.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-10-19

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of 5% scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of 1.74 ± 0.55 % and 1.31 ± 0.59 % after ≈ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical context, a scintillating phantom used for proton therapy treatment plan verification would exhibit a systematic light yield reduction of approximately 0.1% after a year of operation.

  20. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

  1. Scintillator materials for calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    Requirements for fast, dense scintillator materials for calorimetry in high energy physics and approaches to satisfying these requirements are reviewed with respect to possible hosts and luminescent species. Special attention is given to cerium-activated crystals, core-valence luminescence, and glass scintillators. The present state of the art, limitations, and suggestions for possible new scintillator materials are presented.

  2. Scintillator manufacture at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mellott, K.; Bross, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-08-01

    A decade of research into plastic scintillation materials at Fermilab is reviewed. Early work with plastic optical fiber fabrication is revisited and recent experiments with large-scale commercial methods for production of bulk scintillator are discussed. Costs for various forms of scintillator are examined and new development goals including cost reduction methods and quality improvement techniques are suggested.

  3. Worst-Case GPS Scintillations on the Ground Estimated from Radio Occultation Observations of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC During 2007-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. Y.; Chen, S. P.; Yeh, W. H.; Tsai, H. F.; Rajesh, P. K.

    2016-07-01

    The FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) satellite probes the S4 scintillation index profile of GPS signals by using the radio occultation (RO) technique. In this study, for practical use on the Earth's surface, a method is developed to convert and integrate the probed RO S4 index, so obtaining the scintillation on the ground. To estimate the worst case, the maximum value on each profile probed by F3/C, which is termed S4max, is isolated. The isolated data are further used to construct the global three-dimensional distributions of S4max for various local times, seasons, solar activities, and locations. The converted S4max for the first time estimates the global distribution of ionospheric scintillations in the GPS L1 band C/A code signal on the ground. The results show that the worst-case scintillations appear within the low-latitude region of ±30°N, peaking around ±20°N magnetic latitude; they begin at 1900 MLT, reach their maximum at 2100 MLT, and vanish by about 0200-0300 MLT. The most pronounced low-latitude scintillation occurs over the South American and African sectors.

  4. Worst-Case GPS Scintillations on the Ground Estimated from Radio Occultation Observations of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC During 2007-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. Y.; Chen, S. P.; Yeh, W. H.; Tsai, H. F.; Rajesh, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    The FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) satellite probes the S4 scintillation index profile of GPS signals by using the radio occultation (RO) technique. In this study, for practical use on the Earth's surface, a method is developed to convert and integrate the probed RO S4 index, so obtaining the scintillation on the ground. To estimate the worst case, the maximum value on each profile probed by F3/C, which is termed S4max, is isolated. The isolated data are further used to construct the global three-dimensional distributions of S4max for various local times, seasons, solar activities, and locations. The converted S4max for the first time estimates the global distribution of ionospheric scintillations in the GPS L1 band C/A code signal on the ground. The results show that the worst-case scintillations appear within the low-latitude region of ±30°N, peaking around ±20°N magnetic latitude; they begin at 1900 MLT, reach their maximum at 2100 MLT, and vanish by about 0200-0300 MLT. The most pronounced low-latitude scintillation occurs over the South American and African sectors.

  5. Characterization of ionospheric scintillation at a geomagnetic equatorial region station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seba, Ephrem Beshir; Gogie, Tsegaye Kassa

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we analyzed ionospheric scintillation at Bahir Dar station, Ethiopia (11.6°N, 37.38°E) using GPS-SCINDA data between August 2010 and July 2011. We found that small scale variation in TEC caused high ionospheric scintillation, rather than large scale variation. We studied the daily and monthly variations in the scintillation index S4 during this year, which showed that scintillation was a post-sunset phenomenon on equinoctial days, with high activity during the March equinox. The scintillation activity observed on solstice days was relatively low and almost constant throughout the day with low post-sunset activity levels. Our analysis of the seasonal and annual scintillation characteristics showed that intense activity occurred in March and April. We also studied the dependence of the scintillation index on the satellite elevation angle and found that scintillation was high for low angles but low for high elevation angles.

  6. Association between interplanetary shock waves and delayed solar particle events.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datlowe, D.

    1972-01-01

    In studying the propagation of energetic charged particles from a large solar flare, we can no longer regard the interplanetary medium as remaining in a steady state; disturbances in the flow of solar wind from these flares may have great effects on the observed fluxes of charged particles. Delayed particle events, also known as 'energetic storm particle' events, may exhibit an increase by an order of magnitude or greater in the flux of protons above 10 MeV over a period of the order of 6 hours. These events are seen in association with the passage of an interplanetary shock past the earth. It is proposed that the particles are accelerated locally at the time of the passage of the interplanetary blast wave.

  7. Energetic particle transport and acceleration within the interplanetary medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla, Silvia

    2016-07-01

    The propagation through space of energetic particles accelerated at the Sun and in the inner heliosphere is governed by the characteristics of the interplanetary magnetic field. At large scales, the average Parker spiral configuration, on which transient magnetic structures may be superimposed, dominates the transport, while at smaller scales turbulence scatters the particles and produces field line meandering. This talk will review the classical 1D approach to interplanetary transport, mainly applied to Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs), as well as alternative models which allow for effects such as scattering perpendicular to the average magnetic field and field line meandering. The recently emphasized role of drifts in the propagation of SEPs will be discussed. The presentation will also review processes by which particle acceleration takes place within the interplanetary medium and the overall way in which acceleration and transport shape in-situ observations of energetic particles.

  8. Interplanetary magnetic field enhancements in the solar wind Statistical properties at 1 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arghavani, M. R.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Elphic, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) enhancements which do not resemble any of the previously reported amplifications in the IMF. The magnetic field enhacements observed increase slowly at first and then more rapidly to a peak followed by a symmetrical decay. Interplanetary magnetic field enhacement observed by ISEE-3 on various dates are considered, giving attention to observations on June 5, 1979; September 8-9, 1980; February 5, 1981; and June 14-15, 1981. Interplanetary magnetic field enhancement observed with the aid of IMP-8 are also considered. A total of 45 events is found in surveying a 9-year period of magnetic field data.

  9. Optical spectroscopy of interplanetary dust collected in the earth's stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraundorf, P.; Patel, R. I.; Shirck, J.; Walker, R. M.; Freeman, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    Optical absorption spectra of interplanetary dust particles 2-30 microns in size collected in the atmosphere at an altitude of 20 km by inertial impactors mounted on NASA U-2 aircraft are reported. Fourier transform absorption spectroscopy of crushed samples of the particles reveals a broad feature in the region 1300-800 kaysers which has also been found in meteorite and cometary dust spectra, and a weak iron crystal field absorption band at approximately 9800 kaysers, as is observed in meteorites. Work is currently in progress to separate the various components of the interplanetary dust particles in order to evaluate separately their contributions to the absorption.

  10. Scintillator reflective layer coextrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Jae-Chul; Para, Adam

    2001-01-01

    A polymeric scintillator has a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof. The reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and an adhesive binder. The adhesive binder includes polymeric material from which the scintillator is formed. A method of forming the polymeric scintillator having a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof is also provided. The method includes the steps of (a) extruding an inner core member from a first amount of polymeric scintillator material, and (b) coextruding an outer reflective layer on the exterior surface of the inner core member. The outer reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and a second amount of the polymeric scintillator material.

  11. Interstellar scattering of pulsar radiation. 1: Scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backer, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation of the intensity fluctuations of 28 pulsars near 0.4 GHz indicates that scintillation spectra have a Gaussian shape, scintillation indices are near unity, and the scintillation bandwidth depends linearly on dispersion measure. Observations near 2.5 GHz suggest a strong dependence of the frequency at which scintillation indices fall below unity on dispersion measure. Multistation measurements of scintillation provide values or limits for the scale size of the scattering diffraction pattern. The dependences of scattering parameters on dispersion measure is discussed in terms of the current models. It is suggested that any line of sight through the galaxy encounters increasingly rare, increasingly large deviations of thermal electron density on the scale of 10 to the 11th power cm.

  12. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of scintillation processes in NaI(Tl)

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Wang, Zhiguo; Williams, Richard; Grim, Joel; Gao, Fei

    2014-04-26

    Developing a comprehensive understanding of the processes that govern the scintillation behavior of inorganic scintillators provides a pathway to optimize current scintillators and allows for the science-driven search for new scintillator materials. Recent experimental data on the excitation density dependence of the light yield of inorganic scintillators presents an opportunity to incorporate parameterized interactions between excitations in scintillation models and thus enable more realistic simulations of the nonproportionality of inorganic scintillators. Therefore, a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model of elementary scintillation processes in NaI(Tl) is developed in this work to simulate the kinetics of scintillation for a range of temperatures and Tl concentrations as well as the scintillation efficiency as a function of excitation density. The ability of the KMC model to reproduce available experimental data allows for elucidating the elementary processes that give rise to the kinetics and efficiency of scintillation observed experimentally for a range of conditions.

  13. Scintillation Effects on Space Shuttle GPS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.; Kramer, Leonard

    2001-01-01

    Irregularities in ionospheric electron density result in variation in amplitude and phase of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals, or scintillation. GPS receivers tracking scintillated signals may lose carrier phase or frequency lock in the case of phase sc intillation. Amplitude scintillation can cause "enhancement" or "fading" of GPS signals and result in loss of lock. Scintillation can occur over the equatorial and polar regions and is a function of location, time of day, season, and solar and geomagnetic activity. Mid latitude regions are affected only very rarely, resulting from highly disturbed auroral events. In the spring of 1998, due to increasing concern about scintillation of GPS signals during the upcoming solar maximum, the Space Shuttle Program began to assess the impact of scintillation on Collins Miniaturized Airborne GPS Receiver (MAGR) units that are to replace Tactical Air Control and Navigation (TACAN) units on the Space Shuttle orbiters. The Shuttle Program must determine if scintillation effects pose a threat to safety of flight and mission success or require procedural and flight rule changes. Flight controllers in Mission Control must understand scintillation effects on GPS to properly diagnose "off nominal" GPS receiver performance. GPS data from recent Space Shuttle missions indicate that the signals tracked by the Shuttle MAGR manifest scintillation. Scintillation is observed as anomalous noise in velocity measurements lasting for up to 20 minutes on Shuttle orbit passes and are not accounted for in the error budget of the MAGR accuracy parameters. These events are typically coincident with latitude and local time occurrence of previously identified equatorial spread F within about 20 degrees of the magnetic equator. The geographic and seasonal history of these events from ground-based observations and a simple theoretical model, which have potential for predicting events for operational purposes, are reviewed.

  14. Scintillation Noise in Exoplanet Transit Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Föhring, Dóra; Wilson, Richard; Osborn, James; Dhillon, Vik

    2015-04-01

    Transit photometry is a powerful technique for studying exoplanets. Transit observations from the ground of targets of magnitude V= 10 or brighter, however, are limited by scintillation noise due to Earth's atmosphere. Through turbulence profiling using instruments such as the stereo-SCIDAR, we have shown to able to accurately model scintillation noise, which is essential in order to fully account for the error budget of the observation. Through numerical modelling we find that employing scintillation reducing techniques enables an improvement of a factor between 1.36 — 1.6 on the astrophysical parameters.

  15. Interplanetary magnetic field data book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    An interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data set is presented that is uniform with respect to inclusion of cislunar IMF data only, and which has as complete time coverage as presently possible over a full solar cycle. Macroscale phenomena in the interplanetary medium (sector structure, heliolatitude variations, solar cycle variations, etc.) and other phenomena (e.g., ground level cosmic-ray events) for which knowledge of the IMF with hourly resolution is necessary, are discussed. Listings and plots of cislunar hourly averaged IMP parameters over the period November 27, 1963, to May 17, 1974, are presented along with discussion of the mutual consistency of the IMF data used herein. The magnetic tape from which the plots and listings were generated, which is available from the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), is also discussed.

  16. Interplanetary Disturbances Affecting Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    The Sun somehow accelerates the solar wind, an incessant stream of plasma originating in coronal holes and some, as yet unidentified, regions. Occasionally, coronal, and possibly sub-photospheric structures, conspire to energize a spectacular eruption from the Sun which we call a coronal mass ejection (CME). These can leave the Sun at very high speeds and travel through the interplanetary medium, resulting in a large-scale disturbance of the ambient background plasma. These interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) can drive shocks which in turn accelerate particles, but also have a distinct intrinsic magnetic structure which is capable of disturbing the Earth's magnetic field and causing significant geomagnetic effects. They also affect other planets, so they can and do contribute to space weather throughout the heliosphere. This paper presents a historical review of early space weather studies, a modern-day example, and discusses space weather throughout the heliosphere.

  17. Electromagnetic Whistler Precursors at Supercritical Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of electromagnetic precursor waves, identified as whistler mode waves, at supercritical interplanetary shocks using the Wind search coil magnetometer. The precursors propagate obliquely with respect to the local magnetic field, shock normal vector, solar wind velocity, and they are not phase standing structures. All are right-hand polarized with respect to the magnetic field (spacecraft frame), and all but one are right-hand polarized with respect to the shock normal vector in the normal incidence frame. Particle distributions show signatures of specularly reflected gyrating ions, which may be a source of free energy for the observed modes. In one event, we simultaneously observe perpendicular ion heating and parallel electron acceleration, consistent with wave heating/acceleration due to these waves.

  18. Circumstellar, Cometary and Interplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crovisier, J.

    2000-11-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory made us available for the first time the full infrared spectrum of cosmic dust in a variety of astrophysical environments. I review what we learned from ISO on the composition of dust in the Solar System (cometary and interplanetary) and in circumstellar discs around young or evolved stars, what are the commonalities and parallels between dust in these different environments, and what this tells us on the cosmic dust cycle.

  19. Interplanetary medium data book, appendix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Computer generated listings of hourly average interplanetary plasma and magnetic field parameters are given. Parameters include proton temperature, proton density, bulk speed, an identifier of the source of the plasma data for the hour, average magnetic field magnitude and cartesian components of the magnetic field. Also included are longitude and latitude angles of the vector made up of the average field components, a vector standard deviation, and an identifier of the source of magnetic field data.

  20. Autonomous optical navigation for interplanetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskaran, Shyam; Riedel, Joseph E.; Synnott, Stephen P.

    1996-10-01

    The automation of interplanetary spacecraft is becoming increasingly desirable to meet various mission requirements. A prototype autonomous spacecraft which will flyby an asteroid and comet is slated for flight in mid-1998 as part of NASA's New Millennium Program. This spacecraft will navigate by using optical data taken by the onboard camera to determine its orbit, and use this information to predict its future trajectory and make necessary course corrections. The basic navigation data available from the camera are star-relative astrometric observations of solar system bodies which can be used to determine line-of-sight vectors to those objects. The directional sightings are obtained by determining the precise centers of the object and stars in the image. During interplanetary cruise, centerfinding is performed by using two pattern matching techniques inherited from the Galileo mission. Near-encounter images are processed with a separate algorithm employing image modeling and brightness centroiding. This paper describes the image processing algorithms, and the results of a ground-based test of the algorithms using real data.

  1. The interplanetary gamma ray burst network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, T.

    The Interplanetary Gamma-Ray Burst Network (IPN) is providing gamma-ray burst (GRB) alerts and localizations at the maximum rate anticipated before the launch of the Swift mission. The arc-minute source precision of the IPN is again permitting searches for GRB afterglows in the radio and optical regimes with delays of only hours up to 2 days. The successful addition of the Mars Odyssey mission has compensated for the loss of the asteroid mission NEAR, to reconstitute a fully long- baseline interplanetary network, with Ulysses at > 5 AU and Konus-Wind and HETE-2 near the Earth. In addition to making unassisted GRB localizations that enable a renewed supply of counterpart observations, the Mars/Ulysses/Wind IPN is confirming and reinforcing GRB source localizations with HETE-2. It has also confirmed and reinforced localizations with the BeppoSAX mission before the BeppoSAX termination in May and has detected and localized both SGRs and an unusual hard x-ray transient that is neither an SGR nor a GRB. This IPN is expected to operate until at least 2004.

  2. Characterizing Interplanetary Structures of Long-Lasting Ionospheric Storm Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandoi, C.; Dong, Y.; Ngwira, C. M.; Damas, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic storms can result in periods of heightened TEC (Total Electron Content) in Earth's ionosphere. These periods of change in TEC (dTEC) can have adverse impacts on a technological society, such as scintillation of radio signals used by communication and navigation satellites. However, it is unknown which exact properties of a given storm cause dTEC. We are comparing different solar wind properties that result in a significant long-lasting dTEC to see if there are any patterns that remain constant in these storms. These properties, among others, include the interplanetary magnetic field By and Bz components, the proton density, and the flow speed. As a preliminary investigation, we have studied 15 solar storms. Preliminary results will be presented. In the future, we hope to increase our sample size and analyze over 80 different solar storms, which result in significant dTEC.

  3. Equatorial scintillations: advances since ISEA-6

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Our understanding of the morphology of equatorial scintillations has advanced due to more intensive observations at the equatorial anomaly locations in the different longitude zones. The unmistakable effect of the sunspot cycle in controlling irregularity belt width and electron concentration responsible for strong scintillation in the controlling the magnitude of scintillations has been recognized by interpreting scintillation observations inthe light of realistic models of total electron content at various longitudes. A hypothesis based on the alignment of the solar terminator with the geomagnetic flux tubes as an indicator of enhanced scintillation occurrence and another based on the influence of a transequatorial thermospheric neutral wind have been postulated to describe the observed longitudinal variation. A distinct class of equatorial irregularities known as the bottomside sinusoidal (BSS) type was identified. These irregularities occur in very large patches, sometimes in excess of several thousand kilometers in the E-W direction and are associated with frequency spread on ionograms. Scintillations caused by such irregularities exist only in the VHF band, exhibit Fresnel oscillations in intensity spectra and are found to give rise to extremely long durations (approx. several hours) of uninterrrupted scintillations.

  4. Validating the use of scintillation proxies to study ionospheric scintillation over the Ugandan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabayo, Emirant B.; Jurua, Edward; Cilliers, Pierre J.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we compare the standard scintillation indices (S4 and σΦ) from a SCINDA receiver with scintillation proxies (S4p and | sDPR |) derived from two IGS GPS receivers. Amplitude (S4) and phase (σΦ) scintillation data were obtained from the SCINDA installed at Makerere University (0.34°N, 32.57°E). The corresponding amplitude (S4p) and phase (| sDPR |) scintillation proxies were derived from data archived by IGS GPS receivers installed at Entebbe (0.04°N, 32.44°E) and Mbarara (0.60°S, 30.74°E). The results show that for most of the cases analysed in this study, σΦ and | sDPR | are in agreement. Amplitude scintillation occurrence estimated using the S4p are fairly consistent with the standard S4, mainly between 17:00 UT and 21:00 UT, despite a few cases of over and under estimation of scintillation levels by S4p. Correlation coefficients between σΦ and the | sDPR | proxy revealed positive correlation. Generally, S4p and S4 exhibits both moderate and strong positive correlation. TEC depletions associated with equatorial plasma bubbles are proposed as the cause of the observed scintillation over the region. These equatorial plasma bubbles were evident along the ray paths to satellites with PRN 2, 15, 27 and 11 as observed from MBAR and EBBE. In addition to equatorial plasma bubbles, atmospheric gravity waves with periods similar to those of large scale traveling ionospheric disturbances were also observed as one of the mechanisms for scintillation occurrence. The outcome of this study implies that GPS derived scintillation proxies can be used to quantify scintillation levels in the absence of standard scintillation data in the equatorial regions.

  5. Recent development in organic scintillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horrocks, D. L.; Wirth, H. O.

    1969-01-01

    Discussion on recent developments of organic scintillators includes studies of organic compounds that form glass-like masses which scintillate and are stable at room temperature, correlations between molecular structure of organic scintillators and self-quenching, recently developed fast scintillators, and applications of liquid-scintillation counters.

  6. Imaging Interplanetary CMEs at Radio Frequency From Solar Polar Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ji; Sun, Weiying; Zheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Chi; Wang, C. B.; Wang, S.

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are violent discharges of plasma and magnetic fields from the Sun's corona. They have come to be recognized as the major driver of physical conditions in the Sun-Earth system. Consequently, the detection of CMEs is important for un-derstanding and ultimately predicting space weather conditions. The Solar Polar Orbit Radio Telescope (SPORT) is a proposed mission to observe the propagation of interplanetary CMEs from solar polar orbit. The main payload (radio telescope) on board SPORT will be an in-terferometric imaging radiometer working at the meter wavelength band, which will follow the propagation of interplanetary CMEs from a distance of a few solar radii to near 1 AU from solar polar orbit. The SPORT spacecraft will also be equipped with a set of optical and in situ measurement instruments such as a EUV solar telescope, a solar wind plasma experiment, a solar wind ion composition instrument, an energetic particle detector, a wave detector, a mag-netometer and an interplanetary radio burst tracker. In this paper, we first describe the current shortage of interplanetary CME observations. Next, the scientific motivation and objectives of SPORT are introduced. We discuss the basic specifications of the main radio telescope of SPORT with reference to the radio emission mechanisms and the radio frequency band to be observed. Finally, we discuss the key technologies of the SPORT mission, including the con-ceptual design of the main telescope, the image retrieval algorithm and the solar polar orbit injection. Other payloads and their respective observation objectives are also briefly discussed. Key words: Interplanetary CMEs; Interferometric imaging; Solar polar orbit; Radiometer.

  7. Suprathermal ions upstream from interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.; Russell, C. T.

    1984-07-01

    Low energy (10 eV-30 keV) observations of suprathermal ions ahead of outward propagating interplanetary shock waves (ISQ) are reported. The data were taken with the fast plasma experiment on ISEE 1 and 2 during 17 events. Structure was more evident in the suprathermal ion distribution in the earth bow shock region than in the upstream region. Isotropic distributions were only observed ahead of ISW, although field alignment, kidney-bean distributions, ion shells in velocity space and bunches of gyrating ions were not. The data suggest that the solar wind ions are accelerated to suprathermal energies in the vicinity of the shocks, which feature low and subcritical Mach numbers at 1 AU.

  8. Fine-scale characteristics of interplanetary sector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.; Neubauer, F. M.; Barnstoff, H.

    1980-01-01

    The structure of the interplanetary sector boundaries observed by Helios 1 within sector transition regions was studied. Such regions consist of intermediate (nonspiral) average field orientations in some cases, as well as a number of large angle directional discontinuities (DD's) on the fine scale (time scales 1 hour). Such DD's are found to be more similar to tangential than rotational discontinuities, to be oriented on average more nearly perpendicular than parallel to the ecliptic plane to be accompanied usually by a large dip ( 80%) in B and, with a most probable thickness of 3 x 10 to the 4th power km, significantly thicker previously studied. It is hypothesized that the observed structures represent multiple traversals of the global heliospheric current sheet due to local fluctuations in the position of the sheet. There is evidence that such fluctuations are sometimes produced by wavelike motions or surface corrugations of scale length 0.05 - 0.1 AU superimposed on the large scale structure.

  9. Suprathermal ions upstream from interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.; Russell, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    Low energy (10 eV-30 keV) observations of suprathermal ions ahead of outward propagating interplanetary shock waves (ISQ) are reported. The data were taken with the fast plasma experiment on ISEE 1 and 2 during 17 events. Structure was more evident in the suprathermal ion distribution in the earth bow shock region than in the upstream region. Isotropic distributions were only observed ahead of ISW, although field alignment, kidney-bean distributions, ion shells in velocity space and bunches of gyrating ions were not. The data suggest that the solar wind ions are accelerated to suprathermal energies in the vicinity of the shocks, which feature low and subcritical Mach numbers at 1 AU.

  10. Suprathermal proton and alpha -particle bursts (E/q = 6.5-225 keV/e) observed by the WIND-, ACE- and IMP8-S/C during depressions of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsch, E.; Mall, U.

    2003-03-01

    The present study deals with suprathermal proton (E/q=6.5-225 keV/e) and alpha -particle bursts measured by the WIND-SMS experiment in the interplanetary space. They reach up to ~ 5-20 times the solar wind speed and last from a few minutes up to ~ 30 min. Measurements obtained simultaneously by the Solar Wind Ion Composition Sensor SWICS (E/q=0.5-31.5 keV/e) were also available for this study, as well as magnetic field and particle data recorded by ACE near the Libration point L1 and the IMP8-S/C near the Earth. In order to exclude particles escaping from the magnetosphere or accelerated by the Earth's bow shock, interplanetary shocks, coronal mass ejections and corotating interaction regions, we selected ion bursts which were associated with a distinct decrease in the interplanetary magnetic field magnitude and with changes in the azimuthal and tangential field direction. Such changes have been known for a long time as magnetic holes or field depressions. We interpret these signatures as a manifestation of a reconnection process in the interplanetary space near the heliospheric current sheet at about 1 AU distance from the Sun and show for the first time that thermal particles can be accelerated up to ~ 100 keV/e. The suprathermal particles are most likely accelerated in the electric field of the X-line. Inductive electric fields caused by changes in the field magnitude could also be responsible for the particle acceleration.

  11. Interplanetary density models as inferred from solar Type III bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppeneiger, Lucas; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    We report on the density models derived from spectral features of solar Type III bursts. They are generated by beams of electrons travelling outward from the Sun along open magnetic field lines. Electrons generate Langmuir waves at the plasma frequency along their ray paths through the corona and the interplanetary medium. A large frequency band is covered by the Type III bursts from several MHz down to few kHz. In this analysis, we consider the previous empirical density models proposed to describe the electron density in the interplanetary medium. We show that those models are mainly based on the analysis of Type III bursts generated in the interplanetary medium and observed by satellites (e.g. RAE, HELIOS, VOYAGER, ULYSSES,WIND). Those models are confronted to stereoscopic observations of Type III bursts recorded by WIND, ULYSSES and CASSINI spacecraft. We discuss the spatial evolution of the electron beam along the interplanetary medium where the trajectory is an Archimedean spiral. We show that the electron beams and the source locations are depending on the choose of the empirical density models.

  12. Shifting scintillator neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Jr., Morris Lowell; Hannah, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A

    2014-03-04

    Provided are sensors and methods for detecting thermal neutrons. Provided is an apparatus having a scintillator for absorbing a neutron, the scintillator having a back side for discharging a scintillation light of a first wavelength in response to the absorbed neutron, an array of wavelength-shifting fibers proximate to the back side of the scintillator for shifting the scintillation light of the first wavelength to light of a second wavelength, the wavelength-shifting fibers being disposed in a two-dimensional pattern and defining a plurality of scattering plane pixels where the wavelength-shifting fibers overlap, a plurality of photomultiplier tubes, in coded optical communication with the wavelength-shifting fibers, for converting the light of the second wavelength to an electronic signal, and a processor for processing the electronic signal to identify one of the plurality of scattering plane pixels as indicative of a position within the scintillator where the neutron was absorbed.

  13. Interplanetary Circumstances of Quasi-Perpendicular Interplanetary Shocks in 1996-2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2010-01-01

    The angle (theta(sub Bn)) between the normal to an interplanetary shock front and the upstream magnetic field direction, though often thought of as a property "of the shock," is also determined by the configuration of the magnetic field immediately upstream of the shock. We investigate the interplanetary circumstances of 105 near-Earth quasi-perpendicular shocks during 1996-2005 identified by theta(sub Bn) greater than or equal to 80 degrees and/or by evidence of shock drift particle acceleration. Around 87% of these shocks were driven by interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs); the remainder were probably the forward shocks of corotating interaction regions. For around half of the shocks, the upstream field was approximately perpendicular to the radial direction, either east-west or west-east or highly inclined to the ecliptic. Such field directions will give quasi-perpendicular configurations for radially propagating shocks. Around 30% of the shocks were propagating through, or closely followed, ICMEs at the time of observation. Another quarter were propagating through the heliospheric plasma sheet (HPS), and a further quarter occurred in slow solar wind that did not have characteristics of the HPS. Around 11% were observed in high-speed streams, and 7% in the sheaths following other shocks. The fraction of shocks found in high-speed streams is around a third of that expected based on the fraction of the time when such streams were observed at Earth. Quasi-perpendicular shocks are found traveling through ICMEs around 2-3 times more frequently than expected. In addition, shocks propagating through ICMEs are more likely to have larger values of theta(sub Bn) than shocks outside ICMEs.

  14. Scintillator manufacture at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mellott, K.; Bross, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-11-01

    A decade of research into plastic scintillation materials at Fermilab is reviewed. Early work with plastic optical fiber fabrication is revisited and recent experiments with large-scale commercial methods for production of bulk scintillator are discussed. Costs for various forms of scintillator are examined and new development goals including cost reduction methods and quality improvement techniques are suggested. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

  16. Extruded plastic scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Pla-Dalmau, Alan D. Bross and Kerry L. Mellott

    1999-04-16

    As a way to lower the cost of plastic scintillation detectors, commercially available polystyrene pellets have been used in the production of scintillating materials that can be extruded into different profiles. The selection of the raw materials is discussed. Two techniques to add wavelength shifting dopants to polystyrene pellets and to extrude plastic scintillating strips are described. Data on light yield and transmittance measurements are presented.

  17. Interplanetary shock waves and the structure of solar wind disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hundhausen, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Observations and theoretical models of interplanetary shock waves are reviewed, with emphasis on the large-scale characteristics of the associated solar wind disturbances and on the relationship of these disturbances to solar activity. The sum of observational knowledge indicates that shock waves propagate through the solar wind along a broad, roughly spherical front, ahead of plasma and magnetic field ejected from solar flares. Typically, the shock front reaches 1 AU about two days after its flare origin, and is of intermediate strength. Not all large flares produce observable interplanetary shock waves; the best indicator of shock production appears to be the generation of both type 2 and type 4 radio bursts by a flare. Theoretical models of shock propagation in the solar wind can account for the typically observed shock strength, transit time, and shape.

  18. Infrared Spectroscopy of Anhydrous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Flynn, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is the primary means of mineralogical analysis of materials outside our solar system. The identity and properties of circumstellar grains are inferred from spectral comparisons between astronomical observations and laboratory data from natural and synthetic materials. These comparisons have been facilitated by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), which obtained IR spectra from numerous astrophysical objects over a wide spectral range (out to 50/cm) where crystalline silicates and other phases have distinct features. The anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are particularly important comparison materials because some IDPs contain carbonaceous material with non-solar D/H and N-15/N-14 ratios and amorphous and crystalline silicates with non-solar 0- isotopic ratios, demonstrating that these IDPs contain preserved interstellar material. Here, we report on micro- Fourier transform (FT) IR spectrometry of IDPs, focusing on the inorganic components of primitive IDPs (FTIR spectra from the organic/carbonacecous materials in IDPs are described elsewhere).

  19. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections detected by HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, Alejandro

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is being constructed at the volcano Sierra Negra (4100 m a.s.l.) in Mexico. HAWC’s primary purpose is the study of both: galactic and extra-galactic sources of high energy gamma rays. HAWC will consist of 300 large water Cherenkov detectors (WCD), instrumented with 1200 photo-multipliers. The Data taking has already started while construction continues, with the completion projected for late 2014. The HAWC counting rate will be sensitive to cosmic rays with energies above the geomagnetic cutoff of the site (˜ 8 GV). In particular, HAWC will detect solar energetic particles known as Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs), and the effects of Coronal Mass Ejections on the galactic cosmic ray flux, known as Forbush Decreases. In this paper, we present a description of the instrument and its response to interplanetary coronal mass ejections, and other solar wind large scale structures, observed during the August-December 2013 period.

  20. Fractal structure of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Klein, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    Under some conditions, time series of the interplanetary magnetic field strength and components have the properties of fractal curves. Magnetic field measurements made near 8.5 AU by Voyager 2 from June 5 to August 24, 1981 were self-similar over time scales from approximately 20 sec to approximately 3 x 100,000 sec, and the fractal dimension of the time series of the strength and components of the magnetic field was D = 5/3, corresponding to a power spectrum P(f) approximately f sup -5/3. Since the Kolmogorov spectrum for homogeneous, isotropic, stationary turbulence is also f sup -5/3, the Voyager 2 measurements are consistent with the observation of an inertial range of turbulence extending over approximately four decades in frequency. Interaction regions probably contributed most of the power in this interval. As an example, one interaction region is discussed in which the magnetic field had a fractal dimension D = 5/3.

  1. IPShocks: Database of Interplanetary Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isavnin, Alexey; Lumme, Erkka; Kilpua, Emilia; Lotti, Mikko; Andreeova, Katerina; Koskinen, Hannu; Nikbakhsh, Shabnam

    2016-04-01

    Fast collisionless shocks are one of the key interplanetary structures, which have also paramount role for solar-terrestrial physics. In particular, coronal mass ejection driven shocks accelerate particles to high energies and turbulent post-shock flows may drive intense geomagnetic storms. We present comprehensive Heliospheric Shock Database (ipshocks.fi) developed and hosted at University of Helsinki. The database contains currently over 2000 fast forward and fast reverse shocks observed by Wind, ACE, STEREO, Helios, Ulysses and Cluster spacecraft. In addition, the database has search and sort tools based on the spacecraft, time range, and several key shock parameters (e.g., shock type, shock strength, shock angle), data plots for each shock and data download options. These features allow easy access to shocks and quick statistical analyses. All current shocks are identified visually and analysed using the same procedure.

  2. GNSS Phase Scintillation and Cycle Slips Occurrence at High Latitudes: Climatology and Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikryl, Paul; Jayachandran, Periyadan T.; Chadwick, Richard; Kelly, Todd D.

    2014-05-01

    Space weather impacts the operation of modern technology that relies on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). Ionospheric scintillation (rapid fluctuation of radio wave amplitude and phase) degrades GPS positional accuracy and causes cycle slips leading to loss of lock that affects performance of radio communication and navigation systems. At high latitudes, GPS scintillation and total electron content has been monitored by the Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network (CHAIN). GPS phase scintillation and cycle slips, as a function of magnetic latitude and local time, occur on the dayside in the ionospheric cusp, in the nightside auroral oval, and in the polar cap. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections and corotating interaction regions on the leading edge of high-speed streams are closely correlated with the occurrence of scintillation at high latitudes. Results of a superposed epoch analysis of time series of phase scintillation and cycle slips occurrence keyed by arrival times of high speed solar wind streams and interplanetary coronal mass ejections are presented. Based on these results, a method of probabilistic forecasting of high-latitude phase scintillation occurrence is proposed.

  3. Velocity measurement of the interplanetary hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Frederic

    2011-10-01

    We are proposing to use HST/STIS over a single orbit to make Lyman-alpha observations of the interplanetary hydrogen during the March-April period of this year {2012}. This special request is driven by a recent reanalysis of HST data {Vincent et al. 2011, published after the last call for proposals}.The heliospheric interface results from the interaction of the solar wind and the interstellar medium {ISM}. Within the heliosphere, the interplanetary hydrogen {IPH} flows at an average speed of about 23 km/sec, carrying the signature of the ISM and the heliospheric interface. The IPH has been observed for decades through the backscattering of solar Lyman-alpha photons and solar cycle 23 provided the first partial temporal map of the IPH velocity. It is now well established that the IPH velocity depends on solar activity. Moreover some analyses suggested that it may be also affected by the obliquity of the interstellar magnetic field, yielding a change of 1-2 km/sec.However a combination of the uncertainty of some measurements {e.g. GHRS} and the clustering of others near points on the cycle make it difficult to identify an unambiguous trend. Only one limited set is able to show a cycle dependence, but these represent an annual average and do not match the existing models. The best approach to address these issues is a new set of yearly spectroscopic measurements for at least a half solar cycle. Since we are currently just leaving a solar maximum, it is essential to start immediately in order to have an adequate baseline for temporal measurements.

  4. Solar system exposure histories of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, Alfred O.

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: stratospheric collection of interplanetary dust particles (IDP's); sources of interplanetary dust particles; and solar wind and noble gas isotopic ratios in IDP's.

  5. Interplanetary meteoroid debris in LDEF metal craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Horz, F.; Bradley, J.

    1992-01-01

    The extraterrestrial meteoroid residue found lining craters in the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) aluminum and gold targets is highly variable in both quantity and type. In typical craters only a minor amount of residue is found and for these craters it is evident that most of the impacting projectile was ejected during crater formation. Less than 10 percent of the craters greater than 100 microns contain abundant residue consistent with survival of a major fraction of the projectile. In these cases the residue can be seen optically as a dark liner and it can easily be analyzed by SEM-EDX techniques. Because they are rare, the craters with abundant residue must be a biased sampling of the meteoroids reaching the earth. Factors that favor residue retention are low impact velocity and material properties such as high melting point. In general, the SEM-EDX observations of crater residues are consistent with the properties of chondritic meteorites and interplanetary dust particles collected in the stratosphere. Except for impacts by particles dominated by single minerals such as FeS and olivine, most of the residue compositions are in broad agreement with the major element compositions of chondrites. In most cases the residue is a thin liner on the crater floor and these craters are difficult to quantitatively analyze by EDX techniques because the electron beam excites both residue and underlying metal substrate. In favorable cases, the liner is thick and composed of vesicular glass with imbedded FeNi, sulfide and silicate grains. In the best cases of meteoroid preservation, the crater is lined with large numbers of unmelted mineral grains. The projectiles fragmented into micron sized pieces but the fragments survived without melting. In one case, the grains contain linear defects that appear to be solar flare tracks. Solar flare tracks are common properties of small interplanetary particles and their preservation during impact implies that the fragments were

  6. Atypical Particle Heating at a Supercritical Interplanetary Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Lynn B., III

    2010-01-01

    We present the first observations at an interplanetary shock of large amplitude (> 100 mV/m pk-pk) solitary waves and large amplitude (approx.30 mV/m pk-pk) waves exhibiting characteristics consistent with electron Bernstein waves. The Bernstein-like waves show enhanced power at integer and half-integer harmonics of the cyclotron frequency with a broadened power spectrum at higher frequencies, consistent with the electron cyclotron drift instability. The Bernstein-like waves are obliquely polarized with respect to the magnetic field but parallel to the shock normal direction. Strong particle heating is observed in both the electrons and ions. The observed heating and waveforms are likely due to instabilities driven by the free energy provided by reflected ions at this supercritical interplanetary shock. These results offer new insights into collisionless shock dissipation and wave-particle interactions in the solar wind.

  7. Equatorial scintillations: advances since ISEA-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sunanda; Basu, Santimay

    1985-10-01

    Since the last equatorial aeronomy meeting in 1980, our understanding of the morphology of equatorial scintillations has advanced greatly due to more intensive observations at the equatorial anomaly locations in the different longitude zones. The unmistakable effect of the sunspot cycle in controlling irregularity belt width and electron concentration responsible for strong scintillation in the GHz range has been demonstrated. The fact that night-time F-region dynamics is an important factor in controlling the magnitude of scintillations has been recognized by interpreting scintillation observations in the light of realistic models of total electron content at various longitudes. A hypothesis based on the alignment of the solar terminator with the geomagnetic flux tubes as an indicator of enhanced scintillation occurrence and another based on the influence of a transequatorial thermospheric neutral wind have been postulated to describe the observed longitudinal variation. A distinct class of equatorial irregularities known as the bottomside sinusoidal (BSS) type has been identified. Unlike equatorial bubbles, these irregularities occur in very large patches, sometimes in excess of several thousand kilometers in the E-W direction and are associated with frequency spread on ionograms. Scintillations caused by such irregularities exist only in the VHF band, exhibit Fresnel oscillations in intensity spectra and are found to give rise to extremely long durations (~ several hours) of uninterrupted scintillations. These irregularities maximize during solstices, so that in the VHF range, scintillation morphology at an equatorial station is determined by considering occurrence characteristics of both bubble type and BSS type irregularities. The temporal structure of scintillations in relation to the in situ measurements of irregularity spatial structure within equatorial bubbles has been critically examined. A two-component irregularity spectrum with a shallow slope ( p1

  8. Plasma processes in the expansion of the solar wind and in the interplanetary medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, A.

    1975-01-01

    Recent research into plasma processes involved in the expansion of the solar wind and the interplanetary medium is reviewed. Emphasized topics deal primarily with processes that drive the solar wind, the gross expansion of the interplanetary medium between 0.5 and 5 AU, recent observational results in the vicinity of 1 AU, and the microstructure of the interplanetary medium. Satellite measurements of the radial profile of the interplanetary medium out to 5 AU are discussed together with model calculations of the solar wind and its possible driving mechanisms. Studies of Alfven and magnetoacoustic waves in the solar wind are summarized. Possible roles are considered for thermal conduction in coronal energy transport, and observations of ion velocity distributions near 1 AU are described.

  9. MeV Ion Anisotropies in the Vicinity of Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    2007-01-01

    The anticipated signatures of interplanetary shock acceleration to be found in energetic ion anisotropies in the vicinity of interplanetary shocks include near-isotropic particle distributions consistent with of diffusive shock acceleration, "pancake" distributions indicative of shock drift acceleration, and flow reversals, suggestive of a particle acceleration region passing by the observing spacecraft. In practice, while clear examples of these phenomena exist, more typically, particle anisotropies near interplanetary shocks show considerable variation in time and space, both in individual events and from event to event. We investigate the properties of MeV/n ions in the vicinity of a number of interplanetary shocks associated with the largest energetic particle events of solar cycle 23, and previous cycles, including their intensity-time profiles, anisotropies, and relationship with local solar wind structures, using observations from the IMP 8, ISEE-3, Helios 1 and 3 spacecraft. The aim is to help to understand the role of shocks in major solar energetic particle events.

  10. Tongues, bottles, and disconnected loops: The opening and closing of the interplanetary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.

    1994-06-01

    For years the field of Space Physics has had a problem, a really big problem for it occurs on the largest spatial scales in Space physics -- across the entire region under the Sun`s influence, the heliosphere. The problem is that the Sun appears to keep opening new magnetic flux into interplanetary space with no obvious way for this flux to close back off again. This state of affairs, without some previously unknown method for closing the open interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), leads to an ever growing amount of magnetic flux in interplanetary space: the magnetic flux catastrophe. Recently, considerable progress has been made in understanding why this catastrophic state is not the observed state of the heliosphere. This brief article paints the newly emerging picture of the opening and closing of the IMF and how these processes may account for the observed variation in the amount of magnetic flux in interplanetary space over the solar cycle.

  11. Interplanetary Departure Stage Navigation by Means of Liaison Orbit Determination Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGranaghan, Ryan M.; Leonard, Jason M.; Fujimoto, Kohei; Parker, Jeffrey S.; Anderson, Rodney L.; Born, George H.

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous orbit determination for departure stages of interplanetary trajectories is conducted by means of realistic radiometric observations between the departing spacecraft and a satellite orbiting the first lunar libration point. Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation (LiAISON) is used to estimate the orbit solution. This paper uses high-fidelity simulations to explore the utilization of LiAISON in providing improved accuracy for interplanetary departure missions. The use of autonomous navigation to supplement current techniques for interplanetary spacecraft is assessed using comparisons with groundbased navigation. Results from simulations including the Mars Science Laboratory, Mars Exploration Rover, and Cassini are presented. It is shown that observations from a dedicated LiAISON navigation satellite could be used to supplement ground-based measurements and significantly improve tracking performance.

  12. Scintillation near the F-layer trough over Northern Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Kersley, L.; Pryse, S.E.; Russell, C.D.

    1990-05-03

    Results are presented of scintillation observations made during a two and a half year period at Lerwick in the Shetland Islands using more than 19000 passes of NNSS satellites. Examples of scintillation morphology, in the region near the scintillation boundary and the F-layer trough, for both amplitude and phase are discussed using exceedence levels for the S sub 4 and sigma sub psi indices respectively. The equatorwards advancement of the scintillation boundary in response to enhanced solar activity during the increasing phase of the solar cycle is shown to be a dominant feature in the observations.

  13. Thin film scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Warren; McKinney, George; Tzolov, Marian

    2015-03-01

    Scintillating materials convert energy flux (particles or electromagnetic waves) into light with spectral characteristic matching a subsequent light detector. Commercial scintillators such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP) are commonly used. These are inefficient at lower energies due to the conductive coating present on their top surface, which is needed to avoid charging. We hypothesize that nano-structured thin film scintillators will outperform the commercial scintillators at low electron energies. We have developed alternative thin film scintillators, zinc tungstate and zinc oxide, which show promise for higher sensitivity to lower energy electrons since they are inherently conductive. Zinc tungstate films exhibit photoluminescence quantum efficiency of 74%. Cathodoluminescence spectroscopy was applied in transmission and reflection geometries. The comparison between the thin films and the YAG and YAP commercial scintillators shows much higher light output from the zinc tungstate and zinc oxide at electron energies less than 5 keV. Our films were integrated in a backscattered electron detector. This detector delivers better images than an identical detector with commercial YAG scintillator at low electron energies. Dr. Nicholas Barbi from PulseTor LLC, Dr. Anura Goonewardene, NSF Grants: #0806660, #1058829, #0923047.

  14. Infrared spectroscopy of interplanetary dust in the laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraundorf, P.; Patel, R. I.; Freeman, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    A mount containing three crushed chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the earth's stratosphere and subjected to infrared spectroscopic measurements shows features near 1000 and 500/cm, suggesting crystalline pyroxene rather than crystalline olivine, amorphous olivine, or meteoritic clay minerals. Chondritic IDP structural diversity and atmospheric heating effects must be considered when comparing this spectrum with interplanetary and cometary dust astrophysical spectra. TEM and infrared observations of one member of the rare subset of IDPs resembling hydrated carbonaceous chondrite matrix material shows a close infrared spectrum resemblance between 4000 and 400/cm to the C2 meteorite Murchison. TEM observations suggest that this class of particles may be used as an atmospheric entry heating-process thermometer.

  15. Interaction of Strong Transient Interplanetary Disturbances with the Dayside Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berchem, Jean

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the investigation was to gain an understanding of the complex response of the magnetosphere to strong transient interplanetary disturbances. Because the project was only funded for a year, the investigation focused on only one of the three topics proposed in the original three year proposal. We investigated the response of the dayside auroral region to strong transient interplanetary disturbances. The method of the investigation was to use three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations that employ measurements of the solar wind conditions upstream the bow shock to model actual events and then to compare the simulation results with observations from spacecraft located at downstream locations. We modeled an event that occurred on July 14,2000, for which both CLUSTER and IMAGE simultaneous observations were available. The event was marked by high solar wind dynamic pressure and a strong IMF By component. Comparisons showed a very good agreement between intensifications in the auroral emissions measured by IMAGE

  16. The solar origins of two high-latitude interplanetary disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, H.S.; Acton, L.W.; Alexander, D.; Harvey, K.L.; Kurokawa, H.; Kahler, S.; Lemen, J.R. ||||

    1995-06-01

    Two extremely similar interplanetary forward/reverse shock events, with bidirectional electron streaming were detected by Ulysses in 1994. Ground-based and Yohkoh/SXT observations show two strikingly different solar events that could be associated with them: an LDE flare on 20 Feb. 1994, and a extremely large-scale eruptive event on 14 April 1994. Both events resulted in geomagnetic storms and presumably were associated with coronal mass ejections. The sharply contrasting nature of these solar events argues against an energetic causal relationship between them and the bidirectional streaming events observed by Ulysses during its S polar passage. The authors suggest instead that for each pair of events. a common solar trigger may have caused independent instabilities leading to the solar and interplanetary phenomena.

  17. Infrared spectroscopy of interplanetary dust in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraundorf, P.; Patel, R. I.; Freeman, J. J.

    1981-09-01

    A mount containing three crushed chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the earth's stratosphere and subjected to infrared spectroscopic measurements shows features near 1000 and 500/cm, suggesting crystalline pyroxene rather than crystalline olivine, amorphous olivine, or meteoritic clay minerals. Chondritic IDP structural diversity and atmospheric heating effects must be considered when comparing this spectrum with interplanetary and cometary dust astrophysical spectra. TEM and infrared observations of one member of the rare subset of IDPs resembling hydrated carbonaceous chondrite matrix material shows a close infrared spectrum resemblance between 4000 and 400/cm to the C2 meteorite Murchison. TEM observations suggest that this class of particles may be used as an atmospheric entry heating-process thermometer.

  18. Anisotropy of shock-accelerated ion distributions in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.

    1989-01-01

    The discrepancy between theory and observation is discussed with regard to the ability of interplanetary shock waves to accelerate a small percentage of the thermal ion population. The major point of departure rests with the spatial dependence of the energetic particle intensity and anisotropy in the region upstream of interplanetary shocks. It is argued that the discrepancy is due to the presence of solar flare particles forming an additional seed population which alters the upstream boundary condition of the energetic population. The resulting anisotropy of the energetic particle distribution several scale lengths upstream of the shock is proportional to the ratio of the streaming of the shock-accelerated population to the density of the solar flare population. This theory is then compared with the results of observed upstream anisotropy and measured particle intensities and anisotropies.

  19. The LDEF Interplanetary Dust Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, S. F.; Stanley, J. E.; Kassel, P.

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility was launched for the first time on April 6, 1984 by the NASA space shuttle Challenger. An array of solid-state detectors record the arrival time and approximate direction of an impacting particle. Two levels of detector sensitivity provide an indication of particle energy and mass. The orbit of the particle cannot be obtained, except statistically. To study the fate and origin of IP (interplanetary) dust, the authors measure various kinds of time variations. Among the most interesting is the secular variations, i.e., the flux in various meteor streams, as a function of the passage of a comet. One of the challenging problems will be to distinguish IP dust from man-made space debris.

  20. CFDP for Interplanetary Overlay Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    The CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) File Delivery Protocol for Interplanetary Overlay Network (CFDP-ION) is an implementation of CFDP that uses IO' s DTN (delay tolerant networking) implementation as its UT (unit-data transfer) layer. Because the DTN protocols effect automatic, reliable transmission via multiple relays, CFDP-ION need only satisfy the requirements for Class 1 ("unacknowledged") CFDP. This keeps the implementation small, but without loss of capability. This innovation minimizes processing resources by using zero-copy objects for file data transmission. It runs without modification in VxWorks, Linux, Solaris, and OS/X. As such, this innovation can be used without modification in both flight and ground systems. Integration with DTN enables the CFDP implementation itself to be very simple; therefore, very small. Use of ION infrastructure minimizes consumption of storage and processing resources while maximizing safety.

  1. Magnetic sails and interplanetary travel

    SciTech Connect

    Zubrin, R.M.; Andrews, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    A new concept, the magnetic sail, or 'magsail' is proposed which propels spacecraft by using the magnetic field generated by a loop of superconducting cable to deflect interplanetary or interstellar plasma winds. The performance of such a device is evaluated using both a plasma particle model and a fluid model, and the results of a series of investigations are presented. It is found that a magsail sailing on the solar wind at a radius of one astronautical unit can attain accelerations on the order of 0.01 m/sec squared, much greater than that available from a conventional solar lightsail, and also greater than the acceleration due to the sun's gravitational attraction. A net tangential force, or 'lift' can also be generated. Lift to drag ratios of about 0.3 appear attainable. Equations are derived whereby orbital transfers using magsail propulsion can be calculated analytically.

  2. Associations between coronal mass ejections and interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Howard, R. A.; Koomen, M. J.; Michels, D. J.; Schwenn, R.; Muhlhauser, K. H.; Rosenbauer, H.

    1983-01-01

    Nearly continuous complementary coronal observations and interplanetary plasma measurements for the years 1979-1982 are compared. It is shown that almost all low latitude high speed coronal mass ejections (CME's) were associated with shocks at HELIOS 1. Some suitably directed low speed CME's were clearly associated with shocks while others may have been associated with disturbed plasma (such as NCDE's) without shocks. A few opposite hemisphere CME's associated with great flares seem to be associated with shocks at HELIOS.

  3. Use of Reference Frames for Interplanetary Navigation at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heflin, Michael; Jacobs, Chris; Sovers, Ojars; Moore, Angelyn; Owen, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Navigation of interplanetary spacecraft is typically based on range, Doppler, and differential interferometric measurements made by ground-based telescopes. Acquisition and interpretation of these observations requires accurate knowledge of the terrestrial reference frame and its orientation with respect to the celestial frame. Work is underway at JPL to reprocess historical VLBI and GPS data to improve realizations of the terrestrial and celestial frames. Improvements include minimal constraint alignment, improved tropospheric modeling, better orbit determination, and corrections for antenna phase center patterns.

  4. Workshop on the Analysis of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Great progress has been made in the analysis of interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) over the past few years. This workshop provided a forum for the discussion of the following topics: observation and modeling of dust in the solar system, mineralogy and petrography of IDP's, processing of IDP's in the solar system and terrestrial atmosphere, comparison of IDP's to meteorites and micrometeorites, composition of IDP's, classification, and collection of IDP's.

  5. On fragmentation of meteoroids in interplanetary space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porubčan, V.; Tóth, J.; Yano, H.

    2002-10-01

    A possible fragmentation of meteoroids in interplanetary space inferred from grouping of particles in meteor streams is discussed. There is a conviction maintained by many observers that meteors within the streams are observed to be clustered in pairs or larger groups more frequently than one could expect from random distribution. The rate of dispersive effects indicates that the lifetime of any such a group of meteoroids is very limited. Therefore, if real, the pairs or groups must be due to recent fragmentation of larger meteoroids. Analyses based on visual observations of meteor streams lead to contradictory results. More conclusive are analyses based on radio measurements, which present a negative result concerning the permanent meteor showers with the stream structures at their middle and late evolutionary stages, and an indication of a positive result for younger dense stream structures of recent origin. Analysis of the 1969 Leonid display obtained by the Springhill high-power radar shows that about 10% of the population around the shower maximum is associated in close groups, within a distance up to of about 10 km and confined to an effective stream width comparable to the diameter of the Earth. The recent Leonid returns with the storm in 1999 provided a possibility to verify a non-random grouping of particles within this young filament of the stream. The analysis and results based on TV observations of the storm are presented and discussed.

  6. Multi-GNSS for Ionospheric Scintillation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.

    2015-12-01

    presentation will summarize progress and current state of the event-driven multi-GNSS data collection systems, GNSS receiver architectures designed to capture and preserve scintillation features, and scintillation effects observations derived from this unique set of data and processing algorithms.

  7. GPS phase scintillation correlated with auroral forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, D. L.; Azeem, S. I.; Crowley, G.; Santana, J.; Reynolds, A.

    2013-12-01

    The disruption of radio wave propagation due to rapid changes in electron density caused by auroral precipitation has been observed for several decades. In a few cases the disruption of GPS signals has been attributed to distinct auroral arcs [Kintner, 2007; Garner, 2011], but surprisingly there has been no systematic study of the characteristics of the auroral forms that cause GPS scintillation. In the Fall of 2012 ASTRA deployed four CASES GPS receivers at UAF observatories in Alaska (Kaktovik, Fort Yukon, Poker Flat and Gakona) specifically to address the effects of auroral activity on the high latitude ionosphere. We have initiated an analysis that compares the phase scintillation, recorded at high cadence, with filtered digital all-sky camera data to determine the auroral morphology and electron precipitation parameters that cause scintillation. From correlation studies from a single site (Poker Flat), we find that scintillation is well correlated with discrete arcs that have high particle energy flux (power per unit area), and not as well correlated with pulsating forms which typically have high characteristic energy, but lower energy flux . This indicates that the scintillation is correlated with the magnitude of the change in total electron density as expected. We will also report on ongoing work where we correlate the scintillation from the Fort Yukon receiver with the all-sky images at Poker Flat to determine the altitude that produces the greatest disturbance. These studies are aimed at a model that can predict the expected local disturbance to navigation due to auroral activity.

  8. Interplanetary Physics Laboratory (IPL): A concept for an interplanetary mission in the mid-eighties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Feldman, W.

    1977-01-01

    A concept for a near-earth interplanetary mission in the mid-eighties is described. The proposed objectives would be to determine the composition of the interplanetary constituents and its dependence on source-conditions and to investigate energy and momentum transfer processes in the interplanetary medium. Such a mission would accomplish three secondary objectives: (1) provide a baseline for deep space missions, (2) investigate variations of the solar wind with solar activity, and (3) provide input functions for magnetospheric studies.

  9. Separation of scintillation and Cherenkov lights in linear alkyl benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mohan; Guo, Ziyi; Yeh, Minfang; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Shaomin

    2016-09-01

    To separate scintillation and Cherenkov lights in water-based liquid scintillator detectors is a desired feature for future neutrino and proton decay experiments. Linear alkyl benzene (LAB) is one important ingredient of a water-based liquid scintillator currently under development. In this paper we report on the separation of scintillation and Cherenkov lights observed in an LAB sample. The rise and decay times of the scintillation light are measured to be (7.7 ± 3.0) ns and (36.6 ± 2.4) ns , respectively, while the full width [-3σ, 3σ] of the Cherenkov light is 12 ns and is dominated by the time resolution of the photomultiplier tubes. The scintillation light yield was measured to be (1.01 ± 0.12) ×103 photons / MeV .

  10. Development of polystyrene-based scintillation materials and its mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hidehito; Kitamura, Hisashi; Shinji, Osamu; Saito, Katashi; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2012-12-01

    Scintillation materials based on polystyrene (PS) have been investigated. Para-terphenyl was employed as a fluorescent molecule (fluor) that functions as a wavelength shifter. A clear increase in photon yield of the scintillation materials relative to the pure PS was observed, which cannot be explained by the conventional theory of scintillation mechanism. Furthermore, the photon yield increased with flour concentration in accordance with a power-law. Here we reveal the emergence of a luminescence of PS-based scintillation materials and demonstrate that their photon yields can be controlled by the fluor concentration.

  11. Two-way laser link over interplanetary distance.

    PubMed

    Smith, David E; Zuber, Maria T; Sun, Xiaoli; Neumann, Gregory A; Cavanaugh, John F; McGarry, Jan F; Zagwodzki, Thomas W

    2006-01-01

    Here we report timed observations with subnanosecond precision of short laser pulses at a distance of nearly 24 million kilometers between the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) aboard the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft and the NASA Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory (GGAO). Forty MLA downlink observations and 90 uplink observations were obtained during observing sessions on 27 and 31 May 2005. Precise standard ground timing allowed a solution for spacecraft range, range rate, and acceleration, as well as clock bias. This experiment established a new distance record for laser detection and accomplished a two-way laser link at an interplanetary distance. PMID:16400141

  12. Development of coronal mass ejections and association with interplanetary events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pick, M.; Maia, D.; Howard, R.; Thompson, B.; Lanzerotti, L. J. L.; Bothmer, V.; Lamy, P.

    1997-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) obtained by comparing the observations of the large angle spectroscopic coronagraph (LASCO) and the extreme ultraviolet imaging telescope (EIT) instrument onboard the SOHO with those of the Nancay radioheliograph. The radioheliograph provides images at five levels in the corona. An excellent spatial association is found between the position and extent of the type 4 radio sources and the CMEs seen by LASCO. One result is the existence for these two events of discrete successive phases in their development. For these events, Ulysses and SOHO missions measured interplanetary particles of coronal origin. The coronal acceleration site was attempted to be identified, as well as the path of these particles from the corona to the interplanetary medium.

  13. Study of Travelling Interplanetary Phenomena (STIP) workshop travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty six abstracts are provided from the SCOSTEP/STIP Symposium on Retrospective Analyses and Future Coordinated Intervals held in Switzerland on June 10 to 12, 1985. Six American scientists participated in the symposium and their abstracts are also included. The titles of their papers are: (1) An analysis of near surface and coronal activity during STIP interval 12, by T. E. Gergely; (2) Helios images of STIP intervals 6, B. V. Jackson; (3) Results from the analysis of solar and interplanetary observations during STIP interval 7, S. R. Kane; (4) STIP interval 19, E. Cliver; (5) Hydrodynamic buoyancy force in the solar atmosphere, T. Yeh; and (6) A combined MHD modes for the energy and momentum transport from solar surface to interplanetary space, S. T. Wu.

  14. Irregularity anisotropy and drifts from polar-cap scintillations during the current solar maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, S.; Basu, S.; Costa, E.

    1990-05-03

    Spaced receiver scintillation measurements made at Thule, Greenland during two sunspot maximum CEDAR High Latitude Plasma Structure (HLPS) campaigns in Dec 1988 and Nov 1989 have been analyzed to yield phase and amplitude scintillation magnitude, decorrelation time, irregularity drifts and anisotropy of the ground diffraction pattern during well defined polar cap patch and sun-aligned arc events. It is found that all these parameters tend to be different in these two classes of events which are controlled by the Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field.

  15. Operating CFDP in the Interplanetary Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines the design elements of CCSDS File Delivery Protocol and Interplanetary Internet technologies that will simplify their integration and discusses the resulting new capabilities, such as efficient transmission of large files via multiple relay satellites operating in parallel.

  16. Hypersonic Interplanetary Flight: Aero Gravity Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Al; Banks, Dan; Randolph, Jim

    2006-01-01

    The use of aero-gravity assist during hypersonic interplanetary flights is highlighted. Specifically, the use of large versus small planet for gravity asssist maneuvers, aero-gravity assist trajectories, launch opportunities and planetary waverider performance are addressed.

  17. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Interplanetary Cruise Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    You, Tung-Han; Graat, Eric; Halsell, Allen; Highsmith, Dolan; Long, Stacia; Bhat, Ram; Demcak, Stuart; Higa, Earl; Mottinger, Neil; Jah, Moriba

    2007-01-01

    Carrying six science instruments and three engineering payloads, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is the first mission in a low Mars orbit to characterize the surface, subsurface, and atmospheric properties with unprecedented detail. After a seven-month interplanetary cruise, MRO arrived at Mars executing a 1.0 km/s Mars Orbit Insertion (MOI) maneuver. MRO achieved a 430 km periapsis altitude with the final orbit solution indicating that only 10 km was attributable to navigation prediction error. With the last interplanetary maneuver performed four months before MOI, this was a significant accomplishment. This paper describes the navigation analyses and results during the 210-day interplanetary cruise. As of August 2007 MRO has returned more than 18 Terabits of scientific data in support of the objectives set by the Mars Exploration Program (MEP). The robust and exceptional interplanetary navigation performance paved the way for a successful MRO mission.

  18. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections During 1996 - 2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2007-01-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections, the interplanetary counterparts of coronal mass ejections at the Sun, are the major drivers of interplanetary shocks in the heliosphere, and are associated with modulations of the galactic cosmic ray intensity, both short term (Forbush decreases caused by the passage of the shock, post-shock sheath, and ICME), and possibly with longer term modulation. Using several in-situ signatures of ICMEs, including plasma temperature, and composition, magnetic fields, and cosmic ray modulations, made by near-Earth spacecraft, we have compiled a "comprehensive" list of ICMEs passing the Earth since 1996, encompassing solar cycle 23. We summarize the properties of these ICMEs, such as their occurrence rate, speeds and other parameters, the fraction of ICMEs that are classic magnetic clouds, and their association with solar energetic particle events, halo CMEs, interplanetary shocks, geomagnetic storms, shocks and cosmic ray decreases.

  19. The dynamics of solar plasma events and their interplanetary consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Subhash Chandra; Sharma, Giriraj

    2015-07-01

    In the present study we have analyzed the interplanetary plasma / field parameter, which have initiated the complex nature intense and highly geo-effective events in the magnetosphere. It is believed that Solar wind velocity V. interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B and Bz are the crucial drivers of these activities. However, sometimes strong geomagnetic disturbance is associated with the interaction between slow and fast solar wind streams originating from coronal holes leads to create co-rotating plasma interaction region (CIR). Thus the dynamics of the magnetospheric plasma configuration is the reflection of measured solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. While the magnetospheric plasma anomalies are generally represented by geomagnetic storms and sudden ionosphere disturbance (SIDs). The study considers 220 geomagnetic storms associated with disturbance storm time (Dst) decrease of more than -50 nT to -300 nT, observed during solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of solar cycle 24. These have been analyzed and studied statistically. The spacecraft data acquired by space satellites and those provided by World Data Center (WDC) - A and geomagnetic stations data from WDC- C, Kyoto are utilized in the study. It is observed that the yearly occurrences of geomagnetic storm are strongly correlated with sunspot cycle, however we have not found any significant correlation between the maximum and minimum phase of solar cycle. It is also inferred from the results that solar cycle-23 was remarkable for occurrence of intense geomagnetic storms during its descending phase.

  20. Dynamics of the Solar Plasma Events and Their Interplanetary Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Subhash Chandra

    2016-07-01

    In the present study we have analyzed the interplanetary plasma / field parameter, which have initiated the complex nature intense and highly geo-effective events in the magnetosphere. It is believed that Solar wind velocity V. interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B and Bz are the crucial drivers of these activities. However, sometimes strong geomagnetic disturbance is associated with the interaction between slow and fast solar wind originating from coronal holes leads to create co-rotating plasma interaction region (CIR). Thus the dynamics of the magnetospheric plasma configuration is the reflection of measured solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. While the magnetospheric plasma anomalies are generally represented by geomagnetic storms and sudden ionosphere disturbance (SIDs). The study considers geomagnetic storms associated with disturbance storm time (Dst) decreases of more than -50 nT to -300 nT, observed during solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of solar cycle 24. These have been analyzed and studied statistically. The spacecraft data those provided by SOHO, ACE and geomagnetic stations like WDC-Kyoto are utilized in the study. It is observed that the yearly occurrences of geomagnetic storm are strongly correlated with 11-year sunspot cycle, but no significant correlation between the maximum and minimum phase of solar cycle have been found. It is also found that solar cycle-23 is remarkable for occurrence of intense geomagnetic storms during its declining phase. The detailed results are discussed in this paper.

  1. Scintillation Monitoring Using Asymmetry Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Muhammad Mubasshir; Mahrous, Ayman; Abdallah, Amr; Notarpietro, Riccardo

    station in Cairo, Egypt (lat= 29.8641 °, long= 31.3172 °). It was observed that the level of asymmetry was significantly increased during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm. This was due to the changes in ionization, which in turn produced large gradients along occulted ray path in the ionosphere. A very good correlation was found between the evaluated ionospheric asymmetry index and the S4 scintillation index. Additionally, the correlation between evaluated ionospheric asymmetry and errors related to the RO inversion products such as peak electron density (delta NmF2) and Vertical TEC (delta VTEC) estimates also showed promising results. This work is carried out under the framework of the TRANSMIT project (Training Research and Applications Network to Support the Mitigation of Ionospheric Threats - www.transmit-ionosphere.net). [1]Basu Sa. and Basu Su., (1981), ‘Equatorial Scintillation - A Review’, Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics, 43, p. 473. [2]Davies K., (1990), ‘Ionospheric Radio’, IEEE Electromagnetic Waves Series 31, Peter Peregrinus Ltd. [3]Spencer, P., Mitchell, C.N., (2007) ‘Imaging of fast moving electron-density structures in the polar cap’, Annals of Geophysics, vol. 50, no. 3, pp. 427-434. [4]Shaikh, M.M., Notarpietro, R., Nava, B., (2013) ‘The Impact of Spherical Symmetry Assumption on Radio Occultation Data Inversion in the Ionosphere: An Assessment Study’, Advances in Space Research, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.asr.2013.10.025.

  2. TPS Ablator Technologies for Interplanetary Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Donald M.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the status of Thermal Protection System (TPS) Ablator technologies and the preparation for use in interplanetary spacecraft. NASA does not have adequate TPS ablatives and sufficient selection for planned missions. It includes a comparison of shuttle and interplanetary TPS requirements, the status of mainline TPS charring ablator materials, a summary of JSC SBIR accomplishments in developing advanced charring ablators and the benefits of SBIR Ablator/fabrication technology.

  3. The extension of solar magnetic fields into interplanetary space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComas, D. J.; Phillips, J. L.

    The flow of coronal plasma into interplanetary space results in outward transport of the solar magnetic field. The prevailing open interplanetary magnetic field is rooted in the corona and wraps up into a spiral due to the rotation of the Sun. This simple configuration, however, is disrupted by magnetically distinct coronal mass ejections (CME's) which erupt from the solar corona into interplanetary space. Observations of CME's at 1 AU reveal electron signatures indicating a closed magnetic topology, postulated to be: (1) magnetic bottles tied to the corona at both ends; (2) plasmoids that are completely disconnected from the Sun; or (3) flux ropes which have topologies intermediate between (1) and (2). With either the magnetic-bottle or flux rope hypothesis, the inward and outward flux at 1 AU should increase indefinitely as CME's continue to erupt. Using a new technique to calculate the 2-D flux through 1 AU from single spacecraft measurements, we show that while there is a solar cycle variation to the magnetic flux, it clearly does not grow without bound. This suggests that either CME's are closed plasmoids which add to no new flux to the interplanetary medium, or that the opening of new flux by CME's is balanced via reconnection elsewhere in the corona. We suggest that the latter process may be dominant and describe observation from the Solar Maximum Mission coronagraph which are consistent with reconnection above helmet streamers in the corona. Such disconnections would serve to return closed field arches to the Sun and release open, U-shaped structures into the solar wind. Coronal disconnections appear in some cases to be triggered by pressure pulses caused by CME eruption elsewhere, suggesting a dynamic flux-balance process. We describe a class of solar wind structures, called heat flux dropouts, in which the solar wind electron heat flux, driven by magnetic connection to the hot corona, is absent or greatly reduced.

  4. Synoptic IPS and Yohkoh soft X-ray observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hick, P.; Jackson, B. V.; Rappoport, S.; Woan, G.; Slater, G.; Strong, K.; Uchida, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Interplanetary scintillation measurements of the disturbance factor, g, from October 1991 to October 1992 are used to construct synoptic Carrington maps. These maps, which show the structure of the quiet solar wind, are compared with X-ray Carrington maps from the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) instrument. For the period studied the global structure outlined by (weakly) enhanced g-values apparent in the interplanetary scintillation (IPS) maps tend to match the active regions (as shown in the X-ray maps) significantly better than the heliospheric current sheet. Contrary to traditional opinion, which views active regions as magnetically closed structures that do not have any significant impact on the solar wind flow, our results suggest that density fluctuations in the solar wind are significantly enhanced over active regions. These results support the suggestion by Uchida et al. (1992), based on Yohkoh observations of expanding active regions, that active regions play a role in feeding mass into the quiet solar wind.

  5. Ionospheric Scintillation Explorer (ISX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuliano, J.; Bahcivan, H.

    2015-12-01

    NSF has recently selected Ionospheric Scintillation Explorer (ISX), a 3U Cubesat mission to explore the three-dimensional structure of scintillation-scale ionospheric irregularities associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF). ISX is a collaborative effort between SRI International and Cal Poly. This project addresses the science question: To what distance along a flux tube does an irregularity of certain transverse-scale extend? It has been difficult to measure the magnetic field-alignment of scintillation-scale turbulent structures because of the difficulty of sampling a flux tube at multiple locations within a short time. This measurement is now possible due to the worldwide transition to DTV, which presents unique signals of opportunity for remote sensing of ionospheric irregularities from numerous vantage points. DTV spectra, in various formats, contain phase-stable, narrowband pilot carrier components that are transmitted simultaneously. A 4-channel radar receiver will simultaneously record up to 4 spatially separated transmissions from the ground. Correlations of amplitude and phase scintillation patterns corresponding to multiple points on the same flux tube will be a measure of the spatial extent of the structures along the magnetic field. A subset of geometries where two or more transmitters are aligned with the orbital path will be used to infer the temporal development of the structures. ISX has the following broad impact. Scintillation of space-based radio signals is a space weather problem that is intensively studied. ISX is a step toward a CubeSat constellation to monitor worldwide TEC variations and radio wave distortions on thousands of ionospheric paths. Furthermore, the rapid sampling along spacecraft orbits provides a unique dataset to deterministically reconstruct ionospheric irregularities at scintillation-scale resolution using diffraction radio tomography, a technique that enables prediction of scintillations at other radio frequencies, and

  6. Energy Transfer Based Nanocomposite Scintillator for Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Soha; Sahi, Sunil; Chen, Wei; Ma, Lun; Kenarangui, Rasool

    2014-09-01

    Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum yield and size dependent emission, nanoparticles have attracted interested in various field of research. Here, we have studies the nanoparticles for radiation detection. We have synthesized nanoparticles of Cerium fluoride (CeF3), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Copper complex and Zinc sulfide (ZnS). We have used Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) principle to enhance the luminescence properties of nanocomposite scintillator. Nanocomposites scintillators are structurally characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Optical properties are studied using Photoluminescence, UV-Visible and X-ray. Enhancements in the luminescence are observed under UV and X-ray excitation. Preliminary studies shows nanocomposite scintillators are promising for radiation detection. Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum

  7. Superdiffusive shock acceleration and short acceleration times at interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, Silvia; Zimbardo, Gaetano

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of time profiles of particles accelerated at interplanetary shock waves has shown evidence for superdiffusive transport in the upstream region. Superdiffusive transport is characterized by a mean square displacement that grows faster than linearly in time and by non Gaussian statistics for the distribution of the particle jump lengths. In the superdiffusive framework it has been shown that particle time profiles upstream of a planar shock decay as power laws, at variance with exponential particle time profiles predicted in the case of diffusive transport. A large number of interplanetary shocks, including coronal mass ejection driven shocks, exhibit energetic particle time profiles that decay as power laws far upstream. In order to take this evidence into account, we have extended the standard theory of diffusive shock acceleration to the case of particle superdiffusive transport (superdiffusive shock acceleration). This has allowed us to derive both hard energy spectral indices and short acceleration times. This new theory has been tested for a number of interplanetary shock waves, observed by the Ulysses and the ACE spacecraft, and for the termination shock. The superdiffusive shock acceleration leads to a strong reduction of the acceleration times (even of about one order of magnitude) with respect to the diffusive shock acceleration. Thus, this new framework provides a substantial advancement in the understanding of the processes of particle acceleration and particle transport, which are among the main objectives of the new Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter space missions.

  8. Latitudinal Dependence of the Radial IMF Component - Interplanetary Imprint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Smith, E. J.; Phillips, J.; Goldstein, B. E.; Nerney, S.

    1996-01-01

    Ulysses measurements have confirmed that there is no significant gradient with respect to heliomagnetic latitude in the radial component, B(sub r,), of the interplanetary magnetic field. There are two processes responsible for this observation. In the corona, the plasma beta is much less than 1, except directly above streamers, so both longitudinal and latitudinal (meridional) gradients in field strength will relax, due to the transverse magnetic pressure gradient force, as the solar wind carries magnetic flux away from the Sun. This happens so quickly that the field is essentially uniform by 5 solar radius. Beyond 10 solar radius, beta is greater than 1 and it is possible for a meridional thermal pressure gradient to redistribute magnetic flux - an effect apparently absent in Ulysses and earlier ICE and Interplanetary Magnetic Physics (IMP) data. We discuss this second effect here, showing that its absence is mainly due to the perpendicular part of the anisotropic thermal pressure gradient in the interplanetary medium being too small to drive significant meridional transport between the Sun and approx. 4 AU. This is done using a linear analytic estimate of meridional transport. The first effect was discussed in an earlier paper.

  9. Scintillator Measurements for SNO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaptanoglu, Tanner; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    SNO+ is a neutrino detector located 2km underground in the SNOLAB facility with the primary goal of searching for neutrinoless double beta decay. The detector will be filled with a liquid scintillator target primarily composed of linear alkyl benzene (LAB). As charged particles travel through the detector the LAB produces scintillation light which is detected by almost ten thousand PMTs. The LAB is loaded with Te130, an isotope known to undergo double beta decay. Additionally, the LAB is mixed with an additional fluor and wavelength shifter to improve the light output and shift the light to a wavelength regime in which the PMTs are maximally efficient. The precise scintillator optics drastically affect the ultimate sensitivity of SNO+. I will present work being done to measure the optical properties of the SNO+ scintillator cocktail. The measured properties are used as input to a scintillation model that allows us to extrapolate to the SNO+ scale and ultimately predict the sensitivity of the experiment. Additionally, I will present measurements done to characterize the R5912 PMT, a candidate PMT for the second phase of SNO+ that provides better light collection, improved charge resolution, and a narrower spread in timing.

  10. Origins and Dynamics of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, Stanley F.

    2005-01-01

    This is a final report for research supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration issued through the Office of Space Science Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program, covering all relevant activities during its 3-year period of funding from 02/01/2002 through to 01/31/2005. The ongoing aim of the research supported through this grant, and now through a successor award, is to investigate the origin of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and their dynamical and collisional evolution, in order to: (1) understand the provenance of zodiacal cloud particles and their transport from their source regions to the inner solar system; (2) produce detailed models of the zodiacal cloud and its constituent components; (3) determine the origin of the dust particles accreted by the Earth; (4) ascertain the level of temporal variations in the dust environment of the inner solar system and the accretion rate of IDPs by the Earth, and evaluate potential effects on global climate; and to (5) exploit this research as a basis for interpreting the structure observed in exozodiacal clouds that may result from the collisional evolution of planetesimals and the presence of unseen planets.

  11. Interplanetary Consequences of Coronal Mass Ejection Events Occurred During 18-25 June 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, P. K.; Maia, D.; Johri, A.; Induja, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we review the preliminary results on the propagation effects and interplanetary consequences of fast and wide coronal mass ejection (CME) events, occurred during 18-25 June 2015, in the Sun-Earth distance range. The interplanetary scintillation (IPS) images reveal that the large-scale structures of CME-driven disturbances filled nearly the entire inner heliosphere with a range of speeds, ˜300-1000 km s-1. The comparison of speed data sets, from IPS technique results in the inner heliosphere and in-situ measurements at 1 AU, indicates that the drag force imposed by the low-speed wind dominated heliosphere on the propagation of CMEs may not be effective. The arrival of shocks at 1 AU suggests that a shock can be driven in the interplanetary medium by the central part of the moving CME and also by a different part away from its centre. The increased flux of proton at energies >10 MeV is consistent with the acceleration of particles by the shock ahead of the CME.

  12. Detection of Solar Wind Disturbances: Mexican Array Radio Telescope IPS Observations at 140 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Hernandez, E.; Gonzalez-Esparza, J. A.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Ontiveros-Hernandez, V.; Villanueva-Hernandez, P.

    2015-09-01

    The interplanetary scintillation (IPS) technique is a remote-sensing method for monitoring solar-wind perturbations. The Mexican Array Radio Telescope (MEXART) is a single-station instrument operating at 140 MHz, fully dedicated to performing solar-wind studies employing the IPS technique. We report MEXART solar-wind measurements (scintillation indices and solar-wind velocities) using data obtained during the 2013 and 2014 campaigns. These solar-wind measurements were calculated employing a new methodology based on the wavelet transform (WT) function. We report the variation of the scintillation indices versus the heliocentric distance for two IPS sources (3C48 and 3C147). We found different average conditions of the solar-wind density fluctuations in 2013 and 2014. We used the fittings of the radial dependence of the scintillation index to calculate g-indices. Based on the g-index value, we identified 17 events that could be associated with strong compression regions in the solar wind. We present the first ICME identifications in our data. We associated 14 IPS events with preceding CME counterparts by employing white-light observations from the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. We found that most of the IPS events, detected during the solar maximum of Cycle 24 were associated with complex CME events. For the IPS events associated with single CME counterparts, we found a deceleration tendency of the CMEs as they propagate in the interplanetary medium. These results show that the instrument detects solar-wind disturbances, and the WT methodology provides solar-wind information with good accuracy. The MEXART observations will complement solar-wind IPS studies using other frequencies, and the tracking of solar-wind disturbances by other stations located at different longitudes.

  13. Scintillator plate calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Price, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Calorimetry using scintillator plates or tiles alternated with sheets of (usually heavy) passive absorber has been proven over multiple generations of collider detectors. Recent detectors including UA1, CDF, and ZEUS have shown good results from such calorimeters. The advantages offered by scintillator calorimetry for the SSC environment, in particular, are speed (<10 nsec), excellent energy resolution, low noise, and ease of achieving compensation and hence linearity. On the negative side of the ledger can be placed the historical sensitivity of plastic scintillators to radiation damage, the possibility of nonuniform response because of light attenuation, and the presence of cracks for light collection via wavelength shifting plastic (traditionally in sheet form). This approach to calorimetry is being investigated for SSC use by a collaboration of Ames Laboratory/Iowa State University, Argonne National Laboratory, Bicron Corporation, Florida State University, Louisiana State University, University of Mississippi, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, and University of Wisconsin.

  14. On the anisotropies of interplanetary low-energy proton intensities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesses, M. E.; Sarris, E. T.

    1975-01-01

    Explorer 35 proton anisotropic flux data (proton energies between 0.3 and 6.3 MeV) and simultaneous magnetic field measurements were used to supply more information on the propagation characteristics of low-energy protons in the interplanetary medium. During the rising portions of the proton events, large field-aligned anisotropies were observed. During the decaying part of the proton events, either radial anisotropy or near-isotropy was noticed. In addition, certain observations made during the decaying part of the proton events revealed anisotropies deviating significantly from the radial direction.

  15. Testing Gravity Using Pulsar Scintillation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huan; Nishizawa, Atsushi; Pen, Ue-Li

    2016-03-01

    We propose to use pulsar scintillation measurements to test predictions of alternative theories of gravity. Comparing to single-path pulsar timing measurements, the scintillation measurements can achieve a factor of 104 ~105 improvement in timing accuracy, due to the effect of multi-path interference. The self-noise from pulsar also does not affect the interference pattern, where the data acquisition timescale is 103 seconds instead of years. Therefore it has unique advantages in measuring gravitational effect or other mechanisms (at mHz and above frequencies) on light propagation. We illustrate its application in constraining scalar gravitational-wave background and measuring gravitational-wave speed, in which cases the sensitivities are greatly improved with respect to previous limits. We expect much broader applications in testing gravity with existing and future pulsar scintillation observations.

  16. Interplanetary medium data book, supplement, 1975 - 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Since the issurance of the Interplanetary Medium Data Book (NSSDC/WDC-A-R&S 77-04, 1977) which contains plots and listings of hourly average interplanetary field and plasma parameters covering the period November 27, 1963 through December 30, 1975, additional data are available which fill some 1975 data gaps and which extend the data coverage well into 1978. This supplement contains all the presently available data for the years 1975-1978, Interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data are from the IMP 8 triaxial fluxgate magnetometer experiment. Derived plasma parameters are form the IMP 7 and IMP 8 instruments. Some of the early 1975 IMF data are from a HEOS 1 experiment.

  17. International Launch Vehicle Selection for Interplanetary Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrone, Kristine; Nguyen, Lori T.

    2010-01-01

    In developing a mission strategy for interplanetary travel, the first step is to consider launch capabilities which provide the basis for fundamental parameters of the mission. This investigation focuses on the numerous launch vehicles of various characteristics available and in development internationally with respect to upmass, launch site, payload shroud size, fuel type, cost, and launch frequency. This presentation will describe launch vehicles available and in development worldwide, then carefully detail a selection process for choosing appropriate vehicles for interplanetary missions focusing on international collaboration, risk management, and minimization of cost. The vehicles that fit the established criteria will be discussed in detail with emphasis on the specifications and limitations related to interplanetary travel. The final menu of options will include recommendations for overall mission design and strategy.

  18. About Shape of an Interplanetary Shock Front.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Ivan; Petukhov, Stanislav

    The form of an interplanetary shock front has been investigated by the statistical method. Results of determination the components of normals to the interplanetary shock fronts obtained from data of ACE experiment during from 1998 to 2003 years (about 200 measurements) are used. North-south asymmetry of shock amount about 15% is revealed. Possibly, it is caused by more activity of the north semi-sphere of the Sun. East-west asymmetry of shock area are obtained. At probability 95% values of asymmetry more 0.53 and less 0.65 at most probability 0.59. Here asymmetry is ratio west part of area to whole area of shock front. Possibly, it is formed at propagation of a shock in interplanetary space. The reason of asymmetry may be self-generation turbulence by the accelerated particles which influences on velocity of shock propagation.

  19. Boron loaded scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Zane William; Brown, Gilbert Morris; Maya, Leon; Sloop, Jr., Frederick Victor; Sloop, Jr., Frederick Victor

    2009-10-20

    A scintillating composition for detecting neutrons and other radiation comprises a phenyl containing silicone rubber with carborane units and at least one phosphor molecule. The carbonate units can either be a carborane molecule dispersed in the rubber with the aid of a compatibilization agent or can be covalently bound to the silicone.

  20. Polysiloxane scintillator composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J.K.

    1992-05-05

    A plastic scintillator useful for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a matrix which comprises an optically transparent polysiloxane having incorporated therein at least one ionizing radiation-hard fluor capable of converting electromagnetic energy produced in the polysiloxane upon absorption of ionizing radiation to detectable light.

  1. SCINTILLATION EXPOSURE RATE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Spears, W.G.

    1960-11-01

    A radiation detector for gamma and x rays is described. The detector comprises a scintillation crystal disposed between a tantalum shield and the input of a photomultiplier tube, the crystal and the shield cooperating so that their combined response to a given quantity of radiation at various energy levels is substantially constant.

  2. Polysiloxane scintillator composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, James K.

    1992-01-01

    A plastic scintillator useful for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a matrix which comprises an optically transparent polysiloxane having incorporated therein at least one ionizing radiation-hard fluor capable of converting electromagnetic energy produced in the polysiloxane upon absorption of ionizing radiation to detectable light.

  3. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Guiding Relativistic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, S.; Demoulin, P.; Dasso, S.; Klein, K. L.

    2011-01-01

    The origin and the propagation of relativistic solar particles (0.5 to few Ge V) in the interplanetary medium remains a debated topic. These relativistic particles, detected at the Earth by neutron monitors have been previously accelerated close to the Sun and are guided by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) lines, connecting the acceleration site and the Earth. Usually, the nominal Parker spiral is considered for ensuring the magnetic connection to the Earth. However, in most GLEs the IMF is highly disturbed, and the active regions associated to the GLEs are not always located close to the solar footprint of the nominal Parker spiral. A possible explanation is that relativistic particles are propagating in transient magnetic structures, such as Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). In order to check this interpretation, we studied in detail the interplanetary medium where the particles propagate for 10 GLEs of the last solar cycle. Using the magnetic field and the plasma parameter measurements (ACE/MAG and ACE/SWEPAM), we found widely different IMF configurations. In an independent approach we develop and apply an improved method of the velocity dispersion analysis to energetic protons measured by SoHO/ERNE. We determined the effective path length and the solar release time of protons from these data and also combined them with the neutron monitor data. We found that in most of the GLEs, protons propagate in transient magnetic structures. Moreover, the comparison between the interplanetary magnetic structure and the interplanetary length suggest that the timing of particle arrival at Earth is dominantly determined by the type of IMF in which high energetic particles are propagating. Finally we find that these energetic protons are not significantly scattered during their transport to Earth.

  4. Scintillator requirements for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    1999-09-01

    Scintillating materials are used in a variety of medical imaging devices. This paper presents a description of four medical imaging modalities that make extensive use of scintillators: planar x-ray imaging, x-ray computed tomography (x-ray CT), SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) and PET (positron emission tomography). The discussion concentrates on a description of the underlying physical principles by which the four modalities operate. The scintillator requirements for these systems are enumerated and the compromises that are made in order to maximize imaging performance utilizing existing scintillating materials are discussed, as is the potential for improving imaging performance by improving scintillator properties.

  5. Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary; Craig, Richard A.; Reeder; Paul L.

    2003-04-22

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  6. Mars Science Laboratory Interplanetary Navigation Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Kruizinga, Gerhard; Wong, Mau

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, carrying the Curiosity rover to Mars, hit the top of the Martian atmosphere just 200 meters from where it had been predicted more than six days earlier, and 2.6 million kilometers away. This un-expected level of accuracy was achieved by a combination of factors including: spacecraft performance, tracking data processing, dynamical modeling choices, and navigation filter setup. This paper will describe our best understanding of what were the factors that contributed to this excellent interplanetary trajectory prediction performance. The accurate interplanetary navigation contributed to the very precise landing performance, and to the overall success of the mission.

  7. Interplanetary Space Weather and Its Planetary Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Norma; Bothmer, Volker; Facius, Rainer; Grießmeier, Jean-Mathias; Moussas, Xenophon; Panasyuk, Mikhail; Romanova, Natalia; Withers, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Interplanetary travel is not just a science fiction scenario anymore, but a goal as realistic as when our ancestors started to cross the oceans. With curiosity driving humans to visit other planets in our solar system, the understanding of interplanetary space weather is a vital subject today, particularly because the physical conditions faced during a space vehicle's transit to its targeted solar system object are crucial to a mission's success and vital to the health and safety of spacecraft crew, especially when scheduling planned extravehicular activities.

  8. Heliocentric distance dependence of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.

    1977-01-01

    Recent and ongoing planetary missions have provided extensive observations of the variations of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) both in time and with heliocentric distance from the sun. Large time variations in both the IMF and its fluctuations were observed. These are produced predominantly by dynamical processes in the interplanetary medium associated with stream interactions. Magnetic field variations near the sun are propagated to greater heliocentric distances, also contributing to the observed variablity of the IMF. Temporal variations on a time-scale comparable to or less than the corotation period complicate attempts to deduce radial gradients of the field and its fluctuations from the various observations. However, recent measurements inward to 0.46 AU and outward to 5 AU suggest that the radial component of the field on average decreases approximately as r to the minus second power, while the azimuthal component decreases more rapidly than the r to the minum first power dependence predicted by simple theory. This, and other observations, are discussed.

  9. Characterizing Properties and Performance of 3D Printed Plastic Scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Jacob

    2015-10-01

    We are determining various characteristics of the performance of 3D printed scintillators. A scintillator luminesces when an energetic particle raises electrons to an excited state by depositing some of its energy in the atom. When these excited electrons fall back down to their stable states, they emit the excess energy as light. We have characterized the transmission spectrum, emission spectrum, and relative intensity of light produced by 3D printed scintillators. We are also determining mechanical properties such as tensile strength and compressibility, and the refractive index. The emission and transmission spectra were measured using a monochromator. By observing the transmission spectrum, we can see which optical wavelengths are absorbed by the scintillator. This is then used to correct the emission spectrum, since this absorption is present in the emission spectrum. Using photomultiplier tubes in conjunction with integration hardware (QDC) to measure the intensity of light emitted by 3D printed scintillators, we compare with commercial plastic scintillators. We are using the characterizations to determine if 3D printed scintillators are a viable alternative to commercial scintillators for use at Jefferson Lab in nuclear and accelerated physics detectors. I would like to thank Wouter Deconinck, as well as the Parity group at the College of William and Mary for all advice and assistance with my research.

  10. Physical properties of interplanetary dust: laboratory and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadamcik, Edith; Lasue, Jeremie; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Buch, Arnaud; Carrasco, Nathalie; Cottin, Hervé; Fray, Nicolas; Guan, Yuan Yong; Szopa, Cyril

    Laboratory light scattering measurements with the PROGRA2 experiment, in A300-CNES and ESA dedicated microgravity flights or in ground based configurations, offer an alternative to models for exploring the scattering properties of particles with structures too complex to be easily handled by computer simulations [1,2]. The technique allows the use of large size distributions (nanometers to hundreds of micrometers) and a large variety of materials, similar to those suspected to compose the interplanetary particles [3]. Asteroids are probably the source of compact particles, while comets have been shown to eject compact and fluffy materials [4]. Moreover giant planets provide further a small number of interplanetary particles. Some interstellar particles are also present. To choose the best samples and size distributions, we consider previous numerical models for the interplanetary particles and their evolution with solar distance. In this model, fluffy particles are simulated by fractal aggregates and compact particles by ellipsoids. The materials considered are silicates and carbonaceous compound. The silicate grains can be coated by the organics. Observations are fitted with two parameters: the size distribution of the particles and the ratio of silicates over carbonaceous compounds. From the light scattering properties of the particles, their equilibrium temperature can be calculated for different structures and composition. The variation of their optical properties and temperatures are studied with the heliocentric distance [5,6]. Results on analogs of cometary particles [7] and powdered meteorites as asteroidal particles will be presented and compared to numerical simulations as well as observations. Organics on cometary grains can constitute distributed sources if degraded by solar UV and heat [8, 9]. The optical properties of CxHyNz compounds are studied after thermal evolution [10]. As a first approach, they are used to simulate the evolution of cometary or

  11. Evidence for Directly Driven Auroral Signatures Resulting from Interplanetary Pressure Pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F., Jr.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Parks, G. K.; Germany, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    It has been observed that the auroral signature of the arrival of an interplanetary pressure pulse at the bow shock causes an initial brightening near noon. Consequently, the bright region propagates to the night side via the dawn and dusk flanks. The delay time for subsequent auroral breakup is observed to vary significantly from seconds to hours. We have examined the 1998 and early 1999 interplanetary pressure pulse events recorded by WIND and ACE (over 35 in all) and correlated these with the Polar UVI data for the events that are imaged. Evidence for directly driven auroral activity resulting from an interplanetary pressure pulse will be discussed as well as the variation of the delay time for auroral breakup.

  12. Ionization and scintillation of nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, J.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Matis, H. S.; Miller, T.; Nakajima, Y.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Shuman, D.; Álvarez, V.; Borges, F. I. G.; Cárcel, S.; Castel, J.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Dias, T. H. V. T.; Díaz, J.; Esteve, R.; Evtoukhovitch, P.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Gil, A.; Gómez, H.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; González-Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrera, D. C.; Iguaz, F. J.; Irastorza, I. G.; Jinete, M. A.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez, A.; Moiseenko, A.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Natal da Luz, H.; Navarro, G.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Palma, R.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Seguí, L.; Serra, L.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Toledo, J. F.; Tomás, A.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Villar, J. A.; Webb, R. C.; White, J.; Yahlali, N.

    2015-09-01

    Ionization and scintillation produced by nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon at approximately 14 bar have been simultaneously observed in an electroluminescent time projection chamber. Neutrons from radioisotope α-Be neutron sources were used to induce xenon nuclear recoils, and the observed recoil spectra were compared to a detailed Monte Carlo employing estimated ionization and scintillation yields for nuclear recoils. The ability to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils using the ratio of ionization to primary scintillation is demonstrated. These results encourage further investigation on the use of xenon in the gas phase as a detector medium in dark matter direct detection experiments.

  13. Hydrated interplanetary dust particle linked with carbonaceous chondrites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomeoka, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    1985-03-01

    The results of transmission electron microscope observations of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle (IDP) containing Fe-, Mg-rich smectite or mica as a major phase are reported. The sheet silicate appears to have formed by alteration of anhydrous silicates. Fassaite, a Ca, Al clinopyroxene, also occurs in this particle, and one of the crystals exhibits solar-flare tracks, clearly indicating that it is extraterrestrial. Fassaite is a major constituent of the Ca-, Al-rich refractory inclusions found in the carbonaceous chondrites, so its presence in this particle suggests that there may be a link between hydrated IDPs and carbonaceous chondrites in the early history of the solar system.

  14. Hydrated interplanetary dust particle linked with carbonaceous chondrites?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomeoka, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    The results of transmission electron microscope observations of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle (IDP) containing Fe-, Mg-rich smectite or mica as a major phase are reported. The sheet silicate appears to have formed by alteration of anhydrous silicates. Fassaite, a Ca, Al clinopyroxene, also occurs in this particle, and one of the crystals exhibits solar-flare tracks, clearly indicating that it is extraterrestrial. Fassaite is a major constituent of the Ca-, Al-rich refractory inclusions found in the carbonaceous chondrites, so its presence in this particle suggests that there may be a link between hydrated IDPs and carbonaceous chondrites in the early history of the solar system.

  15. Toward the Probabilistic Forecasting of High-latitude GPS Phase Scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prikryl, P.; Jayachandran, P.T.; Mushini, S. C.; Richardson, I. G.

    2012-01-01

    The phase scintillation index was obtained from L1 GPS data collected with the Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network (CHAIN) during years of extended solar minimum 2008-2010. Phase scintillation occurs predominantly on the dayside in the cusp and in the nightside auroral oval. We set forth a probabilistic forecast method of phase scintillation in the cusp based on the arrival time of either solar wind corotating interaction regions (CIRs) or interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). CIRs on the leading edge of high-speed streams (HSS) from coronal holes are known to cause recurrent geomagnetic and ionospheric disturbances that can be forecast one or several solar rotations in advance. Superposed epoch analysis of phase scintillation occurrence showed a sharp increase in scintillation occurrence just after the arrival of high-speed solar wind and a peak associated with weak to moderate CMEs during the solar minimum. Cumulative probability distribution functions for the phase scintillation occurrence in the cusp are obtained from statistical data for days before and after CIR and ICME arrivals. The probability curves are also specified for low and high (below and above median) values of various solar wind plasma parameters. The initial results are used to demonstrate a forecasting technique on two example periods of CIRs and ICMEs.

  16. Radiowave Phase Scintillation and Precision Doppler Tracking of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Phase scintillation cause by propagation through irregularities in the solar wind, ionosphere, and tropospher, introduces noise in spacecraft radio science experiments. The observations reported here are uses to refine the propagation noise model for Doppler tracking of deep space probes.

  17. Geometrical Relationship Between Interplanetary Flux Ropes and Their Solar Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marubashi, K.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Cho, K.-S.; Park, Y.-D.

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the physical connection between interplanetary flux ropes (IFRs) near Earth and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) by comparing the magnetic field structures of IFRs and CME source regions. The analysis is based on the list of 54 pairs of ICMEs (interplanetary coronal mass ejections) and CMEs that are taken to be the most probable solar source events. We first attempted to identify the flux rope structure in each of the 54 ICMEs by fitting models with a cylinder and torus magnetic field geometry, both with a force-free field structure. This analysis determined the possible geometries of the identified flux ropes. Then we compared the flux rope geometries with the magnetic field structure of the solar source regions. We obtained the following results: (1) Flux rope structures are seen in 51 ICMEs out of the 54. The result implies that all ICMEs have an intrinsic flux rope structure, if the three exceptional cases are attributed to unfavorable observation conditions. (2) It is possible to find flux rope geometries with the main axis orientation close to the orientation of the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL) in the solar source regions, the differences being less than 25°. (3) The helicity sign of an IFR is strongly controlled by the location of the solar source: flux ropes with positive (negative) helicity are associated with sources in the southern (northern) hemisphere (six exceptions were found). (4) Over two-thirds of the sources in the northern hemisphere are concentrated along PILs with orientations of 45° ± 30° (measured clockwise from the east), and over two-thirds in the southern hemisphere along PILs with orientations of 135° ± 30°, both corresponding to the Hale boundaries. These results strongly support the idea that a flux rope with the main axis parallel to the PIL erupts in a CME and that the erupted flux rope propagates through the interplanetary space with its orientation maintained and is observed as an IFR.

  18. Magnetic Reconnection in the Interior of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermo, R. L.; Opher, M.; Drake, J. F.

    2014-07-01

    Recent in situ observations of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) found signatures of reconnection exhausts in their interior or trailing edge. Whereas reconnection on the leading edge of an ICME would indicate an interaction with the coronal or interplanetary environment, this result suggests that the internal magnetic field reconnects with itself. In light of this data, we consider the stability properties of flux ropes first developed in the context of astrophysics, then further elaborated upon in the context of reversed field pinches (RFPs). It was shown that the lowest energy state of a flux rope corresponds to ∇×B=λB with λ a constant, the so-called Taylor state. Variations from this state will result in the magnetic field trying to reorient itself into the Taylor state solution, subject to the constraints that the toroidal flux and magnetic helicity are invariant. In reversed field pinches, this relaxation is mediated by the reconnection of the magnetic field, resulting in a sawtooth crash. If we likewise treat the ICME as a flux rope, any deviation from the Taylor state will result in reconnection within the interior of the flux tube, in agreement with the observations by Gosling et al. Such a departure from the Taylor state takes place as the flux tube cross section expands in the latitudinal direction, as seen in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of flux tubes propagating through the interplanetary medium. We show analytically that this elongation results in a state which is no longer in the minimum energy Taylor state. We then present magnetohydrodynamic simulations of an elongated flux tube which has evolved away from the Taylor state and show that reconnection at many surfaces produces a complex stochastic magnetic field as the system evolves back to a minimum energy state configuration.

  19. The interplanetary pioneers. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corliss, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    The Pioneer Space Probe Project is explained to document the events which occurred during the project. The subjects discussed are: (1) origin and history of interplanetary Pioneer program, (2) Pioneer system development and design, (3) Pioneer flight operations, and (4) Pioneer scientific results. Line drawings, circuit diagrams, illustrations, and photographs are included to augment the written material.

  20. Hummingbird: Dramatically Reducing Interplanetary Mission Cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertz, J. R.; Van Allen, R. E.; Sarzi-Amade, N.; Shao, A.; Taylor, C.

    2012-06-01

    The Hummingbird interplanetary spacecraft has an available delta V of 2 to 4 km/sec and a recurring cost of 2 to 3 million, depending on the payload and configuration. The baseline telescope has a resolution of 30 cm at a distance of 100 km.

  1. Interplanetary monitoring platform engineering history and achievements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    In the fall of 1979, last of ten Interplanetary Monitoring Platform Satellite (IMP) missions ended a ten year series of flights dedicated to obtaining new knowledge of the radiation effects in outer space and of solar phenomena during a period of maximum solar flare activity. The technological achievements and scientific accomplishments from the IMP program are described.

  2. Interplanetary magnetic field structure at Saturn inferred from nanodust measurements during the 2013 aurora campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, H.-W.; Kempf, S.; Badman, S. V.; Kurth, W. S.; Postberg, F.; Srama, R.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between the solar wind and planetary magnetospheres provide important diagnostic information about the magnetospheric dynamics. The lack of monitoring of upstream solar wind conditions at the outer planets, however, restrains the overall scientific output. Here we apply a new method, using Cassini nanodust stream measurements, to derive the interplanetary magnetic field structure during the 2013 Saturn aurora campaign. Due to the complex dynamical interactions with the interplanetary magnetic field, a fraction of fast nanodust particles emerging from the Saturnian system is sent back into the magnetosphere and can be detected by a spacecraft located within. The time-dependent directionality caused by the variable interplanetary magnetic field enable these particles to probe the solar wind structure remotely. Information about the arrival time of solar wind compression regions (coupled with the heliospheric current sheet crossings) as well as the field direction associated with the solar wind sector structure can be inferred. Here we present a tentative identification of the interplanetary magnetic field sector structure based on Cassini nanodust and radio emission measurements during the 2013 Saturn aurora campaign. Our results show that, the interplanetary magnetic field near Saturn during 2013-080 to 176 was consistent with a two-sector structure. The intensifications of aurora and the radio emission on 2013-095, 112 and 140 coincide with the IMF sector boundaries, indicating that the encounter of the compressed solar wind is the main cause of the observed activities.

  3. Refractive Interstellar Scintillation for Flux Density Variations of Two Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ai-Zhi; Wu, Xin-Ji; Esamdin, A.

    2003-08-01

    The flux density structure functions of PSRs B0525+21 and B2111+46 are calculated with the refractive interstellar scintillation (RISS) theory. The theoretical curves are in good agreement with observations [Astrophys. J. 539 (2000) 300] (hereafter S2000). The spectra of the electron density fluctuations both are of Kolmogorov spectra. We suggest that the flux density variations observed for these two pulsars are attributed to refractive interstellar scintillation, not to intrinsic variability.

  4. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics: Future role of scintillation detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurfess, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The future role of conventional scintillation detector telescopes for line gamma-ray astronomy is discussed. Although the energy resolution of the germanium detectors now being used by several groups is clearly desirable, the larger effective areas and higher efficiencies available with scintillation detectors is advantageous for many observations. This is particularly true for those observations of astrophysical phenomena where significant line broadening is expected.

  5. Helioseismology with Seismometers: II Coherence with the Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, David J.; Vernon, Frank L.

    2015-04-01

    Since the discovery of seismic "hum'' in 1998 unexpected lines have been observed in terrestrial seismology.In this talk we give further evidence that these lines originate as normal modes of the Sun. Frequencies observed in terrestrial seismic and geomagnetic data are often split by multiples of a cycle/day and, unexpectedly, by multiples of one-half cycle per sidereal day.There is coherence between the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) at ACE (located at L_1) and terrestrial geomagnetic and seismic data. There are slight frequency offsets between colocated geomagnetic and seismic data similar to those observed in normal modes excited by earthquakes. These have been attributed to dispersion from large-scale structure in the Earth.Both the splitting and coherence with the IMF give further confirmation that solar modes propagatethrough interplanetary space and are sufficiently strong to literally shake the Earth. This gives another method to detect and possibly identify solar gravity and low--frequency P-modes.

  6. Solar and Interplanetary Disturbances Causing Moderate Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratap Yadav, Mahendra; Kumar, Santosh

    2003-07-01

    The effect of solar and interplanetary disturbances on geomagnetospheric conditions leading to one hundred twenty one moderate geomagnetic storms (MGSs) with planetary index, Ap ≥ 20 and horizontal component of earth's magnetic field, H ≤ 250γ have been investigated using solar geophysical data (SGD), solar wind plasma (SWP) and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data during the period 1978-99. It is observed statistically that 64%, 36%, MGSs have occurred during maximum and minimum phase of solar cycle 21st and 22nd respectively. Further, it is observed that Hα, X-ray solar flares and active prominences and disapp earing filaments (APDFs) have occurred within lower helio latitude region associated with larger number of MGSs. No significant correlation between the intensity of GMSs and importance of Hα, X-ray solar flares have been observed. Maximum number of MGSs are associated with solar flares of lower importance of solar flare faint (SF). The lower importance in association with some specific characteristics i.e. location, region, duration of occurrence of event may also cause MGSs. The correlation coefficient between MGSs and sunspot numbers (SSNs) using Karl Pearson method, has been obtained 0.37 during 1978-99.

  7. CLIpSAT for Interplanetary Missions: Common Low-cost Interplanetary Spacecraft with Autonomy Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, C.

    2015-10-01

    Blue Sun Enterprises, Inc. is creating a common deep space bus capable of a wide variety of Mars, asteroid, and comet science missions, observational missions in and near GEO, and interplanetary delivery missions. The spacecraft are modular and highly autonomous, featuring a common core and optional expansion for variable-sized science or commercial payloads. Initial spacecraft designs are targeted for Mars atmospheric science, a Phobos sample return mission, geosynchronous reconnaissance, and en-masse delivery of payloads using packetized propulsion modules. By combining design, build, and operations processes for these missions, the cost and effort for creating the bus is shared across a variety of initial missions, reducing overall costs. A CLIpSAT can be delivered to different orbits and still be able to reach interplanetary targets like Mars due to up to 14.5 km/sec of delta-V provided by its high-ISP Xenon ion thruster(s). A 6U version of the spacecraft form fits PPOD-standard deployment systems, with up to 9 km/s of delta-V. A larger 12-U (with the addition of an expansion module) enables higher overall delta-V, and has the ability to jettison the expansion module and return to the Earth-Moon system from Mars orbit with the main spacecraft. CLIpSAT utilizes radiation-hardened electronics and RF equipment, 140+ We of power at earth (60 We at Mars), a compact navigation camera that doubles as a science imager, and communications of 2000 bps from Mars to the DSN via X-band. This bus could form the cornerstone of a large number asteroid survey projects, comet intercept missions, and planetary observation missions. The TugBot architecture uses groups of CLIpSATs attached to payloads lacking innate high-delta-V propulsion. The TugBots use coordinated trajectory following by each individual spacecraft to move the payload to the desired orbit - for example, a defense asset might be moved from GEO to lunar transfer orbit in order to protect and hide it, then returned

  8. Composite scintillator screen

    DOEpatents

    Zeman, Herbert D.

    1994-01-01

    A scintillator screen for an X-ray system includes a substrate of low-Z material and bodies of a high-Z material embedded within the substrate. By preselecting the size of the bodies embedded within the substrate, the spacial separation of the bodies and the thickness of the screen, the sensitivity of the screen to X-rays within a predetermined energy range can be predicted.

  9. Three dimensional aspects of interplanetary shock waves. [and the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siscoe, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Most of the interplanetary shock waves observed with 1 AU of the sun originate from some short lived solar event, such as a solar flare, and then propagate out as a more-or-less spherical shock wave until they leave the solar system. Beyond 1 AU another class of interplanetary shock wave becomes common--the corotating shock pair formed by the interaction of long lived solar wind streams. The three dimensional geometry of these two classes of interplanetary shocks is discussed. Also discussed are how these geometries can be statistically studied with an out-of-the-ecliptic mission. Diagrams of shock wave propagation are shown. Also given are numerical examples of shock wave propagation.

  10. Transmission electron microscopy of the 'LOW-CA' hydrated interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomeoka, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle indicates that it consists largely of a poorly crystalline phyllosilicate containing Fe, Mg and Al with an interlayer spacing of 10 to 12 A and so is distinct from the major phyllosilicate in CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites. The silicate is probably an Fe- and Mg-rich smectite or mica. Submicron, spherical to euhedral pyrrhotite and pentlandite are prominent. Unusual, low-Ni pentlandite is also common and typically occurs as rectangular platelets. Unlike many chondritic interplanetary dust particles, olivine is rare and pyroxene was not observed. Other less abundant phases are magnetite, chromite, and an unidentified phase containing Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Mn. This particle differs from a hydrated micrometeorite described previously by Brownlee (1978), indicating there are mineralogically different subsets of hydrated interplanetary dust particles. Despite gross similarities in mineralogy between the particle and the carbonaceous chondrites, they show appreciable differences in detail.

  11. Low-energy particles in interplanetary magnetic field near the sectorial boundary on September 26, 1977

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeldovich, M. A.; Kuzhevskii, B. M.

    Prognoz-6 data are used to examine effects of the sign reversal in the interplanetary magnetic field of September 26, 1977 on the 70-keV to 40 MeV proton fluxes, and the 10-30 keV and 40-500 keV electron fluxes. The sectorial boundary of interplanetary magnetic field traversed the earth at 2300 UT, and in that period the interplanetary space was filled with the solar cosmic ray particles generated in the flare of September 24, 1977, whose intensity decreased in time. Results indicate that the event of September 26, 1977 was the first observation where effects of the sectorial boundary were traced up to proton energies of 40-50 MeV.

  12. Solar cycle study of interplanetary Lyman-alpha variations - Pioneer Venus Orbiter sky background results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, J. M.; Stewart, A. I.; Thomas, G. E.; Graps, A.

    1987-01-01

    PVO observations of the interplanetary Ly-alpha (IPL) background, obtained over an entire solar cycle (SC) from 1979 to 1985, are compiled and analyzed statistically, along with data from other instruments and earlier solar cycles. The results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. Findings reported include SC variation of 1.8 for the longitudinally averaged IPL intensity (in agreement with the variation of the 27-d disk-averaged integrated solar Ly-alpha flux), yearly averaged ecliptic H-atom lifetime at 1 AU equal to 1.0 Ms at solar minimum and 1.5 Ms at solar maximum, interplanetary H density equal to 0.07 + or - 0.01/cu cm, and interplanetary H/He within the heliopause but far from the sun of 7 + or - 3.

  13. Interplanetary magnetic field control of the Mars bow shock - Evidence for Venuslike interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, T. L.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Lichtenegger, H.; Riedler, W.; Russell, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    The Mars bow shock location and shape have been determined by examining the Phobos spacecraft magnetometer data. Observations show that the position of the terminator bow shock varies with interplanetary magnetic field orientation in the same way as at Venus. The shock is farthest from Mars in the direction of the interplanetary electric field, consistent with the idea that mass loading plays an important role in the solar wind interaction with Mars. The shock cross section at the terminator plane is asymmetric and is controlled by the interplanetary magnetic field. The shock is farther from Mars during solar maximum. Thus the solar wind interaction with Mars appears to be Venuslike, with a magnetic moment too small to affect significantly the solar wind interaction.

  14. Transmission electron microscopy of the 'LOW-CA' hydrated interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomeoka, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    1984-08-01

    Transmission electron microscopy of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle indicates that it consists largely of a poorly crystalline phyllosilicate containing Fe, Mg and Al with an interlayer spacing of 10 to 12 A and so is distinct from the major phyllosilicate in CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites. The silicate is probably an Fe- and Mg-rich smectite or mica. Submicron, spherical to euhedral pyrrhotite and pentlandite are prominent. Unusual, low-Ni pentlandite is also common and typically occurs as rectangular platelets. Unlike many chondritic interplanetary dust particles, olivine is rare and pyroxene was not observed. Other less abundant phases are magnetite, chromite, and an unidentified phase containing Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Mn. This particle differs from a hydrated micrometeorite described previously by Brownlee (1978), indicating there are mineralogically different subsets of hydrated interplanetary dust particles. Despite gross similarities in mineralogy between the particle and the carbonaceous chondrites, they show appreciable differences in detail.

  15. Energetic electron response to interplanetary shocks at geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Zong, Q.-G.

    2015-06-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks have great impacts on Earth's magnetosphere, especially in causing global dynamic changes of energetic particles. In order to study the response of energetic electrons (50keV-1.5MeV) at geosynchronous orbit to IP shocks, we have systematically analyzed 215 IP shock events based on ACE, GOES, and LANL observations during 1998-2007. Our study shows that after the shock arrival low-energy electron fluxes increase at geosynchronous orbit. However, in higher energy channels fluxes show smaller increases and eventually become unchanged or even decrease. The oscillations of electron fluxes following the shock arrival have also been studied in this paper. Statistical analysis revealed a frequency preference for 2.2 mHz and 3.3 mHz oscillations of energetic electron fluxes. The amplitude of these oscillations is larger under southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) than under northward IMF. Furthermore, oscillations from high-energy and low-energy electron fluxes show different phase characteristics and power distributions. The phase angles of the oscillations are the same in the dawn, dusk, and noon sectors for low-energy channels (50-500keV), while they have a π/2 difference between two adjacent local time sectors for high-energy channels (0.5-1.5MeV). The wave power distribution of electron fluxes shows different dawn-dusk asymmetries for low-energy channels and high-energy channels. The results presented in this paper provide an energetic particle point of view of the magnetospheric response to the interplanetary shock impact.

  16. Radio Emmision during the interaction of two Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, Alejandro; Niembro, Tatiana; González, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    We show that some sporadic radio emission observed by the WIND/WAVES experiment in the decametric/kilometric bands are due to the interaction of two interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections. We have performed hydrodynamic simulations of the evolution of two consecutive Coronal Mass ejections in the interplanetary medium. With these simulations it is possible to follow the density evolution of the merged structure, and therefore, compute the frequency limits of the possible plasma emission. We study four well documented ICME interaction events, and found radio emission at the time and frequencies predicted by the simulations. This emission may help to anticipate the complexity of the merged region before it reaches one AU.

  17. Magnetic field directional discontinuities. I - Minimum variance errors. [of interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Behannon, K. W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with a statistical analysis of the errors associated with a minimum variance analysis of directional discontinuities by use of an idealized model of these discontinuities and various simulations, and also by an examination of actual Mariner 10 interplanetary magnetic field data. An empirical expression is derived for the magnitude of the error in an estimated discontinuity normal component, relative to the total field across the directional discontinuity. The analysis was performed primarily to aid in differentiating between interplanetary tangential and rotational discontinuities observed by Mariner 10.

  18. The solar wind angular momentum and energy carried by the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, P.; de La Torre, A.

    1995-03-01

    Solutions already found by one of the authors with a two-region model of the solar coronal expansion are used to analyze the transport of angular momentum and energy by the interplanetary magnetic field. In agreement with observations, it is predicted that the interplanetary magnetic field plays an insignificant role for the flux of energy, but carries a large amount of angular momentum. The appropriate description might be related to the replacement of classical transport coefficients by a collisionless heat flux equation in the outer region of the model. The Sun's loss of angular momentum may affect the strength of the solar rotation in the long term.

  19. New scintillator and waveshifter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, H.; Baumbaugh, B.; Gerig, A.; Marchant, J.; Reynolds, K.; Ruchti, R.; Warchol, J; Wayne, M. Hurlbut, C. Kauffman, J. Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-11-01

    Experimental applications requiring fast timing and/or high efficiency position and energy measurements typically use scintillation materials. Scintillators utilized for triggering, tracking, and calorimetry in colliding beam detectors are vulnerable to the high radiation fields associated with such experiments. We have begun an investigation of several fluorescent dyes which might lead to fast, efficient, and radiation resistant scintillators. Preliminary results of spectral analysis and efficiency are presented. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Mass ejections from the sun and their interplanetary counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenn, R.

    1995-06-01

    Since the first observations of solar mass ejection events in the early seventies from OSO 7 and Skylab a few thousand of these remarkable dynamic incidents have been observed by now, covering about two full solar activity cycles. The mass ejecta include mainly hot coronal plasma, plus cold prominence material in variable amounts. The ejecta are often recognised in the form of interplanetary plasma clouds detected in the distant solar wind by appropriately located spacecraft. Clouds which have been energetic enough to drive large scale interplanetary shock waves can be identified most readily, but clouds without associated shocks do also occur. The plasma clouds are characterized by a variety of signatures indicating that they actually originate from injections of different material into the ambient solar wind. Usually only a few of the signatures are found simultaneously. Apparently the bidirectional streaming of halo electrons is a most reliable criterion, indicating a magnetic bottle or plasmoid topology of the clouds. The discussion of the most recent discoveries in this context will show that quite a few crucial problems still remain to be addressed by the upcoming SOHO mission.

  1. Imaging interplanetary CMEs at radio frequency from solar polar orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ji; Sun, Weiying; Zheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Hao; Yan, Jingye; Wang, Chi; Wang, Chuanbing; Wang, Shui

    2011-09-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) represent a great concentration of mass and energy input into the lower corona. They have come to be recognized as the major driver of physical conditions change in the Sun-Earth system. Consequently, observations of CMEs are important for understanding and ultimately predicting space weather conditions. This paper discusses a proposed mission, the Solar Polar Orbit Radio Telescope (SPORT) mission, which will observe the propagation of interplanetary CMEs to distances of near 0.35 AU from the Sun. The orbit of SPORT is an elliptical solar polar orbit. The inclination angle between the orbit and ecliptic plane should be about 90°. The main payload on board SPORT will be an imaging radiometer working at the meter wavelength band (radio telescope), which can follow the propagation of interplanetary CMEs. The images that are obtained by the radio telescope embody the brightness temperature of the objectives. Due to the very large size required for the antenna aperture of the radio telescope, we adopt interferometric imaging technology to reduce it. Interferometric imaging technology is based on indirect spatial frequency domain measurements plus Fourier transformation. The SPORT spacecraft will also be equipped with a set of optical and in situ measurement instruments such as a EUV solar telescope, a solar wind ion instrument, an energetic particle detector, a magnetometer, a wave detector and a solar radio burst spectrometer.

  2. Counterstreaming electrons in small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, H. Q.; Zhao, G. Q.; Wang, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes (SIMFRs) are commonly observed by spacecraft at 1 AU, and their origin still remains disputed. We investigated the counterstreaming suprathermal electron (CSE) signatures of 106 SIMFRs measured by Wind during 1995-2005. We found that 79 (75%) of the 106 flux ropes contain CSEs, and the percentages of counterstreaming vary from 8% to 98%, with a mean value of 51%. CSEs are often observed in magnetic clouds (MCs), and this indicates these MCs are still attached to the Sun at both ends. CSEs are also related to heliospheric current sheets (HCSs) and the Earth's bow shock. We divided the SIMFRs into two categories: The first category is far from HCSs, and the second category is in the vicinity of HCSs. The first category has 57 SIMFRs, and only 7 of 57 ropes have no CSEs. This ratio is similar to that of MCs. The second category has 49 SIMFRs; however, 20 of the 49 events have no CSEs. This ratio is larger than that of MCs. These two categories have different origins. One category originates from the solar corona, and most ropes are still connected to the Sun at both ends. The other category is formed near HCSs in the interplanetary space.

  3. Mass ejections from the sun and their interplanetary counterparts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenn, R.

    1995-01-01

    Since the first observations of solar mass ejection events in the early seventies from OSO 7 and Skylab a few thousand of these remarkable dynamic incidents have been observed by now, covering about two full solar activity cycles. The mass ejecta include mainly hot coronal plasma, plus cold prominence material in variable amounts. The ejecta are often recognised in the form of interplanetary plasma clouds detected in the distant solar wind by appropriately located spacecraft. Clouds which have been energetic enough to drive large scale interplanetary shock waves can be identified most readily, but clouds without associated shocks do also occur. The plasma clouds are characterized by a variety of signatures indicating that they actually originate from injections of different material into the ambient solar wind. Usually only a few of the signatures are found simultaneously. Apparently the bidirectional streaming of halo electrons is a most reliable criterion, indicating a magnetic bottle or plasmoid topology of the clouds. The discussion of the most recent discoveries in this context will show that quite a few crucial problems still remain to be addressed by the upcoming SOHO mission.

  4. Statistical analysis of scintillation data

    SciTech Connect

    Chua, S.; Noonan, J.P.; Basu, S.

    1981-09-01

    The Nakagami-m distribution has traditionally been used successfully to model the probability characteristics of ionospheric scintillations at UHF. This report investigates the distribution properties of scintillation data in the L-band range. Specifically, the appropriateness of the Nakagami-m and lognormal distributions is tested. Briefly the results confirm that the Nakagami-m is appropriate for UHF but not for L-band scintillations. The lognormal provides a better fit to the distribution of L-band scintillations and is an adequate model allowing for an error of + or - 0.1 or smaller in predicted probability with a sample size of 256.

  5. N-(2-Ethylhexyl)carbazole: A New Fluorophore Highly Suitable as a Monomolecular Liquid Scintillator.

    PubMed

    Montbarbon, Eva; Sguerra, Fabien; Bertrand, Guillaume H V; Magnier, Élodie; Coulon, Romain; Pansu, Robert B; Hamel, Matthieu

    2016-08-16

    The synthesis, photophysical properties, and applications in scintillation counting of N-(2-ethylhexyl)carbazole (EHCz) are reported. This molecule displays all of the required characteristics for an efficient liquid scintillator (emission wavelength, scintillation yield), and can be used without any extra fluorophores. Thus, its scintillation properties are discussed, as well as its fast neutron/gamma discrimination. For the latter application, the material is compared with the traditional liquid scintillator BC-501 A, and other liquid fluorescent molecules classically used as scintillation solvents, such as xylene, pseudocumene (PC), linear alkylbenzenes (LAB), diisopropylnaphthalene (DIN), 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MeNapht), and 4-isopropylbiphenyl (iPrBiph). For the first time, an excimeric form of a molecule has been advantageously used in scintillation counting. A moderate discrimination between fast neutrons and gamma rays was observed in bulk EHCz, with an apparent neutron/gamma discrimination potential half of that of BC-501 A. PMID:27406840

  6. Influence of interplanetary solar wind sector polarity on the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Libo; Zhao, Biqiang; Wan, Weixing

    2012-08-01

    Knowledge of solar sector polarity effects on the ionosphere may provide some clues in understanding of the ionospheric day-to-day variability and "hysteresis" effect on foF2. Ionospheric response to changes in solar sector polarity has not been fully documented previously, partly due to the limitation of observations. In this study, a solar-terrestrial connection ranging from solar sector boundary (SB) crossings, geomagnetic disturbances and ionospheric perturbations has been demonstrated. The increases in interplanetary solar wind speed within three days are seen after SB crossings, while the decreases in solar wind dynamic pressure and magnetic field intensity immediately after SB crossings are confirmed by the superposed epoch analysis results. Furthermore, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz component turns from northward to southward in March equinox and June solstice as the Earth passes from a solar sector of outward to inward directed magnetic fields, whereas the reverse situation occurs for the transition from toward to away sectors. The IMF Bz component for the same solar sector polarity has opposite signs between March equinox and September equinox, and also between June solstice and December solstice. In order to know how the ionosphere reacts to the interplanetary solar wind variations linkage of SB crossings, the F2 region critical frequency (foF2) covering about four solar cycles and total electron content (TEC) during 1998-2011 are utilized to extract the related information, revealing that they are not modified significantly and vary within the range of ±15% on average. The responses of the ionospheric TEC to SB crossings exhibit complex temporal and spatial variations and have strong dependencies on season, latitude, and solar cycle. This effect is more appreciable in equinoctial months than in solstitial months, which is mainly caused by larger southwardBzcomponents in equinox. In September equinox, latitudinal profile of relative

  7. On the backscatter of solar He II, 304 A radiation from interplanetary He/+/.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paresce, F.; Bowyer, S.

    1973-01-01

    Backscatter of solar He II, 304 A radiation by interplanetary positive helium ions is shown to be insufficient to account for recent observations of this airglow radiation in the night sky at rocket altitudes. In fact, for most viewing directions, the expected intensities probably fall well below the sensitivity threshold of existing extreme ultraviolet instrumentation.

  8. Role of solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field during two-step Forbush decreases caused by Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar, Ankush; Vichare, Geeta; Arunbabu, K. P.; Raghav, Anil

    2016-07-01

    The relationship of Forbush decreases (FDs) observed in Moscow neutron monitor with the interplanetary magnetic field (B) and solar wind speed (Vsw) is investigated in detail for the FDs associated with Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) during 2001-2004. The classical two-step FD events are selected, and characteristics of the first step (mainly associated with shock), as well as of complete decrease (main phase) and recovery phase, are studied here. It is observed that the onset of FD occurs generally after zero to a few hours of shock arrival, indicating in the post-shock region that mainly sheath and ICME act as important drivers of FD. A good correlation is observed between the amplitude of B and associated FD magnitude observed in the neutron count rate of the main phase. The duration of the main phase observed in the neutron count rate also shows good correlation with B. This might indicate that stronger interplanetary disturbances have a large dimension of magnetic field structure which causes longer fall time of FD main phase when they transit across the Earth. It is observed that Vsw and neutron count rate time profiles show considerable similarity with each other during complete FD, especially during the recovery phase of FD. Linear relationship is observed between time duration/e-folding time of FD recovery phase and Vsw. These observations indicate that the FDs are influenced by the inhibited diffusion of cosmic rays due to the enhanced convection associated with the interplanetary disturbances. We infer that the inhibited cross-field diffusion of the cosmic rays due to enhanced B is mainly responsible for the main phase of FD whereas the expansion of ICME contributes in the early recovery phase and the gradual variation of Vsw beyond ICME boundaries contributes to the long duration of FD recovery through reduced convection-diffusion.

  9. Low/Mid-latitude Ionospheric irregularities and scintillation climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Amr; Groves, K. M.; Mahrous, Ayman; Hussein, Fayrouz

    Ionospheric scintillation occur when radio signals propagate through an irregular ionosphere (e.g., plasma bubbles). Since plasma bubbles are regions of depleted ion and electron densities, a plasma bubble located on the satellite-to-ground signal path will cause radio signals to fluctuate in phase and amplitude. Ionospheric scintillation data were analyzed in the magnetic latitudinal field-of-view 29° N -13.4° N, observed by a stand-alone SCINDA (Scintillation Network Decision Aid) - GPS receiver at Helwan, Egypt (29.86° N, 31.32° E). A minimum 20° elevation cut off angle has been set in order to minimize the multipath effect. During the enhancing phase of the current solar cycle 24 (years 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013), the behaviour of the scintillation occurrence were characterized. The seasonal, annual and solar cycle variation of scintillation occurrence is investigated together with the Total Electron Content (TEC), to put in evidence the relation between the electron density gradients and the ionospheric irregularities causing scintillation. This study considers a first step to develop a scintillation climatology over Northern Africa.

  10. Software Risk Identification for Interplanetary Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, Robert J.; Papadopoulos, Periklis E.

    2005-01-01

    The need for a systematic and effective software risk identification methodology is critical for interplanetary probes that are using increasingly complex and critical software. Several probe failures are examined that suggest more attention and resources need to be dedicated to identifying software risks. The direct causes of these failures can often be traced to systemic problems in all phases of the software engineering process. These failures have lead to the development of a practical methodology to identify risks for interplanetary probes. The proposed methodology is based upon the tailoring of the Software Engineering Institute's (SEI) method of taxonomy-based risk identification. The use of this methodology will ensure a more consistent and complete identification of software risks in these probes.

  11. Do interplanetary Alfven waves cause auroral activity?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. Aaron; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    1990-01-01

    A recent theory holds that high-intensity, long-duration, continuous auroral activity (HILDCAA) is caused by interplanetary Alfven waves propagating outward from the sun. A survey of Alfvenic intervals in over a year of ISEE 3 data shows that while Alfvenic intervals often accompany HILDCAAs, the reverse is often not true. There are many Alfvenic intervals during which auroral activity (measured by high values of the AE index) is very low, as well as times of high auroral activity that are not highly Alfvenic. This analysis supports the common conclusion that large AE values are associated with a southward interplanetary field of sufficient strength and duration. This field configuration is independent of the presence of Alfven waves (whether solar generated or not) and is expected to occur at random intervals in the large-amplitude stochastic fluctuations in the solar wind.

  12. Earth orbital operations supporting manned interplanetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Brent; Buddington, Patricia A.; Whittaker, William L.

    The orbital operations required to accumulate, assemble, test, verify, maintain, and launch complex manned space systems on interplanetary missions from earth orbit are as vital as the flight hardware itself. Vast numbers of orbital crew are neither necessary nor desirable for accomplishing the required tasks. A suite of robotic techniques under human supervisory control, relying on sensors, software and manipulators either currently emergent or already applied in terrestrial settings, can make the job tractable. The mission vehicle becomes largely self-assembling, using its own rigid aerobrake as a work platform. The Space Station, having been used as a laboratory testbed and to house an assembly crew of four, is not dominated by the process. A feasible development schedule, if begun soon, could emplace orbital support technologies for exploration missions in time for a 2004 first interplanetary launch.

  13. Latitudinal dependence of solar proton flux derived from interplanetary Lyman alpha emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, H.; Fukunishi, H.; Watanabe, S.; Takahashi, Y.; Taguchi, M.; Bertaux, J.; Quemerais, E.; Lallement, R.

    2004-12-01

    There is a uniform flow of the interplanetary hydrogen in the solar system. The distribution of interplanetary neutral hydrogen is sensitive to solar wind proton flux, which has a latitudinal distribution, because interplanetary neutral hydrogen atoms are mainly ionized through a process of charge-exchange with solar wind protons (contributing to 80% of the total ionization rate). Rucinski et al. [1996] estimated the ionization rate of the interplanetary hydrogen in an average solar activity condition: 6.4±0.14 [10E-7/s] for charge exchange with protons. The most practical technique for determining the latitudinal dependence of the interplanetary hydrogen is observation of resonant backscatter of solar Lyman ƒ¿ emission at 121.6 nm. The interplanetary Lyman ƒ¿ emission has been measured by the ultraviolet imaging spectrometer (UVS) on board the Nozomi spacecraft crusing on its Mars transfer orbit with a periapsis of 1 AU and an apoapsis 1.5 AU from the Sun. The field-of-view of UVS is perpendicular to the spin axis of the spacecraft, which is controlled toward the Earth. The spatial resolution of UVS is 1.41 degrees in a plane perpendicular to the spin axis and 0.29 degrees in a plane including the spin axis. Spatial distributions are obtained from the full sky scanning of UVS with spin and orbital motions of the Nozomi spacecraft. One-year UVS data enable us to construct a full sky image of Lyman ƒ¿ emission. We present the results obtained from Nozomi/UVS data analysis for the period of 1999-2002. From a fitting of model calculations to the observed data, it is confirmed that a latitudinal anisotropy with the higher ionization region at the equator is reduced toward solar maximum. Finally, higher ionization region are found at the poles than at the equator near solar maximum. Basically, this change is produced by variations in the latitudinal dependence of persistent solar wind proton flux. However, proton flux from transient CMEs also affects the

  14. Navigation systems. [for interplanetary flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    The elements of the measurement and communications network comprising the global deep space navigation system (DSN) for NASA missions are described. Among the measurement systems discussed are: VLBI, two-way Doppler and range measurements, and optical measurements carried out on board the spacecraft. Processing of navigation measurement is carried out using two modules: an N-body numerical integration of the trajectory (and state transition partial derivatives) based on pre-guessed initial conditions; and partial derivatives of simulated observables corresponding to each actual observation. Calculations of velocity correction parameters is performed by precise modelling of all physical phenomena influencing the observational measurements, including: planetary motions; tracking station locations, gravity field structure, and transmission media effects. Some of the contributions to earth-relative orbit estimate errors for the Doppler/range system on board Voyager are discussed in detail. A line drawing of the DSN navigation system is provided.

  15. Storm Sudden Commencements Without Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Wooyeon; Lee, Jeongwoo; Yi, Yu; Ssessanga, Nicholas; Oh, Suyeon

    2015-09-01

    Storm sudden commencements (SSCs) occur due to a rapid compression of the Earth's magnetic field. This is generally believed to be caused by interplanetary (IP) shocks, but with exceptions. In this paper we explore possible causes of SSCs other than IP shocks through a statistical study of geomagnetic storms using SYM-H data provided by the World Data Center for Geomagnetism ? Kyoto and by applying a superposed epoch analysis to simultaneous solar wind parameters obtained with the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite. We select a total of 274 geomagnetic storms with minimum SYM-H of less than ?30nT during 1998-2008 and regard them as SSCs if SYM-H increases by more than 10 nT over 10 minutes. Under this criterion, we found 103 geomagnetic storms with both SSC and IP shocks and 28 storms with SSC not associated with IP shocks. Storms in the former group share the property that the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), proton density and proton velocity increase together with SYM-H, implying the action of IP shocks. During the storms in the latter group, only the proton density rises with SYM-H. We find that the density increase is associated with either high speed streams (HSSs) or interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), and suggest that HSSs and ICMEs may be alternative contributors to SSCs.

  16. Manned interplanetary missions: prospective medical problems.

    PubMed

    Grigoriev, A I; Svetaylo, E N; Egorov, A D

    1998-12-01

    The present review aimed to suggest approaches to prospective medical problems related to the health maintenance of space crews during future manned interplanetary, particularly Martian, missions up to 2-3 years with a possible stay on a planet with gravity different from that on Earth. The approaches are based on knowledge so far obtained from our analysis of the medical support of long-term orbital flights up to one year, as well as on the consideration of specific conditions of interplanetary missions. These specific conditions include not only long-term exposure to microgravity, but also a prolonged stay of unpredictable duration (2-3 years) on board a spacecraft or on a planet without direct contact with Earth, and living in a team with a risk of psychological incompatibility and the impossibility of an urgent return to Earth. These conditions necessitate a highly trained medical person in the crew, diagnostic tools and equipment, psychophysiological support, countermeasures, as well as the means for urgent, including surgical, treatment on board a spacecraft or on a planet. In this review, the discussion was focused on the following predictable medical problems during an interplanetary mission; 1) unfavorable effects of prolonged exposure to microgravity, 2) specific problems related to Martian missions, 3) medical monitoring, 4) countermeasures, 5) psychophysiological support and 6) the medical care system. PMID:11542693

  17. Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.; Anderson, Rodney L.; Born, George H.; Leonard, Jason M.; McGranaghan, Ryan M.; Fujimoto, Kohei

    2013-01-01

    A navigation technology known as LiAISON (Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation) has been known to produce very impressive navigation results for scenarios involving two or more cooperative satellites near the Moon, such that at least one satellite must be in an orbit significantly perturbed by the Earth, such as a lunar halo orbit. The two (or more) satellites track each other using satellite-to-satellite range and/or range-rate measurements. These relative measurements yield absolute orbit navigation when one of the satellites is in a lunar halo orbit, or the like. The geometry between a lunar halo orbiter and a GEO satellite continuously changes, which dramatically improves the information content of a satellite-to-satellite tracking signal. The geometrical variations include significant out-of-plane shifts, as well as inplane shifts. Further, the GEO satellite is almost continuously in view of a lunar halo orbiter. High-fidelity simulations demonstrate that LiAISON technology improves the navigation of GEO orbiters by an order of magnitude, relative to standard ground tracking. If a GEO satellite is navigated using LiAISON- only tracking measurements, its position is typically known to better than 10 meters. If LiAISON measurements are combined with simple radiometric ground observations, then the satellite s position is typically known to better than 3 meters, which is substantially better than the current state of GEO navigation. There are two features of LiAISON that are novel and advantageous compared with conventional satellite navigation. First, ordinary satellite-to-satellite tracking data only provides relative navigation of each satellite. The novelty is the placement of one navigation satellite in an orbit that is significantly perturbed by both the Earth and the Moon. A navigation satellite can track other satellites elsewhere in the Earth-Moon system and acquire knowledge about both satellites absolute positions and velocities

  18. Water and organics in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, John P.

    2015-08-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and larger micrometeorites (MMs) impinge on the upper atmosphere where they decelerate at ~90 km altitude and settle to the Earth’s surface. Comets and asteroids are the major sources and the flux, 30,000-40,000 tons/yr, is comparable to the mass of larger meteorites impacting the Earth’s surface. The sedimentary record suggests that the flux was much higher on the early Earth. The chondritic porous (CP) subset of IDPs together with their larger counterparts, ultracarbonaceous micrometeorites (UCMMs), appear to be unique among known meteoritic materials in that they are composed almost exclusively of anhydrous minerals, some of them contain >> 50% organic carbon by volume as well as the highest abundances of presolar silicate grains including GEMS. D/H and 15N abundances implicate the Oort Cloud or presolar molecular cloud as likely sources of the organic carbon. Prior to atmospheric entry, IDPs and MMs spend ~104-105 year lifetimes in solar orbit where their surfaces develop amorphous space weathered rims from exposure to the solar wind (SW). Similar rims are observed on lunar soil grains and on asteroid Itokawa regolith grains. Using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) we have detected radiolytic water in the rims on IDPs formed by the interaction of solar wind protons with oxygen in silicate minerals. Therefore, IDPs and MMs continuously deliver both water and organics to the earth and other terrestrial planets. The interaction of protons with oxygen-rich minerals to form water is a universal process.Affiliations:a University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, 1680 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA.b National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.c Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.d Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of California

  19. Whistler Waves Associated with Weak Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velez, J. C. Ramirez; Blanco-Cano, X.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Kajdic, P.; Jian,, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the properties of 98 weak interplanetary shocks measured by the dual STEREO spacecraft over approximately 3 years during the past solar minimum. We study the occurrence of whistler waves associated with these shocks, which on average are high beta shocks (0.2 < Beta < 10). We have compared the waves properties upstream and downstream of the shocks. In the upstream region the waves are mainly circularly polarized, and in most of the cases (approx. 75%) they propagate almost parallel to the ambient magnetic field (<30 deg.). In contrast, the propagation angle with respect to the shock normal varies in a broad range of values (20 deg. to 90 deg.), suggesting that they are not phase standing. We find that the whistler waves can extend up to 100,000 km in the upstream region but in most cases (88%) are contained in a distance within 30,000 km from the shock. This corresponds to a larger region with upstream whistlers associated with IP shocks than previously reported in the literature. The maximum amplitudes of the waves are observed next to the shock interface, and they decrease as the distance to the shock increases. In most cases the wave propagation direction becomes more aligned with the magnetic field as the distance to the shock increases. These two facts suggest that most of the waves in the upstream region are Landau damping as they move away from the shock. From the analysis we also conclude that it is likely that the generation mechanism of the upstream whistler waves is taking place at the shock interface. In the downstream region, the waves are irregularly polarized, and the fluctuations are very compressive; that is, the compressive component of the wave clearly dominates over the transverse one. The majority of waves in the downstream region (95%) propagate at oblique angles with respect to the ambient magnetic field (>60 deg.). The wave propagation with respect to the shock-normal direction has no preferred direction and varies similarly to

  20. First Taste of Hot Channel in Interplanetary Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H. Q.; Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, X.; Li, G.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-04-01

    A hot channel (HC) is a high temperature (˜10 MK) structure in the inner corona first revealed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Eruptions of HCs are often associated with flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results of previous studies have suggested that an HC is a good proxy for a magnetic flux rope (MFR) in the inner corona as well as another well known MFR candidate, the prominence-cavity structure, which has a normal coronal temperature (˜1-2 MK). In this paper, we report a high temperature structure (HTS, ˜1.5 MK) contained in an interplanetary CME induced by an HC eruption. According to the observations of bidirectional electrons, high temperature and density, strong magnetic field, and its association with the shock, sheath, and plasma pile-up region, we suggest that the HTS is the interplanetary counterpart of the HC. The scale of the measured HTS is around 14 R ⊙ , and it maintained a much higher temperature than the background solar wind even at 1 AU. It is significantly different from the typical magnetic clouds, which usually have a much lower temperature. Our study suggests that the existence of a corotating interaction region ahead of the HC formed a magnetic container to inhibit expansion of the HC and cool it down to a low temperature.

  1. Spectral analysis of magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations near interplanetary schocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinas, A. F.; Goldstein, M. L.; Acuna, M. H.

    1983-01-01

    Evidence for two types of relatively large amplitude MHD waves upstream and downstream of quasi-parallel forward and reverse interplanetary shocks is presented. The first mode is an Alfven wave with frequencies (in the spacecraft frame) in the range of 0.025 to 0.07 Hz. This is a left-hand polarized mode and propagates within a few degrees of the ambient magnetic field. The second is a fast MHD mode with frequencies in the range of 0.025 to 0.17 Hz, right-hand polarization and propagating along the magnetic field. These waves are detected principally in association with quasi-parallel shock. The Alfven waves are found to have plasma rest frame frequencies in the range of 1.1 to 6.3 mHz with wavelengths in the order of 4.8 x 10 to the 8th power to 2.7 x 10 to the 9th power cm. Similarly, the fast MHD modes have rest frame frequencies in the range 1.6 to 26 mHz with typical wavelengths about 2.19 x 10 to the 8th power cm. The magnetic field power spectrum in the vicinity of these interplanetary shocks is much steeper than f to the -s/3 at high frequencies. The observed spectra have a high frequency dependence of f to the -2/5 to f to the -4.

  2. Solar cycle variations in the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    ISEE 3 interplanetary magnetic field measurements have been used to extend the NSSDC hourly averaged IMF composite data set through mid-1982. Most of sunspot cycle 20 (start:1964) and the first half of cycle 21 (start:1976) are now covered. The average magnitude of the field was relatively constant over cycle 20 with approx. 5-10% decreases in 1969 and 1971, when the Sun's polar regions changed polarity, and a 20% decrease in 1975-6 around solar minimum. Since the start of the new cycle, the total field strength has risen with the mean for the first third of 1982 being about 40% greater than the cycle 20 average. As during the previous cycle, an approx. 10% drop in IMF magnitude accompanied the 1980 reversal of the solar magnetic field. While the interplanetary magnetic field is clearly stronger during the present solar cycle, another 5-7 years of observations will be needed to determine if cycle 21 exhibits the same modest variations as the last cycle. Accordingly, it appears at this time that intercycle changes in IMF magnitude may be much larger than the intracycle variations.

  3. First Taste of Hot Channel in Interplanetary Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H. Q.; Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, X.; Li, G.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-04-01

    A hot channel (HC) is a high temperature (∼10 MK) structure in the inner corona first revealed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Eruptions of HCs are often associated with flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results of previous studies have suggested that an HC is a good proxy for a magnetic flux rope (MFR) in the inner corona as well as another well known MFR candidate, the prominence-cavity structure, which has a normal coronal temperature (∼1–2 MK). In this paper, we report a high temperature structure (HTS, ∼1.5 MK) contained in an interplanetary CME induced by an HC eruption. According to the observations of bidirectional electrons, high temperature and density, strong magnetic field, and its association with the shock, sheath, and plasma pile-up region, we suggest that the HTS is the interplanetary counterpart of the HC. The scale of the measured HTS is around 14 R ȯ , and it maintained a much higher temperature than the background solar wind even at 1 AU. It is significantly different from the typical magnetic clouds, which usually have a much lower temperature. Our study suggests that the existence of a corotating interaction region ahead of the HC formed a magnetic container to inhibit expansion of the HC and cool it down to a low temperature.

  4. Magnetic field line lengths inside interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiang; Qiu, Jiong; Krucker, Sam

    2015-07-01

    We report on the detailed and systematic study of field line twist and length distributions within magnetic flux ropes embedded in interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). The Grad-Shafranov reconstruction method is utilized together with a constant-twist nonlinear force-free (Gold-Hoyle) flux rope model to reveal the close relation between the field line twist and length in cylindrical flux ropes, based on in situ Wind spacecraft measurements. We show that the field line twist distributions within interplanetary flux ropes are inconsistent with the Lundquist model. In particular, we utilize the unique measurements of magnetic field line lengths within selected ICME events as provided by Kahler et al. () based on energetic electron burst observations at 1 AU and the associated type III radio emissions detected by the Wind spacecraft. These direct measurements are compared with our model calculations to help assess the flux rope interpretation of the embedded magnetic structures. By using the different flux rope models, we show that the in situ direct measurements of field line lengths are consistent with a flux rope structure with spiral field lines of constant and low twist, largely different from that of the Lundquist model, especially for relatively large-scale flux ropes.

  5. Interplanetary propagation of flare-associated energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma Sung, L. S.; Earl, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The basic propagation process of flare-associated energetic particles in interplanetary space is studied on the basis of a model which combines a Gaussian coronal injection profile and interplanetary particle densities found by a theory of focused diffusion. The model is used to describe 30 electron and proton events which originate from the western hemisphere of the sun. A comparison of calculated and observed density profiles shows that the scattering mean free path is 0.1-0.3 AU for 4-80 MeV protons. The value is two or three times smaller for 0.5-1.1 and 3-12 MeV electrons. Thus the scattering mean free path is only slightly rigidity-dependent, contrary to that predicted by the quasi-linear theory of pitch-angle scattering. The rms width is found to be less than an hour for most proton and electron events. This width, which decreases with velocity, is not rigidity-dependent.

  6. Dust in Interplanetary Space and in the Local Galactic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grün, E.; Dikarev, V.; Frisch, P. C.; Graps, A.; Kempf, S.; Krüger, H.; Landgraf, M.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Srama, R.

    2004-05-01

    The solar system is a natural laboratory, accessible by a variety of methods, for studying the astrophysics of dust. Astronomical measurements mostly at visible and infrared wavelengths, yield the large-scale distribution of dust and its average composition. Examining natural surfaces deployed to the space environment, and assessing those surfaces' micro-crater distributions, reveals the size distribution of dust. Meteor observations and their corresponding measurements provide orbital information of dust grains and their genetic interrelation to the larger bodies in our solar system: comets and asteroids. From analyses of meteorites and interplanetary dust particles collected in the stratosphere, we have a comprehensive understanding of the isotopic, elemental, and mineralogical composition of this primordial material. Finally, in situ dust analysis via dust detectors located in interplanetary space, the most versatile method, have been providing data to determine the dust particles' mass, speed, trajectory, and chemical composition. An assortment of dust exhibiting a variety of dynamical processes has been identified in interplanetary space. In Jupiter's proximity, intense streams have been observed of nanometer-sized ash particles, which are emitted from the volcanoes of Jupiter's moon Io. These particles are accelerated by the powerful Jovian magnetic field to speeds of several 100 km/s, and are propelled further into interplanetary and interstellar space by the solar wind magnetic field. In interplanetary space, concentrations of collisional debris in the asteroid belt have been identified by infrared observations. The Poynting-Robertson effect drags these particles in towards the Earth and the Sun, where they sublimate. If the giant planets did not block their inward drift, a similar fate is expected for the dust assortment that is generated by collisions in the Kuiper belt. Another dust population is the mostly sub-micron-sized dust from comets, released

  7. Free liquid scintillation counting bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Packard Instrument Company announces the availability of its newly updated Bibliography of Packard Tri-Carb Liquid Scintillation Analyzers. This unique new booklet lists 628 references in which Packard Tri-Carb{reg_sign} liquid scintillation analyzers have been used in life science, environmental, nuclear power and archaeological measurements. All listings are cross-referenced by radionuclide, specific field of study and author.

  8. Lithium-loaded liquid scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Kesanli, Banu; Neal, John S.

    2012-05-15

    The invention is directed to a liquid scintillating composition containing (i) one or more non-polar organic solvents; (ii) (lithium-6)-containing nanoparticles having a size of up to 10 nm and surface-capped by hydrophobic molecules; and (iii) one or more fluorophores. The invention is also directed to a liquid scintillator containing the above composition.

  9. Development of radiation hard scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markley, F.; Davidson, M.; Keller, J.; Foster, G.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Harmon, J.; Biagtan, E.; Schueneman, G.; Senchishin, V.; Gustfason, H.

    1993-11-01

    The authors have demonstrated that the radiation stability of scintillators made from styrene polymer is very much improved by compounding with pentaphenyl trimethyl trisiloxane (DC 705 vacuum pump oil). The resulting scintillators are softer than desired, so they decided to make the scintillators directly from monomer where the base resin could be easily crosslinked to improve the mechanical properties. They can now demonstrate that scintillators made directly from the monomer, using both styrene and 4-methyl styrene, are also much more radiation resistant when modified with DC705 oil. In fact, they retain from 92% to 95% of their original light output after gamma irradiation to 10 Mrads in nitrogen with air annealing. When these scintillators made directly from monomer are compared with scintillators of the same composition made from polymer the latter have much higher light outputs. They commonly reach 83% while those made from monomer give only 50% to 60% relative to the reference, BC408. When oil modified scintillators using both p-terphenyl and tetra phenyl butadiene are compared with identical scintillators except that they use 3 hydroxy-flavone as the only luminophore the radiation stability is the same. However the 3HF system gives only 30% as much light as BC408 instead of 83% when both are measured with a green extended Phillips XP2081B phototube.

  10. Extruding plastic scintillator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Pla-Dalmau; Alan D. Bross; Victor V. Rykalin

    2003-10-31

    An understanding of the costs involved in the production of plastic scintillators and the development of a less expensive material have become necessary with the prospects of building very large plastic scintillation detectors. Several factors contribute to the high cost of plastic scintillating sheets, but the principal reason is the labor-intensive nature of the manufacturing process. In order to significantly lower the costs, the current casting procedures had to be abandoned. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. This concept was tested and high quality extruded plastic scintillator was produced. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. This paper will discuss the characteristics of extruded plastic scintillator and its raw materials, the different manufacturing techniques and the current R&D program at Fermilab.

  11. Development of radiation hard scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, F.; Davidson, M.; Keller, J.; Foster, G.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Harmon, J.; Biagtan, E.; Schueneman, G.; Senchishin, V.; Gustfason, H.; Rivard, M.

    1993-11-01

    The authors have demonstrated that the radiation stability of scintillators made from styrene polymer is very much improved by compounding with pentaphenyltrimethyltrisiloxane (DC 705 vacuum pump oil). The resulting scintillators are softer than desired, so they decided to make the scintillators directly from monomer where the base resin could be easily crosslinked to improve the mechanical properties. They can now demonstrate that scintillators made directly from the monomer, using both styrene and 4-methyl styrene, are also much more radiation resistant when modified with DC705 oil. In fact, they retain from 92% to 95% of their original light output after gamma irradiation to 10 Mrads in nitrogen with air annealing. When these scintillators made directly from monomer are compared with scintillators of the same composition made from polymer the latter have much higher light outputs. They commonly reach 83% while those made form monomer give only 50% to 60% relative to the reference, BC408. When oil modified scintillators using both p-terphenyl and tetraphenylbutadiene are compared with identical scintillators except that they use 3 hydroxy-flavone as the only luminophore the radiation stability is the same. However the 3HF system gives only 30% as much light as BC408 instead of 83% when both are measured with a green extended Phillips XP2081B phototube.

  12. Hybrid scintillators for neutron discrimination

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Patrick L; Cordaro, Joseph G; Anstey, Mitchell R; Morales, Alfredo M

    2015-05-12

    A composition capable of producing a unique scintillation response to neutrons and gamma rays, comprising (i) at least one surfactant; (ii) a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent; and (iii) at least one luminophore. A method including combining at least one surfactant, a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent and at least one luminophore in a scintillation cell under vacuum or an inert atmosphere.

  13. Development of intrinsic IPT scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.D.

    1989-07-31

    We report on the development of a new polystyrene based plastic scintillator. Optical absorption, fluorescence and light output measurements are presented. Preliminary results of radiation damage effects are also given and compared to the effects on a commercial plastic scintillator, NE 110. 6 refs., 12 figs.

  14. Characteristics of High-latitude and Equatorial Ionospheric Scintillation of GNSS Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.; Jiao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, several years of multi-constellation global navigation satellite scintillation data collected at Alaska, Peru, and Ascension Island are analyzed to characterize scintillation features observed at high latitude and equatorial locations during the current solar maximum. Recognizing that strong scintillation data are often lost due to the lack of robustness in conventional GPS receivers used for ionosphere scintillation monitoring (ISM), an autonomous event driven scintillation data collection system using software-defined raw RF sampling devices have been developed deployed at a number of strategically selected high latitude and equatorial locations since 2009. This unique scintillation data recording system is triggered by indicators computed from a continuously operating ISM receiver and the raw RF data is post processed using advanced receiver signal processing algorithms designed to minimize carrier phase cycle slips and loss of lock of signals during strong scintillations. Based on scintillation events extracted from the raw data, several statistical distributions are established to characterize the intensity, duration and occurrence frequency of scintillation. Results confirm that scintillation at low latitudes is generally more intense and longer lasting, while high-latitude scintillation is milder and usually dominated by phase fluctuations. Results also reveal the impacts of solar activity, geomagnetic activity and seasons on scintillation in different areas. Combining measurements from a co-located geo-magnetometer and corresponding global geomagnetic activities, qualitative and quantitative correlations between scintillation and both local and global geomagnetic activities have been obtained. Results show that in Alaska, the occurrence frequency and intensity of scintillation, especially phase fluctuations, have strong correlations with geomagnetic field intensity disturbances, while in equatorial stations, the correlation is not obvious.

  15. In situ wave phenomena in the upstream and downstream regions of interplanetary shocks: Implications for type 2 burst theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Vinas, A. F.

    1997-01-01

    The results are presented of in situ waves observed by the Ulyssess unified radio and plasma wave experiment (URAP) in the upstream and downstream regions of a large number of interplanetary shocks. The Langmuir waves which are the most essential ingredients for the type 2 radio emission are observed only in the upstream regions of a limited number of shocks. On the other hand, the ion-acoustic-like waves (0.5 to 5 kHz) are observed near most of the interplanetary shocks. Implications of observations made for the electron acceleration mechanisms at the collisionless shocks and for type 2 burst theories are presented.

  16. Aqueous alteration in five chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.

    1991-02-01

    Results are presented on AEM observations carried out on chondritic porous (CP) interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), which include data on alkali-rich layer silicates and new observations of nonstoichiometric plagioclase and alkali feldspars in individual CP IDPs. The compositional similarities found between the feldspar minerals and the layer silicates suggest that the latter have formed from these feldspars during low-temperature aqueous alterations at a stage of diagenesis in the CP IDP parent bodies. Small, but persistent, amounts of layer silicates, carbonates, and barite found in several nominally anhydrous CP IDPs support the suggestion of incipient aqueous alterations in their parent bodies, which may include short-period comet nuclei and outer-belt asteroids.

  17. Transport of solar electrons in the turbulent interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablaßmayer, J.; Tautz, R. C.; Dresing, N.

    2016-01-01

    The turbulent transport of solar energetic electrons in the interplanetary magnetic field is investigated by means of a test-particle Monte-Carlo simulation. The magnetic fields are modeled as a combination of the Parker field and a turbulent component. In combination with the direct calculation of diffusion coefficients via the mean-square displacements, this approach allows one to analyze the effect of the initial ballistic transport phase. In that sense, the model complements the main other approach in which a transport equation is solved. The major advancement is that, by recording the flux of particles arriving at virtual detectors, intensity and anisotropy-time profiles can be obtained. Observational indications for a longitudinal asymmetry can thus be explained by tracing the diffusive spread of the particle distribution. The approach may be of future help for the systematic interpretation of observations for instance by the solar terrestrial relations observatory (STEREO) and advanced composition explorer (ACE) spacecrafts.

  18. Aqueous alteration in five chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented on AEM observations carried out on chondritic porous (CP) interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), which include data on alkali-rich layer silicates and new observations of nonstoichiometric plagioclase and alkali feldspars in individual CP IDPs. The compositional similarities found between the feldspar minerals and the layer silicates suggest that the latter have formed from these feldspars during low-temperature aqueous alterations at a stage of diagenesis in the CP IDP parent bodies. Small, but persistent, amounts of layer silicates, carbonates, and barite found in several nominally anhydrous CP IDPs support the suggestion of incipient aqueous alterations in their parent bodies, which may include short-period comet nuclei and outer-belt asteroids.

  19. Interplanetary double-shock ensembles with anomalous electrical conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, M.

    1972-01-01

    Similarity theory is applied to the case of constant velocity, piston-driven, shock waves. This family of solutions, incorporating the interplanetary magnetic field for the case of infinite electric conductivity, represents one class of experimentally observed, flare-generated shock waves. This paper discusses the theoretical extension to flows with finite conductivity (presumably caused by unspecified modes of wave-particle interactions). Solutions, including reverse shocks, are found for a wide range of magnetic Reynolds numbers from one to infinity. Consideration of a zero and nonzero ambient flowing solar wind (together with removal of magnetic considerations) enables the recovery of earlier similarity solutions as well as numerical simulations. A limited comparison with observations suggests that flare energetics can be reasonably estimated once the shock velocity, ambient solar wind velocity and density, and ambient azimuthal Alfven Mach number are known.

  20. A DATABASE OF >20 keV ELECTRON GREEN'S FUNCTIONS OF INTERPLANETARY TRANSPORT AT 1 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Agueda, N.; Sanahuja, B.; Vainio, R.

    2012-10-15

    We use interplanetary transport simulations to compute a database of electron Green's functions, i.e., differential intensities resulting at the spacecraft position from an impulsive injection of energetic (>20 keV) electrons close to the Sun, for a large number of values of two standard interplanetary transport parameters: the scattering mean free path and the solar wind speed. The nominal energy channels of the ACE, STEREO, and Wind spacecraft have been used in the interplanetary transport simulations to conceive a unique tool for the study of near-relativistic electron events observed at 1 AU. In this paper, we quantify the characteristic times of the Green's functions (onset and peak time, rise and decay phase duration) as a function of the interplanetary transport conditions. We use the database to calculate the FWHM of the pitch-angle distributions at different times of the event and under different scattering conditions. This allows us to provide a first quantitative result that can be compared with observations, and to assess the validity of the frequently used term beam-like pitch-angle distribution.

  1. An improved model for interplanetary dust fluxes in the outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    We present an improved model for interplanetary dust grain fluxes in the outer Solar System constrained by in situ dust density observations. A dynamical dust grain tracing code is used to establish relative dust grain densities and three-dimensional velocity distributions in the outer Solar System for four main sources of dust grains: Jupiter-family comets, Halley-type comets, Oort-Cloud comets, and Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt objects. Model densities are constrained by in situ dust measurements by the New Horizons Student Dust Counter, the Pioneer 10 meteoroid detector, and the Galileo Dust Detection System (DDS). The model predicts that Jupiter-family comet grains dominate the interplanetary dust grain mass flux inside approximately 10 AU, Oort-Cloud cometary grains may dominate between 10 and 25 AU, and Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt grains are dominant outside 25 AU. The model also predicts that while the total interplanetary mass flux at Jupiter roughly matches that inferred by the analysis of the Galileo DDS measurements, mass fluxes to Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are at least one order-of-magnitude lower than that predicted by extrapolations of dust grain flux models from 1 AU. Finally, we compare the model predictions of interplanetary dust oxygen influx to the giant planet atmospheres with various observational and photochemical constraints and generally find good agreement, with the exception of Jupiter, which suggests the possibility of additional chemical pathways for exogenous oxygen in Jupiter's atmosphere.

  2. Research to Operations of Ionospheric Scintillation Detection and Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J.; Scro, K.; Payne, D.; Ruhge, R.; Erickson, B.; Andorka, S.; Ludwig, C.; Karmann, J.; Ebelhar, D.

    Ionospheric Scintillation refers to random fluctuations in phase and amplitude of electromagnetic waves caused by a rapidly varying refractive index due to turbulent features in the ionosphere. Scintillation of transionospheric UHF and L-Band radio frequency signals is particularly troublesome since this phenomenon can lead to degradation of signal strength and integrity that can negatively impact satellite communications and navigation, radar, or radio signals from other systems that traverse or interact with the ionosphere. Although ionospheric scintillation occurs in both the equatorial and polar regions of the Earth, the focus of this modeling effort is on equatorial scintillation. The ionospheric scintillation model is data-driven in a sense that scintillation observations are used to perform detection and characterization of scintillation structures. These structures are then propagated to future times using drift and decay models to represent the natural evolution of ionospheric scintillation. The impact on radio signals is also determined by the model and represented in graphical format to the user. A frequency scaling algorithm allows for impact analysis on frequencies other than the observation frequencies. The project began with lab-grade software and through a tailored Agile development process, deployed operational-grade code to a DoD operational center. The Agile development process promotes adaptive promote adaptive planning, evolutionary development, early delivery, continuous improvement, regular collaboration with the customer, and encourage rapid and flexible response to customer-driven changes. The Agile philosophy values individuals and interactions over processes and tools, working software over comprehensive documentation, customer collaboration over contract negotiation, and responding to change over following a rigid plan. The end result was an operational capability that met customer expectations. Details of the model and the process of

  3. Interplanetary stream magnetism - Kinematic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Barouch, E.

    1976-01-01

    The particle density and the magnetic-field intensity and direction are calculated for volume elements of the solar wind as a function of the initial magnetic-field direction and the initial speed gradient. It is assumed that the velocity is constant and radial. These assumptions are approximately valid between about 0.1 and 1.0 AU for many streams. Time profiles of the particle density, field intensity, and velocity are calculated for corotating streams, neglecting effects of pressure gradients. The compression and rarefaction of the magnetic field depend sensitively on the initial field direction. By averaging over a typical stream, it is found that the average radial field intensity is inversely proportional to the square of the heliocentric distance, whereas the average intensity in the direction of the planets' motion does not vary in a simple way, consistent with deep space observations. Changes of field direction may be very large, depending on the initial angle; but when the initial angle at 0.1 AU is such that the base of the field line corotates with the sun, the spiral angle is the preferred direction at 1 AU. The theory is also applicable to nonstationary flows.

  4. Scintillator phase of the SNO+ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozza, V.; SNO+ Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    The SNO+ experiment is the follow up of the SNO experiment, replacing the heavy water volume with about 780 tons of liquid scintillator (LAB) in order to shift the sensitive threshold to lower energy range. The 6000 m.w.e. natural rock shielding, and the use of ultra-clean materials makes the detector suitable for the detection of pep and CNO solar neutrinos, geo-neutrinos, reactor neutrinos and the possible observation of neutrinos from supernovae. Complementing this program, SNO+ will also search for 150Nd (5.6% abundance) neutrinoless double beta decay, loading the liquid scintillator with 0.1% of natural Neodymium. After a review of the general SNO+ setup, the physics of the solar neutrino phase will be presented.

  5. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Seagraves, David T.

    2003-01-01

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  6. Ionospheric scintillation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rino, C. L.; Freemouw, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The diffracted field of a monochromatic plane wave was characterized by two complex correlation functions. For a Gaussian complex field, these quantities suffice to completely define the statistics of the field. Thus, one can in principle calculate the statistics of any measurable quantity in terms of the model parameters. The best data fits were achieved for intensity statistics derived under the Gaussian statistics hypothesis. The signal structure that achieved the best fit was nearly invariant with scintillation level and irregularity source (ionosphere or solar wind). It was characterized by the fact that more than 80% of the scattered signal power is in phase quadrature with the undeviated or coherent signal component. Thus, the Gaussian-statistics hypothesis is both convenient and accurate for channel modeling work.

  7. Properties of scintillator solutes

    SciTech Connect

    Fluornoy, J.M.

    1998-06-01

    This special report summarizes measurements of the spectroscopic and other properties of the solutes that were used in the preparation of several new liquid scintillators developed at EG and G/Energy Measurements/Santa Barbara Operations (the precursor to Bechtel Nevada/Special Technologies Laboratory) on the radiation-to-light converter program. The data on the individual compounds are presented in a form similar to that used by Prof. Isadore Berlman in his classic handbook of fluorescence spectra. The temporal properties and relative efficiencies of the new scintillators are presented in Table 1, and the efficiencies as a function of wavelength are presented graphically in Figure 1. In addition, there is a descriptive glossary of the abbreviations used herein. Figure 2 illustrates the basic structures of some of the compounds and of the four solvents reported in this summary. The emission spectra generally exhibit more structure than the absorption spectra, with the result that the peak emission wavelength for a given compound may lie several nm away from the wavelength, {lambda}{sub avg}, at the geometric center of the emission spectrum. Therefore, the author has chosen to list absorption peaks, {lambda}{sub max}, and emission {lambda}{sub avg} values in Figures 3--30, as being most illustrative of the differences between the compounds. The compounds, BHTP, BTPB, ADBT, and DPTPB were all developed on this program. P-terphenyl, PBD, and TPB are commercially available blue emitters. C-480 and the other longer-wavelength emitters are laser dyes available commercially from Exciton Corporation. 1 ref., 30 figs.

  8. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF[sub 3] and CeF[sub 3] as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF[sub 3] and the remainder CeF[sub 3] have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography. 2 figures.

  9. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF.sub.3 and CeF.sub.3 as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF.sub.3 and the remainder CeF.sub.3 have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography.

  10. Discovery of nuclear tracks in interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J. P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Fraundorf, P.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear tracks have been identified in interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) collected from the stratosphere. The presence of tracks unambiguously confirms the extraterrestrial nature of IDP's, and the high track densities (10 to the 10th to 10 to the 11th per square centimeter) suggest an exposure age of approximately 10,000 years within the inner solar system. Tracks also provide an upper temperature limit for the heating of IDP's during atmospheric entry, thereby making it possible to distinguish between pristine and thermally modified micrometeorites.

  11. Interplanetary magnetic flux - Measurement and balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomas, D. J.; Gosling, J. T.; Phillips, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for determining the approximate amount of magnetic flux in various solar wind structures in the ecliptic (and solar rotation) plane is developed using single-spacecraft measurements in interplanetary space and making certain simplifying assumptions. The method removes the effect of solar wind velocity variations and can be applied to specific, limited-extent solar wind structures as well as to long-term variations. Over the 18-month interval studied, the ecliptic plane flux of coronal mass ejections was determined to be about 4 times greater than that of HFDs.

  12. Nonthermal Radiation Processes in Interplanetary Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chian, A. C. L.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. En la interacci6n de haces de electrones energeticos con plasmas interplanetarios, se excitan ondas intensas de Langmuir debido a inestabilidad del haz de plasma. Las ondas Langmuir a su vez interaccio nan con fluctuaciones de densidad de baja frecuencia para producir radiaciones. Si la longitud de las ondas de Langmujr exceden las condicio nes del umbral, se puede efectuar la conversi5n de modo no lineal a on- das electromagneticas a traves de inestabilidades parametricas. As se puede excitar en un plasma inestabilidades parametricas electromagneticas impulsadas por ondas intensas de Langmuir: (1) inestabilidades de decaimiento/fusi5n electromagnetica impulsadas por una bomba de Lang- muir que viaja; (2) inestabilidades dobles electromagneticas de decai- miento/fusi5n impulsadas por dos bombas de Langrnuir directamente opues- tas; y (3) inestabilidades de dos corrientes oscilatorias electromagne- ticas impulsadas por dos bombas de Langmuir de corrientes contrarias. Se concluye que las inestabilidades parametricas electromagneticas in- ducidas por las ondas de Langmuir son las fuentes posibles de radiacio- nes no termicas en plasmas interplanetarios. ABSTRACT: Nonthermal radio emissions near the local electron plasma frequency have been detected in various regions of interplanetary plasmas: solar wind, upstream of planetary bow shock, and heliopause. Energetic electron beams accelerated by solar flares, planetary bow shocks, and the terminal shock of heliosphere provide the energy source for these radio emissions. Thus, it is expected that similar nonthermal radiation processes may be responsible for the generation of these radio emissions. As energetic electron beams interact with interplanetary plasmas, intense Langmuir waves are excited due to a beam-plasma instability. The Langmuir waves then interact with low-frequency density fluctuations to produce radiations near the local electron plasma frequency. If Langmuir waves are of sufficiently large

  13. Interplanetary exploration-A challenge for photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, P. M.

    1985-01-01

    Future U.S. interplanetary missions will be less complex and costly than past missions such as Voyager and the soon to be launched, Galileo. This is required to achieve a balanced exploration program that can be sustained within the context of a limited budget. Radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) have served as the power source for missions beyond the orbit of Mars. It is indicated that the cost to the user of these power sources will significantly increase. Solar arrays can provide a low cost alternative for a number of missions. Potential missions are identified along with concerns for implementation, and some array configurations under present investigation are reviewed.

  14. DECLINE AND RECOVERY OF THE INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELD DURING THE PROTRACTED SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Charles W.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; DeForest, Craig E. E-mail: N.Schwadron@unh.edu

    2013-09-20

    The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is determined by the amount of solar magnetic flux that passes through the top of the solar corona into the heliosphere, and by the dynamical evolution of that flux. Recently, it has been argued that the total flux of the IMF evolves over the solar cycle due to a combination of flux that extends well outside of 1 AU and is associated with the solar wind, and additionally, transient flux associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In addition to the CME eruption rate, there are three fundamental processes involving conversion of magnetic flux (from transient to wind-associated), disconnection, and interchange reconnection that control the levels of each form of magnetic flux in the interplanetary medium. This is distinct from some earlier models in which the wind-associated component remains steady across the solar cycle. We apply the model of Schwadron et al. that quantifies the sources, interchange, and losses of magnetic flux to 50 yr of interplanetary data as represented by the Omni2 data set using the sunspot number as a proxy for the CME eruption rate. We do justify the use of that proxy substitution. We find very good agreement between the predicted and observed interplanetary magnetic flux. In the absence of sufficient CME eruptions, the IMF falls on the timescale of ∼6 yr. A key result is that rising toroidal flux resulting from CME eruption predates the increase in wind-associated IMF.

  15. A real-time solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field model for space radiation analysis and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, C. D.; Detman, T. R.; Dryer, M.; Smith, Z.; Sun, W.; Deehr, C. S.; Akasofu, S.-I.; Wu, C.-C.

    We describe an observation-driven model for assessing and predicting the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) environment. High energy particles generated during solar/interplanetary disturbances will pose a serious hazard to crew members traveling beyond low-Earth orbit. In order to provide warnings of dangerous radiation conditions, mission operators will need accurate forecasts of solar energetic particle (SEP) fluxes and fluences in interplanetary space. However, physics-based models for accelerating and propagating SEPs require specifications and predictions of the solar wind conditions and IMF configuration near the evolving interplanetary shock region, and along the IMF lines connecting the shock to the observation point. We are presently using the Hakamada-Akasofu-Fry kinematic solar wind model to predict, in real time, solar wind conditions in the heliosphere, including at the location of Mars, and beyond. This model is being extended via a hybrid approach to include a 3D MHD model, the Interplanetary Global Model, Vectorized (IGMV). We present our modeling results and conclude that uncertainties in determining, from real-time solar observations, the physical parameters used for model inputs are the biggest factors limiting the accuracy of solar wind models used for space radiation analysis and prediction.

  16. A statistical survey of 5-MeV proton events at transient interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenrode, May-Britt

    1996-11-01

    Between 1974 and 1985 the two Helios spacecraft observed 351 transient interplanetary shocks. For 5-MeV protons the particle events associated with these shocks can be divided into three groups: (1) events without intensity increase above quiet time or increased background (47%), (2) solar and interplanetary particle (SIP) events consisting of particles accelerated on or close to the Sun (solar or near-Sun component) as well as at the interplanetary shock (24%), and (3) pure interplanetary particle (PIP) events (29%) which consist of particles accelerated at the shock in interplanetary space but do not show evidence for significant or even excess particle acceleration on the Sun. This classification shows that (1) only about half of the shocks accelerate MeV protons in interplanetary space and (2) MeV protons accelerated on the Sun are neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for the acceleration of MeV protons in interplanetary space. Shock parameters such as speed or shock strength alone do not give an indication for the class of the associated particle event, because in the parameter range which covers most of the shocks, all three classes are distributed rather evenly. However, the shocks strongest in these parameters tend to accelerate particles. The intensity at the time of shock-passage, which can be used as a crude measure for the local acceleration efficiency, is correlated with the local shock speed and the magnetic compression. The correlation coefficients are small but statistically significant, indicating that (1) the correlations are real and (2) the intensity is influenced by additional parameters, which are not necessarily shock inherent. As an example I will show that the local acceleration at the shock decreases roughly symmetrically with increasing distance from the nose of the shock with a median e-folding angle of 10°. Occasionally, larger e-folding angles are observed close to the nose of the shock. The question of how the shock

  17. Solar and Interplanetary Data availability for space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothmer, Volker

    2012-07-01

    Multi-point space missions, such as STEREO, SDO, SOHO, ACE and Proba2, with dedicated instrumentations operating in the Sun-Earth system currently provide a huge amount of unprecedented solar and interplanetary observations. The data from these missions as well as unique other long-term datasets already established provide to date unique input resources for quantification of space weather processes and the development of reliable space weather models. In this presentation I will give an overview on the availability of these datasets to the scientific community, the tools required for access of these datasets, namely the VOs and website resources, and brief comments on their individual importance for the various fields of space weather research.

  18. Ion microprobe isotopic measurements of individual interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeegan, K. D.; Walker, R. M.; Zinner, E.

    1985-09-01

    The results of the first extended ion probe study of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are reported. The analytic procedures and the current limits on the precision and accurary of isotopic measurements of light elements are discussed in considerable detail. It is shown that isotopic measurements of several elements can be made on different individual fragments of a single IDP of 10-15 microns in size. The deuterium enrichments observed in several of the particles are shown to be intrinsic, providing independent proof that the particles are extraterrestrial. Carbon isotopic measurements on fragments of three IDPs give ratios similar to terrestrial values and show a largely uniform isotopic composition for a given particle. Small, but significant, differences in delta C-13 of about 40 percent between particles are seen.

  19. Origin of the hydrocarbon component of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wdowiak, Thomas J.; Lee, Wei

    1994-01-01

    Using experiments as a basis, we have developed a scenario for the origin of the hydrocarbon material of carbonaceous chondrites. This scenario can also serve as an explanation for the origin of the hydrocarbon component of interplanetary dust particles (IDP's). The formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules in the atmospheres of C stars undergoing a late stage of stellar evolution is indicated by the observed unidentified infrared (UIR) emission bands. Those molecules are then transported through interstellar space where they become enriched with D through ion molecule reactions when passing through cold, dark clouds. Many of those PAH molecules are subsequently hydrogenated and cracked in a H-dominated plasma such as would have occurred in the solar nebula. The resulting mixture of alkanes and residual D-rich PAH molecules was then incorporated into the mineral fraction of the parent bodies of carbonaceous chondrites and IDP's.

  20. The Interplanetary Meteoroid Environment for eXploration - (IMEX) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, Rachel H.; Sommer, Maximilian; Herzog, Julian; Srama, Ralf; Grün, Eberhard; Rodmann, Jens; Strub, Peter; Vaubaillon, Jérémie; Hornig, Andreas; Bausch, Lars

    2014-02-01

    The 'Interplanetary Meteoroid Environment for eXploration' (IMEX) project, funded by the European Space Agency (ESA), aims to characterize dust trails and streams produced by comets in the inner solar system. We are therefore developing a meteoroid stream model that consists of a large database of cometary streams from all known comets in the inner solar system. This model will be able to predict meteor showers from most known comets, that can be observed anywhere in the inner solar system, at any time 1980-2080. This is relevant for investigating meteor showers on the Earth, on other planets, or at spacecraft locations. Such assessment of the dust impact hazard to spacecraft is particularly important in the context of human exploration of the solar system.