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Sample records for interpositional gap arthroplasty

  1. Gap Arthroplasty versus Interpositional Arthroplasty for Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junli; Liang, Limin; Jiang, Hua; Gu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gap arthroplasty (GA) and interpositional arthroplasty (IA) are widely used for the treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA). However, controversy remains as to whether IA is superior to GA. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Web of science and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure were searched for literature regarding these procedures (published from 1946 to July 28, 2014). A study was included in this analysis if it was: (1) a randomized controlled trial or non-randomized observational cohort study; (2) comparing the clinical outcomes between GA and IA with respect to the maximal incisal opening (MIO) and reankylosis; (3) with a follow-up period of at least 12 months. The methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale Eight non-randomized observational cohort studies with 272 patients were included. All the statistical analyses were performed using the RevMan 5.3 and Stat 12. The pooled analysis showed no significant difference in the incidence of reankylosis between the IA group (13/120) and the GA group (29/163) (RR= 0.67, 95% CI=0.38 to 1.16; Z=1.43, p=0.15). The IA group showed a significantly larger MIO than the GA group (MD=1.96, 95% CI=0.21 to 3.72, Z=2.19, p=0.03, I2=0%). In conclusion, patients with TMJA could benefit more from IA than GA, with a larger MIO and a similar incidence of reankylosis. IA shows to be an adequate option in the treatment of TMJA based on the results of maximal incisal opening. PMID:26010224

  2. TMJ ANKYLOSIS: MANAGEMENT WITH RECONSTRUCTION AND INTERPOSITIONAL ARTHROPLASTY.

    PubMed

    Madhumati, Singh; Shruthi, R; Mitul, Sojitra; Karan, Abhishek; Aziz, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is a very desolating structural condition that involves fusion of the mandibular condyle to the base of the skull. It causes difficulty in mastication and breathing. Trauma and Infections are usually responsible. If trauma occurs in young age, it leads to disturbance in growth & facial asymmetry. Treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis usually requires adequate excision of the involved ankylotic block (arthroplasty) or interpositional arthroplasty using autogenous or alloplastic materials. Early mobilization, physiotherapy & strict follow up are essential to prevent postop adhesions. In our cases fascia lata was used as an interpositional grafting material. One case was treated by gap arthroplasty, second case by costochondral graft & third case was managed with titanium condylar prosthesis. PMID:27487617

  3. Modified T-Plate Interpositional Arthroplasty for Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: A New and Versatile Option

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Imran; Bariar, Lalit Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Background This study has been conducted with the aim of evaluating modified T-plate interpositional arthroplasty. Methods A prospective comparative study in patients admitted with temporomandibular joint ankylosis. Ankylotic temporomandibular joint arthroplasty included condylectomy gap arthroplasty in 7, temporalis muscle flap interpositional arthroplasty in 8, and modified T-plate interpositional arthroplasty in 13 cases. The patients were followed for three years. Collected data were tabulated and subjected to Fisher's exact test, chi-square test and probability estimation. Results A significant increase in interincisal distance of 32 mm was seen in 12 (92.31%) patients in the T-plate interposition group, in 2 (25%) cases of the temporalis muscle flap interposition group, and in 1 case (14.28%) of the condylectomy group at 12, 24, and 36 months. Re-ankylosis was observed in 1 case (9.69%) of the T-plate interposition group, while as it was observed in 4 (50%) cases in the temporalis muscle flap interposition group and 4 (57.14%) cases in the condylectomy group, and these differences were statistically significant. Conclusions Our clinical experience with the use of the T-plate over the past 5 years has been encouraging, and our physiotherapy technique is quite simple. Even illiterate parents can assess it easily. Hence, we recommend this easy technique that does not damage the temporalis muscle for the management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis. PMID:26618118

  4. Resection interposition arthroplasty for failed distal ulna resections.

    PubMed

    Papatheodorou, Loukia K; Rubright, James H; Kokkalis, Zinon T; Sotereanos, Dean G

    2013-02-01

    The major complications of distal ulna resection, the Darrach procedure, are radioulnar impingement and instability. High failure rates have been reported despite published modifications of the Darrach procedure. Several surgical techniques have been developed to treat this difficult problem and to mitigate the symptoms associated with painful convergence and impingement. No technique has demonstrated clinical superiority. Recently, implant arthroplasty of the distal ulna has been endorsed as an option for the management of the symptomatic patient with a failed distal ulna resection. However, there are concerns for implant longevity, especially in young, active adults. Resection interposition arthroplasty relies on interposition of an Achilles tendon allograft between the distal radius and the resected distal ulna. Although this technique does not restore normal mechanics of the distal radioulnar joint, it can prevent painful convergence of the radius on the ulna. Achilles allograft interposition arthroplasty is a safe and highly effective alternative for failed distal ulna resections, especially for young, active patients, in whom an implant or alternative procedure may not be appropriate. PMID:24436784

  5. Arthroscopic interposition arthroplasty of the first carpometacarpal joint.

    PubMed

    Adams, J E; Merten, S M; Steinmann, S P

    2007-06-01

    First carpometacarpal joint arthritis is a common condition encountered by hand surgeons. Traditionally, surgical approaches have included arthrodesis, trapeziectomy or reconstructive arthroplasty techniques. Previously, we described a technique for arthroscopic debridement and interposition arthroplasty of the first carpometacarpal joint. Patients with Eaton stages II and III symptomatic first carpometacarpal joint arthritis recalcitrant to >6 months of non-operative therapy underwent arthroscopic debridement of the first carpometacarpal joint with interposition of an acellular dermal matrix allograft (GRAFTJACKET). In this paper, we describe outcomes following this procedure. Postoperatively, all patients reported symptomatic relief and 94% stated that they were partially, or completely, satisfied. More than 70% of patients reported no to mild difficulty in performing activities of daily living (average grip strength = 18.5 kg, pinch strength = 3.9kg). Complications were minimal. Outcomes from this study compare favourably to those of other series, demonstrating that this technique is a viable option for treatment of Eaton stages II and III first carpometacarpal arthritis. PMID:17276564

  6. Arthroscopic technique of interposition arthroplasty of the glenohumeral joint.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Deepak N; van Rooyen, Karin S; du Toit, Donald F; de Beer, Joe F

    2006-05-01

    Arthroscopic glenohumeral interposition arthroplasty is performed with the patient placed in the lateral decubitus position. Standard posterior, anterior, and anterosuperior portals are created, a routine diagnostic arthroscopy is performed, and the joint is débrided with the use of an arthroscopic shaver. An arthroscopic burr is used to resect prominent osteophytes, to alter the version of the glenoid if necessary, and to create microfractures on the glenoid surface. Next, 3 absorbable sutures are passed percutaneously with a 30 degrees angled suture grasper from 3 different sites posteriorly through the posterior capsular-labral tissue and into the anterior portal cannula, where they are isolated by means of the suture saver kit. The prepared interposition membrane/tissue (GRAFTJACKET Regenerative Tissue Matrix, Wright Medical Technology, Inc., Arlington, TN) is tagged with the 3 sutures in the anterior cannula before it is introduced into the joint. Three additional sutures are attached to the membrane anteriorly at 1, 3, and 5 o'clock positions and are isolated with suture savers. The membrane is next introduced into the joint through the anterior cannula and is aligned with the glenoid rim. The anterior sutures are rerouted through the anterior capsular-labral tissue with a 70 degrees angled suture grasper, and they are retrieved through the anterior cannula. Intra-articular nonsliding knots are used anteriorly to anchor the interposition tissue to the anterior glenoid labrum and capsule. The posterior sutures are knotted intra-articularly, or they may be tied extra-articularly; the proximal and distal posterior sutures are retrieved subcutaneously out through the skin tract of the posterior portal and are knotted with the suture present in this portal, with the use of nonsliding knots. Stability of the interposition tissue is assessed by movement of the glenohumeral joint through its entire range of motion. The postoperative protocol consists of early

  7. A retrospective review of a series of interposition arthroplasties of the elbow

    PubMed Central

    Vochteloo, Anne JH; Smit, Adriaan A; Vrettos, Basil C; Roche, Stephen JL

    2014-01-01

    Background Interposition arthroplasty (IA) is mostly performed in younger patients where total joint replacement is contraindicated and an arthrodesis is unattractive. The outcome and complications of an IA were evaluated. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 18 consecutive cases of interposition arthroplasty (IA) (one case was excluded as a result of incomplete records). Pre- and postoperative pain and function were evaluated. Complications, re-operations and revisions were recorded. Results The mean age was 41 years (range 19 years to 59 years) at time of surgery. The primary diagnosis was post-traumatic osteoarthritis in 12 cases and inflammatory arthritis in five cases. The median follow-up was 54 months (range 8 months to 120 months). In 15 cases, at least one re-operation was performed. Seven cases were revised, with four of these to a total elbow replacement, an arthrodesis was performed in two cases and a re-do interposition was carried out in one case. The median interval from the interposition to revision was 23 months (range 8 months to 88 months). In 10 patients with the interposition currently in situ, mean visual analogue scale score for pain improved from 7.4 to 2.4 and mean Mayo Elbow Performance Score improved from 42 to 76 points. Conclusions IA offered an improvement in pain and function but at a high cost. It is associated with a high complication rate the need for revision surgery.

  8. Interpositional arthroplasty with Gore-Tex, Marlex or tendon for osteoarthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint. A retrospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Muermans, S; Coenen, L

    1998-02-01

    In this retrospective study of 26 patients with arthritis of the thumb carpometacarpal joint, we report the use of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) (Gore-Tex) and polypropylene (Marlex) as interpositional materials for resection arthroplasty of the trapeziometacarpal joint. We have compared the results with those of "conventional" tendon interposition and those in the literature. In three patients the use of ePTFE (Gore-Tex) was complicated by marked clinical synovitis, resembling findings in silicone synovitis. Therefore, the use of ePTFE has been discontinued. Polypropylene seems to be a valuable alternative to tendon interposition arthroplasty. PMID:9571484

  9. Gap Balanced Total Knee Arthroplasty

    MedlinePlus

    Gap Balanced Total Knee Arthroplasty – SIGMA® with AOX™ You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2010 OR-Live, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Kienbock’s Disease treated with Interposition Arthroplasty using Ipsilateral Palmaris Longus Tendon and Muscle Belly

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Anshuman; Sipani, Arun Kumar; Agarwala, Vikash; Srikanth, Mudiganty

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Kienbock’s disease is an osteonecrosis of lunate bone (lunatomalacia) seen more commonly in males in the second to fourth decade of life. The exact etiology is unknown and symptoms include wrist pain and stiffness of wrist. Advanced stages of disease may require lunate excision and filling of the void by various substitutes like silicone implants, tendon grafts etc. We report a case of Kienbock’s disease with lunate excision and filling of defect by coiled palmaris longus muscle and tendon unit. Case Report: An 18 year old male student presented with progressive wrist pain and difficulty in wrist movements. Investigations revealed a diagnosis of grade 4 Kienbock’s disease. Lunate excision by a palmar approach followed by interposition arthroplasty with ipsilateral coiled Palmaris longus muscle belly along with the tendon was done under regional anaesthesia. Nine months post-operatively patient is pain free and wrist movements are full and free. Conclusion: In advanced stages of Keinbock’s disease lunate excision surgery is recommended. Post excision void can be filled with coiled Palmaris longus tendon-muscle unit together to increase the volume of the graft. This achieves snug fit, avoids the need of internal fixation, and also prevent carpal collapse. Our case shows good clinical outcome in short term with no carpal collapse by use of this procedure.

  11. Elbow interposition arthroplasty in children and adolescents: long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Palazzi, Federico; Rodriguez, Janeth; Oliver, Guillermo

    2008-04-01

    degrees . Patients who were able to perform flexion of 120 degrees or more were considered to be excellent, those between 90 degrees and 119 degrees were graded good, from 60 degrees to 89 degrees fair and those 59 degrees or less poor. The ability to attain a hand to mouth position requires a mobility of 120 degrees . We obtained excellent results in two patients, good results in three, fair results in four and poor results in three. The fascia lata was used in 83% of cases, obtaining excellent to good results in five patients (41%). Elbow interposition arthroplasty has its indications in children and adolescents where arthrodesis or total joint replacement cannot be performed. PMID:17308908

  12. Elbow interposition arthroplasty in children and adolescents: long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Janeth; Oliver, Guillermo

    2007-01-01

    were considered to be excellent, those between 90° and 119° were graded good, from 60° to 89° fair and those 59° or less poor. The ability to attain a hand to mouth position requires a mobility of 120°. We obtained excellent results in two patients, good results in three, fair results in four and poor results in three. The fascia lata was used in 83% of cases, obtaining excellent to good results in five patients (41%). Elbow interposition arthroplasty has its indications in children and adolescents where arthrodesis or total joint replacement cannot be performed. PMID:17308908

  13. [Interposition arthroplasty for the treatment of primary osteoarthritis: comparison of results using the technique of Epping and Weilby].

    PubMed

    Angly, B; Steiger, R; Stober, R

    2006-04-01

    We compare clinically and radiologically two groups of total trapezectomy performed as treatment for the primary osteoarthritis of trapeziometacarpal joint combined in 83 cases (2000 to 2003) with tendon interposition arthroplasty type Weilby, in 51 cases (1987 to 1991) with Epping tendon interposition and ligament reconstruction arthroplasty in a retrospective study. In both groups we used a strip of the flexor carpi radialis tendon. The mean follow-up time in both groups is 33 months. Overall, both methods achieved similar results. The relief of pain and the patient satisfaction are better, stability and grip force are worse in the Weilby group. At least one year (12 to 57 months) after operation with the technique of Weilby, 88 % of the patients would prefer this method for the other side. It appears that there is no clinical and radiological benefit of ligament reconstruction. However, the two procedures studied yield equally good results in most cases, but we prefer the simple technique of Weilby and guess that the (missing) long-term results would be superior to the results after trapezectomy alone. Long-term results need to be evaluated. PMID:16680664

  14. Conservative gap arthroplasty in temporomandibular ankylosis not involving the sigmoid notch: a selected age group study.

    PubMed

    Temerek, Ahmed Talaat

    2016-06-01

    In this prospective, cohort, clinical follow-up study we aimed to investigate the role of conservative gap arthroplasty without interpositional material in managing ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Thirteen patients (15 joints) with ankylosis who fulfilled the other inclusion criteria were enrolled. The ankylotic mass was excised to create a gap of 7-9mm. No interpositional material was used. Ipsilateral or bilateral masseter reflection, pterygomasseteric sling, and temporalis tendon release plus coronoidectomy were considered if maximum mouth opening failed to reach 35mm. A physiotherapy protocol was started on the first day. Patients' ages ranged from 13-38 (mean (SD) 18 (7) years). Trauma was the main cause. Duration of ankylosis at presentation ranged from 1-17 years (mean (SD) 5 (4) years). Eleven patients had unilateral, and two bilateral, ankylosis that did not involve the sigmoid notch. The mean (SD) maximum incisal opening (mm) was 38 (4) two years' postoperatively. The facial nerve was affected temporarily in two patients. Mean (SD) duration of follow-up was 4 (2) years without recurrence. Within our selection criteria, conservative gap arthroplasty of 7-9mm without interpositional material and with vigorous postoperative physiotherapy has a role in treating ankylosis of the TMJ and preventing its recurrence for more than four years. PMID:26972420

  15. Restoring esophageal continuity following a failed colonic interposition for long-gap esophageal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Dionigi, Beatrice; Bairdain, Sigrid; Smithers, Charles Jason; Jennings, Russell W.; Hamilton, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    The Foker process is a method of esophageal lengthening through axial tension-induced growth, allowing for subsequent primary reconstruction of the esophagus in esophageal atresia (EA). In this unique case, the Foker process was used to grow the remaining esophageal segment long enough to attain esophageal continuity following failed colonic interpositions for long-gap esophageal atresia (LGEA). Initially developed for the treatment of LGEA in neonates, this case demonstrates that (i) an active esophageal lengthening response may still be present beyond the neonate time-period; and, (ii) the Foker process can be used to restore esophageal continuity following a failed colonic interposition if the lower esophageal segment is still present. PMID:25907539

  16. ARTHROPLASTY FOR TRAPEZIUM EXCISION AND TENDON INTERPOSITION IN RHIZARTHROSIS CASES: PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Junior, Walter Gomes Pinheiro; Chaim, Renan Moukbel; de Carvalho, Henrique Bella Freire; Albertoni, Walter Manna; Faloppa, Flávio; Santos, João Baptista Gomes dos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively evaluate the results from a series of patients who underwent surgical treatment for rhizarthrosis using the technique of trapezium resection associated with interposition of yarn from the long abductor tendon of the thumb. Methods: From May to August 2005, ten patients underwent surgical treatment for rhizarthrosis. Patients with primary osteoarthrosis of the trapezium-metacarpal joint, in stages II, III and IV of the Eaton classification, with persistent pain that was refractory to clinical treatment, were included. For the functional assessment, the visual analogue scale, DASH questionnaire and Buck-Gramcko score were used. For the overall assessment on the patients, strength measurements were made for palm grip, pulp to pulp pinch, lateral pinch, three-point pinch, opposition and radial and palmar abductions. The migration index for the first metacarpal was also determined on radiographs at rest and under stress. Results: The pain relief was considered to be good (p = 0.005), with functional improvements in modules 2 (p = 0.02) and 3 (p = 0.022) of DASH. The Buck-Gramcko score showed one excellent and three very good results. There was an improvement in almost all of the overall assessment and was only non-significant regarding lateral pinch and abduction. For all patients, there was migration of the first metacarpal. Conclusion: Trapeziectomy associated with interposition of yarn from the long abductor tendon of the thumb was shown to be a relatively simple and effective technique for pain relief and functional improvement. PMID:27026990

  17. Trapeziectomy With Ligament Reconstruction and Tendon Interposition Arthroplasty With the Entire Width of the Flexor Carpi Radialis Tendon.

    PubMed

    Marenghi, Letizia; Paterlini, Marco; Tocco, Silvio; Corradi, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    The original Burton-Pellegrini technique used to treat trapeziometacarpal joint osteoarthritis suggests the use of half of the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) width to reconstruct the ligament and perform the tendon interposition arthroplasty. In our study, unlike the original technique, we used the full thickness of the FCR and evaluated a sample of 100 thumbs (95 patients) preoperatively and postoperatively, with a mean follow-up of 36 months. According to the Eaton classification, 1 thumb was grade II, 81 were grade III, and 18 were grade IV. The mean patient age at the time of surgery was 62.4 years. The finger-tip pinch improved by 46.3%, the key pinch improved by 34.5%, the grip strength improved by 50.8%, and the Kapandji test improved by 7.4%. Pain measured with visual analog score improved by 78.8%. The self-administrated questionnaires DASH and PRWHE were completed postoperatively from 2006 to 2012, because the Italian version of PRWHE was not yet validated: the postoperative DASH and PRWHE were, respectively, 9.9 and 10.5. No complications such as metacarpal subluxation of the thumb, impingement, fracture of the first metacarpal base, or a decrease in the wrist function were found in our population after surgical treatment. Therefore, according to our series, this variation of the original Burton-Pellegini surgical technique provides pain relief, stability, and mobility of the thumb without any morbidity caused by the full harvest of the FCR tendon. PMID:27015407

  18. Silicone vs temporalis fascia interposition in TMJ ankylosis: A comparison

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sumit; Gupta, Hemant; Mohammad, Shadab; Mehra, Hemant; Natu, Subodh Shankar; Gupta, Niharika

    2016-01-01

    Objective Temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJa) is a distressing condition, but can be surgically managed by gap or interpositional arthroplasty, with an aim to restore joint function and prevent re-ankylosis. The aim of this paper is to compare two interposition materials used in management of TMJ ankylosis. Methods 15 patients with TMJa were randomly allocated to two groups: group A (n = 6), interposition material used was medical-grade silicon elastomer, and group B (n = 9) where the interposition material used was temporalis fascia. Patients were followed up at regular intervals of 1 and 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months and were assessed on following parameters: pain by VAS Scale, maximal mouth opening (MMO), implant rejection, and recurrence. Results The results showed a loss of 4.6% and 7.9% in maximal interincisal mouth opening at 3rd and 6th months in Group A while Group B had a mean loss of 9% and 10% at 3rd and 6th months respectively without any significant difference. None of our cases showed recurrence or implant rejection. Conclusion We conclude that silicone is comparable to temporalis fascia in terms of stability, surgical ease, and adaptability. It not only restores the function of mandible and ensures good maximum interincisal opening but also maintains the vertical ramal height. Also, it requires less operating time and is easy to handle but is not economical. It might be an effective way to restore function and prevent re-ankylosis. PMID:27195207

  19. Is referencing the posterior condyles sufficient to achieve a rectangular flexion gap in total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Schnurr, Christoph; Nessler, Jochen; König, Dietmar Pierre

    2009-12-01

    Femoral malrotation in total knee arthroplasty causes flexion gap instability. Conventional instruments mostly reference the posterior condylar angle (PCA). The aim of this study was to verify whether the computer-navigated flexion gap (GAP) method produces a rectangular flexion gap and if a balanced flexion gap could also be achieved by referencing the PCA. A total of 100 knee prostheses were analysed using the navigated GAP method, and flexion gap symmetry along with femoral rotation were recorded. The GAP technique resulted in a rectangular flexion gap with adequate femoral rotational alignment. If the PCA technique had been used, only 51% of the femoral components would have been implanted in correct femoral rotation; the remaining 49% would have implanted with flexion gap instability. The GAP technique produces a rectangular flexion gap. The referencing of the PCA was shown to be less reliable. Thus, modern knee prosthesis instrumentation should not base femoral rotation solely on the PCA. PMID:18956189

  20. Identifying the procedural gap and improved methods for maintaining accuracy during total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gross, Allan; Muir, Jeffrey M

    2016-09-01

    Osteoarthritis is a ubiquitous condition, affecting 26 million Americans each year, with up to 17% of adults over age 75 suffering from one variation of arthritis. The hip is one of the most commonly affected joints and while there are conservative options for treatment, as symptoms progress, many patients eventually turn to surgery to manage their pain and dysfunction. Early surgical options such as osteotomy or arthroscopy are reserved for younger, more active patients with less severe disease and symptoms. Total hip arthroplasty offers a viable solution for patients with severe degenerative changes; however, post-surgical discrepancies in leg length, offset and component malposition are common and cause significant complications. Such discrepancies are associated with consequences such as low back pain, neurological deficits, instability and overall patient dissatisfaction. Current methods for managing leg length and offset during hip arthroplasty are either inaccurate and susceptible to error or are cumbersome, expensive and lengthen surgical time. There is currently no viable option that provides accurate, real-time data to surgeons regarding leg length, offset and cup position in a cost-effective manner. As such, we hypothesize that a procedural gap exists in hip arthroplasty, a gap into which fall a large majority of arthroplasty patients who are at increased risk of complications following surgery. These complications and associated treatments place significant stress on the healthcare system. The costs associated with addressing leg length and offset discrepancies can be minor, requiring only heel lifts and short-term rehabilitation, but can also be substantial, with revision hip arthroplasty costs of up to $54,000 per procedure. The need for a cost-effective, simple to use and unobtrusive technology to address this procedural gap in hip arthroplasty and improve patient outcomes is of increasing importance. Given the aging of the population, the projected

  1. The use of navigation to obtain rectangular flexion and extension gaps during primary total knee arthroplasty and midterm clinical results.

    PubMed

    Seon, Jong-Keun; Song, Eun-Kyoo; Park, Sang-Jin; Lee, Dam-Seon

    2011-06-01

    The authors evaluated 112 knees treated by total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using a navigation-assisted modified gap balancing technique. Initial mediolateral gap differences in extension and in 90° of flexion were measured after proximal tibia bone cutting. Final flexion and extension gaps were measured by checking distances under equal tension before prosthesis insertion. Amount of femoral bone cutting and external rotations of femoral components were found to depend on initial gaps. Patients with a final rectangular gap had greater knee flexion angles preoperatively and at 1 year after TKA. However, no differences were observed between the clinical and radiologic outcomes of knees with rectangular and nonrectangular gaps at 1 or 4 years after TKA. The study shows that the navigation-assisted modified gap balancing technique provides an effective means of achieving rectangular flexion and extension gaps during TKA. PMID:20580194

  2. Arthroplasty of the elbow in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kimura, C; Vainio, K

    1976-05-21

    The study consists of 208 elbow arthroplasties performed on rheumatoid arthritic patients. A straight resection of the joint was used in 53 cases and a modified Hass arthroplasty with skin interposition in 155 cases. The average postoperative range of motion in these groups was 100 degrees and 96 degrees respectively. Postoperatively the joint was painless in 81 and 67% of the elbows respectively. The Hass arthroplasty gave a better stability and extension power. The most common complications were paresthesias in the region of the ulnar nerve and bone resorption in the region of the ulnar nerve and bone resorption in the region of the olecranon fossa. PMID:779734

  3. Ligament reconstruction with tendon interposition using an acellular dermal allograft for thumb carpometacarpal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Zanaros, George; Sotereanos, Dean G

    2009-03-01

    Ligament reconstruction tendon interposition arthroplasty is currently the preferred technique for carpometacarpal joint arthritis of the thumb by most surgeons. Despite its efficacy, morbidity has been associated with the harvest of the flexor carpi radialis tendon. Using an allograft as material for arthroplasty, donor site morbidity is avoided. In this report, we present our surgical technique to perform ligament reconstruction tendon interposition arthroplasty using an acellular dermal matrix allograft (GraftJacket) in patients with Eaton stages II, III, and IV symptomatic first carpometacarpal arthritis.One hundred thumbs with trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis underwent surgical treatment using GraftJacket allograft instead of the flexor carpi radialis tendon autograft. Each patient was followed for a minimum of 12 months. The surgical procedure included trapezial excision and identification of the flexor carpi radialis. The allograft was cut to create a 15-cm strip. The ligament reconstruction was performed by passing the strip around the flexor carpi radialis tendon and suturing it to the base of the thumb metacarpal base through an intramedullary drill hole. The remaining portion of the allograft was fashioned as an interposition mass (anchovy) and interposed between the scaphoid and the base of the first metacarpal.All but 1 patient experienced significant improvement in his or her pain scale rating and grip and pinch strengths. Outcomes from this study compare very favorably with those of other series. No patients experienced a foreign body reaction or infection in this series. We believe that the use of an acellular dermal allograft for both ligament reconstruction and tendon interposition provides a safe and an effective alternative technique for the treatment of advanced first carpometacarpal arthritis. PMID:19276927

  4. Glenohumeral kinematics after soft tissue interposition graft and glenoid reaming: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Garbis, Nickolas G; Weber, Alexander E; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Cole, Brian J; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-01-01

    Background: The management of young patients with glenohumeral arthritis is controversial. Resurfacing of the glenoid with biologic interposition and reaming of the glenoid have been suggested as potential treatment options. The goal of this study was to determine the change in glenohumeral contact pressures in interposition arthroplasty, as well as glenoid reaming in an arthritis model. We hypothesized that interposition with meniscal allograft will lead to the best normalization of contact pressure throughout the glenohumeral range of motion. Materials and Methods: Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were tested in static positions of humeral abduction with a compressive load. Glenohumeral contact area, contact pressure, and peak force were determined sequentially for (1) intact glenoid (2) glenoid with cartilage removed (arthritis model) (3) placement of lateral meniscus allograft (4) placement of Achilles allograft (5) arthritis model with reamed glenoid. Results: The arthritis model demonstrated statistically higher peak pressures than intact glenoid and glenoid with interpositional allograft. Meniscal and Achilles allograft lowered mean contact pressure and increased contact area to a level equal to or more favorable than the control state. In contrast, the reamed glenoid did not show any statistical difference from the arthritis model for any of the recorded measures. Conclusion: Glenohumeral contact pressure is significantly improved with interposition of allograft at time zero compared to an arthritic state. Our findings suggest that concentric reaming did not differ from the arthritic model when compared to normal. These findings favor the use of allograft for interposition as a potential treatment option in patients with glenoid wear. PMID:27293292

  5. Obliteration of Intercondylar Notch Mimicking Flexion-Extension Gap Imbalance in a Cruciate Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gungor, Harun Resit; Kiter, Esat; Akkaya, Semih; Ok, Nusret; Yorukoglu, Cagdas

    2015-01-01

    Following total knee arthroplasty (TKA), the most frequent cause of extension deficit and limitation of range of motion in early postoperative period is related to improper tensioning of soft tissues and failure to balance extension and flexion gaps. If a cruciate retaining (CR) prosthesis is the planned implant, then attention should be given to balancing the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and any factor that alters this balance may also cause deterioration of knee balance in postoperative period. Here, we report on an unusual case referred from another hospital because of continuous pain and restriction of knee motion in early postoperative period following CR-designed TKA that was initially thought to be due to flexion-extension imbalance. However, during the revision procedure, extruded cement to the intercondylar notch was found to be both mechanically blocking terminal extension and limiting flexion by possible mechanism of irritation of the synovial nerve endings around the stretched anterior fibers of PCL during flexion. This case was successfully treated by removal of extruded cement from intercondylar notch to decompress PCL, polyethylene exchange, and secondary patellar resurfacing. PMID:26185697

  6. Effects of Reduction Osteotomy on Gap Balancing During Total Knee Arthroplasty for Severe Varus Deformity.

    PubMed

    Niki, Yasuo; Harato, Kengo; Nagai, Katsuya; Suda, Yasunori; Nakamura, Masaya; Matsumoto, Morio

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of down-sizing and lateralizing of the tibial component (reduction osteotomy) on gap balancing in TKA, and the clinical feasibility of an uncemented modular trabecular metal tibial tray in this technique. Reduction osteotomy was performed for 39 knees of 36 patients with knee OA with a mean tibiofemoral angle of 21° varus. In 20 knees, appropriate gap balance was achieved by release of the deep medial collateral ligament alone. Flexion gap imbalance could be reduced by approximately 1.7° and 2.8° for 4-mm osteotomy and 8-mm osteotomy, respectively. Within the first postoperative year, clinically-stable tibial component subsidence was observed in 9 knees, but it was not progressive, and the clinical results were excellent at a mean follow-up of 3.3 years. PMID:26239234

  7. Colon interposition for oesophageal replacement.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Pascal A; Gilardoni, Adrian; Trousse, Delphine; D'Journo, Xavier B; Avaro, Jean-Philippe; Doddoli, Christophe; Giudicelli, Roger; Fuentes, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The choice of the colon as an oesophageal substitute results primarily from the unavailability of the stomach. However, given its durability and function, colon interposition keeps elective indications in patients with benign or malignant oesophageal disease who are potential candidates for long survival. The choice of the colonic portion used for oesophageal reconstruction depends on the required length of the graft, and the encountered colonic vascular anatomy, the last being characterised by the near-invariability of the left colonic vessels, in contrast to the vascular pattern of the right side of the colon. Accordingly, the transverse colon with all or part of the ascending colon is the substitute of choice, positioned in the isoperistaltic direction, and supplied either from the left colic vessels for long grafts or middle colic vessels for shorter grafts. Technical key points are: full mobilisation of the entire colon, identification of the main colonic vessels and collaterals, and a prolonged clamping test to ensure the permeability of the chosen nourishing pedicle. Transposition through the posterior mediastinum in the oesophageal bed is the shortest one and thereby offers the best functional results. When the oesophageal bed is not available, the retrosternal route is the preferred alternative option. The food bolus travelling mainly by gravity makes straightness of the conduit of paramount importance. The proximal anastomosis is a single-layer hand-fashioned end-to-end anastomosis to prevent narrowing. When the stomach is available, the distal anastomosis is best performed at the posterior part of the antrum for the reasons of pedicle positioning and reflux prevention, and a gastric drainage procedure is added when the oesophagus and vagus nerves have been removed. In the other cases, a Roux-en-Y jejunal loop is preferable to prevent bile reflux into the colon. Additional procedures include re-establishment of the colonic continuity, a careful closure of

  8. Ligament reconstruction tendon interposition with mersilene augmentation.

    PubMed

    Stein, Andrew J; Schofield, Jennifer L; Marsh, Mike; Paulo, Jerry

    2011-03-01

    Many surgical procedures have been described for the treatment of thumb basilar joint osteoarthritis. Augmentation of the standard ligament reconstruction tendon interposition procedure with the use of a Mersilene suture tape suspension-plasty, to recreate the stability provided by the anterior oblique ligament and increase pinch strength, will be described. Satisfaction with this procedure was evaluated through surveys completed by patients. In addition, independent physical assessments were performed to demonstrate stability, range of motion, and strength. PMID:21358518

  9. [Periostal interposition in epiphysiolysis, diagnosed by ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Ostergård, L L; Gaster, P; Hjarbaek, J

    2000-06-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound is a rapidly expanding diagnostic field. High frequency transducers with high spacial resolution make it possible to demonstrate superficial soft tissue structures such as tendons, muscles, ligaments and even, under certain circumstances, fractures and periosteum. A case is presented where ultrasound clearly visualised periostal interposition in a distal tibial epiphysiolysis in an eight year-old boy, and some aspects of ultrasound in musculo-skeletal imaging are discussed. PMID:10895603

  10. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... implant). 872.3970 Section 872.3970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... disc prosthesis (interpositional implant). (a) Identification. An interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant) is a device that is intended to be an interface between the natural articulating...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... implant). 872.3970 Section 872.3970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... disc prosthesis (interpositional implant). (a) Identification. An interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant) is a device that is intended to be an interface between the natural articulating...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... implant). 872.3970 Section 872.3970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... disc prosthesis (interpositional implant). (a) Identification. An interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant) is a device that is intended to be an interface between the natural articulating...

  13. Gastric interposition following transhiatal esophagectomy: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, B.H.; Agha, F.P.; Glazer, G.M.; Orringer, M.B.

    1985-04-01

    Transhiatal esophagectomy without thoracotomy (THE) but with gastric interposition results in less morbidity and mortality than standard transpleural esophagectomy with thoracotomy. Barium examination has been the primary radiographic study following THE for detecting postoperative complications. The authors reviewed computed tomography (CT) scans of 21 patients who had undergone THE and correlated CT appearance with clinical status and with findings of the barium studies. Local mediastinal recurrent neoplasm was detected by CT in seven patients; barium study within 2 weeks of the CT scan failed to detect tumor recurrence in three of these patients. CT is the modality of choice for detecting locally recurrent neoplasm and distant metastases following THE and may also be helpful in patients with postoperative mediastinal abscess. Normal mediastinal CT anatomy after esophagectomy is reviewed in order to warn against pitfalls in scan interpretation.

  14. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of the mandibular condyle and glenoid fossa. (b) Classification. Class III. (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the... prosthesis (interpositional implant) shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of the mandibular condyle and glenoid fossa. (b) Classification. Class III. (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the... prosthesis (interpositional implant) shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect...

  16. Interposition Porcine Acellular Dermal Matrix Xenograft Successful Alternative in Treatment for Massive Rotator Cuff

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Julie; Zgonis, Miltiadis H.; Reay, Kathleen Dolores; Mayer, Stephanie W.; Boggess, Blake; Toth, Alison P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Despite advances in the surgical techniques of rotator cuff repair (RCR), the management of massive rotator cuff tears in shoulders without glenohumeral arthritis poses a difficult problem for surgeons. Failure of massive rotator cuff repairs range from 20-90% at one to two years postoperatively using arthrography, ultrasound, or magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, there are inconsistent outcomes reported with debridement alone of massive rotator cuff tears as well as limitations seen with other current methods of operative intervention including arthroplasty and tendon transfers. The purpose of this prospective, comparative study was to determine if the repair of massive rotator cuff tears using an interposition porcine acellular dermal matrix xenograft improves subjective function, pain, range of motion, and strength at greater than two years follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the largest prospective series reporting outcomes of using porcine acellular dermal matrix xenograft as an interposition graft. Methods: Thirty-seven patients (37 shoulders) with an average age of 66 years (range 51-80 years) were prospectively followed for 33 months (range 23-48) following massive RCR using porcine acellular dermal matrix interposition xenograft. Subjective outcomes were measured using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain score (0-10, 0 = no pain), Modified American Shoulder and Elbow Score (M-ASES), and Short-Form12 (SF-12) scores. Preoperative and postoperative objective outcome measures included active range of motion and supraspinatus and infraspinatus manual muscle strength. Postoperative outcome measures included quantitative muscle strength using a dynamometer and static and dynamic ultrasonography to assess the integrity of the repair. Results: Average VAS pain score decreased from 4.5 to 1.1 (P<0.001). Average postoperative M-ASES was 89.23. Average postoperative SF-12 was 52.6. Mean forward flexion, external and internal rotation significantly

  17. Comparison of glass ionomer cement and incus interposition in reconstruction of incus long process defects.

    PubMed

    Dere, Huseyin; Ozdogan, Fatih; Ozcan, K Murat; Selcuk, Adin; Ozcan, Ibrahim; Gokturk, Gokhan

    2011-11-01

    The ossicles may be affected through the mass effect of the pathological tissue in chronic otitis media. Ossicular reconstruction may be accomplished using the patients' own ossicles or with alloplastic materials. Glass ionomer ossiculoplasty is a fast, efficient, safe and cost-effective method and it has been used more frequently in recent years. Forty-six patients who had surgery for chronic otitis media were included in this study. All patients had an incus long process defect and a normal stapes superstructure. Ossicular reconstruction was performed using glass ionomer cement (GIC) (Ketac-Cem, Espe Dental AG, Seefeld, Germany) in 23 patients (group 1), while incus interposition was performed in other 23 patients (group 2). Preoperative and postoperative air pure tone averages of the group 1 patients were 42.8 and 35.2 dB, respectively (p < 0.01). These values were 42.9 and 34.5 dB in group 2 (p < 0.01). Two groups were similar with respect to postoperative hearing gain (p > 0.05). The air bone gap of group 1 was 27 dB preoperatively and 20.7 dB postoperatively. These values were 28.7 and 20.2 dB, respectively, in group 2. The closure of air bone gap was statistically significant in both the groups (p < 0.01, p < 0.01). The comparison of the mean gains of the air bone gap revealed no difference between the groups (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the use of both GIC ossiculoplasty and incus interposition are efficient methods for reconstruction of incus long process and one is not superior to the other. A larger study population may be useful for comparison of these methods. PMID:21340562

  18. Distraction arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Morse, Kenneth R; Flemister, A Samuel; Baumhauer, Judith F; DiGiovanni, Benedict F

    2007-03-01

    Few joint-preserving surgical options exist for the patient who has ankle arthritis refractory to conservative measures. Therefore, continuous effort is afforded to the development of additional treatment options for such patients. Distraction arthroplasty has been proposed as one of these options for the patient in whom fusion or joint replacement is not appropriate. Although the mechanism of action remains unknown, the reports of several researchers support the potential beneficial effects that can be obtained from joint distraction arthroplasty in the severely osteoarthritic ankle. Furthermore, the studies published to date suggest that these effects may not only persist for years but also improve as time progresses during the first several years after treatment. Although additional laboratory studies are needed to understand the biochemical and biomechanical effects of distraction, additional prospective clinical studies are also needed to further understand its efficacy and appropriate patient population. The data thus far suggests that joint distraction arthroplasty may be a viable alternative treatment to arthrodesis and replacement for the young patient who has a congruent, painful, mobile, arthritic ankle joint. PMID:17350509

  19. Results of reconstruction for failed total elbow arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Figgie, M P; Inglis, A E; Mow, C S; Wolfe, S W; Sculco, T P; Figgie, H E

    1990-04-01

    soft-tissue arthroplasty without the use of an interpositional material. When the epicondylar ridges were not retained and there was marked instability, the patients did not achieve satisfactory results. PMID:2317965

  20. Interposition vein graft for giant coronary aneurysm repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Azoury, F.; Lytle, B. W.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Coronary aneurysms in adults are rare. Surgical treatment is often concomitant to treating obstructing coronary lesions. However, the ideal treatment strategy is poorly defined. We present a case of successful treatment of a large coronary artery aneurysm with a reverse saphenous interposition vein graft. This modality offers important benefits over other current surgical and percutaneous techniques and should be considered as an option for patients requiring treatment for coronary aneurysms.

  1. Incomplete seating of a metal-backed alumina liner in ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Carvajal Alba, Jaime A; Schiffman, Eric D; Scully, Sean P; Parvataneni, Hari K

    2010-01-01

    Metal-backed modular ceramic bearing systems using a recessed alumina liner in a titanium sleeve were developed to decrease ceramic chipping or fracture due to femoral neck impingement after total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, malseating of the metal-backed ceramic liner has recently been described. The goal of this study was to assess the prevalence, etiology, and clinical relevance of this event. Between 2005 and 2008, 51 consecutive patients (61 hips) underwent THA with a metal-backed alumina liner housed in a titanium shell. The metal-backed ceramic liner was aligned, seated, and impacted into the shell, and satisfaction in terms of liner stability and seating was confirmed intraoperatively. Postoperative assessment of seating was assessed with standard radiographs. Liner seating was classified as well seated, suspicious, or malseated. Seven liners (11.5%) were found to be malseated and 4 (6.5%) were considered suspicious. Radiographically, there was a gap between the liner and the shell located inferomedially in 4 patients and superolaterally in 3 patients. Two liners subsequently seated at 1 and 3 months postoperatively, respectively. No dislodgement, failures, or adverse events were identified. There were no revision surgeries. The significant percentage of malseated liners were potentially attributed to poor exposure, bony/soft tissue interposition, and surgeon learning curve. PMID:20055343

  2. SHOULDER ARTHROPLASTY RECORDS

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Geraldo Motta; Galvão, Marcus Vinicius; Monteiro, Martim; Cohen, Marcio; Brandão, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The study's objective is to evaluate the characteristics and problems of patients who underwent shoulder arthroplasties between July 2004 and November 2006. Methodology: During the period of the study, 145 shoulder arthroplasties were performed. A prospective protocol was used for every patient; demographic, clinical and surgical procedure data were collected. All gathered data were included in the data base. The patients were divided in three major groups: fractures, degenerative diseases and trauma sequels. Information obtained from the data base was correlated in order to determine patients' epidemiologic, injuries, and surgical procedure profiles. Results: Of the 145 shoulder arthroplasties performed, 37% presented trauma sequels, 30% degenerative diseases, and 33% proximal humerus fracture. 12% of the cases required total arthroplasties and 88% partial arthroplasties. Five major complications were observed on early postoperative period. Conclusion: Shoulder arthroplasties have become a common procedure in orthopaedic practice. Surgical records are important in evidencing progressive evolution and in enabling future clinical outcomes evaluation. PMID:26998463

  3. Total Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Sotelo, Joaquin

    2011-01-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty has been the subject of marked advances over the last few years. Modern implants provide a wide range of options, including resurfacing of the humeral head, anatomic hemiarthroplasty, total shoulder arthroplasty, reverse shoulder arthroplasty and trauma-specific implants for fractures and nonunions. Most humeral components achieve successful long-term fixation without bone cement. Cemented all-polyethylene glenoid components remain the standard for anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty. The results of shoulder arthroplasty vary depending on the underlying diagnosis, the condition of the soft-tissues, and the type of reconstruction. Total shoulder arthroplasty seems to provide the best outcome for patients with osteoarthritis and inflammatory arthropathy. The outcome of hemiarthroplasty for proximal humerus fractures is somewhat unpredictable, though it seems to have improved with the use of fracture-specific designs, more attention to tuberosity repair, and the selective use of reverse arthroplasty, as well as a shift in indications towards internal fixation. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty has become extremely popular for patients with cuff-tear arthropathy, and its indications have been expanded to the field of revision surgery. Overall, shoulder arthroplasty is a very successful procedure with predictable pain relief and substantial improvements in motion and function. PMID:21584206

  4. Implantation of Inferior Vena Cava Interposition Graft in Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Ung; Yi, Tai; Tara, Shuhei; Lee, Avione Y.; Hibino, Narutoshi; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable scaffolds seeded with bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) are often used for reconstructive surgery to treat congenital cardiac anomalies. The long-term clinical results showed excellent patency rates, however, with significant incidence of stenosis. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of vascular neotissue formation and prevent stenosis development in tissue engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs), we developed a mouse model of the graft with approximately 1 mm internal diameter. First, the TEVGs were assembled from biodegradable tubular scaffolds fabricated from a polyglycolic acid nonwoven felt mesh coated with ε-caprolactone and L-lactide copolymer. The scaffolds were then placed in a lyophilizer, vacuumed for 24 hr, and stored in a desiccator until cell seeding. Second, bone marrow was collected from donor mice and mononuclear cells were isolated by density gradient centrifugation. Third, approximately one million cells were seeded on a scaffold and incubated O/N. Finally, the seeded scaffolds were then implanted as infrarenal vena cava interposition grafts in C57BL/6 mice. The implanted grafts demonstrated excellent patency (>90%) without evidence of thromboembolic complications or aneurysmal formation. This murine model will aid us in understanding and quantifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms of neotissue formation in the TEVG. PMID:24961688

  5. Tourniquetless Total Knee Arthroplasty

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Tourniquetless Total Knee Arthroplasty You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2010 OR- ...

  6. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty

    MedlinePlus

    ... arthroplasty, we don’t want to have vigorous terminal stretches. Because this is a constrained implant, we ... limited range, rather than pushing vigorously for a terminal range. The other thing to keep in mind ...

  7. Soft tissue balancing in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    MELONI, MARIA CHIARA; HOEDEMAEKER, RUSSALKA W.; VIOLANTE, BRUNO; MAZZOLA, CLAUDIO

    2014-01-01

    A good outcome in total knee arthroplasty depends on many factors: joint alignment, range of motion, patellar tracking and ligament stability. A correct soft tissue balance keeps the joint aligned in flexion and extension, and therefore constitutes the most important factor for durability of the implant. Indeed, incorrect soft tissue balancing is the primary cause of early implant failure necessitating revision surgery. Soft tissue releases, serving to correct imbalances, are performed until the flexion and extension gaps appear symmetrical and balanced. A knee is considered perfectly balanced when the flexion and extension gaps are perfectly rectangular and all the measurements are absolutely equal. PMID:25606540

  8. Bipolar hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Liu, Shubing; Guan, Changyong; Yu, Fangyuan; Wu, Shenguang; Jiang, Changliang

    2011-12-01

    Our aim was to compare hip arthroplasty with internal screw fixation in the repair of intertrochanteric fractures in elderly patients with osteoporosis. Of 112 included patient, 70 (81.81 ± 4.88 years) received hip arthroplasty with a prosthesis specially designed for intertrochanteric fractures, and 42 (83.46 ± 5.11 years) underwent plate-screw fixation. The hip arthroplasty group had significantly longer operation time, intraoperative blood loss, and total volume of blood transfused but had shorter time to beginning weight-bearing (5.94 ± 2.76 vs 23.68 ± 22.01 days) and higher postoperative Harris hip score (91.37 ± 4.80 vs 86.14 ± 5.46). In the arthroplasty group, there were 2 dislocations; and in the plate-screw fixation group, there were 5 internal fixation failures. Hip arthroplasty is preferable to internal fixation in elderly patients (age >80 years) with osteoporosis. PMID:21530148

  9. Rotational alignment of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Falvo, Daniele Antonio; Iapicca, Mario Luigi; Gotti, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    We describe here various surgical options to obtain a correct rotational alignment of femoral component in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The correct rotational alignment is the key point to obtain a rectangular balanced flexion gap as well to have a good patellar tracking. For that reason, rotation alignment largely affects postoperative kinematic results particularly during flexion. PMID:26855940

  10. Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Basho, Rahul; Hood, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration of the cervical spine remains problematic for patients and surgeons alike. Despite advances in surgical techniques and instrumentation, the solution remains elusive. Spurred by the success of total joint arthroplasty in hips and knees, surgeons and industry have turned to motion preservation devices in the cervical spine. By preserving motion at the diseased level, the hope is that adjacent segment degeneration can be prevented. Multiple cervical disc arthroplasty devices have come onto the market and completed Food and Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption trials. Though some of the early results demonstrate equivalency of arthroplasty to fusion, compelling evidence of benefits in terms of symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration are lacking. In addition, non-industry-sponsored studies indicate that these devices are equivalent to fusion in terms of adjacent segment degeneration. Longer-term studies will eventually provide the definitive answer. PMID:24353955

  11. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Giachino, Matteo; Risitano, Salvatore; Atzori, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most worldwide practiced surgery for knee osteoarthritis and its efficacy is mightily described by literature. Concerns about the invasiveness of TKA let the introduction of segmental resurfacing of the joint for younger patients with localized osteoarthritis. Bone stock sparing and ligaments preservation are the essence of both unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA). Advantages related to BKA are the respect of knee biomechanics, lower complications rates, shorter hospital stay, faster rehabilitation. Moreover, in case of failure of the first implant the conversion to TKA is undemanding and can be compared to a standard prosthesis. Our experience suggest that BKA is a reliable technique in selected cases and especially younger people with higher functional requests can favourably profit from it. Although those results are encouraging, we still need further prospective, randomized, long-term studies to finally assess BKA indications and outcomes. PMID:26855941

  12. Bicruciate retaining arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mont, Michael A; John, Mario; Johnson, Aaron

    2012-12-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is one of the most successful orthopaedic procedures with 10 to 20 year survivorships from multiple studies of greater than 95%. These success rates typically apply to patients over 70 years of age who may only want to return to activities of daily living. However, recently there is a demand by both senior citizens as well as young patients to have TKAs that return them to high activity levels and occasionally high performance sports. In this review, we will describe bicruciate retaining prostheses, including knowledge of their kinematics from fluoroscopic and gait studies, results of clinical studies, a summary of their potential advantages and disadvantages, anterior cruciate ligament viability at time of arthroplasty, considerations for implantation of these devices, and their role in the future of total knee arthroplasty. PMID:22915498

  13. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Risitano, Salvatore; Atzori, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most worldwide practiced surgery for knee osteoarthritis and its efficacy is mightily described by literature. Concerns about the invasiveness of TKA let the introduction of segmental resurfacing of the joint for younger patients with localized osteoarthritis. Bone stock sparing and ligaments preservation are the essence of both unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA). Advantages related to BKA are the respect of knee biomechanics, lower complications rates, shorter hospital stay, faster rehabilitation. Moreover, in case of failure of the first implant the conversion to TKA is undemanding and can be compared to a standard prosthesis. Our experience suggest that BKA is a reliable technique in selected cases and especially younger people with higher functional requests can favourably profit from it. Although those results are encouraging, we still need further prospective, randomized, long-term studies to finally assess BKA indications and outcomes. PMID:26855941

  14. Colon-interposition as replacement for the esophagus. A follow-up study.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, D C; Zwierstra, R P; Kootstra, G; Edens, E T; van der Wagen, A; Bijleveld, C; Jonkers, A

    1981-08-01

    The longterm results of the use of colon-interposition as a substitution for the esophagus have been studied. Colon-interposition was carried out in eleven patients. There was one operative death. A second child died of an unknown cause nine years and eight months after operation. Nine patients could be studied from sixteen years and nine months to thirteen months after the operation. In six patients a satisfactory result has been achieved. One child is staying in a psychiatric infirmary. Feeding problems due to recurrent fistulae have led to growth retardation in another patient, while a third patient has regurgitation symptoms. A study of the case histories gives insight into the many early and late complications which occur in this operative procedure. The colon-interposition is a complicated procedure and should only be carried out in centers for pediatric surgery, because of its specific indication, its technique and the occurrence of complications afterwards. The development of alternative, less complicated, methods leaves a restricted indication for colon-interposition. PMID:7324572

  15. Occult Interpositional Rotator Cuff - an Extremely Rare Case of Traumatic Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Li; Su, Wei-Ren; Jou, I-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic interposition of a rotator cuff tendon in the glenohumeral joint without recognizable glenohumeral dislocation is an unusual complication after shoulder trauma. Here we report the clinical and imaging presentations of a 17-year-old man with trapped rotator cuff tendons in the glenohumeral joint after a bicycle accident. The possible trauma mechanism is also discussed. PMID:22247643

  16. Pre-arthroplasty simultaneous maxillomandibular distraction osteogenesis for the correction of post-ankylotic dentofacial deformities.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, D; Vishwakarma, K; Chellapa, A L; Mahajan, N

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hard and soft tissue changes after pre-arthroplasty simultaneous maxillomandibular distraction osteogenesis for the correction of post-ankylotic dentofacial deformities. This prospective study included 10 patients with unilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis who presented with a facial deformity and a maxillary cant. Informed patient consent was obtained for participation. Simultaneous maxillomandibular distraction was planned based on clinical and radiographic examinations. A horizontal mandibular osteotomy was performed in the ramus and the distractor device was fixed. A bilateral Le Fort I osteotomy was then performed and a four-hole straight plate was fixed on the contralateral zygomatic buttress to act as a fulcrum. After a latency period of 5 days, the distractor was activated twice daily by 0.5mm until the required vertical lengthening was achieved. Intermaxillary fixation was maintained during the entire distraction period. After a consolidation period of 8-12 weeks, the distractor was removed. The TMJ ankylosis was released and a temporal fascia interpositional arthroplasty was performed as second surgery, along with a genioplasty if needed. All patients were followed up for a period of 12-24 months. A marked improvement in the facial asymmetry was noted in all cases. The occlusal cant and mandibular retrusion improved satisfactorily, and the average postoperative inter-incisal opening was 35.6mm. Pre-arthroplasty simultaneous maxillomandibular distraction offers a good treatment outcome, as it allows improvements in facial aesthetics as well as function. PMID:26780926

  17. Primary total elbow arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Suresh; Mahanta, Sunayan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Primary total elbow arthroplasty (TEA) is a challenging procedure for orthopedic surgeons. It is not performed as frequently as compared to hip or knee arthroplasty. The elbow is a nonweight-bearing joint; however, static loading can create forces up to three times the body weight and dynamic loading up to six times. For elderly patients with deformity and ankylosis of the elbow due to posttraumatic arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis or comminuted fracture distal humerus, arthroplasty is one of the option. The aim of this study is to analyze the role of primary total elbow arthroplasty in cases of crippling deformity of elbow. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 11 cases of TEA, between December 2002 and September 2012. There were 8 females and 3 males. The average age was 40 years (range 30-69 years). The indications for TEA were rheumatoid arthritis, comminuted fracture distal humerus with intraarticular extension, and posttraumatic bony ankylosis of elbow joint. The Baksi sloppy (semi constrained) hinge elbow prosthesis was used. Clinico-radiological followup was done at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, and then yearly basis. Results: In the present study, average supination was 70° (range 60-80°) and average pronation was 70° (range 60-80°). Average flexion was 135° (range 130-135°). However, in 5 cases, there was loss of 15 to 35° (average 25°) of extension (45°) out of 11 cases. The mean Mayo elbow performance score was 95.4 points (range 70-100). Arm length discrepancy was only in four patients which was 36% out of 11 cases. Clinico-radiologically all the elbows were stable except in one case and no immediate postoperative complication was noted. Radiolucency or loosening of ulnar stem was seen in 2 cases (18%) out of 11 cases, in 1 case it was noted after 5 years and in another after 10 years. In second case, revision arthroplasty was done, in which only ulnar hinge section, hinge screw and lock screw with hexagonal head were replaced

  18. Rat posterior facial vein interpositional graft: a more relevant training model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nicolas; Daley, Roger A; Cooley, Brian C

    2014-11-01

    Microvascular training models for vein grafting most often use the rat epigastric vein interpositioned to the femoral artery. We describe the rat posterior facial vein as an alternative vein graft model; it has at least a 2:1 diametric ratio to the femoral artery and a tougher connective tissue, making it more similar to clinical vein grafting for reconstructive microsurgery. A series of 24 grafts interpositioned to the femoral artery were done using 11-12 sutures per end-to-end anastomosis and yielded early patency rates of 96% at 20 min and 92% at 2 and 4 weeks for subsets of 12 grafts. As a training model the diametric disparity provides unique challenges with clinical relevance, for which a number of different techniques for matching arterial to venous circumferences can be done. PMID:24848809

  19. Testicular Interposition Flap for Repair of Perineal Urinary Fistulae: A Novel Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Raup, Valary T.; Eswara, Jairam R.; Marshall, Stephen D.; Brandes, Steven B.

    2015-01-01

    Rectourinary fistulae and urinary-cutaneous fistulae are a rare yet devastating complication. Current options for tissue interposition include rectus, gracilis, or gluteal muscle, omentum, or intestine for use in coloanal pull-through procedures. In elderly patients, testicular interposition flaps may be an excellent tissue option to use when vitalized tissue is necessary to supplement fistula repair. Elderly patients frequently have increased spermatic cord length, potentially offering a longer flap reach than use of a muscle flap. Additionally, mobilizing one of the testicles and developing it through the external inguinal ring may be a less morbid and less costly procedure than harvesting and tunneling a muscle flap. Longer follow-up and further studies are needed to determine the outcomes of this novel technique. PMID:26483985

  20. Total esophagogastrectomy plus extended lymphadenectomy with transverse colon interposition: A treatment for extensive esophagogastric junction cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ceroni, Marco; Norero, Enrique; Henríquez, Juan Pablo; Viñuela, Eduardo; Briceño, Eduardo; Martínez, Cristian; Aguayo, Gloria; Araos, Fernando; González, Paulina; Díaz, Alfonso; Caracci, Mario

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To review the post-operative morbidity and mortality of total esophagogastrectomy (TEG) with second barrier lymphadenectomy (D2) with interposition of a transverse colon and to determine the oncological outcomes of TEG D2 with interposition of a transverse colon. METHODS: This study consisted of a retrospective review of patients with a cancer diagnosis who underwent TEG between 1997 and 2013. Demographic data, surgery protocols, complications according to Clavien-Dindo classifications, final pathological reports, oncological follow-ups and causes of death were recorded. We used the TNM 2010 and Japanese classifications for nodal dissection of gastric cancer. We used descriptive statistical analysis and Kaplan-Meier survival curves. A P-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: The series consisted of 21 patients (80.9% men). The median age was 60 years. The 2 main surgical indications were extensive esophagogastric junction cancers (85.7%) and double cancers (14.2%). The mean total surgery time was 405 min (352-465 min). Interposition of a transverse colon through the posterior mediastinum was used for replacement in all cases. Splenectomy was required in 13 patients (61.9%), distal pancreatectomy was required in 2 patients (9.5%) and resection of the left adrenal gland was required in 1 patient (4.7%). No residual cancer surgery was achieved in 75.1% of patients. A total of 71.4% of patients had a postoperative complication. Respiratory complications were the most frequently observed complication. Postoperative mortality was 5.8%. Median follow-up was 13.4 mo. Surgery specific survival at 5 years of follow-up was 32.8%; for patients with curative surgery, it was 39.5% at 5 years. CONCLUSION: TEG for cancer with interposition of a transverse colon is a very complex surgery, and it presents high post-operative morbidity and adequate oncological outcomes. PMID:26464757

  1. Reversed gastric tube (RGT) esophagoplasty for failure of colon, jejunum and prosthetic interpositions.

    PubMed Central

    Heimlich, H J

    1975-01-01

    Reversed gastric tube (RGT) esophagoplasty is preferred by the author as the primary procedure for esophageal replacement. Many patients undergoing RGT esophagoplasty, however, have previously had multiple operative procedures. A particularly challenging problem in esophageal reconstruction is the patient who has already had unsuccessful intestinal or prosthetic interposition operations in attempts to reconstruct the esophagus. In such patients, it has been possible to replace the esophagus by means of the RGT operation. Of 67 RGT esophagoplasties, 9 patients (13.4%) had previous interposition operations that had failed. Six had undergone colon interposition; 2 of these had strictured, 1 had partially sloughed leaving a cervical salivary fistula, and in 1 the proximal end was never patent. In each instance, bypass with RGT was performed without resecting the colon transplant. The colon had necrosed and was removed in 2 patients. Of the remaining 3 patients, in 1 a plastic esophageal prothesis had sloughed and two had free jejunal transplants, 1 of which had impaired vascularity and the other had fibrosed. The specific techniques used to reconstruct the esophagus by reversed gastric tube esophagoplasty, as they relate to this particular group of patients, are described. Images Fig. 1a. Fig. 1b. Fig. 1c. Fig. 2a. Fig. 2b. Fig. 3. Figs. 4a and b. Figs. 5a and b. PMID:1211993

  2. Arthroplasty in Femoral Head Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Dong Cheol; Jung, Kwangyoung

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive joint disease requiring early hip arthroplasty. The polyethylene-metal design using a 22-mm femoral head component, introduced by Charnley in 1950, has been widely used for over half a century. Since then, different materials with the capacity to minimize friction between bearing surfaces and various cement or cementless insert fixations have been developed. Although the outcome of second and third generation designs using better bearing materials and technologies has been favorable, less favorable results are seen with total hip arthroplasty in young patients with osteonecrosis. Selection of appropriate materials for hip arthroplasty is important for any potential revisions that might become inevitable due to the limited durability of a prosthetic hip joint. Alternative hip arthroplasties, which include hemiresurfacing arthroplasty and bipolar hemiarthroplasty, have not been found to have acceptable outcomes. Metal-on-metal resurfacing has recently been suggested as a feasible option for young patients with extra physical demands; however, concerns about complications such as hypersensitivity reaction or pseudotumor formation on metal bearings have emerged. To ensure successful long-term outcomes in hip arthroplasty, factors such as insert stabilization and surfaces with less friction are essential. Understanding these aspects in arthroplasty is important to selection of proper materials and to making appropriate decisions for patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:27536561

  3. Malleus-to-footplate prosthetic interposition: experience with 265 patients.

    PubMed

    Colletti, V; Fiorino, F G

    1999-03-01

    Absence of the long process of the incus with or without absence of the stapes head accounts for more than 80% of ossicular discontinuities. Total or partial replacement prostheses, made of various materials, are interposed to restore the transfer function of the middle ear. To simplify ossicular reconstruction, reduce operative times and costs, improve functional outcomes, and avoid the risk of infections, we have adopted, during the past 10 years, a technique that makes use of a personally designed alloplastic prosthetic device. The prosthesis connects the malleus to the footplate, even in the presence of the stapes superstructure. This malleus-to-footplate prosthesis consists in a plastipore-coated steel piston and hydroxyapatite head, complete with a groove. The groove is placed beneath the malleus neck after dissection of the tensor tympani tendon and the shaft of the piston on the footplate. Two hundred ninety primary ossiculoplasties with the malleus-to-footplate prostheses were performed in 265 patients from 1986 to 1995 in the ENT Department of the University of Verona. The average postoperative air-bone gap at 0.5 to 3 kHz was 11 dB at 1 year and 14 dB at 5 years. These outcomes are significantly better than those personally obtained previously with ossicular or alloplastic prostheses. No extrusions occurred. The structural characteristics of the malleus-to-foot-plate prosthesis endow the prosthesis with a high degree of biocompatibility and stability and optimal sound-transfer function. The rationale for this particular ossiculoplasty procedure is discussed. PMID:10064651

  4. Cementless total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Salvatore; Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Agati, Gabriele; Massè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Interest for uncemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has greatly increased in recent years. This technique, less used than cemented knee replacement in the last decades, sees a revival thanks an advance in prosthetic design, instrumentation and operative technique. The related literature in some cases shows conflicting data on survival and on the revision’s rate, but in most cases a success rate comparable to cemented TKA is reported. The optimal fixation in TKA is a subject of debate with the majority of surgeons favouring cemented fixation. PMID:27162779

  5. Early Attempts at Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Pablo F; Morcuende, Jose A

    2005-01-01

    Over the last three centuries, treatment of hip arthritides has evolved from rudimentary surgery to modern total hip arthroplasty (THA), which is considered one of the most successful surgical interventions ever developed. We here review the history of the early hip arthroplasty procedures for hip arthritis that preceded Charley total hip arthroplasty. An evaluation of such past enterprises is relevant, and reminds us of the ephemeral nature of human industriousness, and how medical research and procedures are not isolated developments, but correlate to the social, economical, and cultural framework of their time. PMID:16089067

  6. [Revision after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Mohr, G; Martin, J; Clarius, M

    2014-10-01

    Unicompartmental arthroplasty is an efficient and approved treatment option of unicompartmental arthritis of the knee, being performed with increasing frequency worldwide. Compared to total knee replacement, there are several advantages such as faster recovery, lower blood loss, better functional outcome and lower infection rates. However, higher revision rates are a frequent argument against the use of unicompartmental arthroplasty. The following article gives an overview of failure mechanisms and strategies for revision arthroplasty. This article is based on a selective literature review including PubMed and relevant print media. Our own clinical experience is considered as well. PMID:25209015

  7. Interposition of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament into the Medial Compartment of the Knee Joint on Coronal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Su; Park, Ki Jeong; Wang, Joon Ho; Choe, Bong-Keun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of our study was to evaluate the overall prevalence and clinical significance of interposition of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) into the medial compartment of the knee joint in coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 317 consecutive patients referred for knee MRI at our institution between October 2009 and December 2009. Interposition of the PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint on proton coronal MRI was evaluated dichotomously (i.e., present or absent). We analyzed the interposition according to its prevalence as well as its relationship with right-left sidedness, gender, age, and disease categories (osteoarthritis, anterior cruciate ligament tear, and medial meniscus tear). Results Prevalence of interposition of PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint was 47.0% (149/317). There was no right (50.0%, 83/166) to left (43.7%, 66/151) or male (50.3%, 87/173) to female (43.1%, 62/144) differences in the prevalence. There was no significant association between the prevalence and age, or the disease categories. Conclusion Interposition of the PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint is observed in almost half of patients on proton coronal MRI of the knee. Its presence is not associated with any particular factors including knee pathology and may be regarded as a normal MR finding. PMID:26957909

  8. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Murray, D. W.; Liddle, A. D.; Dodd, C. A. F.; Pandit, H.

    2015-01-01

    There is a large amount of evidence available about the relative merits of unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty (UKA and TKA). Based on the same evidence, different people draw different conclusions and as a result, there is great variability in the usage of UKA. The revision rate of UKA is much higher than TKA and so some surgeons conclude that UKA should not be performed. Other surgeons believe that the main reason for the high revision rate is that UKA is easy to revise and, therefore, the threshold for revision is low. They also believe that UKA has many advantages over TKA such as a faster recovery, lower morbidity and mortality and better function. They therefore conclude that UKA should be undertaken whenever appropriate. The solution to this argument is to minimise the revision rate of UKA, thereby addressing the main disadvantage of UKA. The evidence suggests that this will be achieved if surgeons use UKA for at least 20% of their knee arthroplasties and use implants that are appropriate for these broad indications. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B(10 Suppl A):3–8. PMID:26430080

  9. Colonic Interposition between the Liver and Diaphragm: “The Chilaiditi Sign”

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Nita; Takieddine, Zeina; Tariq, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    A 90-year-old wheelchair bound male was brought to the emergency department with complaints of worsening abdominal pain over the last 2-3 days. The patient also had difficulty in passing urine. Abdominal examination revealed tenderness in the umbilical and hypogastric area without rebound tenderness or guarding. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen showed a loop of colon interpositioned between the liver and the right hemidiaphragm (the Chilaiditi sign), mimicking free air. Foley's catheter was placed and the patient was managed conservatively. The patient clinically improved with improvement of the abdominal pain. PMID:27446829

  10. [Results of the surgical treatment of bridge callus through silastic membrane interposition].

    PubMed

    Zilch, H

    1979-01-01

    A report on 5 cases with successful treatment of a posttraumatic synostosis of radius and ulna by resection and interposition of a silastic-membrane is presented. This membrane has to ensheath one of the forearm bones for at least half of its circumference and it is fixed partially with Dexon sutures. During operation it is necessary to confirm this fixation of the membrane, which must be unchanged after rotation of the forearm. The range of movement reached 4 years after operation was about 120 degrees (100-130 degrees) on an average. A better result can only be expected by an osteotomy of the radius and correction of its position. PMID:554848

  11. External iliac artery polytetrafluoroethylene graft interposition: An effective rescuer for kidney transplant in progressive intimal dissection of external iliac artery

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Tanveer Iqbal; Tyagi, Vipin; Khawaja, Abdul Rouf; Chadha, Sudhir; Jauhari, Harsha

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objective: The aim of this study is to highlight the use of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) interposition graft as an important salvage procedure in case of irreparable intimal injury of external iliac artery during renal transplant recipient surgery. Materials and Methods: Since 1987, we encountered irreparable intimal dissection of external iliac artery in five cases just after opening the clamp. It was successfully managed by PTFE interposition graft with subsequent end to side anastomosis of donor renal artery to the vascular graft. Results: No patient had bleeding or infective complications related to the graft and three patients had immediate diuresis. Normal immediate graft function was present in three patients while the other two had delayed graft function. Conclusion: Polytetrafluoroethylene interposition graft is a successful procedure to salvage the kidney and lower limb in case of progressive intimal dissection of external iliac artery during renal transplant surgery. PMID:27141197

  12. Talocalcaneal Joint Middle Facet Coalition Resection With Interposition of a Juvenile Hyaline Cartilage Graft.

    PubMed

    Tower, Dyane E; Wood, Ryan W; Vaardahl, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Talocalcaneal joint middle facet coalition is the most common tarsal coalition, occurring in ≤2% of the population. Fewer than 50% of involved feet obtain lasting relief of symptoms after nonoperative treatment, and surgical intervention is commonly used to relieve symptoms, increase the range of motion, improve function, reconstruct concomitant pes planovalgus, and prevent future arthrosis from occurring at the surrounding joints. Several approaches to surgical intervention are available for patients with middle facet coalitions, ranging from resection to hindfoot arthrodesis. We present a series of 4 cases, in 3 adolescent patients, of talocalcaneal joint middle facet coalition resection with interposition of a particulate juvenile hyaline cartilaginous allograft (DeNovo(®) NT Natural Tissue Graft, Zimmer, Inc., Warsaw, IN). With a mean follow-up period of 42.8 ± 2.9 (range 41 to 47) months, the 3 adolescent patients in the present series were doing well with improved subtalar joint motion and decreased pain, and 1 foot showed no bony regrowth on a follow-up computed tomography scan. The use of a particulate juvenile hyaline cartilaginous allograft as interposition material after talocalcaneal middle facet coalition resection combined with adjunct procedures to address concomitant pes planovalgus resulted in good short-term outcomes in 4 feet in 3 adolescent patients. PMID:25922335

  13. Vertical chin augmentation with interpositional porous polyethylene implants: a histologic study in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Magro-Filho, O; Kallal, R; Rangel-Garcia Júnior, I; Magro-Ernica, N

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to evaluate histologically the tissue reaction in the chin after a vertical augmentation using interpositional porous polyethylene (PPE) implants in monkeys. Six monkeys (Cebus apella) underwent an anterior horizontal mandibular osteotomy with implantation of an interpositional PPE implant to increase the vertical height. The animals were sacrificed 5 months postoperatively. Histologic preparations were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The perimeter of the interface between the implant and the bone, the implant and the trabecular space, and the implant and the fibrous capsule were quantified using the NIH Image Analysis System (Image 1.60/PPC). In addition, the Tukey test was done. The study demonstrated that bone growth takes place within the pores of the implant; a fibrous capsule exists in some animals, where the implant has contact with the periosteum and mentalis muscle with few chronic inflammatory cells; and the 3 different tissues responded in statistically different manners. Perimeter analysis revealed 68.9% implant-bone contact, 22.9% implant-fibrous tissue contact, and 8.2% implant-trabecular space contact. PMID:10686842

  14. Cementless total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Morscher, E W

    1983-12-01

    The differences between prostheses fixed with and without cement are mainly in the design and nature of the surface implant. The shapes of the sockets to be implanted without cement show a wide variety: cylinder, square, conus, and ellipsoid with and without threads. The hemispheric shape, however, which was chosen for the acetabular component of the isoelastic hip joint, does not disturb the natural form and function of the hip joint since the outer surface is closely adapted to the original subchondral bone layer. The noncemented cup is secured by threads, pegs, screws, etc., and by ingrowth of bony tissue in the grooves of the surfaces. Most femoral stems are based on the self-locking principle. All prosthetic models incorporate attempts to increase the surface of the stem (ribs, wings, corrugations, rims, etc.). There is a tendency to use less rigid elastic implants instead of the well known rigid metallic prostheses. The aim is to overcome the problems of stress protection and stress concentration observed with rigid implants. For the biomechanical integration of an implant, the properties of the surface, especially macroporosity and microporosity, are important. Most European models of noncemented endoprostheses are based on macroporosity (porometal, madreporic, etc.). The increase in implant surface area achieved with macroscopic perforations and recesses is relatively minor compared with the possibilities offered by microporosity ("alumine fritée," Proplast, fiber-metal, etc.). The best indication for use of a cementless hip endoprosthesis is in revision arthroplasty. The lost bone stock is replaced by bone grafts, thereby creating a situation comparable with that of a primary arthroplasty. Clinical experience with noncemented hip endoprostheses is, to date, promising, although the observation time for most models is short. PMID:6357588

  15. Indications, surgical technique, and long-term functional results of colon interposition or bypass.

    PubMed Central

    DeMeester, T R; Johansson, K E; Franze, I; Eypasch, E; Lu, C T; McGill, J E; Zaninotto, G

    1988-01-01

    Over a 17-year period, 92 patients with esophageal disease underwent colon interposition or bypass, with each operation performed by the same surgeon. The indication was cure of cancer in 20 patients, relief of dysphagia in 55 (cancer in 17 patients and benign in 38), loss of gastrointestinal (G.I.) continuity in ten, and tracheoesophageal fistula in seven patients (malignant in five, benign in 2). The thirty-day operative mortality rate was 5%, and the hospital mortality rate was 9%. Graft necrosis occurred in seven of 92 patients, four of whom later underwent a successful second reconstruction. Thirteen patients required subsequent revisional surgery. In 85 patients, the left colon based on the inferior mesenteric artery was used, and in seven, the right colon was used. Technical insights were gained to help preserve the blood supply to the graft and improve its function in transporting food. Thirty-four patients were available for interview 2-17 years after operation (median of 5 years) 28 of whom had benign disease, and six of whom had malignant disease); 82% of the patients felt they were cured of their preoperative symptoms, 18% improved, and none worsened. Eighty-eight per cent of the patients were able to receive an unrestricted diet. All patients except one were satisfied with the results of surgery, and, asked what they would do if they had to make the choice again, all responded that they would have the operation. Twenty-six of the interviewed patients had their eating ability evaluated with a test meal and the transit time of a liquid and solid barium bolus measured. Compared to controls, patients with colon interpositions consumed a smaller capacity meal over a longer period of time and were not dependent on liquids to flush the food through the colon graft. A colon interposition provides good quality of deglutition, is very durable, and is the organ of choice for patients who require an esophageal substitute and are potential candidates for long

  16. Robotic-assisted knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Elmallah, Randa K; Jauregui, Julio J; Pierce, Todd P; Mont, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Robotics in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has undergone vast improvements. Although some of the systems have fallen out of favor due to safety concerns, there has been recent increased interest for semi-active haptic robotic systems that provide intraoperative tactile feedback to the surgeon. The potential advantages include improvements in radiographic outcomes, reducing the incidence of mechanical axis malalignment of the lower extremity and better tissue balance. Proponents of robotic technology believe that these improvements may lead to superior functional outcomes and implant survivorship. We aim to discuss robotic technology development, outcomes of unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty and the future outlook. Short-term follow-up studies on robotic-assisted knee arthroplasty suggest that, although some alignment objectives may have been achieved, more studies regarding functional outcomes are needed. Furthermore, studies evaluating the projected cost-benefit analyses of this new technology are needed before widespread adoption. Nevertheless, the short-term results warrant further evaluation. PMID:26365088

  17. Usefulness of Cardiac Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Prosthetic Coronary Artery Graft with Interposition Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Wake, Ryotaro; Iwata, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Masashi; Doi, Atsushi; Sugioka, Kenichi; Otsuka, Ryo; Hozumi, Takeshi; Takemoto, Yasuhiko; Ehara, Shoichi; Hanatani, Akihisa; Muro, Takashi; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    An 80-year-old Japanese man was admitted with orthopnea and pitting edema of both lower legs. We diagnosed congestive heart failure (CHF) on the basis of a chest X-ray and an echocardiogram. An electrocardiogram showed a heart rate of 120 beats/min with atrial fibrillation rhythm (Af). The patient developed aortic valve failure and destruction of the base of right coronary artery (RCA) due to infectious endocarditis at 71 years of age. The patient underwent aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting with an interposed graft with polyester vascular graft to RCA. The patient recovered from CHF after the 6 days of treatment with diuretics and verapamil. We confirmed the patency of coronary arteries and bypass grafts using a 64-slice cardiac computed tomography scan (CT) and diagnosed CHF due to Af. Here we describe the estimation of the prosthetic coronary artery graft patency with the interposition procedure using 64-slice cardiac CT. PMID:21079753

  18. Reconstruction of a Severely Crushed Leg with Interpositional Vessel Grafts and Latissimus Dorsi Flap

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Woo; Hwang, Kyu Tae; Kim, Jeong Tae

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of a near total amputation at the distal tibial level, in which the patient emphatically wanted to save the leg. The anterior and posterior tibial nerves were intact, indicating a high possibility of sensory recovery after revascularization. The patient had open fractures at the tibia and fibula, but no bone shortening was performed. The posterior tibial vessels were reconstructed with an interposition saphenous vein graft from the contralateral side and a usable anterior tibial artery graft from the undamaged ipsilateral distal portions. The skin and soft tissue defects were covered using a subatmospheric pressure system for demarcating the wound, and a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous free flap for definite coverage of the wound. At 6 months after surgery, the patient was ambulatory without requiring additional procedures. Replantation without bone shortening, with use of vessel grafts and temporary coverage of the wound with subatmospheric pressure dressings before definite coverage, can shorten recovery time. PMID:22872848

  19. Irreducible tongue-type calcaneal fracture due to interposition of flexor hallucis longus.

    PubMed

    Wong-Chung, John; O'Longain, Diarmaid; Lynch-Wong, Matthew; Julian, Harriet

    2016-06-01

    We present a rare case of interposition of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon blocking percutaneous closed reduction of a displaced tongue-type calcaneal fracture, and necessitating open repositioning of the tendon and internal fixation through a single extensile lateral approach. Although not recognized until during surgery, with a high index of suspicion, preoperative diagnosis of this injury combination should be possible on high resolution CT, thus enabling better planning of the procedure. The presence of a small sustentacular fragment, especially if markedly displaced or rotated, should further alert the physician as to increased likelihood of such tendon entrapment within the fracture. In the literature, fracture fixation and extrication of the FHL tendon have been performed via either or both lateral and medial approaches. A medial approach may prove necessary when there is severe displacement or rotation of the sustentacular fragment. Arthroscopically assisted surgery may aid in disengaging the tendon from within the fracture site. PMID:26802813

  20. ASSESSMENT OF THE GASTRO-JEJUNO-DUODENAL TRANSIT AFTER JEJUNAL POUCH INTERPOSITION

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Alcino Lázaro; GOMES, Célio Geraldo de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Background : The jejunal pouch interposition between the gastric body and the duodenum after the gastrectomy, although not frequent in the surgical practice today, has been successfully employed for the prevention and treatment of the postgastrectomy syndromes. In the latter, it is included the dumping syndrome, which affects 13-58% of the patients who undergo gastrectomy. Aim : Retrospective assessment of the results of this procedure for the prevention of the dumping syndrome. Methods : Fourty patients were selected and treatetd surgically for peptic ulcer, between 1965 and 1970. Of these, 29 underwent vagotomy, antrectomy, gastrojejunalduodenostomy at the lesser curvature level, and the 11 remaining were submitted to vagotomy, antrectomy, gastrojejunal-duodenostomy at the greater curvature level. The gastro-jejuno-duodenal transit was assessed in the immediate or late postoperative with the contrasted study of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum. The clinical evolution was assessed according to the Visick grade. Results : Of the 40 patients, 28 were followed with the contrast evaluation in the late postoperative. Among those who were followed until the first month (n=22), 20 (90%) had slow gastro-jejuno-duodenal transit and in two (10%) the transit was normal. Among those who were followed after the first month (n=16), three (19%) and 13 (81%) had slow and normal gastric emptying, respectively. None had the contrasted exam compatible with the dumping syndrome. Among the 40 patients, 22 underwent postoperative clinical evaluation. Of these, 19 (86,5%) had excellent and good results (Visick 1 and 2, respectively). Conclusions : The jejunal pouch interposition showed to be a very effective surgical procedure for the prevention of the dumping syndrome in gastrectomized patients. PMID:26734789

  1. Review of Arthroscopic and Histological Findings Following Knee Inlay Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Markarian, Gregory G; Kambour, Michael T; Uribe, John W

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of cartilage rim loading in defects exceeding the threshold diameter of 10 mm is well documented. Contoured defect fill off-loads the perimeter and counteracts further delamination and progression of defects. When biological procedures have failed, inlay arthroplasty follows these concepts. The human biological response to contoured metallic surface implants has not been described. Four patients underwent non-implant-related, second-look arthroscopy following inlay arthroplasty for bi- (n=3) and tricompartmental (n=1) knee arthrosis without subchondral bone collapse. Arthroscopic probing of the implant-cartilage interface of nine prosthetic components did not show signs of implant-cartilage gap formation, loosening, or subsidence. The implant periphery was consistently covered by cartilage confluence leading to a reduction of the original defect size diameter. Femoral condyle cartilage flow appeared to have more hyaline characteristics. Trochlear cartilage flow showed greater histological variability and less organization with fibrocartilage and synovialized scar tissue. This review reconfirmed previous basic science results and demonstrated effective defect fill and rim off-loading with inlay arthroplasty. PMID:27082884

  2. A case of ruptured infectious anterior cerebral artery aneurysm treated by interposition graft bypass using the superficial temporal artery

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Takatsugu; Endo, Hidenori; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Fujimura, Miki; Endo, Toshiki; Sakata, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Mika; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    Background: To describe the application of an interposition graft bypass using superficial temporal artery (STA) for the treatment of a ruptured anterior cerebral artery (ACA) infectious aneurysm. Case Description: A 30-year-old male suffered from severe headache with high fever. The patient's diagnosis was ruptured infectious ACA aneurysm at the A3 segment with a maximum diameter of 4.5 mm, caused by infectious endocarditis. The patient was initially treated with high-dose intravenous antibiotics. Follow-up digital subtraction angiography (DSA) revealed that the fusiform aneurysm had enlarged to a maximum diameter of 14.0 mm. A left paracentral artery, supplying the motor area of the left lower extremity, originated from the body of this aneurysm. Because the angiographic findings suggested a risk of recurrent bleeding, the patient underwent open surgery. Interposition graft bypass using the STA was performed to reconstruct the left A3 segment in an end-to-side manner (left proximal callosomarginal artery – STA graft – left distal pericallosal artery). Then, the origin of the left paracentral artery was cut and anastomosed to the STA graft in an end-to-side manner. The affected parent artery was trapped, and the aneurysm was resected. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging showed no ischemic or hemorrhagic complications, and postoperative DSA revealed the patency of the interposition graft. Pathological diagnosis of the resected aneurysm revealed features corresponding to infectious cerebral aneurysm. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged without any neurological deficits. Conclusion: In the treatment of infectious cerebral aneurysms, revascularization should be considered when the affected artery supplies the eloquent area. Interposition graft bypass using the STA is one of the options for revascularization surgery for the treatment of infectious ACA aneurysms. PMID:26862444

  3. Revision of the Gunston polycentric knee arthroplasty with total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Memişoğlu, Kaya; Müezzinoğlu, U Sefa; Kesemenli, Cumhur Cevdet

    2010-01-01

    The Gunston polycentric knee arthroplasty, first designed and performed by Frank Gunston in 1971, is the first prosthesis considering the natural knee biomechanics. Although the polycentric knee arthroplasty showed encouraging results to relieve pain and to preserve the preoperative range of motion and joint instability, the improvements in prosthesis design and arthroplasty technology rapidly made the polycentric knee prosthesis obsolete. Herein, we report a 58-year old male patient who had revision of the Gunston polycentric knee arthroplasty with total knee arthroplasty performed 32 years after the initial operation. PMID:21343693

  4. Functional assessment of colonic interposition with 99Tcm-labeled milk

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, R.; Sutton, H.; Ackery, D.M.; Freeman, N.V. )

    1989-09-01

    A prospective study was performed to evaluate the use of radionuclide imaging in the assessment of patients who have undergone esophageal reconstruction. Dynamic radionuclide imaging was performed on ten patients aged 11 months to 11 years who had undergone colon interposition via the normal esophageal route for esophageal atresia. Patients were considered clinically unsatisfactory if at the time of imaging feeding was troubled, or if weight gain had fallen to below the third centile before operation and remained below after operation. Each patient underwent erect imaging with a small milk feed labeled with 10 to 20 MBq (250 to 500 muCi) 99Tcm DTPA adjusted according to body surface area; supine studies were subsequently performed on five patients. All five clinically unsatisfactory patients showed conduit emptying delayed beyond 45 minutes and/or spontaneous reflux, significantly different from the clinically satisfactory patients (X2 = 6.4, P less than .02). Conduit complications were subsequently identified in three of the five clinically unsatisfactory patients. Radionuclide imaging with radiolabeled milk was found to be well tolerated, and obtained results that were clinically useful. These results suggest that dynamic radionuclide imaging can be more widely applied in the assessment of esophageal substitutes.

  5. An improved Mo/n-GaAs contact by interposition of a thin Pd layer

    SciTech Connect

    Nee, C.Y.; Chang, C.Y.; Cheng, T.F.; Huang, T.S.

    1988-06-01

    The idea of limited reaction is employed to solve the adhesion and stability problems of Mo/n-GaAs and Pd/n-GaAs contacts by interposing a thin Pd layer between the Mo and GaAs. The structural and electrical properties of Mo/Pd/n-GaAs with different thicknesses of Pd layer, annealed at 300/sup 0/C up to 500/sup 0/C for 30 min, were investigated. Adhesion of Mo to GaAs has been improved with the interposition of a thin Pd layer. With increasing interposed Pd thickness, wider temperature ranges were achieved in which the contact showed rectifying Shcottky behavior. The Schottky barrier heights kept nearly constant below 300/sup 0/C and then dropped sharply at 450/sup 0/C, except those of Mo(2000 A)/Pd(200 A)/n-GaAs diodes. The ideality factors converged to nearly unity at 300/sup 0/C then increased sharply from 300 to 500/sup 0/C, except those of Mo(2000 A)/Pd/(200 A)/n-GaAs diodes, which maintained nearly a constant of 1.34 from 400 to 500/sup 0/C.

  6. NAVIGATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire

    2015-01-01

    Navigation was the most significant advance in instrumentation for total knee arthroplasty over the last decade. It provides surgeons with a precision tool for carrying out surgery, with the possibility of intraoperative simulation and objective control over various anatomical and surgical parameters and references. Since the first systems, which were basically used to control the alignment of bone cutting referenced to the mechanical axis of the lower limb, many other surgical steps have been incorporated, such as component rotation, ligament balancing and arranging the symmetry of flexion and extension spaces, among others. Its efficacy as a precision tool with an effective capacity for promoting better alignment of the lower-limb axis has been widely proven in the literature, but the real value of optimized alignment and the impact of navigation on clinical results and the longevity of arthroplasty have yet to be established. PMID:27026979

  7. Humeral windows in revision total elbow arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Peach, Chris A; Salama, Amir; Stanley, David

    2016-04-01

    The use of cortical windows for revision elbow arthroplasty has not previously been widely reported. Their use aids safe revision of a well fixed humeral prosthesis and can be used in the setting of dislocation, periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening of the ulnar component. We describe our technique and results of cortical windows in the distal humerus for revision elbow arthroplasty surgery. PMID:27583011

  8. Prosthetic graft interposition of the brachiocephalic veins or superior vena cava combined with resection of malignant tumours: graft patency and risk factors for graft occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Geun Dong; Choi, Se Hoon; Kim, Yong-Hee; Kim, Dong Kwan; Park, Seung-Il

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to assess graft patency in patients undergoing prosthetic graft interposition of the brachiocephalic veins (BCVs) or the superior vena cava (SVC) combined with resection of malignant tumours. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted on 16 patients who underwent prosthetic graft interposition of the BCVs or the SVC between 1998 and 2012. Results Among a total of 20 grafts in 16 patients (unilateral graft interposition in 12, bilateral graft interposition in 4), 8 grafts were occluded in 8 patients. Overall graft patency rate was 64.6%, 42.4% at the 2- and 5-year follow-up. Graft patency rate of the left BCV was significantly lower than that of the right BCV or the SVC (2-year patency, 38.1% vs. 81.8%, P=0.024). In univariate analysis, the superior anastomosis site [left BCV vs. right BCV; hazard ratio (HR) =2.312; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.015–5.265; P=0.046], the inferior anastomosis site (right atrial appendage vs. SVC; HR =2.409; 95% CI, 1.124–5.161; P=0.024), and interruption of warfarin (HR =5.015; 95% CI, 1.106–22.734; P=0.037) were significant risk factors for graft occlusion. Graft occlusive symptoms were identified in 4 patients who underwent unilateral graft interposition. Conclusions Prosthetic graft interposition between the left BCV and the right atrial appendage resulted in a significant rate of graft occlusion. Prosthetic graft interposition of the bilateral BCVs and long-term warfarin therapy may be necessary to prevent graft occlusive symptoms. PMID:26904213

  9. Training a Sophisticated Microsurgical Technique: Interposition of External Jugular Vein Graft in the Common Carotid Artery in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Schleimer, Karina; Grommes, Jochen; Greiner, Andreas; Jalaie, Houman; Kalder, Johannes; Langer, Stephan; Koeppel, Thomas A.; Jacobs, Michael; Kokozidou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Neointimal hyperplasia is one the primary causes of stenosis in arterialized veins that are of great importance in arterial coronary bypass surgery, in peripheral arterial bypass surgery as well as in arteriovenous fistulas.1-5 The experimental procedure of vein graft interposition in the common carotid artery by using the cuff-technique has been applied in several research projects to examine the aetiology of neointimal hyperplasia and therapeutic options to address it. 6-8 The cuff prevents vessel anastomotic remodeling and induces turbulence within the graft and thereby the development of neointimal hyperplasia. Using the superior caval vein graft is an established small-animal model for venous arterialization experiment.9-11 This current protocol refers to an established jugular vein graft interposition technique first described by Zou et al., 9 as well as others.12-14 Nevertheless, these cited small animal protocols are complicated. To simplify the procedure and to minimize the number of experimental animals needed, a detailed operation protocol by video training is presented. This video should help the novice surgeon to learn both the cuff-technique and the vein graft interposition. Hereby, the right external jugular vein was grafted in cuff-technique in the common carotid artery of 21 female Sprague Dawley rats categorized in three equal groups that were sacrificed on day 21, 42 and 84, respectively. Notably, no donor animals were needed, because auto-transplantations were performed. The survival rate was 100 % at the time point of sacrifice. In addition, the graft patency rate was 60 % for the first 10 operated animals and 82 % for the remaining 11 animals. The blood flow at the time of sacrifice was 8±3 ml/min. In conclusion, this surgical protocol considerably simplifies, optimizes and standardizes this complicated procedure. It gives novice surgeons easy, step-by-step instruction, explaining possible pitfalls, thereby helping them to gain expertise fast

  10. Training a sophisticated microsurgical technique: interposition of external jugular vein graft in the common carotid artery in rats.

    PubMed

    Schleimer, Karina; Grommes, Jochen; Greiner, Andreas; Jalaie, Houman; Kalder, Johannes; Langer, Stephan; Koeppel, Thomas A; Jacobs, Michael; Kokozidou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Neointimal hyperplasia is one the primary causes of stenosis in arterialized veins that are of great importance in arterial coronary bypass surgery, in peripheral arterial bypass surgery as well as in arteriovenous fistulas.(1-5) The experimental procedure of vein graft interposition in the common carotid artery by using the cuff-technique has been applied in several research projects to examine the aetiology of neointimal hyperplasia and therapeutic options to address it. (6-8) The cuff prevents vessel anastomotic remodeling and induces turbulence within the graft and thereby the development of neointimal hyperplasia. Using the superior caval vein graft is an established small-animal model for venous arterialization experiment.(9-11) This current protocol refers to an established jugular vein graft interposition technique first described by Zou et al., (9) as well as others.(12-14) Nevertheless, these cited small animal protocols are complicated. To simplify the procedure and to minimize the number of experimental animals needed, a detailed operation protocol by video training is presented. This video should help the novice surgeon to learn both the cuff-technique and the vein graft interposition. Hereby, the right external jugular vein was grafted in cuff-technique in the common carotid artery of 21 female Sprague Dawley rats categorized in three equal groups that were sacrificed on day 21, 42 and 84, respectively. Notably, no donor animals were needed, because auto-transplantations were performed. The survival rate was 100 % at the time point of sacrifice. In addition, the graft patency rate was 60 % for the first 10 operated animals and 82 % for the remaining 11 animals. The blood flow at the time of sacrifice was 8±3 ml/min. In conclusion, this surgical protocol considerably simplifies, optimizes and standardizes this complicated procedure. It gives novice surgeons easy, step-by-step instruction, explaining possible pitfalls, thereby helping them to gain

  11. Failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Leta, Tesfaye H; Lygre, Stein Håkon L; Skredderstuen, Arne; Hallan, Geir; Furnes, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose In Norway, the proportion of revision knee arthroplasties increased from 6.9% in 1994 to 8.5% in 2011. However, there is limited information on the epidemiology and causes of subsequent failure of revision knee arthroplasty. We therefore studied survival rate and determined the modes of failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties. Method This study was based on 1,016 aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register between 1994 and 2011. Revisions done for infections were not included. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to assess the survival rate and the relative risk of re-revision with all causes of re-revision as endpoint. Results 145 knees failed after revision total knee arthroplasty. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of re-revision (28%), followed by instability (26%), loose tibial component (17%), and pain (10%). The cumulative survival rate for revision total knee arthroplasties was 85% at 5 years, 78% at 10 years, and 71% at 15 years. Revision total knee arthroplasties with exchange of the femoral or tibial component exclusively had a higher risk of re-revision (RR = 1.7) than those with exchange of the whole prosthesis. The risk of re-revision was higher for men (RR = 2.0) and for patients aged less than 60 years (RR = 1.6). Interpretation In terms of implant survival, revision of the whole implant was better than revision of 1 component only. Young age and male sex were risk factors for re-revision. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of failure of revision of aseptic total knee arthroplasties. PMID:25267502

  12. The Painful Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Mitchell; Park, Andrew; Gerlinger, Tad L

    2016-04-01

    There are many causes of residual pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Evaluation and management begins with a comprehensive history and physical examination, followed by radiographic evaluation of the replaced and adjacent joints, as well as previous films of the replaced joint. Further workup includes laboratory analysis, along with a synovial fluid aspirate to evaluate the white blood cell count with differential as well as culture. Advanced imaging modalities may be beneficial when the diagnosis remains unclear. Revision surgery is not advisable without a clear diagnosis, as it may be associated with poor results. PMID:26772940

  13. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: An Imaging Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Da-Rae; Potter, Hollis G.; Li, Angela E.; Chun, Ka-Young; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin-Su; Young, Ki-Won

    2016-01-01

    With advances in implant technology, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis. However, reports in the literature do not focus on the imaging features of TAA. Through a literature review, we demonstrate basic design features of the current ankle arthroplasty system, and the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging features associated with such devices. Pre- and postoperative evaluations of ankle arthroplasty mainly include radiography; in addition, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide further characterization of imaging abnormalities. Familiarization with multimodal imaging features of frequent procedural complications at various postoperative intervals is important in radiological practice. PMID:27134529

  14. Neurovascular Injury in Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Neurological and vascular complications following hip arthroplasty are uncommon, and their impact ranges from transient and trivial to permanent and devastating. The proximity of neural and vascular structures makes any operation on the hip potentially hazardous. Direct or indirect injuries of these structures may occur during operative exposure and subsequent procedures. Thus, complete awareness of the anatomy of the pelvis and proximal femur is required. Peripheral nerve injuries can involve either distant sites or nerves in the immediate vicinity of the hip joint. Sciatic nerve injury is the most common nerve injury following total hip arthroplasty. Femoral nerve injury is much less common and is associated with an anterior approach. Its diagnosis is often delayed, but the prognosis is generally better than with sciatic nerve injury. The superior gluteal nerve is at risk during the direct lateral approach. Obturator nerve injury is the least common type of injury and has the least functional consequences. Vascular injuries are less common but more immediately life threatening. The mechanisms of vascular injury include occlusion associated with preexisting peripheral vascular disease and vascular injury during removal of cement during screw fixation of acetabular components, cages, or structural grafts. It is critical to avoid the anterior quadrants for acetabular screw fixation. All acetabular and femoral defects should be bone-grafted to avoid inadvertent cement migration. Following these guidelines, surgeons should be able to offer the most appropriate treatment and counseling to the patients.

  15. Cervical disc arthroplasty: Pros and cons

    PubMed Central

    Moatz, Bradley; Tortolani, P. Justin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cervical disc arthroplasty has emerged as a promising potential alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in appropriately selected patients. Despite a history of excellent outcomes after ACDF, the question as to whether a fusion leads to adjacent segment degeneration remains unanswered. Numerous US investigational device exemption trials comparing cervical arthroplasty to fusion have been conducted to answer this question. Methods: This study reviews the current research regarding cervical athroplasty, and emphasizes both the pros and cons of arthroplasty as compared with ACDF. Results: Early clinical outcomes show that cervical arthroplasty is as effective as the standard ACDF. However, this new technology is also associated with an expanding list of novel complications. Conclusion: Although there is no definitive evidence that cervical disc replacement reduces the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration, it does show other advantages; for example, faster return to work, and reduced need for postoperative bracing. PMID:22905327

  16. Introduction of total knee arthroplasty in Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    Stucinskas, Justinas; Robertsson, Otto; Wingstrand, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose We have previously reported that the first 10 years of hip arthroplasty in Lithuania resulted in a higher cumulative revision rate than that observed in Sweden. We thus compared the corresponding results after introduaction of total knee replacement in Lithuania. Methods The 10-year revision rate for the first 595 primary ScanKnee arthroplasties inserted in Klaipeda, Lithuania, was compared to that for the first 1,280 ScanKnee primary arthroplasties inserted in Sweden. As in the hip replacement study, only patients with osteoarthritis (OA) were included. Primary knee arthroplasties without patellar resurfacing were included, and the endpoint was revision for any reason other than addition of a patellar component. Results We found that the cumulative revision rate was not statistically significantly different between the groups. The revision pattern was different, however, and we observed 24 isolated patellar component additions in Sweden, but none in Klaipeda. Interpretation Contrary to the results of our previous hip arthroplasty study, the cumulative revision rate after total knee arthroplasty was similar in the two groups. This suggests that compared to hip arthroplasty, the outcome of total knee arthroplasty was less dependent on surgical experience. The large difference regarding isolated patellar component additions may be explained by long-term accumulation of severe OA cases in Lithuania. To patients subject to a newly introduced surgical treatment offering great improvement in quality of life, patellofemoral pain may be a minor problem. Furthermore, patellar problems may not have seemed particularly relevant for the surgeons, considering the disability of other patients waiting to be treated. PMID:19297790

  17. Emerging Indications for Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Urch, Ekaterina; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M

    2016-01-01

    Historically, reverse shoulder arthroplasty was reserved for older, low-demand patients in whom rotator cuff arthropathy was diagnosed. Other common indications included sequelae of previously treated proximal humerus fractures, failed anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty, tumor resection, and rheumatoid arthritis in the elderly population. Unpredictable implant durability and high complication rates have limited the use of reverse shoulder arthroplasty to a narrow group of patients. Over the past decade, however, research has led to an improved understanding of the biomechanics behind reverse shoulder prostheses, which has improved implant design and surgical techniques. Consequently, orthopaedic surgeons have slowly begun to expand the indications for reverse shoulder arthroplasty to include a wider spectrum of shoulder pathologies. Recent studies have shown promising results for patients who undergo reverse shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of acute proximal humerus fractures, massive rotator cuff tears without arthropathy, primary osteoarthritis, and chronic anterior dislocation, as well as for younger patients who have rheumatoid arthritis. These data suggest that, with judicious patient selection, reverse shoulder arthroplasty can be an excellent treatment option for a growing patient cohort. PMID:27049188

  18. Joint Line Reconstruction in Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-16

    Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty Because of; Loosening; Instability; Impingement; or Other Reasons Accepted as Indications for TKA Exchange.; The Focus is to Determine the Precision of Joint Line Restoration in Navigated vs. Conventional Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty

  19. Conversion of lateral unicompartmental arthroplasty to anterior cruciate retaining tricompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rolston, Lindsey; Moore, Christopher

    2010-06-01

    This case report presents the conversion of a lateral unicompartmental arthroplasty (UKA) to an anterior cruciate retaining tricompartmental knee arthroplasty. The patient presented with disease progression to the medial and patellofemoral compartments of the knee, in addition to significant varus deformity. During revision surgery, the previously implanted UKA device was found to be well fixed and in good condition. The conventional treatment option would be conversion to total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, in this case conversion to a tricompartmental, ligament sparing arthroplasty via implantation of a bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA) device was found to be feasible. In UKA revision cases where the device is functional, the current surgical approach may be an appropriate alternative to conventional TKA. PMID:19875295

  20. [Results of cementless hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Grübl, A

    2006-09-01

    Hip arthroplasty is performed nowadays according to the needs of the patients irrespective of their age. Tapered rectangular stems for cementless fixation are chosen in most cases in central Europe. They provide primary stability by press-fit implantation into a precisely rasped osseous bed and secondary stability by bone ingrowth into the highly biocompatible titanium alloy with a microrough surface. The 10-year survival of such devices is 92%. Typical radiographic patterns include cortical atrophy and radiolucent lines in Gruen zones 1 and 7. They are due to stress shielding with these distally fixed implants. The number one reason for revision is polyethylene wear and subsequent osteolysis. Metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic bearings show less wear but osteolysis continues to be a problem. PMID:16552511

  1. Biomechanical comparison of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) and PTFE interpositional patches and direct tendon-to-bone repair for massive rotator cuff tears in an ovine model

    PubMed Central

    McKeown, Andrew DJ; Beattie, Rebekah F; Murrell, George AC

    2015-01-01

    Background Massive irreparable rotator cuff tears are a difficult problem. Modalities such as irrigation and debridement, partial repair, tendon transfer and grafts have been utilized with high failure rates and mixed results. Synthetic interpositional patch repairs are a novel and increasingly used approach. The present study aimed to examine the biomechanical properties of common synthetic materials for interpositional repairs in contrast to native tendon. Methods Six ovine tendons, six polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) felt sections and six expanded PTFE (ePTFE) patch sections were pulled-to-failure to analyze their biomechanical and material properties. Six direct tendon-to-bone surgical method repairs, six interpositional PTFE felt patch repairs and six interpositional ePTFE patch repairs were also constructed in ovine shoulders and pulled-to-failure to examine the biomechanical properties of each repair construct. Results Ovine tendon had higher load-to-failure (591 N) and had greater stiffness (108 N/mm) than either PTFE felt (296 N, 28 N/mm) or ePTFE patch sections (323 N, 34 N/mm). Both PTFE felt and ePTFE repair techniques required greater load-to-failure (225 N and 177 N, respectively) than direct tendon-to-bone surgical repairs (147 N) in ovine models. Conclusions Synthetic materials lacked several biomechanical properties, including strength and stiffness, compared to ovine tendon. Interpositional surgical repair models with these materials were significantly stronger than direct tendon-to-bone model repairs. PMID:27582997

  2. Patients’ decision making in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, T.; Griffin, D.; Barlow, D.; Realpe, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A patient-centred approach, usually achieved through shared decision making, has the potential to help improve decision making around knee arthroplasty surgery. However, such an approach requires an understanding of the factors involved in patient decision making. This review’s objective is to systematically examine the qualitative literature surrounding patients’ decision making in knee arthroplasty. Methods A systematic literature review using Medline and Embase was conducted to identify qualitative studies that examined patients’ decision making around knee arthroplasty. An aggregated account of what is known about patients’ decision making in knee arthroplasties is provided. Results Seven studies with 234 participants in interviews or focus groups are included. Ten themes are replicated across studies, namely: expectations of surgery; coping mechanisms; relationship with clinician; fear; pain; function; psychological implications; social network; previous experience of surgery; and conflict in opinions. Conclusions This review is helpful in not only directing future research to areas that are not understood, or require confirmation, but also in highlighting areas that future interventions could address. These include those aimed at delivering information, which are likely to affect the satisfaction rate, demand, and use of knee arthroplasties. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4;163–169. PMID:26450640

  3. Squeaking hip arthroplasties: a tribological phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Brockett, Claire L; Williams, Sophie; Jin, Zhongmin; Isaac, Graham H; Fisher, John

    2013-01-01

    The clinical incidence of squeaking has been reported with increasing frequency, with ceramic-on-ceramic bearings seemingly most affected. This study investigated potential causes of squeaking in hard-on-hard hip bearings through 2 sets of experimental conditions. Bearing clearance appeared to affect the incidence of squeaking in metal-on-metal surface arthroplasties. The addition of third-body particles to the interface for total hip arthroplasties also affected the incidence of squeaking. In both studies, the incidence of squeaking correlated well with elevated friction. The findings of this study suggest that a likely cause of squeaking in the hip arthroplasty is adverse tribological conditions caused by suboptimal lubrication. There are numerous factors that may cause the suboptimal lubrication, and therefore, it is unlikely that an individual cause for squeaking will be identified. PMID:22480525

  4. Tranexamic Acid in Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Melvin, J Stuart; Stryker, Louis S; Sierra, Rafael J

    2015-12-01

    Perioperative blood loss is a significant concern for patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty. A growing body of evidence has shown tranexamic acid (TXA) to be effective in decreasing perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements in both primary and revision hip and knee arthroplasty. TXA is a synthetic drug that limits blood loss through inhibition of fibrinolysis and clot degradation. Both topical and intravenous administration of TXA, in a variety of dosing regimens, has proven effective. Further investigation is required to determine the optimal dose and dosing regimens; however, evidence exists to recommend an initial intravenous dose be given before beginning the procedure, with at least one additional intravenous dose administered postoperatively. Additionally, topical TXA doses >2 g appear to be more efficacious than lower doses. Finally, relatively few adverse reactions have been reported in arthroplasty patients, and no study to date has demonstrated an increased risk of symptomatic venous thromboembolic events in this patient population. PMID:26493971

  5. Total Hip Arthroplasty around the Inception of the Interface Bioactive Bone Cement Technique

    PubMed Central

    Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Kawahara, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Background To augment cement-bone fixation, Dr. Hironobu Oonishi attempted additional physicochemical bonding through interposition of osteoconductive crystal hydroxyapatite (HA) granules at the cement-bone interface in 1982. He first used the interface bioactive bone cement (IBBC) technique in 12 selected patients (12 hips) in 1982 (first stage) and followed them for 2 years. In 1985, the technique was applied in 25 total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients (second stage) and the effects were investigated by comparing the side with the IBBC technique and the other side without the IBBC technique. He has employed this technique in all THA patients since 1987 (third stage). Methods In the IBBC technique, HA granules (2 to 3 g) were smeared on the bone surface just before the acetabular and femoral components were cemented. In the first stage, 12 hips were operated using the IBBC technique in 1982. In the second stage, THA was performed without the IBBC technique on one side and with the IBBC technique on the other side within 1 year in 25 patients. In the third stage, THA was performed with the IBBC technique in 285 hips in 1987. Results In the first stage patients, implant loosening was not detected at 30 years after operation. In the second stage patients, revision was required in 7 hips without the IBBC technique due to cup loosening (5 hips) and stem loosening (2 hips), whereas no hip was revised after THA with the IBBC technique at 26 years after operation. In the third stage patients, the incidence of radiolucent lines and osteolysis was very few at 25 years after operation. Conclusions The long-term follow-up of THA performed around the inception of the IBBC technique has revealed low incidences of radiolucent lines, osteolysis, and revision surgery. PMID:27583104

  6. Total Elbow Arthroplasty for Distal Humerus Fractures.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Luke S; Sanchez-Sotelo, Joaquin

    2015-11-01

    Total elbow arthroplasty is a good treatment alternative for selected patients with distal humerus fractures. Its attractiveness is related to several factors, including the possibility of performing the procedure; leaving the extensor mechanism intact; faster, easier rehabilitation compared with internal fixation; and overall good outcomes reported in terms of both pain relief and function. Implant failure leading to revision surgery does happen, and patients must comply with certain limitations to extend the longevity of their implant. Development of high-performance implants may allow expanding the indications of elbow arthroplasty for fractures. PMID:26498549

  7. Biomechanics of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Berliner, Jonathan L; Regalado-Magdos, Ashton; Ma, C Benjamin; Feeley, Brian T

    2015-01-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is an effective procedure for treatment of glenohumeral joint disease among patients with severe rotator cuff deficiency. Improvements in prosthetic design are the result of an evolved understanding of both shoulder and joint replacement biomechanics. Although modern generations of the reverse shoulder prosthesis vary in specific design details, they continue to adhere to Grammont's core principles demonstrated by his original Delta III prosthesis. This review article discusses the biomechanics of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty with a focus on elements of implant design and surgical technique that may affect stability, postoperative complications, and functional outcomes. PMID:25441574

  8. Dislocation following total knee arthroplasty: A report of six cases

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Manuel; Ríos-Luna, Antonio; Pereiro, Javier; Fahandez-Saddi, Homid; Pérez-Caballer, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Background: Dislocation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the worst form of instability. The incidence is from 0.15 to 0.5%. We report six cases of TKA dislocation and analyze the patterns of dislocation and the factors related to each of them. Materials and Methods: Six patients with dislocation of knee following TKA are reported. The causes for the dislocations were an imbalance of the flexion gap (n=4), an inadequate selection of implants (n=1), malrotation of components (n=1) leading to incompetence of the extensor mechanism, or rupture of the medial collateral ligament (MCC). The patients presented complained of pain, giving way episodes, joint effusion and difficulty in climbing stairs. Five patients suffered posterior dislocation while one anterior dislocation. An urgent closed reduction of dislocation was performed under general anaesthesia in all patients. All patients were operated for residual instability by revision arthroplasty after a period of conservative treatment. Results: One patient had deep infection and knee was arthrodesed. Two patients have a minimal residual lag for active extension, including a patient with a previous patellectomy. Result was considered excellent or good in four cases and fair in one, without residual instability. Five out of six patients in our series had a cruciate retaining (CR) TKA designs: four were revised to a posterior stabilized (PS) TKA and one to a rotating hinge design because of the presence of a ruptured MCL. Conclusion: Further episodes of dislocation or instability will be prevented by identifying and treating major causes of instability. The increase in the level of constraint and correction of previous technical mistakes is mandatory. PMID:20924487

  9. Immediate breast reconstruction using the free lumbar artery perforator flap and lateral thoracic vein interposition graft for recipient lateral thoracic artery anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Satake, Toshihiko; Nakasone, Reiko; Kobayashi, Shinji; Maegawa, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    The lumbar artery perforator (LAP) flap, which contains excess skin and fat tissue, love handles, that extends from the lower back to upper buttock, may provide an alternate tissue source for autologous breast reconstruction. However, LAP flap use during this procedure frequently requires vessel interposition grafts to correct the short flap pedicle length and mismatched recipient vessel calibre. A 46-year-old patient underwent a right nipple-sparing mastectomy using a lateral approach for ductal carcinoma in situ and immediate LAP flap breast reconstruction. The lateral thoracic vessel served as the recipient vessel, and a lateral thoracic vein interposition graft from the distal remnant was performed to adjust the arterial length and size discrepancy between the recipient lateral thoracic artery and pedicle artery. This procedure facilitates microsurgical anastomosis and medialisation of LAP flap to make a natural decollete line and create a cleavage for the reconstructed breast.

  10. Implant Design in Cementless Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Taek

    2016-01-01

    When performing cementless hip arthroplasty, it is critical to achieve firm primary mechanical stability followed by biological fixation. In order to achieve this, it is essential to fully understand characteristics of implant design. In this review, the authors review fixation principles for a variety of implants used for cementless hip replacement and considerations for making an optimal selection. PMID:27536647

  11. Periprosthetic fractures in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Van Flandern, Geoffrey J

    2005-09-01

    Periprosthetic fractures can be discussed in many formats. In this article, epidemiology, classification, and treatment are divided into the following three categories of periprosthetic fracture: intraoperative fractures detected at the time of surgery; intraoperative fractures undetected at the time of surgery, but detected postoperatively; and postoperative fractures occurring late after the arthroplasty procedure. PMID:16190043

  12. Knee arthroplasty in Denmark, Norway and Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Bizjajeva, Svetlana; Fenstad, Anne Marie; Furnes, Ove; Lidgren, Lars; Mehnert, Frank; Odgaard, Anders; Pedersen, Alma Becic; Havelin, Leif Ivar

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose The number of national arthroplasty registries is increasing. However, the methods of registration, classification, and analysis often differ. Methods We combined data from 3 Nordic knee arthroplasty registers, comparing demographics, methods, and overall results. Primary arthroplasties during the period 1997–2007 were included. Each register produced a dataset of predefined variables, after which the data were combined and descriptive and survival statistics produced. Results The incidence of knee arthroplasty increased in all 3 countries, but most in Denmark. Norway had the lowest number of procedures per hospital—less than half that of Sweden and Denmark. The preference for implant brands varied and only 3 total brands and 1 unicompartmental brand were common in all 3 countries. Use of patellar button for total knee arthroplasty was popular in Denmark (76%) but not in Norway (11%) or Sweden (14%). Uncemented or hybrid fixation of components was also more frequent in Denmark (22%) than in Norway (14%) and Sweden (2%). After total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, the cumulative revision rate (CRR) was lowest in Sweden, with Denmark and Norway having a relative risk (RR) of 1.4 (95% CI: 1.3–1.6) and 1.6 (CI: 1.4–1.7) times higher. The result was similar when only including brands used in more than 200 cases in all 3 countries (AGC, Duracon, and NexGen). After unicompartmental arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, the CRR for all models was also lowest in Sweden, with Denmark and Norway having RRs of 1.7 (CI: 1.4–2.0) and 1.5 (CI: 1.3–1.8), respectively. When only the Oxford implant was analyzed, however, the CRRs were similar and the RRs were 1.2 (CI: 0.9–1.7) and 1.3 (CI: 1.0–1.7). Interpretation We found considerable differences between the 3 countries, with Sweden having a lower revision rate than Denmark and Norway. Further classification and standardization work is needed to permit more elaborate studies. PMID:20180723

  13. [Repair of a facial nerve substance loss by interposition of a collagen neurotube].

    PubMed

    Semere, A; Morand, B; Loury, J; Vuillerme, N; Bettega, G

    2014-08-01

    We are exposing the case of a 22 year-old patient presenting a wound of the right cheek, with a palsy of the right corner of the mouth. He has been sent to us 6 days after the trauma for secondary exploration. A section of the buccal branch of the right facial nerve with a 1cm gap has been brought out. We have bypassed the loss of substance with a collagen absorbable biological conduit. The 6-months clinical and electromyographic follow-up has shown a clear improvement of the function of the orbicularis oris, as well as its reinnervation by the buccal branch of the right facial nerve. PMID:24698336

  14. Synovial cutaneous fistula complicating a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Letter, Haley P; Limback, Joseph; Wasyliw, Christopher; Bancroft, Laura; Scherer, Kurt

    2016-06-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is becoming a common form of shoulder arthroplasty that is often performed in the setting of rotator cuff pathology. Infection is a rare complication but is more common in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty than in hemiarthroplasty or anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty. We present the case of a 69-year-old patient with a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty who presented with purulent drainage from the skin of his anterior shoulder. Computed tomography arthrogram confirmed the presence of a synovial cutaneous fistula. Synovial cutaneous fistula is a rare variant of periprosthetic infection that, to our knowledge, has not been described previously in the setting of a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Computed tomography arthrogram proved to be a reliable method for confirming the diagnosis and was used for operative planning to remove the hardware. PMID:27257460

  15. [Intraoperative Evaluation of Total Knee Arthroplasty: Anatomic and Kinematic Assessment with Trial Components].

    PubMed

    von Roth, P; Pfitzner, T; Fuchs, M; Perka, C

    2015-06-01

    The intraoperative use of trial components in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is of paramount importance to prevent inadequate ligament balance and to achieve optimal position of the definitive components. This review demonstrates an 8-step algorithm to assess the anatomy of the femoral, tibial and patellar component as well as the kinematics of the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints. Trial components allow an easy assessment of the anatomic fit of the final implants. Upon the trials insertion, bone coverage and the component overhang should be evaluated. The femoral rotation should be assessed using the transepicondylar axis and for the tibial component rotation assessment, the tibial tuberosity would be the most reliable bony landmark. Addressing the patella, sizing and bone coverage should be thoroughly evaluated. In order to restore physiological kinematics the remnants of the meniscus rim can be used to determine the correct reconstruction of the joint line. A tight extension gap results in limited extension, whereas a tight or unbalanced flexion gap leads to "booking" or "spin-out" of the inlay. The POLO test (pull-out, lift- off) allows an easy assessment of the posterior cruciate ligament tension and the size of the flexion gap as well. To prevent postoperative dislocation and overstuffing, specific tests for correct patellar positioning and tracking support should be performed. The anatomy and kinematics of total knee arthroplasty have to be evaluated by trial components on a routine basis before inserting the final implants in order to identify implant positioning errors and inadequate ligament balance. PMID:26114563

  16. Popliteal Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young-Soo; Hwang, Yeok-Gu; Savale, Abhijit Prakash

    2014-01-01

    An early diagnosis of popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm-a sequela of popliteal artery trauma-is difficult owing to its late presentation following total knee arthroplasty. The incidence of a popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm with a hematoma presenting only a peripheral nerve injury after total knee arthroplasty is also uncommon in the absence of common diagnostic features such as a pulsatile swelling with an audible bruit on auscultation. In the present report, we describe popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm following total knee arthroplasty. PMID:24944978

  17. Mycobacterium smegmatis infection of a prosthetic total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Saffo, Zaid; Ognjan, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The most common organisms causing prosthetic knee joint infections are staphylococci. However, arthroplasty infections with atypical microbial pathogens, such as Mycobacteria can occur. Due to the rarity of mycobacterial prosthetic joint infections, diagnosis, treatment, and management of these atypical infections represent a clinical challenge. A 71-year old female post-operative day 40 after a left total knee arthroplasty was hospitalized secondary to left knee pain and suspected arthroplasty infection. She had failed outpatient oral antimicrobial treatment for superficial stitch abscess; and outpatient IV/Oral antimicrobials for a clinical postoperative septic bursitis. Ultimately, resection arthroplasty with operative tissue acid fast bacterial cultures demonstrated growth of the Mycobacterium smegmatis group. Post-operatively, she completed a combination course of oral doxycycline and levofloxacin and successfully completed a replacement arthroplasty with clinical and microbial resolution of the infection. To our knowledge, literature review demonstrates three case of knee arthroplasty infection caused by the Mycobacterium smegmatis group. Correspondingly, optimal surgical procedures and antimicrobial management including antimicrobial selection, treatment duration are not well defined. Presently, the best treatment options consists of two step surgical management including prosthesis hardware removal followed by extended antimicrobial therapy, followed by consideration for re-implantation arthroplasty. Our case illustrates importance of considering atypical mycobacterial infections in post-operative arthroplasty infections not responding to traditional surgical manipulations and antimicrobials. For an arthroplasty infection involving the atypical Mycobacterium smegmatis group, two step arthroplasty revision, including arthroplasty resection, with a combination of oral doxycycline and levofloxacin can lead to successful infection resolution, allowing for a

  18. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  19. The rotating platform mobile bearing total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sorrells, R B

    2000-01-01

    The recent evolution of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has been substantial and unlike that of total hip arthroplasty (THA). The current THA technique is similar to that initially developed and perfected by Professor John Charnley in the mid 1960s. The ball-and-socket articulation of the hip is simple and reproducible biomechanically. The long term (20 years and longer) results with total hip arthroplasty have been very satisfactory. The THA prosthetic designs of today remain similar to those of years past. Improvements have been in biomaterials, methods of fixation and surgical technique. The total knee arthroplasty prostheses of today differ greatly from their predecessors. PMID:21136412

  20. The Rotating Platform Mobile Bearing Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sorrells, R Barry

    2000-10-01

    The recent evolution of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has been substantial and unlike that of total hip arthroplasty (THA). The current THA technique is similar to that initially developed and perfected by Professor John Charnley in the mid 1960s. The ball-and-socket articulation of the hip is simple and reproducible biomechanically. The long term (20 years and longer) results with total hip arthroplasty have been very satisfactory. The THA prosthetic designs of today remain similar to those of years past. Improvements have been in biomaterials, methods of fixation and surgical technique. The total knee arthroplasty prostheses of today differ greatly from their predecessors. PMID:12219304

  1. Unexpected wear of an unicompartimental knee arthroplasty in oxidized zirconium.

    PubMed

    Luyet, Anais; Fischer, Jean-François; Jolles, Brigitte M; Lunebourg, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    Unicompartimental knee arthroplasty is a successful procedure for the treatment of localized osteoarthritis to one compartment of the knee with good long-term results. However, several modes of failure of unicompartimental knee arthroplasty have been described, namely aseptic or septic loosening, progression of disease, wear, and instability. Metallosis after unicompartimental knee arthroplasty is rarely reported and is most often related with polyethylene wear or break. We report on a case of rapid failure of unicompartimental knee arthroplasty in oxidized zirconium associated with metallosis secondary to the dislocation of the polyethylene. PMID:26790806

  2. Qualifying CT for wrist arthroplasty: extending techniques for total hip arthroplasty to total wrist arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcala, Yvonne; Olivecrona, Henrik; Olivecrona, Lotta; Noz, Marilyn E.; Maguire, Gerald Q., Jr.; Zeleznik, Michael P.; Sollerman, Christer

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend previous work to detect migration of total wrist arthroplasty non-invasively, and with greater accuracy. Two human cadaverous arms, each with a cemented total wrist implant, were used in this study. In one of the arms, 1 mm tantalum balls were implanted, six in the carpal bones and five in the radius. Five CT scans of each arm were acquired, changing the position of the arm each time to mimic different positions patients might take on repeated examinations. Registration of CT volume data sets was performed using an extensively validated, 3D semi-automatic volume fusion tool in which co-homologous point pairs (landmarks) are chosen on each volume to be registered. Three sets of ten cases each were obtained by placing landmarks on 1) bone only (using only arm one), 2) tantalum implants only, and 3) bone and tantalum implants (both using only arm two). The accuracy of the match was assessed visually in 2D and 3D, and numerically by calculating the distance difference between the actual position of the transformed landmarks and their ideal position (i.e., the reference landmark positions). All cases were matched visually within one width of cortical bone and numerically within one half CT voxel (0.32 mm, p = 0.05). This method matched only the bone/arm and not the prosthetic component per se, thus making it possible to detect prosthetic movement and wear. This method was clinically used for one patient with pain. Loosening of the carpal prosthetic component was accurately detected and this was confirmed at surgery.

  3. Radiological assessment of irreducible posterolateral knee subluxation after dislocation due to interposition of the vastus medialis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Paulin, Emilie; Boudabbous, Sana; Nicodème, Jean-Damien; Arditi, Daniel; Becker, Christoph

    2015-06-01

    Knee dislocation is a serious and relatively uncommon traumatism that every emergency room is supposed to diagnose and treat rapidly. Most of the time these dislocations reduce spontaneously or with closed reduction. If a subluxation persists, an incarceration of soft tissue in the joint must be suspected. Irreducible knee subluxations after dislocation are rare entities better described in the orthopaedic than in the radiological literature. However, the initial radiological assessment is an important tool to obtain the correct diagnosis, to detect neurovascular complications, and to plan the most suitable treatment. In cases of delayed diagnosis, the functional prognosis of the joint and even the limb may be seriously compromised primarily because of vascular lesions. Thereby, vascular imaging is essential in cases of dislocation of the knee, and we will discuss the role of angiography and the more recent use of computed tomography angiography or magnetic resonance angiography. Our patient presented with an irreducible knee subluxation due to interposition of the vastus medialis, and we will review the classical clinical presentation and 'do not miss' imaging findings on conventional radiography, computed tomography angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Finally, we will also report the classical imaging pathway indicated in knee dislocation, with a special emphasis on the irreducible form. PMID:25560996

  4. Effectively Axonal-supercharged Interpositional Jump-Graft with an Artificial Nerve Conduit for Rat Facial Nerve Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Yosuke; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Sasaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Yamato, Masayuki; Miyata, Mariko; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interpositional jump graft (IPJG) is a nerve graft axonally supercharged from the hypoglossal nerve. However, for using the technique, an autologous nerve, which should contain the great auricular and sural nerves, must be obtained. Depending on the donor site, unavoidable issues such as nerve disorders and postoperative scarring may appear. To reduce the issues, in this study, the authors developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit and investigated the efficacy of an IPJG with an artificial nerve conduit in a rat facial nerve paresis model. Methods: A ligature clip was used to crush the facial nerve trunk, thereby creating a partial facial nerve paresis model. An artificial nerve conduit was then prepared with a 10-mm-long silicone tube containing 10 μL type I collagen and used to create an IPJG between the facial nerve trunk and the hypoglossal nerve (the silicone tube group). Thirteen weeks after the surgery, the outcome was histologically and physiologically compared with conventional IPJG with autograft using the great auricular nerve. Results: Retrograde tracer test confirmed a double innervation by the facial and hypoglossal nerve nuclei. In the autograft and silicone tube groups, the regeneration of myelinated axons was observed. Conclusion: In this study, the authors successfully developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit, and revealed that an IPJG in the conduit was effective in the rat facial nerve paresis model. PMID:26180717

  5. Dissociation of intestinal and hepatic activities of FXR and LXRα supports metabolic effects of terminal ileum interposition in rodents.

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Renga, Barbara; D'Amore, Claudio; Santorelli, Chiara; Graziosi, Luigina; Bruno, Angela; Monti, Maria Chiara; Distrutti, Eleonora; Cipriani, Sabrina; Donini, Annibale; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2013-10-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and the liver x receptors (LXRs) are bile acid-activated receptors that are highly expressed in the enterohepatic tissues. The mechanisms that support the beneficial effects of bariatric surgery are only partially defined. We have investigated the effects of ileal interposition (IT), a surgical relocation of the distal ileum into the proximal jejunum, on FXR and LXRs in rats. Seven months after surgery, blood concentrations of total bile acids, taurocholic acid, an FXR ligand, and taurohyocholic acid, an LXRα ligand, were significantly increased by IT (P < 0.05). In contrast, liver and intestinal concentrations of conjugated and nonconjugated bile acids were decreased (P < 0.05). These changes were associated with a robust induction of FXR and FXR-regulated genes in the intestine, including Fgf15, a negative regulator of bile acid synthesis. IT repressed the liver expression of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pepck), two gluconeogenetic genes, along with the expression of LXRα and its target genes sterol regulatory element-binding protein (Srebp) 1c and fatty acid synthase (Fas) in the liver. Treating IT rats with chenodeoxycholic acid ameliorated insulin signaling in the liver. Whether confirmed in human settings, these results support the association of pharmacological therapies with bariatric surgeries to exploit the selective activation of intestinal nuclear receptors. PMID:23835330

  6. Robotic repair of a vesicovaginal fistula in an irradiated field using a dehydrated amniotic allograft as an interposition patch.

    PubMed

    Price, David T; Price, Tina C

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a 66 year old female with a supratrigonal vesicovaginal fistula (VVF) that developed after undergoing radical hysterectomy, chemotherapy and pelvic radiation therapy for advanced cervical cancer. VVF repairs in an irradiated field are known to be complicated procedures with significant morbidity and a high rate of failure due to the effect of radiation. Amniotic membranes have been demonstrated to improve healing rates in difficult to heal wounds. To decrease morbidity a minimally invasive robotic procedure was performed and a dehydrated amniotic allograft patch was used to augment tissue healing. The VVF was repaired using the da Vinci Surgical System and the amniotic membrane was used as an interposition patch over the repair. There were no operative or postoperative complications and the patient was discharged home on postoperative day one. A cystogram performed 3 weeks postoperatively demonstrated a healed fistula. Follow-up at 5 months revealed no incontinence. This is the first reported case of a robotic VVF repair performed in an irradiated pelvis and the first use of an amniotic membrane allograft in the repair a VVF. PMID:26661412

  7. The dimensional accuracy of preparation of femoral cavity in cementless total hip arthroplasty*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-dong; Hahne, HJ; Hassenpflug, J

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the accuracy of femoral preparation and the position of the cementless prosthesis in femoral cavity, and to compare the results between the computer-assisted surgical group (CASPAR) and the conventional group. Methods: Ten femoral components were implanted either manually or by CASPAR in cadaver femurs. The specimens were cut to 3 mm thick slices. Microradiograms of every slice were sent to a computer for analysis with special software (IDL). The gaps and the medullary cavities between component and bone, the direct bone contact area of the implant surface, the gap width and the percentage of gap and bone contact area were measured in every slice. Results: In the proximal implant coated with HA of the CASPAR group, the average percentage of bone contact reached 93.2% (ranging from 87.6% to 99.7%); the average gap percentage was 2.9% (ranging from 0.3% to 7.8%); the maximum gap width was 0.81 mm and the average gap width was only 0.20 mm. While in the conventional group, the average percentage of bone contact reached 60.1% (ranging from 49.2% to 70.4%); the average gap percentage was 32.8% (ranging from 25.1% to 39.9%); the maximum gap width was 2.97 mm and the average gap width was 0.77 mm. The average gap around the implant in the CASPAR group was only 9% of that in the manual group; the maximum and average gap widths were only about 26% of those in the manual group. On the other hand, the CASPAR group showed 33% higher bone contact than the manual group. Conclusion: With the use of robotics-assisted system, significant progress can be achieved for femoral preparation in total hip arthroplasty. PMID:15362200

  8. Pain Management After Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Lisa T; Corbiere, Nicole C; DeLisle, Jay A; Clark, Alexander Martin; Kuxhaus, Laurel

    2016-06-01

    Controlling pain after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is critical to minimizing complications, decreasing costs, and expediting patients' return to function. We implemented a TJA multimodal pain management protocol at a Level III trauma center in a small, rural community in New York. We retrospectively reviewed 266 patient charts and collected patient demographics, pain management information, and discharge data. Our primary goals were to quantify the total number of narcotic medication doses used and length of hospital stay. The multimodal pain management protocol significantly reduced the number of narcotic doses used (P < .01). Hospital length of stay decreased slightly; although not statistically significant (P = .25), this may be clinically significant. Gender, age, and type of arthroplasty (ie, knee, hip) were not significant factors. A multimodal approach to pain management after TJA can reduce narcotic use and hospital length of stay, thereby also reducing the incidence of side effects from narcotics. PMID:27234795

  9. Stemless shoulder arthroplasty: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    PETRICCIOLI, DARIO; BERTONE, CELESTE; MARCHI, GIACOMO

    2015-01-01

    The design of humeral implants for shoulder arthroplasty has evolved over the years. The new-generation modular shoulder prostheses have an anatomical humeral stem that replicates the three-dimensional parameters of the proximal humerus. An anatomical reconstruction is the best way to restore stability and mobility of the prosthetic shoulder and improve implant durability. However, a perfect anatomical match is not always possible in, for example, patients with post-traumatic osteoarthritis of the shoulder and deformities in the metaphyseal region. To avoid stem-related complications while retaining the advantages of the fourth generation of shoulder implants, different stemless implants have been developed. The stemless shoulder prosthesis is a new concept in shoulder arthroplasty. The authors review the indications, surgical technique, clinical and radiological midterm results, and complications of these humeral implants. PMID:26151038

  10. Active Robotics for Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dungy, Danton S; Netravali, Nathan A

    2016-01-01

    Robotics and computer-assisted navigation have been developed to increase the accuracy of hip implant placement and improve long-term outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA). These technologies have shown significant improvements in implant positioning when compared to conventional techniques. Currently, 3 robotic systems are cleared for use for THA in the US. The lead author (DSD) describes his preferred technique for using one of these systems, the TSolution One® (Think Surgical, Inc.). PMID:27327918

  11. Proximal tibial fracture following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Krause, Heike; Dunleavy, Kim

    2011-09-01

    The patient was a 74-year-old man, with a history of total knee arthoplasty 14 years earlier, after having sustained a pathological fracture of the proximal diaphysis of the left tibia following a fall. Given the unstable nature of the fracture and the severe osteolysis noted below the total knee arthroplasty, surgical management 1 day after the fall entailed packing cancellous bone graft into the defect and realigning the fracture. PMID:21885911

  12. Gap Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-16

    With the continued improvements of next generation DNA sequencing technologies and their advantages over traditional Sanger sequencing, the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) has modified its sequencing pipeline to take advantage of the benefits of such technologies. Currently, standard 454 Titanium, paired end 454 Titanium, and Illumina GAll data are generated for all microbial projects and then assembled using draft assemblies at a much greater throughput than before. However, it also presents us with new challenges. In addition to the increased throughput, we also have to deal with a larger number of gaps in the Newbler genome assemblies. Gaps in these assemblies are usually caused by repeats (Newbler collapses repeat copies into individual contigs, thus creating gaps), strong secondary structures, and artifacts of the PCR process (specific to 454 paired end libraries). Some gaps in draft assemblies can be resolved merely by adding back the collapsed data from repeats. To expedite gap closure and assembly improvement on large numbers of these assemblies, we developed software to address this issue.

  13. Gap Resolution

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-06-16

    With the continued improvements of next generation DNA sequencing technologies and their advantages over traditional Sanger sequencing, the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) has modified its sequencing pipeline to take advantage of the benefits of such technologies. Currently, standard 454 Titanium, paired end 454 Titanium, and Illumina GAll data are generated for all microbial projects and then assembled using draft assemblies at a much greater throughput than before. However, it also presents us with new challenges.more » In addition to the increased throughput, we also have to deal with a larger number of gaps in the Newbler genome assemblies. Gaps in these assemblies are usually caused by repeats (Newbler collapses repeat copies into individual contigs, thus creating gaps), strong secondary structures, and artifacts of the PCR process (specific to 454 paired end libraries). Some gaps in draft assemblies can be resolved merely by adding back the collapsed data from repeats. To expedite gap closure and assembly improvement on large numbers of these assemblies, we developed software to address this issue.« less

  14. Outcome of patellofemoral arthroplasty, determinants for success.

    PubMed

    Willekens, Philippe; Victor, Jan; Verbruggen, Dimitri; Vande Kerckhove, Michiel; Van Der Straeten, Catherine

    2015-12-01

    The primary aim of this study is to document whether patellofemoral arthroplasty is a good treatment option for patellofemoral osteoarthritis and to identify prognostic outcome factors. Secondary aim is to investigate the influence of preoperative tibiofemoral osteoarthritis on the clinical outcome. From 2004 to 2010, 37 Avon patellofemoral prostheses were implanted in 32 patients. Clinical outcome was evaluated with five questionnaires: KOOS, Kujala, VAS, OKS and Satisfaction Score. Radiographs were analyzed using the IWANO and Kellgren-Lawrence classification. To identify determinants of outcome, subgroups were examined according to sex, age, diagnosis, BMI and prior surgery. Patellofemoral arthroplasty is a valuable treatment for patellofemoral osteoarthritis. After prosthesis placement, KOOS, Kujala, VAS and OKS improved significantly (all p < 0.001). Patients with prior patellofemoral surgery were clinically worse (p < 0.05). Patients with preoperative Kellgren-Lawrence grade 2 tibiofemoral osteoarthritis had a significantly worse outcome compared to grade 1 (p < 0.05). Further research is necessary to determine whether patellofemoral arthroplasty is indicated in these patients. PMID:26790802

  15. Periprosthetic Fractures Following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Ki

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty may occur in any part of the femur, tibia and patella, and the most common pattern involves the supracondylar area of the distal femur. Supracondylar periprosthetic fractures frequently occur above a well-fixed prosthesis, and risk factors include anterior femoral cortical notching and use of the rotational constrained implant. Periprosthetic tibial fractures are frequently associated with loose components and malalignment or malposition of implants. Fractures of the patella are much less common and associated with rheumatoid arthritis, use of steroid, osteonecrosis and malalignment of implants. Most patients with periprosthetic fractures around the knee are the elderly with poor bone quality. There are many difficulties and increased risk of nonunion after treatment because reduction and internal fixation is interfered with by preexisting prosthesis and bone cement. Additionally, previous soft tissue injury is another disadvantageous condition for bone healing. Many authors reported good clinical outcomes after non-operative treatment of undisplaced or minimally displaced periprosthetic fractures; however, open reduction or revision arthroplasty was required in displaced fractures or fractures with unstable prosthesis. Periprosthetic fractures around the knee should be prevented by appropriate technique during total knee arthroplasty. Nevertheless, if a periprosthetic fracture occurs, an appropriate treatment method should be selected considering the stability of the prosthesis, displacement of fracture and bone quality. PMID:25750888

  16. Ceramic/ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bizot, P; Nizard, R; Lerouge, S; Prudhommeaux, F; Sedel, L

    2000-01-01

    Alumina-on-alumina total hip arthroplasty has been used for 30 years, mainly in Europe. The theoretical advantages of this combination are represented by its remarkable sliding characteristics, its very low wear debris generation, and its sufficient fracture toughness. These advantages are achieved if the material is properly controlled with high density, high purity, and small grains. The authors summarize the results obtained with ceramic/ceramic total hip arthroplasty. Information is provided about in vivo behavior regarding wear debris characterization and quantification, and histological tissue examinations for inflammatory reactions, which were not encountered except when alumina debris was mixed with metal or cement. Modification of socket fixation resulted in improved clinical outcomes. With a press-fit metal shell and an alumina liner utilized for 10 years, the results are excellent especially in a young and active population. Alumina-on-alumina seems at the moment to be one of the best choices when a total hip arthroplasty has to be performed in young and active patients. PMID:11180930

  17. TREATMENT OF INFECTION AFTER TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Ricardo de Paula Leite; Cinagawa, Eduardo Hitoshi Tsuge; Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix; Honda, Emerson Kiyoshi; Klautau, Giselle Burlamaqui; Salles, Mauro José Costa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To identify and compare the rate of success of therapeutic modalities applied in surgeries for the treatment of infections associated with total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and to evaluate the functional outcome and pain in different therapeutic modalities by means of quality of life scores. Methods: We evaluated all patients who developed periprosthetic infection after TKA for primary or secondary osteoarthritis, in the period from January 1st, 2008 to December 31st, 2010. Results: In the study period, 29 patients with TKA had infection, and 12 of these underwent debridement and retention of the prosthesis (D+R), seven received two-stage and six one-stage exchange arthroplasties, and four patients were treated with suppressive antibiotic therapy because they could not undergo another surgical procedure. Conclusion: The D+R, one-stage revision and two-stage revision success rates were 75%, 83.3%, and 100%, respectively. The best results of quality of life (QoL) and function occur in patients undergoing D+R. In contrast, the worst QoL and functional results were obtained in patients treated with two-stage revision arthroplasty. Level of Evidence II, Prognostic Studies - Investigating the Effect of a Patient Characteristic on the Outcome of Disease. PMID:26981029

  18. Total hip arthroplasty revision in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Gasbarra, Elena; Perrone, Fabio Luigi; Celi, Monica; Rao, Cecilia; Feola, Maurizio; Cuozzo, Nicola; Tarantino, Umberto

    2013-10-01

    In the last years, the number of total hip arthroplasty is increased both in young patients and elderly with a poor bone quality due to extension of surgical indications. According to this trend, also revision surgery showed a growth of its number, especially in elderly patients, because of implant loosening, failed osseointegration of prosthetic components, errors in biomechanical restoration and infections. The aim of this study is to analyze life quality improvement through evaluation of articular functionality and postoperative pain, and to examine osseointegration of implant components with periprosthetic bone. During total hip arthroplasty revision, the orthopedic surgeon often has to face complex cases, especially in elderly patients with a preexisting status of poor bone quality and sarcopenia. In these cases, a correct planning and a surgical procedure well-executed are able to ensure a good outcome that led to pain relief and functional recovery. Furthermore anti-osteoporotic therapy surely represents a useful resource both in primary total hip arthroplasty and in revisions, mainly for elderly patients with a poor bone quality. PMID:24046034

  19. Acetabular Reconstruction in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Siva Swaminathan; Choi, Jung Woo

    2016-01-01

    The difficulties encountered in dealing with the bone deficient acetabulum are amongst the greatest challenges in hip surgery. Acetabular reconstruction in revision total hip arthroplasty can successfully be achieved with hemispherical components featuring a porous or roughened ingrowth surface and options for placement of multiple screws for minor acetabular defect. Acetabular component selection is mostly based on the amount of bone loss present. In the presence of combined cavitary and segmental defects without superior acetabular coverage, reconstructions with a structural acetabular allograft protected by a cage or a custom-made triflange cage have been one of preferred surgical options. The use of a cage or ring over structural allograft bone for massive uncontained defects in acetabular revision can restore host bone stock and facilitate subsequent rerevision surgery to a certain extent. But high complication rates have been reported including aseptic loosening, infection, dislocation and metal failure. On the other hand, recent literature is reporting satisfactory outcomes with the use of modular augments combined with a hemispherical shell for major acetabular defect. Highly porous metals have been introduced for clinical use in arthroplasty surgery over the last decade. Their higher porosity and surface friction are ideal for acetabular revision, optimizing biological fixation. The use of trabecular metal cups in acetabular revision has yielded excellent clinical results. This article summarizes author's experience regarding revision acetabular reconstruction options following failed hip surgery including arthroplasty. PMID:27536638

  20. Minimally invasive knee arthroplasty: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Tria, Alfred J; Scuderi, Giles R

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for arthroplasty of the knee began with surgery for unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA). Partial knee replacements were designed in the 1970s and were amenable to a more limited exposure. In the 1990s Repicci popularized the MIS for UKA. Surgeons began to apply his concepts to total knee arthroplasty. Four MIS surgical techniques were developed: quadriceps sparing, mini-mid vastus, mini-subvastus, and mini-medial parapatellar. The quadriceps sparing technique is the most limited one and is also the most difficult. However, it is the least invasive and allows rapid recovery. The mini-midvastus is the most common technique because it affords slightly better exposure and can be extended. The mini-subvastus technique entirely avoids incising the quadriceps extensor mechanism but is time consuming and difficult in the obese and in the muscular male patient. The mini-parapatellar technique is most familiar to surgeons and represents a good starting point for surgeons who are learning the techniques. The surgeries are easier with smaller instruments but can be performed with standard ones. The techniques are accurate and do lead to a more rapid recovery, with less pain, less blood loss, and greater motion if they are appropriately performed. PMID:26601062

  1. Physical Activity After Total Joint Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Laura A.; Carotenuto, Giuseppe; Basti, John J.; Levine, William N.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is a common surgical option to treat painful degenerative joint disease. However, there is currently no consensus on the appropriate intensity of physical activity after TJA or how physical activity level affects the rate of revision surgery. Materials and Methods: A systematic review of the literature regarding physical or athletic activity after TJA was performed to determine current clinical opinion and recommendations regarding appropriate activity levels after TJA, as well as variables affecting successful surgery and improved outcomes. Results: Many studies in the literature regarding athletic activity after TJA focus on total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. The literature reports contradictory results regarding rates of physical activity after TJA as well as the relationship between physical activity and rates of revision surgery. The current trend in expert opinion shows more liberal recommendations for patients to engage in athletic activity after TJA. Conclusions: Individual characteristics, lifestyle, and patient preferences must be taken into account when one considers appropriate recommendations for athletic activity after TJA. Current trends in clinical opinion favor a higher level of athletic activity after TJA, but clinicians should caution patients not to participate in contact sports or sports that create high joint loads in the replaced joint. PMID:23016041

  2. Acetabular Reconstruction in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shon, Won Yong; Santhanam, Siva Swaminathan; Choi, Jung Woo

    2016-03-01

    The difficulties encountered in dealing with the bone deficient acetabulum are amongst the greatest challenges in hip surgery. Acetabular reconstruction in revision total hip arthroplasty can successfully be achieved with hemispherical components featuring a porous or roughened ingrowth surface and options for placement of multiple screws for minor acetabular defect. Acetabular component selection is mostly based on the amount of bone loss present. In the presence of combined cavitary and segmental defects without superior acetabular coverage, reconstructions with a structural acetabular allograft protected by a cage or a custom-made triflange cage have been one of preferred surgical options. The use of a cage or ring over structural allograft bone for massive uncontained defects in acetabular revision can restore host bone stock and facilitate subsequent rerevision surgery to a certain extent. But high complication rates have been reported including aseptic loosening, infection, dislocation and metal failure. On the other hand, recent literature is reporting satisfactory outcomes with the use of modular augments combined with a hemispherical shell for major acetabular defect. Highly porous metals have been introduced for clinical use in arthroplasty surgery over the last decade. Their higher porosity and surface friction are ideal for acetabular revision, optimizing biological fixation. The use of trabecular metal cups in acetabular revision has yielded excellent clinical results. This article summarizes author's experience regarding revision acetabular reconstruction options following failed hip surgery including arthroplasty. PMID:27536638

  3. Reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty cost-effectiveness: A quality-adjusted life years comparison with total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bachman, Daniel; Nyland, John; Krupp, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) cost-effectiveness with total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. METHODS: This study used a stochastic model and decision-making algorithm to compare the cost-effectiveness of RSA and total hip arthroplasty. Fifteen patients underwent pre-operative, and 3, 6, and 12 mo post-operative clinical examinations and Short Form-36 Health Survey completion. Short form-36 Health Survey subscale scores were converted to EuroQual Group Five Dimension Health Outcome scores and compared with historical data from age-matched patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty. Quality-adjusted life year (QALY) improvements based on life expectancies were calculated. RESULTS: The cost/QALY was $3900 for total hip arthroplasty and $11100 for RSA. After adjusting the model to only include shoulder-specific physical function subscale items, the RSA QALY improved to 2.8 years, and its cost/QALY decreased to $8100. CONCLUSION: Based on industry accepted standards, cost/QALY estimates supported both RSA and total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. Although total hip arthroplasty remains the quality of life improvement “gold standard” among arthroplasty procedures, cost/QALY estimates identified in this study support the growing use of RSA to improve patient quality of life. PMID:26925384

  4. Historical view and future demand for knee arthroplasty in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Rolfson, Ola; W-Dahl, Annette; Garellick, Göran; Sundberg, Martin; Kärrholm, Johan; Robertsson, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose The incidence of knee osteoarthritis will most likely increase. We analyzed historical trends in the incidence of knee arthroplasty in Sweden between 1975 and 2013, in order to be able to provide projections of future demand. Patients and methods We obtained information on all knee arthroplasties in Sweden in the period 1975–2013 from the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register, and used public domain data from Statistics Sweden on the evolution of and forecasts for the Swedish population. We forecast the incidence, presuming the existence of a maximum incidence. Results We found that the incidence of knee arthroplasty will continue to increase until a projected upper incidence level of about 469 total knee replacements per 105 Swedish residents aged 40 years and older is reached around the year 2130. In 2020, the estimated incidence of total knee arthroplasties per 105 Swedish residents aged 40 years and older will be 334 (95% prediction interval (PI): 281–374) and in 2030 it will be 382 (PI: 308–441). Using officially forecast population growth data, around 17,500 operations would be expected to be performed in 2020 and around 21,700 would be expected to be performed in 2030. Interpretation Today’s levels of knee arthroplasty are well below the expected maximum incidence, and we expect a continued annual increase in the total number of knee arthroplasties performed. PMID:25806653

  5. Total Hip Arthroplasty in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IH.

    PubMed

    O'heireamhoin, S; Bayer, T; Mulhall, K J

    2011-01-01

    Children affected by mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type IH (Hurler Syndrome), an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder, are known to experience a range of musculoskeletal manifestations including spinal abnormalities, hand abnormalities, generalised joint stiffness, genu valgum, and hip dysplasia and avascular necrosis. Enzyme therapy, in the form of bone marrow transplantation, significantly increases life expectancy but does not prevent the development of the associated musculoskeletal disorders. We present the case of a 23-year-old woman with a diagnosis of Hurler syndrome with a satisfactory result following uncemented total hip arthroplasty. PMID:23259102

  6. Learning Curves in Arthroplasty in Orthopedic Trainees.

    PubMed

    Nzeako, Obinna; Back, Diane

    2016-01-01

    The NHS is adapting to a changing environment, in which economical constraints have forced theatres to maximise efficiency. An environment in which working hours and surgical exposure has been reduced and outcomes are being published. Litigation is high, and patients are living longer with higher demands. We ask, will traditional methods of apprentiship type training suffice in producing competent arthroplasty surgeons when hands on experience is falling. We review learning curves and assessment tools available to accurately assess competency and support trainee orthopaedic surgeons in their acquisition of surgical proficiency. PMID:27168384

  7. Snapping Pes Syndrome after Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Taketomi, Shuji; Yamagami, Ryota; Tahara, Keitaro; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Snapping pes syndrome is defined as a snapping sensation in the medial knee caused by pes anserinus and rarely occurs. Snapping pes syndrome after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) has not been reported yet. We experienced two cases with this syndrome after UKA. Conservative treatment was effective in one case, while surgical excision of the gracilis tendon was necessary to relieve painful snapping in the other case. The main cause of the first case might be posteromedial overhang of the tibial tray that reached up to 5 mm. The probable cause of the second case was posteromedial overhang of the mobile bearing. PMID:27274476

  8. Tibial rotation kinematics subsequent to knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Duane J.; Khatib, Yasser H.; Parker, David A.; Jenkin, Deanne E.; Molnar, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of computer assisted joint replacement has facilitated precise intraoperative measurement of knee kinematics. The changes in “screw home mechanism” (SHM) resulting from Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) with different prostheses and constraints has not yet been accurately described. Methods A pilot study was first completed. Intraoperative kinematic data was collected two groups of 15 patients receiving different prostheses. Results On average, patients lost 5.3° of ER (SD = 6.1°). There was no significant difference between the prostheses or different prosthetic constraints. Conclusions There significant loss of SHM after TKA. Further research is required to understand its impact on patient function. PMID:25829754

  9. Navigated minimally invasive unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Jean-Yves; Müller, Peter E; Weyer, R; John, Michael; Weber, Patrick; Ciobanu, Eugène; Schmitz, Andreas; Bacher, Thomas; Neumann, Wolfram; Jansson, Volkmar

    2006-10-01

    Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is an alternative procedure to high tibial osteotomy. This study assessed the procedure using computer navigation to improve implantation accuracy and presents early radiological results of a group of patients implanted with the univation UKA (B. Braun Aesculap, Tuttlingen, Germany) with navigation instrumentation and a minimally invasive approach. The authors concluded that navigated implantation of a UKA using a nonimage-based system improved radiologic accuracy implantation without significant inconvenience and minimal change in the conventional operating technique. PMID:17407935

  10. Dual mobility in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Darren R; Haughom, Bryan D; Della Valle, Craig J

    2014-01-01

    Dual-mobility articulations have shown promising results. Postoperative instability remains the most common reason for revision of a total hip arthroplasty (THA). Dual-mobility cups have been shown to decrease the rate of dislocation in primary THA and have been used to treat and prevent instability in revision THA. Greater range of motion and a greater head-to-neck ratio and a greater jump distance are achieved, resulting in a lower risk of instability. Concerns with dual-mobility cups include wear and intraprosthetic dislocation. Specific design modifications have aimed to improve cup fixation and decrease polyethylene wear and the risks of intraprosthetic dislocation. PMID:24267202

  11. The arthritic glenoid: anatomy and arthroplasty designs.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Nikolas K; Ferreira, Louis M; Athwal, George S

    2016-03-01

    The number of shoulder arthroplasty procedures has increased dramatically in recent years, with the primary indication being osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, morphology and subchondral bone changes associated with OA may be important factors to consider when choosing a replacement component. For surgical treatment, many implant options exist and survivability is often dependent on patient age, activity level, and progression of OA. In the placement of these replacement components, patient-specific guides now exist to improve component positioning, with the goal to improve long-term survivability by ensuring that intra-operative placement meets component design. PMID:26803610

  12. Early attempts at hip arthroplasty--1700s to 1950s.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Pablo F; Morcuende, Jose A

    2005-01-01

    Over the last three centuries, treatment of hip arthritides has evolved from rudimentary surgery to modern total hip arthroplasty (THA), which is considered one of the most successful surgical interventions ever developed. We here review the history of the early hip arthroplasty procedures for hip arthritis that preceded Charley total hip arthroplasty. An evaluation of such past enterprises is relevant, and reminds us of the ephemeral nature of human industriousness, and how medical research and procedures are not isolated developments, but correlate to the social, economical, and cultural framework of their time. PMID:16089067

  13. [Application and development of kinematical alighment during total knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Zhang Guo-dong; Yang, Chen; Yang, Guang; Qi, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Kinematical alignment during total knee arthroplasty is an emerging process, and draws more and more attentions from scholars. Knee joint is close to normal joint after TKA through kinematical alighment, which has good clinical results and functional scores, and not increase failure probility. Thus, it may increase joint stress of patella-femur joint, lead to patellar maltracking and increase abrasion. The paper summarized defination and basical principle, operative method, clinical outcomes and deficiency of kinematical alignment during total knee arthroplasty, in order to choose a better way for kinematical alignment during total knee arthroplasty. PMID:26911130

  14. Assessing hospital cost of joint arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    BONIFORTI, FILIPPO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose total joint replacement is one of the most successful procedures in medicine and cost reimbursements to hospitals for the joint arthroplasty diagnosis-related group are among the largest payments made by a Regional Health Service. Despite the popularity of these procedures, there are few high-quality cost-effectiveness studies on this topic. This study evaluates the cost of total joint arthroplasty performed in a district hospital. Methods direct and indirect costs have been measured and patient procedure pathway was analyzed subdivided into three stages: surgical procedure, inpatient care and outpatient clinic. Results the cost of the surgical procedure stage was calculated as 3,798 euros, while that of the inpatient stage was 2,924 euros. The mean hospital costs per procedure amounted to 6,952 euros. Conclusions although the Health Service tariffs fully reimburse the cost of providing a joint replacement, our data contribute to point out the role of hospital staff’s organization to support sustainable improvements on health care for joint replacement surgery. Level of evidence Level VI, single economic evaluation. PMID:26904524

  15. Footprint mismatch in lumbar total disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gstoettner, Michaela; Michaela, Gstoettner; Heider, Denise; Denise, Heider; Liebensteiner, Michael; Bach, Christian Michael; Michael, Bach Christian

    2008-11-01

    Lumbar disc arthroplasty has become a popular modality for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The dimensions of the implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae; the majority of these were cadaver studies. The fit of the prosthesis in the intervertebral space is of utmost importance. An undersized implant may lead to subsidence, loosening and biomechanical failure due to an incorrect center of rotation. The aim of the present study was to measure the dimensions of lumbar vertebrae based on CT scans and assess the accuracy of match in currently available lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 240 endplates of 120 vertebrae were included in the study. The sagittal and mediolateral diameter of the upper and lower endplates were measured using a digital measuring system. For the levels L4/L5 and L5/S1, an inappropriate size match was noted in 98.8% (Prodisc L) and 97.6% (Charite) with regard to the anteroposterior diameter. Mismatch in the anterior mediolateral diameter was noted in 79.3% (Prodisc L) and 51.2% (Charite) while mismatch in the posterior mediolateral diameter was observed in 91.5% (Prodisc L) and 78% (Charite) of the endplates. Surgeons and manufacturers should be aware of the size mismatch of currently available lumbar disc prostheses, which may endanger the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Larger footprints of currently available total disc arthroplasties are required. PMID:18791748

  16. Footprint mismatch in lumbar total disc arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Michaela, Gstoettner; Denise, Heider; Liebensteiner, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar disc arthroplasty has become a popular modality for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The dimensions of the implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae; the majority of these were cadaver studies. The fit of the prosthesis in the intervertebral space is of utmost importance. An undersized implant may lead to subsidence, loosening and biomechanical failure due to an incorrect center of rotation. The aim of the present study was to measure the dimensions of lumbar vertebrae based on CT scans and assess the accuracy of match in currently available lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 240 endplates of 120 vertebrae were included in the study. The sagittal and mediolateral diameter of the upper and lower endplates were measured using a digital measuring system. For the levels L4/L5 and L5/S1, an inappropriate size match was noted in 98.8% (Prodisc L) and 97.6% (Charite) with regard to the anteroposterior diameter. Mismatch in the anterior mediolateral diameter was noted in 79.3% (Prodisc L) and 51.2% (Charite) while mismatch in the posterior mediolateral diameter was observed in 91.5% (Prodisc L) and 78% (Charite) of the endplates. Surgeons and manufacturers should be aware of the size mismatch of currently available lumbar disc prostheses, which may endanger the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Larger footprints of currently available total disc arthroplasties are required. PMID:18791748

  17. Robot-assisted total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Cherian, Jeffery J; Elmallah, Randa K; Pierce, Todd P; Jauregui, Julio J; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Precise and accurate biomechanical reconstruction during total hip arthroplasty (THA) is essential for durable long-term survivorship. Accurate fit of cementless hip implants is also crucial to reduce micromotion between the bone-implant interfaces to allow for stable osseointegration. Robotic technology aims to minimize potential human errors and improve implant alignment and fit, and address persisting concerns with modern-day cementless THA. Although robotic THA dates back to the early 1990s, concerns with increased operating times, costs, and complications led to its withdrawal. However, semi-active systems have renewed interest in robot-assisted joint arthroplasty. We reviewed the current technology, its potential benefits, and the reported clinical and radiographic outcomes. Early evidence suggests that robotic use may lead to more accurate reconstruction of radiographic parameters, such as implant positioning, fit, center-of-rotation, and leg-length discrepancy. Further research is needed to determine if these will translate into better outcomes and improved implant longevity to justify increased costs. PMID:26592900

  18. The Cruciate Ligaments in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parcells, Bertrand W; Tria, Alfred J

    2016-01-01

    The early knee replacements were hinge designs that ignored the ligaments of the knee and resurfaced the joint, allowing freedom of motion in a single plane. Advances in implant fixation paved the way for modern designs, including the posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that sacrifices both cruciate ligaments while substituting for the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and the cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA designs that sacrifice the anterior cruciate ligament but retain the PCL. The early bicruciate retaining (BCR) TKA designs suffered from loosening and early failures. Townley and Cartier designed BCR knees that had better clinical results but the surgical techniques were challenging.Kinematic studies suggest that normal motion relies on preservation of both cruciate ligaments. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty retains all knee ligaments and closely matches normal motion, while PS and CR TKA deviate further from normal. The 15% to 20% dissatisfaction rate with current TKA has renewed interest in the BCR design. Replication of normal knee kinematics and proprioception may address some of the dissatisfaction. PMID:27327919

  19. Robot-assisted unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pearle, Andrew D; O'Loughlin, Padhraig F; Kendoff, Daniel O

    2010-02-01

    The outcomes of unicompartmental knee arthroplasties (UKAs) have demonstrated inconsistent long-term survival. We report the first clinical series of UKA using a semiactive robotic system for the implantation of an inlay unicondylar knee arthroplasty. Ten patients were selected for this study. Preoperative mechanical leg alignment values ranged from 0.3 degrees varus to 9.8 degrees varus. A haptic guidance system was used; a detailed description is given in the manuscript. The setup time for the robot was 41 minutes; intraoperative registration process, 7.5 minutes (6-13 minutes); skin incision, 8 cm; robot-assisted burring, 34.8 minutes (18-50 minutes); mean tourniquet time, 87.4 minutes (68-113 minutes); and overall operation time, 132 minutes (118-152 minutes). The planned and intraoperative tibiofemoral angle was within 1 degrees. The postoperative long leg axis radiographs were within 1.6 degrees. Haptic guidance in combination with a navigation module allows for precise planning and execution of both inlay components in UKA. PMID:19056227

  20. Painful knee arthroplasty: definition and overview

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Christian; Villano, Marco; Bucciarelli, Giovanni; Martini, Caterina; Innocenti, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Summary Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) is one of the most successful procedures in Orthopaedic Surgery, with good clinical results and high survival rate in more than 90% of the cases at long-term follow-up. Since the increase of population’s mean age, worsening of articular degenerative alterations, and articular sequelae related to previous fractures, there is a persistent growing of the number of knee arthroplasties in every country each year, with expected increase of complications rates. Painful TKA is considered an unusual complication, but several reports focus on this challenging clinical issue. Common causes of painful TKA may be divided as early or late, and in referred, periarticular or intra-articular. Among the early, we recall implant instability (related to surgical and technical mistakes) and problems of extensor mechanism (patella not resurfaced, malalignment of femoral, tibial, or patellar component, tendons failure or degeneration). Late causes of painful TKA are almost related to aseptic loosening and infection, but also, even if unusual, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, synovitis, and hypersensitivity to metal implants are represented. Hypersensitivity to metal is a clinical issue with significative increase, but to date without a specific characterization. The Authors report about incidence, clinical features, and diagnostic pathways of hypersensitivity to metal implants, focusing on the prevention of this challenging problem. PMID:22461811

  1. The Difficult Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Malkani, Arthur L; Hitt, Kirby D; Badarudeen, Sameer; Lewis, Courtland; Cherian, Jeffrey; Elmallah, Randa; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for the treatment of knee arthritis has substantially increased over the past decade. Because of its success, the indications for primary TKA have expanded to include younger patients who are more active, elderly patients who have multiple comorbidities, and patients who have more complex issues, such as posttraumatic arthritis and severe deformity. TKA also has been used to salvage failed unicondylar arthroplasty and osteotomies about the knee. Exposure may be challenging and outcomes may not be as successful in patients with soft-tissue contractures, such as a stiff knee, who undergo TKA. Bone graft or augments may be required to correct deformity and attain proper knee alignment in patients who have a substantial varus or valgus deformity. TKA is somewhat challenging in patients who have deformity, bone loss, contracture, or multiple comorbidities, or have had prior surgery; therefore, it is necessary for surgeons to be aware of some general principles that may help minimize complications and improve outcomes. PMID:27049194

  2. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty for Trauma: When, Where, and How.

    PubMed

    Szerlip, Benjamin W; Morris, Brent J; Edwards, T Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Reverse shoulder arthroplasty has become increasingly popular for the treatment of complex shoulder injuries, including proximal humerus fractures and fixed glenohumeral dislocation, in the elderly population. The early to midterm results of reverse shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of proximal humerus fractures are promising compared with the results of unconstrained humeral head replacement, and patients may have more predictable improvement with less dependence on bone healing and rehabilitation. However, long-term follow-up is needed, and surgeons must be familiar with various complications that are specific to reverse shoulder arthroplasty. To achieve optimal patient outcomes for the management of traumatic shoulder injuries, surgeons must have a comprehensive understanding of the current implant options, indications, and surgical techniques for reverse shoulder arthroplasty. PMID:27049189

  3. Current Approaches in Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Gülen; Atıcı, Şebnem; Kurt, Ercan; Karaca, Saffet; Yılmazlar, Aysun

    2015-01-01

    Risk assesment, preoperative drug regulation, the anesthesia and analgesia techniques are very important and the effectivity on success of surgery is great. So, these topics in arthroplasty were reviewed under current knowledge. PMID:27366493

  4. Activity Levels in Healthy Older Adults: Implications for Joint Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Thorp, Laura E.; Orozco, Diego; Block, Joel A.; Sumner, Dale R.; Wimmer, Markus A.

    2012-01-01

    This work evaluated activity levels in a group of healthy older adults to establish a target activity level for adults of similar age after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). With the decreasing age of TJA patients, it is essential to have a reference for activity level in younger patients as activity level affects quality of life and implant design. 54 asymptomatic, healthy older adults with no clinical evidence of lower extremity OA participated. The main outcome measure, average daily step count, was measured using an accelerometer-based activity monitor. On average the group took 8813 ± 3611 steps per day, approximately 4000 more steps per day than has been previously reported in patients following total joint arthroplasty. The present work provides a reference for activity after joint arthroplasty which is relevant given the projected number of people under the age of 65 who will undergo joint arthroplasty in the coming years. PMID:23577274

  5. Total knee arthroplasty in patients with a previous patellectomy.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Jed; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Immerman, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Post-patellectomy patients represent a specific subgroup of patients that may develop arthritis and persistent knee pain and potentially require treatment with total knee arthroplasty. This article reviews the treatment and functional outcomes following total knee arthroplasty in patients with prior patellectomy. A case report is presented as an example of the clinical management of a post-patellectomy patient with significant knee pain and disability treated with total knee arthroplasty. Emphasis will be placed in decision- making, specifically with the use of a posterior stabilized implant. In addition, postoperative strengthening of the quadriceps is essential to compensate for the lack of the patella and increase the success of total knee arthroplasty in this subgroup of patients. PMID:24151951

  6. Colonic interposition: radiographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Agha, F P; Orringer, M B

    1984-04-01

    This report reviews the clinical and radiographic features of 40 patients who underwent visceral esophageal substitution with colon for benign or malignant lesions of the esophagus. The incidence and radiographic identification of complications are discussed. All patients were routinely examined with barium esophagrams on postoperative day 10. If an anastomotic leak was suspected clinically before this time, studies were performed using water-soluble iodinated contrast material. Follow-up barium esophagrams were obtained 1-96 months after operation (average, 60 months) in 24 patients. Eight patients (21%) demonstrated asymptomatic "jejunization" of the colonic mucosa with no attributable clinical manifestations; this finding resolved in 1-3 months, without sequelae, and has not been reported before. The spectrum of ischemic changes in the colonic segment included mucosal edema, spasm, ulceration, loss of haustration, and frank necrosis. Radiographically detectable early postoperative complications included anastomotic leak in six (three pharyngocolic, three cervical esophagocolic) and aspiration of barium into the tracheobronchial tree due to incoordinated swallowing in eight. Late postoperative complications included anastomotic narrowing (12) malfunctioning of the colon due to impaired emptying (five), recurrent aspiration pneumonia (three), small bowel obstruction (three), transhiatal herniation of small bowel through the diaphragmatic hiatus (one), and reflux into the retained bypassed esophagus (one). PMID:6608225

  7. The influence of joint line position on knee stability after condylar knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Martin, J W; Whiteside, L A

    1990-10-01

    Using a special knee-testing device, ten knees obtained at autopsy were subjected to varus-valgus, anterior-posterior, and flexion-rotation analysis in the intact state and after total knee arthroplasty. The ten knees showed no significant change in stability after knee replacement when the joint line was maintained in its natural position. When the femoral component was repositioned 5 mm proximally and 5 mm anteriorly, a significant increase in laxity occurred during midflexion. When the joint line was shifted 5 mm distal and 5 mm posterior to its anatomic location, significant tightening occurred in midrange of motion. Coupled rotation of the tibia with knee flexion was decreased after surgery in all knees with no specific relationship to joint line position. Coupled rotation with varus-valgus testing, however, remained within the normal range through the first 30 degrees of flexion only when the joint line was restored to its normal anatomic position. Stability in condylar knee arthroplasty is in part dependent on position of the joint line. Surgical techniques that rely on restoring the flexion and extension gap without regard to joint line position may result in alteration of varus-valgus or anterior-posterior displacement in midrange flexion. PMID:2208849

  8. SCREW MIGRATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: CLINICAL REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fernando; Tomé, José; Barreto, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Complications from total knee arthroplasty caused by the implanted material are rare, with the exception of polyethylene wear. Descriptions of screw migration into the knee joint cavity are very rare. The authors report intra-articular migration of a polyethylene safety screw in a case of total knee arthroplasty, with sacrifice of the posterior cruciate ligament (TKA Performance; Biomet, Warsaw, IN, USA), which necessitated new surgery to remove the screw, replace the polyethylene insert and emplace a new fixation screw. PMID:27022526

  9. Ureaplasma urealyticum infection in total hip arthroplasty leading to revision.

    PubMed

    Sköldenberg, Olof G; Rysinska, Agata D; Neander, Gustaf; Muren, Olle H; Ahl, Torbjörn E

    2010-10-01

    We describe an infection with Ureaplasma urealyticum causing rapid loosening of a cemented total hip arthroplasty. When reviewing the literature we found that no such case has been reported previously. Taking intraoperative cultures for U urealyticum during revision surgery is not a standard procedure. In cases with rapid, presumed aseptic, loosening of a total hip arthroplasty, an infection with U urealyticum should be considered. PMID:20705423

  10. A Dutch Survey on Circumpatellar Electrocautery in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    van Jonbergen, Hans-Peter W.; Barnaart, Alexander F.W.; Verheyen, Cees C.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Anterior knee pain following total knee arthroplasty is estimated to occur in 4-49% of patients. Some orthopedic surgeons use circumpatellar electrocautery (diathermy) to reduce the prevalence of postsurgical anterior knee pain; however, the extent of its use is unknown. Materials and Methodology: In April 2009, a postal questionnaire was sent to all 98 departments of orthopedic surgery in The Netherlands. The questions focused on the frequency of total knee arthroplasties, patellar resurfacing, and the use of circumpatellar electrocautery. Results: The response rate was 92%. A total of 18,876 TKAs, 2,096 unicompartmental knee arthroplasties, and 215 patellofemoral arthroplasties are performed yearly in The Netherlands by the responding orthopedic surgeons. Of the orthopedic surgeons performing TKA, 13% always use patellar resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, 49% use selective patellar resurfacing, and 38% never use it. Fifty-six percent of orthopedic surgeons use circumpatellar electrocautery when not resurfacing the patella, and 32% use electrocautery when resurfacing the patella. Conclusion: There is no consensus among Dutch orthopedic surgeons on the use of patellar resurfacing or circumpatellar electrocautery in total knee replacement performed for osteoarthritis. A prospective clinical trial is currently underway to fully evaluate the effect of circumpatellar electrocautery on the prevalence of anterior knee pain following total knee arthroplasty. PMID:21228917

  11. Traumatic Migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Scott C; Kang, Daniel G; Helgeson, Melvin D

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Case study. Objective To describe a case of dislodgment and migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, Tennessee, United States) arthroplasty more than 6 months after implantation secondary to low-energy trauma. Methods The inpatient, outpatient, and radiographic medical records of a patient with traumatic migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty were reviewed. The authors have no relevant disclosures to report. Results A 36-year-old man with chronic left upper extremity radiculopathy underwent uncomplicated Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty at C5-C6, with complete resolution of his symptoms. Approximately 6 months after his index procedure, he sustained low-energy trauma to the posterior cervical spine, after being struck by a book falling from a shelf. The injury forced his neck into flexion, and though he did not have recurrence of his radiculopathy symptoms, radiographs demonstrated anterior migration of the arthroplasty device. He underwent revision to anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion. Conclusions Although extremely rare, it is imperative that surgeons consider the potential for failure of osseous integration in patients undergoing cervical disk arthroplasty, even beyond 3 to 6 months postoperatively. This concern is especially relevant to press-fit or milled devices like the Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty, which lack direct fixation into adjacent vertebral bodies. We are considering modification of our postoperative protocol to improve protection of the device after implantation, even beyond 3 months postoperatively. PMID:26835211

  12. Traumatic Migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Scott C.; Kang, Daniel G.; Helgeson, Melvin D.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case study. Objective To describe a case of dislodgment and migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, Tennessee, United States) arthroplasty more than 6 months after implantation secondary to low-energy trauma. Methods The inpatient, outpatient, and radiographic medical records of a patient with traumatic migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty were reviewed. The authors have no relevant disclosures to report. Results A 36-year-old man with chronic left upper extremity radiculopathy underwent uncomplicated Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty at C5–C6, with complete resolution of his symptoms. Approximately 6 months after his index procedure, he sustained low-energy trauma to the posterior cervical spine, after being struck by a book falling from a shelf. The injury forced his neck into flexion, and though he did not have recurrence of his radiculopathy symptoms, radiographs demonstrated anterior migration of the arthroplasty device. He underwent revision to anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion. Conclusions Although extremely rare, it is imperative that surgeons consider the potential for failure of osseous integration in patients undergoing cervical disk arthroplasty, even beyond 3 to 6 months postoperatively. This concern is especially relevant to press-fit or milled devices like the Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty, which lack direct fixation into adjacent vertebral bodies. We are considering modification of our postoperative protocol to improve protection of the device after implantation, even beyond 3 months postoperatively. PMID:26835211

  13. Femoral Component Survival in Hybrid Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Perry, Clayton R; Perry, Kevin I

    2016-05-01

    Although the majority of North American surgeons perform total knee arthroplasty by cementing both the femoral and the tibial components, hybrid fixation with a press-fit femur and cemented tibia is an alternative form of total knee arthroplasty performed by some. Currently, there is a paucity of literature evaluating long-term outcomes after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. As such, the purpose of the current study was to describe the long-term results of total knee arthroplasty performed using the hybrid technique. The authors retrospectively reviewed a total of 77 hybrid total knee arthroplasties with at least 12 years of follow-up. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed to determine patient function and the incidence of femoral component failure after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. At the time of last follow-up, 76 of 77 (99%) of the femoral components remained in place without evidence of loosening. One femoral component failed due to aseptic loosening and was ultimately revised to a cemented femoral component without further complication. In addition, 1 tibial component and 2 patellar components failed due to aseptic loosening. Four tibial polyethylene liners were revised for polyethylene wear. In conclusion, press-fit fixation of the femoral component is a reliable and durable alternative to cemented fixation. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):181-186.]. PMID:27135453

  14. Use of Oral Mucoperiosteal and Pterygo-Masseteric Muscle Flaps as Interposition Material in Surgery of Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Anyanechi, CE; Osunde, OD; Bassey, GO

    2015-01-01

    Background: The most common complication of surgery for the release of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is relapse of the ankylosis. To prevent re-ankylosis, a variety of interpositional materials have been used. Aim: The aim was to compare the surgical outcome of oral mucoperiosteal flap, not hitherto used as interpositional material, with pterygo-masseteric muscles flap after surgical release of TMJ ankylosis. Subjects and Methods: This was a prospective randomized study of all consecutive patients treated for the release of complete TMJ bony ankylosis, from January 2003 to December 2012, at the Oral and Maxillofacial unit of our institution. The patients were randomized into two groups: The pterygo-masseteric group comprises 22 patients while the oral mucoperiosteal group had 23 patients. Information on demographics, clinical characteristics, and postoperative complications over a 5 year follow-up period were obtained, and analyzed using the statistical package for social sciences (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 13, Chicago, IL, USA). A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The age of the patients ranged from 15 to 28 mean 20.3 (3.35) years while the duration of ankylosis ranged from 2 to 16 mean 5.1 (3.4) years. The baseline demographic (gender; P = 0.92; side; P = 0.58) and clinical characteristics in terms of etiology (P = 0.60) and age (P = 0.52) were comparable in both treatment groups. All the patients presented with complete bony TMJ ankylosis with a preoperative inter-incisal distance of <0.5 cm. The intraoperative mouth opening achieved ranged from 4 cm to 5 cm, mean 4.6 (0.27) cm and this was not different for either group (P = 0.51). The patients were followed up postoperatively for a period ranging from 3 to 5 years, mean 3.4 (0.62) years. The mouth opening decreased, over the period of postoperative review, from the initial range of 4–5 cm to 2.9–3.6 cm, and this was not different in both groups (P = 0

  15. Total hip arthroplasty after rotational acetabular osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hideya; Takatori, Yoshio; Moro, Toru; Oshima, Hirofumi; Oka, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine whether the outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA) after rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) are equal to those of primary THA, and to elucidate the characteristics of THA after RAO. The clinical and radiographic findings of THA after RAO (44 hips), with minimum 24 months of follow-up, were compared with a matched control group of 58 hips without prior RAO. We found that the outcomes in terms of functional scores and complication rates did not differ between THA after RAO and THA without previous pelvic osteotomy, indicating that the results of THA after RAO are equivalent to those of primary THA. Although THA after RAO requires technical considerations, similar clinical outcomes to primary THA can be expected. PMID:25456635

  16. Patellar meniscus in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lavernia, Carlos J; Sheldon, Daniel A; Hernández, Victor H; D'Apuzzo, Michele R; Lee, David J; Krackow, Kenneth A; Hungerford, David S

    2007-04-01

    Twenty-four clinically successful, autopsy retrieved porous-coated anatomic total knee arthroplasty (TKA) specimens were evaluated to determine the structure and function of the patellar meniscus. Mean implant duration was 76 months (range: 11-135 months). Histological examination showed the patellar meniscus to be composed of dense fibrous tissue with scattered regions of chronic granulomatous response to polyethylene debris. Patellar wear and polyethylene exposed patellar surface area were correlated with implant duration (r = 0.47, P = .03; r = 0.52, P = .06). Postoperative patellar tilt was also associated with patellar component wear (r = 0.64, P = .03). No other clinical measures were significantly associated with patellar wear or exposed surface area. Additional research is needed to determine what role, if any, the patellar meniscus plays in TKA outcomes. PMID:17486906

  17. Resection arthroplasty for comminuted olecranon fractures.

    PubMed

    Compton, R; Bucknell, A

    1989-02-01

    Five cases of comminuted olecranon fractures treated by resection of the proximal fragments are reviewed. The patients' average age was 56 years and all were radiographically osteopenic. The triceps was advanced and attached to the distal olecranon with the elbow flexed at 90 degrees. A standard postoperative regimen was used with immobilization for three weeks in plaster at 45 to 60 degrees of flexion followed by progression to cautious active range of motion exercises. Follow-up of from 18 to 54 months shows an average active range of motion of 10 degrees flexion to 120 degrees flexion. There were no complaints or clinical evidence of instability and minimal degenerative changes were seen on radiography. We conclude that resection arthroplasty of comminuted olecranon fractures yields excellent clinical and functional results in elderly patients. PMID:2927958

  18. Level of constraint in revision knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Indelli, Pier Francesco; Giori, Nick; Maloney, William

    2015-12-01

    Revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in the setting of major bone deficiency and/or soft tissue laxity might require increasing levels of constraint to restore knee stability. However, increasing the level of constraint not always correlates with mid-to-long-term satisfactory results. Recently, modular components as tantalum cones and titanium sleeves have been introduced to the market with the goal of obtaining better fixation where bone deficiency is an issue; theoretically, satisfactory meta-diaphyseal fixation can reduce the mechanical stress at the level of the joint line, reducing the need for high levels of constraint. This article reviews the recent literature on the surgical management of the unstable TKA with the goal to propose a modern surgical algorithm for adult reconstruction surgeons. PMID:26373770

  19. Choosing the socket in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Davey, J R

    1995-02-01

    Significant improvements have been made in the long-term results of cemented femoral components, but there has been little improvement in the results of cemented acetabular components. Polyethylene wear debris has been proposed as the most important factor causing loosening of cemented acetabular components. Polyethylene thickness and femoral-head size affect the rate of acetabular wear and loosening. The early results of total hip arthroplasty with noncemented acetabular components are promising, and many feel that they represent the state of the art. The hemispheric components with a porous coating have proven superior to most of the screw ring designs. There are potential disadvantages with the use of screws to augment fixation of the hemispheric components, and recently it has become popular to under-ream the acetabulum and press-fit the oversized acetabular component without the use of screws. PMID:7874628

  20. Blood Management Strategies in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Michael; Martinez Martos, Sara; Beller, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    A perioperative blood management program is one of a number of important elements for successful patient care in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and surgeons should be proactive in its application. The aims of blood conservation are to reduce the risk of blood transfusion whilst at the same time maximizing hemoglobin (Hb) in the postoperative period, leading to a positive effect on outcome and cost. An individualized strategy based on patient specific risk factors, anticipated blood loss and comorbidities are useful in achieving this aim. Multiple blood conservation strategies are available in the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative periods and can be employed in various combinations. Recent literature has highlighted the importance of preoperative Hb optimization, minimizing blood loss and evidence-based transfusion guidelines. Given TKA is an elective procedure, a zero allogenic blood transfusion rate should be the aim and an achievable goal. PMID:27595070

  1. Robotic-assisted unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tamam, Cuneyt; Poehling, Gary G

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, development of computer graphics and haptic feedback technology enabled the use of virtual reality. Virtual reality provides the opportunity to combine 3D visual imagery with interactivity, visual, and tactile realism. Robotic-assisted orthopedic surgery is defined as the use of computers and robotic technology to assist the orthopedist in providing musculoskeletal care, in which machine has the capability of precision and accuracy. Robotic-assisted orthopedic surgery is used in simulating diagnosis, preoperative and intraoperative planning, and actual surgery. One of the main areas for computer-assisted surgical applications is unicompartmental or bicompartmental knee arthroplasty, in which the clinical efficacy is improved by providing enhanced component positioning with dynamic ligament balancing. PMID:25370877

  2. Alternative bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Inzerillo, V Christopher; Garino, Jonathan P

    2003-01-01

    Polyethylene wear and extension of indications of total hip arthroplasty into younger and younger age groups have pushed manufacturers to develop more durable bearing surfaces. Standard polyethylene, the plastic used for the first 3 decades of hip replacement, virtually ceases to exist in its original form. Modifications of the processing, including sterlization in an inert environment and cross-linking, have demonstrated some improvements in wear. Hard-on-hard bearings such as ceramic-on-ceramic and metal-on-metal also have demonstrated extremely low wear. This article reviews the pros and cons of the alternative bearing options available to assist in the proper bearing selection for a particular patient. PMID:12882250

  3. Blood Management Strategies in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Liu, David; Dan, Michael; Martinez Martos, Sara; Beller, Elaine

    2016-09-01

    A perioperative blood management program is one of a number of important elements for successful patient care in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and surgeons should be proactive in its application. The aims of blood conservation are to reduce the risk of blood transfusion whilst at the same time maximizing hemoglobin (Hb) in the postoperative period, leading to a positive effect on outcome and cost. An individualized strategy based on patient specific risk factors, anticipated blood loss and comorbidities are useful in achieving this aim. Multiple blood conservation strategies are available in the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative periods and can be employed in various combinations. Recent literature has highlighted the importance of preoperative Hb optimization, minimizing blood loss and evidence-based transfusion guidelines. Given TKA is an elective procedure, a zero allogenic blood transfusion rate should be the aim and an achievable goal. PMID:27595070

  4. Fracture Blisters After Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Halawi, Mohamad J

    2015-08-01

    Fracture blisters are tense vesicles that arise on markedly swollen skin overlying traumatized soft tissue. While this relatively uncommon complication has been well described in the trauma literature, this article reports for the first time a case of fracture blisters after primary total knee arthroplasty. The fracture blisters developed within 36 hours of surgery and were associated with profound swelling and erythema. There was no evidence of vascular injury, compartment syndrome, iatrogenic fracture, or deep venous thrombosis. The patient was treated with leg elevation, loosely applied nonadhesive dressings, and a short course of oral antibiotics after skin desquamation. Blood-filled blisters required longer time to reepithelialization than fluid-filled blisters. Knee stiffness developed because of pain and fear of participation with physical therapy, but the patient was able to resume intensive rehabilitation after resolution of the blisters. Patient factors, surgical factors, and review of the literature are discussed. PMID:26251947

  5. Patient Blood Management in Hip Replacement Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hee

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative blood transfusions are common in total hip arthroplasty because of preoperative anemia and perioperative blood loss. Perioperative anemia and the need for allogeneic blood transfusion are related with increased morbidity. To reduce perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion, keeping the preoperative hemoglobin level above 12.0 g/dL is important in orthopedic patients. By using the anti-fibrinolytic agent or perioperative cell salvage, reduce intraoperative blood loss is very important for the reduction of perioperative blood loss. As a transfusion trigger, low hemoglobin is another important target to reduce the transfusion rate. Because blood management is closely connected with prognosis, it has become a new challenge in orthopedic surgery. PMID:27536627

  6. Metaphyseal bone loss in revision knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ponzio, Danielle Y; Austin, Matthew S

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of bone loss encountered during revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is often multifactorial and can include stress shielding, osteolysis, osteonecrosis, infection, mechanical loss due to a grossly loose implant, and iatrogenic loss at the time of implant resection. Selection of the reconstructive technique(s) to manage bone deficiency is determined by the location and magnitude of bone loss, ligament integrity, surgeon experience, and patient factors including the potential for additional revision, functional demand, and comorbidities. Smaller, contained defects are reliably managed with bone graft, cement augmented with screw fixation, or modular augments. Large metaphyseal defects require more extensive reconstruction such as impaction bone grafting with or without mesh augmentation, prosthetic augmentation, use of bulk structural allografts, or use of metaphyseal cones or sleeves. While each technique has advantages and disadvantages, the most optimal method for reconstruction of large metaphyseal bone defects during revision TKA is not clearly established. PMID:26362647

  7. Irreducible Fracture-Dislocation of the Ankle Associated With Interposition of the Tibialis Posterior Tendon in the Syndesmosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lacasse, Jean-Simon; Laflamme, Melissa; Penner, Murray J

    2015-01-01

    Although ankle fracture-dislocations are common orthopedic injuries, it is very uncommon for them to be irreducible, and such cases require special attention. We report the case of a closed fracture-dislocation of the ankle in a 17-year-old male that required 3 surgeries because of persistent anterior subluxation of the talus on the postoperative radiographs. After advanced radiologic investigations, tibialis posterior tendon interposition in the syndesmosis was identified as the cause of the subluxation. This is a very rare event, reported in only 5 patients in published studies. Once the diagnosis was identified by magnetic resonance imaging, the tendon was relocated to its anatomic position, and the tibiofibular and tibiotalar joints were reduced adequately. The patient was then able to regain a satisfactory level of function many months after the initial trauma. PMID:24846161

  8. Revision of infected knee arthroplasties in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Lindberg-Larsen, Martin; Jørgensen, Christoffer C; Bagger, Jens; Schrøder, Henrik M; Kehlet, Henrik

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - The surgical treatment of periprosthetic knee infection is generally either a partial revision procedure (open debridement and exchange of the tibial insert) or a 2-stage exchange arthroplasty procedure. We describe the failure rates of these procedures on a nationwide basis. Patients and methods - 105 partial revisions (100 patients) and 215 potential 2-stage revision procedures (205 patients) performed due to infection from July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013 were identified from the Danish Knee Arthroplasty Register (DKR). Failure was defined as surgically related death ≤ 90 days postoperatively, re-revision due to infection, or not reaching the second stage for a planned 2-stage procedure within a median follow-up period of 3.2 (2.2-4.2) years. Results - The failure rate of the partial revisions was 43%. 71 of the partial revisions (67%) were revisions of a primary prosthesis with a re-revision rate due to infection of 34%, as compared to 55% in revisions of a revision prosthesis (p = 0.05). The failure rate of the 2-stage revisions was 30%. Median time interval between stages was 84 (9-597) days. 117 (54%) of the 2-stage revisions were revisions of a primary prosthesis with a re-revision rate due to infection of 21%, as compared to 29% in revisions of a previously revised prosthesis (p = 0.1). Overall postoperative mortality was 0.6% in high-volume centers (> 30 procedures within 2 years) as opposed to 7% in the remaining centers (p = 0.003). Interpretation - The failure rates of 43% after the partial revision procedures and 30% after the 2-stage revisions in combination with the higher mortality outside high-volume centers call for centralization and reconsideration of surgical strategies. PMID:26900908

  9. Souter arthroplasty for elbows with severe destruction.

    PubMed

    Ikävalko, Mikko; Belt, Eero A; Kautiainen, Hannu; Lehto, Matti U K

    2004-04-01

    One hundred fifty-eight primary Souter elbow arthroplasties were done on 134 patients (121 women) with severe joint destruction (Larsen Grade 5) or large bone defects or both. Joint replacement operations were done at our institution from 1985-1997. The study group comprised 156 joints in 132 patients with rheumatoid arthritis or other variants of chronic inflammatory joint disease, one in a patient with osteoarthritis, and one patient with posttraumatic arthrosis. The mean age of the patients at the time of surgery was 57 years (range, 26-81 years) and the mean disease duration was 27 years (tinge, 2-70 years). Radiographically, severe bone defects were detected in 100 humeri and 134 ulnas. Retentive (snap-fit) ulnar components were implanted in 110 joints, and bone grafts were used on 26 humeri and 14 ulnas. Major complications led to five early and 16 late reoperations in 19 patients. Four reoperations were done because of dislocation and eight because of aseptic loosening. One reoperation was done because of early infection and five were done because of late infection. One patient had reoperation because of superficial infection in the bursa olecrani and one triceps tendon rupture also was repaired. One patient had wound repair because of marginal necrosis. In the survival analysis, the cumulative success rate without revision for aseptic loosening at 5 years followup was 97%. Despite the demanding nature of these arthroplasties, the primary results are encouraging. Technically, it is possible to do elbow replacement, even on elbows where the humeral condyles or olecranon or both are missing, if there is sufficient bone left on the diaphyseal areas for primary stem fixation. However, in these extreme cases, the poor general condition of the patient or the difficult soft tissue problems in the elbow region may prove to be a contraindication for joint replacement. PMID:15123937

  10. Debridement arthroplasty for osteoarthritis of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Oka, Y; Ohta, K; Saitoh, I

    1998-06-01

    For treatment of osteoarthritis of the elbow, the authors use debridement arthroplasty with a medial or lateral approach. Thirty-eight elbows in 36 patients treated with this procedure were examined. The age of the patients ranged from 20 to 71 years, with a mean age of 41.7 years. Cubital tunnel syndrome was present in 16 of the 38 (42%) elbows. The operations were performed through a lateral approach in four elbows, a lateral approach with medial skin incision for ulnar nerve neurolysis in 16 elbows, a medial approach in 10 elbows, and a medial plus a lateral approach in eight elbows. The followup ranged from 2 years to 12.1 years, with an average of 5.9 years. Complete pain relief or minimal elbow pain was reported in 95% of patients who had surgical treatment. The average gain in motion was 6 degrees extension and 18 degrees flexion. Results for the various surgical approaches did not show a statistically significant difference. Recurrence of bony spurs and ridges was analyzed additionally in 18 selected patients who could be observed more than 5 years after surgery (range, 5-12 years). Redevelopment of bony spurs on the coronoid process and olecranon tip occurred in all 18 patients, but those changes were graded as mild in 13 (74%) patients and moderate in five (16%) patients and were accompanied by no pain or slight pain. Elbow arthroplasty as used by the authors produces stable and reliable results for relief of pain, gains in range of motion, and the absence of recurrence of significant osteoarthritis. PMID:9646755

  11. Minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty: in opposition.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, David S

    2004-06-01

    At the Knee Society Winter Meeting in 2003, Seth Greenwald and I debated about whether there should be new standards (ie, regulations) applied to the release of information to the public on "new developments." I argued for the public's "right to know" prior to the publication of peer-reviewed literature. He argued for regulatory constraint or "proving by peer-reviewed publication" before alerting the public. It is not a contradiction for me to currently argue against the public advertising of minimally invasive (MIS) total hip arthroplasty as not yet being in the best interest of the public. It is hard to remember a concept that has so captured both the public's and the surgical community's fancy as MIS. Patients are "demanding" MIS without knowing why. Surgeons are offering it as the next best, greatest thing without having developed the skill and experience to avoid the surgery's risks. If you put "minimally invasive hip replacement" into the Google search engine (http://www.google.com), you get 5,170 matches. If you put the same words in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi), referencing the National Library of Medicine database, you get SEVENTEEN; none is really a peer-reviewed article. Most are 1 page papers in orthopedics from medical education meetings. On the other hand, there are over 6,000 peer-reviewed articles on total hip arthroplasty. Dr. Thomas Sculco, my couterpart in this debate, wrote an insightful editorial in the American Journal of Orthopedic Surgery in which he stated: "Although these procedures have generated incredible interest and enthusiasm, I am concerned that they may be performed to the detriment of our patients." I couldn't agree with him more. Smaller is not necessarily better and, when it is worse, it will be the "smaller" that is held accountable. PMID:15190556

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Uterine Fibroids: Effect of Bowel Interposition on Procedure Feasibility and a Unique Bowel Displacement Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-sun; Lim, Hyo Keun; Rhim, Hyunchul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of bowel interposition on assessing procedure feasibility, and the usefulness and limiting conditions of bowel displacement techniques in magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation of uterine fibroids. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approved this study. A total of 375 screening MR exams and 206 MR-HIFU ablations for symptomatic uterine fibroids performed between August 2010 and March 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The effect of bowel interposition on procedure feasibility was assessed by comparing pass rates in periods before and after adopting a unique bowel displacement technique (bladder filling, rectal filling and subsequent bladder emptying; BRB maneuver). Risk factors for BRB failure were evaluated using logistic regression analysis. Results Overall pass rates of pre- and post-BRB periods were 59.0% (98/166) and 71.7% (150/209), and in bowel-interposed cases they were 14.6% (7/48) and 76.4% (55/72), respectively. BRB maneuver was technically successful in 81.7% (49/60). Through-the-bladder sonication was effective in eight of eleven BRB failure cases, thus MR-HIFU could be initiated in 95.0% (57/60). A small uterus on treatment day was the only significant risk factor for BRB failure (B = 0.111, P = 0.017). Conclusion The BRB maneuver greatly reduces the fraction of patients deemed ineligible for MR-HIFU ablation of uterine fibroids due to interposed bowels, although care is needed when the uterus is small. PMID:27186881

  13. Conversion of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty to total knee arthroplasty: the challenges and need for augments.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zeeshan; Nawaz, Syed Z; Kahane, Steven; Esler, Colin; Chatterji, Urjit

    2013-12-01

    The potential advantages of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) include lower morbidity and mortality, quicker recovery, good range of motion, good medium and long-term survival results, potential bone conservation and perceived easier revision. Converting a UKA to a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may be challenging due to issues of bone loss, need for augmentation, restoring joint line and rotation. We present the intraoperative findings of 201 cases of failed UKA's from the Trent Wales arthroplasty audit group (TWAAG) register. The objectives of the study were to determine the modes of failure, number of cases requiring augments and bone grafting, types of augments and implants used in revision surgery. This study does not include the clinical outcomes after revision knee surgery. The average age of the cohort at revision surgery was 67 years. There were 111 females and 90 males. The commonest modes of failure in young patients were unexplained pain/instability and aseptic loosening and in older patients they were aseptic loosening and progression of the disease. The survivorship of the implant was higher in the less than 55 years age group in comparison to the older patients. A total of 49 patients (25.9%) required bone grafting commonest in the 60 years and above age group (79.6%). Fifty patients (26.4%) required some form of augmentation, with the commonest site being tibia and commonest augment being tibial stem (35 cases). Only 8% of the cohort required revision knee implants whereas 78% of the cases received a cruciate retaining primary knee implant. To the author's knowledge, this is one of the largest studies in the literature which signifies the technical difficulties that might be experienced in revising the UKA's which will require appropriate pre-operative planning. PMID:24563977

  14. A biomechanical study on fracture risks in ulnohumeral arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Degreef, I; Van Audekercke, R; Boogmans, T; De Smet, L

    2011-06-01

    In the Outerbridge-Kashiwagi ulnohumeral arthroplasty, bone strength may be weakened significantly as a result of the humeral fenestration. Therefore, fracture risks may be increased, particularly in the immediate postoperative period. The objective of this biomechanical cadaver study is to study the humeral bone strength after ulnohumeral arthroplasty. A biomechanical cadaveric study was done in which differences in force needed to fracture the humerus with and without fenestration was measured. First, the diaphysis of 12 distal humeri was embedded and a posterior force was applied until a fracture occurred. Second, a similar study was done with fixed humeral columns, to specifically compare the column strength. In the first part, the force needed to fracture was reduced by 17% after ulnohumeral arthroplasty, which was not statistically significant. However, a shift in the fracture pattern occurred: from diaphyseal fracture towards column fractures after the arthroplasty. In the second part, the force needed to fracture the columns proved to be significantly reduced by 41% after humeral perforation. Alterations in the biomechanical properties of the distal humerus after ulnohumeral arthroplasty may lead to a shift in fracture patterns from diaphyseal to column fractures. The strength of the columns is strongly reduced by 41%. PMID:21592841

  15. Prophylactic antibiotics in elective hip and knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hickson, C. J.; Metcalfe, D.; Elgohari, S.; Oswald, T.; Masters, J. P.; Rymaszewska, M.; Reed, M. R.; Sprowson†, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We wanted to investigate regional variations in the organisms reported to be causing peri-prosthetic infections and to report on prophylaxis regimens currently in use across England. Methods Analysis of data routinely collected by Public Health England’s (PHE) national surgical site infection database on elective primary hip and knee arthroplasty procedures between April 2010 and March 2013 to investigate regional variations in causative organisms. A separate national survey of 145 hospital Trusts (groups of hospitals under local management) in England routinely performing primary hip and/or knee arthroplasty was carried out by standard email questionnaire. Results Analysis of 189 858 elective primary hip and knee arthroplasty procedures and 1116 surgical site infections found statistically significant variations for some causative organism between regions. There was a 100% response rate to the prophylaxis questionnaire that showed substantial variation between individual trust guidelines. A number of regimens currently in use are inconsistent with the best available evidence. Conclusions The approach towards antibiotic prophylaxis in elective arthroplasty nationwide reveals substantial variation without clear justification. Only seven causative organisms are responsible for 89% of infections affecting primary hip and knee arthroplasty, which cannot justify such widespread variation between prophylactic antibiotic policies. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:181–189. PMID:26585304

  16. Ogilvie’s syndrome after lower extremity arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    ElMaraghy, Amr W.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Burnstein, Marcus J.; Waddell, James P.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To alert surgeons who perform arthroplasty to the possibility of acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (Ogilvie’s syndrome) after elective orthopedic procedures. To identify possible risk factors and emphasize the need for prompt recognition, careful monitoring and appropriate management so as to reduce morbidity and mortality. Design A case series. Setting A university-affiliated hospital that is a major referral centre for orthopedic surgery. Patients Four patients who had Ogilvie’s syndrome after lower extremity arthroplasty. Of this group, 2 had primary hip arthroplasty, 1 had primary knee arthroplasty and 1 had revision hip arthroplasty. Main outcome measures Morbidity and mortality. Results In all 4 patients Ogilvie’s syndrome was recognized late and required surgical intervention. Two patients died as a result of postoperative complications. Conclusions Our case series identified increasing age, immobility and patient-controlled narcotic analgesia as potential risk factors for Ogilvie’s syndrome in the postoperative orthopedic patient. Prompt recognition and early consultation with frequent clinical and radiographic monitoring are necessary to avoid colonic perforation and its significant associated death rate. PMID:10223075

  17. Fretting and Corrosion in Modular Shoulder Arthroplasty: A Retrieval Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Panzram, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Tribocorrosion in taper junctions of retrieved anatomic shoulder arthroplasty implants was evaluated. A comparison of the tribocorrosion between cobalt-chromium and titanium alloy stems was conducted and the observations were correlated with the individual's clinical data. Adverse effects caused by metal debris and subsequent elevated serum metal ion levels are frequently reported in total hip arthroplasty. In total shoulder arthroplasty, to date only a small number of retrieval analyses are available and even fewer address the issue of tribocorrosion at the taper junctions. A total of 36 retrieved hemiarthroplasties and total shoulder arthroplasties were assessed using the modified Goldberg score. The prevalence of fretting and corrosion was confirmed in this cohort. Titanium stems seem to be more susceptible to damage caused by tribocorrosion than cobalt-chromium stems. Furthermore, stemless designs offered less tribocorrosion at the taper junction than stemmed designs. A weak correlation between time to revision and increased levels of tribocorrosion was seen. Whether or not tribocorrosion can lead to adverse clinical reactions and causes failure of shoulder arthroplasties remains to be examined. PMID:27433471

  18. Infection following total knee arthroplasty: prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Kevin L; Konigsberg, Beau S

    2012-01-01

    Despite diligent efforts to prevent infection, prosthetic knee infection occurs in up to 2% of patients treated with total knee arthroplasty. Although the risk of infection is relatively low, the effects are considerable. The number of total knee arthroplasties is projected to increase by more than 600% by 2030, resulting in 3.48 million knee replacements, with a possible 70,000 prosthetic knee infections. Infection will be the most common indication for revision total knee arthroplasty. Prophylactic antibiotics and minimizing patient risk factors are critical in preventing infections. Staphylococcus is the most common organism in infected total knee arthroplasties. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are crucial to the long-term outcomes of patients with prosthetic joint infections. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein level, and interleukin-6 serum level should be checked in all patients with clinical signs of infection or unexplained pain or stiffness. The surgical management of a prosthetic knee infection depends on several factors, but none is more important than the timing of infection in relationship to the index surgery. With a success rate of 80% to 90%, two-stage component exchange remains the treatment of choice for chronically infected total knee arthroplasties. PMID:22301250

  19. Hip arthroplasty for failed treatment of proximal femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    D'Arrigo, Carmelo; Perugia, Dario; Carcangiu, Alessandro; Monaco, Edoardo; Speranza, Attilio; Ferretti, Andrea

    2010-10-01

    Failed treatment of an intertrochanteric fracture typically leads to profound functional disability and pain. Salvage treatment with hip arthroplasty may be considered. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results and complications of hip arthroplasty performed as a salvage procedure after the failed treatment of an intertrochanteric hip fracture. Twenty-one patients were treated in our hospital with hip arthroplasty for failed treatment of intertrochanteric hip fracture. There were sixteen women and five men with a mean age of 75.8 years (range 61-85 years). Fourteen patients had failure of a previous nail fixation procedure, five had failure of a plate fixation, one of hip screws fixation and one of Ender nail fixation. In 19 out of 21 patients we performed a total hip arthroplasty-14 cases used modular implants with long-stems and five cases used a standard straight stem. In 2 of 21 cases we used a bipolar hemiarthroplasty. A statistically significant improvement was found comparing pre and postoperative conditions (p < 0.05). Our experience confirms that total hip arthroplasty is a satisfactory salvage procedure after failed treatment of an intertrochanteric fracture in elderly patients with few serious orthopaedic complications and acceptable clinical outcomes. PMID:19572131

  20. Radiographic and scintigraphic evaluation of total knee arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, R.; Soudry, M.

    1986-04-01

    Various radiographic and scintigraphic methods are used to supplement clinical findings in the evaluation of total knee arthroplasty and its complications. Serial roentgenograms offer reliable information for diagnosing mechanical loosening. Wide and extensive radiolucency at the cement-bone interface and shift in position and alignment of prosthetic components can be seen in almost all cases by the time revision is necessary. Radiographic abnormalities are usually not present in acute infection, but are often present in chronic infection. Bone scanning has a high sensitivity for diagnosis of infection or loosening, but is nonspecific because increased uptake is often present around asymptomatic total knee arthroplasties with normal radiographs. Differential bone and Gallium scanning and scanning with Indium 111-labeled leukocytes have a greater specificity for diagnosis of infection than does bone or Gallium scanning alone. Routine radiographic and scintigraphic studies have shown a high incidence of deep vein thrombosis in the calf after total knee arthroplasty. Clinically significant pulmonary embolization is infrequent.

  1. Contemporary Strategies for Rapid Recovery Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stambough, Jeffrey B; Beaulé, Paul E; Nunley, Ryan M; Clohisy, John

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, rapid recovery protocols for total hip arthroplasty have evolved in parallel with advancements in pain management, regional anesthesia, focused rehabilitation, and the patient selection process. As fiscal pressures from payers of health care increase, surgical outcomes and complications are being scrutinized, which evokes a sense of urgency for arthroplasty surgeons as well as hospitals. The implementation of successful accelerated recovery pathways for total hip arthroplasty requires the coordinated efforts of surgeons, practice administrators, anesthesiologists, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, case managers, and postacute care providers. To optimize performance outcomes, it is important for surgeons to select patients who are eligible for rapid recovery. The fundamental tenets of multimodal pain control, regional anesthesia, prudent perioperative blood management, venous thromboembolic prophylaxis, and early ambulation and mobility should be collectively addressed for all patients who undergo primary total hip replacement. PMID:27049192

  2. Computer-Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty Utilization.

    PubMed

    Bala, Abiram; Penrose, Colin Thomas; Seyler, Thorsten Markus; Mather, Richard Chad; Wellman, Samuel Secord; Bolognesi, Michael Paul

    2016-07-01

    Computer-navigated total knee arthroplasty (CN-TKA) has been used to improve component alignment, though the evidence is currently mixed on whether there are clinically significant differences in long-term outcomes. Given the established increased costs and operative time, we hypothesized that the utilization rate of CN-TKA would be decreasing relative to standard TKA in the Medicare population given the current health care economic environment. We queried 1,914,514 primary TKAs performed in the entire Medicare database from 2005 to 2012. Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify and separate CN-TKAs. Utilization of TKA was compared by year, gender, and region. Average change in cases per year and compound annual growth rate (CAGR) were used to evaluate trends in utilization of the procedure. We identified 30,773 CN-TKAs performed over this time period. There was an increase in utilization of CN-TKA per year from 984 to 5,352 (average = 572/year, R (2) = 0.85, CAGR = 23.58%) from 2005 to 2012. In contrast, there was a slight decrease in overall TKA utilization from 264,345 to 230,654 (average = 4297/year, R (2) = 0.74, CAGR = - 1.69%). When comparing proportion of CN-TKA to all TKAs, there was an increase from 0.37 to 2.32% (average 0.26%/year, R (2) = 0.88, CAGR = 25.70%). CN-TKA growth in males and females was comparable at 24.42 and 23.11%, respectively. The South region had the highest growth rate at 28.76%, whereas the Midwest had the lowest growth rate at 15.51%. The Midwest was the only region that peaked (2008) with a slow decline in utilization until 2012. Despite increased costs with unclear clinical benefit, CN-TKA is increasing in utilization among Medicare patients. Reasons could include patient preference, advertising, proper of coding the procedure, and increased publicly available information about

  3. Increased Long-Term Cardiovascular Risk After Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Max; Rysinska, Agata; Garland, Anne; Rolfson, Ola; Aspberg, Sara; Eisler, Thomas; Garellick, Göran; Stark, André; Hailer, Nils P.; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Total hip arthroplasty is a common and important treatment for osteoarthritis patients. Long-term cardiovascular effects elicited by osteoarthritis or the implant itself remain unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine if there is an increased risk of late cardiovascular mortality and morbidity after total hip arthroplasty surgery. A nationwide matched cohort study with data on 91,527 osteoarthritis patients operated on, obtained from the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register. A control cohort (n = 270,688) from the general Swedish population was matched 1:3 to each case by sex, age, and residence. Mean follow-up time was 10 years (range, 7–21). The exposure was presence of a hip replacement for more than 5 years. The primary outcome was cardiovascular mortality after 5 years. Secondary outcomes were total mortality and re-admissions due to cardiovascular events. During the first 5 to 9 years, the arthroplasty cohort had a lower cardiovascular mortality risk compared with the control cohort. However, the risk in the arthroplasty cohort increased over time and was higher than in controls after 8.8 years (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.0–10.5). Between 9 and 13 years postoperatively, the hazard ratio was 1.11 (95% CI 1.05–1.17). Arthroplasty patients were also more frequently admitted to hospital for cardiovascular reasons compared with controls, with a rate ratio of 1.08 (95% CI 1.06–1.11). Patients with surgically treated osteoarthritis of the hip have an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality many years after the operation when compared with controls. PMID:26871792

  4. Anatomic Versus Mechanically Aligned Total Knee Arthroplasty for Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Toliopoulos, Panagiota; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Hutt, Jonathan; Lavigne, Martin; Desmeules, Francois; Vendittoli, Pascal-Andre

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the intra-operative benefits and the clinical outcomes from kinematic or mechanical alignment for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients undergoing revision of failed unicompartmental kneel arthroplasty (UKA) to TKA. Methods: Ten revisions were performed with a kinematic alignment technique and 11 with a mechanical alignment. Measurements of the hip-knee-ankle angle (HKA), the lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA), and the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) were performed using long-leg radiographs. The need for augments, stems, and constrained inserts was compared between groups. Clinical outcomes were compared using the WOMAC score along with maximum distance walked as well as knee range of motion obtained prior to discharge. All data was obtained by a retrospective review of patient files. Results: The kinematic group required less augments, stems, and constrained inserts than the mechanical group and thinner polyethylene bearings. There were significant differences in the lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA) and the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) between the two groups (p<0.05). The mean WOMAC score obtained at discharge was better in the kinematic group as was mean knee flexion. At last follow up of 34 months for the kinematic group and 58 months for the mechanical group, no orthopedic complications or reoperations were recorded. Conclusion: Although this study has a small patient cohort, our results suggest that kinematic alignment for TKA after UKA revision is an attractive method. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27563365

  5. Current indications for hip resurfacing arthroplasty in 2016.

    PubMed

    Sershon, Robert; Balkissoon, Rishi; Valle, Craig J Della

    2016-03-01

    Hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) is an alternative to conventional, stemmed total hip arthroplasty (THA). The best reported results are young, active patients with good bone stock and a diagnosis of osteoarthritis. Since the 1990s, metal-on-metal (MoM) HRA has achieved excellent outcomes when used in the appropriate patient population. Concerns regarding the metal-on-metal bearing surface including adverse local tissue reaction (ALTR) to metal debris have recently lead to a decline in the use of this construct. The current paper aims to provide an updated review on HRA, including a critical review of the most recent literature on HRA. PMID:26830851

  6. Advances in Small Joint Arthroplasty of the Hand

    PubMed Central

    Adkinson, Joshua M.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Substantial effort has been directed at the development of small joint prostheses for the hand. Despite advances in prosthetic joint design, outcomes have been relatively unchanged over the past 60 years. Pain relief and range of motion achieved after surgery have yet to mirror the success of large joint arthroplasty. Innovations in biotechnology and stem cell applications for damaged joint surfaces may someday make prostheses obsolete. The purpose of this review is to describe the current status, ongoing advances, and future of small joint arthroplasty of the hand. PMID:25415093

  7. Diagnosis of Periprosthetic Joint Infection Following Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Javad; Fassihi, Safa Cyrus; Enayatollahi, Mohammad A

    2016-07-01

    The diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) following total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty has been one of the major challenges in orthopedic surgery. As there is no single absolute test for diagnosis of PJI, diagnostic criteria for PJI have been proposed that include using several diagnostic modalities. Focused history, physical examination, plain radiographs, and initial serologic tests should be followed by joint aspiration and synovial analysis. Newer diagnostic techniques, such as alpha-defensin and interleukin-6, hold great promise in the future diagnosis of equivocal infections. PMID:27241375

  8. The triceps preserving approach to total elbow arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pierce, T D; Herndon, J H

    1998-09-01

    Elbow arthroplasty most commonly is performed through a posterior approach by detaching or reflecting the triceps off the olecranon. Surgical approaches to the elbow joint that dissociate the triceps from the olecranon have distinct disadvantages. Triceps avulsion, triceps weakness, and wound healing problems have been reported. Such complications necessitate more surgery and predispose the joint to an infection. To avoid these complications a modified posterior approach to the elbow joint that preserves the triceps muscle insertion on the olecranon was used in 10 consecutive elbow arthroplasties. This method provides adequate exposure, allows early rehabilitation, and avoids triceps weakness. PMID:9755773

  9. Resection arthroplasty for failed patellar components

    PubMed Central

    Alcerro, Jose C.; Drakeford, Michael K.; Tsao, Audrey K.; Krackow, Kenneth A.; Hungerford, David S.

    2008-01-01

    A total of 1,401 primary total knee arthroplasties (TKA) were reviewed; 44 (3.2%) had at least the patellar component revised. Nine of these knees (eight patients) had insufficient bone stock to allow reimplantation of another patellar component. Clinical data on the nine knees were obtained with recent follow-up evaluation, review of their medical records and radiographs. Evaluation included Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) scores. Average follow-up was 4 years and 7 months, 2-year range (2 months to 8 years and 4 months). Common factors found in these nine knees included: thin patella after primary TKR status, osteoarthritis, good range of motion and patella alta. Results were good to excellent in seven knees and fair in two. The untoward associations with patellectomy such as quadriceps lag, extension weakness and anterior knee pain were not experienced. Resection of the patellar component, without reimplantation, is an acceptable alternative in revision TKA lacking adequate remaining bone stock. PMID:18956182

  10. Cup positioning in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Scheerlinck, T

    2014-09-01

    The "optimal" positioning of the cup in total hip arthroplasty can improve hip function and reduce wear, impingement and dislocation. The cup position is described as the spatial relation between the hip rotation centre and the pelvis and, as the cup orientation around the rotation centre. The first parameter affects hip balance and, if not managed properly, might result in poor function and leg length discrepancy. The second parameter is often "silent", unless impingement or dislocation occurs. However, inappropriate cup orientation can accelerate wear and cause early failure. As such, it is mandatory to get both right, taking into account multiple parameters: the stem position, the approach, the bearing surface, the cup coverage and the pelvic orientation during loading. In most cases a "standard" cup position is adequate. However, specific anatomic features might require an individualized approach. This paper aims at reviewing the parameters that impact on the optimal cup position. This should allow for more judicious choices in those particular cases. PMID:26280607

  11. Emerging technologies in arthroplasty: additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Kulesha, Gene; Kester, Mark; Mont, Michael A

    2014-06-01

    Additive manufacturing is an industrial technology whereby three-dimensional visual computer models are fabricated into physical components by selectively curing, depositing, or consolidating various materials in consecutive layers. Although initially developed for production of simulated models, the technology has undergone vast improvements and is currently increasingly being used for the production of end-use components in various aerospace, automotive, and biomedical specialties. The ability of this technology to be used for the manufacture of solid-mesh-foam monolithic and coated components of complex geometries previously considered unmanufacturable has attracted the attention of implant manufacturers, bioengineers, and orthopedic surgeons. Currently, there is a paucity of reports describing this fabrication method in the orthopedic literature. Therefore, we aimed to briefly describe this technology, some of the applications in other orthopedic subspecialties, its present use in hip and knee arthroplasty, and concerns with the present form of the technology. As there are few reports of clinical trials presently available, the true benefits of this technology can only be realized when studies evaluating the clinical and radiographic outcomes of cementless implants manufactured with additive manufacturing report durable fixation, less stress shielding, and better implant survivorship. Nevertheless, the authors believe that this technology holds great promise and may potentially change the conventional methods of casting, machining, and tooling for implant manufacturing in the future. PMID:24764230

  12. Surgical approaches for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul; Demesugh, Daniel Mue; Agarwal, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    There are various surgical approaches to the knee joint and its surrounding structures and such approaches are generally designed to allow the best access to an area of pathology whilst safeguarding important surrounding structures. Controversy currently surrounds the optimal surgical approach for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The medial parapatellar arthrotomy, or anteromedial approach, has been the most used and has been regarded as the standard approach for exposure of the knee joint. It provides extensive exposure and is useful for open anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, total knee replacement, and fixation of intra-articular fractures. Because this approach has been implicated in compromise of the patellar circulation, some authors have advocated the subvastus, midvastus, and trivector approaches for exposure of the knee joint. While these approaches expose the knee from the medial side, the anterolateral approach exposes the knee joint from the lateral side. With careful planning and arthrotomy selection, the anterior aspect of the joint can be adequately exposed for TKA in different clinical scenarios. PMID:27182142

  13. Uncemented total shoulder arthroplasty. A review.

    PubMed

    Cofield, R H

    1994-10-01

    Clinicians have had much experience with uncemented humeral components. A press-fitted humeral component will usually remain stable in the absence of a glenoid component. From the information available, surgeons should not continue to use press-fitted humeral components for total shoulder arthroplasty. Tissue ingrowth humeral components offer promise; however, the reports to date have short or intermediate length followup, and radiographic results do not equal those of cemented components. Early clinical results with tissue ingrowth glenoid components are excellent; radiographically evident changes occur much less frequently than they do following cement fixation. However, their disadvantage is the possibility of accelerated polyethylene wear and subsequent metal-induced synovitis. As such, there are no clear cut indications for cement fixation versus tissue ingrowth fixation for the glenoid component other than those intuitively based on bone quality and quantity in the glenoid fossa. Accruing experience will help to define the indications better, but given the similarity of clinical outcomes to date, distinction between the options may be difficult. PMID:7924051

  14. Diagnosis of infected total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Enayatollahi, Mohammad A; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Despite the battery of available tests, the diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) remains a challenge. A comprehensive medical history and physical examination with appropriate radiographs followed by erythrocyte sedimentation rate and serum C-reactive protein are the first-line screening test for patients with suspected hip PJI. The second line of investigation of patients with abnormal serology or a strong suspicion for PJI, is joint aspiration. Aspirates should be sent for assessment of white blood cell count, polymorphonuclear percentage, leukocyte esterase strip test, and microbiology. If the first attempt fails, the joint should be re-aspirated at a different time. The International Consensus recommends against infiltration of saline or other fluids into a "dry" joint. In patients not planned for surgery but need further evaluation for PJI, a nuclear imaging study may help. In others with a planned revision surgery, intraoperative samples for frozen section and culture study are the best measures available. Treatment strategies for PJI are well established in the literature. Poor surgical candidates receive oral suppressive antibiotic therapy alone. Acute PJI, presenting within 4 weeks of the index surgery, or as a result of bacteraemia, may be treated with irrigation and debridement and implant retention. Chronic PJI, occurring more than 4 weeks after initial surgery, is treated with 1-stage or 2-stage revision arthroplasty. In some persistent infections or patients who refuse to undergo revision surgery, salvage procedures may be needed. PMID:26044538

  15. Periprosthetic Osteolysis after Total Wrist Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boeckstyns, Michel E. H.; Herzberg, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Background and Literature Review Periprosthetic osteolysis (PPO) after second- or third-generation total wrist arthroplasty (TWA), with or without evident loosening of the implant components, has previously been reported in the literature, but rarely in a systematic way. Purpose The purpose of this study was to analyze the prevalence, location, and natural history of PPO following a TWA and to determine whether this was associated with prosthetic loosening. Patients and Methods We analyzed 44 consecutive cases in which a RE-MOTION TWA (Small Bone Innovations Inc., Morrisville, PA, USA) had been done. Results We found significant periprosthetic radiolucency (more than 2 mm in width) at the radial component side in 16 of the cases and at the carpal component side in 7. It developed gradually juxta-articularly around the prosthetic components regardless of the primary diagnosis, and seemed to stabilize in most patients after 1–3 years. In a small percentage of the patients, the periprosthetic area of bone resorption was markedly larger. In general, radiolucency was not related to evident loosening of the implant components, and only five carpal components and one radial had subsided or tilted. Conclusion Periprosthetic loosening is frequent following a TWA. In our series it was not necessarily associated with implant loosening and seemed to stabilize within 3 years. Close and continued observation is, however, recommended. Level of Evidence Therapeutic IV PMID:25032076

  16. Patient Satisfaction after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is one of the most successful and effective surgical options to reduce pain and restore function for patients with severe osteoarthritis. The purpose of this article was to review and summarize the recent literatures regarding patient satisfaction after TKA and to analyze the various factors associated with patient dissatisfaction after TKA. Patient satisfaction is one of the many patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). Patient satisfaction can be evaluated from two categories, determinants of satisfaction and components of satisfaction. The former have been described as all of the patient-related factors including age, gender, personality, patient expectations, medical and psychiatric comorbidity, patient's diagnosis leading to TKA and severity of arthropathy. The latter are all of the processes and technical aspects of TKA, ranging from the anesthetic and surgical factors, type of implants and postoperative rehabilitations. The surgeon- and patient-reported outcomes have been shown to be disparate occasionally. Among various factors that contribute to patient satisfaction, some factors can be managed by the surgeon, which should be improved through continuous research. Furthermore, extensive discussion and explanation before surgery will reduce patient dissatisfaction after TKA. PMID:26955608

  17. Patellar malalignment treatment in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Giorgio; Familiari, Filippo; Ranuccio, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Summary The patella, with or without resurfacing, plays a fundamental role in the success of a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Patellofemoral joint complications are due to problems related to the patient, to the surgical technique, or to the design of the components. Patellar tracking is influenced by several factors: a severe preoperative valgus, the presence of pre-existing patellofemoral dysplasia, the design of the femoral component, the surgical approach, the Q angle, the mechanical alignment of the limb, the tightness of the lateral retinaculum, the positioning of the patellar component in the proximal-distal and medial-lateral directions, the patella height, the patella (native or resurfaced) thickness, the size of the femoral and the tibial components, and the alignment and rotation of the components. Several factors are crucial to prevent patellar maltracking in TKA: the use of an anatomical femoral component, a meticulous surgical technique, careful dynamic intraoperative assessment of patellar tracking, and, if necessary, the achievement of an adequate lateral release. PMID:25606506

  18. A histological study of non-ceramic hydroxyapatite as a bone graft substitute material in the vertical bone augmentation of the posterior mandible using an interpositional inlay technique: A split mouth evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Karen; Dottore, Alexandre M; Kawakami, Paulo Y; Gehrke, Sergio A; Coelho, Paulo G; Piattelli, Adriano; Iezzi, Giovanna; Shibli, Jamil Awad

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the influence of graft material (non-ceramic hydroxyapatite versus autologous bone) on bone behaviour and perform a resonance frequency analysis of implants placed in augmented sites to evaluate stability. For this study, 11 patients with bilateral edentulous areas in the mandibular posterior region were selected. Alveolar augmentation osteotomies were bilaterally (split mouth design) performed. In one hemiarch, the space generated by the osteotomy was grafted with an interpositional intra-oral autologous bone graft (control group). In the other hemiarch, the space generated by the osteotomy was grafted with an interpositional non-ceramic hydroxyapatite (ncHA) (test group). The groups were randomized. After 6 months of healing, a bone sample was retrieved from each side for histological evaluation using a trephine drill that was 2-mm in internal diameter. The implant stability quotient (ISQ) was measured by the resonance frequency immediately following implant placement at baseline and after 6 months of follow-up. Good incorporation of the graft was observed in both groups; however, in the test group, a residual-grafted material was observed. Bone density and marrow spaces were similar between groups. Correlations between the ISQ values and the histometric variables were not observed (p>0.05). The results of this trial suggest that both intra-oral autologous bone and ncHA may be elected as interpositional grafting materials to vertically augment posterior atrophic mandibles. PMID:26325427

  19. Calcaneal Insufficiency Fracture after Ipsilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Min; Shin, Sung Jin; Kang, Byoung Youl

    2016-01-01

    Insufficiency fracture of the calcaneus is a rare entity. In the absence of trauma, evaluating a painful ankle in an elderly patient can be difficult and also it might be overlook the insufficiency fracture. We experienced a case of insufficiency calcaneus fracture that occurred after ipsilateral total knee arthroplasty. Here, we report our case with a review of literatures. PMID:26981521

  20. Uncovertebral Anatomic Midline Targeting for Cervical Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bednar, Drew A.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Prospective observational cohort. Objective To document the accuracy of uncovertebral anatomic targeting in positioning cervical disc arthroplasty. Summary of Background Data Disc arthroplasty implants depend on midline placement for optimum mechanical function. Fluoroscopy is used to delineate the midline. Anatomic targeting from the uncovertebral joints in the neck may be adequate. We have investigated the efficacy of uncovertebral anatomic targeting for cervical disc arthroplasty. Methods Anatomic uncovertebral midline targeting for disc arthroplasty insertion was performed in 18 male (mean age 51 years, range 27 to 67) and 22 female (mean age 50, range 35 to 70) patients receiving a total of 59 implants over a 5-year period. Device insertion was under only lateral imaging control. Postinsertion operative fluoroscopy with optimized centering was used to record implant position in the anteroposterior plane, and centerline analysis was performed using cursor measurement technology from the GE PACS™ imaging system (GE Medical Systems, Mt. Prospect, IL). Results Analysis found a mean deviation from the ideal midline placement of only 0.7 mm (range, 0 to 2.9 mm). Only three devices were more than 2 mm off the anatomic midline. Conclusion This anatomic technique is effective, safely minimizing imaging resource needs and X-ray exposure to the patient and operating team. PMID:24353946

  1. Clinical Implication of Diabetes Mellitus in Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Young-Soo; Lee, Seung-Hyuk; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Cho, Yoon-Je

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of diabetes mellitus on primary total hip arthroplasty by comparing the clinical outcomes of patients diagnosed to have diabetes mellitus before the operation with those without diabetes. Materials and Methods A total 413 patients who underwent unilateral cementless total hip arthroplasty from June 2006 to May 2009 were recruited and divided into diabetic and non-diabetic groups. The comparative analysis between the two groups was made. We evaluated Harris hip score, postoperative complications such as wound problem, surgical site infection, other medical complication and length of stay in hospital as clinical parameters. Radiographic evaluations were also included to determine loosening, dislocation and osteolysis. Results Patients with diabetes had an increased incidence of orthopaedic complications including surgical site infection and mortality, but other medical complications were not increased in diabetic patients. All complications after primary total hip arthroplasty were associated with diabetes mellitus, but the degree of diabetes was not associated with complications. Conclusion Diabetes mellitus increases incidence of orthopaedic complications, particularly deep infection, after cementless primary total hip arthroplasty.

  2. Exactech Opteon Femoral Component Fracture 12 Years after Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shaun P.; Antoci, Valentin; Kadzielski, John J.; Vrahas, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Arthroplasty implant fracture is a rare but critical complication that requires difficult revision surgery, often with poor results, patient disability, and significant cost. Several reports show component fracture either at the stem or at the neck interface after a relatively short postoperative course. We report such failure after 12 years, suggesting no safe period after which femoral implant fracture does not occur. PMID:26955493

  3. Wear simulation strategies for reverse shoulder arthroplasty implants.

    PubMed

    Langohr, G Daniel G; Athwal, George S; Johnson, James A; Medley, John B

    2016-05-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is a clinically accepted surgical procedure; however, its long-term wear performance is not known. The purpose of this work is to review wear simulator testing of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, to develop a wear simulator protocol for reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, and to test it by performing a pilot study. The review of wear simulator testing in the literature revealed considerable variation in protocols. A combination of our own cadaveric testing and those of other research groups helped in determining the magnitude and direction of joint loading for the development of the present protocol. A MATCO orbital-bearing simulator was adapted using custom fixtures to simulate a circumduction motion of the shoulder under mildly adverse conditions, and a pilot study gave wear rates within the wide range found in the literature. Arguments were presented in support of the currently developed protocol, but it was also suggested that, rather than rely on one protocol, a series of simulator wear protocols should be developed to fully test the implant wear performance in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. PMID:27160563

  4. Arthroscopic management of the painful total elbow arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Gregory I

    2015-01-01

    Background Failure of total elbow arthroplasty is more common than after other major joint arthroplasties and is often a result of aseptic loosening, peri-prosthetic infection, fracture and instability. Infection can be a devastating complication, yet there are no established guidelines for the pre-operative diagnosis of total elbow peri-prosthetic infection. This is because pre-operative clinical, radiographic and biochemical tests are often unreliable. Methods Using three case examples, a standardized protocol for the clinical and arthroscopic assessment of the painful total elbow arthroplasty is described. This is used to provide a mechanical and microbiological diagnosis of the patient’s pain. Results There have been no complications resulting from the use of this technique in the three patients described, nor in any other patient to date. Conclusions The staged protocol described in the present study, utilizing arthroscopic assessment, has refined the approach to the painful total elbow arthroplasty because it directly influences the definitive surgical management of the patient. It is recommended that other surgeons follow the principles outlined in the present study when faced with this challenging problem. PMID:27583000

  5. Total Knee Arthroplasty Failure Induced by Metal Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ryan; Phan, Duy; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 70 Final Diagnosis: Metal hypersensitivity Symptoms: Joint pain • swelling • instability Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Revision total knee arthroplasty Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Metal hypersensitivity is an uncommon complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that can lead to significant functional impairment and aseptic prosthesis failure. Case Report: We describe a 70-year-old patient who presented with persistent pain, swelling, and instability 2 years after a primary TKA. The patient had a history of metal hypersensitivity following bilateral metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (THA) that was revised to ceramic-on-polyethylene implants. Knee radiographs showed severe osteolysis with implant loosening. Serum cobalt was elevated and serum chromium was significantly elevated, while joint aspiration and inflammatory marker levels ruled out a periprosthetic infection. Revision TKA was performed, with intraoperative tissue pathology and postoperative leukocyte transformation testing confirming metal hypersensitivity as the cause for aseptic implant failure. Conclusions: This case report demonstrates the clinical and laboratory signs that suggest metal hypersensitivity in total knee arthroplasty and the potential for joint function restoration with revision surgery. PMID:26278890

  6. Delayed Axillary Artery Occlusion after Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Heitmiller, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Axillary artery injury has been associated with shoulder dislocation and surgery. We describe a case of delayed axillary artery occlusion after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. The injury was confirmed by Doppler and angiography and was treated with angioplasty and stenting. Early recognition and treatment of this injury are mandatory for patients' recovery. PMID:27555975

  7. Future Bearing Surfaces in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important issues in the modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the bearing surface. Extensive research on bearing surfaces is being conducted to seek an ideal bearing surface for THA. The ideal bearing surface for THA should have superior wear characteristics and should be durable, bio-inert, cost-effective, and easy to implant. However, bearing surfaces that are currently being implemented do not completely fulfill these requirements, especially for young individuals for whom implant longevity is paramount. Even though various new bearing surfaces have been investigated, research is still ongoing, and only short-term results have been reported from clinical trials. Future bearing surfaces can be developed in the following ways: (1) change in design, (2) further improvement of polyethylene, (3) surface modification of the metal, (4) improvement in the ceramic, and (5) use of alternative, new materials. One way to reduce wear and impingement in THA is to make changes in its design by using a large femoral head, a monobloc metal shell with preassembled ceramic liner, dual mobility cups, a combination of different bearing surfaces, etc. Polyethylene has improved over time with the development of highly crosslinked polyethylene. Further improvements can be made by reinforcing it with vitamin E or multiwalled carbon nanotubes and by performing a surface modification with a biomembrane. Surface modifications with titanium nitride or titanium niobium nitride are implemented to try to improve the metal bearings. The advance to the fourth generation ceramics has shown relatively promising results, even in young patients. Nevertheless, further improvement is required to reduce fragility and squeaking. Alternative materials like diamond coatings on surfaces, carbon based composite materials, oxidized zirconium, silicon nitride, and sapphire are being sought. However, long-term studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy of these surfaces after enhancements

  8. Future bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jun-Dong

    2014-03-01

    One of the most important issues in the modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the bearing surface. Extensive research on bearing surfaces is being conducted to seek an ideal bearing surface for THA. The ideal bearing surface for THA should have superior wear characteristics and should be durable, bio-inert, cost-effective, and easy to implant. However, bearing surfaces that are currently being implemented do not completely fulfill these requirements, especially for young individuals for whom implant longevity is paramount. Even though various new bearing surfaces have been investigated, research is still ongoing, and only short-term results have been reported from clinical trials. Future bearing surfaces can be developed in the following ways: (1) change in design, (2) further improvement of polyethylene, (3) surface modification of the metal, (4) improvement in the ceramic, and (5) use of alternative, new materials. One way to reduce wear and impingement in THA is to make changes in its design by using a large femoral head, a monobloc metal shell with preassembled ceramic liner, dual mobility cups, a combination of different bearing surfaces, etc. Polyethylene has improved over time with the development of highly crosslinked polyethylene. Further improvements can be made by reinforcing it with vitamin E or multiwalled carbon nanotubes and by performing a surface modification with a biomembrane. Surface modifications with titanium nitride or titanium niobium nitride are implemented to try to improve the metal bearings. The advance to the fourth generation ceramics has shown relatively promising results, even in young patients. Nevertheless, further improvement is required to reduce fragility and squeaking. Alternative materials like diamond coatings on surfaces, carbon based composite materials, oxidized zirconium, silicon nitride, and sapphire are being sought. However, long-term studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy of these surfaces after enhancements

  9. Total Hip Arthroplasty for Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Monzón, Daniel Godoy; Iserson, Kenneth V.; Jauregui, José; Musso, Carlos; Piccaluga, Francisco; Buttaro, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to determine the dislocation and reoperation rate, functional outcomes, and the survival rate of the unique subset of very old but lucid and independent patients with hip fractures following a total hip arthroplasty (THA) and geriatric team-coordinated perioperative care. Method: Between 2000 and 2006, previously independent ambulatory patients ≥80 years old presenting with an intracapsular hip fracture were given THAs under the care of an integrated orthopedic surgery–geriatric service. Their fracture-related complications, ambulation, mental status, and survival were followed for 5 to 11 years postinjury. Results: Five years postinjury, 57 (61.3%) patients of the original study group were living. In all, 3 (3.2%) patients had postoperative hip dislocations (and 2 patients had dislocation twice) and 2 reoperations were needed within the first postoperative month. There were no hip dislocations or reoperations after the first year. Radiographs obtained on 88% of the surviving patients at 5 years postoperatively showed that all remained unchanged from their immediate postoperative images. Nearly half of the patients were still able to ambulate as they did preoperatively and their mixed-model equation was statistically unchanged. Conclusion: This study of patients >80 years old with previously good functional status demonstrates that with appropriate surgical (best prosthesis, good operating technique, and regional anesthesia) and geriatric (pre- and postoperative assessments, close follow-up, medication adjustments, and fall-prevention instruction) care, they have few hip dislocations and reoperations, survive postfracture at least as long as their noninjured contemporaries, and continue to function and ambulate as they did prior to their injury. PMID:24660092

  10. Infection after primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lindeque, Bennie; Hartman, Zach; Noshchenko, Andriy; Cruse, Margaret

    2014-04-01

    The number of primary total hip arthroplasties (THAs) performed in the United States each year continues to climb, as does the incidence of infectious complications. The changing profile of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has made preventing and treating primary THA infections increasingly complex. The goal of this review was to summarize (1) the published data concerning the risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after primary THA by type of bacteria and (2) the effect of potentially modifying factors. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, EMBASE, Web of Science, and PubMed were searched. Studies dated between 2001 and 2011 examining primary THA in adults were included. Meta-analysis of the collected data was performed. The pooled SSI rate was 2.5% (95% confidence interval [Cl], 1.4%-4.4%; P<.001; n=28,883). The pooled deep prosthetic joint infection (PJI) rate was 0.9% (95% Cl, 0.4%-2.2%; P<.001; n=28,883). The pooled rate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus SSI was 0.5% (95% Cl, 0.2%-1.5%; P<.001; n=26,703). This is approximately 20% of all SSI cases. The pooled rate of intraoperative bacterial wound contamination was 16.9% (95% Cl, 6.6%-36.8%; P=.003; n=2180). All these results had significant heterogeneity. The postoperative risk of SSI was significantly associated with intraoperative bacterial surgical wound contamination (pooled rate ratio, 2.5; 95% Cl, 1.4%-4.6%; P=.001; n=19,049). PMID:24762833

  11. The use of internal jugular vein as interposition graft for femoral vein reconstruction following traumatic venous injury: a useful approach in selected cases.

    PubMed

    Woodson, J; Rodriguez, A A; Menzoian, J O

    1990-09-01

    Complex venous injuries remain a controversial and interesting challenge to the vascular and trauma surgeon. Data from the Vietnam Vascular Registry, combined with experience from recent civilian series, seem to indicate that the best results are obtained when venous repair is undertaken. This is especially true of combined arterial and venous injury where compromised venous outflow may lead to limb loss in spite of patent arterial reconstruction. The larger size of veins, however, has required the construction of complex and time-consuming panel and spiral-vein grafts. This makes them far from ideal in the trauma treatment setting, where minimization of blood loss and operating room time are high priorities. We present a case of combined injury to both femoral artery and vein, where the femoral vein injury was repaired using autologous internal jugular vein as interposition graft while the arterial injury was repaired with autologous saphenous vein from the opposite limb. The avoidance of prosthetics, ease of harvest, size match, and little associated morbidity all make a strong case for use of the internal jugular vein where speedy reconstruction of large venous conduits is indicated. PMID:2223549

  12. Pulmonary marrow embolism: a dog model simulating dual component cemented arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Byrick, R J; Kay, J C; Mullen, J B

    1987-07-01

    The cardiopulmonary changes resulting from cemented arthroplasty procedures were monitored in 11 dogs with a single prosthesis implanted and nine dogs with a dual arthroplasty procedure. These changes were characterized by decreased BP, elevated PPA, and elevated PVR, associated with decreases in PaO2, cardiac output and mixed venous oxygen tension. All changes were more pronounced and prolonged in the dual component arthroplasty group. Histologic lung examination and morphometry demonstrated significant degrees of marrow (fat) microembolism in the dual arthroplasty model. Cardiopulmonary collapse has been associated with Guepar dual component arthroplasties clinically and these patients are at increased risk and should be monitored continuously. Prophylactic measures include meticulous lavage of the intramedullary cavity, increased FIO2, and maintenance of intravascular volume and cardiac output. The bilateral arthroplasty model is useful in investigating therapeutic interventions which may detect and prevent the marrow microembolism syndrome intraoperatively. PMID:3608047

  13. Current Perspectives on Arthroplasty in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Rates, Outcomes, and Adverse Events.

    PubMed

    Kasturi, Shanthini; Goodman, Susan

    2016-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic debilitating condition with significant impact on the musculoskeletal system. Arthroplasty may be indicated for damage related to active lupus or its treatment. As therapies for SLE have advanced, morbidity and mortality have declined, while the rate of joint replacement has increased. The age of SLE patients undergoing arthroplasty is increasing, and the indication for surgery is evolving-while avascular necrosis was previously the predominant indication for arthroplasty, osteoarthritis now accounts for a larger proportion of surgeries. Pain and functional outcomes of arthroplasty in SLE patients are comparable to those of the general population with osteoarthritis, but lupus remains an independent risk factor for post-hip arthroplasty complications and mortality. Further research is needed to characterize the impact of lupus disease activity and severity on arthroplasty outcomes. PMID:27443850

  14. Total knee arthroplasty after high tibial osteotomy. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    van Raaij, Tom M; Reijman, Max; Furlan, Andrea D; Verhaar, Jan AN

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous osteotomy may compromise subsequent knee replacement, but no guidelines considering knee arthroplasty after prior osteotomy have been developed. We describe a systematic review of non-randomized studies to analyze the effect of high tibial osteotomy on total knee arthroplasty. Methods A computerized search for relevant studies published up to September 2007 was performed in Medline and Embase using a search strategy that is highly sensitive to find nonrandomized studies. Included were observational studies in which patients had total knee arthroplasty performed after prior high tibial osteotomy. Studies that fulfilled these criteria, were assessed for methodologic quality by two independent reviewers using the critical appraisal of observational studies developed by Deeks and the MINORS instrument. The study characteristics and data on the intervention, follow-up, and outcome measures, were extracted using a pre-tested standardized form. Primary outcomes were: knee range of motion, knee clinical score, and revision surgery. The grade of evidence was determined using the guidelines of the GRADE working group. Results Of the 458 articles identified using our search strategy, 17 met the inclusion criteria. Fifteen studies were cohort study with a concurrent control group, one was a historical cohort study and one a case-control study. Nine studies scored 50% or more on both methodological quality assessments. Pooling of the results was not possible due to the heterogeneity of the studies, and our analysis could not raise the overall low quality of evidence. No significant differences between primary total knee arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty after osteotomy were found for knee range of motion in four out of six studies, knee clinical scores in eight out of nine studies, and revision surgery in eight out of eight studies after a median follow-up of 5 years. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that osteotomy does not compromise subsequent knee

  15. The Finnish Arthroplasty Register: report of the hip register.

    PubMed

    Puolakka, T J; Pajamäki, K J; Halonen, P J; Pulkkinen, P O; Paavolainen, P; Nevalainen, J K

    2001-10-01

    The Finnish Arthroplasty Register was established in 1980. Between 1980 and 1999, 62,841 primary and 12,224 revision total hip arthroplasties (THA) were recorded. The annual number of both primary and revision THA has increased: in 1999, the incidence of primary THAs was 93/100,000. 174 implant designs have been used, but the 6 commonest implants comprised 82% in 1999. Since the late 1980s, more than 40% of the hips were inserted without cement. Over 47% of the cementless primary hip prostheses were used in patients younger than 60 years and over 93% of the cemented primary hips were used in patients 60 years or older. The 10-year survival rate was 72 (95% CI 67-76)% in patients younger than 55 years and 90 (89-91)% in patients older than 70 years. The commonest reasons for revision were aseptic loosening (65%), dislocation (9%) and infection (7%). In revisions, the 5-year survival of the cementless hip prosthesis improved over time: it was 85 (82-87)% in 1985-1989, 89 (88-91)% in 1990-1994 and 92 (88-95)% in 1995-1999. There are striking differences between the Arthroplasty Registers of Scandinavia as regards the end-point definition of survival. The Finnish Arthroplasty Register considers all reasons for revisions as the end-point of survival, but the Swedish register takes into account only aseptic loosening, so direct comparisons between registers are not possible. Recent data from the Finnish Arthroplasty Register indicate that the results of total hip replacements are improving in Finland. With the civic registration number, one can link and match data files. For example, with use of the Finnish Cancer Register, we found no increase in the risk of cancer after a THA. PMID:11728068

  16. Seasonality of infection rates after total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kane, Patrick; Chen, Christopher; Post, Zachary; Radcliff, Kris; Orozco, Fabio; Ong, Alvin

    2014-02-01

    The correlation between season (fall, winter, spring, and summer) and infection rate in surgical patients is well defined in many specialties. To the authors' knowledge, there are no data in the literature on this phenomenon in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty. They hypothesized that there would be an increased infection rate in the summer months in patients undergoing elective total joint arthroplasty. They retrospectively reviewed consecutive patients undergoing elective total hip or knee arthroplasty at a single institution during 1 year by a single surgeon. Wound infections were defined as any patient requiring oral antibiotics for cellulitis, readmission for intravenous antibiotics, a return to the operating room for irrigation and debridement, or excisional arthroplasty and placement of a cement spacer within 90 days of the initial procedure. Seventeen of 750 patients developed an infection, for an overall incidence of 2.2%. There was a statistically significant difference in infection rate according to season: 3 (1.5%) infections occurred in winter, 1 (0.5%) in spring, 9 (4.7%) in summer, and 4 (2.4%) in fall. The incidence was highest during July (4.5%), August (5.4%), and September (4.3%). There was a statistically significant difference in infection rate between summer/fall (3.6%) vs winter/spring (1.0%). There is an increase in the incidence of infection during summer months for patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty. The authors recommend increased surveillance and more thorough preoperative sterilization procedures during these warmer months. PMID:24679206

  17. Biomechanics of Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty: 
Current Concepts.

    PubMed

    Lorenzetti, Adam J; Stone, Geoffrey P; Simon, Peter; Frankle, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of reverse shoulder arthroplasty has provided surgeons with new solutions for many complex shoulder problems. A primary goal of orthopaedics is the restoration or re-creation of functional anatomy to reduce pain and improve function, which can be accomplished by either repairing injured structures or replacing them as anatomically as possible. If reconstructible tissue is lacking or not available, which is seen in patients who have complex shoulder conditions such as an irreparable rotator cuff-deficient shoulder, cuff tear arthropathy, or severe glenoid bone loss, substantial problems may arise. Historically, hemiarthroplasty or glenoid grafting with total shoulder arthroplasty yielded inconsistent and unsatisfactory results. Underlying pathologies in patients who have an irreparable rotator cuff-deficient shoulder, cuff tear arthropathy, or severe glenoid bone loss can considerably alter the mechanical function of the shoulder and create treatment dilemmas that are difficult to overcome. A better biomechanical understanding of these pathologic adaptations has improved treatment options. In the past three decades, reverse total shoulder arthroplasty was developed to treat these complex shoulder conditions not by specifically re-creating the anatomy but by using the remaining functional tissue to improve shoulder balance. Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty has achieved reliable improvements in both pain and function. Initial implant designs lacked scientific evidence to support the design rationale, and many implants failed because surgeons did not completely understand the forces involved or the pathology being treated. Implant function and clinical results will continue to improve as surgeons' biomechanical understanding of shoulder disease and reverse shoulder arthroplasty implants increases. PMID:27049186

  18. UNICOMPARTMENTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: CURRENT PERSPECTIVES AND TRENDS IN BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Júnior, João Alberto Yazigi; Angelini, Felipe Bertelli; Ferlin, Fernando; Hernandes, Andrea Canizares; Astur, Diego da Costa; Cohen, Moises

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the approaches and procedures used by Brazilian orthopedic surgeons for treating osteoarthrosis by means of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty and high tibial osteotomy of the knee. Methods: A questionnaire with 14 closed questions was developed and applied to Brazilian knee surgeons during the three days of the 43rd Brazilian Congress of Orthopedics and Traumatology. Results: A total of 113 surgeons filled out the questionnaire completely and became part of the sample analyzed. In this study, the majority of the surgeons performed fewer than five unicompartmental knee arthroplasty procedures/year (61.1%) and between 5 and 15 high tibial osteotomy procedures/year (37.2%). Use of computerized navigation systems during surgery remains uncommon in our environment, since only 0.9% of the specialists were using it. 65.5% of the surgeons reported that they had chosen to use total knee arthroplasty rather than partial arthroplasty due to lack of familiarity with the surgical technique. When asked about the possibility that the number of unicompartmental prostheses used in Brazil would grow as surgeons in this country become increasingly familiar with the technique, 80.5% of the respondents believed in this hypothesis. In this sample, we found that the greater the surgeon's experience was, the greater the numbers of unicompartmental prostheses and tibial osteotomies performed annually were (r = 0.550 and r = 0.465, respectively; p < 0.05). Conclusions: There is a clear evolutional trend towards treatment of unicompartmental osteoarthritis using partial knee arthroplasty in Brazil. However, further prospective controlled studies are needed in order to evaluate the clinical and scientific benefits of these trends. PMID:27047891

  19. Long-term results of compartmental arthroplasties of the knee: Long term results of partial knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parratte, S; Ollivier, M; Lunebourg, A; Abdel, M P; Argenson, J-N

    2015-10-01

    Partial knee arthroplasty (PKA), either medial or lateral unicompartmental knee artroplasty (UKA) or patellofemoral arthroplasty (PFA) are a good option in suitable patients and have the advantages of reduced operative trauma, preservation of both cruciate ligaments and bone stock, and restoration of normal kinematics within the knee joint. However, questions remain concerning long-term survival. The goal of this review article was to present the long-term results of medial and lateral UKA, PFA and combined compartmental arthroplasty for multicompartmental disease. Medium- and long-term studies suggest reasonable outcomes at ten years with survival greater than 95% in UKA performed for medial osteoarthritis or osteonecrosis, and similarly for lateral UKA, particularly when fixed-bearing implants are used. Disappointing long-term outcomes have been observed with the first generation of patellofemoral implants, as well as early Bi-Uni (i.e., combined medial and lateral UKA) or Bicompartmental (combined UKA and PFA) implants due to design and fixation issues. Promising short- and med-term results with the newer generations of PFAs and bicompartmental arthroplasties will require long-term confirmation. PMID:26430081

  20. Migration and wear of hydroxyapatite-coated press-fit cups in revision hip arthroplasty: a radiostereometric study.

    PubMed

    Nivbrant, B; Kärrholm, J

    1997-12-01

    Screw-fixated and hydroxyapatite-coated press-fit cups were studied using radiostereometry in 29 revision and 14 primary arthroplasties. The acetabular defects in the revision cases varied from none to type 3 (wall defects) according to Gustilo-Pasternak. Morsellized allograft was used in 25 revisions. Nine of these cups rested on less than 50% living bone. After 2 years, the mean migration in the revised group reached 0.36, 0.21, and 0.49 mm in the horizontal, longitudinal, and anteroposterior (AP) directions. The mean rotations varied between 0.5 degrees and 0.7 degrees depending on direction. The primary implants displayed smaller mediolateral migration and AP tilt. The mean proximal wear rate for the whole group was 0.11 mm/y. A central gap on the postoperative AP view implied less migration. The size of the preoperative bone defects or amount of bone-graft used had no influence on the migration. Despite extensive use of morsellized allograft, this implant displayed the smallest migration so far reported in revision hip arthroplasty. PMID:9458256

  1. Shoulder arthroplasty in osteoarthritis: current concepts in biomechanics and surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    Merolla, G; Nastrucci, G; Porcellini, G

    Shoulder arthroplasty is a technically demanding procedure to restore shoulder function in patients with severe osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint. The modern prosthetic system exploit the benefits of modularity and the availibility of additional sizes of the prosthetic components. In this paper we describe the biomechanics of shoulder arthroplasty and the technique for shoulder replacement including total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) with all-polyethylene and metal-backed glenoid component, humeral head resurfacing and stemless humeral replacement. PMID:24251240

  2. TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY IN A PATIENT WITH HOFFA FRACTURE PSEUDARTHROSIS: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires e; Giordano, Vincenzo; Amaral, Ney Pecegueiro do; Carvalho, Antônio Carlos Pires; Barretto, João Maurício

    2015-01-01

    A rare occurrence of a case of Hoffa fracture pseudarthrosis in an alcoholic patient with genu valgum associated with venous insufficiency who underwent total knee arthroplasty is reported. The literature is reviewed and the main factors for surgical indication of total knee arthroplasty after a fracture of the knee are discussed. Total knee arthroplasty was a viable option in a 60-year-old patient with Hoffa fracture pseudarthrosis and comorbidities. PMID:27027038

  3. Use of indomethacin as an adjuvant to surgery for recurrent temporomandibular joint ankylosis in adults

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Krushna; Pandey, Sandeep; Bhutia, Ongkila; Roychoudhury, Ajoy

    2014-01-01

    Two cases with multiple recurrences of temporomandibular joint ankylosis and multiple failed interposition/gap arthroplasty procedures are presented here. Heterotopic bone formation was thought to be the reason. Indomethacin prophylaxis for prevention of heterotopic new bone formation at the osteoarthrectomy site was used as an adjuvant to surgery, in dosages of 75 mg/day for six weeks. Indomethacin is used frequently in hip and elbow arthroplasties to prevent heterotopic ossification, but its use in temporomandibular joint is not routine. The presented cases did not develop further recurrence and attained stable mouth opening over two-year follow-up after osteoarthrectomy and oral indomethacin. PMID:25937735

  4. [Diagnosis in patients with a painful arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Carrega, Giuliana; Antonini, Andrea; Burastero, Giorgio; Casalino-Finocchio, Giorgetta; Ronca, Agostina; Salomone, Carlo; Riccio, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    The differential diagnosis between asepting loosening or prosthetic joint infection is not always easy. Tc-99m-labelled leucocyte scans, frozen section and histology can help recognise doubtful cases. We report the experience of the Unit for Infectious Diseases and Septic Orthopaedics of the ASL-2 Liguria, Italy, with a Tc-99m-labelled leucocyte scan and intraoperative frozen section to choose the best therapeutic approach: one-stage or two-stage exchange or arthrodesis-arthroplastica. All cases underwent histology and intraoperative cultures to confirm the diagnosis, and the effectiveness of the approach was evaluated at follow up after 18 months. From January 2011 to December 2012, 36 patients were evaluated (21 hip and 15 knee arthroprosthesis). The Tc-99m-labelled leukocyte scan was positive in 31 and negative in 5 patients. Frozen section was negative in 7 patients. Five of them were patients with a negative Tc-99m-labelled leucocyte scan and were treated successfully with one-stage exchange, even if, in one of them, Enterococcus faecalis was isolated at replacement and suppressive antibiotic treatment was needed. The other 31 patients were treated with arthrodesis arthroplasty (3 patients) or a two-stage exchange. In this group the Tc-99m-labelled leucocyte scan was positive in all patients and the frozen section was positive in 29/31 cases with 6% false negative. Histology was positive in 27/31 with 13% of false negative. The sensitivity and specificity value was respectively 90% and 100% in the frozen section, 84% and 100% in histology. Cultures were positive in 23/31 cases. Patients subjected to two-stage exchange were evaluated again during prosthesis replacement but the results of the Tc-99m-labelled leucocyte scan and histology showed unclear results more frequently: the Tc-99m-labelled leucocyte scan was positive in two cases, the frozen section in three and histology in seven in spite of positive culture in three cases and one relapse in a patient

  5. NATIONAL GAP ANALYSIS PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    GAP Analysis is a rapid conservation evaluation method for assessing the current status of biodiversity at large spatial scales. GAP Analysis provides a systematic approach for evaluating the protection afforded biodiversity in given areas. It uses Geographic Information System (...

  6. Practice Gaps in Pruritus.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Jonathan I

    2016-07-01

    There are several practice gaps in the evaluation and management of itch. These gaps include a dearth of objective measures of itch, infrequent use of validated patient-reported outcomes for itch, non-evidence-based treatment, and lack of consensus about the ideal workup for generalized itch. The present article reviews these gaps and presents potential solutions. PMID:27363881

  7. Behind the Pay Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dey, Judy Goldberg; Hill, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Women have made remarkable gains in education during the past three decades, yet these achievements have resulted in only modest improvements in pay equity. The gender pay gap has become a fixture of the U.S. workplace and is so ubiquitous that many simply view it as normal. "Behind the Pay Gap" examines the gender pay gap for college graduates.…

  8. Funding Gap Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newmyer, Joe; McIntyre, Chuck

    The "funding gap" in public higher education in California represents the difference between state appropriations and the amount needed to fully support each segment's educational mission. This report identifies and defines the funding gap for the California Community Colleges (CCC); measures the consequences of this gap on program quality and…

  9. Metal-on-Metal Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sehatzadeh, S; Kaulback, K; Levin, L

    2012-01-01

    Background Metal-on-metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) is in clinical use as an appropriate alternative to total hip arthroplasty in young patients. In this technique, a metal cap is placed on the femoral head to cover the damaged surface of the bone and a metal cup is placed in the acetabulum. Objectives The primary objective of this analysis was to compare the revision rates of MOM HRA using different implants with the benchmark set by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE). The secondary objective of this analysis was to review the literature regarding adverse biological effects associated with implant material. Review Methods A literature search was performed on February 13, 2012, to identify studies published from January 1, 2009, to February 13, 2012. Results The revision rates for MOM HRA using 6 different implants were reviewed. The revision rates for MOM HRA with 3 implants met the NICE criteria, i.e., a revision rate of 10% or less at 10 years. Two implants had short-term follow-ups and MOM HRA with one of the implants failed to meet the NICE criteria. Adverse tissue reactions resulting in failure of the implants have been reported by several studies. With a better understanding of the factors that influence the wear rate of the implants, adverse tissue reactions and subsequent implant failure can be minimized. Many authors have suggested that patient selection and surgical technique affect the wear rate and the risk of tissue reactions. The biological effects of high metal ion levels in the blood and urine of patients with MOM HRA implants are not known. Studies have shown an increase in chromosomal aberrations in patients with MOM articulations, but the clinical implications and long-term consequences of this increase are still unknown. Epidemiological studies have shown that patients with MOM HRA implants did not have an overall increase in mortality or risk of cancer. There is insufficient clinical data to confirm the

  10. Bile-acid-mediated decrease in endoplasmic reticulum stress: a potential contributor to the metabolic benefits of ileal interposition surgery in UCD-T2DM rats.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Bethany P; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Graham, James L; Kim, Jaehyoung; Ma, Fangrui; Shibata, Noreene; Stanhope, Kimber L; Giulivi, Cecilia; Hansen, Frederik; Jelsing, Jacob; Vrang, Niels; Kowala, Mark; Chouinard, Michael L; Haj, Fawaz G; Havel, Peter J

    2013-03-01

    Post-operative increases in circulating bile acids have been suggested to contribute to the metabolic benefits of bariatric surgery; however, their mechanistic contributions remain undefined. We have previously reported that ileal interposition (IT) surgery delays the onset of type 2 diabetes in UCD-T2DM rats and increases circulating bile acids, independently of effects on energy intake or body weight. Therefore, we investigated potential mechanisms by which post-operative increases in circulating bile acids improve glucose homeostasis after IT surgery. IT, sham or no surgery was performed on 2-month-old weight-matched male UCD-T2DM rats. Animals underwent an oral fat tolerance test (OFTT) and serial oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT). Tissues were collected at 1.5 and 4.5 months after surgery. Cell culture models were used to investigate interactions between bile acids and ER stress. IT-operated animals exhibited marked improvements in glucose and lipid metabolism, with concurrent increases in postprandial glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion during the OFTT and OGTTs, independently of food intake and body weight. Measurement of circulating bile acid profiles revealed increases in circulating total bile acids in IT-operated animals, with a preferential increase in circulating cholic acid concentrations. Gut microbial populations were assessed as potential contributors to the increases in circulating bile acid concentrations, which revealed proportional increases in Gammaproteobacteria in IT-operated animals. Furthermore, IT surgery decreased all three sub-arms of ER stress signaling in liver, adipose and pancreas tissues. Amelioration of ER stress coincided with improved insulin signaling and preservation of β-cell mass in IT-operated animals. Incubation of hepatocyte, adipocyte and β-cell lines with cholic acid decreased ER stress. These results suggest that postoperative increases in circulating cholic acid concentration contribute to improvements in