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Sample records for interstellar hydrogen atom

  1. Hot hydrogen atoms reactions of interest in molecular evolution and interstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. S.; Hong, K.; Hong, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Hot hydrogen atoms which are photochemically generated initiate reactions among mixtures of methane, ethane, water and ammonia, to produce ethanol, organic amines, organic acids, and amino acids. Both ethanol and ethyl amine can also act as substrates for formation of amino acids. The one carbon substrate methane is sufficient as a carbon source to produce amino acids. Typical quantum yields for formation of amino acids are approximately 0.00002 to 0.00004. In one experiment, 6 protein amino acids were identified and 8 nonprotein amino acids verified utilizing gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. We propose that hot atoms, especially hydrogen, initiate reactions in the thermodynamic nonequilibrium environment of interstellar space as well as in the atmospheres of planets.

  2. Rotational excitation of hydrogen molecules by collisions with hydrogen atoms. [interstellar gas energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.; Truhlar, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    Rate constants for rotational excitation of hydrogen molecules by collisions with hydrogen atoms have been obtained from quantum-mechanical calculations for kinetic temperatures between 100 and 5000 K. These calculations involve the rigid-rotator approximation, but other possible sources of error should be small. The calculations indicate that the early values of Nishimura are larger than accurate rigid-rotator values by about a factor of 20 or more.

  3. Direct measurement of interstellar extinction toward young stars using atomic hydrogen Lyα absorption

    SciTech Connect

    McJunkin, Matthew; France, Kevin; Brown, Alexander; Schneider, P. C.; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Schindhelm, Eric; Edwards, Suzan

    2014-01-10

    Interstellar reddening corrections are necessary to reconstruct the intrinsic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of accreting protostellar systems. The stellar SED determines the heating and chemical processes that can occur in circumstellar disks. Measurement of neutral hydrogen absorption against broad Lyα emission profiles in young stars can be used to obtain the total H I column density (N(H I)) along the line of sight. We measure N(H I) with new and archival ultraviolet observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of 31 classical T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be stars. The H I column densities range from log{sub 10}(N(H I)) ≈19.6-21.1, with corresponding visual extinctions of A{sub V} =0.02-0.72 mag, assuming an R{sub V} of 3.1. We find that the majority of the H I absorption along the line of sight likely comes from interstellar rather than circumstellar material. Extinctions derived from new HST blue-optical spectral analyses, previous IR and optical measurements, and new X-ray column densities on average overestimate the interstellar extinction toward young stars compared to the N(H I) values by ∼0.6 mag. We discuss possible explanations for this discrepancy in the context of a protoplanetary disk geometry.

  4. H2 recombination on interstellar grains. [due to hydrogen atom chemisorption on graphite grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, M. J.; Silk, J.

    1976-01-01

    From a consideration of relevant theoretical and experimental data it is concluded that H atoms (but not H2 molecules) will be chemisorbed on interstellar graphite grains, with H2 formation proceeding efficiently for graphite grain temperatures less than 70 K. It is argued that graphite grains will act as the principal sites for H2 formation, with a formation rate of about 4 to the minus 17th cu cm per sec. Heating by H2 molecules formed by surface recombination is analyzed in the context of the available experimental data, and a heating rate is derived and compared with other suggested cloud heating mechanisms. It is concluded that H2 recombination will provide the largest heat source in diffuse clouds if the albedo of interstellar dust in the 912-1200 A region is high (about 0.9), whereas if the albedo in this wavelength region is lower (about 0.5), photoelectron ejection from grains will tend to predominate, and can explain observed cloud temperatures with a carbon depletion factor of approximately 2, a factor attributable to a normal interstellar abundance of graphite grains.

  5. Adsorption and recombination of hydrogen atoms on a model graphite surface. [in interstellar space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz, S.; Chang, S.

    1985-01-01

    The adsorption and recombination of atomic hydrogen on a model graphite grain have been examined in a series of calculations in which a modified, iterative, extended Hueckel program was used. The hydrogen atom is found to be chemisorbed at a site with a zero-point binding energy of 0.7 eV and at an equilibrium distance of 2.25 A above the site. Despite a barrier of about 0.4 eV between adjacent sites, calculations suggest that at temperatures as low as 10 K, an H atom will tunnel through to adjacent sites in less than one nanosecond. However, a potential barrier to the recombination of two hydrogen atoms has been found which displays high sensitivity to the mutual arrangement of the two hydrogen atoms with respect to the graphite surface. Results show that at very low temperatures, recombinations can occur only by tunneling. Consistent with experiment, the region in which H2 begins to form exhibits a repulsive potential with respect to possible chemisorption of the incipient H2 entity.

  6. Interstellar clouds and molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1977-01-01

    Data obtained from the Copernicus Orbiting Astronomical Observatory, launched in 1972 and still obtaining information, are used in a discussion of the interstellar medium. The Copernicus instruments have facilitated direct estimates for the density and temperature of individual interstellar clouds, and improved the ability to determine where along the line of sight a cloud lies with respect to background stars. The physical characteristics of hydrogen molecules are considered, with attention to the formation and destruction of interstellar hydrogen. The differences between 'thin' clouds, in which molecular hydrogen is optically thin, and 'thick' clouds are examined. Several features of the interstellar medium are described.

  7. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of about 3 x 10 (exp -10) relative to H, If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for about 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (about 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 mm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H, that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  8. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of approximately 3 x 10(exp -10) relative to H2. If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for approximately 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (approximately 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 nm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H2 that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  9. Observed perturbations of the velocity distribution of interstellar hydrogen atoms in the solar system with Prognoz Lyman-alpha measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallement, R.; Bertaux, J. L.; Kurt, V. G.; Mironova, E. N.

    1984-11-01

    Observations of the interplanetary Lyman α emission made at five different places in the solar system with high apogee satellites Prognoz 5 and Prognoz 6 are reported. This Lyα emission is the result of resonance scattering of solar photons by H atoms of the local interstellar medium (LISM) flowing in the solar system at the velocity - Vw and the spectral profile is an image of the velocity distribution of the atoms. A hydrogen absorption cell was used to analyze the spectral profile, the variation of Doppler shift with looking direction providing its spectral scanning. A first estimate of the LISM temperature is derived, T ≅ 8000K, and also an approximate location of Vw in fair agreement with previous measurements. The observed variation of the heating effect is of 3000K, and is independent of the existence of a potential galactic background in the vicinity of the Lyα wavelength. An upper limit of this background is found to be 15 Rayleigh.

  10. The hydrogen coverage of interstellar PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. R.; Cohen, M.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Barker, J. R.; Barker, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The rate at which the CH bond in interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) rupture due to the absorption of a UV photon has been calculated. The results show that small PAHs (less than or equal to 25 carbon atoms) are expected to be partially dehydrogenated in regions with intense UV fields, while large PAHs (greater than or equal to 25 atoms) are expected to be completely hydrogenated in those regions. Because estimate of the carbon content of interstellar PAHs lie in the range of 20 to 25 carbon atoms, dehydrogenation is probably not very important. Because of the absence of other emission features besides the 11.3 micrometer feature in ground-based 8 to 13 micrometer spectra, it has been suggested that interstellar PAHs are partially dehydrogenated. However, IRAS 8 to 22 micrometer spectra of most sources that show strong 7.7 and 11.2 micrometer emission features also show a plateau of emission extending from about 11.3 to 14 micrometer. Like the 11.3 micrometer feature, this new feature is attributed to the CH out of plane bending mode in PAHs. This new feature shows that interstellar PAHs are not as dehydrogenated as estimated from ground-based 8 to 13 micrometer spectra. It also constrains the molecular structure of interstellar PAHs. In particular, it seems that very condensed PAHs, such as coronene and circumcoronene, dominate the interstellar PAH mixture as expected from stability arguments.

  11. The hydrogen coverage of interstellar PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Allamandola, L. J.; Barker, J. R.; Cohen, M.

    1987-01-01

    The rate at which the CH bond in interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) rupture due to the absorption of a UV photon has been calculated. The results show that small PAHs (less than or equal to 25 carbon atoms) are expected to be partially dehydrogenated in regions with intense UV fields, while large PAHs (greater than or equal to 25 atoms) are expected to be completely hydrogenated in those regions. Because estimate of the carbon content of interstellar PAHs lie in the range of 20 to 25 carbon atoms, dehydrogenation is probably not very important. Because of the absence of other emission features besides the 11.3 micrometer feature in ground-based 8 to 13 micrometer spectra, it has been suggested that interstellar PAHs are partially dehydrogenated. However, IRAS 8 to 22 micrometer spectra of most sources that show strong 7.7 and 11.2 micrometer emission features also show a plateau of emission extending from about 11.3 to 14 micrometer. Like the 11.3 micrometer feature, this new feature is attributed to the CH out of plane bending mode in PAHs. This new feature shows that interstellar PAHs are not as dehydrogenated as estimated from ground-based 8 to 13 micrometer spectra. It also constrains the molecular structure of interstellar PAHs. In particular, it seems that very condensed PAHs, such as coronene and circumcoronene, dominate the interstellar PAH mixture as expected from stability arguments.

  12. A survey of interstellar molecular hydrogen. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, B. D.; Drake, J. F.; Budich, W.; Bohlin, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Data from the Copernicus satellite's ultraviolet telescope were used to survey column densities of atomic and molecular hydrogen from a large sample of early-type stars; these data have bearing on an eventual understanding of diffuse and dense interstellar clouds. Column densities are derived by fitting damping profiles to the observed spectra, most of which exhibit strong damping lines in the lower rotational levels surveyed. Plots of dust column density, fractional abundance of molecular hydrogen, and the logarithm of fractional abundance versus total gas column density are given for many of the stars; stars with abnormally large or small hydrogen column densities, as well as some distant stars at high galactic latitudes, are considered. Equilibrium and nonequilibrium theories accounting for the abundance of interstellar hydrogen are compared, and support is found in the data for an account which balances hydrogen formation on interstellar grains with destruction through photodissociation. Overall averages for atomic and molecular hydrogen levels in the galactic plane are also calculated.

  13. Low-temperature surface formation of NH3 and HNCO: hydrogenation of nitrogen atoms in CO-rich interstellar ice analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedoseev, G.; Ioppolo, S.; Zhao, D.; Lamberts, T.; Linnartz, H.

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state astrochemical reaction pathways have the potential to link the formation of small nitrogen-bearing species, like NH3 and HNCO, and prebiotic molecules, specifically amino acids. To date, the chemical origin of such small nitrogen-containing species is still not well understood, despite the fact that ammonia is an abundant constituent of interstellar ices towards young stellar objects and quiescent molecular clouds. This is mainly because of the lack of dedicated laboratory studies. The aim of this work is to experimentally investigate the formation routes of NH3 and HNCO through non-energetic surface reactions in interstellar ice analogues under fully controlled laboratory conditions and at astrochemically relevant temperatures. This study focuses on the formation of NH3 and HNCO in CO-rich (non-polar) interstellar ices that simulate the CO freeze-out stage in dark interstellar cloud regions, well before thermal and energetic processing start to become relevant. We demonstrate and discuss the surface formation of solid HNCO through the interaction of CO molecules with NH radicals - one of the intermediates in the formation of solid NH3 upon sequential hydrogenation of N atoms. The importance of HNCO for astrobiology is discussed.

  14. Hydrogen atom chemisorption and diffusion on neutral and charged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) flakes in the interstellar media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Morella; Ruette, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen atoms diffusion on a hydrocarbon flake is studied using PM6 and DFT programs using as models neutral and positive charged coronene. Chemisorption and potential energy surfaces and diffusion paths were calculated. Results show that diffusion occurs through Csbnd C bonds. Edge effects are very important because the most stable adsorptions occur on hydrogenated border sites, so the diffusion is biased toward edge sites. Charged coronene has stronger adsorption energies than neutral systems. A large difference between barriers in neutral and charged systems was not observed in most of the cases. A discussion of modeling diffusion processes is presented.

  15. The interaction of heavy interstellar atoms with the heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Zank, G.P.; Lipatov, A.S.; Mueller, H.

    1999-06-01

    It is now reasonably well understood that the interaction of neutral interstellar hydrogen (H) with the heliosphere is highly nonlinear. In particular, neutral H does not stream unimpeded into the heliosphere, experiencing instead considerable {open_quotes}filtration{close_quotes} in the region upstream of the heliopause. This leads to the formation of a hydrogen wall. A recently developed 2D Boltzmann code is used to investigate the entrance of neutral helium, oxygen, carbon, and other heavy species into the heliosphere. The role of filtration for heavy interstellar neutral atoms is described and distribution functions throughout the heliosphere are presented. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. SOLAR RADIATION PRESSURE AND LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM FLOW PARAMETERS FROM INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER LOW ENERGY HYDROGEN MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schwadron, N. A.; Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; French, J.; Saul, L.; Wurz, P.; Bzowski, M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Frisch, P.; Gruntman, M.; Mueller, H. R.

    2013-10-01

    Neutral hydrogen atoms that travel into the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium (LISM) experience strong effects due to charge exchange and radiation pressure from resonant absorption and re-emission of Lyα. The radiation pressure roughly compensates for the solar gravity. As a result, interstellar hydrogen atoms move along trajectories that are quite different than those of heavier interstellar species such as helium and oxygen, which experience relatively weak radiation pressure. Charge exchange leads to the loss of primary neutrals from the LISM and the addition of new secondary neutrals from the heliosheath. IBEX observations show clear effects of radiation pressure in a large longitudinal shift in the peak of interstellar hydrogen compared with that of interstellar helium. Here, we compare results from the Lee et al. interstellar neutral model with IBEX-Lo hydrogen observations to describe the distribution of hydrogen near 1 AU and provide new estimates of the solar radiation pressure. We find over the period analyzed from 2009 to 2011 that radiation pressure divided by the gravitational force (μ) has increased slightly from μ = 0.94 ± 0.04 in 2009 to μ = 1.01 ± 0.05 in 2011. We have also derived the speed, temperature, source longitude, and latitude of the neutral H atoms and find that these parameters are roughly consistent with those of interstellar He, particularly when considering the filtration effects that act on H in the outer heliosheath. Thus, our analysis shows that over the period from 2009 to 2011, we observe signatures of neutral H consistent with the primary distribution of atoms from the LISM and a radiation pressure that increases in the early rise of solar activity.

  17. Electron-impact ionization of interstellar hydrogen and helium at interplanetary shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Isenberg, P.A.; Feldman, W.C.

    1995-04-15

    The authors investigate the ionization of interstellar hydrogen and helium due to electron impact by shock-heated electrons. Taking the electron distributions measured at four interplanetary shocks at 1 AU, they show that the electrons in the downstream region of strong shocks can ionize interstellar atoms at rates matching or exceeding the nominal photoionization or charge-exchange rates. They suggest that this process may explain some puzzling observations of interstellar pickup ions made by the Ulysses spacecraft. 17 refs.

  18. Excitation of interstellar hydrogen chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufild, David A.; Green, Sheldon

    1994-01-01

    We have computed new rate coefficients for the collisional excitation of HCl by He, in the close-coupled formalism and using an interaction potential determined recently by Willey, Choong, & DeLucia. Results have been obtained for temperatures between 10 K and 300 K. With the use of the infinite order sudden approximation, we have derived approximate expressions of general applicability which may be used to estimate how the rate constant for a transition (J to J prime) is apportioned among the various hyperfine states F prime of the final state J prime. Using these new rate coefficients, we have obtained predictions for the HCl rotational line strengths expected from a dense clump of interstellar gas, as a function of the HCl fractional abundance. Over a wide range of HCl abundances, we have found that the line luminosities are proportional to abundance(exp 2/3), a general result which can be explained using a simple analytical approximation. Our model for the excitation of HCl within a dense molecular cloud core indicates that the J = 1 goes to 0 line strengths measured by Blake, Keene, & Phillips toward the Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC-1) imply a fractional abundance n(HCl)/n(H2) approximately 2 x 10(exp -9), a value which amounts to only approximately 0.3% of the cosmic abundance of chlorine nuclei. Given a fractional abundance of 2 x 10(exp -9), the contribution of HCl emission to the total radiative cooling of a dense clump is small. For Orion, we predict a flux approximately 10(exp -19) W/sq cm for the HCl J = 3 goes to 2 line near 159.8 micrometers, suggesting that the strength of this line could be measured using the Infrared Space Observatory.

  19. The Secondary Stream of Interstellar Neutral Hydrogen Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, H.; Fukunishi, H.; Watanabe, S.; Takahashi, Y.; Taguchi, M.; Yamazaki, A.

    2005-12-01

    The solar system is located in a low-density interstellar cloud. Neutral hydrogen and helium atoms of the interstellar medium can penetrate deep into the heliosphere without being completely interrupted by the solar wind plasma. Consequently, there is a uniform flow of interplanetary hydrogen and helium in the solar system. This neutral hydrogen and helium flow is called `interstellar wind'. Spacecraft data demonstrated that the upstream direction of the interplanetary neutral helium flow is (254.7°+-0.4°, 5.2°+-0.2°) in the ecliptic coordinate system [Witte, 2004; Vallerga et al., 2004; Gloeckler et al., 2004], while it is (252.5°+-0.5°, 8.8°+-0.5°) for the interplanetary neutral hydrogen [Lallement, et al., 2005; Quemerais et al., 1999]. The presence of this well-established primary stream leads the hydrogen and helium glows to symmetry with respect to the 74° / 254° ecliptic longitude axis. Meanwhile, the existence of a secondary stream of the neutral wind inside the heliosphere arriving from a direction between about 260° and 290° ecliptic longitude, about 10° - 40° different from the upstream primary interstellar neutral flow direction, has been proposed recently by a synthetic analysis of a wide variety of spacecraft observations [M. R. Collier, private communication]. In this study, we have performed a detailed analysis of the interstellar hydrogen resonance glow data obtained from ultraviolet imaging spectrometer (UVS) measurements onboard Nozomi spacecraft. Although the UVS instrument instantaneously points a certain direction with the field-of-view which is perpendicular to the spin axis controlled toward the Earth, spatial distributions of emissions are measured by using the spin and orbital motion of the Nozomi spacecraft. One year observations enable us to derive the full sky image of Lyman alpha emission. We plotted the data obtained in the ecliptic plane from 2000 to 2001 and compared them with the model calculations in cases of the

  20. Model calculations for diffuse molecular clouds. [interstellar hydrogen cloud model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Langer, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    A steady state isobaric cloud model is developed. The pressure, thermal, electrical, and chemical balance equations are solved simultaneously with a simple one dimensional approximation to the equation of radiative transfer appropriate to diffuse clouds. Cooling is mainly by CII fine structure transitions, and a variety of heating mechanisms are considered. Particular attention is given to the abundance variation of H2. Inhomogeneous density distributions are obtained because of the attenuation of the interstellar UV field and the conversion from atomic to molecular hyrodgen. The effects of changing the model parameters are described and the applicability of the model to OAO-3 observations is discussed. Good qualitative agreement with the fractional H2 abundance determinations has been obtained. The observed kinetic temperatures near 80 K can also be achieved by grain photoelectron heating. The problem of the electron density is solved taking special account of the various hydrogen ions as well as heavier ones.

  1. Vacuum ultraviolet photolysis of hydrogenated amorphous carbons . I. Interstellar H2 and CH4 formation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alata, I.; Cruz-Diaz, G. A.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Dartois, E.

    2014-09-01

    Context. The interstellar hydrogenated amorphous carbons (HAC or a-C:H) observed in the diffuse medium are expected to disappear in a few million years, according to the destruction time scale from laboratory measurements. The existence of a-C:H results from the equilibrium between photodesorption, radiolysis, hydrogenation and resilience of the carbonaceous network. During this processing, many species are therefore injected into the gas phase, in particular H2, but also small organic molecules, radicals or fragments. Aims: We perform experiments on interstellar a-C:H analogs to quantify the release of these species in the interstellar medium. Methods: The vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis of interstellar hydrogenated amorphous carbon analogs was performed at low (10 K) to ambient temperature, coupled to mass-spectrometry detection and temperature-programed desorption. Using deuterium isotopic substitution, the species produced were unambiguously separated from background contributions. Results: The VUV photolysis of hydrogenated amorphous carbons leads to the efficient production of H2 molecules, but also to small hydrocarbons. Conclusions: These species are formed predominantly in the bulk of the a-C:H analog carbonaceous network, in addition to the surface formation. Compared with species made by the recombination of H atoms and physisorbed on surfaces, they diffuse out at higher temperatures. In addition to the efficient production rate, it provides a significant formation route in environments where the short residence time scale for H atoms inhibits H2 formation on the surface, such as PDRs. The photolytic bulk production of H2 with carbonaceous hydrogenated amorphous carbon dust grains can provide a very large portion of the contribution to the H2 molecule formation. These dust grains also release small hydrocarbons (such as CH4) into the diffuse interstellar medium, which contribute to the formation of small carbonaceous radicals after being dissociated

  2. Characteristics of the local interstellar hydrogen determined from PROGNOZ 5 and 6 interplanetary Lyman-alpha line profile measurements with a hydrogen absorption cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertaux, J. L.; Lallement, R.; Kurt, V. G.; Mironova, E. N.

    1985-09-01

    The flow of interstellar H atoms in the solar system was observed through resonance scattering of solar Lyman-alpha protons with two Lyman-alpha photometers on the Prognoz 5 and 6 satellites. Data collected at five different locations in the solar system were compared with a model of the interstellar H flow, modified by solar interaction. Five parameters describing atomic hydrogen of the local interstellar medium and two parameters describing the solar interaction were derived simultaneously to give a good fit of the upwind hemisphere. The solar Lyman-alpha flux at line center was determined along with the ionization rate of H atoms.

  3. Charge transfer reactions in multiply charged ion-atom collisions. [in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steigman, G.

    1975-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions in collisions between highly charged ions and neutral atoms of hydrogen and/or helium may be rapid at thermal energies. If these reactions are rapid, they will suppress highly charged ions in H I regions and guarantee that the observed absorption features from such ions cannot originate in the interstellar gas. A discussion of such charge-transfer reactions is presented and compared with the available experimental data. The possible implications of these reactions for observations of the interstellar medium, H II regions, and planetary nebulae are outlined.

  4. Observations of interstellar hydrogen and deuterium toward Alpha Centauri A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, W. B.; Henry, R. C.; Moos, H. W.; Linsky, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    A composite profile is presented of the Ly-alpha emission line of Alpha Cen A, obtained from 10 individual spectra with the high-resolution spectrograph aboard the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite. There is excellent overall agreement with two previous Copernicus observations. Interstellar deuterium is detected, and a lower limit is set on the deuterium to hydrogen ratio of nDI/nHI greater than 8 x 10 to the -6th. In addition, the deuterium bulk velocity appears blueshifted by 8 + or - 2 km/s with respect to interstellar hydrogen, suggesting a nonuniform medium along the line of sight.

  5. Properties of nearby interstellar hydrogen deduced from Lyman-alpha sky background measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    For a sufficiently rapid relative motion of the solar system and the nearby interstellar gas, neutral atoms may be expected to penetrate the heliosphere before becoming ionized. Recent satellite measurements of the Lyman alpha emission above the geocorona indicate such an interstellar wind of neutral hydrogen emerging from the direction of Sagittarius and reaching to within a few astronomical units of the sun. A detailed model of the scattering of solar Lyman alpha from the spatial distribution of neutral hydrogen in interplanetary space is presented. This asymmetric distribution is established by solar wind and solar ultraviolet ionization processes along the trajectories of the incoming hydrogen atoms. The values of the interstellar density, the relative velocity, and the gas temperature are adjusted to agree with the Lyman alpha measurements. The results may be interpreted in terms of two models, the cold model and the hot model of the interstellar gas, depending on whether galactic Lyman alpha emission is present at its maximum allowable value or negligibly small.

  6. LOCAL INTERSTELLAR HYDROGEN'S DISAPPEARANCE AT 1 AU: FOUR YEARS OF IBEX IN THE RISING SOLAR CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Saul, Lukas; Rodriguez, Diego; Scheer, Juergen; Wurz, Peter; Bzowski, Maciej; Kubiak, Marzena; Sokol, Justina; Fuselier, Stephen; McComas, Dave; Moebius, Eberhard

    2013-04-20

    NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission has recently opened a new window on the interstellar medium (ISM) by imaging neutral atoms. One ''bright'' feature in the sky is the interstellar wind flowing into the solar system. Composed of remnants of stellar explosions as well as primordial gas and plasma, the ISM is by no means uniform. The interaction of the local ISM with the solar wind shapes our heliospheric environment with hydrogen being the dominant component of the very local ISM. In this paper, we report on direct sampling of the neutral hydrogen of the local ISM over four years of IBEX observations. The hydrogen wind observed at 1 AU has decreased and nearly disappeared as the solar activity has increased over the last four years; the signal at 1 AU has dropped off in 2012 by a factor of {approx}8 to near background levels. The longitudinal offset has also increased with time presumably due to greater radiation pressure deflecting the interstellar wind. We present longitudinal and latitudinal arrival direction measurements of the bulk flow as measured over four years beginning at near solar minimum conditions. The H distribution we observe at 1 AU is expected to be different from that outside the heliopause due to ionization, photon pressure, gravity, and filtration by interactions with heliospheric plasma populations. These observations provide an important benchmark for modeling of the global heliospheric interaction. Based on these observations we suggest a further course of scientific action to observe neutral hydrogen over a full solar cycle with IBEX.

  7. THE IMPRINT OF THE VERY LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD IN SIMULATED ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Prested, C.; Schwadron, N.; Opher, M. E-mail: nathanas@bu.ed

    2010-06-10

    The interaction of the solar wind with the very local interstellar medium (VLISM) forms the boundaries of the heliosphere. A strong asymmetry of the heliosphere was found both directly by the Voyager probes and indirectly from measurements of the deflection of neutral hydrogen. The most likely source of this asymmetry is from the interstellar magnetic field, the properties of which are highly unconstrained. Energetic neutral atom (ENA) images will provide an additional method to view the heliosphere and infer the interstellar magnetic field. This paper investigates the imprint of the interstellar magnetic field on simulated energetic neutral atom all-sky maps. We show that a significant source of 0.5-1 keV ENAs may originate from the outside of the heliopause, if a strong suprathermal population exists in the VLISM. In simulations, a strong outer heliosheath ENA feature appears near the nose of the heliosphere. A weaker, complementary feature is also present consisting entirely of inner heliosheath ENAs. From this feature the direction of the interstellar magnetic field can be easily inferred.

  8. Studies of Interstellar and Circumstellar Magnetic Field with Aligned Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarian, A.; Yan, H.

    2004-12-01

    Population of levels of the hyperfine and fine split ground state of an atom is affected by radiative transitions induced by anisotropic radiation flux. Such aligned atoms precess in the external magnetic field and this affects properties of polarized radiation arising from both scattering and absorption by atoms. As the result the degree of light polarization depends on the direction of the magnetic field. This provides a new tool for studies of astrophysical magnetic fields using optical and UV polarimetry. We provide calculations for several atoms and ions that can be used to study magnetic fields in interplanetary medium, interstellar medius, circumstellar regions and quasars.

  9. Helium atoms in interstellar and interplanetary space. II: Determination of direction of interstellar gas motion relative to Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, V. G.; Mironova, Y. N.; Berto, Z. L.; Dalodye, F.

    1985-02-01

    The far ultraviolet photometer on board the Prognoz-6 satellite measured the brightness distribution in the 584 A line of atomic helium in interplanetary space. Since atoms of neutral helium penetrate deeper into the solar system than neutral hydrogen and are focused by the Sun's gravitational field, it is possible to determine the direction of the vector Vw, which is the sum of the interstellar gas velocity vector Vt and the vector -Vs which is the velocity vector of the Sun relative to several hundreds of the closest stars. The scanning geometry of the photometer system is illustrated graphically and the data from seven observational sessions between 29 Sep. 1977 and 15 Jan. 1978 are summarized in tabular form. The velocity vector projected onto the celestial sphere (Vs) has a right ascension of 77 plus or minus 2 deg and a declination of 17 plus or minus 2.5 deg.

  10. Helium atoms in interstellar and interplanetary media. III - Temperature and velocity of the interstellar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, V. G.; Mironova, E. N.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Dalode, F.

    1984-03-01

    The temperature and velocity of the interstellar wind were determined by observations of background radiation in the He I 584-A line performed in interplanetary space by Prognoz-6. Values of 13,500 + or - 2000 K and 25 + or - 2 km/s were obtained. The density of neutral helium atoms beyond the heliosphere ranges from 0.008 to 0.028/cu cm.

  11. The effect of new interstellar medium parameters on the heliosphere and energetic neutral atoms from the interstellar boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Heerikhuisen, J.; Zirnstein, E. J.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Funsten, H. O.

    2014-03-20

    We present new results from three-dimensional simulations of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) using recent observations by NASA's Interstellar Boundary EXplorer (IBEX) mission estimates of the velocity and temperature of the LISM. We investigate four strengths of the LISM magnetic field, from 1 to 4 μG, and adjust the LISM proton and hydrogen densities so that the distance to the termination shock (TS) in the directions of the Voyager spacecraft is just below 90 AU, and the density of hydrogen at the TS is close to 0.09 cm{sup –3} in the nose direction. The orientation of the magnetic field is chosen to point toward the center of the ribbon of enhanced energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux seen in the IBEX data. Our simulations show that the plasma and neutral properties in the outer heliosheath vary considerably as a function of the LISM magnetic field strength. We also show that the heliotail points downwind in all cases, though its structure is strongly affected by the external magnetic field. Comparison and consistency between the simulated ENA flux and the circularity of the ribbon as measured by IBEX are most consistent with a LISM magnetic field strength aligned with the center of the ribbon and a magnitude in the range 2.5-3 μG.

  12. Abundance of atomic carbon /C I/ in dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, T. G.; Huggins, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    The abundance of interstellar neutral atomic carbon is investigated by means of its ground state fine-structure line emission at 492 GHz using the 91.5 cm telescope of NASAs Kuiper Airborne Observatory. Atomic carbon is found to be very abundant in dense interstellar molecular clouds with column densities of about 10 to the 19th per sq cm. Because the observations have considerably greater column densities than current theories of carbon chemistry, it is suggested that the physical conditions of these clouds are not as simple as assumed in the models. Various situations are discussed which would lead to large C I abundances, including the possibility that the chemical lifetimes of the clouds are relatively short.

  13. A survey of local interstellar hydrogen from OAO-2 observations of Lyman alpha absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, B. D.; Jenkins, E. B.

    1972-01-01

    The Wisconsin far ultraviolet spectrometer aboard OAO-2 observed the wavelength region near 1216 A for 69 stars of spectral type B2 or earlier. From the strength of the observed interstellar L sub alpha absorption, atomic hydrogen column densities were derived over distances averaging 300 pc away from the sun. The OAO data were compared to synthetic ultraviolet spectra, originally derived from earlier higher resolution rocket observations, which were computer processed to simulate the effects of absorption by different amounts of hydrogen followed by the instrumental blending.

  14. Charting the Interstellar Magnetic Field causing the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) Ribbon of Energetic Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Berdyugin, A.; Piirola, V.; Magalhaes, A. M.; Seriacopi, D. B.; Wiktorowicz, S. J.; Andersson, B.-G.; Funsten, H. O.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Slavin, J. D.; Hanson, A. J.; Fu, C.-W.

    2015-12-01

    .8}-27.6+23.5 between {B}{POL} and the bulk LSR velocity the local interstellar material indicates a geometry that is consistent with an expanding superbubble. The efficiency of grain alignment in the local interstellar medium has been assessed using stars where both polarization data and hydrogen column density data are available. Nearby stars appear to have larger polarizations than expected based on reddened sightlines, which is consistent with previous results, but uncertainties are large. Optical polarization and color excess E(B - V) data indicate the presence of nearby interstellar dust in the BICEP2 field. Color excess E(B - V) indicates an optical extinction of AV > 0.6 in the BICEP2 field, while the polarization data indicate that AV > 0.09 mag. The IBEX Ribbon ISMF extends to the boundaries of the BICEP2 region.

  15. The neutral atomic phases of the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfire, M. G.; Hollenbach, D.; Mckee, C. F.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Bakes, E. L. O.

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the thermal equilibrium gas temperature of the diffuse interstellar medium. Our method incorporates a new photoelectric heating rate from small grains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that accounts for a size distribution of particles extending from 100 to 3 A radius. We also include a detailed treatment of the ionization rates and heating due to the soft X-ray background and due to cosmic rays. Phase diagrams (thermal pressure P versus hydrogen density n) are presented for gas that is illuminated by local interstellar far-ultraviolet (FUV) and X-ray radiation fields. A stable two-phase medium is produced with thermal pressure in the range P/k approximately = to 10(exp 3-4) K/cc. We demonstrate that photoelectric heating from PAHs dominates in the warm neutral phase (WNM) and cold neutral phase (CNM). If the C II (158 micrometers cooling per hydrogen nucleus in the solar neighborhood represents an average value for the Galaxy, we predict L(sub CII) approximately = to 7 x 10(exp 7) solar luminosities from the CNM in the Galaxy, comparable to that observed by the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE). We discuss the dependence of the results on absorbing column density, gas phase abundances, dust abundances and metallicity, FUV field, and the X-ray radiation field. These results will be useful in modeling the multiphase structure of high-velocity clouds in the halo, the interstellar matter (ISM) at other galactocentric radii, and the ISM in external galaxies and galactic nuclei.

  16. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF REACTIONS BETWEEN H ATOMS AND CARBANIONS OF INTERSTELLAR RELEVANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Zhibo; Eichelberger, Brian; Carpenter, Marshall Y.; Martinez, Oscar; Bierbaum, Veronica M.; Snow, Theodore P. E-mail: BEichelberger@jbu.ed E-mail: Oscar.Martinez@colorado.ed E-mail: Theodore.Snow@colorado.ed

    2010-11-10

    The recent detection of molecular anions in the interstellar medium (ISM) has highlighted the need for laboratory studies of negative ion chemistry. Hydrogen atoms are the most abundant atomic species in the ISM, and the chemistry of H atoms with anions may contribute to molecular synthesis in interstellar clouds. This work is a combined experimental and computational study of a series of anions reacting with H atoms by associative detachment (A{sup -} + H {yields} AH + e {sup -}). The anions include deprotonated nitriles (CH{sub 2}CN{sup -}, CH{sub 3}CHCN{sup -}, and (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CCN{sup -}), acetaldehyde (HC(O)CH{sub 2} {sup -}), acetone (CH{sub 3}C(O)CH{sub 2} {sup -}), ethyl acetate (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OC(O)CH{sub 2} {sup -}), methanol (CH{sub 3}O{sup -}), and acetic acid (CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2} {sup -}). Experimental measurements of the reaction rate constants were made with the flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube technique. Ab initio theoretical calculations were carried out to explore the reaction mechanism and investigate the factors influencing reaction efficiencies, which are largely proportional to reaction exothermicities. Other factors influencing reaction efficiencies include the charge density on the reactive site of the anion, the characteristics of the potential energy surfaces along the approach of the reactants, and angular momentum conservation of the anion-H atom collision.

  17. Direction of interstellar hydrogen flow in the heliosphere: theoretical modelling and comparison with SOHO/SWAN data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katushkina, O. A.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Alexashov, D. B.

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Solar Wind ANisotropies (SWAN) data for backscattered solar Lyman α radiation performed by Lallement et al. showed for the first time that the average direction of interstellar hydrogen flow in the heliosphere is deflected by several degrees relative to the original direction of the interstellar wind outside the heliosphere. This deflection is caused by the indirect influence of the interstellar magnetic field (IsMF) through charge exchange between hydrogen atoms and interstellar protons deflected by the IsMF in the region of interaction between the solar wind and the local interstellar medium (LISM). Thus, measurements of the backscattered Lyman α radiation at the Earth's orbit can be used as a remote IsMF diagnostic. However, the direction of interstellar hydrogen flow in the vicinity of the Sun may be influenced by other effects such as the solar radiation pressure, gravitation and ionization and kinetic non-Maxwellian properties of the hydrogen distribution and also may depend on other LISM parameters besides IsMF. In this work, we perform a theoretical modelling of the backscattered solar Lyman α radiation seen at 1 au from the Sun and analyse the direction of hydrogen flow in the heliosphere, which can be obtained from the spectral properties of the backscattered radiation. The influence of different effects mentioned above is investigated. Also we compare our results obtained by means of a state-of-art 3D time-dependent kinetic model of the hydrogen distribution with the SWAN data of 1996.

  18. GPGPU Approach: Simulation of the Interaction of Heavy Interstellar Atoms with the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeStefano, A.

    2014-12-01

    Running simulations is an involved process taking many hours of computational time to complete. With the advent of cluster computing and parallel processing, problems may be solved in much less time compared to those run in serial. Specifically, NVIDIA released the parallel computing platform CUDA in 2007 giving researchers and programmers access to the GPU to solve generalized problems, and not those of just images.In current research, code has previously been developed to study the interaction of the heliosphere and heavy atoms from the local interstellar medium.Ionized species of hydrogen, helium and other heavy atoms are deflected by the heliosphere where as the neutral species are relatively unimpeded. Charge exchange of these neutral particles may occur between ionized species originating from the solar wind or other populations of pickup ions (PUI) modifying the shape and properties of the heliosphere, compared to one without neutrals. The details of the charge exchange interaction are element dependent and need to be investigated one by one. Current research has studied the interaction of local interstellar hydrogen with the heliosphere quite extensively with theory, simulations and modeling.Since hydrogen is the most abundant element care must be taken when coupling MHD equations with the charge exchange interactions. Simulation code has been developed to account for this dynamic problem and they have shown that the shape of the heliosphere is affected by this. Interstellar atoms heavier than hydrogen interacting with the heliosphere has been looked at as well, but not nearly with as much detail or sophisticated models as hydrogen. The heavy atom data collected by IBEX has in this sense been under-utilized by models.Previously, the simulation was computed with the use of MPI (Message Passing Interface) for parallelization. This approach provided a decrease in computational time. However, CUDA enables the programmer to take advantage of the computer

  19. Thin film atomic hydrogen detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    Thin film and bead thermistor atomic surface recombination hydrogen detectors were investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Devices were constructed on a thin Mylar film substrate. Using suitable Wheatstone bridge techniques sensitivities of 80 microvolts/2x10 to the 13th power atoms/sec are attainable with response time constants on the order of 5 seconds.

  20. Atomic hydrogen in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Stephen E.; Silverglate, Peter R.; Altschuler, Daniel R.; Giovanardi, Carlo

    1987-01-01

    The authors searched for neutral atomic hydrogen associated with 22 planetary nebulae and three evolved stars in the 21 cm line at the Arecibo Observatory. Objects whose radial velocities permitted discrimination from Galactic H I were chosen for observation. Hydrogen was detected in absorption from IC 4997. From the measurements new low limits are derived to the mass of atomic hydrogen associated with the undetected nebulae. Radio continuum observations were also made of several of the nebulae at 12.6 cm. The authors reexamine previous measurements of H I in planetary nebulae, and present the data on a consistent footing. The question of planetary nebula distances is considered at length. Finally, implications of the H I measurements for nebular evolution are discussed and it is suggested that atomic hydrogen seen in absorption was expelled from the progenitor star during the final 1000 yr prior to the onset of ionization.

  1. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, A.; Parthey, Ch G.; Kolachevsky, N.; Alnis, J.; Khabarova, K.; Pohl, R.; Peters, E.; Yost, D. C.; Matveev, A.; Predehl, K.; Droste, S.; Wilken, T.; Holzwarth, R.; Hänsch, T. W.; Abgrall, M.; Rovera, D.; Salomon, Ch; Laurent, Ph; Udem, Th

    2013-12-01

    Precise determinations of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference [1]. A recent measurement of the 2S - 2P3/2 transition frequency in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct [2, 3]. We hope to contribute to this so-called "proton size puzzle" by providing additional experimental input from hydrogen spectroscopy.

  2. The sticking of atomic hydrogen on amorphous water ice

    SciTech Connect

    Veeraghattam, Vijay K.; Manrodt, Katie; Lewis, Steven P.; Stancil, P. C. E-mail: lewis@physast.uga.edu

    2014-07-20

    Using classical molecular dynamics, we have simulated the sticking and scattering process of a hydrogen atom on an amorphous ice film to predict the sticking probability of hydrogen on ice surfaces. A wide range of initial kinetic energies of the incident hydrogen atom (10 K-600 K) and two different ice temperatures (10 K and 70 K) were used to investigate this fundamental process in interstellar chemistry. We report here the sticking probability of atomic hydrogen as a function of incident kinetic energy, gas temperature, and substrate temperature, which can be used in astrophysical models. The current results are compared to previous theoretical and experimental studies that have reported a wide range in the sticking coefficient.

  3. Electron impact ionization rates for interstellar H and He atoms near interplanetary shocks: Ulysses observations

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, W.C.; Phillips, J.L.; Gosling, J.T.; Isenberg, P.A.

    1996-07-01

    Solar wind plasma data measured during the near-ecliptic phase of the Ulysses mission between October, 1990 and January, 1993 were studied to determine the relative importance of electron-impact ionization to the total ionization rates of interstellar hydrogen and helium atoms. During times of quiet flow conditions electron-impact ionization rates were found to be generally low, of the order of 1{percent} of the total ionization rates. However, just downstream of the strongest CME- and CIR-driven shock waves encountered by Ulysses, the electron impact-ionization rate at times was more than 10{percent} that of the charge-exchange rate for hydrogen and more than 100{percent} that of the photoionization rate for helium. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Detection of interstellar hydrogen sulfide in cold, dark clouds.

    PubMed

    Minh, Y C; Irvine, W M; Ziurys, L M

    1989-10-01

    We have detected interstellar hydrogen sulfide (H2S) toward the cold, dark clouds L134N and TMC 1. We derive total column densities of approximately 2.6 x 10(13) cm-2 and approximately 7.0 x 10(12) cm-2 at the SO peak of L134N and at the NH3 peak of TMC 1, respectively. Since the expected gas phase reactions leading to the formation of H2S are thought to be endothermic, grain surface reactions may play a major role in the synthesis of this species in cold, dark clouds. If the carbon abundance is high and grain surface reactions are the dominant formation route, H2CS would be expected to form instead of H2S, and the abundances of H2CS have been observed to be high where those of H2S are low in L134N and TMC 1. PMID:11538326

  5. The formation of molecules in interstellar clouds from singly and multiply ionized atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    The suggestion is considered that multiply ionized atoms produced by K- and L-shell X-ray ionization and cosmic-ray ionization can undergo ion-molecule reactions and also initiate molecule production. The role of X-rays in molecule production in general is discussed, and the contribution to molecule production of the C(+) radiative association with hydrogen is examined. Such gas-phase reactions of singly and multiply ionized atoms are used to calculate molecular abundances of carbon-, nitrogen-, and oxygen-bearing species. The column densities of the molecules are evaluated on the basis of a modified version of previously developed isobaric cloud models. It is found that reactions of multiply ionized carbon with H2 can contribute a significant fraction of the observed CH in diffuse interstellar clouds in the presence of diffuse X-ray structures or discrete X-ray sources and that substantial amounts of CH(+) can be produced under certain conditions.

  6. STUDIES OF DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS V. PAIRWISE CORRELATIONS OF EIGHT STRONG DIBs AND NEUTRAL HYDROGEN, MOLECULAR HYDROGEN, AND COLOR EXCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Scott D.; Sonnentrucker, Paule; York, Donald G.; Hobbs, L. M.; McCall, Benjamin J.; Dahlstrom, Julie; Welty, Daniel E.; Drosback, Meredith M.; Rachford, Brian L.; Snow, Theodore P.

    2011-01-20

    We establish correlations between equivalent widths of eight diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), and examine their correlations with atomic hydrogen, molecular hydrogen, and E{sub B-V}. The DIBs are centered at {lambda}{lambda} 5780.5, 6204.5, 6283.8, 6196.0, 6613.6, 5705.1, 5797.1, and 5487.7, in decreasing order of Pearson's correlation coefficient with N(H) (here defined as the column density of neutral hydrogen), ranging from 0.96 to 0.82. We find the equivalent width (EW) of {lambda}5780.5 is better correlated with column densities of H than with E{sub B-V} or H{sub 2}, confirming earlier results based on smaller data sets. We show that the same is true for six of the seven other DIBs presented here. Despite this similarity, the eight strong DIBs chosen are not correlated well enough with each other to suggest they come from the same carrier. We further conclude that these eight DIBs are more likely to be associated with H than with H{sub 2}, and hence are not preferentially located in the densest, most UV shielded parts of interstellar clouds. We suggest that they arise from different molecules found in diffuse H regions with very little H{sub 2} (molecular fraction f < 0.01). Of the 133 stars with available data in our study, there are three with significantly weaker {lambda}5780.5 than our mean H-{lambda}5780.5 relationship, all of which are in regions of high radiation fields, as previously noted by Herbig. The correlations will be useful in deriving interstellar parameters when direct methods are not available. For instance, with care, the value of N(H) can be derived from W{sub {lambda}}(5780.5).

  7. Ultraviolet observations of cool stars. VII - Local interstellar hydrogen and deuterium Lyman-alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclintock, W.; Henry, R. C.; Linsky, J. L.; Moos, H. W.

    1978-01-01

    High-resolution Copernicus spectra of Epsilon Eri and Epsilon Ind containing interstellar hydrogen and deuterium L-alpha absorption lines are presented, reduced, and analyzed. Parameters of the interstellar hydrogen and deuterium toward these two stars are derived independently, without any assumptions concerning the D/H ratio. Copernicus spectra of Alpha Aur and Alpha Cen A are reanalyzed, and limits on the D/H number-density ratio consistent with the data for all four stars are considered. A comparison of the present estimates for the parameters of the local interstellar medium with those obtained by other techniques shows that there is no compelling evidence for significant variations in the hydrogen density and D/H ratio in the local interstellar medium. On this basis the hypothesis of an approaching local interstellar cloud proposed by Vidal-Madjar et al. (1978) is rejected

  8. "Dark" Atomic Gas in the Diffuse Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reach, William T.; Heiles, Carl; Bernard, Jean-Philippe

    2015-08-01

    Far-infrared and gamma-ray surveys indicate there are significantly more nucleons in the diffuse interstellar medium than are traced by HI and CO emission. We are using the Arecibo Observatory to complement Planck observations, testing hypotheses for the origin of "dark gas" associated with the far-infrared and gamma rays. The "dark gas" is really the far-infrared emission in excess over what can be explained by dust mixed with atomic gas traced by the 21-cm line in the GALFA survey. First we test the hypothesis that the excess is molecular gas, by measuring OH absorption toward selected radio sources. Next, we are observing HI absorption, because cold atomic gas is optically thick and does not emit as readily in the 21-cm line, but it can be seen in absorption against radio continuum sources. We will observe radio sources near clouds with far-infrared emission measured by Planck to be in excess of the high-resolution HI observations from the Arecibo GALFA HI survey. We will also test another hypothesis that the ”dark gas” is molecular by observing OH absorption toward the brightest sources.

  9. Atomic Hydrogen in the Circumstellar Envelope of IRC+10216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, L. D.; Gérard, E.; Le Bertre, T.

    2015-08-01

    Using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), we have performed the most sensitive search to date for neutral atomic hydrogen (HI) associated with the circumstellar envelope (CSE) of the carbon star IRC+10216. We report the discovery of a low surface brightness HI shell of diameter ˜1280'' (˜0.8 pc) surrounding the star. The shell's kinematics are consistent with matter that has been decelerated through interaction with the interstellar medium (ISM). The angular extent of the shell is comparable to the far ultraviolet (FUV)-emitting astrosphere previously detected with GALEX. The total mass of atomic hydrogen associated with IRC+10216 is < 1% of the expected total mass of the CSE. We briefly discuss implications for the possible origins of the circumstellar atomic hydrogen.

  10. Molecular hydrogen formation by excited atom radiative association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latter, William B.; Black, John H.

    1991-01-01

    The results from a semiclassical calculation of the thermal rate coefficient for the radiative association process H(n = 2) + H(n = 1) - H2 + hv are presented (n is the principal quantum number of the separated hydrogen atoms). The relative importance of this reaction in various environments is briefly discussed. Models of the early universe around the epoch of recombination and protostellar winds have been calculated which include the excited atom process. Not surprisingly, it is shown that the excited atom process will not be important in the general interstellar medium, except possibly in environments where the amount of Ly-alpha photon trapping is large. Examples may be the material surrounding quasars, active galactic nuclei, and bright H II regions. The most likely application of this process might be within rapidly evolving systems where a large transient n = 2 population of neutral hydrogen could result in a burst of molecular hydrogen formation.

  11. An Atomic Hydrogen Mushroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, J.; Taylor, A. R.; Irwin, J. A.; Canadian Galactic Plane Survey Collaboration

    1998-12-01

    Neutral hydrogen ``worms'', which stream vertically from the mid-plane to high latitudes, may be conduits through which hot gas can escape into the halo. Using the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory's (DRAO) Synthesis Telescope, as part of the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey, we have resolved an HI worm candidate. Although simulations have previously made general predictions, these data will constrain, for the first time, detailed numerical models of the dynamical processes generating disk-halo features. After the incorporation of the data from the 26-m DRAO's single-dish telescope, the mosaic data cube has full information on all spatial scales down to a resolution limit of 1 arcmin and a velocity resolution of 0.82 km s(-1) . Thus we delineate Rayleigh-Taylor instability-like structures and can distinguish a 5 km s(-1) line of sight velocity difference between the base and top of the worm. In general morphology, the worm is mushroom-shaped. Although it extends only a few hundred parsecs south of the midplane, the cap appears to be fragmenting. This may allow hot material from the stem's cavity, as well as UV photons, to escape to higher galactic latitudes. The preliminary estimate of the observed minimum HI mass is 1.3 x 10(5) Msolar. Our initial thin-shell model, which assumes supernovae explosions drive this outflow, gives a minimum total energy of about 100 x 10(51) ergs s(-1) .

  12. Energetic neutral helium atoms as a tool to study the heliosphere and the local interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaczyna, Pawel; Grzedzielski, Stan; Bzowski, Maciej

    2015-04-01

    The aim of our study is to determine the utility of helium energetic neutral atoms (ENA) in the studies of the outer heliosphere, its boundary region, and the nearby interstellar medium, and to assess the requirements for future instruments to enable them to observe He ENA fluxes. Presently, studying these regions is rendered possible mostly by combining the in-situ measurements by the plasma and cosmic-ray instruments on Voyagers and the remote-sensing observations of H ENA from IBEX. Helium as the second most abundant species in the universe could potentially enable further extension of our knowledge about nearest surroundings of the Sun. We assessed the expected emission of the heliospheric He ENA and of He ENA from the nearby interstellar medium. To estimate the heliospheric emission of He ENA we used a simple model of the heliosphere and performed numerical simulations to determine the distribution of various populations of helium ions in the inner heliosphere. Based on this model, we calculated fluxes of He ENA created by charge exchange between helium ions and neutral atoms over a wide energy range from 0.5 keV/nuc up to 1 MeV/nuc. We included binary interactions between various combinations of hydrogen and helium ions and atoms. We also included the signal from the vicinity of the heliosphere produced via the secondary ENA mechanism, which is most likely the source for the observed IBEX Ribbon. The mean free path against ionization of He ENA in the local interstellar medium reaches about 8000 AU for atoms with an energy of a few keV. This is about 10 times more than the mean free path against ionization for hydrogen atoms at the same energy. Thus emission of helium ENA from hypothetic extraheliospheric sources could be detectable from larger distances than the hydrogen atoms. This could provide a novel method of sounding the sources of suprathermal ions that might operate in the surrounding of the heliosphere. The He ENA produced by charge-exchange could

  13. Atomic and Molecular Data for Interstellar Studies: A Status Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Federman, Steven R.; Cardelli, Jason A.

    1996-01-01

    Most interstellar species have a large fraction of their electronic transitions at far ultraviolet wavelengths. Observations at these wavelengths reveal spectra rich in absorption lines seen against the continuum of a background source, such as a hot star in our Galaxy, a supernova in a nearby galaxy, or even a bright nucleus in an active galaxy. Most of the observations continue to be made with space-borne instruments, but recent work includes measurements of extragalactic material at large redshifts obtained at high resolution with large ground-based telescopes (e.g., the Keck Telescope). The combination of precise experimental oscillator strengths, large-scale computations, and astronomical spectra with high signal-to-noise ratios are yielding a set of self-consistent-values that span a range in strength in excess of 100 for more and more species. The large range is important for studies involving the different environments probed by the various background sources. This review highlights recent work on the atomic species. Si II, S I, and Fe II, and on the molecules, CO and C2.

  14. A massive cloud of cold atomic hydrogen in the outer Galaxy.

    PubMed

    Knee, L B; Brunt, C M

    2001-07-19

    A large fraction of the mass of the interstellar medium in our Galaxy is in the form of warm (103-104 K) and cool (50-100 K) atomic hydrogen (H i) gas. Cold (10-30 K) regions are thought to be dominated by dense clouds of molecular hydrogen. Cold H i is difficult to observe, and therefore our knowledge of its abundance and distribution in the interstellar medium is poor. The few known clouds of cold H i are much smaller in size and mass than typical molecular clouds. Here we report the discovery that the H i supershell GSH139-03-69 is very cold (10 K). It is about 2 kiloparsecs in size and as massive as the largest molecular complexes. The existence of such an immense structure composed of cold atomic hydrogen in the interstellar medium runs counter to the prevailing view that cold gas resides almost exclusively in clouds dominated by molecular hydrogen. PMID:11460155

  15. Energy storage possibilities of atomic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Dugan, J. V., Jr.; Palmer, R.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility of storing large amounts of energy in a free radical system such as atomic hydrogen is analyzed. Attention is focused on theoretical calculations of the ground state properties of spin-aligned atomic triplet hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium. The solid-liquid phase transition in atomic hydrogen is also examined.

  16. The Atomic to Molecular Transition in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.

    2012-01-01

    Study of H2 in UV and IR continues to surprise us with complexity of excitation state, OPR, and role in astrochemistry. Atomic H in molecular clouds is a very powerful tool suggesting that they are not "young" but that it takes millions of years to convert primarily atomic hydrogen clouds to 99.9% molecular form. Laboratory data suggests that H2 formation is efficient over broader range of temperatures than thought to be the case a few years ago, but range is still limited. Issues of complex grain morphology and surface structure make this a very difficult field in which to obtain definitively meaningful results. Ongoing and future observations of CI and CII will improve our understanding of the structure of clouds, their total mass, and how they have evolved and will continue to do so.

  17. Atomic-scale simulations of atomic and molecular mobility in models of interstellar ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Stefan

    The mobility of atoms and molecular radicals at ice-covered dust particles controls the surprisingly rich chemistry of circumstellar and interstellar environments, where a large number of different organic molecules have been observed. Both thermal and non-thermal processes, for instance caused by UV radiation, have been inferred to play important roles in this chemistry. A growing number of experimental studies support previously suggested mechanisms and add to the understanding of possible astrochemical processes. Simulations, of both experiments and astrophysical environments, aid in interpreting experiments and suggesting important mechanisms. Still, the exact mechanisms behind the mobility of species in interstellar ice are far from fully understood. We have performed calculations at the molecular level on the mobility of H atoms and OH radicals at water ice surfaces of varying morphology. Calculations of binding energies and diffusion barriers of H atoms at crystalline and amorphous ice surfaces show that the experimentally observed slower diffusion at amorphous ice is due to considerably stronger binding energies and higher diffusion barriers than at crystalline ice. These results are in excellent agreement with recent experiments. It was also found that quantum tunneling is important for H atom mobility below 10 K. The binding energies and diffusion barriers of OH radicals at crystalline ice have been studied using the ONIOM(QM:AMOEBA) approach. Results indicate that OH diffusion over crystalline ice, contrary to the case of H atoms, might be slower at crystalline ice than at amorphous ice, due to a higher surface density of stronger binding sites at crystalline ice. We have also performed molecular dynamics simulations of the photoexcitation of vapor-deposited water at a range of surface temperatures. These results support that the experimentally observed desorption of H atoms following UV excitation is best explained by release of H atoms from

  18. Helium atoms in interstellar and interplanetary media, part 3: Temperature and velocity of interstellar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, V. G.; Mironova, Y. N.; Berto, Z. L.; Dalode, F.

    1984-10-01

    The distribution of intensities over the celestial sphere in the neutral helium line ar lambda=584 A which is obtained from background radiation observations on the Prognoz-6 satellite with a 4 channel photometer was used to find the temperature and magnitude of the velocity vector of the interstellar wind. The direction of motin of the interstellar medium relative to the sun was determined from the same observations. Interaction of neutral helium in the interstellar medium with the gravitational field of the sun and resonant scattering on intereplanetary helium are calculated. The temperature and velocity of the model which best agree with the results were determined separately for each of six measurement sessions onboard the satellite. The average temperature was 11,600 K, velocity 25.3 km/s. It is found that the mean density of helium in space near the sun is be 0.018 cm -3.

  19. Hydrogen-Atom Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Xiao, Jian

    2016-04-01

    The cascade [1,n]-hydrogen transfer/cyclization, recognized as the tert-amino effect one century ago, has received considerable interest in recent decades, and great achievements have been made. With the aid of this strategy, the inert C(sp(3))-H bonds can be directly functionalized into C-C, C-N, C-O bonds under catalysis of Lewis acids, Brønsted acids, as well as organocatalysts, and even merely under thermal conditions. Hydrogen can be transferred intramolecularly from hydrogen donor to acceptor in the form of hydride, or proton, followed by cyclization to furnish the cyclic products in processes featuring high atom economy. Methylene/methine adjacent to heteroatoms, e.g., nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, can be exploited as hydride donor as well as methylene/methine without heteroatom assistance. Miscellaneous electrophilic subunits or intermediates, e.g., alkylidene malonate, carbophilic metal activated alkyne or allene, α,β-unsaturated aldehydes/ketone, saturated aldehydes/iminium, ketenimine/carbodiimide, metal carbenoid, electron-withdrawing groups activated allene/alkyne, in situ generated carbocation, can serve as hydride acceptors. This methodology has shown preeminent power to construct 5-, 6-, or 7-membered heterocyclic as well as carbon rings. In this chapter, various hydrogen donors and acceptors are adequately discussed. PMID:27573142

  20. Interaction of the solar wind with interstellar neutral hydrogen - Three-fluid model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isenberg, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    It is commonly assumed in models of the solar wind-interstellar neutral hydrogen interaction that the ionized interstellar particles are quickly assimilated into the solar wind proton population and 'become indistinguishable' from the original solar wind. This assumption leads to the prediction that the solar wind proton temperature should increase with radius in the outer heliosphere. This temperature increase has not been observed. It is pointed out that assimilation of the interstellar particles to the point of indistinguishability takes place on the very long Coulomb collision time scale, and is not expected to occur within the heliosphere. Results are presented of a three-fluid model of the solar wind which consists of comoving thermal populations of protons of solar origin, protons produced by ionization of interstellar hydrogen, and electrons. The steady-state results yield a solar wind with a 'core' proton distribution which cools adiabatically, and a 'halo' of interstellar pickup protons which is maintained near 10 to the 7th K by the energy input of continued ionization and pickup. Such a distribution will not be observed to manifest the temperature increase at large heliocentric distances which is predicted from a one-fluid analysis. Further time-dependent calculations show a strong correlation between the densities of the solar wind and the interstellar pickup protons. It is suggested that the interstellar pickup population may be observable by the Voyager plasma instruments in low resolution mode during periods of high solar wind density and low solar wind temperature.

  1. Detection of the 610 micron /492 GHz/ line of interstellar atomic carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, T. G.; Huggins, P. J.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Miller, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The ground-state transition of neutral atomic carbon, 3P1-3P0, has been detected in the interstellar medium at the frequency of 492.162 GHz determined in the laboratory by Saykally and Evenson (1980). The observations were made from the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory using an InSb heterodyne bolometer receiver. The line was detected as strong emission from eight molecular clouds and apparently provides a widely useful probe of the interstellar medium.

  2. Absorption Reveals and Hydrogen Addition Explains New Interstellar Aldehydes: Propenal and Propanal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Jewell, P. R.; Lovas, F. J.; Remijan, A.; Mollendal, H.

    2004-01-01

    New interstellar molecules propenal (CH2CHCHO) and propanal (CH3CH2CHO) have been detected largely in absorption toward the star-forming region Sagittarius B2(N) by means of rotational transitions observed with the 100-m Green Bank Telescope (GBT) operating in the range of 18 GHz (lambda approximately 1.7 cm) to 26 GHz (lambda approximately 1.2 cm). The GBT was also used to observe the previously reported interstellar aldehyde propynal (HC2CHO) in Sagittarius B2(N) which is known for large molecules believed to form on interstellar grains. The presence of these three interstellar aldehydes toward Sagittarius B2(N) strongly suggests that simple hydrogen addition on interstellar grains accounts for successively larger molecular species: from propynal to propenal and from propenal to propanal. Energy sources within Sagittarius B2(N) likely permit the hydrogen addition reactions on grain surfaces to proceed. This work demonstrates that successive hydrogen addition is probably an important chemistry route in the formation of a number of complex interstellar molecules. We also searched for but did not detect the three-carbon sugar glyceraldehyde (CH2OHCHOHCHO).

  3. Physical state of interstellar atoms. [from Copernicus satellite UV data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    Brief survey of the physical conditions along the lines of sight to reddened and unreddened stars, as determined from Copernicus observation of interstellar lines between 95 and 300 nm. Differences in ionization structure and density between clouds and the local intercloud medium are discussed. Some new data for beta Centauri is used to supplement the previously available data.

  4. H ATOM IRRADIATION OF CARBON GRAINS UNDER SIMULATED DENSE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM CONDITIONS: THE EVOLUTION OF ORGANICS FROM DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS TO THE SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Mennella, Vito

    2010-08-01

    We present the results of experiments aimed at studying the interaction of hydrogen atoms at 80 K with carbon grains covered with a water ice layer at 12 K. The effects of H processing have been analyzed, using IR spectroscopy, as a function of the water ice layer. The results confirm that exposure of the samples to H atoms induces the activation of the band at 3.47 {mu}m with no evidence for the formation of aromatic and aliphatic C-H bonds in the CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} functional groups. The formation cross section of the 3.47 {mu}m band has been estimated from the increase of its integrated optical depth as a function of the H atom fluence. The cross section decreases with increasing thickness of the water ice layer, indicating an increase of adsorption of H atoms in the water ice layer. A penetration depth of 100 nm has been estimated for H atoms in the porous water ice covering carbon grains. Sample warm-up at room temperature causes the activation of the IR features due to the vibrations of the CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} aliphatic functional groups. The evolution of the 3.47 {mu}m band carrier has been evaluated for dense and diffuse interstellar clouds, using the estimated formation cross section and assuming that the destruction cross section by energetic processing is the same as that derived for the 3.4 {mu}m band. In both environments, the presence of the 3.47 {mu}m band carrier is compatible with the evolutionary timescale limit imposed by fast cycling of materials between dense and diffuse regions of the interstellar medium. In diffuse regions the formation of the CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} aliphatic bands, inhibited in dense regions, takes place, masking the 3.47 {mu}m band. The activation of the CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} aliphatic vibrational modes at the end of H processing after sample warm-up represents the first experimental evidence supporting an evolutionary connection between the interstellar carbon grain population, which is responsible for the 3

  5. AN ESTIMATE OF THE NEARBY INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD USING NEUTRAL ATOMS

    SciTech Connect

    Heerikhuisen, J.; Pogorelov, N. V.

    2011-09-01

    The strength and orientation of the magnetic field in the nearby interstellar medium have remained elusive, despite continual improvements in observations and models. Data from NASA's Voyager mission and the Solar Wind ANisotropies (SWAN) experiment on board Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) have placed observational constraints on the magnetic field, and the more recent Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) data appear to also bear an imprint of the interstellar magnetic field (ISMF). In this paper, we combine computational models of the heliosphere with data from Voyager, SOHO/SWAN, and IBEX to estimate both the strength and direction of the nearby ISMF. On the basis of our simulations, we find that a field strength of 2-3 {mu}G pointing from ecliptic coordinates (220-224, 39-44), combined with an interstellar hydrogen density of {approx}0.15 cm{sup -3}, produces results most consistent with observations.

  6. Sticking coefficient of hydrogen and deuterium on silicates under interstellar conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaabouni, H.; Bergeron, H.; Baouche, S.; Dulieu, F.; Matar, E.; Congiu, E.; Gavilan, L.; Lemaire, J. L.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Sticking of H and D atoms on interstellar dust grains is the first step in molecular hydrogen formation, which is a key reaction in the interstellar medium. Isotopic properties of the sticking can have an incidence on the observed HD molecule. Aims: After studying the sticking coefficients of H2 and D2 molecules on amorphous silicate surfaces experimentally and theoretically, we extrapolate the results to the sticking coefficient of atoms and propose a formulae that gives the sticking coefficients of H and D on both silicates and icy dust grains. Methods: In our experiments, we used the King and Wells method for measuring the sticking coefficients of H2 and D2 molecules on a silicate surface held at 10 K. It consists of measuring with a QMS (quadrupole mass spectrometer) the signals of H2 and D2 molecules reflected by the surface during the exposure of the sample to the molecular beam at a temperature ranging from 20 K to 340 K. We tested the efficiency of a physical model, developed previously for sticking on water-ice surfaces. We applied this model to our experimental results for the sticking coefficients of H2 and D2 molecules on a silicate surface and estimated the sticking coefficient of atoms by a single measurement of atomic recombination and propose an extrapolation. Results: Sticking of H, D, HD, H2, and D2 on silicates grains behaves the same as on icy dust grains. The sticking decreases with the gas temperature, and is dependent on the mass of the impactor. The sticking coefficient for both surfaces and impactors can be modeled by an analytical formulae S(T) = S0(1 + βT/T0)/(1 + T/T0)β, which describes both the experiments and the thermal distribution expected in an astrophysical context. The parameters S0 and T0 are summarized in a table. Conclusions: Previous estimates for the sticking coefficient of H atoms are close to the new estimation; however, we find that, when isotopic effects are taken into account, the sticking coefficient

  7. COMPETING MECHANISMS OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN FORMATION IN CONDITIONS RELEVANT TO THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Lemaire, J. L.; Vidali, G.; Baouche, S.; Chehrouri, M.; Chaabouni, H.; Mokrane, H.

    2010-12-20

    The most efficient mechanism of the formation of molecular hydrogen in the current universe is by association of hydrogen atoms on the surface of interstellar dust grains. The details of the processes of its formation and release from the grain are of great importance in the physical and chemical evolution of the space environments where it takes place. The main puzzle is still the fate of the 4.5 eV released in H{sub 2} formation and whether it goes into internal energy (rovibrational excitation), translational kinetic energy, or heating of the grain. The modality of the release of this energy affects the dynamics of the ISM and its evolution toward star formation. We present results of the detection of the rovibrational states of the just-formed H{sub 2} as it leaves the surface of a silicate. We find that rovibrationally excited molecules are ejected into the gas phase immediately after formation over a much wider range of grain temperatures than anticipated. Our results can be explained by the presence of two mechanisms of molecule formation that operate in partially overlapping ranges of grain temperature. A preliminary analysis of the relative importance of these two mechanisms is given. These unexpected findings, which will be complemented with experiments on the influence of factors such as silicate morphology, should be of great interest to the astrophysics and astrochemistry communities.

  8. Photometric Observations of Interstellar Hydrogen by HDAC: In-flight Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Horst Uwe; Skorov, Yuri; Reulke, Ralf; Glaßmeier, Karl-Heinz; Reshetnyk, Volodymyr

    2014-05-01

    HDAC is part of the ultraviolet imaging spectrometer (UVIS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft. The instrument scans the Lyman-α emission lines of hydrogen and deuterium atoms. In the photometer mode only the CEM detector is used to register the signals within a 3 degree field of view (FOV). HDAC has been switched on in photometer mode most of the time producing a unique continuous data set for more than a decade. An analysis of the Lyman-α background data serves two purposes: determination of the parameters of the interstellar/interplanetary hydrogen and determination of the properties of the solar wind. The exhaustive pre-flight laboratory calibrations included evaluation of the absolute sensitivity of the instrument; evaluation of the instrument spectral sensitivity; evaluation of the off-axis response. During the mission these characteristics may change over time due to continuous time degradation of electronics and/or abrupt events. We have systematically analyzed photometric observations of the star SPICA in order to perform in-flight calibrations. All three aspects listed above were explored. We find that the instrument is still in good condition. The current sensitivity of 12 count/s/Rayleigh is sufficient to provide good signal to noise data. Off-axis responsivity is non-uniform and visibly differs from pre-flight determinations. At the same time the shape of the spatial sensitivity response is constant and can be used for all observations. Because of the rather wide FOV and spectral sensitivity of HDAC stellar contributions are always in the data. This leads to considerable disturbances in the measured signal during observations. In order to clean the data, we use the TD1 Catalog of Stellar Ultraviolet Fluxes. That allows us to estimate flux values around 120 nm for many bright UV stars. The developed software detects secondary local peaks and cleans the measurements visibly. HDAC is part of the Cassini UVIS instrument and is operated independently but

  9. Progress towards trapping of atomic hydrogen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, Isaac; Libson, Adam; Mazur, Tom; Majors, Julia; Raizen, Mark

    2009-05-01

    Using a series of pulsed electromagnetic coils (atomic coilgun) we can stop supersonic beams of paramagnetic atoms and molecules. We will employ the coilgun method to stop and trap supersonic beams of hydrogen isotopes. The slowed atoms will be trapped in a quadrupole magnetic trap where single-photon atomic cooling will be applied. Further applications will be discussed.

  10. Ionisation of atomic hydrogen by positron impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spicher, Gottfried; Olsson, Bjorn; Raith, Wilhelm; Sinapius, Guenther; Sperber, Wolfgang

    1990-01-01

    With the crossed beam apparatus the relative impact-ionization cross section of atomic hydrogen by positron impact was measured. A layout of the scattering region is given. The first measurements on the ionization of atomic hydrogen by positron impact are also given.

  11. NASA atomic hydrogen standards program - An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V. S.; Kaufmann, D. C.; Adams, W. A.; Deluca, J. J.; Soucy, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Some of the design features of NASA hydrogen masers are discussed including the large hydrogen source bulb, the palladium purified, the state selector, the replaceable pumps, the small entrance stem, magnetic shields, the elongated storage bulb, the aluminum cavity, the electronics package, and the autotuner. Attention is also given to the reliability and operating life of these hydrogen atomic standards.

  12. IUE observations of neutral hydrogen and deuterium in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, W. B.; Murthy, J.; Henry, R. C.; Moos, H. W.; Linsky, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Small-aperture, high-dispersion IUE spectra have been obtained of seven late-type stars that, in general, confirm previous Copernicus results concerning the distribution of hydrogen and deuterium in the local interstellar medium. In addition, the IUE Ly Alpha spectra of Altair, and of the Alpha Cen components, suggest that multiple velocity components exist in these two directions.

  13. Atoms in carbon cages as a source of interstellar diffuse lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballester, J. L.; Antoniewicz, P. R.; Smoluchowski, R.

    1990-01-01

    A model to describe the resonance absorption lines of various atoms trapped in closed carbon cages is presented. These systems may be responsible for some of the as yet unexplained diffuse interstellar bands. Model potentials for possible atom-C60 systems are obtained and used to calculate the resonance lines. The trapped atoms considered are O, N, Si, Mg, Al, Na, and S, and in all cases the resonance lines are shifted toward the red as compared to the isolated atoms. The calculated wavelengths are compared to the range of wavelengths observed for the diffuse interstellar bands, and good agreement is found for Mg and Si resonance lines. Other lines may be caused by other than resonance transitions or by trapped molecules. The oscillator strengths and the abundances are evaluated and compared with observation. Mechanisms to explain the observed band width of the lines and the existence of certain correlated pairs of lines are discussed.

  14. OBSERVATIONS OF THE INTERPLANETARY HYDROGEN DURING SOLAR CYCLES 23 AND 24. WHAT CAN WE DEDUCE ABOUT THE LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM?

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, Frédéric E.; Quémerais, Eric; Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi; Harris, Walter M.; Clarke, John

    2014-06-20

    Observations of interstellar helium atoms by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) spacecraft in 2009 reported a local interstellar medium (LISM) velocity vector different from the results of the Ulysses spacecraft between 1991 and 2002. The interplanetary hydrogen (IPH), a population of neutrals that fills the space between planets inside the heliosphere, carries the signatures of the LISM and its interaction with the solar wind. More than 40 yr of space-based studies of the backscattered solar Lyα emission from the IPH provided limited access to the velocity distribution, with the first temporal evolution map of the IPH line-shift during solar cycle 23. This work presents the results of the latest IPH observations made by the Hubble Space Telescope's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph during solar cycle 24. These results have been compiled with previous measurements, including data from the Solar Wind Anisotropies instrument on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. The whole set has been compared to physically realistic models to test both sets of LISM physical parameters as measured by Ulysses and IBEX, respectively. This comparison shows that the LISM velocity vector has not changed significantly since Ulysses measurements.

  15. The galactic distribution (in radius and Z) of interstellar molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoville, N. Z.; Solomon, P. M.; Sanders, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of the galactic longitude and latitude distributions of gamma = 2.6 mm CO emission are presented. Analysis of this spectral line data yields the large scale distribution of molecular clouds in the galactic disk and their z-distribution out of the disk. Strong maxima in the number of molecular clouds occur in the galactic nucleus and at galactic radii 4-8 kpc. The peak at 4-8 kpc correlates well with a region of enhanced 100 Mev gamma ray emissivity. This correlation strongly supports the conclusion that the gamma rays are produced as a result of cosmic ray interactions in molecular H2 clouds rather than HI. One important implication of this is that the interstellar magnetic field lines to which cosmic rays are confined must therefore not be excluded from these dense clouds. The width of the cloud layer perpendicular to galactic plane between half density points is 105 + or - 15 pc near the 5.5 kpc peak. The total mass of molecular gas in the interior of the galaxy exceeds that of atomic hydrogen.

  16. Potential of Energetic Neutral Helium Atoms to Resolve Structure of the Local Interstellar Medium within 0.1 Parsec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaczyna, P.; Grzedzielski, S.; Bzowski, M.

    2014-12-01

    Expected fluxes of energetic neutral helium atoms (He ENA) emitted from the heliosheath and created by the Ribbon secondary ENA mechanism are relatively small for the directions of the nose and flanks of the heliosphere. The mean free path against ionization in the Local Interstellar Cloud (LIC) for the He ENA reaches ~8,000 AU for atoms of energy ~5 keV, i.e., about 10 times higher than the mean free path against ionization for hydrogen atoms for the same energy. Thus observation of potential sources in the Local Interstellar Medium by an ENA detector could be possible for distances over a dozen thousand AU. This includes a potential to observe processes at the LIC boundary, to which the closest distance is likely smaller than 10,000 AU. Measurements of He ENA could potentially be used to bridge the gap between direct in situ sampling of our Galactic environment, available from Ulysses and IBEX, and the parsec-scale telescopic observations of interstellar absorption lines. Estimates of the expected heliospheric emission of He ENA are taken from a simple model of the heliosphere, for which we have obtained results consistent with HSTOF observation of He ENA. We use analytical model of the secondary ENA emission with a simple heliolatitude dependence in the supersonic solar wind. For the extraheliospheric sources, we examine simple He ENA production models on distant (<~0.1 pc) boundary layer. One such model, proposed earlier as an extraheliospheric source for the IBEX Ribbon at the hypothetic interface between the LIC and the Local Bubble, is now extended to provide estimates of the fluxes at a wider energy range, from a few to a few tens of keV, taking various distances to the interface into account. Including an appropriate mass spectrometer in the IMAP energetic neutral atom detector will give opportunity to distinguish helium atoms from the general ENA flux. This added capability would provide IMAP with a potential to discover possible enhancements in the He

  17. Laboratory Experiments on the Reactions of PAH Cations with Molecules and Atoms of Interstellar Interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LePage, V.; Lee, H. S.; Bierbaum, V. M.; Snow, T. P.

    1996-01-01

    The C10H8(+) cation and its dehydrogenated derivatives, C10H7(+) and C10H6(+), have been studied using a selected ion flow tube (SIFT). Reactions with molecules and atoms of interstellar interest show that C10H8(+) reacts with N md O to give neutral products HCN and CO, respectively. C10H6(+) and C10H6(+) are moderately reactive and reactions proceed through association with molecules. The implications of these results for the depletion of C10H(n)(+) in the interstellar medium are briefly discussed.

  18. Effects of hydrogen atom spin exchange collisions on atomic hydrogen maser oscillation frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    Frequency shifts due to collisions between hydrogen atoms in an atomic hydrogen maser frequency standard are studied. Investigations of frequency shifts proportional to the spin exchange frequency shift cross section and those proportional to the duration of exchange collisions are discussed. The feasibility of operating a hydrogen frequency standard at liquid helium temperatures is examined.

  19. Results of an investigation of interstellar neutral hydrogen and helium in the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova, E. N.

    The temperature and direction of moving interstellar gas has been determined relative to the position of the sun, based on measurements of scattered radiation in hydrogen and helium lines. The measurements were carried out using far-ultraviolet photometers on the scientific spacecraft Prognoz-5 and Prognoz-6. The wavelengths of the photometer measurements were 1216 A for H I; 584 A for He I; and 304 A for He II. The temperature of interstellar hydrogen in the vicinity of the sun was 9000 + or - 1000 K. Equatorial coordinates for the leeward direction of the neutral hydrogen gas were calculated on the basis of the photometric measurements. The coordinates are: alpha = 80 degrees, delta = 15 + or - 3 degrees.

  20. The distribution of neutral hydrogen in the interstellar medium. 1: The data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fruscione, Antonella; Hawkins, Isabel; Jelinsky, Patrick; Wiercigroch, Alexandria

    1994-01-01

    We compile, from the existing literature, the largest sample to date (842 data points) of hydrogen column density measurements, N(H I), of the gas in the interstellar medium. We include only results obtained from absorption measurements toward individual stars (594 in our sample) in an effort to construct a three-dimensional picture of the interstellar gas. We derive hydrogen column densities toward a fraction of the stars in the sample from published column density measurements of metal ions. A three-dimensional physical model derived from this data set will be presented in a companion paper. The observed stars span distances from a few parsecs to a few thousand parsecs, and more than half of the sample serves to describe the local interstellar medium within a few hundred parsecs of the Sun. Hydrogen column densities range from 10(exp 17) to 10(exp 22)/sq cm. We describe here the various observational methods used to estimate the hydrogen column densities and present the table with the stellar and hydrogen column density data. The provided table is intended as a global reference work, not to introduce new results.

  1. Atomic hydrogen as a launch vehicle propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of several atomic hydrogen launch vehicles was conducted. A discussion of the facilities and the technologies that would be needed for these vehicles is also presented. The Gross Liftoff Weights (GLOW) for two systems were estimated; their specific impulses (I sub sp) were 750 and 1500 lb (sub f)/s/lb(sub m). The atomic hydrogen launch vehicles were also compared to the currently planned Advanced Launch System design concepts. Very significant GLOW reductions of 52 to 58 percent are possible over the Advanced Launch System designs. Applying atomic hydrogen propellants to upper stages was also considered. Very high I(sub sp) (greater than 750 1b(sub f)/s/lb(sub m) is needed to enable a mass savings over advanced oxygen/hydrogen propulsion. Associated with the potential benefits of high I(sub sp) atomic hydrogen are several challenging problems. Very high magnetic fields are required to maintain the atomic hydrogen in a solid kilogauss (3 Tesla). Also the storage temperature of the propellant is 4 K. This very low temperature will require a large refrigeration facility for the launch vehicle. The design considerations for a very high recombination rate for the propellant are also discussed. A recombination rate of 210 cm/s is predicted for atomic hydrogen. This high recombination rate can produce very high acceleration for the launch vehicle. Unique insulation or segmentation to inhibit the propellant may be needed to reduce its recombination rate.

  2. Enhanced Cooling of Hydrogen Atoms by Lithium Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Cote, R.; Jamieson, M. J.; Yan, Z-C.; Geum, N.; Jeung, G.-H.; Dalgarno, A.

    2000-03-27

    We present calculated scattering lengths for collisions between various isotopic forms of lithium and hydrogen atoms interacting via singlet and triplet molecular states of LiH. We demonstrate that one bound triplet level is supported for each isotopomer {sup 7}LiH , {sup 6}LiH , {sup 7}LiD , and {sup 6}LiD . We obtain large calculated triplet scattering lengths that are stable against uncertainties in the potential. We present elastic and momentum transfer cross sections, and the corresponding rate coefficients, for hydrogen atoms colliding with {sup 7}Li atoms. We suggest that enhanced cooling of trapped atomic hydrogen by {sup 7}Li atoms is feasible. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  3. The heating of interstellar clouds by vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, T. P.; Williams, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The possibility that vibrationally excited H2 may be collisionally de-excited, so providing a heating mechanism for interstellar clouds which operates by coupling the stellar radiation to the gas, is discussed. The majority of excitations in the Lyman and Werner bands of H2 return the molecules to the ground electronic state in a vibrationally excited level, the most favored level being 7. The heating rate obtained in this way is compared with other mechanisms which have been postulated, and the results of calculations of temperature as a function of depth into clouds of different densities are presented. It appears that this mechanism is a significant one, which should be taken into account in detailed models of dense clouds.

  4. Detection of interstellar pick-up hydrogen in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Geiss, J.; Balsiger, H.; Fisk, L. A.; Galvin, A. B.; Ipavich, F. M.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Von Steiger, R.; Wilken, B.

    1993-01-01

    Interstellar hydrogen ionized primarily by the solar wind has been detected by the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer instrument on the Ulysses spacecraft at a distance of 4.8 AUs from the sun. This 'pick-up' hydrogen is identified by its distinct velocity distribution function, which drops abruptly at twice the local solar wind speed. From the measured fluxes of pick-up protons and singly charged helium, the number densities of neutral hydrogen and helium in the distant regions of the solar system are estimated to be 0.077 +/- 0.015 and 0.013 +/- 0.003 per cu cm, respectively.

  5. The Hydrogen Atom: The Rutherford Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilton, Homer Benjamin

    1996-06-01

    Early this century Ernest Rutherford established the nuclear model of the hydrogen atom, presently taught as representing the best visual model after modification by Niels Bohr and Arnold Sommerfeld. It replaced the so-called "plum pudding" model of J. J. Thomson which held sway previously. While the Rutherford model represented a large step forward in our understanding of the hydrogen atom, questions remained, and still do.

  6. Energy storage possibilities of atomic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Dugan, J. V., Jr.; Palmer, R.

    1976-01-01

    Several recent experiments designed to produce and store macroscopic quantities of atomic hydrogen are discussed. The bulk, ground state properties of atomic hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium systems are calculated assuming that all pair interactions occur via the atomic triplet potential. The conditions required to obtain this system, including inhibition of recombination through the energetically favorable singlet interaction, are discussed. The internal energy, pressure, and compressibility are calculated applying the Monte Carlo technique with a quantum mechanical variational wavefunction. The system studied consisted of 32 atoms in a box with periodic boundary conditions. Results show that atomic triplet hydrogen and deuterium remain gaseous at 0 K; i.e., the internal energy is positive at all molar volumes considered.

  7. Solid Hydrogen Formed for Atomic Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2000-01-01

    Several experiments on the formation of solid hydrogen particles in liquid helium were recently conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The solid hydrogen experiments are the first step toward seeing these particles and determining their shape and size. The particles will ultimately store atoms of boron, carbon, or hydrogen, forming an atomic propellant. Atomic propellants will allow rocket vehicles to carry payloads many times heavier than possible with existing rockets or allow them to be much smaller and lighter. Solid hydrogen particles are preferred for storing atoms. Hydrogen is generally an excellent fuel with a low molecular weight. Very low temperature hydrogen particles (T < 4 K) can prevent the atoms from recombining, making it possible for their lifetime to be controlled. Also, particles that are less than 1 mm in diameter are preferred because they can flow easily into a pipe when suspended in liquid helium. The particles and atoms must remain at this low temperature until the fuel is introduced into the engine combustion (or recombination) chamber. Experiments were, therefore, planned to look at the particles and observe their formation and any changes while in liquid helium.

  8. Interstellar CH, CH+ and abundance of atomic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnacinski, P.; Krogulec, M.; Krelowski, J.

    2007-12-01

    The CH molecule is the only one molecule from the visual spectral range observed in two ionisation stages. The production of CH+ is commonly assigned to shock fronts, since the reaction C+ + H2 -> CH+ + H is endothermic. Moreover a velocity difference between the CH and CH+ spectral lines is often observed. We compare the CH/CH+ column densities with that of neutral and ionised atoms. The CH column density correlates better with neutral atoms, while column density of CH+ correlates better with ionised ones.

  9. Diffuse interstellar bands versus known atomic and molecular species in the interstellar medium of M82 toward SN 2014J

    SciTech Connect

    Welty, Daniel E.; York, Donald G.; Ritchey, Adam M.; Dahlstrom, Julie A.

    2014-09-10

    We discuss the absorption due to various constituents of the interstellar medium (ISM) of M82 seen in moderately high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra of SN 2014J. Complex absorption from M82 is seen, at velocities 45 ≲ v {sub LSR} ≲ 260 km s{sup –1}, for Na I, K I, Ca I, Ca II, CH, CH{sup +}, and CN; many of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are also detected. Comparisons of the column densities of the atomic and molecular species and the equivalent widths of the DIBs reveal both similarities and differences in relative abundances, compared to trends seen in the ISM of our Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. Of the 10 relatively strong DIBs considered here, 6 (including λ5780.5) have strengths within ±20% of the mean values seen in the local Galactic ISM, for comparable N(K I); 2 are weaker by 20%-45% and 2 (including λ5797.1) are stronger by 25%-40%. Weaker than 'expected' DIBs (relative to N(K I), N(Na I), and E(B – V)) in some Galactic sight lines and toward several other extragalactic supernovae appear to be associated with strong CN absorption and/or significant molecular fractions. While the N(CH)/N(K I) and N(CN)/N(CH) ratios seen toward SN 2014J are similar to those found in the local Galactic ISM, the combination of high N(CH{sup +})/N(CH) and high W(5797.1)/W(5780.5) ratios has not been seen elsewhere. The centroids of many of the M82 DIBs are shifted relative to the envelope of the K I profile—likely due to component-to-component variations in W(DIB)/N(K I) that may reflect the molecular content of the individual components. We compare estimates for the host galaxy reddening E(B – V) and visual extinction A {sub V} derived from the various interstellar species with the values estimated from optical and near-IR photometry of SN 2014J.

  10. IUE observations of hydrogen and deuterium in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, J.; Henry, R. C.; Moos, H. W.; Landsman, W. B.; Linsky, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    High-resolution Ly-alpha spectra of the late-type stars Epsilon Eri, Procyon, Altair, Capella, and HR 1099 taken with the short-wavelength camera on IUE are presented. The density, velocity dispersion, and bulk velocity of the interstellar H I toward each of the stars is derived from the spectra. Lower limits on the deuterium-to-hydrogen ratio toward these stars are obtained.

  11. Atomic hydrogen as a launch vehicle propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Palaszewski, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of several atomic hydrogen launch vehicles was conducted. A discussion of the facilities and the technologies that would be needed for these vehicles is also presented. The Gross Liftoff Weights (GLOW) for two systems were estimated; their specific impulses (I{sub sp}) were 750 and 1500 lb{sub f}/s/lb{sub m}. The atomic hydrogen launch vehicles were also compared to the currently planned Advanced Launch System design concepts. Very significant GLOW reductions of 52 to 58 percent are possible over the Advanced Launch System designs. Applying atomic hydrogen propellants to upper stages was also considered. Very high I{sub sp} (greater than 750 lb{sub f}/s/lb{sub m}) is needed to enable a mass savings over advanced oxygen/hydrogen propulsion. Associated with the potential benefits of high I(sub sp) atomic hydrogen are several challenging problems. Very high magnetic fields are required to maintain the atomic hydrogen in a solid hydrogen matrix. The magnetic field strength was estimated to be 30 kilogauss (3 Tesla). Also the storage temperature of the propellant is 4 K. This very low temperature will require a large refrigeration facility for the launch vehicle. The design considerations for a very high recombination rate for the propellant are also discussed. A recombination rate of 210 cm/s is predicted for atomic hydrogen. This high recombination rate can produce very high acceleration for the launch vehicle. Unique insulation or segmentation to inhibit the propellant may be needed to reduce its recombination rate.

  12. Atomic hydrogen as a launch vehicle propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of several atomic hydrogen launch vehicles was conducted. A discussion of the facilities and the technologies that would be needed for these vehicles is also presented. The Gross Liftoff Weights (GLOW) for two systems were estimated; their specific impulses (I sub sp) were 750 and 1500 lb(sub f)/s/lb(sub m). The atomic hydrogen launch vehicles were also compared to the currently planned Advanced Launch System design concepts. Very significant GLOW reductions of 52 to 58 percent are possible over the Advanced Launch System designs. Applying atomic hydrogen propellants to upper stages was also considered. Very high I(sub sp) (greater than 750 lb(sub f)/s/lb(sub m)) is needed to enable a mass savings over advanced oxygen/hydrogen propulsion. Associated with the potential benefits of high I(sub sp) atomic hydrogen are several challenging problems. Very high magnetic fields are required to maintain the atomic hydrogen in a solid hydrogen matrix. The magnetic field strength was estimated to be 30 kilogauss (3 Tesla). Also the storage temperature of the propellant is 4 K. This very low temperature will require a large refrigeration facility for the launch vehicle. The design considerations for a very high recombination rate for the propellant are also discussed. A recombination rate of 210 cm/s is predicted for atomic hydrogen. This high recombination rate can produce very high acceleration for the launch vehicle. Unique insulation or segmentation to inhibit the propellant may be needed to reduce its recombination rate.

  13. Helium atoms in the interstellar and interplanetary media. II - Determination of the direction of motion of the interstellar medium relative to the sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, V. G.; Mironova, E. N.; Berto, Zh.-L.; Dalode, F.

    1984-01-01

    The direction of motion of the interstellar gas relative to the sun was determined on the basis of Progress-6 interplanetary measurements of the brightness distribution in the atomic helium line at 584 A. The coordinates of the velocity vector in the projection on the celestial sphere are equal: alpha = 77 + or - 2 deg and delta = 17 + or - 2.5 deg.

  14. The Violent Interstellar Medium in Dwarf Galaxies: Atomic Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinks, E.; Walter, F.

    1998-12-01

    We review the morphology of the warm, neutral ISM as observed in the 21 cm line of neutral hydrogen (H I) of several nearby, gas-rich (dIrr) galaxies. The H I emission is dominated by shell-like structures, most likely superbubbles produced by the combined effects of strong stellar winds followed by supernova explosions of stars more massive than M > 8 M-sun within a region of massive star formation, an OB association. Somewhat counter-intuitively, H I superbubbles grow to larger dimensions in dwarf galaxies than in large spiral galaxies like our own or M 31. This can be explained as follows. In dwarf galaxies, the gravitational potential is lower than in spirals. Hence, for similar H I velocity dispersions, the scaleheight of the H I layer will be larger. Then, for comparable H I surface densities, the volume density will be lower. Both effects facilitate the growth to large dimensions of shells in dwarf galaxies and explains why such shells are much less likely to break through the H I layer into the halo. Moreover, dwarf galaxies lack density waves and tend to be dominated by solid-body rotation. As a result, shells will persist much longer than in spirals. A comparison with other galaxies shows that the energies needed to create H I supershells are the same for all types of galaxies, the energy output of a typical star-forming region therefore not being related to its galactic environment, at least to first order. The overall statistical properties of the H I holes and shells in galaxies show clear trends with Hubble type (or rather mass), such as in their diameter distribution, expansion velocities and ages.

  15. Ionization of polarized hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Methods are discussed for the production of polarized H/sup -/ ions from polarized atoms produced in ground state atomic beam sources. Present day sources use ionizers of two basic types - electron ionizers for H/sup +/ Vector production followed by double charge exchange in a vapor, or direct H/sup -/ Vector production by charge exchange of H/sup 0/ with Cs/sup 0/. Both methods have ionization efficiencies of less than 0.5%. Ionization efficiencies in excess of 10% may be obtained in the future by the use of a plasma ionizer plus charge exchange in Cs or Sr vapor, or ionization by resonant charge exchange with a self-extracted D/sup -/ beam from a ring magnetron or HCD source. 36 references, 4 figures.

  16. Optical Polarization From Aligned Atoms As A Diagnostic Of Interstellar And Circumstellar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, H.; Lazarian, A.

    2005-12-01

    Population among sublevels of the ground state of an atom is affected by radiative transitions induced by anisotropic radiation flux. Such aligned atoms precess in the external magnetic field and this affects properties of polarized radiation arising from both scattering and absorption by atoms. As the result the degree of light polarization depends on the direction of the magnetic field. This provides a perspective tool for studies of astrophysical magnetic fields using optical and UV polarimetry. We discuss the process of alignment that can be used to study magnetic fields in interplanetary medium, interstellar medium, circumstellar regions and quasars. To exemplify what atomic alignment can provide to the observers we consider synthetic data obtained with MHD simulations of comet wake.

  17. Changes in interstellar atomic abundances from the galactic plane to the halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.

    1982-01-01

    A few, specially selected interstellar absorption lines were measured in the high resolution, far ultraviolet spectra of 200 O and B type stars observed by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). For lines of sight extending beyond about 500 pc from the galactic plane, the abundance of singly ionized iron atoms increases relative to singly ionized sulfur. However, the relative abundances of singly ionized sulfur, silicon and aluminum do not seem to change appreciably. An explanation for the apparent increase of iron is the partial sputtering of material off the surfaces of dust grains by interstellar shocks. Another possibility might be that the ejecta from type I supernovae enrich the low density medium in the halo with iron.

  18. Hydrogenation of interstellar molecules: a survey for methylenimine (CH2NH).

    PubMed

    Dickens, J E; Irvine, W M; DeVries, C H; Ohishi, M

    1997-04-10

    Methylenimine (CH2NH) has been convincingly detected for the first time outside the Galactic center as part of a study of the hydrogenation of interstellar molecules. We have observed transitions from energy levels up to about 100 K above the ground state in the giant molecular clouds W51, Orion KL and G34.3 + 0.15. In addition, CH2NH was found at the " radical-ion peak" on the quiescent ridge of material in the Orion molecular cloud. The abundance ratio CH2NH/HCN at the radical-ion peak agrees with the predictions of recent gas-phase chemical models. This ratio is an order of magnitude higher in the warmer cloud cores, suggesting additional production pathways for CH2NH, probably on interstellar grains. PMID:11541227

  19. Lyman-alpha observations of the interplanetary hydrogen: support of a NASA sounding rocket program and study of the local interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Frederic

    2013-10-01

    Our proposal is to use the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph {HST /STIS} over a single orbit to make Lyman-alpha observations of the interplanetary hydrogen {IPH} during the April period of this year {2014}.These measurements will provide wavelength and flux calibration, in order to support the HYPE instrument {Hydrogen Polarimetric Explorer} that is planned to make spectro-polarimetric observations in April during a suborbital flight of a NASA sounding rocket {grant NNX08AI98G}. Cross-calibration will also be made with the SWAN instrument {Solar Wind Anisotropies} on the SOHO satellite {Solar and Heliospheric Observatory}. SWAN can provide flux calibration but without any spectral information, so only HST/STIS can provide the wavelength calibration.Moreover the scientific controversy on the physical properties of the local interstellar medium {LISM} is still going on. The recent observations of interstellar helium atoms by IBEX {Interstellar Boundaries Explorer} suggest that the LISM velocity vector may vary over time. Such a change should impact the bulk velocity of interplanetary hydrogen and should be detected by HST /STIS.

  20. Compact microwave cavity for hydrogen atomic clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Dejun; Zhang, Yan; Fu, Yigen; Zhang, Yanjun

    1992-01-01

    A summary is presented that introduces the compact microwave cavity used in the hydrogen atomic clock. Special emphasis is placed on derivation of theoretical calculating equations of main parameters of the microwave cavity. A brief description is given of several methods for discriminating the oscillating modes. Experimental data and respective calculated values are also presented.

  1. Moller Polarimetry with Atomic Hydrogen Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Eugene Chudakov; Vladimir Luppov

    2003-10-19

    A novel proposal of using polarized atomic hydrogen gas, stored in an ultra-cold magnetic trap, as the target for electron beam polarimetry based on Moller scattering is discussed. Such a target of practically 100% polarized electrons could provide a superb systematic accuracy of about 0.5% for beam polarization measurements. The feasibility studies for the CEBAF electron beam have been performed.

  2. Hybrid simulations of the effects of interstellar pickup hydrogen on the solar wind termination shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liewer, P. C.; Goldstein, B. E.; Omidi, N.

    1993-01-01

    Hybrid (kinetic ions/fluid electrons) plasma simulations are used to study the effects of a population of energetic interstellar pickup hydrogen ions on the solar wind termination shock. The pickup hydrogen is treated as a second ion species in the simulations, and thus the effects of the pick-ups on the shock, as well as the effects of the shock on the pickups, are treated in a fully self-consistent manner. For quasi-perpendicular shocks with 10-20 percent pickup hydrogen the pickup ions manifest themselves in a small foot ahead of the shock ramp caused by pickup ion reflection. For oblique shocks with smaller angles between the field and the shock normal, a large fraction of the pickup ions are reflected and move back upstream where they excite large amplitude magnetosonic waves which steepen into shocklets. These backstreaming pickup ions may provide advance warning of a spacecraft encounter with the termination shock.

  3. Hydromagnetic wave excitation by ionised interstellar hydrogen and helium in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Martin A.; Ip, W.-H.

    1987-01-01

    The modification of the interplanetary MHD wave spectrum due to the pickup and isotropization of interstellar hydrogen and helium in the solar wind is predicted on the basis of quasi-linear and (for hydrogen) WKB theory. Results indicate that pickup helium has a very small (unobservable) effect on the solar wind wave spectrum, but that pickup hydrogen results in substantial modifications of cyclotron resonant frequencies (about 0.01 Hz at about 7 AU). It is noted that the predicted modifications beyond about 5 AU are substantial and could be observable at spacecraft frequencies greater than about 0.005 Hz if not degraded by turbulent wave-wave interactions or stochastic ion acceleration.

  4. Interstellar Antifreeze: Ethylene Glycol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Lovas, F. J.; Jewell, P. R.; Coudert, L. H.

    2002-05-01

    Interstellar ethylene glycol (HOCH2CH2OH) has been detected in emission toward the Galactic center source Sagittarius B2(N-LMH) by means of several millimeter-wave rotational torsional transitions of its lowest energy conformer. The types and kinds of molecules found to date in interstellar clouds suggest a chemistry that favors aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols-e.g., formaldehyde (H2CO)/methanol (CH3OH), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO)/ethanol (CH3CH2OH). Similarly, ethylene glycol is the reduced alcohol of glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO), which has also been detected toward Sgr B2(N-LMH). While there is no consensus as to how any such large complex molecules are formed in the interstellar clouds, atomic hydrogen (H) and carbon monoxide (CO) could form formaldehyde on grain surfaces, but such surface chemistry beyond that point is uncertain. However, laboratory experiments have shown that the gas-phase reaction of atomic hydrogen (H) and solid-phase CO at 10-20 K can produce formaldehyde and methanol and that alcohols and other complex molecules can be synthesized from cometary ice analogs when subject to ionizing radiation at 15 K. Thus, the presence of aldehyde/reduced alcohol pairs in interstellar clouds implies that such molecules are a product of a low-temperature chemistry on grain surfaces or in grain ice mantles. This work suggests that aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols provide unique observational constraints on the formation of complex interstellar molecules.

  5. Interstellar Antifreeze: Ethylene Glycol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Lovas, F. J.; Jewell, P. R.; Coudert, L. H.

    2002-01-01

    Interstellar ethylene glycol (HOCH2CH2,OH) has been detected in emission toward the Galactic center source Sagittarius B2(N-LMH) by means of several millimeter-wave rotational torsional transitions of its lowest energy conformer. The types and kinds of molecules found to date in interstellar clouds suggest a chemistry that favors aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols-e.g., formaldehyde (H2CO)/methanol (CH3OH), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO)/ethanol (CH3CH2OH). Similarly, ethylene glycol is the reduced alcohol of glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO), which has also been detected toward Sgr B2(N-LMH). While there is no consensus as to how any such large complex molecules are formed in the interstellar clouds, atomic hydrogen (H) and carbon monoxide (CO) could form formaldehyde on grain surfaces, but such surface chemistry beyond that point is uncertain. However, laboratory experiments have shown that the gas-phase reaction of atomic hydrogen (H) and solid-phase CO at 10-20 K can produce formaldehyde and methanol and that alcohols and other complex molecules can be synthesized from cometary ice analogs when subject to ionizing radiation at 15 K. Thus, the presence of aldehyde/ reduced alcohol pairs in interstellar clouds implies that such molecules are a product of a low-temperature chemistry on grain surfaces or in grain ice mantles. This work suggests that aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols provide unique observational constraints on the formation of complex interstellar molecules.

  6. Atomic hydrogen cleaning of semiconductor photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, C.K.; Poelker, B.M.; Price, J.S.

    1997-06-01

    Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) semiconductor photocathodes are widely used for the production of polarized electron beams, and are also useful for the production of high brightness electron beams which can be modulated at very high frequencies. Preparation of an atomically clean semiconductor surface is an essential step in the fabrication of a NEA photocathode. This cleaning step is difficult for certain semiconductors, such as the very thin materials which produce the highest beam polarization, and those which have tightly bound oxides and carbides. Using a small RF dissociation atomic hydrogen source, the authors have reproducibly cleaned GaAs wafers which have been only degreased prior to installation in vacuum. They have consistently prepared very high quantum efficiency photocathodes following atomic hydrogen cleaning. Details of their apparatus and most recent results are presented.

  7. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-05-08

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using, a metal hydride.

  8. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-03-30

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

  9. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

  10. Infrared emission from hydrogenated amorphous carbon and amorphous carbon grains in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duley, W. W.; Jones, A. P.; Taylor, S. D.; Williams, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The correlations deduced by Boulanger et al. (1990) from IRAS maps of the Chamaeleon, Taurus and Ursa Major molecular cloud complexes are interpreted in terms of the evolutionary hydrogenated amorphous carbon model of interstellar dust. In particular, regions of relatively strong 12-micron emission may be regions where recently accreted carbon is being converted by ambient UV to small PAHs in situ. Regions of weak 12-micron emission are probably quiescent regions where carbon has been annealed to amorphous carbon. Observational consequences of these inferences are briefly described.

  11. Energetic neutral atom and interstellar flow observations with IBEX: Implications for the global heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N. A.; McComas, D. J.; Christian, E. R.; Desai, M. I.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S. A.; Moebius, E.; Reno, M.; Scherrer, J.; Zirnstein, E.

    2016-03-01

    Since launch in Oct. 2008, IBEX, with its two energetic neutral atom (ENA) cameras, has provided humankind with the first-ever global images of the complex boundary separating the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium (LISM). IBEX's energy-resolved all-sky maps, collected every six months, are yielding remarkable new insights into the heliospheres structure as it is shaped by the combined forces of the local interstellar flow, the local interstellar magnetic field (LISMF), and the evolving solar wind. IBEX has also acquired the first images of ENAs backscattered from the surface of the moon as well as global images of the magnetospheric response to solar wind disturbances. IBEX thus addresses all three Heliophysics science objectives set forth in the 2014 Science Plan for NASAs Science Mission Directorate (SMD) as well as the goals in the recent Solar and Space Physics Decadal Survey (NRC 2012). In addition, with the information it provides on the properties of the LISM and the LISMF, IBEX represents a unique bridge between heliophysics and astrophysics, and fills in critical knowledge for understanding the habitability of exoplanetary systems and the future habitability of Earth and the solar system. Because of the few-year time lag due to solar wind and ENA transport, IBEX observed the solar wind/ LISM interaction characteristic of declining phase/solar minimum conditions. In the continuing mission, IBEX captures the response of the interstellar boundaries to the changing structure of the solar wind in its transition toward the "mini" solar maximum and possibly the decline into the next solar minimum. The continuing IBEX mission affords never-to-be-repeated opportunities to coordinate global imaging of the heliospheric boundary with in-situ measurements by the Voyagers as they pass beyond the heliopause and start to directly sample the LISM.

  12. Solar wind heating beyond 1 AU. [interplanetary atomic hydrogen gas effect on protons and electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzer, T. E.; Leer, E.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of an interplanetary atomic hydrogen gas on solar wind proton, electron and alpha-particle temperatures beyond 1 AU is considered. It is shown that the proton temperature (and probably also the alpha-particle temperature) reaches a minimum between 2 AU and 4 AU, depending on values chosen for solar wind and interstellar gas parameters. Heating of the electron gas depends primarily on the thermal coupling of the protons and electrons. For strong coupling, the electron temperature reaches a minimum between 4 AU and 8 AU, but for weak coupling (Coulomb collisions only), the electron temperature continues to decrease throughout the inner solar system. A spacecraft travelling to Jupiter should be able to observe the heating effect of the solar wind-interplanetary hydrogen interaction, and from such observations it may be possible of infer some properties of the interstellar neutral gas.

  13. Mapping atomic and diffuse interstellar band absorption across the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Mandy; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Sarre, Peter J.; Beckman, John E.

    2015-12-01

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) trace warm neutral and weakly ionized diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). Here we present a dedicated, high signal-to-noise spectroscopic survey of two of the strongest DIBs, at 5780 and 5797 Å, in optical spectra of 666 early-type stars in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds, along with measurements of the atomic Na I D and Ca II K lines. The resulting maps show for the first time the distribution of DIB carriers across large swathes of galaxies, as well as the foreground Milky Way ISM. We confirm the association of the 5797 Å DIB with neutral gas, and the 5780 Å DIB with more translucent gas, generally tracing the star-forming regions within the Magellanic Clouds. Likewise, the Na I D line traces the denser ISM whereas the Ca II K line traces the more diffuse, warmer gas. The Ca II K line has an additional component at ˜200-220 km s-1 seen towards both Magellanic Clouds; this may be associated with a pan-Magellanic halo. Both the atomic lines and DIBs show sub-pc-scale structure in the Galactic foreground absorption; the 5780 and 5797 Å DIBs show very little correlation on these small scales, as do the Ca II K and Na I D lines. This suggests that good correlations between the 5780 and 5797 Å DIBs, or between Ca II K and Na I D, arise from the superposition of multiple interstellar structures. Similarity in behaviour between DIBs and Na I in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Milky Way suggests the abundance of DIB carriers scales in proportion to metallicity.

  14. The interstellar wind - Mariner 10 measurements of hydrogen /1216 A/ and helium /584 A/ interplanetary emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broadfoot, A. L.; Kumar, S.

    1978-01-01

    A set of unique observations of interplanetary emission at 1216 A and 584 A is presented which were made from Mariner 10 when that spacecraft was in interplanetary space on its way to Venus. The data provide simultaneous mapping of 1216-A hydrogen emission and 584-A helium emission, which allows a direct cross-correlation of these two aspects of the interstellar wind. The data are examined photometrically and compared with the principles of a simple model which provides a first-order understanding of the expected intensity variation over the celestial sphere. Hydrogen and helium sky maps are given which indicate the minima and maxima in emission intensity, a helium-focusing region in excess of 50 to 60 deg, and asymmetries in both emission profiles.

  15. Electron impact ionization rates for interstellar neutral H and He atoms near interplanetary shocks: Ulysses observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Phillips, J. L.; Gosling, J. T.; Isenberg, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    During average solar wind flow conditions at 1 AU, ionization rates of interstellar neutrals that penetrate into the inner heliosphere are dominated by charge exchange with solar wind protons for H atoms, and by photoionization for He atoms. During occurrences of strong, coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven interplanetary shock waves near 1 AU, electron impact ionization can make substantial, if not dominating, contributions to interstellar neutral ionization rates in the regions downstream of the shocks. However, electron impact ionization is expected to be relatively less important with increasing heliocentric distance because of the decrease in electron temperature. Ulysses encountered many CME-driven shocks during its journey to and beyond Jupiter, and in addition, encountered a number of strong corotating interaction region (CIR) shocks. These shocks generally occur only beyond approximately 2 AU. Many of the CIR shocks were very strong rivalling the Earth's bow shock in electron heating. We have compared electron impact ionization rates calculated from electron velocity distributions measured downstream from CIR shocks using the Ulysses SWOOPS experiment to charge-exchange rates calculated from measured proton number fluxes and the photoionization rate estimated from an assumed solar photon spectrum typical of solar maximum conditions. We find that, although normally the ratio of electron-impact ionization rates to charge-exchange (for H) and to photoionization (for He) rates amounts to only about one and a few tens of percent, respectively, downstream of some of the stronger CIR shocks they amount to more than 10% and greater than 100%, respectively.

  16. Beam transport of low temperature atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, W. A.

    1993-12-01

    Analytic calculations and particle tracking simulations are presented for a polarized atomic hydrogen beam produced by extraction from an ultra-cold (T=300 mK) helium film coated cell in a large solenoidal magnetic field (12 T). Initial focusing of states 1 and 2 by the solenoidal field and subsequent focusing by a sextupole are examined within the constraints imposed by the requirements of the polarized jet for the experiments NEPTUN and NEPTUN-A at UNK.

  17. Solid Hydrogen Experiments for Atomic Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2001-01-01

    This paper illustrates experiments that were conducted on the formation of solid hydrogen particles in liquid helium. Solid particles of hydrogen were frozen in liquid helium, and observed with a video camera. The solid hydrogen particle sizes, their molecular structure transitions, and their agglomeration times were estimated. article sizes of 1.8 to 4.6 mm (0.07 to 0. 18 in.) were measured. The particle agglomeration times were 0.5 to 11 min, depending on the loading of particles in the dewar. These experiments are the first step toward visually characterizing these particles, and allow designers to understand what issues must be addressed in atomic propellant feed system designs for future aerospace vehicles.

  18. The interaction of hydrogen with the {010} surfaces of Mg and Fe olivine as models for interstellar dust grains: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Downing, C A; Ahmady, B; Catlow, C R A; de Leeuw, N H

    2013-07-13

    There is no consensus as yet to account for the significant presence of water on the terrestrial planets, but suggested sources include direct hydrogen adsorption from the parent molecular cloud after the planets' formation, and delivery of hydrous material via comets or asteroids external to the zone of the terrestrial planets. Alternatively, a more recent idea is that water may have directly adsorbed onto the interstellar dust grains involved in planetary formation. In this work, we use electronic structure calculations based on the density functional theory to investigate and compare the bulk and {010} surface structures of the magnesium and iron end-members of the silicate mineral olivine, namely forsterite and fayalite, respectively. We also report our results on the adsorption of atomic hydrogen at the mineral surfaces, where our calculations show that there is no activation barrier to the adsorption of atomic hydrogen at these surfaces. Furthermore, different surface sites activate the atom to form either adsorbed hydride or proton species in the form of hydroxy groups on the same surface, which indicates that these mineral surfaces may have acted as catalytic sites in the immobilization and reaction of hydrogen atoms to form dihydrogen gas or water molecules. PMID:23734054

  19. The interaction of hydrogen with the {010} surfaces of Mg and Fe olivine as models for interstellar dust grains: a density functional theory study

    PubMed Central

    Downing, C. A.; Ahmady, B.; Catlow, C. R. A.; de Leeuw, N. H.

    2013-01-01

    There is no consensus as yet to account for the significant presence of water on the terrestrial planets, but suggested sources include direct hydrogen adsorption from the parent molecular cloud after the planets’ formation, and delivery of hydrous material via comets or asteroids external to the zone of the terrestrial planets. Alternatively, a more recent idea is that water may have directly adsorbed onto the interstellar dust grains involved in planetary formation. In this work, we use electronic structure calculations based on the density functional theory to investigate and compare the bulk and {010} surface structures of the magnesium and iron end-members of the silicate mineral olivine, namely forsterite and fayalite, respectively. We also report our results on the adsorption of atomic hydrogen at the mineral surfaces, where our calculations show that there is no activation barrier to the adsorption of atomic hydrogen at these surfaces. Furthermore, different surface sites activate the atom to form either adsorbed hydride or proton species in the form of hydroxy groups on the same surface, which indicates that these mineral surfaces may have acted as catalytic sites in the immobilization and reaction of hydrogen atoms to form dihydrogen gas or water molecules. PMID:23734054

  20. SEPARATION OF THE INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER RIBBON FROM GLOBALLY DISTRIBUTED ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Schwadron, N. A.; Kucharek, H.; Moebius, E. E-mail: harald.kucharek@unh.edu

    2011-04-10

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observes a remarkable feature, the IBEX ribbon, which has energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux over a narrow region {approx}20{sup 0} wide, a factor of 2-3 higher than the more globally distributed ENA flux. Here, we separate ENA emissions in the ribbon from the distributed flux by applying a transparency mask over the ribbon and regions of high emissions, and then solve for the distributed flux using an interpolation scheme. Our analysis shows that the energy spectrum and spatial distribution of the ribbon are distinct from the surrounding globally distributed flux. The ribbon energy spectrum shows a knee between {approx}1 and 4 keV, and the angular distribution is approximately independent of energy. In contrast, the distributed flux does not show a clear knee and more closely conforms to a power law over much of the sky. Consistent with previous analyses, the slope of the power law steepens from the nose to tail, suggesting a weaker termination shock toward the tail as compared to the nose. The knee in the energy spectrum of the ribbon suggests that its source plasma population is generated via a distinct physical process. Both the slope in the energy distribution of the distributed flux and the knee in the energy distribution of the ribbon are ordered by latitude. The heliotail may be identified in maps of globally distributed flux as a broad region of low flux centered {approx}44{sup 0}W of the interstellar downwind direction, suggesting heliotail deflection by the interstellar magnetic field.

  1. Solid Hydrogen Particles Analyzed for Atomic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2001-01-01

    Solid hydrogen particles have been selected as a means of storing atomic propellants in future launch vehicles (refs. 1 to 2). In preparation for this, hydrogen particle formation in liquid helium was tested experimentally. These experiments were conducted to visually characterize the particles and to observe their formation and molecular transformations (aging) while in liquid helium. The particle sizes, molecular transformations, and agglomeration times were estimated from video image analyses. The experiments were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center in the Supplemental Multilayer Insulation Research Facility (SMIRF, ref. 3). The facility has a vacuum tank, into which the experimental setup was placed. The vacuum tank prevented heat leaks and subsequent boiloff of the liquid helium, and the supporting systems maintained the temperature and pressure of the liquid helium bath where the solid particles were created. As the operation of the apparatus was developed, the hydrogen particles were easily visualized. The figures (ref. 1) show images from the experimental runs. The first image shows the initial particle freezing, and the second image shows the particles after the small particles have agglomerated. The particles finally all clump, but stick together loosely. The solid particles tended to agglomerate within a maximum of 11 min, and the agglomerate was very weak. Because the hydrogen particles are buoyant in the helium, the agglomerate tends to compact itself into a flat pancake on the surface of the helium. This pancake agglomerate is easily broken apart by reducing the pressure above the liquid. The weak agglomerate implies that the particles can be used as a gelling agent for the liquid helium, as well as a storage medium for atomic boron, carbon, or hydrogen. The smallest particle sizes that resulted from the initial freezing experiments were about 1.8 mm. About 50 percent of the particles formed were between 1.8 to 4.6 mm in diameter. These very

  2. A Newtonian Model of the Hydrogen Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, James; Woodyard, James

    2010-03-01

    Classical physics was deemed useless in atomic physics in the early 1900's by the vast majority of the physics community. There were multiple problems that were believed to be insoluble, such as blackbody radiation and the photoelectric and Compton effects. Another outstanding problem had been the explanation of atomic spectra. By the 1920's, a very powerful theory called quantum mechanics was created which explained all atomic experiments. Nevertheless, a few physicists, most notably Albert Einstein, rejected this theory on the grounds that it did not give a complete description of the microscopic world. Another more radical view held by Walter Ritz is that Newtonian physics is applicable to all of atomic physics. Over the last couple of years, we have presented classical explanations of many of the ``insoluble'' problems given by textbooks. We will present a model of the hydrogen atom that stays within the framework of Newton. Using only the assumption that the stable building blocks of matter are the electron, positron, and neutrino, we will deduce the following results from our model: orbital stability, line spectra, and scattering cross sections for electrons and protons. We will also qualitatively demonstrate how to explain the lifetime of excited states.

  3. Energetic neutral atoms measured by the interstellar boundary explorer (IBEX): Evidence for multiple heliosheath populations

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, M. I.; Allegrini, F. A.; Dayeh, M. A.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J.; Bzowski, M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Sokół, J. M.; Funsten, H.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Zirnstein, E. J.; Schwadron, N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) provide powerful diagnostics about the origin of the progenitor ion populations and the physical mechanisms responsible for their production. In this paper, we extend the work of Desai et al. and Fuselier et al. and combine and compare ENA spectra from the first 3 yr of observations by the IBEX-Hi and -Lo ENA imagers along the lines-of-sight (LOSs) from the inner heliosphere through to the locations of Voyager 1 and 2 with results from an updated physics-based model of the three-dimensional heliosphere and its constituent ion populations. Our results show that (1) IBEX ENA fluxes and spectra above ∼0.7 keV measured along the LOSs of the Voyagers are consistent with several models in which the parent pickup ion (PUI) populations originate in the inner heliosheath, and (2) a significant fraction of lower energy ENAs between ∼0.1-0.5 keV may originate from interstellar neutral gas charge-exchanging with a non-thermalized (hot) population of PUIs in the outer heliosheath beyond the heliopause. We discuss the implications of ENAs observed by IBEX originating from distinct parent populations as well as from two distinct locations in the heliospheric interface. These results indicate that ENA spectral measurements at various energies can be used to remotely probe distinct physical processes operating in vastly different regions of the distant heliosphere.

  4. The interstellar oxygen crisis, or where have all the oxygen atoms gone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu; Li, Aigen; Jiang, B. W.

    2015-11-01

    The interstellar medium (ISM) seems to have a significant surplus of oxygen which was dubbed as the `O crisis': independent of the adopted interstellar reference abundance, the total number of O atoms depleted from the gas phase far exceeds that tied up in solids by as much as ˜160 ppm of O/H. Recently, it has been hypothesized that the missing O could be hidden in μm-sized H2O ice grains. We examine this hypothesis by comparing the infrared (IR) extinction and far-IR emission arising from these grains with that observed in the Galactic diffuse ISM. We find that it is possible for the diffuse ISM to accommodate ˜160 ppm of O/H in μm-sized H2O ice grains without violating the observational constraints including the absence of the 3.1 μm O-H absorption feature. More specifically, H2O ice grains of radii ˜4 μm and O/H = 160 ppm are capable of accounting for the observed flat extinction at ˜3-8 μm and produce no excessive emission in the far-IR. These grains could be present in the diffuse ISM through rapid exchange of material between dense molecular clouds where they form and diffuse clouds where they are destroyed by photosputtering.

  5. CIRCULARITY OF THE INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER RIBBON OF ENHANCED ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM (ENA) FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H. O.; Higdon, D. M.; Larsen, B. A.; Möbius, E. E-mail: dhigdon@lanl.gov; and others

    2013-10-10

    As a sharp feature in the sky, the ribbon of enhanced energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission is a key signature for understanding the interaction of the heliosphere and the interstellar medium through which we are moving. Over five nominal IBEX energy passbands (0.7, 1.1, 1.7, 2.7, and 4.3 keV), the ribbon is extraordinarily circular, with a peak location centered at ecliptic (λ{sub RC}, β{sub RC}) = (219.°2 ± 1.°3, 39.°9 ± 2.°3) and a half cone angle of φ{sub C} = 74.°5 ± 2.°0. A slight elongation of the ribbon, generally perpendicular to the ribbon center-heliospheric nose vector and with eccentricity ∼0.3, is observed over all energies. At 4.3 keV, the ribbon is slightly larger and displaced relative to lower energies. For all ENA energies, a slice of the ribbon flux peak perpendicular to the circular arc is asymmetric and systematically skewed toward the ribbon center. We derive a spatial coherence parameter δ{sub C} ≤ 0.014 that characterizes the spatial uniformity of the ribbon over its extent in the sky and is a key constraint for understanding the underlying processes and structure governing the ribbon ENA emission.

  6. Fourteen Years of Atomic Hydrogen from SABER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, L. A.; Mlynczak, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    We present results for atomic hydrogen in the mesopause region (80-100 km) derived from measurements made by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the TIMED satellite. SABER has been measuring the vertical distribution of infrared radiation emitted by various atmospheric gases for nearly 14 years, providing important information about chemical species, including atomic oxygen, atomic hydrogen, ozone and hydroxyl; temperature; and the radiation budget in the upper atmosphere. The methodology for the derivation of daytime and nighttime concentrations and volume mixing ratios will be presented. Zonal mean and global average daytime and nighttime concentrations of H, which demonstrate excellent agreement between 87 and 95 km, have been calculated and the results are compared with observations from the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) satellite made nearly 30 years ago. Variability over the course of the SABER mission will be shown, including the apparent inverse dependence on the solar cycle, which stems from the temperature dependence of various reaction rate coefficients for H photochemistry. Results for H near solar max will be compared for Solar Cycles 23 and 24.

  7. DIFFUSE ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR GAS IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM OF M82 TOWARD SN 2014J

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchey, Adam M.; Welty, Daniel E.; York, Donald G.; Dahlstrom, Julie A.

    2015-02-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of interstellar absorption lines seen in moderately high resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra of SN 2014J in M82. Our observations were acquired over the course of six nights, covering the period from ∼6 days before to ∼30 days after the supernova reached its maximum B-band brightness. We examine complex absorption from Na I, Ca II, K I, Ca I, CH{sup +}, CH, and CN, arising primarily from diffuse gas in the interstellar medium (ISM) of M82. We detect Li I absorption over a range in velocity consistent with that exhibited by the strongest Na I and K I components associated with M82; this is the first detection of interstellar Li in a galaxy outside of the Local Group. There are no significant temporal variations in the absorption-line profiles over the 37 days sampled by our observations. The relative abundances of the various interstellar species detected reveal that the ISM of M82 probed by SN 2014J consists of a mixture of diffuse atomic and molecular clouds characterized by a wide range of physical/environmental conditions. Decreasing N(Na I)/N(Ca II) ratios and increasing N(Ca I)/N(K I) ratios with increasing velocity are indicative of reduced depletion in the higher-velocity material. Significant component-to-component scatter in the N(Na I)/N(Ca II) and N(Ca I)/N(Ca II) ratios may be due to variations in the local ionization conditions. An apparent anti-correlation between the N(CH{sup +})/N(CH) and N(Ca I)/N(Ca II) ratios can be understood in terms of an opposite dependence on gas density and radiation field strength, while the overall high CH{sup +} abundance may be indicative of enhanced turbulence in the ISM of M82. The Li abundance also seems to be enhanced in M82, which supports the conclusions of recent gamma-ray emission studies that the cosmic-ray acceleration processes are greatly enhanced in this starburst galaxy.

  8. Reactions of Azine Anions with Nitrogen and Oxygen Atoms: Implications for Titan's Upper Atmosphere and Interstellar Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe-Chen; Cole, Callie A; Demarais, Nicholas J; Snow, Theodore P; Bierbaum, Veronica M

    2015-08-26

    Azines are important in many extraterrestrial environments, from the atmosphere of Titan to the interstellar medium. They have been implicated as possible carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands in astronomy, indicating their persistence in interstellar space. Most importantly, they constitute the basic building blocks of DNA and RNA, so their chemical reactivity in these environments has significant astrobiological implications. In addition, N and O atoms are widely observed in the ISM and in the ionospheres of planets and moons. However, the chemical reactions of molecular anions with abundant interstellar and atmospheric atomic species are largely unexplored. In this paper, gas-phase reactions of deprotonated anions of benzene, pyridine, pyridazine, pyrimidine, pyrazine, and s-triazine with N and O atoms are studied both experimentally and computationally. In all cases, the major reaction channel is associative electron detachment; these reactions are particularly important since they control the balance between negative ions and free electron densities. The reactions of the azine anions with N atoms exhibit larger rate constants than reactions of corresponding chain anions. The reactions of azine anions with O atoms are even more rapid, with complex product patterns for different reactants. The mechanisms are studied theoretically by employing density functional theory; spin conversion is found to be important in determining some product distributions. The rich gas-phase chemistry observed in this work provides a better understanding of ion-atom reactions and their contributions to ionospheric chemistry as well as the chemical processing that occurs in the boundary layers between diffuse and dense interstellar clouds. PMID:26281019

  9. Parity nonconservation in the hydrogen atom

    SciTech Connect

    Chupp, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    The development of experiments to detect parity nonconserving (PNC) mixing of the 2s/sub a/2/ and 2p/sub 1/2/ levels of the hydrogen atom in a 570 Gauss magnetic field is described. The technique involves observation of an asymmetry in the rate of microwave induced transitions at 1608 MHz due to the interference of two amplitudes, one produced by applied microwave and static electric fields and the other produced by an applied microwave field and the 2s/sub 1/2/-2p/sub 1/2/ mixing inducd by a PNC Hamiltonian.

  10. ATOMIC HYDROGEN IN A GALACTIC CENTER OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Green, J. A.; Hill, A. S.; Lockman, F. J.; Dickey, J. M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Green, A. J.

    2013-06-10

    We describe a population of small, high-velocity, atomic hydrogen clouds, loops, and filaments found above and below the disk near the Galactic center. The objects have a mean radius of 15 pc, velocity widths of {approx}14 km s{sup -1}, and are observed at |z| heights up to 700 pc. The velocity distribution of the clouds shows no signature of Galactic rotation. We propose a scenario where the clouds are associated with an outflow from a central star-forming region at the Galactic center. We discuss the clouds as entrained material traveling at {approx}200 km s{sup -1} in a Galactic wind.

  11. Positron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Acacia, P.; Campeanu, R.I.; Horbatsch, M.

    1993-05-01

    We will present integrated cross sections for ionization of atomic hydrogen by positrons. These have been calculated in a distorted-wave approximation using energy-dependent effective charges in the final channel as well as static and polarization potentials in the initial channel. We present two models for calculating the energy-dependent effective charges both of which produce results in good agreement with the recent experimental measurements of Spicher et al. This is in contrast to previous distorted-wave calculations which used fixed effective charges as well as classical trajectory calculations. Both of these latter methods produced results which were substantially below ours and the experimental data.

  12. Isotope effects of hydrogen and atom tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Pliss, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    The abnormally high mass-dependent isotope effects in liquid-phase hydrogen (deuterium) atom transfer reactions, which are customarily regarded as quantum effects, are actually the products of two classical effects, namely, kinetic and thermodynamic ones. The former is determined by the rate constants for atom transfer and the latter is caused by nonbonded (or noncovalent) isotope effects in the solvation of protiated and deuterated reacting molecules. This product can mimic the large isotope effects that are usually attributed to tunnelling. In enzymatic reactions, tunnelling is of particular interest; its existence characterizes an enzyme as a rigid molecular machine in which the residence time of reactants on the reaction coordinate exceeds the waiting time for the tunnelling event. The magnitude of isotope effect becomes a characteristic parameter of the internal dynamics of the enzyme catalytic site. The bibliography includes 61 references.

  13. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes using Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Cassell, Alan M.; Nguyen, Cattien V.; Meyyappan, M.; Han, Jie; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the irradiation of multi walled and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with atomic hydrogen. After irradiating the SWNT sample, a band at 2940/cm (3.4 microns) that is characteristic of the C-H stretching mode is observed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Additional confirmation of SWNT functionalization is tested by irradiating with atomic deuterium. A weak band in the region 1940/cm (5.2 micron) to 2450/cm (4.1 micron) corresponding to C-D stretching mode is also observed in the FTIR spectrum. This technique provides a clean gas phase process for the functionalization of SWNTs, which could lead to further chemical manipulation and/or the tuning of the electronic properties of SWNTs for nanodevice applications.

  14. Solar photoionization as a loss mechanism of neutral interstellar hydrogen in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogawa, H. S.; Wu, C. Y. Robert; Gangopadhyay, P.; Judge, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    Two primary loss mechanisms of interstellar neutral hydrogen in interplanetary space are resonance charge exchange ionization with solar wind protons and photoionization by solar EUV radiation. The later process has often been neglected since the average photoionization rate has been estimated to be as much as 5 to 10 times smaller than the charge exchange rate. These factors are based on ionization rates from early measurements of solar EUV and solar wind fluxes. Using revised solar EUV and solar wind fluxes measured near the ecliptic plane we have reinvestigated the ionization rates of interplanetary hydrogen. The result of our analysis indicates that indeed the photoionization rate during solar minimum can be smaller than charge exchange by a factor of 5; however, during solar maximum conditions when solar EUV fluxes are high, and solar wind fluxes are low, photoionization can be over 60% of the charge exchange rate at Earth orbit. To obtain an accurate estimate of the importance of photoionization relative to charge exchange, we have included photoionization from both the ground and metastable states of hydrogen. We find, however, that the photoionization from the metastable state does not contribute significantly to the overall photoionization rate.

  15. Thermal Reactions of Oxygen Atoms with Alkenes at Low Temperatures on Interstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Michael D.; Price, Stephen D.

    2011-11-01

    Laboratory experiments show that the thermal heterogeneous reactions of oxygen atoms may contribute to the synthesis of epoxides in interstellar clouds. The data set also indicates that the contribution of these pathways to epoxide formation, in comparison to non-thermal routes, is likely to be strongly temperature dependent. Our results indicate that an increased abundance of epoxides, relative to the corresponding aldehydes, could be an observational signature of a significant contribution to molecular oxidation via thermal O atom reactions with alkenes. Specifically surface science experiments show that both C2H4O and C3H6O are readily formed from reactions of ethene and propene molecules with thermalized oxygen atoms at temperatures in the range of 12-90 K. It is clear from our experiments that these reactions, on a graphite surface, proceed with significantly reduced reaction barriers compared with those operating in the gas phase. For both the C2H4 + O and the C3H6 + O reactions, the surface reaction barriers we determine are reduced by approximately an order of magnitude compared with the barriers in the gas phase. The modeling of our experimental results, which determines these reaction barriers, also extracts desorption energies and rate coefficients for the title reactions. Our results clearly show that the major product from the O + C2H4 reaction is ethylene oxide, an epoxide.

  16. THERMAL REACTIONS OF OXYGEN ATOMS WITH ALKENES AT LOW TEMPERATURES ON INTERSTELLAR DUST

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Michael D.; Price, Stephen D. E-mail: s.d.price@ucl.ac.uk

    2011-11-10

    Laboratory experiments show that the thermal heterogeneous reactions of oxygen atoms may contribute to the synthesis of epoxides in interstellar clouds. The data set also indicates that the contribution of these pathways to epoxide formation, in comparison to non-thermal routes, is likely to be strongly temperature dependent. Our results indicate that an increased abundance of epoxides, relative to the corresponding aldehydes, could be an observational signature of a significant contribution to molecular oxidation via thermal O atom reactions with alkenes. Specifically surface science experiments show that both C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O and C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O are readily formed from reactions of ethene and propene molecules with thermalized oxygen atoms at temperatures in the range of 12-90 K. It is clear from our experiments that these reactions, on a graphite surface, proceed with significantly reduced reaction barriers compared with those operating in the gas phase. For both the C{sub 2}H{sub 4} + O and the C{sub 3}H{sub 6} + O reactions, the surface reaction barriers we determine are reduced by approximately an order of magnitude compared with the barriers in the gas phase. The modeling of our experimental results, which determines these reaction barriers, also extracts desorption energies and rate coefficients for the title reactions. Our results clearly show that the major product from the O + C{sub 2}H{sub 4} reaction is ethylene oxide, an epoxide.

  17. Activation of extended red emission photoluminescence in carbon solids by exposure to atomic hydrogen and UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furton, Douglas G.; Witt, Adolf N.

    1993-01-01

    We report on new laboratory results which relate directly to the observation of strongly enhanced extended red emission (ERE) by interstellar dust in H2 photodissociation zones. The ERE has been attributed to photoluminescence by hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC). We are demonstrating that exposure to thermally dissociated atomic hydrogen will restore the photoluminescence efficiency of previously annealed HAC. Also, pure amorphous carbon (AC), not previously photoluminescent, can be induced to photoluminesce by exposure to atomic hydrogen. This conversion of AC into HAC is greatly enhanced by the presence of UV irradiation. The presence of dense, warm atomic hydrogen and a strong UV radiation field are characteristic environmental properties of H2 dissociation zones. Our results lend strong support to the HAC photoluminescence explanation for ERE.

  18. Atomic hydrogen propellants: Historical perspectives and future possibilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    1993-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen, a very high density free-radical propellant, is anticipated to generate a specific impulse of 600-1500 lb-f sec/lb-mass performance; this may facilitate the development of unique launch vehicles. A development status evaluation is presently given for atomic hydrogen investigations. It is noted that breakthroughs are required in the production, storage, and transfer of atomic hydrogen, before this fuel can become a viable rocket propellant.

  19. In-Vacuum Dissociator for Atomic-Hydrogen Masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal control and vacuum sealing achieved while contamination avoided. Simple, relatively inexpensive molecular-hydrogen dissociator for atomic-hydrogen masers used on Earth or in vacuum of space. No air cooling required, and absence of elastomeric O-ring seals prevents contamination. In-vacuum dissociator for atomic hydrogen masers, hydrogen gas in glass dissociator dissociated by radio-frequency signal transmitted from surrounding 3-turn coil. Heat in glass conducted away by contacting metal surfaces.

  20. The interplanetary hydrogen and helium glow and the inferred interstellar gas properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of the interplanetary hydrogen and helium glow have been obtained by a number of spacecraft and rocket experiments during the past fifteen years. Important results have been established on the temperature, density, velocity, spatial dependence, and hydrogen to helium ratio. However, only four spacecraft launched to date are investigating the outer solar system and of these four the Pioneer 10 spacecraft is the farthest out at 28 A.U. Observations from this spacecraft at great distances have permitted an improved analysis of the effects which are only evident at large distances from the Sun. Perhaps the most significant result in this regard is the clear evidence of the importance of multiple scattering of solar Ly-alpha; an effect which has not been observed in earlier work. Ignoring this effect can lead to a gross overestimate of the local galactic glow. Current best estimates of the galactic glow and the local interstellar wind parameters obtained by the Pioneer 10 photometer at great distances are presented, in addition to complementary experimental observations of particular interest.

  1. On the Apparent Associations Between Interstellar Neutral Hydrogen Structure and (WMAP) High-frequency Continuum Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    2010-03-01

    Galactic neutral hydrogen (H I) within a few hundred parsecs of the Sun contains structure with an angular distribution that is similar to small-scale structure observed by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). A total of 108 associated pairs of associated H I and WMAP features have now been cataloged using H I data mapped in 2 km s-1 intervals and these pairs show a typical offset of 0fdg8. A large-scale statistical test for a direct association is carried out that casts little additional light on whether the these small offsets are merely coincidental or carry information. To pursue the issue further, the nature of several of the features within the foreground H I most closely associated with WMAP structure is examined in detail and it is shown that the cross-correlation coefficient for well-matched pairs of structures is of order unity. It is shown that free-free emission from electrons in unresolved density enhancements in interstellar space could theoretically produce high-frequency radio continuum radiation at the levels observed by WMAP and that such emission will appear nearly flat across the WMAP frequency range. Evidence for such structure in the interstellar medium already exists in the literature. Until higher angular resolution observations of the high-frequency continuum emission structure as well as the apparently associated H I structure become available, it may be difficult to rule out the possibility that some if not all the small-scale structure usually attributed to the cosmic microwave background may have a galactic origin.

  2. ON THE APPARENT ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN INTERSTELLAR NEUTRAL HYDROGEN STRUCTURE AND (WMAP) HIGH-FREQUENCY CONTINUUM EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    2010-03-10

    Galactic neutral hydrogen (H I) within a few hundred parsecs of the Sun contains structure with an angular distribution that is similar to small-scale structure observed by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). A total of 108 associated pairs of associated H I and WMAP features have now been cataloged using H I data mapped in 2 km s{sup -1} intervals and these pairs show a typical offset of 0.{sup 0}8. A large-scale statistical test for a direct association is carried out that casts little additional light on whether the these small offsets are merely coincidental or carry information. To pursue the issue further, the nature of several of the features within the foreground H I most closely associated with WMAP structure is examined in detail and it is shown that the cross-correlation coefficient for well-matched pairs of structures is of order unity. It is shown that free-free emission from electrons in unresolved density enhancements in interstellar space could theoretically produce high-frequency radio continuum radiation at the levels observed by WMAP and that such emission will appear nearly flat across the WMAP frequency range. Evidence for such structure in the interstellar medium already exists in the literature. Until higher angular resolution observations of the high-frequency continuum emission structure as well as the apparently associated H I structure become available, it may be difficult to rule out the possibility that some if not all the small-scale structure usually attributed to the cosmic microwave background may have a galactic origin.

  3. Atomic hydrogen cleaning of Ru-capped EUV multilayer mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motai, Kumi; Oizumi, Hiroaki; Miyagaki, Shinji; Nishiyama, I.; Izumi, Akira; Ueno, Tomoya; Miyazaki, Yasuo; Namiki, Akira

    2007-03-01

    Atomic hydrogen cleaning has been developed to reduce the amount of surface oxide on Ru-capped Mo/Si multilayer mirrors for EUVL. Atomic hydrogen generated by a heated W wire catalyzer was supplied to a Ru cap layer that had been lightly oxidized by ECR O2 plasma or EUV irradiation. The effectiveness of atomic hydrogen in deoxidizing it was examined by ex situ AES, XPS, and EUV absolute reflectivity measurements; and it was found that the amount of surface oxide was reduced to the initial level and that the EUV reflectivity of a multilayer degraded by oxidation recovered. In addition, the transport of atomic hydrogen thorough a winding quartz tube was demonstrated to be a promising technique. The actual density of hydrogen radicals was directly measured under various conditions so that the conditions for generating atomic hydrogen could be optimized and the required treatment time shortened.

  4. Hydrogen atom in intense magnetic field.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Kelly, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    The structure of a hydrogen atom situated in an intense magnetic field is investigaged. Three approaches are employed. An elementary Bohr picture establishes a crucial magnetic field strength, H sub a approximately equal to 5 x 10 to the 9th G. Fields in excess of H sub a are intense in that they are able to modify the characteristic atomic scales of length and binding energy. A second approach solves the Schrodinger equation by a combination of variational methods and perturbation theory. It yields analytic expressions for the wave functions and energy eigenvalues. A third approach determines the energy eigenvalues by reducing the Schrodinger equation to a one-dimensional wave equation, which is then solved numerically. Energy eigenvalues are tabulated for field strengths of 2 x 10 to the 10th G and 2 x 10 to the 12th G. It is found that at 2 x 10 to the 12th G the lowest energy eigenvalue is changed from -13.6 to about -180 eV in agreement with previous variational computations.

  5. Molecular Hydrogen in Diffuse Interstellar Clouds of Arbitrary Three-Dimensional Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaans, Marco; Neufeld, David A.

    1997-01-01

    We have constructed three-dimensional models for the equilibrium abundance of molecular hydrogen in diffuse interstellar clouds of arbitrary geometry that are illuminated by ultraviolet radiation. The position-dependent photodissociation rate of H2 in such clouds was computed with a 26 ray approximation to model the attenuation of the incident ultraviolet radiation field by dust and by H2 line absorption. We have applied our modeling technique to the isolated diffuse cloud G236+39, assuming that the cloud has a constant density and that the thickness of the cloud along the line of sight is at every point proportional to the 100 micron continuum intensity measured by IRAS. We find that our model can successfully account for observed variations in the ratio of 100 micron continuum intensity to H I column density, with larger values of that ratio occurring along lines of sight in which the molecular hydrogen fraction is expected to be the largest. Using a standard chi square analysis to assess the goodness of fit of our models, we find (at the 60 a level) that a three-dimensional model is more successful in matching the observational data than a one-dimensional model in which the geometrical extent of the cloud along the line of sight is assumed to be much smaller than its extent in the plane of the sky. If D is the distance to G236 + 39, and given standard assumptions about the rate of grain-catalyzed H2 formation, we find that the cloud has an extent along the line of sight that is 0.9 +/- 0.1 times its mean extent projected onto the plane of the sky and a gas density of 53 +/- 8 (100 pc/D) H nuclei/cc and is illuminated by a radiation field of 1.1 +/- 0.2 (100 pc/D) times the mean interstellar radiation field. The derived 100 micron emissivity per nucleon is 1.13 +/- 0.06 x 10(exp -20) MJy/sr sq cm.

  6. Hydrogen atom reactions in coal liquefaction. [Demethylation of methylnaphthalene by hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Bockrath, B.C.; Schroeder, K.T.; Keldsen, G.L.

    1985-06-01

    Hydrogen atom reactions were investigated in the demethylation of methylnaphthalenes at 450/sup 0/C. Demethylation by the hydrogen atom at the 1-position was about 4 times faster than at the 2-position. The methylnaphthalenes were somewhat more reactive toward hydrocracking than was bibenzyl. The extent of hydrocracking was a function of hydrogen pressure and initiator concentration. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Formation of Nitrogen and Hydrogen-bearing Molecules in Solid Ammonia and Implications for Solar System and Interstellar Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weijun; Jewitt, David; Osamura, Yoshihiro; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2008-02-01

    We irradiated solid ammonia (NH3) in the temperature range of 10-60 K with high-energy electrons to simulate the processing of ammonia-bearing ices in the interstellar medium and in the solar system. By monitoring the newly formed molecules online and in situ, the synthesis of hydrazine (N2H4), diazene (N2H2 isomers), hydrogen azide (HN3), the amino radical (NH2), molecular hydrogen (H2), and molecular nitrogen (N2) has been confirmed. Our results show that the production rates of hydrazine, diazene, hydrogen azide, molecular hydrogen, and molecular nitrogen are higher in amorphous ammonia than those in crystalline ammonia; this behavior is similar to the production of molecular hydrogen, molecular oxygen, and hydrogen peroxide found in electron-irradiated water ices. However, the formation of hydrazine in crystalline ammonia does not show any temperature dependence. Our experimental results give hints to the origin of molecular nitrogen in the Saturnian system and possibly in the atmospheres of proto-Earth and Titan; our research may also guide the search of hitherto unobserved nitrogen-bearing molecules in the interstellar medium and in our solar system.

  8. Reactions of substituted benzene anions with N and O atoms: Chemistry in Titan's upper atmosphere and the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe-Chen; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2016-06-01

    The likely existence of aromatic anions in many important extraterrestrial environments, from the atmosphere of Titan to the interstellar medium (ISM), is attracting increasing attention. Nitrogen and oxygen atoms are also widely observed in the ISM and in the ionospheres of planets and moons. In the current work, we extend previous studies to explore the reactivity of prototypical aromatic anions (deprotonated toluene, aniline, and phenol) with N and O atoms both experimentally and computationally. The benzyl and anilinide anions both exhibit slow associative electron detachment (AED) processes with N atom, and moderate reactivity with O atom in which AED dominates but ionic products are also formed. The reactivity of phenoxide is dramatically different; there is no measurable reaction with N atom, and the moderate reactivity with O atom produces almost exclusively ionic products. The reaction mechanisms are studied theoretically by employing density functional theory calculations, and spin conversion is found to be critical for understanding some product distributions. This work provides insight into the rich gas-phase chemistry of aromatic ion-atom reactions and their relevance to ionospheric and interstellar chemistry.

  9. Reactions of substituted benzene anions with N and O atoms: Chemistry in Titan's upper atmosphere and the interstellar medium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe-Chen; Bierbaum, Veronica M

    2016-06-01

    The likely existence of aromatic anions in many important extraterrestrial environments, from the atmosphere of Titan to the interstellar medium (ISM), is attracting increasing attention. Nitrogen and oxygen atoms are also widely observed in the ISM and in the ionospheres of planets and moons. In the current work, we extend previous studies to explore the reactivity of prototypical aromatic anions (deprotonated toluene, aniline, and phenol) with N and O atoms both experimentally and computationally. The benzyl and anilinide anions both exhibit slow associative electron detachment (AED) processes with N atom, and moderate reactivity with O atom in which AED dominates but ionic products are also formed. The reactivity of phenoxide is dramatically different; there is no measurable reaction with N atom, and the moderate reactivity with O atom produces almost exclusively ionic products. The reaction mechanisms are studied theoretically by employing density functional theory calculations, and spin conversion is found to be critical for understanding some product distributions. This work provides insight into the rich gas-phase chemistry of aromatic ion-atom reactions and their relevance to ionospheric and interstellar chemistry. PMID:27276954

  10. Use of Hilbert Curves in Parallelized CUDA code: Interaction of Interstellar Atoms with the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destefano, Anthony; Heerikhuisen, Jacob

    2015-04-01

    Fully 3D particle simulations can be a computationally and memory expensive task, especially when high resolution grid cells are required. The problem becomes further complicated when parallelization is needed. In this work we focus on computational methods to solve these difficulties. Hilbert curves are used to map the 3D particle space to the 1D contiguous memory space. This method of organization allows for minimized cache misses on the GPU as well as a sorted structure that is equivalent to an octal tree data structure. This type of sorted structure is attractive for uses in adaptive mesh implementations due to the logarithm search time. Implementations using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) library and NVIDIA's parallel computing platform CUDA will be compared, as MPI is commonly used on server nodes with many CPU's. We will also compare static grid structures with those of adaptive mesh structures. The physical test bed will be simulating heavy interstellar atoms interacting with a background plasma, the heliosphere, simulated from fully consistent coupled MHD/kinetic particle code. It is known that charge exchange is an important factor in space plasmas, specifically it modifies the structure of the heliosphere itself. We would like to thank the Alabama Supercomputer Authority for the use of their computational resources.

  11. Atomic-scale control of graphene magnetism by using hydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    González-Herrero, Héctor; Gómez-Rodríguez, José M; Mallet, Pierre; Moaied, Mohamed; Palacios, Juan José; Salgado, Carlos; Ugeda, Miguel M; Veuillen, Jean-Yves; Yndurain, Félix; Brihuega, Iván

    2016-04-22

    Isolated hydrogen atoms absorbed on graphene are predicted to induce magnetic moments. Here we demonstrate that the adsorption of a single hydrogen atom on graphene induces a magnetic moment characterized by a ~20-millielectron volt spin-split state at the Fermi energy. Our scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments, complemented by first-principles calculations, show that such a spin-polarized state is essentially localized on the carbon sublattice opposite to the one where the hydrogen atom is chemisorbed. This atomically modulated spin texture, which extends several nanometers away from the hydrogen atom, drives the direct coupling between the magnetic moments at unusually long distances. By using the STM tip to manipulate hydrogen atoms with atomic precision, it is possible to tailor the magnetism of selected graphene regions. PMID:27102478

  12. Atomic-scale control of graphene magnetism by using hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Herrero, Héctor; Gómez-Rodríguez, José M.; Mallet, Pierre; Moaied, Mohamed; Palacios, Juan José; Salgado, Carlos; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Veuillen, Jean-Yves; Yndurain, Félix; Brihuega, Iván

    2016-04-01

    Isolated hydrogen atoms absorbed on graphene are predicted to induce magnetic moments. Here we demonstrate that the adsorption of a single hydrogen atom on graphene induces a magnetic moment characterized by a ~20–millielectron volt spin-split state at the Fermi energy. Our scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments, complemented by first-principles calculations, show that such a spin-polarized state is essentially localized on the carbon sublattice opposite to the one where the hydrogen atom is chemisorbed. This atomically modulated spin texture, which extends several nanometers away from the hydrogen atom, drives the direct coupling between the magnetic moments at unusually long distances. By using the STM tip to manipulate hydrogen atoms with atomic precision, it is possible to tailor the magnetism of selected graphene regions.

  13. Finding Interstellar Shells in the SETHI Database and Mapping their Ionized Hydrogen with MOSAIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallmen, Shauna; Korpela, E. J.; Baldwin, B.; Willcutt, A.; Grunwald, K.; Vaughan, P.; Douglas, K.

    2009-05-01

    The Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) exhibits a complex set of interacting structures driven by stellar winds and supernova explosions. Shells and other features are evidence of how energy and matter released by stars are redistributed throughout the Universe, resulting in the formation of new generations of stars. Models of the ISM remain incomplete, but detailed study of the interactions of particular supernova remnants with their environment will improve our understanding of the overall processes in the ISM. Specifically, observing expanding shells of supernova remnants at various wavelengths gives us a picture of the gas at various temperatures and physical conditions. The first step is identifying neutral hydrogen (HI) shells which have been previously neglected. Older shells exhibiting little expansion or with broken outlines are missed in most computer-based searches. The human eye is better at searching for such large, irregular features. We have examined the SETHI database, searching for shell-like structures. This is a particularly rich resource (angular resolution 0.03°, velocity resolution 1.5 km/s) not yet utilized to its full potential. We present the current status of our search for shells. We also present a high resolution H-α map of one shell found this way, and compare to the HI data. Data of the shell at (l,b) (56. 5°, -5.5°) were taken at the Kitt Peak National Observatory using the WIYN 0.9-m telescope utilizing the MOSAIC camera. Individual images were corrected for instrumental effects and stacked into a single map of ionized hydrogen in the shell. In general, H-α emissions are strongest in the regions where there exist gaps in the HI wall of the shell, indicating warm gas in this region has not yet cooled. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST/RUI-0507326, AST-0307596, and AST-0709347, Research Corporation award CC6476/6255, and a WSGC seed grant.

  14. Quantum Sticking of Atomic Hydrogen to Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanting; Doherty, Adam; Geragotelis, Andrew; Clougherty, Dennis

    2013-03-01

    We consider the low-energy behavior of the sticking probability of atomic hydrogen to suspended graphene. For energy transfer through the flexural modes of graphene, we find that the inelastic coupling falls in the subOhmic regime. Thus the effects of low-frequency fluctuations of the graphene sheet are crucially important for quantum sticking. We analytically solve for the low-energy asymptotic behavior of the sticking coefficient using a variational mean-field method [D.P. Clougherty and Y. Zhang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 120401 (2012)]. We find that as a result of strong coupling to the low-frequency flexural modes of graphene, a new scaling law results. For suspended graphene at finite temperature, we find that at a critical incident energy, the sticking probability drops discontinuously; below this critical energy, the sticking probability is suppressed by the orthogonality catastrophe. We compare our nonperturbative variational results to those obtained by using Fermi's golden rule. We gratefully acknowledge support by the National Science Foundation under DMR-1062966.

  15. The one-dimensional hydrogen atom revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, G.; Raff, U.

    2006-09-01

    The one-dimensional Schrodinger hydrogen atom is an interesting mathematical and physical problem for the study of bound states, eigenfunctions, and quantum-degeneracy issues. This one-dimensional physical system has given rise to some intriguing controversy for more than four decades. Presently, still no definite consensus seems to have been reached. We reanalyzed this apparently controversial problem, approaching it from a Fourier-transform representation method combined with some fundamental (basic) ideas found in self-adjoint extensions of symmetric operators. In disagreement with some previous claims, we found that the complete Balmer energy spectrum is obtained together with an odd-parity set of eigenfunctions. Closed-form solutions in both coordinate and momentum spaces were obtained. No twofold degeneracy was observed as predicted by the degeneracy theorem in one dimension, though it does not necessarily have to hold for potentials with singularities. No ground state with infinite energy exists since the corresponding eigenfunction does not satisfy the Schrodinger equation at the origin.

  16. Effects of hydrogen atoms on surface conductivity of diamond film

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fengbin Cui, Yan; Qu, Min; Di, Jiejian

    2015-04-15

    To investigate the effects of surface chemisorbed hydrogen atoms and hydrogen atoms in the subsurface region of diamond on surface conductivity, models of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on diamond with (100) orientation and various concentrations of hydrogen atoms in the subsurface layer of the diamond were built. By using the first-principles method based on density functional theory, the equilibrium geometries and densities of states of the models were studied. The results showed that the surface chemisorbed hydrogen alone could not induce high surface conductivity. In addition, isolated hydrogen atoms in the subsurface layer of the diamond prefer to exist at the bond centre site of the C-C bond. However, such a structure would induce deep localized states, which could not improve the surface conductivity. When the hydrogen concentration increases, the C-H-C-H structure and C-3H{sub bc}-C structure in the subsurface region are more stable than other configurations. The former is not beneficial to the increase of the surface conductivity. However, the latter would induce strong surface states near the Fermi level, which would give rise to high surface conductivity. Thus, a high concentration of subsurface hydrogen atoms in diamond would make significant contributions to surface conductivity.

  17. Surface production of H(-) ions by hyperthermal hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Brian S.; Seidl, M.

    1992-12-01

    Hyperthermal atomic hydrogen of energy in the range of 1-10 eV has been produced by electron impact dissociation in a CW 2.45 GHz microwave electron cyclotron resonance discharge using a Lisitano-Coil (Lisitano, 1970). The flux and the energy of the hydrogen atoms have been measured by negative surface ionization of the atoms backscattered from pure and cesiated metal surfaces. A hyperthermal atomic hydrogen flux density equivalent to more than 0.5 A/sq cm and a temperature of about 5 eV has been produced for 420 W discharge power under CW condition. These hydrogen atoms can be directed onto an external converter located outside the discharge. This opens up new possibilities for H(-) ion source design.

  18. Surface characterization of silica glass substrates treated by atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Hiroyuki; Masuno, Atsunobu; Ishibashi, Keiji; Tawarayama, Hiromasa; Zhang, Yingjiu; Utsuno, Futoshi; Koya, Kazuo; Fujinoki, Akira; Kawazoe, Hiroshi

    2013-12-15

    Silica glass substrates with very flat surfaces were exposed to atomic hydrogen at different temperatures and durations. An atomic force microscope was used to measure root-mean-square (RMS) roughness and two-dimensional power spectral density (PSD). In the treatment with atomic hydrogen up to 900 °C, there was no significant change in the surface. By the treatment at 1000 °C, the changes in the RMS roughness and the PSD curves were observed. It was suggested that these changes were caused by etching due to reactions of atomic hydrogen with surface silica. By analysis based on the k-correlation model, it was found that the spatial frequency of the asperities became higher with an increase of the treatment time. Furthermore, the data showed that atomic hydrogen can flatten silica glass surfaces by controlling heat-treatment conditions. - Highlights: • Silica glass surface was treated by atomic hydrogen at various temperatures. • Surface roughness was measured by an atomic force microscope. • Roughness data were analyzed by two-dimensional power spectral density. • Atomic hydrogen can flatten silica glass surfaces.

  19. VARIATIONS IN THE HELIOSPHERIC POLAR ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM FLUX OBSERVED BY THE INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER

    SciTech Connect

    Reisenfeld, D. B.; Janzen, P. H.; Allegrini, F.; McComas, D. J. E-mail: paul.janzen@umontana.edu E-mail: dmccomas@swri.org; and others

    2012-03-10

    The ecliptic poles are observed continuously by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX); thus, it is possible to discern temporal variations in the energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) from the outer heliosphere on timescales much shorter than the time it takes for IBEX to generate a full sky map (six months). Observations indicate that the ENA flux from the polar directions incident at Earth has been steadily decreasing for the two-year period from 2008 December through 2011 February. Over the IBEX-Hi energy range, the decrease in flux is energy dependent, varying at the south ecliptic pole from no drop at 0.71 keV, to 70% at 1.1 keV. At higher energies the drop ranges between 10% and 50%. The decline observed at the north ecliptic pole is as high as 48%, also at 1.1 keV. The trend correlates with the steady decline in solar wind dynamic pressure observed at 1 AU between 2005 and 2009, the likely period when solar wind protons that provide the source for ENAs observed by IBEX would have been outbound from the Sun. We propose a method by which the correlation between the 1 AU solar wind dynamic pressure and the ENA-derived pressure within the inner heliosheath (IHS) can be used to estimate the distance to the termination shock and the thickness of the IHS in the direction of the ecliptic poles. Our new analysis based on IBEX data shows the TS distances to be 110 AU and 134 AU at the south and north poles, respectively, and the corresponding IHS thicknesses to be 55 AU and 82 AU. Our analysis is consistent with the notion that the observed ENA fluxes originate in the IHS and their variations are driven by the solar wind as it evolves through the solar cycle.

  20. Latitudinal and Energy Dependence of Energetic Neutral Atom Spectral Indices Measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, M. I.; Allegrini, F.; Dayeh, M. A.; Funsten, H.; Heerikhuisen, J.; McComas, D. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Pogorelov, N.; Schwadron, N. A.; Zank, G. P.; Zirnstein, E. J.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the latitudinal and energy dependence of the globally distributed 0.5-6 keV energetic neutral atom (ENA) spectra measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) during the first 3 yrs of the mission. Our results are: (1) the ENA spectral indices at the two lowest energies (0.89 and 1.47 keV) exhibit no clear trend with ecliptic latitude θ, while those at ˜2.29 and ˜3.41 keV exhibit a clear latitudinal pattern; flatter spectra occur above 60° latitude and steeper spectra occur ±30° of the equator. (2) The latitudinal dependence of the spectral indices at different energies can be represented by the cosine function γ ={{a}0}+{{a}1}cos ({{a}2}θ ) with unique offsets, amplitudes, and phase angles; the higher energy ENA indices transition to successively larger amplitudes within ±45° of the equator. Our results confirm the previously reported latitudinal organization of the ENA spectra and their remarkable similarity to that of the solar wind (SW) speed observed by Ulysses in the inner heliosphere. While earlier studies showed that the ˜0.5-6 keV globally distributed ENA spectral indices could be represented as single power laws over much of the sky, our new results indicate that this is an over-simplification because the spectral indices have an energy and latitude dependence. This dependence is an important factor that must be taken into consideration by models and simulations that seek to map the IBEX ENA observations back to the latitudinal profile of the SW speed structure observed in the inner heliosphere.

  1. Hydrogen atom as a four-dimensional oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A.C.

    1980-08-01

    A coordinate transformation which exhibits the rotational invariance of the hydrogen atom in four-dimensional Hilbert space is introduced. The coordinates are shown to be directly related to the spherical polar and parabolic coordinates in position space. With the use of the transformation, the Schroedinger equation for the hydrogen atom left-multiplied by 4r is transformed into one for a four-dimensional harmonic oscillator. Solutions are obtained and related to the hydrogenic wave functions. Group-theoretical implications of the transformation and its application to the hydrogen Stark problem are briefly discussed.

  2. Parity nonconservation in the hydrogen atom

    SciTech Connect

    Chupp, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    The development of experiments to detect parity nonconserving (PNC) mixing of the 2s/sub 1///sub 2/ and 2p/sub 1///sub 2/ levels of the hydrogen atom in a 570 Gauss magnetic field is described. The technique involves observation of an asymmetry in the rate of microwave induced transitions at 1608 MHz due to the interference of two amplitudes, one produced by applied microwave and static electric fields and the other produced by an applied microwave field and the 2s/sub 1///sub 2/ - 2p/sub 1///sub 2/ mixing induced by a PNC Hamiltonian. These investigations, underway since 1977, have led to an experiment in which the two amplitudes are produced in two independently phased microwave cavities. The apparatus has the great advantage that all applied fields are cylindrically symmetric, thus false PNC effects can be generated only by departures from cylindrical symmetry which enter as the product of two small misalignment angles. The apparatus also has great diagnostic power since the sectioned microwave cavities can be used to produce static electric fields over short, well localized regions of space. This permits alignment of the apparatus and provides a sensitive probe of cylindrical symmetry. A phase regulation loop greatly reduces phase noise due to instabilities of the magnetic field, microwave generators, and resonant cavities. A preliminary measurement following alignment of the apparatus sets an upper limit of 575 on the parameter C/sub 2/p, which gives the strength of the PNC-induced mixing of the ..beta../sub 0/ (2s/sub 1///sub 2/) and e/sub 0/ (2p/sub 1///sub 2/) states. The prediction of the standard model, including radiative corrections, is C/sub 2/p = 0.08 +/- 0.037.

  3. Interstellar Grain Surface Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Chemistry on grain surfaces plays an Important role in the formation of interstellar Ices, It can also influence the composition of the gas phase through outgassing near luminous, newly formed stars. This paper reviews the chemical processes taking place on Interstellar grain surfaces with the emphasis on those transforming CO into other hydrocarbons. At low, molecular cloud temperatures (approximately equal to 10K), physisorption processes dominate interstellar grain surface chemistry and GO is largely hydrogenated through reactions with atomic H and oxidized through reactions with atomic O. The former will lead to the formation of H2CO and CH3OH ices, while the latter results in CO2 ice. The observational evidence for these ices in molecular clouds will be discussed. Very close to protostars, the gas and grain temperatures are much higher (approximately equal to 500K) and chemisorption processes, including catalytic surface reactions, becomes important. This will be illustrated based upon our studies of the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis of CH4 from CO on metallic surfaces. Likely, this process has played an important role in the early solar nebula. Observational consequences will be pointed out.

  4. Muon transfer from hot muonic hydrogen atoms to neon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R. . Inst. de Physique); Bailey, J.M. ); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. ); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. ); Huber, T.M. ); Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J.

    1992-01-01

    A negative muon beam has been directed on adjacent solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Three targets differing by their deuterium concentration were investigated. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. The time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law with a disappearance rate corresponding to the one of [mu][sup [minus]p] atoms in each target. The rates [lambda][sub pp[mu

  5. Atomic hydrogen and nitrogen distributions from atmosphere explorer measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breig, Edward L.

    1992-01-01

    We were selective as to our approach to research activities, and devoted primary attention to two investigations concerning the global behavior of atomic hydrogen in the Earth's upper atmosphere. We derive the thermospheric concentration of H by applying the condition of charge-exchange equilibrium between hydrogen and oxygen atoms and ions to in-situ measurements of F-region composition and temperature from the series of Atmosphere Explorer (AE) aeronomy satellites. Progress and accomplishments on these chosen research projects are summarized.

  6. MOBILE SOURCE NOX MONITOR, HYDROGEN-ATOM DIRECT CHEMILUMINESCENCE METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analyzer was developed for measuring motor vehicle NOx (NO and NO2) emissions based on the chemiluminescence reaction of NO and NO2 with hydrogen atoms. This eliminated the need for an NO2 to NO converter as required with ozone chemiluminescence for NOx analysis. The hydrogen-...

  7. Discovery of a shell of neutral atomic hydrogen surrounding the carbon star IRC+10216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, L. D.; Gérard, E.; Le Bertre, T.

    2015-05-01

    We have used the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope to perform the most sensitive search to date for neutral atomic hydrogen (H I) in the circumstellar envelope (CSE) of the carbon star IRC+10216. Our observations have uncovered a low surface brightness H I shell of diameter ˜1300 arcsec (˜0.8 pc), centred on IRC+10216. The H I shell has an angular extent comparable to the far ultraviolet-emitting astrosphere of IRC+10216 previously detected with the GALEX satellite, and its kinematics are consistent with circumstellar matter that has been decelerated by the local interstellar medium. The shell appears to completely surround the star, but the highest H I column densities are measured along the leading edge of the shell, near the location of a previously identified bow shock. We estimate a total mass of atomic hydrogen associated with the IRC+10216 CSE of M_{H I} ˜ 3× 10^{-3} M_{⊙}. This is only a small fraction of the expected total mass of the CSE (<1 per cent) and is consistent with the bulk of the stellar wind originating in molecular rather than atomic form, as expected for a cool star with an effective temperature Teff ≲ 2200 K. H I mapping of a 2° × 2° region surrounding IRC+10216 has also allowed us to characterize the line-of-sight interstellar emission in the region and has uncovered a link between diffuse FUV emission south-west of IRC+10216 and the Local Leo Cold Cloud.

  8. Topics in atomic hydrogen standard research and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.

    1971-01-01

    Hydrogen maser based frequency and time standards have been in continuous use at NASA tracking stations since February 1970, while laboratory work at Goddard has continued in the further development and improvement of hydrogen masers. Concurrently, experimental work has been in progress with a new frequency standard based upon the hydrogen atom using the molecular beam magnetic resonance method. Much of the hydrogen maser technology is directly applicable to the new hydrogen beam standard, and calculations based upon realistic data indicate that the accuracy potential of the hydrogen atomic beam exceeds that of either the cesium beam tube or the hydrogen maser, possibly by several orders of magnitude. In addition, with successful development, the hydrogen beam standard will have several other performance advantages over other devices, particularly exceptional stability and long continuous operating life. Experimental work with a new laboratory hydrogen beam device has recently resulted in the first resonance transition curves, measurements of relative state populations, beam intensities, etc. The most important aspects of both the hydrogen maser and the hydrogen beam work are covered.

  9. Surface Production of Hydride Ions by Backscattering Hyperthermal Hydrogen Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Brian Seungwhan

    The thesis experimentally demonstrates the surface production of H^- ions by backscattering hyperthermal hydrogen atoms of energy 1-10 eV from clean molybdenum and cesiated molybdenum surfaces. Hyperthermal hydrogen atoms are produced by electron impact dissociation through Frank-Condon excitation process in a hydrogen plasma. Theoretical calculations of the hyperthermal hydrogen atom flux density in various plasmas are made by using particle balance equations. A Lisitano-Coil interdigital slow wave structure is used for plasma production. The efficient production of hyperthermal hydrogen atoms by electron impact dissociation makes the discharge source an excellent source of hyperthermal hydrogen atom beams. The total H^- ion yield, which is the ratio of the H^- ion flux density to the atom flux density, is estimated taking a Maxwellian beam distribution and a cosine angular scattering distribution of H atoms on the basis of theoretical calculation of surface charge transfer probability. More than 20% of total H^- ion yield is expected for atomic hydrogen beams of a few eV temperature from cesiated metal surfaces with an extraction electric field of thousands Volts/cm. The abundant presence of hyperthermal hydrogen atoms and the high H^- ion yield suggest that major parts of H^ - ions in most H^- ion sources are produced by the surface process by backscattering hyperthermal hydrogen atoms from cesiated walls. H^ - ions produced on external converter surfaces, located outside the plasma, are analyzed by magnetic spectroscopy developed for this purpose. The measured parallel energy distribution of H^- ions follows a Maxwellian with temperature of a few eV. Several experimental results of parallel energy distributions are obtained for different operating conditions. Experimental data on production of H^ - ions from clean molybdenum and cesiated molybdenum converter surfaces as functions of discharge power and H_2 gas flow rate for several operating modes are presented

  10. Absolute frequency of an atomic hydrogen maser clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Hall, R. G.; Percival, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    An accurate determination was made of the unperturbed atomic hydrogen ground state hyperfine transition frequency (F=1,m=0 - F=0,m=0) in reference to present world wide realizations of internationally defined time interval. In relation to the international atomic time system, the composite value is 1,420,405,751.7755 plus or minus 0.0031 HZ.

  11. Influence of probe contamination on recombination of atomic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, L. W.; Downs, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen concentration profiles were measured through a screen-stabilized one-dimensional propane/oxygen front using a specially modified electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer. The ESR line occurring at 3075.5 G at 9261.2 MHz was monitored in the presence and absence of various halogenated hydrocarbons. A significant cumulative decrease in peak intensity occurred with addition of any halogenated compound. Further results suggest that the effect is due to inhibitor action on the transport tube walls followed by changes in atomic hydrogen interaction with the walls, and that hydrogen decay is nonlinear in the halogenated tube.

  12. Concerted hydrogen atom exchange between three HF molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komornicki, Andrew; Dixon, David A.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1992-01-01

    The termolecular reaction involving concerted hydrogen-atom exchange between three HF molecules was investigated with particular attention given to the effects of correlation at the various stationary points along the reaction. Using large segmented Gaussian basis sets to locate the (HF)3 stationary points at the SCF level, the geometries of the stable hydrogen-bonded trimer, which is of C(3h) symmetry, were located, together with the transition state for hydrogen exchange, which is of D(3h) symmetry. Then, using a large atomic natural orbital basis and correlating all valence electrons, the energetics of the exchange reaction were evaluated at the correlated level.

  13. Modeling atomic hydrogen diffusion in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagadei, Valerii A.; Nefyodtsev, E.

    2004-05-01

    The hydrogen diffusion model in GaAs in conditions of an intense flow of penetrating atoms has been developed. It is shown that the formation undersurface diffusion barrier layer from immobile interstitial molecules of hydrogen reduce probability of atoms penetration into crystal and rate of their diffusion in GaAs, and influence on the process of shallow- and/or deep-centers passivation. It is exhibited that the influence of diffusion barrier should be taken into account at optimum mode selection of GaAs structure hydrogenation.

  14. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen and the Proton Size Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udem, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Precise determination of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference. A recent measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct. We hope to contribute to the resolution of this so called `proton size puzzle' by providing additional experimental input from the hydrogen side.

  15. The interstellar deuterium-to-hydrogen ratio - A reevaluation of Lyman absorption-line measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccullough, Peter R.

    1992-01-01

    The D/H ratio in the local interstellar medium is evaluated based upon previously published measurements of Lyman absorption lines together with the hypothesis that the D/H ratio is constant. A unique value for the D/H ratio of 1.5 (+/- 0.2) x 10 exp -5 by number is shown to be consistent with all published determinations made with the Copernicus and the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellites. The possibility that the D/H ratio may vary substantially in the local interstellar medium is considered and found to be unnecessary.

  16. Atomic Diffusion in Solid Molecular Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Belonoshko, Anatoly B.; Ramzan, Muhammad; Mao, Ho-kwang; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2013-01-01

    We performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of the C2c and Cmca-12 phases of hydrogen at pressures from 210 to 350 GPa. These phases were predicted to be stable at 0 K and pressures above 200 GPa. However, systematic studies of temperature impact on properties of these phases have not been performed so far. Filling this gap, we observed that on temperature increase diffusion sets in the Cmca-12 phase, being absent in C2c. We explored the mechanism of diffusion and computed melting curve of hydrogen at extreme pressures. The results suggest that the recent experiments claiming conductive hydrogen at the pressure around 260 GPa and ambient temperature might be explained by the diffusion. The diffusion might also be the reason for the difference in Raman spectra obtained in recent experiments. PMID:23902995

  17. Interstellar Hydrogen Fluxes Measured by IBEX-Lo in 2009: Numerical Modeling and Comparison with the Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katushkina, O. A.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Alexashov, D. B.; Schwadron, N. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we perform numerical modeling of the interstellar hydrogen fluxes measured by IBEX-Lo during orbit 23 (spring 2009) using a state-of-the-art kinetic model of the interstellar neutral hydrogen distribution in the heliosphere. This model takes into account the temporal and heliolatitudinal variations of the solar parameters as well as the non-Maxwellian kinetic properties of the hydrogen distribution due to charge exchange in the heliospheric interface. We found that there is a qualitative difference between the IBEX-Lo data and the modeling results obtained with the three-dimensional, time-dependent model. Namely, the model predicts a larger count rate in energy bin 2 (20-41 eV) than in energy bin 1 (11-21 eV), while the data shows the opposite case. We perform study of the model parameter effects on the IBEX-Lo fluxes and the ratio of fluxes in two energy channels. We show that the most important parameter, which has a major influence on the ratio of the fluxes in the two energy bins, is the solar radiation pressure. The parameter fitting procedure shows that the best agreement between the model result and the data occurs when the ratio of the solar radiation pressure to the solar gravitation, μ0, is {1.26}-0.076+0.06, and the total ionization rate of hydrogen at 1 AU is {β }E,0={3.7}-0.35+0.39× {10}-7 s-1. We have found that the value of μ0 is much larger than μ0 = 0.89, which is the value derived from the integrated solar Lyα flux data for the period of time studied. We discuss possible reasons for the differences.

  18. Cold atomic hydrogen in the inner galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, J. M.; Garwood, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The VLA is used to measure 21 cm absorption in directions with the absolute value of b less than 1 deg., the absolute value of 1 less than 25 deg. to probe the cool atomic gas in the inner galaxy. Abundant H I absorption is detected; typical lines are deep and narrow, sometimes blending in velocity with adjacent features. Unlike 21 cm emission not all allowed velocities are covered: large portions of the l-v diagram are optically thin. Although not similar to H I emission, the absorption shows a striking correspondence with CO emission in the inner galaxy: essentially every strong feature detected in one survey is seen in the other. The provisional conclusion is that in the inner galaxy most cool atomic gas is associated with molecular cloud complexes. There are few or no cold atomic clouds devoid of molecules in the inner galaxy, although these are common in the outer galaxy.

  19. Atomic hydrogen on Mars - Measurements at solar minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Mcdougal, D. S.; Anderson, D. E., Jr.; Barker, E. S.

    1978-01-01

    The Copernicus Orbiting Astronomical Observatory was used to obtain measurements of Mars Lyman-alpha (1215.671-angstrom) emission at the solar minimum, which has resulted in the first information on atomic hydrogen concentrations in the upper atmosphere of Mars at the solar minimum. The Copernicus measurements, coupled with the Viking in situ measurements of the temperature (170 plus or minus 30 K) of the upper atmosphere of Mars, indicate that the atomic hydrogen number density at the exobase of Mars (250 kilometers) is about 60 times greater than that deduced from Mariner 6 and 7 Lyman-alpha measurements obtained during a period of high solar activity. The Copernicus results are consistent with Hunten's hypothesis of the diffusion-limited escape of atomic hydrogen from Mars.

  20. Thermochemical nonequilibrium in atomic hydrogen at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    A numerical study of the nonequilibrium flow of atomic hydrogen in a cascade arc was performed to obtain insight into the physics of the hydrogen cascade arc. A rigorous mathematical model of the flow problem was formulated, incorporating the important nonequilibrium transport phenomena and atomic processes which occur in atomic hydrogen. Realistic boundary conditions, including consideration of the wall electrostatic sheath phenomenon, were included in the model. The governing equations of the asymptotic region of the cascade arc were obtained by writing conservation of mass and energy equations for the electron subgas, an energy conservation equation for heavy particles and an equation of state. Finite-difference operators for variable grid spacing were applied to the governing equations and the resulting system of strongly coupled, stiff equations were solved numerically by the Newton-Raphson method.

  1. Observations of interstellar chlorine and phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; York, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    Copernicus observations of interstellar Cl I, Cl II, and P II UV lines toward 10 stars are reported. Column densities are estimated for each species, and upper limits are computed for HCl column densities. Derivation of the gas-phase abundances of chlorine and phosphorus indicates that the averages of both the chlorine and the phosphorus logarithmic abundances relative to hydrogen are between 5.0 and 5.1. It is suggested that interstellar chlorine may be depleted by about a factor of 3 relative to the solar abundance and that interstellar phosphorus is depleted by a factor of 2 to 3. The results are shown to support the prediction that chlorine is ionized in regions containing primarily atomic oxygen and is neutral in regions where there is a significant amount of molecular hydrogen. The photoionization rate of neutral chlorine toward 15 Mon is estimated, and it is concluded that most chlorine is contained within the gas phase.

  2. Multiple scattering and charged-particle - hydrogen-atom collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, V.; Thomas, B. K.

    1979-01-01

    Glauber-approximation scattering amplitudes for charged-particle - hydrogen-atom elastic and inelastic collisions are derived directly in terms of the known particle-electron and particle-proton Coulomb scattering amplitudes and the known hydrogen-atom form factors. It is shown that the particle-hydrogen amplitude contains no single-scattering term. The double-scattering term is obtained as a two-dimensional integral in momentum space. It is demonstrated how the result can be used as the starting point for an alternative and relatively simple derivation, in closed form, of the Glauber particle-hydrogen scattering amplitude for transitions from the ground state to an arbitrary (nlm) state.

  3. Proton form factor effects in hydrogenic atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Daza, F. Garcia; Kelkar, N. G.; Nowakowski, M.

    2011-10-21

    The proton structure corrections to the hyperfine splittings in electronic and muonic hydrogen are evaluated using the Breit potential with electromagnetic form factors. In contrast to other methods, the Breit equation with q{sup 2} dependent form factors is just an extension of the standard Breit equation which gives the hyperfine splitting Hamiltonian. Precise QED corrections are comparable to the structure corrections which therefore need to be evaluated ab initio.

  4. Atomic hydrogen distribution. [in Titan atmospheric model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabarie, N.

    1974-01-01

    Several possible H2 vertical distributions in Titan's atmosphere are considered with the constraint of 5 km-A a total quantity. Approximative calculations show that hydrogen distribution is quite sensitive to two other parameters of Titan's atmosphere: the temperature and the presence of other constituents. The escape fluxes of H and H2 are also estimated as well as the consequent distributions trapped in the Saturnian system.

  5. The galactic distribution (in radius and Z) of interstellar molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoville, N. Z.; Solomon, P. M.; Sanders, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    Observations of the galactic longitude and latitude distributions of lambda = 2.6 mm CO emission are presented. Analysis of these spectral-line data yields the large-scale distribution of molecular clouds in the galactic disk and their z-distribution out of the disk. Strong maxima in the number of molecular clouds occur in the galactic nucleus and at galactic radii 4 to 8 kpc. The peak at 4 to 8 kpc correlates well with a region of enhanced 100-MeV gamma-ray emissivity. This correlation strongly supports the conclusion that the gamma-rays are produced as a result of cosmic ray interactions in molecular H2 clouds rather than in H(I). The width of the cloud layer perpendicular to the galactic plane between half-density points is 105 plus or minus 15 pc near the 5.5-kpc peak. The total mass of molecular gas in the interior of the galaxy exceeds that of atomic hydrogen and is 30 to the 9th power solar mass based on these observations.

  6. Michigan ultra-cold polarized atomic hydrogen jet target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, B. B.; Gladycheva, S. E.; Kageya, T.; Kantsyrev, D. Yu.; Krisch, A. D.; Luppov, V. G.; Morozov, V. S.; Murray, J. R.; Raymond, R. S.; Borisov, N. S.; Fimushkin, V. V.; Grishin, V. N.; Mysnik, A. I.; Kleppner, D.

    2001-06-01

    To study spin effects in high energy collisions, we are developing an ultra-cold high-density jet target of proton-spin-polarized hydrogen atoms. The target uses a 12 Tesla magnetic field and a 0.3 K separation cell coated with superfluid helium-4 to produce a slow monochromatic electron-spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam, which is then focused by a superconducting sextupole into the interaction region. In recent tests, we studied a polarized beam of hydrogen atoms focused by the superconducting sextupole into a compression tube detector, which measured the polarized atoms' intensity. The Jet produced, at the detector, a spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam with a measured intensity of about 2.8.1015 H s-1 and a FWHM area of less than 0.13 cm2. This intensity corresponds to a free jet density of about 1.1012 H cm-3 with a proton polarization of about 50%. When the transition RF unit is installed, we expect a proton polarization higher than 90%. .

  7. Solar wind/local interstellar medium interaction including charge exchange with neural hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauls, H. Louis; Zank, Gary P.

    1995-01-01

    We present results from a hydrodynamic model of the interaction of the solar wind with the local interstellar medium (LISM), self-consistently taking into account the effects of charge exchange between the plasma component and the interstellar neutrals. The simulation is fully time dependent, and is carried out in two or three dimensions, depending on whether the helio-latitudinal dependence of the solar wind speed and number density (both giving rise to three dimensional effects) are included. As a first approximation it is assumed that the neutral component of the flow can be described by a single, isotropic fluid. Clearly, this is not the actual situation, since charge exchange with the supersonic solar wind plasma in the region of the nose results in a 'second' neutral fluid propagating in the opposite direction as that of the LISM neutrals.

  8. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H. Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-04-08

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure.

  9. Photoionization of atoms and molecules. [of hydrogen, helium, and xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.

    1976-01-01

    A literature review on the present state of knowledge in photoionization is presented. Various experimental techniques that have been developed to study photoionization, such as fluorescence and photoelectron spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, are examined. Various atoms and molecules were chosen to illustrate these techniques, specifically helium and xenon atoms and hydrogen molecules. Specialized photoionization such as in positive and negative ions, excited states, and free radicals is also treated. Absorption cross sections and ionization potentials are also discussed.

  10. Evolution of energetic neutral atom spectra as measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer during its first seven years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayeh, Maher A.; Heerikhuisen, Jacob; McComas, David; Schwadron, Nathan; Desai, Mihir; Zirnstein, Eric J.

    2016-07-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission continues to provide remote Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) measurements produced by charge exchange between energetic protons and interstellar neutrals at the edge of our heliosphere. Using the first seven years of IBEX-Hi ENA measurements (January 2009 through December 2015), we examine the evolution of the spectral slopes in four different energy bands, namely, ˜0.7-1.1 keV, ˜1.1-1.7 keV, ˜1.7-2.7 keV, and ˜2.7-4.3 keV, across different regions of the sky. Results show that spectral slopes at each energy band are characterized with unique distribution properties (e.g., width, shape, and mode), which vary in time at different rates and in both directions (distribution modes increase or decrease). We attempt to explain these results in context of ENA source regions, solar wind temporal variations, and changes in the heliosheath thickness and its plasma properties. These results provide insights into ENA production mechanisms, properties of their plasma progenitors, and how they relate to changes in the solar wind.

  11. Hydrogen bonding tunes the early stage of hydrogen-atom abstracting reaction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Lei; Chen, Junsheng; Han, Keli

    2014-09-01

    The spontaneous and collision-assisted hydrogen-atom abstracting reaction (HA) dynamics of triplet benzil are investigated through the combination of transient absorption spectroscopy with TD-DFT calculations. HA dynamics exhibit a remarkable dependence on the hydrogen donor properties. The effects of the triplet-state hydrogen bonding on the reaction dynamics are illustrated. In particular, it is experimentally observed that strengthened triplet-state hydrogen bonding could accelerate the HA, whereas weakened triplet-state hydrogen bonding would postpone the HA. The triplet-state hydrogen bonding has great influences on the early stage of the HA reaction, while the bond dissociation energy of the hydrogen donors determines the subsequent reaction pathways. Protic solvents could sustain longer lifetimes of the excited-state intermediate formed after HA than non-protic solvents by 10 μs. This investigation provides insights into the HA dynamics and guidance to improve the product efficiency of photochemical reactions. PMID:25036436

  12. Research Toward Laser Spectroscopy of Trapped Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Jon Carl

    An apparatus has been designed and constructed to perform laser spectroscopy on magnetically trapped atomic hydrogen. Earlier experiments demonstrated the feasibility of magnetic trapping and evaporative cooling of atomic hydrogen. The current apparatus has been designed to explore two areas of research: high resolution laser spectroscopy of hydrogen, and the possible production and detection of Bose condensation. The 1S{-}2S two-photon transition was chosen for study because of its extremely narrow natural linewidth. The techniques developed here should ultimately permit laser spectroscopy with a resolution approaching 1 part in 10^{15 } and should be well suited to the detection of Bose condensation. The apparatus consists of two subsystems: a cryogenic apparatus for magnetically trapping hydrogen, and a laser source for producing the ultraviolet light necessary to excite the 1S{-}2S transition. The two subsystems have independently demonstrated exceptional performance. The magnetic trap has produced gas densities approaching 10^{14} cm ^{-3} at temperatures as low as 100 muK, the closest approach to Bose condensation achieved to date with atomic hydrogen. The continuous wave laser source has produced 20 mW of 243 nm light with an estimated spectral linewidth of 2 kHz. The optimum experimental conditions for excitation and detection of the 1S{-}2S transition in trapped hydrogen have been identified. Initial trials with the apparatus revealed an unexpected operational problem, however several strategies have been proposed that should allow observation of the transition. The expected features of the 1S{-}2S transition lineshape with magnetically trapped hydrogen have been calculated. The possibilities for future research with laser spectroscopy of magnetically trapped hydrogen are described, and a promising strategy for the detection of Bose condensation is proposed. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551 Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617

  13. Laboratory simulations of chemical reactions on dust grains in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roser, Joseph E.

    Dust grains exert a major influence upon the chemical composition of the interstellar medium: photoelectrons emitted from the dust grains are the primary energy source for heating interstellar gas, dust grains in dense molecular clouds can accumulate layers of frozen interstellar gases that participate in solid phase chemical reactions, and the most abundant molecule in the Universe, molecular hydrogen, primarily forms from hydrogen atoms adsorbed onto grain surfaces. Molecular hydrogen influences the evolution of molecular clouds by acting as a coolant during the gravitational collapse of the cloud and serving as a precursor for the formation of many molecular species. A complete description of molecular hydrogen formation in molecular clouds requires an understanding of the efficiency of hydrogen atom recombination on ice surfaces. Observations of interstellar carbon dioxide ice have the potential for serving as a diagnostic sign of the evolution of interstellar ice layers but require a satisfactory explanation of the formation mechanisms of interstellar CO 2 . This work describes a series of investigations that were designed to study the properties of interstellar dust grains and to obtain and analyze data for astrophysically important chemical reactions. We measured the recombination efficiency of H atoms on the surface of amorphous H 2 O ices and measured the kinetics of H 2 formation and desorption on different morphologies of ice substrate. We demonstrated that the hydrogen atom recombination kinetics depend upon the morphology of the ice layer and that the recombination efficiency is consistent with observations of molecular clouds. We also demonstrated that CO and O can be trapped within an amorphous H 2 O ice layer at temperatures greater than their sublimation temperatures and that the reaction CO (ads) + O (ads) [arrow right] CO 2,(ads) can produce appreciable amounts of CO2 within an interstellar ice layer in the absence of ultraviolet or cosmic

  14. The effects of newly measured cross sections in hydrogen on the production of secondary nuclei during the propagation of cosmic rays through interstellar H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webber, W. R.; Gupta, M.; Koch-Miramond, L.; Masse, P.

    1985-01-01

    The cross sections of six important cosmic ray source nuclei in hydrogen at several energies between 300 and 1800 MeV/nuc were measured. Significant differences, sometimes exceeding 50%, exist between these new measurements and the earlier semiempirical predictions, and a new set of semiempirical formulae are being determined that better describe this fragmentation. New cross sections were obtained so that the systematics of their effects on cosmic ray propagation through interstellar hydrogen can be examined.

  15. Triggered energy releases in solid hydrogen hosts containing unpaired atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, G.W.; Fearon, E.M.; Maienschein, J.L.; Mapoles, E.R.; Tsugawa, R.T.; Souers, P.C. ); Gaines, J.R. )

    1990-07-23

    We have observed both triggered and spontaneous energy releases in tritiated solid hydrogens at temperatures above 1.2 K in several different experiments. These energy releases, which can be triggered by a temperature increase, were observed by monitoring the temperature excursion ( heat spike'') versus time, the atom spin density, and nuclear-magnetic-resonance signal heights. The heat spikes correlate with a disappearance of free-atom spin density so that fast atomic recombination is the probable cause. The spontaneous heat spikes may be suppressed by improved heat extraction.

  16. Variational Perturbation Treatment of the Confined Hydrogen Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, H. E., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The Schrodinger equation for the ground state of a hydrogen atom confined at the centre of an impenetrable cavity is treated using variational perturbation theory. Energies calculated from variational perturbation theory are comparable in accuracy to the results from a direct numerical solution. The goal of this exercise is to introduce the…

  17. Quantum-Classical Connection for Hydrogen Atom-Like Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syam, Debapriyo; Roy, Arup

    2011-01-01

    The Bohr-Sommerfeld quantum theory specifies the rules of quantization for circular and elliptical orbits for a one-electron hydrogen atom-like system. This article illustrates how a formula connecting the principal quantum number "n" and the length of the major axis of an elliptical orbit may be arrived at starting from the quantum…

  18. Modelling spectral properties of non-equilibrium atomic hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ammando, G.; Pietanza, L. D.; Colonna, G.; Longo, S.; Capitelli, M.

    2010-02-01

    A model to predict the emissivity and absorption coefficient of atomic hydrogen plasma is presented in detail. Non-equilibrium plasma is studied through coupling of the model with a collisional-radiative code for the excited states population as well as with the Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function.

  19. The Confined Hydrogen Atom with a Moving Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the hydrogen atom confined to a spherical box with impenetrable walls but, unlike earlier pedagogical articles on the subject, we assume that the nucleus also moves. We obtain the ground-state energy approximately by means of first-order perturbation theory and show that it is greater than that for the case in which the nucleus is clamped…

  20. Probability of Locating the Electron in a Hydrogen Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Thomas C. W.; Li, Wai-Kee

    2000-04-01

    A variety of numerical problems, along with their solutions, regarding the probability of locating the electron in a hydrogen atom are given. These problems range from simple substitution exercises to graduate-level take-home questions. Comments on the physical meaning of some of the results are also provided. These problems may be easily modified by teachers to suit their purposes.

  1. Microwave plasma generation of hydrogen atoms for rocket propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Filpus, J.; Morin, T.; Snellenberger, R.; Asmussen, J.; Hawley, M.; Kerber, R.

    1981-01-01

    A flow microwave plasma reaction system is used to study the conversion of hydrogen to hydrogen atoms as a function of pressure, power density, cavity tuning, cavity mode, and time in the plasma zone. Hydrogen atom concentration is measured down-stream from the plasma by NOCl titration. Extensive modeling of the plasma and recombination zones is performed with the plasma zone treated as a backmix reaction system and the recombination zone treated as a plug flow. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the recombination process are examined in detail to provide an understanding of the conversion of recombination energy to gas kinetic energy. It is found that cavity tuning, discharge stability, and optimum power coupling are critically dependent on the system pressure, but nearly independent of the flow rate.

  2. Concerted hydrogen-atom abstraction in photosynthetic water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Westphal, K L; Tommos, C; Cukier, R I; Babcock, G T

    2000-06-01

    Photosystem II evolves oxygen by using water in the unlikely role of a reductant. The absorption of sunlight by chlorophyll produces highly oxidizing equivalents that are filled with electrons stripped from water. This proton-coupled redox chemistry occurs at the oxygen-evolving complex, which contains a tetramanganese cluster, a redox-active tyrosine amino acid hydrogen-bonded to a histidine amino acid, a calcium ion and chloride. Hydrogen-atom abstraction by the tyrosyl radical from water bound to the manganese cluster is now widely held to occur in this process, at least for some of the steps in the catalytic cycle. We discuss kinetic and energetic constraints on the hydrogen-atom abstraction process. PMID:10837268

  3. Production of Excited Atomic Hydrogen from Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacek, J. R.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.; Furst, J. E.; Gay, T. J.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Landers, A. L.; McLaughlin, K. W.

    2009-05-01

    We have measured the production of Lyα and Hα fluorescence from atomic H for the photodissociation of CH4 by linearly-polarized photons with energies between 20 and 65 eV. Comparison between our Lyα relative cross section and that previously reported [1] show different peak height ratios. This also occurs in the Hα cross section when compared to previous data [2]. We do not observe as significant a drop in either cross section above 35 eV. Our measurements were taken with pressures two orders of magnitude lower than those used in ref. [1]. We present comparisons between data sets and a discussion of possible systematic effects. [1] H. Fukuzawa et al., J. Phys. B. 38, 565 (2005). [2] M. Kato et al., J. Phys. B. 35, 4383 (2002). Support provided by the NSF (Grant PHY-0653379), DOE (LBNL/ALS) and ANSTO (Access to Major Research Facilities Programme).

  4. On the Formation of Interstellar Water Ice: Constraints from a Search for Hydrogen Peroxide Ice in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. G.; Charnley, S. B.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Wright, C. M.; Maldoni, M. M.; Robinson, G.

    2011-12-01

    Recent surface chemistry experiments have shown that the hydrogenation of molecular oxygen on interstellar dust grains is a plausible formation mechanism, via hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), for the production of water (H2O) ice mantles in the dense interstellar medium. Theoretical chemistry models also predict the formation of a significant abundance of H2O2 ice in grain mantles by this route. At their upper limits, the predicted and experimental abundances are sufficiently high that H2O2 should be detectable in molecular cloud ice spectra. To investigate this further, laboratory spectra have been obtained for H2O2/H2O ice films between 2.5 and 200 μm, from 10 to 180 K, containing 3%, 30%, and 97% H2O2 ice. Integrated absorbances for all the absorption features in low-temperature H2O2 ice have been derived from these spectra. For identifying H2O2 ice, the key results are the presence of unique features near 3.5, 7.0, and 11.3 μm. Comparing the laboratory spectra with the spectra of a group of 24 protostars and field stars, all of which have strong H2O ice absorption bands, no absorption features are found that can definitely be identified with H2O2 ice. In the absence of definite H2O2 features, the H2O2 abundance is constrained by its possible contribution to the weak absorption feature near 3.47 μm found on the long-wavelength wing of the 3 μm H2O ice band. This gives an average upper limit for H2O2, as a percentage of H2O, of 9% ± 4%. This is a strong constraint on parameters for surface chemistry experiments and dense cloud chemistry models.

  5. On the Formation of Interstellar Water Ice: Constraints from a Search for Hydrogen Peroxide Ice in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. G.; Charnely, S. B.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Wright, C. M.; Maldoni, M. M.; Robinson, G.

    2011-01-01

    Recent surface chemistry experiments have shown that the hydrogenation of molecular oxygen on interstellar dust grains is a plausible formation mechanism, via hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), for the production of water (H2O) ice mantles in the dense interstellar medium. Theoretical chemistry models also predict the formation of a significant abundance of H2O2 ice in grain mantles by this route. At their upper limits, the predicted and experimental abundances are sufficiently high that H2O2 should be detectable in molecular cloud ice spectra. To investigate this further, laboratory spectra have been obtained for H2O2/H2O ice films between 2.5 and 200 micron, from 10 to 180 K, containing 3%, 30%, and 97% H2O2 ice. Integrated absorbances for all the absorption features in low-temperature H2O2 ice have been derived from these spectra. For identifying H2O2 ice, the key results are the presence of unique features near 3.5, 7.0, and 11.3 micron. Comparing the laboratory spectra with the spectra of a group of 24 protostars and field stars, all of which have strong H2O ice absorption bands, no absorption features are found that can definitely be identified with H2O2 ice. In the absence of definite H2O2 features, the H2O2 abundance is constrained by its possible contribution to the weak absorption feature near 3.47 micron found on the long-wavelength wing of the 3 micron H2O ice band. This gives an average upper limit for H2O2, as a percentage of H2O, of 9% +/- 4%. This is a strong constraint on parameters for surface chemistry experiments and dense cloud chemistry models.

  6. Induced absorption and annihilation in hadronic hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantsev, Vladimir N.; Popov, Vladimir P.

    The induced absorption or annihilation in the collisions of the hydrogen hadronic atoms in the excited states with ordinary hydrogen have been described in a unified manner with the elastic scattering, Stark transitions, and Coulomb de-excitation in the framework of a close-coupling approach including both the open and closed channels corresponding to both the stationary and non-stationary states of hadronic atom. The general features of the induced absorption cross sections have been studied in a wide range of the complex energy-shift values. The total and differential cross sections of all processes have been calculated for π - p, K - p, and bar p p atoms with the principal quantum numbers n = 2 - 8 and kinetic energy from 0.001 eV up to 100 eV.

  7. Induced absorption and annihilation in hadronic hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantsev, Vladimir N.; Popov, Vladimir P.

    2012-05-01

    The induced absorption or annihilation in the collisions of the hydrogen hadronic atoms in the excited states with ordinary hydrogen have been described in a unified manner with the elastic scattering, Stark transitions, and Coulomb de-excitation in the framework of a close-coupling approach including both the open and closed channels corresponding to both the stationary and non-stationary states of hadronic atom. The general features of the induced absorption cross sections have been studied in a wide range of the complex energy-shift values. The total and differential cross sections of all processes have been calculated for π - p, K - p, and bar p p atoms with the principal quantum numbers n = 2 - 8 and kinetic energy from 0.001 eV up to 100 eV.

  8. Atomic hydrogen maser active oscillator cavity and bulb design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Washburn, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    The performance characteristics and reliability of the active oscillator atomic hydrogen maser depend upon oscillation parameters which characterize the interaction region of the maser, the resonant cavity and atom storage bulb assembly. With particular attention to use of the cavity frequency switching servo (1) to reduce cavity pulling, it is important to maintain high oscillation level, high atomic beam flux utilization efficiency, small spin exchange parameter and high cavity quality factor. It is also desirable to have a small and rigid cavity and bulb structure and to minimize the cavity temperature sensitivity. Curves for a novel hydrogen maser cavity configuration which is partially loaded with a quartz dielectric cylinder and show the relationships between cavity length, cavity diameter, bulb size, dielectric thickness, cavity quality factor, filling factor and cavity frequency temperature coefficient are presented. The results are discussed in terms of improvement in maser performance resulting from particular design choices.

  9. Atomic cobalt on nitrogen-doped graphene for hydrogen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Huilong; Dong, Juncai; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Ye, Gonglan; Dong Kim, Nam; Samuel, Errol L. G.; Peng, Zhiwei; Zhu, Zhuan; Qin, Fan; Bao, Jiming; Yacaman, Miguel Jose; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Chen, Dongliang; Tour, James M.

    2015-10-01

    Reduction of water to hydrogen through electrocatalysis holds great promise for clean energy, but its large-scale application relies on the development of inexpensive and efficient catalysts to replace precious platinum catalysts. Here we report an electrocatalyst for hydrogen generation based on very small amounts of cobalt dispersed as individual atoms on nitrogen-doped graphene. This catalyst is robust and highly active in aqueous media with very low overpotentials (30 mV). A variety of analytical techniques and electrochemical measurements suggest that the catalytically active sites are associated with the metal centres coordinated to nitrogen. This unusual atomic constitution of supported metals is suggestive of a new approach to preparing extremely efficient single-atom catalysts.

  10. Transition state geometry in radical hydrogen atom abstraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, Evgenii T.; Shestakov, Alexander F.; Denisova, Taisa G.

    2012-12-01

    The interatomic distances in the transition states of radical hydrogen atom abstraction reactions X•+HY → XH+Y• determined by quantum chemical calculations are systematized and generalized. It is shown that depending on the reaction centre structure, these reactions can be subdivided into classes with the same X...Y interatomic distance in each class. The transition state geometries found by the methods of intersecting parabolas and intersecting Morse curves are also presented. The X...H...Y fragments are almost linear, the hydrogen atom position being determined by the reaction enthalpy. The effects of triplet repulsion, electronegativities and radii of X and Y atoms, the presence of adjoining π-bonds, and steric effects on the X...Y interatomic distances are analyzed and characterized. The bibliography includes 62 references.

  11. Atomic cobalt on nitrogen-doped graphene for hydrogen generation

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Huilong; Dong, Juncai; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Ye, Gonglan; Dong Kim, Nam; Samuel, Errol L.G.; Peng, Zhiwei; Zhu, Zhuan; Qin, Fan; Bao, Jiming; Yacaman, Miguel Jose; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Chen, Dongliang; Tour, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of water to hydrogen through electrocatalysis holds great promise for clean energy, but its large-scale application relies on the development of inexpensive and efficient catalysts to replace precious platinum catalysts. Here we report an electrocatalyst for hydrogen generation based on very small amounts of cobalt dispersed as individual atoms on nitrogen-doped graphene. This catalyst is robust and highly active in aqueous media with very low overpotentials (30 mV). A variety of analytical techniques and electrochemical measurements suggest that the catalytically active sites are associated with the metal centres coordinated to nitrogen. This unusual atomic constitution of supported metals is suggestive of a new approach to preparing extremely efficient single-atom catalysts. PMID:26487368

  12. Atomic cobalt on nitrogen-doped graphene for hydrogen generation.

    PubMed

    Fei, Huilong; Dong, Juncai; Arellano-Jiménez, M Josefina; Ye, Gonglan; Dong Kim, Nam; Samuel, Errol L G; Peng, Zhiwei; Zhu, Zhuan; Qin, Fan; Bao, Jiming; Yacaman, Miguel Jose; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Chen, Dongliang; Tour, James M

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of water to hydrogen through electrocatalysis holds great promise for clean energy, but its large-scale application relies on the development of inexpensive and efficient catalysts to replace precious platinum catalysts. Here we report an electrocatalyst for hydrogen generation based on very small amounts of cobalt dispersed as individual atoms on nitrogen-doped graphene. This catalyst is robust and highly active in aqueous media with very low overpotentials (30 mV). A variety of analytical techniques and electrochemical measurements suggest that the catalytically active sites are associated with the metal centres coordinated to nitrogen. This unusual atomic constitution of supported metals is suggestive of a new approach to preparing extremely efficient single-atom catalysts. PMID:26487368

  13. Correlation of Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction Reaction Efficiencies for Aryl Radicals with their Vertical Electron Affinities and the Vertical Ionization Energies of the Hydrogen Atom Donors

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Linhong; Nash, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The factors that control the reactivities of aryl radicals toward hydrogen-atom donors were studied by using a dual-cell Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT – ICR). Hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies for two substrates, cyclohexane and isopropanol, were measured for twenty-three structurally different, positively-charged aryl radicals, which included dehydrobenzenes, dehydronaphthalenes, dehydropyridines, and dehydro(iso)quinolines. A logarithmic correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) vertical electron affinities (EA) of the aryl radicals. Transition state energies calculated for three of the aryl radicals with isopropanol were found to correlate linearly with their (calculated) EAs. No correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) enthalpy changes for the reactions. Measurement of the reaction efficiencies for the reactions of several different hydrogen-atom donors with a few selected aryl radicals revealed a logarithmic correlation between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the vertical ionization energies (IE) of the hydrogen-atom donors, but not the lowest homolytic X – H (X = heavy atom) bond dissociation energies of the hydrogen-atom donors. Examination of the hydrogen-atom abstraction reactions of twenty-nine different aryl radicals and eighteen different hydrogen-atom donors showed that the reaction efficiency increases (logarithmically) as the difference between the IE of the hydrogen-atom donor and the EA of the aryl radical decreases. This dependence is likely to result from the increasing polarization, and concomitant stabilization, of the transition state as the energy difference between the neutral and ionic reactants decreases. Thus, the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiency for an aryl radical can be “tuned” by structural changes that influence either

  14. Reactivity and Catalytic Activity of Hydrogen Atom Chemisorbed Silver Clusters.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Dar; Pal, Sourav

    2015-06-18

    Metal clusters of silver have attracted recent interest of researchers as a result of their potential in different catalytic applications and low cost. However, due to the completely filled d orbital and very high first ionization potential of the silver atom, the silver-based catalysts interact very weakly with the reacting molecules. In the current work, density functional theory calculations were carried out to investigate the effect of hydrogen atom chemisorption on the reactivity and catalytic properties of inert silver clusters. Our results affirm that the hydrogen atom chemisorption leads to enhancement in the binding energy of the adsorbed O2 molecule on the inert silver clusters. The increase in the binding energy is also characterized by the decrease in the Ag-O and increase in the O-O bond lengths in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Pertinent to the increase in the O-O bond length, a significant red shift in the O-O stretching frequency is also noted in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Moreover, the hydrogen atom chemisorbed silver clusters show low reaction barriers and high heat of formation of the final products for the environmentally important CO oxidation reaction as compared to the parent catalytically inactive clusters. The obtained results were compared with those of the corresponding gold and hydrogen atom chemisorbed gold clusters obtained at the same level of theory. It is expected the current computational study will provide key insights for future advances in the design of efficient nanosilver-based catalysts through the adsorption of a small atom or a ligand. PMID:25988294

  15. Atomic-scale studies of hydrogenated semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayne, A. J.; Riedel, D.; Comtet, G.; Dujardin, G.

    The adsorption of hydrogen on semiconductors strongly modifies the electronic and chemical properties of the surfaces, whether on the surface or in the sub-surface region. This has been the starting point, in recent years, of many new areas of research and technology. This paper will discuss the properties, at the atomic scale, of hydrogenated semiconductor surfaces studied with scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and synchrotron radiation. Four semiconductor surfaces will be described - germanium(1 1 1), silicon(1 0 0), silicon carbide(1 0 0) and diamond(1 0 0). Each surface has its particularities in terms of the physical and electronic structure and in regard to the adsorption of hydrogen. The manipulation of hydrogen on these surfaces by electronic excitation using electrons from the STM tip will be discussed in detail highlighting the excitation mechanisms. The reactivity of these surfaces towards various molecules and semiconductor nanocrystals will be illustrated.

  16. Electron-impact ionization of atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Baertschy, Mark D.

    2000-02-14

    Since the invention of quantum mechanics, even the simplest example of collisional breakup in a system of charged particles, e{sup {minus}} + H {r_arrow} H{sup +} + e{sup {minus}} + e{sup {minus}}, has stood as one of the last unsolved fundamental problems in atomic physics. A complete solution requires calculating the energies and directions for a final state in which three charged particles are moving apart. Advances in the formal description of three-body breakup have yet to lead to a viable computational method. Traditional approaches, based on two-body formalisms, have been unable to produce differential cross sections for the three-body final state. Now, by using a mathematical transformation of the Schrodinger equation that makes the final state tractable, a complete solution has finally been achieved, Under this transformation, the scattering wave function can be calculated without imposing explicit scattering boundary conditions. This approach has produced the first triple differential cross sections that agree on an absolute scale with experiment as well as the first ab initio calculations of the single differential cross section.

  17. Observations of molecular and atomic gas in photodissociation regions. [interstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Howe, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    Dense gas at the ionized/neutral boundaries of molecular clouds illuminated by far-UV photons plays an important role in the appearance of the neutral interstellar medium. It also is a laboratory for the study of UV-photochemistry and of a number of heating and cooling phenomena not seen elsewhere. Fine structure lines of neutral and low ionization potential species dominate the cooling in the outer part of the photodissociation regions. Observations of these lines show that the regions are dense and highly clumped. Observations of H2 and CO show that heating by UV photons plays a significant role in the excitation of molecular lines near the H II/neutral boundary. Warm CO is more abundant in these regions than predicted by the standard theoretical models. Optical reflection nebulas provide an ideal laboratory for the study of photodissocciation region phenomena.

  18. Goddard high-resolution spectrograph observations of the local interstellar medium and the deuterium/hydrogen ratio along the line of sight toward Capella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Brown, Alexander; Gayley, Ken; Diplas, Athanassios; Savage, Blair D.; Ayres, Thomas R.; Landsman, Wayne; Shore, Steven N.; Heap, Sara R.

    1993-01-01

    HST Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph observations of the 1216, 2600, and 2800 A spectral regions are analyzed for the spectroscopic binary system Capella, obtained at orbital phase 0.26 with 3.27-3.57 km/s resolution and high SNR. The column densities of H I, D I, Mg II, and Fe II for the local interstellar medium along this 12.5 pc line of sight, together with estimates of the temperature and turbulent velocity are inferred. It is inferred that the atomic deuterium/hydrogen ratio by number is 1.65(+0.07, -0.18) x 10 exp -5 for this line of sight. Galactic evolution calculations indicate that the primordial D/H ratio probably lies in the range of (1.5-3) x (D/H)LISM. If H0 = 80 km/s Mpc, as recent evidence suggests, then the baryonic density in units of the Einstein-de Sitter closure density is 0.023-0.031. Thus the universe is argued to expand forever, unless nonbaryonic matter greatly exceeds the amount of baryonic matter.

  19. On the performance of van der Waals corrected-density functional theory in describing the atomic hydrogen physisorption on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferullo, Ricardo M.; Domancich, Nicolás F.; Castellani, Norberto J.

    2010-11-01

    The atomic hydrogen physisorption on graphite was studied using the hydrogen-coronene model system and the van der Waals corrected-density functional theory (DFT + vdW). The results show that H preferentially occupies the hollow site. The adsorption energy at this site is calculated as 38.1 meV, in very good agreement with the available experimental measurements on a single graphite layer (39.2 ± 0.5 meV) and with reported MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ calculations (39.7 meV). The results suggest that, in DFT simulations, dispersion corrections should be considered in order to obtain accurate distances, adsorption energies and diffusion barriers in physisorption processes such as those occurring in the cold interstellar medium.

  20. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in interstellar chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Lepp, S.; Dalgarno, A.

    1988-01-01

    Interstellar chemistry modifications resulting form the presence of large molecules such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are investigated. For abundances of PAH relative to hydrogen of greater than 10 to the -8th, free electrons attach to PAH molecules to yield PAH(-) ions, and qualitative interstellar chemistry changes are shown to result as atomic and molecular ions undergo nondestructive mutual neutralization reactions with these negative ions. An increase in the steady state abundances of carbon-bearing molecules is also noted. For a PAH abundance ratio relative to hydrogen of 10 to the -7th, the equilibrium densities of C3H2 and neutral atomic C are found to be enhanced by two orders of magnitude. 18 references.

  1. The alpha Centauri Line of Sight: D/H Ratio, Physical Properties of Local Interstellar Gas, and Measurement of Heated Hydrogen (The 'Hydrogen Wall') Near the Heliopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.

    1996-01-01

    We analyze high-resolution spectra of the nearby (1.34 pc) stars alpha Cen A (G2 V) and alpha Cen B (K1 V), which were obtained with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. The observations consist of echelle spectra of the Mg II 2800 A and Fe II 2599 A resonance lines and the Lyman-alpha lines of hydrogen and deuterium. The interstellar gas has a velocity (v = - 18.0 +/- 0.2 km/s) consistent with the local flow vector proposed for this line of sight by Lailement & Berlin (1992). The temperature and nonthermal velocity inferred from the Fe II, Mg II, and D I line profiles are T = 5400 +/- 500 K and xi = 1.20 +/- 0.25 km/s, respectively. However, single-component fits to the H I Lyman-alpha lines yield a Doppler parameter (b(sub HI) = 11.80 km/s) that implies a significantly warmer temperature of 8350 K, and the velocity of the H I absorption (v = - 15.8 +/- 0.2 km/s) is redshifted by about 2.2 km/s with respect to the Fe II, Mg II, and D I lines. The one-component model of the interstellar gas suggests natural logarithm N base HI = 18.03 +/- 0.01 and D/H = (5.7 +/- 0.2) x 10(exp -6) . These parameters lead to a good fit to the observed spectra, but this model does not explain the higher temperature and redshift of H I relative to the other interstellar lines. The most sensible way to resolve the discrepancy between H(I) and the other lines is to add a second absorption component to the H(I) lines. This second component is hotter (T approx. equals 30,000 K), is redshifted relative to the primary component by 2-4 km/s, and has a column density too low to be detected in the Fe(II), Mg(II), and D(I) lines. We propose that the gas responsible for this component is located near the heliopause, consisting of the heated H I gas from the interstellar medium that is compressed by the solar wind. This so-called 'hydrogen wall' is predicted by recent multifluid gasdynamical models of the interstellar gas and solar wind interaction. Our data

  2. Sudden perturbation of hydrogen atoms by intense ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Lugovskoy, A. V.; Bray, I.

    2005-12-15

    We study theoretically how hydrogen atoms respond to intense ultrashort laser pulses of duration {tau} shorter than the inverse of the initial-state energy {epsilon}{sub i}{sup -1}. An analytical expression for the evolution operator S is derived up to the first order of the sudden perturbation approximation. This approximation treats the laser-atom interaction beyond the dipole approximation and yields S as a series in the small parameter {epsilon}{sub i}{tau}. It is shown that the effect of realistic laser pulses on atoms begins at the first order of {epsilon}{sub i}{tau}. Transitions between atomic (nlm) states of different m become possible due to the action of the pulse's magnetic field. Transitions between states of same m and arbitrary l become possible if the static Coulomb potential is taken into account during the pulse.

  3. Laser stripping of hydrogen atoms by direct ionization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brunetti, E.; Becker, W.; Bryant, H. C.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Chou, W.

    2015-05-08

    Direct ionization of hydrogen atoms by laser irradiation is investigated as a potential new scheme to generate proton beams without stripping foils. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation describing the atom-radiation interaction is numerically solved obtaining accurate ionization cross-sections for a broad range of laser wavelengths, durations and energies. Parameters are identified where the Doppler frequency up-shift of radiation colliding with relativistic particles can lead to efficient ionization over large volumes and broad bandwidths using currently available lasers.

  4. Unparticle contribution to the hydrogen atom ground state energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wondrak, Michael F.; Nicolini, Piero; Bleicher, Marcus

    2016-08-01

    In the present work we study the effect of unparticle modified static potentials on the energy levels of the hydrogen atom. By using Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory, we obtain the energy shift of the ground state and compare it with experimental data. Bounds on the unparticle energy scale ΛU as a function of the scaling dimension dU and the coupling constant λ are derived. We show that there exists a parameter region where bounds on ΛU are stringent, signaling that unparticles could be tested in atomic physics experiments.

  5. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies Of Highly Charged Ions On Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganić, I. N.; Seely, D. G.; McCammon, D.; Havener, C. C.

    2011-06-01

    Accurate studies of low-energy charge exchange (CX) are critical to understanding underlying soft X-ray radiation processes in the interaction of highly charged ions from the solar wind with the neutral atoms and molecules in the heliosphere, cometary comas, planetary atmospheres, interstellar winds, etc.. Particularly important are the CX cross sections for bare, H-like, and He-like ions of C, N, O and Ne, which are the dominant charge states for these heavier elements in the solar wind. Absolute total cross sections for single electron capture by H-like ions of C, N, O and fully-stripped O ions from atomic hydrogen have been measured in an expanded range of relative collision energies (5 eV/u-20 keV/u) and compared to previous H-oven measurements. The present measurements are performed using a merged-beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source installed on a high voltage platform at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For the collision energy range of 0.3 keV/u-3.3 keV/u, which corresponds to typical ion velocities in the solar wind, the new measurements are in good agreement with previous H-oven measurements. The experimental results are discussed in detail and compared with theoretical calculations where available.

  6. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies of Highly Charged Ions on Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Draganic, Ilija N; Seely, D. G.; McCammon, D; Havener, Charles C

    2011-01-01

    Accurate studies of low energy charge exchange (CX) are critical to understanding underlying soft X ray radiation processes in the interaction of highly charged ions from the solar wind with the neutral atoms and molecules in the heliosphere, cometary comas, planetary atmospheres, interstellar winds, etc.. Particularly important are the CX cross sections for bare, H like, and He like ions of C, N, O and Ne, which are the dominant charge states for these heavier elements in the solar wind. Absolute total cross sections for single electron capture by H like ions of C, N, O and fully stripped O ions from atomic hydrogen have been measured in an expanded range of relative collision energies (5 eV u 20 keV u) and compared to previous H oven measurements. The present measurements are performed using a merged beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source installed on a high voltage platform at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For the collision energy range of 0.3 keV u 3.3 keV u, which corresponds to typical ion velocities in the solar wind, the new measurements are in good agreement with previous H oven measurements. The experimental results are discussed in detail and compared with theoretical calculations where available.

  7. Solid Hydrogen Experiments for Atomic Propellants: Image Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the results of detailed analyses of the images from experiments that were conducted on the formation of solid hydrogen particles in liquid helium. Solid particles of hydrogen were frozen in liquid helium, and observed with a video camera. The solid hydrogen particle sizes, their agglomerates, and the total mass of hydrogen particles were estimated. Particle sizes of 1.9 to 8 mm (0.075 to 0.315 in.) were measured. The particle agglomerate sizes and areas were measured, and the total mass of solid hydrogen was computed. A total mass of from 0.22 to 7.9 grams of hydrogen was frozen. Compaction and expansion of the agglomerate implied that the particles remain independent particles, and can be separated and controlled. These experiment image analyses are one of the first steps toward visually characterizing these particles, and allow designers to understand what issues must be addressed in atomic propellant feed system designs for future aerospace vehicles.

  8. Hydrogenated fullerenes dimer, peanut and capsule: An atomic comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EL-Barbary, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogenated fullerenes are detected in the Universe in space but their identification is still unsolved task. Therefore, this paper provides useful information about hydrogenated fullerenes (dimer, peanut and capsule) using DFT method at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. The stability, geometric structures, hydrogen adsorption energies and NMR chemical shifts are calculated. The results show that the energy of most stable isomer of C118 dimer is lower than the energies sum of C60 and C58 cages by 1.77 eV and the energy per carbon atom of C144 capsule is more stable than C60 cage by 126.98 meV. Also, endohedral Ti-doped C118 dimer and C128 peanut are found to be most stable structures than exohedral Ti-doped C118 dimer and C128 peanut by 2.19 eV/Ti and 3.52 eV/Ti, respectively. The hydrogenation process is found to be enhanced (especially at the caps) for endohedral Ti-doped C118 dimer and C128 peanut through electronic surface modifications. The most active hydrogenation sites are selected and it is found that the most stable hydrogenation sites are Houts1 and Houts3 for fullerenes and endohedral Ti-doped fullerenes, respectively.

  9. Fluorescence Quenching of Benzaldehyde in Water by Hydrogen Atom Abstraction.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Katharyn; Bunz, Uwe H F; Dreuw, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    We computed the mechanism of fluorescence quenching of benzaldehyde in water through relaxed potential energy surface scans. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations along the protonation coordinate from water to benzaldehyde reveal that photoexcitation to the bright ππ* (S3 ) state is immediately followed by ultrafast decay to the nπ* (S1 ) state. Evolving along this state, benzaldehyde (BA) abstracts a hydrogen atom, resulting in a BAH(.) and OH(.) radical pair. Benzaldehyde does not act as photobase in water, but abstracts a hydrogen atom from a nearby solvent molecule. The system finally decays back to the ground state by non-radiative decay and an electron transfers back to the OH(.) radical. Proton transfer from BAH(+) to OH(-) restores the initial situation, BA in water. PMID:27305520

  10. Semirelativistic model for ionization of atomic hydrogen by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Attaourti, Y.; Taj, S.; Manaut, B.

    2005-06-15

    We present a semirelativistic model for the description of the ionization process of atomic hydrogen by electron impact in the first Born approximation by using the Darwin wave function to describe the bound state of atomic hydrogen and the Sommerfeld-Maue wave function to describe the ejected electron. This model, accurate to first order in Z/c in the relativistic correction, shows that, even at low kinetic energies of the incident electron, spin effects are small but not negligible. These effects become noticeable with increasing incident electron energies. All analytical calculations are exact and our semirelativistic results are compared with the results obtained in the nonrelativistic Coulomb Born approximation both for the coplanar asymmetric and the binary coplanar geometries.

  11. A discrete variable representation for electron-hydrogen atom scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaucher, Lionel Francis

    1994-08-01

    A discrete variable representation (DVR) suitable for treating the quantum scattering of a low energy electron from a hydrogen atom is presented. The benefits of DVR techniques (e.g. the removal of the requirement of calculating multidimensional potential energy matrix elements and the availability of iterative sparse matrix diagonalization/inversion algorithms) have for many years been applied successfully to studies of quantum molecular scattering. Unfortunately, the presence of a Coulomb singularity at the electrically unshielded center of a hydrogen atom requires high radial grid point densities in this region of the scattering coordinate, while the presence of finite kinetic energy in the asymptotic scattering electron also requires a sufficiently large radial grid point density at moderate distances from the nucleus. The constraints imposed by these two length scales have made application of current DVR methods to this scattering event difficult.

  12. Amide-Substituted Titanocenes in Hydrogen-Atom Transfer Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Jakoby, Verena; Stainer, Katharina; Schmer, Alexander; Klare, Sven; Bauer, Mirko; Grimme, Stefan; Cuerva, Juan Manuel; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2016-01-22

    Two new catalytic systems for hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) catalysis involving the N-H bonds of titanocene(III) complexes with pendant amide ligands are reported. In a monometallic system, a bifunctional catalyst for radical generation and reduction through HAT catalysis depending on the coordination of the amide ligand is employed. The pendant amide ligand is used to activate Crabtree's catalyst to yield an efficient bimetallic system for radical generation and HAT catalysis. PMID:26636435

  13. Two-photon transitions to excited states in atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Quattropani, A.; Bassani, F.; Carillo, S.

    1982-06-01

    Resonant two-photon transition rates from the ground state of atomic hydrogen to ns excited states have been computed as a function of photon frequencies in the length and velocity gauges in order to test the accuracy of the calculation and to discuss the rate of convergence over the intermediate states. The dramatic structure of the transition rates produced by intermediate-state resonances is exhibited. A two-photon transparency is found in correspondence to each resonance.

  14. Infrared atomic hydrogen line formation in luminous stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, J. H.; Smith, H. A.

    1981-01-01

    Infrared atomic hydrogen lines observed in luminous stars, generally attributed to compact circumstellar H II regions, can also be formed in the winds likely to emanate from these stars. Implications are discussed for the class of obscured infrared point sources showing these lines, and an illustrative model is derived for the BN object in Orion. Such stellar winds should also produce weak, but detectable, radio emission.

  15. Effects of wall coatings and temperature on hydrogen atom surface recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, E. L.; Baker, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The efficiency of various surface coatings and materials toward inhibiting hydrogen atom surface recombination was investigated over a temperature range of 77 to 298 K. A flow discharge, mass spectrometer technique was used to make the experimental measurements. Hydrogen atoms were monitored directly, and these measurements were expressed as ratios of mass spectrometer peak heights for atomic and molecular hydrogen. Several of the surface coatings studied were efficient at reducing hydrogen atom surface recombination at room temperature. However, as the temperature was lowered, this efficiency was drastically reduced. Calibration of the mass spectrometer for atomic and molecular hydrogen indicated that mass spectrometer discrimination against hydrogen atoms was severe. Mass spectrometer sensitivity for hydrogen atoms was only about one-sixth of that for molecular hydrogen.

  16. Ground-State Structures of Atomic Metallic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Jeffrey M.; Ceperley, David M.

    2011-04-01

    Ab initio random structure searching using density functional theory is used to determine the ground-state structures of atomic metallic hydrogen from 500 GPa to 5 TPa. Including proton zero-point motion within the harmonic approximation, we estimate that molecular hydrogen dissociates into a monatomic body-centered tetragonal structure near 500 GPa (rs=1.23) that remains stable to 1 TPa (rs=1.11). At higher pressures, hydrogen stabilizes in an …ABCABC… planar structure that is similar to the ground state of lithium, but with a different stacking sequence. With increasing pressure, this structure compresses to the face-centered cubic lattice near 3.5 TPa (rs=0.92).

  17. The hydrogen atom in plasmas with an external electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2014-09-15

    We numerically solve the Schrödinger equation, using a more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential with an electric field, in order to investigate the screening and weak external electric field effects on the hydrogen atom in plasmas. The MGECSC potential is examined for four different cases, corresponding to different screening parameters of the potential and the external electric field. The influences of the different screening parameters and the weak external electric field on the energy eigenvalues are determined by solving the corresponding equations using the asymptotic iteration method (AIM). It is found that the corresponding energy values shift when a weak external electric field is applied to the hydrogen atom in a plasma. This study shows that a more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential allows the influence of an applied, weak, external electric field on the hydrogen atom to be investigated in detail, for both Debye and quantum plasmas simultaneously. This suggests that such a potential would be useful in modeling similar effects in other applications of plasma physics, and that AIM is an appropriate method for solving the Schrödinger equation, the solution of which becomes more complex due to the use of the MGECSC potential with an applied external electric field.

  18. Zero-Temperature Structures of Atomic Metallic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Jeffrey; Ceperley, David

    2011-03-01

    Since the first prediction of an atomic metallic phase of hydrogen by Wigner and Huntington over 75 years ago, there have been many theoretical efforts aimed at determining the crystal structures of the zero-temperature phases. We present results from ab initio random structure searching with density functional theory performed to determine the ground state structures from 500 GPa to 5 TPa. We estimate that molecular hydrogen dissociates into a monatomic body-centered tetragonal structure near 500 GPa (rs = 1.225), which then remains stable to 2.5 TPa (rs = 0.969). At higher pressures, hydrogen stabilizes in an . . . ABCABC . . . planar structure that is remarkably similar to the ground state of lithium, which compresses to the face-centered cubic lattice beyond 5 TPa (rs < 0.86). Our results provide a complete ab initio description of the atomic metallic crystal structures of hydrogen, resolving one of the most fundamental and long outstanding issues concerning the structures of the elements.

  19. The atomic hydrogen cloud in the saturnian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, W.-L.; Johnson, R. E.; Ip, W.-H.

    2013-09-01

    The importance of Titan's H torus shaped by solar radiation pressure and of hydrogen atoms flowing out of Saturn's atmosphere in forming the broad hydrogen cloud in Saturn's magnetosphere is still debated. Since the Saturnian system also contains a water product torus which originates from the Enceladus plumes, the icy ring particles, and the inner icy satellites, as well as Titan's H2 torus, we have carried out a global investigation of the atomic hydrogen cloud taking into account all sources. We show that the velocity and angle distributions of the hot H ejected from Saturn's atmosphere following electron-impact dissociation of H2 are modified by collisions with the ambient atmospheric H2 and H. This in turn affects the morphology of the escaping hydrogen from Saturn, as does the morphology of the ionospheric electron distribution. Although an exact agreement with the Cassini observations is not obtained, our simulations show that H directly escaping from Titan is the dominant contributor in the outer magnetosphere. Of the total number of H observed by Cassini from 1 to 5RS, ∼5.7×1034, our simulations suggest ∼20% is from dissociation in the Enceladus torus, ∼5-10% is from dissociation of H2 in the atmosphere of the main rings, and ∼50% is from Titan's H torus, implying that ∼20% comes from Saturn atmosphere.

  20. ON THE FORMATION OF INTERSTELLAR WATER ICE: CONSTRAINTS FROM A SEARCH FOR HYDROGEN PEROXIDE ICE IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. G.; Wright, C. M.; Robinson, G.; Charnley, S. B.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Maldoni, M. M. E-mail: c.wright@adfa.edu.au E-mail: Steven.B.Charnley@nasa.gov

    2011-12-20

    Recent surface chemistry experiments have shown that the hydrogenation of molecular oxygen on interstellar dust grains is a plausible formation mechanism, via hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), for the production of water (H{sub 2}O) ice mantles in the dense interstellar medium. Theoretical chemistry models also predict the formation of a significant abundance of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice in grain mantles by this route. At their upper limits, the predicted and experimental abundances are sufficiently high that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} should be detectable in molecular cloud ice spectra. To investigate this further, laboratory spectra have been obtained for H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ice films between 2.5 and 200 {mu}m, from 10 to 180 K, containing 3%, 30%, and 97% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice. Integrated absorbances for all the absorption features in low-temperature H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice have been derived from these spectra. For identifying H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice, the key results are the presence of unique features near 3.5, 7.0, and 11.3 {mu}m. Comparing the laboratory spectra with the spectra of a group of 24 protostars and field stars, all of which have strong H{sub 2}O ice absorption bands, no absorption features are found that can definitely be identified with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice. In the absence of definite H{sub 2}O{sub 2} features, the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} abundance is constrained by its possible contribution to the weak absorption feature near 3.47 {mu}m found on the long-wavelength wing of the 3 {mu}m H{sub 2}O ice band. This gives an average upper limit for H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, as a percentage of H{sub 2}O, of 9% {+-} 4%. This is a strong constraint on parameters for surface chemistry experiments and dense cloud chemistry models.

  1. IUE observations of interstellar hydrogen and deuterium toward Alpha Centauri B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, W. B.; Murthy, J.; Henry, R. C.; Moos, H. W.; Linsky, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    A high dispersion profile is presented of the Lyman-alpha emission toward Alpha Cen B as recorded in two images taken with the IUE spacecraft. The spectra were examined with a three-parameter Gaussian or five-parameter solar-type profile to derive the intrinsic background stellar emission. Voight absorption profiles were calculated for the intervening H I and D I gas. A uniform, thermally broadened medium was assumed, with the calculations being based on the free stellar parameters of density, velocity dispersion and the bulk velocity of H I, and the density of D I. The use of a small aperture is shown to have been effective in eliminating geocoronal and interplanetary diffuse Ly-alpha contamination. The H I absorption profile toward Alpha Cen B is found to be equivalent to that toward Alpha Cen A, indicating that the H I profiles derived are essentially independent of stellar emission. Less success, however, was attained in obtaining any definitive D I profile, although an asymmetry in the blue and red wings of the Lyman-alpha emissions did show the presence of absorption by interstellar deuterium and allow setting a lower limit of 0.00001 for the D I/H I ratio.

  2. Reactions of butadiyne. 1: The reaction with hydrogen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwanebeck, W.; Warnatz, J.

    1984-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen (H) atoms with butadiene (C4H2) was studied at room temperature in a pressure range between w mbar and 10 mbar. The primary step was an addition of H to C4H2 which is in its high pressure range at p 1 mbar. Under these conditions the following addition of a second H atom lies in the transition region between low and high pressure range. Vibrationally excited C4H4 can be deactivated to form buten-(1)-yne-(3)(C4H4) or decomposes into two C2H2 molecules. The rate constant at room temperature for primary step is given. The second order rate constant for the consumption of buten-(1)-yne-(3) is an H atom excess at room temperature is given.

  3. Detecting extra dimensions by Hydrogen-like atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan-Ping, Zhou; Peng, Zhou; Hao-Xue, Qiao

    2015-01-01

    We reconsider the idea in spectroscopy of detecting extra dimensions by regarding the nucleus as a homogeneous sphere. In our results, it turns out that the gravitational potential inside the nucleus is much stronger than the potential induced by a particle in the same regime in ref. [16], and thus a more significant correction of the ground state energy of hydrogen-like atoms is obtained, which can be used to determine the existence of ADD's extra dimensions. In order to get a larger order of magnitude for the correction, it is better to apply our theory to high-Z atoms or muonic atoms, where the volume of the nucleus can't be ignored and the relativistic effect is important. Our work is based on the Dirac equation in aweak gravity field, and the result is more precise.

  4. THE DYNAMICS OF HYDROGEN ATOM ABSTRACTION FROM POLYATOMIC MOLECULES.

    SciTech Connect

    LIU,X.; SUITS,A.G.

    2002-11-21

    The hydrogen atom abstraction reaction is an important fundamental process that is extensively involved in atmospheric and combustion chemistry. The practical significance of this type of reaction with polyatomic hydrocarbons is manifest, which has led to many kinetics studies. The detailed understanding of these reactions requires corresponding dynamics studies. However, in comparison to the A + HX {radical} AH + X reactions, the study of the dynamics of A + HR {yields} AH + R reactions is much more difficult, both experimentally and theoretically (here and in the following, A stands for an atom, X stands for a halogen atom, and R stands for a polyatomic hydrocarbon radical). The complication stems from the structured R, in contrast to the structureless X. First of all, there are many internal degrees of freedom in R that can participate in the reaction. In addition, there are different carbon sites from which an H atom can be abstracted, and the dynamics are correspondingly different; there are also multiple identical carbon sites in HR and in the picture of a local reaction, there exist competitions between neighboring H atoms, and so on. Despite this complexity, there have been continuing efforts to obtain insight into the dynamics of these reactions. In this chapter, some examples are presented, including the reactions of ground state H, Cl, and O atoms, with particular focus on our recent work using imaging to obtain the differential cross sections for these reactions.

  5. Concerted hydrogen atom exchange between three HF molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komornicki, Andrew; Dixon, David A.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the termolecular reaction involving concerted hydrogen exchange between three HF molecules, with particular emphasis on the effects of correlation at the various stationary points along the reaction. Using an extended basis, we have located the geometries of the stable hydrogen-bonded trimer, which is of C(sub 3h) symmetry, and the transition state for hydrogen exchange, which is of D(sub 3h) symmetry. The energies of the exchange reation were then evaluated at the correlated level, using a large atomic natural orbital basis and correlating all valence electrons. Several correlation treatments were used, namely, configration interaction with single and double excitations, coupled-pair functional, and coupled-cluster methods. We are thus able to measure the effect of accounting for size-extensivity. Zero-point corrections to the correlated level energetics were determined using analytic second derivative techniques at the SCF level. Our best calculations, which include the effects of connected triple excitations in the coupled-cluster procedure, indicate that the trimer is bound by 9 +/- 1 kcal/mol relative to three separate monomers, in excellent agreement with previous estimates. The barrier to concerted hydrogen exchange is 15 kcal/mol above the trimer, or only 4.7 kcal/mol above three separated monomers. Thus the barrier to hydrogen exchange between HF molecules via this termolecular process is very low.

  6. Ultrafast effective multilevel atom method for primordial hydrogen recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2010-09-01

    Cosmological hydrogen recombination has recently been the subject of renewed attention because of its importance for predicting the power spectrum of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. It has become clear that it is necessary to account for a large number n≳100 of energy shells of the hydrogen atom, separately following the angular momentum substates in order to obtain sufficiently accurate recombination histories. However, the multilevel atom codes that follow the populations of all these levels are computationally expensive, limiting recent analyses to only a few points in parameter space. In this paper, we present a new method for solving the multilevel atom recombination problem, which splits the problem into a computationally expensive atomic physics component that is independent of the cosmology and an ultrafast cosmological evolution component. The atomic physics component follows the network of bound-bound and bound-free transitions among excited states and computes the resulting effective transition rates for the small set of “interface” states radiatively connected to the ground state. The cosmological evolution component only follows the populations of the interface states. By pretabulating the effective rates, we can reduce the recurring cost of multilevel atom calculations by more than 5 orders of magnitude. The resulting code is fast enough for inclusion in Markov chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation algorithms. It does not yet include the radiative transfer or high-n two-photon processes considered in some recent papers. Further work on analytic treatments for these effects will be required in order to produce a recombination code usable for Planck data analysis.

  7. Ultrafast effective multilevel atom method for primordial hydrogen recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Ali-Haiemoud, Yacine; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2010-09-15

    Cosmological hydrogen recombination has recently been the subject of renewed attention because of its importance for predicting the power spectrum of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. It has become clear that it is necessary to account for a large number n > or approx. 100 of energy shells of the hydrogen atom, separately following the angular momentum substates in order to obtain sufficiently accurate recombination histories. However, the multilevel atom codes that follow the populations of all these levels are computationally expensive, limiting recent analyses to only a few points in parameter space. In this paper, we present a new method for solving the multilevel atom recombination problem, which splits the problem into a computationally expensive atomic physics component that is independent of the cosmology and an ultrafast cosmological evolution component. The atomic physics component follows the network of bound-bound and bound-free transitions among excited states and computes the resulting effective transition rates for the small set of 'interface' states radiatively connected to the ground state. The cosmological evolution component only follows the populations of the interface states. By pretabulating the effective rates, we can reduce the recurring cost of multilevel atom calculations by more than 5 orders of magnitude. The resulting code is fast enough for inclusion in Markov chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation algorithms. It does not yet include the radiative transfer or high-n two-photon processes considered in some recent papers. Further work on analytic treatments for these effects will be required in order to produce a recombination code usable for Planck data analysis.

  8. Hydrogen atom density in narrow-gap microwave hydrogen plasma determined by calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Takahiro; Ohmi, Hiromasa; Kakiuchi, Hiroaki; Yasutake, Kiyoshi

    2016-02-01

    The density of hydrogen (H) atoms in the narrow-gap microwave hydrogen plasma generated under high-pressure conditions is expected to be very high because of the high input power density of the order of 104 W/cm3. For measuring the H atom density in such a high-pressure and high-density plasma, power-balance calorimetry is suited since a sufficient signal to noise ratio is expected. In this study, H atom density in the narrow-gap microwave hydrogen plasma has been determined by the power-balance calorimetry. The effective input power to the plasma is balanced with the sum of the powers related to the out-going energy per unit time from the plasma region via heat conduction, outflow of high-energy particles, and radiation. These powers can be estimated by simple temperature measurements using thermocouples and optical emission spectroscopy. From the power-balance data, the dissociation fraction of H2 molecules is determined, and the obtained maximum H atom density is (1.3 ± 0.2) × 1018 cm-3. It is found that the H atom density increases monotonically with increasing the energy invested per one H2 molecule within a constant plasma volume.

  9. The Simplicity of Perfect Atoms: Degeneracies in Supersymmetric Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Rube, Tomas; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2011-08-19

    Supersymmetric QED hydrogen-like bound states are remarkably similar to non-supersymmetric hydrogen, including an accidental degeneracy of the fine structure and which is broken by the Lamb shift. This article classifies the states, calculates the leading order spectrum, and illustrates the results in several limits. The relation to other non-relativistic bound states is explored. Supersymmetric bound states provide a laboratory for studying dynamics in supersymmetric theories. Bound states like hydrogen provide a framework for understanding the qualitative dynamics of QCD mesons, a supersymmetric version of QED can provide a qualitative picture for the symmetries and states of superQCD mesons. Furthermore, recent interest in dark matter as a composite state, leads to asking how supersymmetry acts upon these composite states [4-7]. This article calculates the leading order corrections to a hydrogen-like atoms in an exactly supersymmetric version of QED. Much of the degeneracy is broken by the fine structure and a seminal calculation was performed in [1] for positronium, see [2] for an N = 2 version of positronium. Supersymmetric hydrogen is a similar except for the absence of annihilation diagrams, see [3] for an independent calculation. In the heavy proton mass limit, the supersymmetric interactions of the theory become irrelevant operators, suppressed by powers of the proton mass like the magnetic moment operator in QED and the fine structure is identical to the non-supersymmetric theory. This article finds that fine structure spectrum of supersymmetric spectrum of hydrogen has an accidental degeneracy which is exactly analogous to the accidental degeneracy of the l = 0 and l = 1 levels of the n = 2; j = 1/2 state of hydrogen. The supersymmetric version of the Lamb shift lifts the residual degeneracy and this article computes the logarithmically enhanced breaking.

  10. Role of Double Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions in Atmospheric Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Sinha, Amitabha; Francisco, Joseph S

    2016-05-17

    Hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions are ubiquitous and play a crucial role in chemistries occurring in the atmosphere, biology, and industry. In the atmosphere, the most common and traditional HAT reaction is that associated with the OH radical abstracting a hydrogen atom from the plethora of organic molecules in the troposphere via R-H + OH → R + H2O. This reaction motif involves a single hydrogen transfer. More recently, in the literature, there is an emerging framework for a new class of HAT reactions that involves double hydrogen transfers. These reactions are broadly classified into four categories: (i) addition, (ii) elimination, (iii) substitution, and (iv) rearrangement. Hydration and dehydration are classic examples of addition and elimination reactions, respectively whereas tautomerization or isomerization belongs to a class of rearrangement reactions. Atmospheric acids and water typically mediate these reactions. Organic and inorganic acids are present in appreciable levels in the atmosphere and are capable of facilitating two-point hydrogen bonding interactions with oxygenates possessing an hydroxyl and/or carbonyl-type functionality. As a result, acids influence the reactivity of oxygenates and, thus, the energetics and kinetics of their HAT-based chemistries. The steric and electronic effects of acids play an important role in determining the efficacy of acid catalysis. Acids that reduce the steric strain of 1:1 substrate···acid complex are generally better catalysts. Among a family of monocarboxylic acids, the electronic effects become important; barrier to the catalyzed reaction correlates strongly with the pKa of the acid. Under acid catalysis, the hydration of carbonyl compounds leads to the barrierless formation of diols, which can serve as seed particles for atmospheric aerosol growth. The hydration of sulfur trioxide, which is the principle mechanism for atmospheric sulfuric acid formation, also becomes barrierless under acid catalysis