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Sample records for interventions teen online problem

  1. Parents, Teens, and Online Privacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Mary; Cortesi, Sandra; Gasser, Urs; Lenhart, Amanda; Duggan, Maeve

    2012-01-01

    Most parents of teenagers are concerned about what their teenage children do online and how their behavior could be monitored by others. Some parents are taking steps to observe, discuss, and check up on their children's digital footprints. A new survey of 802 parents and their teens shows that: (1) 81% of parents of online teens say they are…

  2. Of Every 10 Teens, Nine Are Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This article briefly discusses a recent Pew Internet and American Life Project survey of 1,100 teens. 75 percent of online teens use instant messaging, about half visit the Web daily, and 45 percent of all kids surveyed have their own cell phones.

  3. Effectiveness of Parent-Focused Interventions to Increase Teen Driver Safety:A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Allison E.; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Hamann, Cara J.; Mirman, Jessica H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We critically reviewed recent parent-directed teen driving interventions in order to summarize their success in meeting stated goals; identify promising intervention components and knowledge gaps; aid in the selection, adaptation, and dissemination of effective interventions; and guide future research efforts. Methods We focused on interventions that included a direct parent component, explicitly stated outcomes related to the teen and/or their parents, were evaluated for parent or teen outcomes, targeted drivers under age 21, and had at least one evaluation study published since 1990 and in English. We conducted a comprehensive systematic search of 26 online databases between November 2013 and January 2014 and identified 34 papers representing 18 interventions. Results Several interventions—in particular those that had an active engagement component, incorporated an in-vehicle data recorder system, and had a strong conceptual approach—show promise in improving parental supervisory behaviors during the learner and early independent phases, increasing teen driver skill acquisition, and reducing teens' risky driving behaviors. Conclusions We identify essential characteristics of effective parent-involved teen driving interventions and their evaluation studies, propose a comprehensive and multi-tiered approach to intervention, and discuss several research areas and overarching issues for consideration. PMID:26112737

  4. Acceptability of Interventions Delivered Online and Through Mobile Phones for People Who Experience Severe Mental Health Problems: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lobban, Fiona; Emsley, Richard; Bucci, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Background Psychological interventions are recommended for people with severe mental health problems (SMI). However, barriers exist in the provision of these services and access is limited. Therefore, researchers are beginning to develop and deliver interventions online and via mobile phones. Previous research has indicated that interventions delivered in this format are acceptable for people with SMI. However, a comprehensive systematic review is needed to investigate the acceptability of online and mobile phone-delivered interventions for SMI in depth. Objective This systematic review aimed to 1) identify the hypothetical acceptability (acceptability prior to or without the delivery of an intervention) and actual acceptability (acceptability where an intervention was delivered) of online and mobile phone-delivered interventions for SMI, 2) investigate the impact of factors such as demographic and clinical characteristics on acceptability, and 3) identify common participant views in qualitative studies that pinpoint factors influencing acceptability. Methods We conducted a systematic search of the databases PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Web of Science in April 2015, which yielded a total of 8017 search results, with 49 studies meeting the full inclusion criteria. Studies were included if they measured acceptability through participant views, module completion rates, or intervention use. Studies delivering interventions were included if the delivery method was online or via mobile phones. Results The hypothetical acceptability of online and mobile phone-delivered interventions for SMI was relatively low, while actual acceptability tended to be high. Hypothetical acceptability was higher for interventions delivered via text messages than by emails. The majority of studies that assessed the impact of demographic characteristics on acceptability reported no significant relationships between the two. Additionally, actual acceptability was higher when

  5. Effect of depressive symptoms on asthma intervention in urban teens

    PubMed Central

    Guglani, Lokesh; Havstad, Suzanne L.; Johnson, Christine Cole; Ownby, Dennis R.; Joseph, Christine L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The literature suggests that depression is an important comorbidity in asthma that can significantly influence disease management and quality of life (QOL). Objective To study the effect of coexisting depressive symptoms on the effectiveness of self-management interventions in urban teens with asthma. Methods We analyzed data from a randomized controlled trial of Puff City, a web-based, tailored asthma management intervention for urban teens, to determine whether depression modulated intervention effectiveness for asthma control and QOL outcomes. Teens and caregivers were classified as depressed based on responses collected from baseline questionnaires. Result Using logistic regression analysis, we found that a lower percentage of treatment students had indicators of uncontrolled asthma compared with controls (adjusted odds ratios <1). However, for teens depressed at baseline, QOL scores at follow-up were significantly higher in the treatment group compared with the control group for the emotions domain (adjusted relative risk, 2.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.2–3.63; P = .01; interpreted as emotional QOL for treatment students increased by a factor of 2.08 above controls). Estimates for overall QOL and symptoms QOL were borderline significant (adjusted relative risk, 1.57; 95% confidence interval, 0.93–2.63; P = .09; and adjusted relative risk, 1.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.94–3.15; P = .08; respectively). Among teens not depressed at baseline, no significant differences were observed between treatment and control groups in QOL domains at follow-up. Conclusion Our results suggest that depression modified the relationship between the effectiveness of an asthma intervention and emotional QOL in urban teens. Further assessment of self-management behavioral interventions for asthma should explore the mechanism by which depression may alter the intervention effect. PMID:23010228

  6. Perceived safety and teen risk taking in online chat sites.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Cheryl; Prawitz, Aimee D; Derscheid, Linda E; Montgomery, Bette

    2011-03-01

    Framed by theories of adolescent development, this study explored relationships among adolescents' perceptions of chat-site safety, time spent chatting, and risky online behaviors. Tenth graders (N = 139) in rural Midwestern U.S. schools completed surveys. Factor analysis produced three factors each for perception of safety and risk-taking behaviors. Regression analyses revealed that perception of safety factors were useful in predicting online risk-taking behaviors. Teens with more social discomfort and those who thought it was safe to reveal personal information and trust chat-site "friends" were more likely to take risks. As time spent in chat sites increased, so did risk-taking behaviors. Implications for educators and parents are discussed, such as initiation of conversations about safe Internet use, parental participation in chat sites as teens' invited "friends," and school programs to teach safe online practices. PMID:20677982

  7. How to Tell If Your Teen Has a Mental Health Problem

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Tell If Your Teen Has a Mental Health Problem 1 in 5 kids develop a serious ... Teen Mental Health Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Teen Mental Health About MedlinePlus Site Map ...

  8. Implementation Evaluation of "Steering Teens Safe": Engaging Parents to Deliver a New Parent-Based Teen Driving Intervention to Their Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Marizen; Yang, Jingzhen; Young, Tracy; Roth, Lisa; Garinger, Anne; Snetselaar, Linda; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2013-01-01

    Parents play a fundamental role in teaching their children safe driving skills to reduce risk of motor vehicle crashes, the leading cause of death for teens. "Steering Teens Safe" is a new parent-based intervention that equips parents with communication skills to talk about, demonstrate, and practice safe driving behaviors and skills…

  9. Locating the Subject: Teens Online @ ninemsn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Stephen; Nixon, Helen

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we examine how the figure of the teenager is positioned within the discourses and practices of commercial online media. In particular, we explore how the popular, Australia-based web portal "ninemsn" works discursively to shape the identities of young people. Ninemsn not only constructs and circulates selected representations of…

  10. Teen CHAT: Development and Utilization of a Web-Based Intervention to Improve Physician Communication with Adolescents About Healthy Weight

    PubMed Central

    Bravender, Terrill; Tulsky, James A.; Farrell, David; Alexander, Stewart C.; Østbye, Truls; Lyna, Pauline; Dolor, Rowena J.; Coffman, Cynthia J.; Bilheimer, Alicia; Lin, Pao-Hwa; Pollak, Kathryn I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the theoretical basis, use, and satisfaction with Teen CHAT, an online educational intervention designed to improve physician-adolescent communication about healthy weight. Methods Routine health maintenance encounters between pediatricians and family practitioners and their overweight adolescent patients were audio recorded, and content was coded to summarize adherence with motivational interviewing techniques. An online educational intervention was developed using constructs from social cognitive theory and using personalized audio recordings. Physicians were randomized to the online intervention or not, and completed post-intervention surveys. Results Forty-six physicians were recruited, and 22 physicians were randomized to view the intervention website. The educational intervention took an average of 54 minutes to complete, and most physicians thought it was useful, that they would use newly acquired skills with their patients, and would recommend it to others. Fewer physicians thought it helped them address confidentiality issues with their adolescent patients. Conclusion The Teen CHAT online intervention shows potential for enhancing physician motivational interviewing skills in an acceptable and time-efficient manner. Practice Implications If found to be effective in enhancing motivational interviewing skills and changing adolescent weight-related behaviors, wide dissemination will be feasible and indicated. PMID:24021419

  11. Teen Suicide in Nevada: The Problem, Effective Intervention & Prevention Programs, Status of Programs in Nevada Schools, Exemplary Programs, [and] Guidelines for Nevada School Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smaby, Marlow H.; Downing, Jerry

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: it reviews current national research on adolescent suicide and successful intervention/prevention programs and it surveys the 17 Nevada school districts to determine the presence of successful suicide intervention/prevention programs in the state. Findings include the following: (1) the popular…

  12. Teen Depression and Suicide: Effective Prevention and Intervention Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Keith A.; Vidourek, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    Teen depression and suicidal behaviors are intricately intertwined, with untreated depression being a leading cause of adolescent suicide. Most depressed or suicidal teens tend to show warning signs and possess specific risk factors. A key component to preventing teen depression is for adults to remain aware of such warning signs and risk factors…

  13. Changing Channels for Tobacco Control with Youth: Developing an Intervention for Working Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Glorian; Fagan, Pebbles; Hunt, Mary Kay; Stoddard, Anne M.; Girod, Kathy; Eisenberg, Marla; Frazier, Lindsay

    2004-01-01

    Worksites represent an untapped resource for reaching teens with tobacco control messages, given that 80% of teens have held at least one job by the time they graduate from high school. This paper presents formative research findings from a methods development study aimed at designing and testing a tobacco control intervention targeting working…

  14. Linking online sexual activities to health outcomes among teens.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Lucia F

    2014-01-01

    New digital technologies are highly responsive to many of the developmental needs of adolescents, including their need for intimate connection and social identity. This chapter explores adolescents' use of web-based sexual information, texting and "sexting," online dating sites, role-playing games, and sexually explicit media, and presents new data comparing the interpersonal and intrapersonal health outcomes among youth who engage in online sexual activities to those who do not. Despite the media-stoked concerns surrounding adolescents' participation in online sexual activities, the ubiquity of online activities and close overlap between online and offline activities indicate that this type of behavior should not be pathologized or used as a metric of problem behavior. The chapter concludes with implications for parents, educators, researchers, counselors, and health care providers, a call to challenge our deep discomfort around adolescent sexuality and to harness these technologies in ways that help promote growth and positive development. PMID:24962361

  15. International note: Teen users' problematic online behavior: using panel data from South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Eun; Kim, Jinhee

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors of teen users' problematic online behaviors using data from the Korea Youth Panel Survey (KYPS) collected over a four-year period. Problematic online behaviors included unauthorized ID use, disguising one's age or gender while chatting online, and cursing/insulting someone in a chat room or on a bulletin board. Results from the panel data analyses showed that many adolescents explored and discontinued engaging in online delinquency as they got older. Respondents' offline behaviors and self-control were significantly associated with problematic online behaviors, supporting the importance of internal traits. Peer effects were consistently more important than parental effects on teen's online delinquency. Increases in time spent using a computer also contributed to the likelihood of problematic online behaviors. PMID:25621406

  16. Usability testing of the Internet program: "Teens Taking Charge: Managing My Transplant Online".

    PubMed

    Korus, M; Cruchley, E; Stinson, J N; Gold, A; Anthony, S J

    2015-02-01

    Adolescents with SOT demonstrate high rates of medication non-adherence and higher rates of graft loss compared to all other age groups. Self-management interventions encompass information-based material designed to achieve disease-related learning and changes in the participant's knowledge and skill acquisition, while providing social support. These interventions have had some success in chronic disease populations by reducing symptoms and promoting self-efficacy and empowerment. Using findings from a needs assessment, an Internet-based self-management program, Teens Taking Charge: Managing My Transplant Online, for youth with SOT was developed. This program contains information on transplant, self-management and transition skills, and opportunities for peer support. The purpose of this study was to determine the usability and acceptability of the initial three modules (Medication and Vaccines; Diet after Transplant; and Living with a Transplant Organ) of the online program from the perspectives of youth with SOT. Participants were recruited from SOT clinics at a large pediatric tertiary care center in Canada. Three iterative cycles (seven patients per iteration) of usability testing took place to refine the Web site prototype. Study procedures involved participants finding items from a standardized list of features and talking aloud about issues they encountered, followed by a semi-structured interview to generate feedback about what they liked and disliked about the program. All 21 patients (mean age = 14.9 yr) found the Web site content to be trustworthy, they liked the picture content, and they found the videos of peer experiences to be particularly helpful. Participants had some difficulties finding information within submodules and suggested a more simplistic design with easier navigation. This web-based intervention is appealing to teenagers and may foster improved self-management with their SOT. Nine additional teen and two parent modules are being

  17. Seizures and Teens: When Seizures Aren't the Only Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanner, Andres M.; Shafer, Patricia O.

    2006-01-01

    Some teenagers with epilepsy only have to deal with seizures, which can be tough enough, but for other teens, seizures are not the only problem. Parents and caregivers often report changes in their teens' abilities to think clearly, learn in school, or remain focused in class. Mood and other behavioral problems may also be seen. It is critical…

  18. Child abuse history in teen mothers and parent-child risk processes for offspring externalizing problems.

    PubMed

    Pasalich, Dave S; Cyr, Maeve; Zheng, Yao; McMahon, Robert J; Spieker, Susan J

    2016-06-01

    This study examined whether child abuse history in teen mothers impacts offspring externalizing problems indirectly, through its influence on attachment and maternal hostility. In a longitudinal sample of 112 teen mother-child dyads, mothers reported on their own abuse experiences, attachment and maternal hostility were assessed via direct observations, and externalizing problems were measured using maternal reports. Compared with mothers with no abuse history, mothers with a history of sexual and physical abuse were more likely to have an insecurely attached infant, which predicted higher externalizing problems in preschool, which in turn predicted subsequent increases in externalizing problems in Grade 3. Furthermore, relative to the no abuse history group, mothers with a history of sexual and physical abuse showed more hostility toward their child at preschool, which in turn predicted elevated externalizing problems in Grade 3. Mothers' history of either sexual or physical abuse alone did not have significant indirect effects on externalizing problems. Fostering secure attachment and reducing risk for maternal hostility might be important intervention goals for prevention programs involving at-risk mothers with abuse histories. PMID:27174770

  19. Connecting Developmental Constructions to the Internet: Identity Presentation and Sexual Exploration in Online Teen Chat Rooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subrahmanyam, Kaveri; Smahel, David; Greenfield, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    The authors examined the online construction of identity and sexuality in a large sample of conversations from monitored and unmonitored teen chat rooms. More than half of the 583 participants (identified by a distinct screen name) communicated identity information, most frequently gender. In this way, participants compensated for the text-based…

  20. Getting out of Depression: Teens' Self-Help Interventions to Relieve Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisdom, Jennifer P.; Barker, Ellen C.

    2006-01-01

    Most depressed adolescents do not access medical care for symptoms, yet many improve without professional intervention. While several self-help interventions have empirical support, teens' non-directed efforts to reduce symptoms are not documented. We reviewed 14 depressed adolescents' reports of attempts to reduce depressive symptoms. Results…

  1. Strengthening positive coparenting in teen parents: a cultural adaptation of an evidence-based intervention.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Amy; Hodgkinson, Stacy; Waters, Damian M; Prempeh, Henry A; Beers, Lee S; Feinberg, Mark E

    2015-06-01

    Teen childbearing is associated with a range of adverse outcomes for both mothers and children, and perpetuates an intergenerational cycle of socioeconomic disadvantage. Fathers may be an underappreciated source of support to teen mothers and their children. The strongest and most consistent predictor of positive father involvement is a positive coparenting relationship between the mother and father. Thus, strengthening the coparenting relationship of teen parents may be protective for both parents and children. This paper describes the rationale, the intervention model, and the cultural adaptation of Strong Foundations, an intervention designed to facilitate and enhance positive coparenting in teen parents. Adapted from an evidence-based coparenting program for adult, cohabiting parents, this intervention was modified to be developmentally and culturally appropriate, acceptable, and feasible for use with urban, low-income, minority expectant teen mothers and their male partners. The authors present lessons learned from the cultural adaptation of this innovative intervention. Pilot testing has shown that this model is both acceptable and feasible in this traditionally hard to reach population. Although recruitment and engagement in this population present specific challenges, young, urban minority parents are deeply interested in being effective coparents, and were open to learning skills to support this goal. PMID:25771911

  2. Pilot Study of a Web-Delivered Multicomponent Intervention for Rural Teens with Poorly Controlled Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Christiano, Ann S.; Casella, Samuel J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of a web-delivered multicomponent behavioral and family-based intervention targeting self-regulation and self-monitoring of blood glucose levels (SMBG) and glycemic control (HbA1c) in teens with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) living in rural US. Methods. 15 teens with poorly controlled T1DM participated in a 25-week web-delivered intervention with two phases, active treatment (weekly treatment sessions and working memory training program) and maintenance treatment (fading of treatment sessions). Results. Almost all (13 of 15) participants completed at least 14 of 15 treatment sessions and at least 20 of 25 working memory training sessions. SMBG was increased significantly at end of active and maintenance treatment, and HbA1c was decreased at end of active treatment (p's ≤ 0.05). Executive functioning improved at end of maintenance treatment: performance on working memory and inhibitory control tasks significantly improved (p's ≤ 0.02) and parents reported fewer problems with executive functioning (p = 0.05). Improvement in inhibitory control was correlated with increases in SMBG and decreases in HbA1c. Conclusions. An innovative web-delivered and multicomponent intervention was feasible for teens with poorly controlled T1DM and their families living in rural US and associated with significant improvements in SMBG and HbA1c. PMID:27610391

  3. Pilot Study of a Web-Delivered Multicomponent Intervention for Rural Teens with Poorly Controlled Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lansing, Amy Hughes; Stanger, Catherine; Budney, Alan; Christiano, Ann S; Casella, Samuel J

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of a web-delivered multicomponent behavioral and family-based intervention targeting self-regulation and self-monitoring of blood glucose levels (SMBG) and glycemic control (HbA1c) in teens with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) living in rural US. Methods. 15 teens with poorly controlled T1DM participated in a 25-week web-delivered intervention with two phases, active treatment (weekly treatment sessions and working memory training program) and maintenance treatment (fading of treatment sessions). Results. Almost all (13 of 15) participants completed at least 14 of 15 treatment sessions and at least 20 of 25 working memory training sessions. SMBG was increased significantly at end of active and maintenance treatment, and HbA1c was decreased at end of active treatment (p's ≤ 0.05). Executive functioning improved at end of maintenance treatment: performance on working memory and inhibitory control tasks significantly improved (p's ≤ 0.02) and parents reported fewer problems with executive functioning (p = 0.05). Improvement in inhibitory control was correlated with increases in SMBG and decreases in HbA1c. Conclusions. An innovative web-delivered and multicomponent intervention was feasible for teens with poorly controlled T1DM and their families living in rural US and associated with significant improvements in SMBG and HbA1c. PMID:27610391

  4. Teen Girls and Technology: What's the Problem, What's the Solution?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Lesley

    2008-01-01

    Are teenage girls being left behind in the technology race? According to author and professor Lesley Farmer, teenage girls are not embracing technology and all of its potential impact on their futures. In "Teen Girls and Technology", Farmer explores the developmental issues of teen girls, including the reality of girls and tech as it now stands.…

  5. Wyman Teen Outreach Program (TOP). What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The "Wyman Teen Outreach Program" (TOP) is a life skills curriculum for 12- to 17-year-olds that aims to prevent negative youth behaviors, such as school failure and early pregnancy. Trained facilitators deliver the curriculum in weekly classes throughout the school year. Participants discuss topics such as goal-setting, peer pressure,…

  6. Evaluation of a School-Based Teen Obesity Prevention Minimal Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abood, Doris A.; Black, David R.; Coster, Daniel C.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A school-based nutrition education minimal intervention (MI) was evaluated. Design: The design was experimental, with random assignment at the school level. Setting: Seven schools were randomly assigned as experimental, and 7 as delayed-treatment. Participants: The experimental group included 551 teens, and the delayed treatment group…

  7. Correlates of Adherence to a Telephone-Based Multiple Health Behavior Change Cancer Preventive Intervention for Teens: The Healthy for Life Program (HELP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mays, Darren; Peshkin, Beth N.; Sharff, McKane E.; Walker, Leslie R.; Abraham, Anisha A.; Hawkins, Kirsten B.; Tercyak, Kenneth P.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined factors associated with teens' adherence to a multiple health behavior cancer preventive intervention. Analyses identified predictors of trial enrollment, run-in completion, and adherence (intervention initiation, number of sessions completed). Of 104 teens screened, 73% (n = 76) were trial eligible. White teens were more…

  8. Recognizing teen depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... are twice as likely as boys to have depression. Your teen has trouble being social Your teen has learning disabilities Your teen has a chronic illness There are family problems or problems with their parents

  9. Tuning in to teens: Improving parental responses to anger and reducing youth externalizing behavior problems.

    PubMed

    Havighurst, Sophie S; Kehoe, Christiane E; Harley, Ann E

    2015-07-01

    Parent emotion socialization plays an important role in shaping emotional and behavioral development during adolescence. The Tuning in to Teens (TINT) program aims to improve parents' responses to young people's emotions with a focus on teaching emotion coaching. This study examined the efficacy of the TINT program in improving emotion socialization practices in parents and whether this reduced family conflict and youth externalizing difficulties. Schools were randomized into intervention and control conditions and 225 primary caregiving parents and 224 youth took part in the study. Self-report data was collected from parents and youth during the young person's final year of elementary school and again in their first year of secondary school. Multilevel analyses showed significant improvements in parent's impulse control difficulties and emotion socialization, as well as significant reductions in family conflict and youth externalizing difficulties. This study provides support for the TINT program in reducing youth externalizing behavior problems. PMID:26005933

  10. The Real Life Cost Model: An Early Intervention Strategy for Preventing Teen Fatherhood and Motherhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarmon, Brenda "BJ"

    1998-01-01

    Describes a cognitive-behavioral approach to pregnancy prevention. In a 20-hour course, middle school children learn the costs and problems of raising children and are exposed to the real-life options and problems encountered by teen mothers and fathers. They also learn skills to help them stay in school, stay sexually abstinent, and avoid other…

  11. But I Trust My Teen: Parents' Attitudes and Response to a Parental Monitoring Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Aaron; Ice, Christa; Cottrell, Lesley

    2012-01-01

    Parental knowledge gained from monitoring activities protects against adolescent risk involvement. Parental monitoring approaches are varied and may be modified with successful interventions but not all parents or adolescents respond to monitoring programs the same way. 339 parent-adolescent dyads randomized to receive a parental monitoring intervention and 169 parent-adolescent dyads in the control group were followed for one year over four measurement periods. Parent attitudes about the usefulness of monitoring, the importance of trust and respecting their teens' privacy, and the appropriateness of adolescent risk-taking behavior and experimentation were examined as predictors of longitudinal change in parental monitoring and open communication. Similar effects were found in both the intervention and control group models regarding open communication. Parental attitudes impacted longitudinal patterns of teen-reported parent monitoring, and these patterns differed across experimental groups. In the intervention group, parents' beliefs about the importance of trust and privacy were associated with a steeper decline in monitoring across time. Finally, parents' attitudes about the normative nature of teen experimentation were associated with a quadratic parental monitoring time trend in the intervention but not the control group. These findings suggest that parental attitudes may impact how families respond to an adolescent risk intervention. PMID:22720144

  12. Mental Health Problems and Symptoms among Male Adolescents Attending a Teen Health Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peggy B.; Buzi, Ruth S.; Weinman, Maxine L.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the frequency and nature of mental health problems and symptoms among a group of 51 inner city male adolescents attending a teen health clinic. Results indicated participants experienced significant mental health problems and symptoms, such as relationship problems, problems with time and money, and symptoms of anger, depression, and…

  13. Lifestyle Intervention Using an Internet-Based Curriculum with Cell Phone Reminders for Obese Chinese Teens: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Anisha A.; Chow, Wing-Chi; So, Hung-Kwan; Yip, Benjamin Hon-Kei; Li, Albert M.; Kumta, Shekhar M.; Woo, Jean; Chan, Suk-Mei; Lau, Esther Yuet-Ying; Nelson, E. Anthony S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Obesity is an increasing public health problem affecting young people. The causes of obesity are multi-factorial among Chinese youth including lack of physical activity and poor eating habits. The use of an internet curriculum and cell phone reminders and texting may be an innovative means of increasing follow up and compliance with obese teens. The objectives of this study were to determine the feasibility of using an adapted internet curriculum and existing nutritional program along with cell phone follow up for obese Chinese teens. Design and Methods This was a randomized controlled study involving obese teens receiving care at a paediatric obesity clinic of a tertiary care hospital in Hong Kong. Forty-eight subjects aged 12 to 18 years were randomized into three groups. The control group received usual care visits with a physician in the obesity clinic every three months. The first intervention (IT) group received usual care visits every three months plus a 12-week internet-based curriculum with cell phone calls/texts reminders. The second intervention group received usual care visits every three months plus four nutritional counselling sessions. Results The use of the internet-based curriculum was shown to be feasible as evidenced by the high recruitment rate, internet log-in rate, compliance with completing the curriculum and responses to phone reminders. No significant differences in weight were found between IT, sLMP and control groups. Conclusion An internet-based curriculum with cell phone reminders as a supplement to usual care of obesity is feasible. Further study is required to determine whether an internet plus text intervention can be both an effective and a cost-effective adjunct to changing weight in obese youth. Trial Registration Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR-TRC-12002624 PMID:25946465

  14. Linking Online Sexual Activities to Health Outcomes among Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Lucia F.

    2014-01-01

    New digital technologies are highly responsive to many of the developmental needs of adolescents, including their need for intimate connection and social identity. This chapter explores adolescents' use of web-based sexual information, texting and "sexting," online dating sites, role-playing games, and sexually explicit media, and…

  15. Constructing Sexuality and Identity in an Online Teen Chat Room

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subrahmanyam, K.; Greenfield, P. M.; Tynes, B.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we propose that adolescents' online interactions are both a literal and a metaphoric screen for representing major adolescent developmental issues, such as sexuality and identity. Because of the public nature of Internet chat rooms, they provide an open window into the expression of adolescent concerns. Our study utilizes this…

  16. Texting Teens in Transition: The Use of Text Messages in Clinical Intervention Research

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, David B

    2014-01-01

    Background The rapidly growing population of young adults living with congenital heart disease (CHD), currently challenging ill-prepared cardiac care systems, presents a novel population in which to consider the use of mHealth. This methodological study was part of a larger study that tested the effectiveness of a clinic-based nursing intervention to prepare teens for transfer from pediatric to adult cardiology care. The intervention included creation of a MyHealth Passport and subsequently SMS (short message service) text messages between the intervention nurse and study participant. Objective Our aim was to determine (1) the preference of teens with CHD to be contacted via text message following the nursing intervention, (2) the effectiveness of texting to collect data regarding the use of MyHealth Passport after participation in the intervention, (3) the nature of the texting interaction, and (4) the risks and benefits of texting. Methods Participants were recruited through the intervention study (n=24) by either choosing to receive information from the study coordinator through text message, or texting a question to the study nurses. Inclusion criteria were age 15-17 years, diagnosed with moderate or complex heart disease, and currently being followed by the Division of Cardiology at Stollery Children’s Hospital. Exclusion criteria were heart transplantation and/or less than a 6th grade reading and comprehension ability. Text message transcripts were analyzed by qualitative inductive content analysis. Results Two-thirds of teens (16/24, 67%) chose text messaging as their preferred contact, making them eligible for the study. Texting was effective in collecting information regarding the MyHealth Passport; all but one teen had their MyHealth Passport on them, and many reported carrying it with them wherever they went. All teens reported showing their MyHealth Passport to at least one person. Seven themes were identified in the texting transcripts: mixing formal

  17. Comparison of intervention fidelity between COPE TEEN and an attention-control program in a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Stephanie A; Oswalt, Krista; Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Jacobson, Diana

    2015-04-01

    Fidelity in implementing an intervention is critical to accurately determine and interpret the effects of an intervention. It is important to monitor the manner in which the behavioral intervention is implemented (e.g. adaptations, delivery as intended and dose). Few interventions are implemented with 100% fidelity. In this study, high school health teachers implemented the intervention. To attribute study findings to the intervention, it was vital to know to what degree the intervention was implemented. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to evaluate intervention fidelity and to compare implementation fidelity between the creating opportunities for personal empowerment (COPE) Healthy Lifestyles TEEN (thinking, emotions, exercise, and nutrition) program, the experimental intervention and Healthy Teens, an attention-control intervention, in a randomized controlled trial with 779 adolescents from 11 high schools in the southwest region of the United States. Thirty teachers participated in this study. Findings indicated that the attention-control teachers implemented their intervention with greater fidelity than COPE TEEN teachers. It is possible due to the novel intervention and the teachers' unfamiliarity with cognitive-behavioral skills building, COPE TEEN teachers had less fidelity. It is important to assess novel skill development prior to the commencement of experimental interventions and to provide corrective feedback during the course of implementation. PMID:25355179

  18. Effectiveness of an Attachment-Focused Manualized Intervention for Parents of Teens at Risk for Aggressive Behaviour: The Connect Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moretti, Marlene M.; Obsuth, Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    Aggressive, violent and antisocial behaviour in children and adolescents is a growing concern across the globe. Targeting parent-teen relationships is critical in reducing problem behaviour. "Connect" is a manualized ten-week program for parents or alternative caregivers of at-risk teens that focuses on the building blocks of secure attachment:…

  19. An intervention to address interpersonal violence among low-income midwestern Hispanic-American teens.

    PubMed

    Enriquez, Maithe; Kelly, Patricia J; Cheng, An-Lin; Hunter, Jennifer; Mendez, Eduardo

    2012-04-01

    This paper reports pilot testing of "Familias En Nuestra Escuela", an in-school interpersonal violence prevention intervention targeting Hispanic-American teens. The intervention, based on the hypothesis that the preservation and reinforcement of Hispanic cultural values can serve as a protective factor against violence, focused on the enhancement of ethnic pride. Researchers formed a partnership with a midwestern Hispanic community to test the feasibility, receptivity and preliminary impact of the intervention in a pre/post test, no control group design. Participants were low-income, predominantly first-generation Hispanic-American freshmen and sophomore students from one Hispanic-serving high school. Findings revealed a statistically significant increase in the intervention's mediator, ethic pride. Changes in the desired direction occurred on measures of perceptions of self-efficacy for self-control, couple violence, and gender attitudes. The incidence of physical fighting and dating violence behaviors decreased over the course of an academic school year. Results provide preliminary evidence for the use of interventions based on ethnic and cultural pride as a violence prevention strategy among Hispanic-American teens, especially those who are first generation Americans. PMID:21573749

  20. Effectiveness of Abstinence-Only Intervention in Middle School Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borawski, Elaine A.; Trapl, Erika S.; Lovegreen, Loren D.; Colabianchi, Natalie; Block, Tonya

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To examine effectiveness of abstinence-until-marriage curriculum on knowledge, beliefs, efficacy, intentions, and behavior. Methods: Nonrandomized control trial involving 2069 middle school students with a 5-month follow-up. Results: Intervention students reported increases in knowledge and abstinence beliefs, but decreases in…

  1. Cognitive reserve as a moderator of responsiveness to an online problem-solving intervention for adolescents with complicated mild-to-severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Karver, Christine L; Wade, Shari L; Cassedy, Amy; Taylor, H Gerry; Brown, Tanya M; Kirkwood, Michael W; Stancin, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Children and adolescents with traumatic brain injury (TBI) often experience behavior difficulties that may arise from problem-solving deficits and impaired self-regulation. However, little is known about the relationship of neurocognitive ability to post-TBI behavioral recovery. To address this question, we examined whether verbal intelligence, as estimated by Vocabulary scores from the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence, predicted improvements in behavior and executive functioning following a problem-solving intervention for adolescents with TBI. One hundred and thirty-two adolescents with complicated mild-to-severe TBI were randomly assigned to a six-month Web-based problem-solving intervention (CAPS; n = 65) or to an Internet resource comparison (IRC; n = 67) group. Vocabulary moderated the association between treatment group and improvements in metacognitive abilities. Examination of the mean estimates indicated that for those with lower Vocabulary scores, pre-intervention Metacognition Index scores from the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) did not differ between the groups, but post-intervention scores were significantly lower (more improved) for those in the CAPS group. These findings suggest that low verbal intelligence was associated with greater improvements in executive functioning following the CAPS intervention and that verbal intelligence may have an important role in response to intervention for TBI. Understanding predictors of responsiveness to interventions allows clinicians to tailor treatments to individuals, thus improving efficacy. PMID:23710617

  2. Efficacy of a randomized cell phone-based counseling intervention in postponing subsequent pregnancy among teen mothers.

    PubMed

    Katz, Kathy S; Rodan, Margaret; Milligan, Renee; Tan, Sylvia; Courtney, Lauren; Gantz, Marie; Blake, Susan M; McClain, Lenora; Davis, Maurice; Kiely, Michele; Subramanian, Siva

    2011-12-01

    Adolescent mothers in Washington, DC have a high rate of subsequent teen pregnancies, often within 24 months. Children of teen mothers are at risk for adverse psychosocial outcomes. When adolescents are strongly attached to parents, schools, and positive peers, they may be less likely to repeat a pregnancy. This study tested the efficacy of a counseling intervention delivered by cell phone and focused on postponing subsequent teen pregnancies by strengthening healthy relationships, reproductive practices, and positive youth assets. The objective of this study was to compare time to a repeat pregnancy between the intervention and usual care groups, and, secondarily, to determine whether treatment intensity influenced time to subsequent conception. Primiparous pregnant teens ages 15-19, were recruited in Washington, DC. Of 849 teens screened, 29.3% (n = 249) met inclusion criteria, consented to participate, and completed baseline measures. They were then randomized to the intervention (N = 124) or to usual care (N = 125). Intervention group teens received cell phones for 18 months of counseling sessions, and quarterly group sessions. Follow-up measures assessed subsequent pregnancy through 24 months post-delivery. A survival analysis compared time to subsequent conception in the two treatment groups. Additional models examined the effect of treatment intensity. By 24 months, 31% of the intervention and 36% of usual care group teens had a subsequent pregnancy. Group differences were not statistically significant in intent-to-treat analysis. Because there was variability in the degree of exposure of teens to the curriculum, a survival analysis accounting for treatment intensity was performed and a significant interaction with age was detected. Participants who were aged 15-17 years at delivery showed a significant reduction in subsequent pregnancy with increased levels of intervention exposure (P < 0.01), but not those ≥ 18 years. Adolescents ≥ 18 years faced

  3. Text messaging intervention for teens and young adults with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Jessica T; Cousineau, Tara; Franko, Debra L; Schultz, Alan T; Trant, Meredith; Rodgers, Rachel; Laffel, Lori M B

    2014-09-01

    Adolescents and young adults use text messaging as their primary mode of communication, thus providing an opportunity to use this mode of communication for mobile health (mHealth) interventions. Youth with diabetes are an important group for these mHealth initiatives, as diabetes management requires an enormous amount of daily effort and this population has difficulty achieving optimal diabetes management. Goal setting and self-efficacy are 2 factors in the management of diabetes. We examined the feasibility of a healthy lifestyle text messaging program targeting self-efficacy and goal setting among adolescents and young adults with diabetes. Participants, ages 16-21, were assigned to either a text messaging group, which received daily motivational messages about nutrition and physical activity, or a control group, which received paper-based information about healthy lifestyle. Both groups set goals for nutrition and physical activity and completed a measure of self-efficacy. Participants' mean age was 18.7 ± 1.6 years old, with diabetes duration of 10.0 ± 4.6 years, and A1c of 8.7 ± 1.7%. The text messaging intervention was rated highly and proved to be acceptable to participants. Self-efficacy, glycemic control, and body mass index did not change over the course of the short, 1-month pilot study. Positive, daily, motivational text messages may be effective in increasing motivation for small goal changes in the areas of nutrition and physical activity. These interventions may be used in the future in youth with diabetes to improve diabetes care. Utilizing more targeted text messages is an area for future research. PMID:25172879

  4. Text Messaging Intervention for Teens and Young Adults With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cousineau, Tara; Franko, Debra L.; Schultz, Alan T.; Trant, Meredith; Rodgers, Rachel; Laffel, Lori M. B.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults use text messaging as their primary mode of communication, thus providing an opportunity to use this mode of communication for mobile health (mHealth) interventions. Youth with diabetes are an important group for these mHealth initiatives, as diabetes management requires an enormous amount of daily effort and this population has difficulty achieving optimal diabetes management. Goal setting and self-efficacy are 2 factors in the management of diabetes. We examined the feasibility of a healthy lifestyle text messaging program targeting self-efficacy and goal setting among adolescents and young adults with diabetes. Participants, ages 16-21, were assigned to either a text messaging group, which received daily motivational messages about nutrition and physical activity, or a control group, which received paper-based information about healthy lifestyle. Both groups set goals for nutrition and physical activity and completed a measure of self-efficacy. Participants’ mean age was 18.7 ± 1.6 years old, with diabetes duration of 10.0 ± 4.6 years, and A1c of 8.7 ± 1.7%. The text messaging intervention was rated highly and proved to be acceptable to participants. Self-efficacy, glycemic control, and body mass index did not change over the course of the short, 1-month pilot study. Positive, daily, motivational text messages may be effective in increasing motivation for small goal changes in the areas of nutrition and physical activity. These interventions may be used in the future in youth with diabetes to improve diabetes care. Utilizing more targeted text messages is an area for future research. PMID:25172879

  5. Listening with care: Using narrative methods to cultivate nurses’ responsive relationships in a home visiting intervention with teen mothers

    PubMed Central

    SmithBattle, Lee; Lorenz, Rebecca; Leander, Sheila

    2012-01-01

    Effective public health nursing relies on the development of responsive and collaborative relationships with families. While nurse-family relationships are endorsed by home visitation programs, training nurses to follow visit-to-visit protocols may unintentionally undermine these relationships and may also obscure nurses’ clinical understanding and situated knowledge. With these issues in mind, we designed a home visiting intervention, titled Listening with Care, to cultivate nurses’ relationships with teen mothers and nurses’ clinical judgment and reasoning. Rather than using protocols, the training for the intervention introduced nurses to narrative methods and therapeutic tools. This mixed-method pilot study included a quasi-experimental design to examine the effect of the intervention on teen mothers’ depressive symptoms, self-silencing, repeat pregnancy, and educational progress compared to teens who received usual care. Qualitative data was collected from the nurses to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention and therapeutic tools. The nurses endorsed the therapeutic tools and expected to continue using them in their practice. Despite the lack of statistically significant differences in outcomes between groups, findings suggest that further study of the intervention is warranted. Future studies may have implications for strengthening hidden aspects of nursing that make a difference in the lives of teen mothers. PMID:22713121

  6. Writing, Technology and Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenhart, Amanda; Arafeh, Sousan; Smith, Aaron

    2008-01-01

    Teenagers' lives are filled with writing. All teens write for school, and 93% of teens say they write for their own pleasure. Most notably, the vast majority of teens have eagerly embraced written communication with their peers as they share messages on their social network pages, in emails and instant messages online, and through fast-paced thumb…

  7. Leadership Qualities Emerging in an Online Social Support Group Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Kodatt, Stephanie A.; Shenk, Jared E.; Williams, Mark L.; Horvath, Keith J.

    2014-01-01

    Technology-delivered interventions addressing a broad range of problems for which clients present for therapy are proliferating. However, little is known of leadership dynamics that emerge in online group interventions. The purpose of this study was to assess the types of leadership qualities that would emerge in an online social support group intervention to improve medication adherence for men with HIV, and to characterize the demographic and psychosocial profiles of leaders. Written posts (n=616) from 66 men were coded using an adapted version of the Full Range Model of Leadership. Results showed that 10% (n=64) of posts reflected one of five leadership types, the most common of which was mentoring/providing feedback (40% of leadership posts). The next most common leadership style were instances in which encouragement was offered (30% of leadership posts). Leaders appeared to have lived with HIV longer and have higher Internet knowledge scores than non-leaders. Results indicate that online group interventions potentially may be useful to supplement traditional face-to-face treatment by providing an additional venue for group members to mentor and provide emotional support to each other. However, additional research is needed to more fully understand leadership qualities and group dynamics in other online group intervention settings. PMID:25642144

  8. RESTORE: an exploratory trial of an online intervention to enhance self-efficacy to manage problems associated with cancer-related fatigue following primary cancer treatment: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There are over 25 million people worldwide living with or beyond cancer and this number is increasing. Cancer survivors face a range of problems following primary treatment. One of the most frequently reported and distressing symptoms experienced by cancer survivors is fatigue. There is growing support for survivors who are experiencing problems after cancer treatment to engage in supported self-management. To date there is some evidence of effective interventions to manage fatigue in this population; however, to our knowledge there are no online resources that draw on this information to support self-management of fatigue. This paper describes the protocol for an exploratory randomized controlled trial of an online intervention to support self-management of cancer-related fatigue after primary cancer treatment. Methods/design This is a parallel-group two-armed (1:1) exploratory randomized controlled trial including 125 cancer survivors experiencing fatigue (scoring ≥4 on a unidimensional 11-point numeric rating scale for fatigue intensity) within five years of primary treatment completion with curative intent. Participants will be recruited from 13 NHS Trusts across the UK and randomized to either the online intervention (RESTORE), or a leaflet comparator (Macmillan Cancer Backup, Coping with Fatigue). The primary outcome is a change in Perceived Self-Efficacy for Fatigue Self-Management (as measured by the Perceived Self-Efficacy for Fatigue Self-Management Instrument). Secondary outcomes include impact on perception and experience of fatigue (measured by the Brief Fatigue Inventory), and quality of life (measured by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - General and the Personal Wellbeing Index). Outcome measures will be collected at baseline, 6 weeks (completion of intervention), and 3 months. Process evaluation (including telephone interviews with recruiting staff and participants) will determine acceptability of the intervention and trial

  9. Teen Gambling

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Teen Gambling Page Content Article Body How can I tell ... son or daughter is having a problem with gambling? Look for the following warning signs: Finding gambling " ...

  10. Schoolgirls and soccer moms: a content analysis of free "teen" and "MILF" online pornography.

    PubMed

    Vannier, Sarah A; Currie, Anna B; O'Sullivan, Lucia F

    2014-01-01

    Viewing free online pornographic videos has increasingly become a common behavior among young people, although little is known about the content of these videos. The current study analyzed the content of two popular female-age-based types of free, online pornography (teen and MILF) and examined nuances in the portrayal of gender and access to power in relation to the age of the female actor. A total of 100 videos were selected from 10 popular Web sites, and their content was coded using independent raters. Vaginal intercourse and fellatio were the most frequently depicted sexual acts. The use of sex toys, paraphilias, cuddling, and condom use were rare, as were depictions of coercion. Control of the pace and direction of sexual activity was typically shared by the male and female actors. Moreover, there were no gender differences in initiation of sexual activity, use of persuasion, portrayals of sexual experience, or in professional status. However, female actors in MILF videos were portrayed as more agentic and were more likely to initiate sexual activity, control the pace of sexual activity, and have a higher professional status. Implications regarding the role of pornography in generating or reinforcing sexual norms or scripts are discussed. PMID:24228745

  11. Kentucky Teen Institute: Results of a 1-Year, Health Advocacy Training Intervention for Youth.

    PubMed

    King, Kristi M; Rice, Jason A; Steinbock, Stacie; Reno-Weber, Ben; Okpokho, Ime; Pile, Amanda; Carrico, Kelly

    2015-11-01

    The Kentucky Teen Institute trains youth throughout the state to advocate for policies that promote health in their communities. By evaluating two program summits held at universities, regularly scheduled community meetings, ongoing technical support, and an advocacy day at the state Capitol, the aims of this study were to assess the impact of the intervention on correlates of youths' advocacy intentions and behaviors and to assess youth participants' and other key stakeholders' perceptions of the intervention. An ecological model approach and the theory of planned behavior served as theoretical frameworks from which pre-post, one-group survey and qualitative data were collected (June 2013-June 2014). An equal number of low-income and non-low-income youth representing five counties participated in the Summer Summit pretest (n = 24) and Children's Advocacy Day at the Capitol posttest (n = 14). Survey data revealed that youths' attitude toward advocacy, intentions to advocate, and advocacy behaviors all improved over the intervention. Observations, interviews, a focus group, and other written evaluations identified that the youths', as well as their mentors' and advocacy coaches', confidence, communities' capacity, and mutually beneficial mentorship strengthened. Stronger public speaking skills, communication among the teams, and other recommendations for future advocacy interventions are described. PMID:26009558

  12. Connecting developmental constructions to the internet: identity presentation and sexual exploration in online teen chat rooms.

    PubMed

    Subrahmanyam, Kaveri; Smahel, David; Greenfield, Patricia

    2006-05-01

    The authors examined the online construction of identity and sexuality in a large sample of conversations from monitored and unmonitored teen chat rooms. More than half of the 583 participants (identified by a distinct screen name) communicated identity information, most frequently gender. In this way, participants compensated for the text-based chat environment by providing information about themselves that would be visible and obvious in face-to-face communication. Sexual themes constituted 5% of all utterances (1 sexual comment per minute); bad or obscene language constituted 3% of the sample (1 obscenity every 2 minutes). Participants who self-identified as female produced more implicit sexual communication, participants who self-identified as male produced more explicit sexual communication. The protected environment of monitored chat (hosts who enforce basic behavioral rules) contained an environment with less explicit sexuality and fewer obscenities than the freer environment of unmonitored chat. These differences were attributable both to the monitoring process itself and to the differing populations attracted to each type of chat room (monitored: more participants self-identified as younger and female; unmonitored: more participants self-identified as older and male). PMID:16756432

  13. An Online Family Intervention to Reduce Parental Distress Following Pediatric Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Shari L.; Carey, Joanne; Wolfe, Christopher R.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined whether an online problem-solving intervention could improve parental adjustment following pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI). Families of children with moderate-to-severe TBI were recruited from the trauma registry of a large children's hospital and randomly assigned to receive online family problem solving therapy (FPS; n…

  14. Teen Depression and Suicide, A SILENT CRISIS.

    PubMed

    Kroning, Maureen; Kroning, Kayla

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent depression is a serious problem affecting 10.7% of all teens and 29.9% of high school students; 17% of high school students have contemplated suicide. Yet, depression in teens is often unrecognized. This article relays the tragic death of a 17-year-old, along with symptoms of depression and suicide in adolescents; DSM-5 criteria for depression; treatments including protective factors, psychotherapy, and medications; and imparts interventions for addressing this huge but silent crisis. PMID:27119802

  15. Developing an Educational Workshop on Teen Depression and Suicide: A Proactive Community Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArt, Ebba W.; Shulman, Donald A.; Gajary, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    An educational workshop was developed in Monroe County, New York on teen depression and suicide. The workshop used a proactive, preventive-educational approach, including both primary and secondary prevention modalities, directly available to teens, parents, and youth professionals. The program subsequently developed new partnerships between…

  16. Denormalizing a Historical Problem: Teen Pregnancy, Policy, and Public Health Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandakai, Tina L.; Smith, Leonie C. R.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the impact of teen-adult sexual relationships as a public health threat and the effectiveness of statutory rape laws in protecting adolescent children. Methods: A comprehensive review of current literature surrounding child abuse, teen pregnancy, and statutory rape was conducted. Results: Of one million teen girls who become…

  17. Correlates of adherence to a telephone-based multiple health behavior change cancer preventive intervention for teens: the Healthy for Life Program (HELP).

    PubMed

    Mays, Darren; Peshkin, Beth N; Sharff, McKane E; Walker, Leslie R; Abraham, Anisha A; Hawkins, Kirsten B; Tercyak, Kenneth P

    2012-02-01

    This study examined factors associated with teens' adherence to a multiple health behavior cancer preventive intervention. Analyses identified predictors of trial enrollment, run-in completion, and adherence (intervention initiation, number of sessions completed). Of 104 teens screened, 73% (n = 76) were trial eligible. White teens were more likely to enroll than non-Whites (χ(2)[1] df = 4.49, p = .04). Among enrolled teens, 76% (n = 50) completed the run-in; there were no differences between run-in completers and noncompleters. A majority of run-in completers (70%, n = 35) initiated the intervention, though teens who initiated the intervention were significantly younger than those who did not (p < .05). The mean number of sessions completed was 5.7 (SD = 2.6; maximum = 8). After adjusting for age, teens with poorer session engagement (e.g., less cooperative) completed fewer sessions (B = -1.97, p = .003, R (2) = .24). Implications for adolescent cancer prevention research are discussed. PMID:21632437

  18. Use of media technologies by Native American teens and young adults in the Pacific Northwest: exploring their utility for designing culturally appropriate technology-based health interventions.

    PubMed

    Rushing, Stephanie Craig; Stephens, David

    2011-08-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth are disproportionally burdened by many common adolescent health issues, including drug and alcohol use, injury and violence, sexually transmitted infections, and teen pregnancy. Media technologies, including the Internet, cell phones, and video games, offer new avenues for reaching adolescents on a wide range of sensitive health topics. While several studies have informed the development of technology-based interventions targeting mainstream youth, no such data have been reported for AI/AN youth. To fill this gap, this study quantified media technology use among 405 AI/AN youth (13-21 years old) living in tribes and urban communities in the Pacific Northwest, and identified patterns in their health information-seeking practices and preferences. Overall, technology use was exceptionally common among survey respondents, mirroring or exceeding national rates. High rates of online health information seeking were also reported: Over 75% of AI/AN youth reported searching online for health information. These data are now being used by the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board and NW tribes to design culturally-appropriate, technology-based health interventions targeting AI/AN youth. PMID:21805055

  19. A randomized, controlled trial to test the efficacy of an online, parent-based intervention for reducing the risks associated with college-student alcohol use

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Elizabeth; Wood, Mollie; Frayjo, Kezia; Black, Ryan A.; Surette, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol consumption among college students remains a major public health concern. Universal, Web-based interventions to reduce risks associated with student alcohol consumption have been found to be effective in changing their alcohol-related behavior. Recent studies also indicate that parent-based interventions, delivered in booklet form, are effective. A parent-based intervention that is also Web-based may be well suited to a dispersed parent population; however, no such tool is currently available. The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of an online parent-based intervention designed to (1) increase communication between parents and students about alcohol and (2) reduce risks associated with alcohol use to students. A total of 558 participants, comprising 279 parent-teen dyads, were enrolled in the study. The findings suggested that parents who participated in the online intervention were more likely to discuss protective behavioral strategies, particularly those related to manner of drinking and stopping/limiting drinking, with their teens, as compared with parents in an e-newsletter control group. Moreover, students whose parents received the intervention were more likely to use a range of protective behavioral strategies, particularly those related to manner of drinking and stopping/limiting drinking, as compared with students whose parents did not receive the intervention. A universal, online, parent-based intervention to reduce risks associated with student alcohol consumption may be an efficient and effective component of a college’s overall prevention strategy. PMID:21963316

  20. Real Problems, Virtual Solutions: Engaging Students Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, A. Fiona

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author explains how she used online blogs with more than 263 students over a period of four semesters in an introductory social problems course. She describes how she uses blogs to enhance student participation, engagement, and skill building. Finally, she provides an overview of students' qualitative assessments of the blog…

  1. Correlates of Adherence to a Telephone-Based Multiple Health Behavior Change Cancer Preventive Intervention for Teens: The Healthy for Life Program (HELP)

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Darren; Peshkin, Beth N.; Sharff, McKane E.; Walker, Leslie R.; Abraham, Anisha A.; Hawkins, Kirsten; Tercyak, Kenneth P.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined factors associated with teens’ adherence to a multiple health behavior cancer preventive intervention. Analyses identified predictors of trial enrollment, run-in completion, and adherence (intervention initiation, number of sessions completed). Of 104 teens screened, 73% (n = 76) were trial-eligible. White teens were more likely to enroll than non-whites (χ2 [1] df = 4.49, p = 0.04). Among enrolled teens, 76% (n = 50) completed the run-in; there were no differences between run-in completers and non-completers. A majority of run-in completers (70%, n = 35) initiated the intervention, though teens who initiated the intervention were significantly younger than those who did not (p < 0.05). The mean number of sessions completed was 5.7 (SD = 2.6; maximum = 8). After adjusting for age, teens with poorer session engagement (e.g., less cooperative) completed fewer sessions (B = -1.97, p = 0.003, R2 = 0.24). Implications for adolescent cancer prevention research are discussed. PMID:21632437

  2. Internet-based interventions for youth dealing with gambling problems.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, Sally; Wood, Richard T A

    2010-01-01

    A substantial proportion of adolescents and young adults gamble and rates of problem gambling amongst youth are significantly higher than found in adult populations. Despite this, few youth seek treatment suggesting that traditional services are failing to help this vulnerable population. Youth are progressively active online and use the Internet for social networking, recreation, and increasingly, to seek help for health and mental health issues where they would not be comfortable seeking traditional forms of professional help. In recognition of this, Internet-based therapy and guided interventions have been launched specifically for adolescents and young adults in an attempt to reduce high-risk behaviors and increase program utilization. Research has demonstrated that online therapeutic support is perceived to be acceptable and useful by youth. Furthermore, online interventions have demonstrated success in reducing smoking and heavy drinking amongst this typically hard to reach population. Given the success of similar programs, online problem gambling services are predicted to be effective in increasing youth awareness of their potentially problematic gambling behavior and assist adolescents and young adults in retaining control and minimizing and reducing gambling-related problems. PMID:20491421

  3. Pacific Youth and Shifting Thresholds: Understanding Teen Dating Violence in Hawai'i

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Charlene K.; Helm, Susana

    2010-01-01

    The high prevalence of teen dating violence (TDV) nationally suggests that it is a public health problem in need of intervention. However, there is limited information about what constitutes TDV in the eyes of teens. Equally limited is an understanding of these parameters among diverse cultures. To fill these gaps, the current study conducted…

  4. Couple and Family Interventions in Health Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Cleveland G.; Finley, Michelle A.; Chawla, Neelu

    2012-01-01

    Intervention research for couples and families managing chronic health problems is in an early developmental stage. We reviewed randomized clinical trials of family interventions for common neurological diseases, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and diabetes, which is similar to the content of previous reviews discussed later. One overriding theme…

  5. Teen Dating Violence Prevention Program Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Quincy Arrianna Rose

    2013-01-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA) has identified the prevention of and intervention in relationship violence as a top priority (APA, n.d.). According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's 2012 Teen Dating Violence Fact Sheet, dating violence is a serious problem in the United States. In accordance with Foshee et al. (1998):…

  6. It's Time To Know about Teen Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Martha H.

    This report describes "Time To Know about Teen Pregnancy," an educational intervention program implemented in 1985 in the junior and senior high schools in Cherokee County, South Carolina by the Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service. It provides an overview of the problem of adolescent pregnancy in South Carolina and describes the…

  7. Developing an Effective Intervention for Incarcerated Teen Fathers: The Baby Elmo Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brito, Natalie; Barr, Rachel; Rodriguez, Jennifer; Shauffer, Carole

    2012-01-01

    The absence of a father figure has been linked to very poor developmental outcomes. The Baby Elmo Program, a parenting and structured visitation program, aims to form and maintain bonds between children and their incarcerated teen fathers. The program is taught and supervised by probation staff in juvenile detention facilities. This intervention…

  8. Financial Incentives for Teen Parents to Stay in School. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Financial incentives for teen parents are components of state welfare programs intended to encourage enrollment, attendance, and completion of high school as a means of increasing employment and earnings and reducing welfare dependence. The incentives take the form of bonuses and sanctions to the welfare grant related to school enrollment,…

  9. Family Life Education for Young Teens: An Assessment of Three Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herz, Elicia J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The impact of exposure time, instructional methods, and teacher quality in a family life education program for junior high students was investigated and classified according to intensity. The more intensive the program, the greater the gains in knowledge about teen reproduction and prevention methods. (Author/CH)

  10. At-Risk Children: Problems and Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovland, Jane; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Using a sampling of 1,801 students in grades K-6, provides school counselors with information about the frequency and the severity of specific behavior problems of boys and girls in classrooms. Also lists interventions recommended by teachers who report few of these problems in their classrooms. Statistical summaries appear in four appendices.…

  11. The Supporting a Teen's Effective Entry to the Roadway (STEER) Program: Feasibility and Preliminary Support for a Psychosocial Intervention for Teenage Drivers with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabiano, Gregory A.; Hulme, Kevin; Linke, Stuart; Nelson-Tuttle, Chris; Pariseau, Meaghan; Gangloff, Brian; Lewis, Kemper; Pelham, William E.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Waxmonsky, James G.; Gormley, Matthew; Gera, Shradha; Buck, Melina

    2011-01-01

    Teenage drivers with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at considerable risk for negative driving outcomes, including traffic citations, accidents, and injuries. Presently, no efficacious psychosocial interventions exist for teenage drivers with ADHD. The Supporting a Teen's Effective Entry to the Roadway (STEER) program is a…

  12. Active Patient Participation in the Development of an Online Intervention

    PubMed Central

    van Weel-Baumgarten, Evelyn M; Snippe, Harm Wouter; Gouw, Hans; Zijlstra, Josée M; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Background An important and challenging part of living with cancer relates to the repeated visits to the hospital. Since how patients cope between these post-diagnostic visits depends partly on the information and support received from their physician during the visits, it is important to make the most of them. Recent findings reinforce the importance of training not only the health care professionals in communication skills, but providing patients with support in communication as well. Delivering such supportive interventions online can have potential benefits in terms of accessibility, cost-effectiveness, and ability to tailor information to personal needs. However, problems with attrition (dropout, non-usage) during the test phase and poor uptake after implementation are frequently reported. The marginal level of engagement of the patient as end user seems to play a role in this. Therefore, recent research suggests integrating theory-based development methods with methods that promote involvement of the patient at an early stage. This paper describes a participatory protocol, used to let patients guide a theory-informed development process. Objective The objective of this project was to apply a bottom-up inspired procedure to develop a patient-centered intervention with corresponding evaluation and implementation plan. Methods The applied development protocol was based on the intervention mapping framework, combined with patient participatory methods that were inspired by the participation ladder and user-centred design methods. Results The applied protocol led to a self-directed online communication intervention aimed at helping patients gain control during their communications with health care professionals. It also led to an evaluation plan and an implementation plan. The protocol enabled the continuous involvement of patient research partners and the partial involvement of patient service users, which led to valuable insights and improvements. Conclusions

  13. Novel Incentives and Messaging in an Online College Smoking Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Carla J.; Stratton, Erin; Sokol, Michael; Santamaria, Andrew; Bryant, Lawrence; Rodriguez, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the feasibility, acceptability, and potential effectiveness of an online intervention targeting college smokers. The incentives involved discounted or free goods and services from businesses proximal to each campus. Methods A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 122 current smokers recruited from 2 Southeastern US universities. The intervention involved health behavior monitoring, targeted messaging, and incentives for healthy goods and services versus the American Cancer Society’s Guide to Quitting Smoking online. Results The intervention achieved greater adherence and utilization (p’s < .001). Overall, 55.6% learned about a local business through this program. At end-of-treatment, intervention participants less frequently attempted to quit (p = .02) but smoked fewer cigarettes/day (p = .05). Both groups demonstrated significant end-of-treatment cessation rates. Conclusions This intervention demonstrated feasibility and acceptability. PMID:24933136

  14. The Use of Online Focus Groups to Design an Online Food Safety Education Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Ashley Bramlett; Harrison, Judy A.

    2012-01-01

    In the development of an online food safety education intervention for college students, online focus groups were used to determine the appropriate format and messages. Focus groups are often used in qualitative research and formative evaluation of public health programs, yet traditional focus groups can be both difficult and expensive to…

  15. Teen Pregnancy: It's Time for the Schools to Tackle the Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buie, James

    1987-01-01

    To counter the teenage pregnancy epidemic, sex education should be expanded to a twelve year learning program. Schools must develop imaginative and innovative programs geared to their individual and community needs. School-based medical clinics and special programs for pregnant and parenting teens may be necessities in some communities. (MD)

  16. Couple-based interventions for medical problems.

    PubMed

    Baucom, Donald H; Porter, Laura S; Kirby, Jennifer S; Hudepohl, Jasmine

    2012-03-01

    The current paper discusses general principles, therapeutic strategies, common factors, and domains commonly addressed in the treatment of couples who have a partner with a medical condition. Couple-based interventions for medical problems are contrasted with couple therapy and relationship education in that the emphasis is on assisting the patient in addressing the medical disorder, along with being attentive to the patient's partner and their relationship. Guidelines are provided showing how knowledge and understanding of medical disorders and couple functioning are integrated in order to conduct such interventions. Five common domains addressed during intervention are elaborated upon: (a) psychoeducation about the disorder, (b) sharing thoughts and feeling regarding the disorder, (c) making decisions focal to the medical disorder, (d) implementing relationship changes that are nonmedical but that result from the disorder, and (e) addressing relationship functioning unrelated to the disorder. The importance of empirically demonstrating the utility of each domain in future investigations is noted. PMID:22304879

  17. Teens, Kindness and Cruelty on Social Network Sites: How American Teens Navigate the New World of "Digital Citizenship"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenhart, Amanda; Madden, Mary; Smith, Aaron; Purcell, Kristen; Zickuhr, Kathryn; Rainie, Lee

    2011-01-01

    Social media use has become so pervasive in the lives of American teens that having a presence on a social network site is almost synonymous with being online. Fully 95% of all teens ages 12-17 are now online and 80% of those online teens are users of social media sites. The authors focused their attention in this research on social network sites…

  18. Cost of Talking Parents, Healthy Teens: a Worksite-based Intervention to Promote Parent-Adolescent Sexual Health Communication

    PubMed Central

    Ladapo, Joseph A.; Elliott, Marc N.; Bogart, Laura M.; Kanouse, David E.; Vestal, Katherine D.; Klein, David J.; Ratner, Jessica A.; Schuster, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the cost and cost-effectiveness of implementing Talking Parents, Healthy Teens, a worksite-based parenting program designed to help parents address sexual health with their adolescent children. Methods We enrolled 535 parents with adolescent children at 13 worksites in southern California in a randomized trial. Time and wage data from employees involved in implementing the program were used to estimate fixed and variable costs. Cost-effectiveness was determined with nonparametric bootstrap analysis. For the intervention, parents participated in eight weekly one-hour teaching sessions at lunchtime. The program included games, discussions, role plays, and videotaped role plays to help parents learn to communicate with their children about sex-related topics, teach their children assertiveness and decision-making skills, and supervise and interact with their children more effectively. Results Implementing the program cost $543.03 (SD=$289.98) per worksite in fixed costs, and $28.05 per parent (SD=$4.08) in variable costs. At 9 months, this $28.05 investment per parent yielded improvements in number of sexual health topics discussed, condom teaching, and communication quality and openness. The cost-effectiveness was $7.42 per new topic discussed using parental responses and $9.18 using adolescent responses. Other efficacy outcomes also yielded favorable cost-effectiveness ratios. Conclusions Talking Parents, Healthy Teens demonstrated the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of a worksite-based parenting program to promote parent-adolescent communication about sexual health. Its cost is reasonable and unlikely to be a significant barrier to adoption and diffusion for most worksites considering its implementation. PMID:23406890

  19. Specific strategies: interventions for identified problem behaviors.

    PubMed

    Reed, S A

    1990-12-01

    Negativism, complaining, underachievement, game playing, passive-aggressive behavior, and workaholism constitute a repertoire of problem employee behaviors that impact on the productivity and morale of the work environment. Responding appropriately to the employee who presents with any of these behaviors is a formidable challenge to the nurse manager. Understanding the etiology of unmet needs, psychosocial dynamics (as discussed in Chapter 1) and variety of interventions can empower the nurse manager to achieve success in these difficult interactions. PMID:2081113

  20. Avoiding common problems during online submission of manuscripts.

    PubMed

    Welch, Stephen J

    2007-05-01

    Online submission of manuscripts is normally fast, relatively easy, and timely. However, failure to follow journal instructions, omitting required aspects of manuscripts, and other problems can delay or stop the submission and peer-review process. This article discusses common problems encountered during online submission and advises authors on how to avoid those problems and maximize the efficiency of the online submission process. PMID:17494812

  1. Replicating a Teen HIV/STD Preventive Intervention in a Multicultural City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Diane M.; Hoppe, Marilyn J.; Wells, Elizabeth A.; Beadnell, Blair A.; Wilsdon, Anthony; Higa, Darrel; Gillmore, Mary Rogers; Casey, Erin A.

    2007-01-01

    Although there are now several adolescent HIV and STD preventive interventions of demonstrated efficacy in the literature, little is understood about the portability of these interventions. This study replicated Stanton's Focus on Kids intervention, developed for inner city African American adolescents, in a different population, transferring it…

  2. Teen Options for Change (TOC): An Intervention for Adolescent Emergency Patients who Screen Positive for Suicide Risk

    PubMed Central

    King, Cheryl A.; Gipson, Polly Y; Horwitz, Adam G; Opperman, Kiel J

    2015-01-01

    Objective Previous research has documented the feasibility of adolescent suicide risk screening in emergency departments. This randomized trial examined the effectiveness of Teen Options for Change (TOC), an intervention for adolescents seeking medical emergency services who screen positive for suicide risk. Method Participants were 49 adolescents, ages 14 to 19, seeking services for non-psychiatric chief complaints who screened positive for suicide risk due to recent suicidal ideation/attempt and/or depression plus alcohol abuse. They were randomly assigned to TOC or enhanced treatment-as-usual. Depression, hopelessness, and suicidal ideation were assessed at baseline and two-month follow-up. Results Adolescents assigned to TOC showed greater reductions in depression than adolescents assigned to the comparison group (Cohen's d = 1.07; large effect size). Hopelessness, suicidal ideation and alcohol outcomes trended positively (nonsignificantly) with small to moderate effect sizes. Conclusions TOC is a promising, brief intervention for adolescents seeking emergency services who are at risk for suicide. PMID:25321886

  3. Teen Mothers' Mental Health.

    PubMed

    SmithBattle, Lee; Freed, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Psychological distress is common in teen mothers. High rates of distress are attributed to teen mothers' childhood adversities and the challenges of parenting in the context of chronic stress, cumulative disadvantage, and limited social support. We describe the prevalence of psychological distress in teen mothers; what is known about its origins and impact on mothers and children; factors that promote teen mothers' mental health and resilience; and the many barriers that make it difficult to obtain traditional mental healthcare. We also briefly review the few studies that test interventions to improve teen mothers' mental health. Because barriers to traditional mental health treatment are ubiquitous and difficult to remedy, the second article in this two-part series calls for nurses in healthcare settings, schools, and home visiting programs to screen pregnant and parenting teens for adverse childhood experiences and psychological distress, and to integrate strength-based and trauma-based principles into their practice. Creating a supportive setting where past traumas and psychological distress are addressed with skill and sensitivity builds upon teen mothers' strengths and their aspirations to be the best parents they can be. These approaches facilitate the long-term health and development of mother and child. PMID:26474475

  4. Reducing Depression Through an Online Intervention: Benefits From a User Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    Background Internet interventions are increasingly being recognized as effective in the treatment and prevention of mental health conditions; however, the usefulness of such programs from the perspective of the participants is often not reported. Objective This study explores the experiences of participants of a 12-week randomized controlled trial of an automated self-help training program (e-couch), with and without an Internet support group, targeting depression. Methods The study comprised a community sample of 298 participants who completed an online survey both prior to and on completion of an intervention for preventing or reducing depressive symptoms. Results Overall, participants reported a high level of confidence in the ability of an online intervention to improve a person’s understanding of depression. However, confidence that a website could help people learn skills for preventing depression was lower. Benefits reported by participants engaged in the intervention included increased knowledge regarding depression and its treatment, reduced depressive symptoms, increased work productivity, and improved ability to cope with everyday stress. A minority of participants reported concerns or problems resulting from participation in the interventions. Conclusions The findings provide consumer support for the effectiveness of this online intervention. Trial Registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 65657330;http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN65657330 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6cwH8xwF0) PMID:26747378

  5. Evaluating an Online Resourcefulness Training Intervention Pilot Test Using Six Critical Parameters.

    PubMed

    Musil, Carol M; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A; Burant, Christopher J; Toly, Valerie B; Warner, Camille B

    2015-12-01

    Few resources are available to help grandmother caregivers to grandchildren manage their complex family situations that may have immediate and long-term consequences for themselves and their families. Resourcefulness training is an intervention designed to help grandmothers improve their ability to deal with these problems. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the necessity, feasibility, acceptability, fidelity, safety, and effectiveness (i.e., effect sizes) of an online, computer-based resourcefulness training intervention that was adapted from a face-to-face intervention. Twelve grandmothers raising or living with grandchildren participated in the pilot intervention that included (a) watching an instructional video on resourcefulness, (b) completing two online questionnaires over a 6-week time period, and (c) writing in an online journal every day for 4 weeks. Data are evaluated within the context of the six parameters important to intervention development. Qualitative and quantitative results provide initial support for all six parameters. Recommendations to improve aspects of the intervention are discussed. PMID:26738997

  6. Online perspective-taking as an intervention tool against cyberbullying.

    PubMed

    Van Den Broeck, Evert; Poels, Karolien; Vandebosch, Heidi; Van Royen, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    This study will examine the use of an online role-playing experiment as a cyberbullying intervention tool. The study will be carried out among 14 - to 18-year old adolescents (N = 200). Respondents will be assigned a fictitious character and a role (perpetrator, victim or bystander) in a cyberbullying situation. They will be asked to identify with this character and act accordingly in an initiated mock, but realistic online bullying situation. We expect, based on role playing literature and bullying prevention programs, a positive change in the adolescents' behavioral intentions (e.g. defending a victim). PMID:24875702

  7. Grieving Teen

    MedlinePlus

    ... and talk to? Teens often trust only their peers, believing that no one else can understand how ... thoughts of how to ease their pain. Does peer counseling work? Because teens are most open to ...

  8. Teen Violence

    MedlinePlus

    Teen violence refers to harmful behaviors that can start early and continue into young adulthood. The young ... death. An important risk factor for violence in teens is the behavior of their friends and classmates. ...

  9. Online Help for Problem Gambling among Chinese Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chang Boon Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the perceptions and accessibility of online help for problem gambling among Chinese youths. A group of undergraduates participated in a survey cum laboratory exercise to search for help for problem gambling in Macao, Hong Kong, and China. Online search engines were used. During the search process,…

  10. Designing Problem-Driven Instruction with Online Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyeong-Ju Seo, Kay, Ed.; Pellegrino, Debra A., Ed.; Engelhard, Chalee, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Designing Problem-Driven Instruction with Online Social Media has the capacity to transform an educator's teaching style by presenting innovative ways to empower problem-based instruction with online social media. Knowing that not all instructors are comfortable in this area, this book provides clear, systematic design approaches for instructors…

  11. Three-Month Follow-up Of Brief Computerized And Therapist Interventions For Alcohol And Violence Among Teens

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Walton, Maureen A.; Goldstein, Abby; Chermack, Stephen T.; Shope, Jean T.; Bingham, C. Raymond; Zimmerman, Marc A.; Blow, Frederic C.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol use and violent behaviors are well documented among inner city adolescents and have enormous effect on morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVES We hypothesize that universal computer screening of teens in an inner city ED, followed by a brief intervention (BI) for violence & alcohol will be: 1) feasible (as measured by participation and completion of BI during the ED visit) and well received by teens (as measured by post-test process measures of intervention acceptability); and 2) effective at significantly changing known precursors to behavior change such as attitudes, self-efficacy, and readiness to change alcohol use and violence 3-months following the ED-based BI. METHODS Patients (ages 14–18, 3–11 shift, 7 days/week), at an Urban Level 1 ED (Sept 06–Nov 08) were approached to complete a computerized survey. Adolescents reporting past year alcohol use and violence were randomized to a control group, or a ~35 minute BI delivered by a computer or therapist as part of the SafERteens study. Measures Validated measures were administered including: demographics, alcohol use, attitudes toward alcohol and violence, self-efficacy for alcohol and violence, readiness to change alcohol and violence, and BI process questions, including likeability of intervention. RESULTS 2423 adolescents were screened (13% refused): 45% male; 58% African-American and 6.2% Hispanic. Of those screened, 637 adolescents (26%) screened positive; 533 were randomized to participate and 515 completed the BI prior to discharge. The BIs were well received by the adolescents; overall, 97% of those randomized to a BI self-reported that they found one intervention section “very helpful”. At post-test, significant reductions in positive attitudes for alcohol use and violence and significant increases in self-efficacy related to alcohol/violence were found in both the therapist and computer BI conditions. At 3-month follow-up (81% retention), as compared to the control condition, generalized

  12. An Online Bystander Intervention Program for the Prevention of Sexual Violence

    PubMed Central

    Kleinsasser, Anne; Jouriles, Ernest N.; McDonald, Renee; Rosenfield, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective Because of its high prevalence and serious consequences for victims, sexual violence is a significant problem on college campuses. Sexual assault prevention programs based on the bystander intervention model have been shown to be effective; however, current programs are limited in terms of ease of distribution. To address this issue, we developed and evaluated “Take Care,” an online bystander intervention program. To our knowledge, this is the first empirical evaluation of an online bystander intervention program designed to prevent sexual violence. Method Ninety-three participants (80.6% female, 19.4% male) recruited from social psychology classes at a mid-size university were randomly assigned to view one of two online programs: Take Care or a control program on study skills. Before viewing the programs, participants completed measures of bystander behaviors and feelings of efficacy for performing such behaviors. Measures were administered again post-intervention and at a two-month follow-up assessment. Results Participants who viewed Take Care reported greater efficacy for engaging in bystander behaviors at post-treatment and two months following treatment, compared to those who viewed the control program. In addition, participants who viewed Take Care reported performing relatively more bystander behaviors for friends at the two-month follow-up assessment, compared to participants who viewed the control program. Conclusions These results suggest that sexual violence prevention programs may be effectively adapted to an online format. PMID:26240776

  13. Evaluating an online stress management intervention for college students.

    PubMed

    Hintz, Samuel; Frazier, Patricia A; Meredith, Liza

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of a theory-based online intervention designed to improve stress management in undergraduate students. The intervention focused on present control because it has been found to be associated with a range of positive outcomes, including lower levels of depression, anxiety, and stress, controlling for a range of other variables (e.g., Frazier et al., 2011, 2012). Two pilot studies were first conducted to confirm that our intervention could increase present control. We then randomly assigned psychology students (n = 292) who were prescreened to have lower scores on the present control subscale of the Perceived Control Over Stressful Events Scale (Frazier et al., 2011) to 1 of 3 conditions: the present control intervention, the present control intervention plus feedback, and stress-information only. Seventy-six percent (n = 223) began the intervention, and 87% (n = 195) of those completed the posttest and 3-week follow-up. The 2 present control intervention groups had lower levels of stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms (on the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales; Lovibond & Lovibond, 1995) and perceived stress (on the Perceived Stress Scale; Cohen, Kamarck, & Mermelstein, 1983) relative to the stress-information-only group at posttest and 3-week follow-up (mean between group d at follow-up = .35, mean within group d for intervention groups at follow-up = -.46). Further, mediation analyses revealed that these effects were mediated by changes in present control. Our intervention represents a potentially valuable tool for college mental health services. PMID:24635586

  14. Enhancing Sensitivity in Adolescent Mothers: Does a Standardised, Popular Parenting Intervention Work with Teens?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohr, Yvonne; BinNoon, Noam

    2014-01-01

    This community pilot study was designed to evaluate a small group intervention, Right From The Start (RFTS), in terms of the benefits it provides to adolescent mothers specifically. The effectiveness of the programme was examined in the areas of maternal sensitivity, parenting confidence, parenting stress, and postnatal depression. RFTS has been…

  15. Teaching Soils Online Using a Problem-Based Learning Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlpine, Iain; Dudley, Nick

    Problem-based learning (PBL) was used as the instructional design basis for a TAFE (Technical and Further Education) unit of competency developed for online delivery. The courseware was commissioned to provide online content for users of the Victorian TAFE Virtual Campus (Australia). The aim of the project was to provide courseware that would…

  16. Student Technological Creativity Using Online Problem-Solving Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yu-Shan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of online (web-based) creative problem-solving (CPS) activities on student technological creativity and to examine the characteristics of student creativity in the context of online CPS. A pretest-posttest quasi-experiment was conducted with 107 fourth-grade students in Taiwan. The…

  17. Online and Social Networking Interventions for the Treatment of Depression in Young People: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Goodall, Joanne; Hetrick, Sarah E; Parker, Alexandra G; Gilbertson, Tamsyn; Amminger, G. Paul; Davey, Christopher G; McGorry, Patrick D; Gleeson, John; Alvarez-Jimenez, Mario

    2014-01-01

    with most trials using self-report data. Studies varied significantly in presentation of intervention content, treatment dose, and dropout. Only two studies included moderator or clinician input. Results for Section 2 were less consistent. None of the Section 2 studies reported controlled or randomized designs. With the exception of four studies, all included participants were younger than 25 years of age. Eight of the 16 social networking studies reported positive results for depression-related outcomes. The remaining studies were either mixed or negative. Findings for online support groups tended to be more positive; however, noteworthy risks were identified. Conclusions Online interventions with a broad cognitive behavioral focus appear to be promising in reducing depression symptomology in young people. Further research is required into the effectiveness of online interventions delivering cognitive behavioral subcomponents, such as problem-solving therapy. Evidence for the use of social networking is less compelling, although limited by a lack of well-designed studies and social networking interventions. A range of future social networking therapeutic opportunities are highlighted. PMID:25226790

  18. Authoritative feeding behaviors to reduce child BMI through online interventions.

    PubMed

    Frenn, Marilyn; Pruszynski, Jessica E; Felzer, Holly; Zhang, Jiannan

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE.: The purpose of the study was to examine the feasibility and initial efficacies of parent- and/or child-focused online interventions and variables correlated with child body mass index percentile change. DESIGN AND METHODS.: A feasibility and cluster randomized controlled pilot study was used. RESULTS.: Recruitment was more effective at parent-teacher conferences compared with when materials were sent home with fifth- to eighth-grade culturally diverse students. Retention was 90% for students and 62-74% for parents. Authoritative parent feeding behaviors were associated with lower child body mass index. A larger study is warranted. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS.: Online approaches may provide a feasible option for childhood obesity prevention and amelioration. PMID:23289456

  19. Teen Driving as Public Drama: Statistics, Risk, and the Social Construction of Youth as a Public Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, Amy L.

    2008-01-01

    In popular and policy framings in the USA, traffic accidents and fatalities involving teens are typically treated as having their own facticity. Much like other social phenomenon, teen driving accidents are regarded as though they are part of an objective reality external to a set of ideational or discursive processes and social organization of…

  20. COPE for Depressed and Anxious Teens: A Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Skills Building Intervention to Increase Access to Timely, Evidence-Based Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lusk, Pamela; Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek

    2012-01-01

    TOPIC Evidence–based CBT skills building intervention – COPE -for depressed and anxious teens in brief 30 minute outpatient visits. PURPOSE Based on COPE training workshops, this paper provides an overview of the COPE program, it’s development, theoretical foundation, content of the sessions and lessons learned for best delivery of COPE to individuals and groups in psychiatric settings, primary care settings and schools. SOURCES Published literature and clinical examples CONCLUSION With the COPE program, the advanced practice nurse in busy outpatient practice can provide timely, evidence-based therapy for adolescents and use the full extent of his/her advanced practice nursing knowledge and skills. PMID:23351105

  1. Developing an online health intervention for young gay and bisexual men.

    PubMed

    Pachankis, John E; Lelutiu-Weinberger, Corina; Golub, Sarit A; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2013-11-01

    Young gay and bisexual men continue to experience increases in HIV incidence in the US highlighting a need for competent health services, while the prominence of the internet in their social and sexual lives calls for novel preventive modalities. Toward this goal, we adapted an efficacious in-office HIV risk reduction intervention for online delivery. This paper describes the development of the online intervention and highlights the results of interviews and focus groups with the original intervention participants regarding effective adaptation and online delivery recommendations. The final intervention incorporates strategies for overcoming barriers to online intervention with this population and capitalizes on the unique strengths of online intervention delivery. The systematic process described in this paper can be used as a template for other researchers to develop online risk reduction programs and fills an important gap in the field's ability to maximally reach a critical risk group. PMID:23673791

  2. Developing an Online Health Intervention for Young Gay and Bisexual Men

    PubMed Central

    Pachankis, John E.; Lelutiu-Weinberger, Corina; Golub, Sarit A.; Parsons, Jeffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    Young gay and bisexual men who have sex with men continue to experience increases in HIV incidence in the U.S, highlighting a need for competent health services, while the prominence of the internet in their social and sexual lives call for novel preventive modalities. Towards this goal, we adapted an efficacious in-office HIV risk reduction intervention, for online delivery. This paper describes the development of the online intervention and highlights the results of interviews and focus groups with the original intervention participants regarding effective adaptation and online delivery recommendations. The final intervention incorporates strategies for overcoming barriers to online intervention with this population, capitalizing on the unique strengths of online intervention delivery. The systematic process described in this paper can be used as a template for other researchers to develop online risk reduction programs and fills an important gap in the field’s ability to maximally reach a critical risk group. PMID:23673791

  3. ADVICE IN THE TEEN MAGAZINES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SIMPSON, ELIZABETH J.

    THE PURPOSES OF THIS STUDY WERE TO DETERMINE (1) WHAT PROBLEMS THE ADVICE COLUMNS AND ARTICLES IN THE TEEN MAGAZINES PRESENT, (2) THE NATURE OF THE ADVICE GIVEN, (3) WHETHER THEY WERE DIRECTED PRIMARILY TOWARD GIRLS, BOYS, OR BOTH, AND (4) WHO THE AUTHORS ARE. OVER A 10-MONTH PERIOD, 84 ISSUES OF DIFFERENT TEEN MAGAZINES WERE EXAMINED BY USING A…

  4. Understanding Your Teen's Emotional Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... of a problem. Teens, especially those with low self-esteem or with family problems, are at risk for ... energy and lack of interest in activities Low self-esteem Trouble falling asleep Run-ins with the law ...

  5. Teen Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prenatal Baby (0-12 mos.) Toddler 1-3yrs. Preschool 3-5yrs Grade School 5-12yrs. Teen 12- ... Find a Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Dating & Sex Fitness Nutrition Driving Safety ...

  6. Interventions for Achievement and Behavioral Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoner, Gary, Ed.; And Others

    This book is organized around several themes, namely: the changing context for the professional practice of school psychology; classroom- and school-based prevention and intervention programs; and professional training issues specific to intervention-oriented school psychology. The first three chapters address numerous reform and restructuring…

  7. An Intervention Including an Online Game to Improve Grade 6 Students' Performance in Early Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolovou, Angeliki; van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja; Koller, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether an intervention including an online game contributed to 236 Grade 6 students' performance in early algebra, that is, solving problems with covarying quantities. An exploratory quasi-experimental study was conducted with a pretest-posttest-control-group design. Students in the experimental group were asked to…

  8. Problem Solving Variations in an Online Programming Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebrahimi, Alireza

    2007-01-01

    An observation on teaching introductory programming courses on SLN for a period of two terms led me to believe that online students try various ways to solve a problem. In the beginning, I got the impression that some of their approaches for a solution were wrong; but after a little investigation, I found that some of the problem-solving…

  9. The Effect of Positive Adolescent Life Skills Training on Long Term Outcomes for High-Risk Teens.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Heider, Nancy; Tuttle, Jane; Knapp, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on long term follow-up data-12 months post intervention-from a clinical trial of an intervention designed to enhance teen resilience by supporting the development of social skills needed to make positive connections and overcome the influence of negative environmental influences. Sixteen adolescents aged 12 to 16 (10 boys and 6 girls) attending an inner city urban secondary school participated in a 32 week intervention study. Subjects were randomly assigned within sex to Teen Club plus Positive Adolescent Life Skills (PALS) or Teen Club intervention groups. The Problem Oriented Screening Instrument for Teenagers (POSIT) was used to measure the dependent variables (problems related to substance use, health, mental health, family relations, peer relations, education status, vocational status, social skills, leisure and recreation, and aggression). The small sample size limited the ability to determine statistical differences between the POSIT subscale scores for PALS plus Teen Club or Teen Club only interventions. Descriptive data suggest mixed results for both interventions and sex groups. Most important were reductions in mental health problems for all boys in both groups and only slightly increased numbers of problems in substance use for PALS boys and girls over time. Other trends by group and sex are reported. PMID:21132073

  10. Cybersex and the E-teen: what marriage and family therapists should know.

    PubMed

    Delmonico, David L; Griffin, Elizabeth J

    2008-10-01

    Adolescents who use the Internet regularly (the "e-teen") present a new set of challenges for marriage and family therapists. This article introduces marriage and family therapists to (a) the basic technological concepts and unique psychological characteristics of the Internet important in understanding and addressing adolescent online sexual behavior, (b) the appropriate developmental expectations for teens online, including risk-taking behaviors and critical decision-making skills, and (c) suggested strategies for assessment, prevention, and intervention when dealing with problematic online sexual behavior in adolescents. Marriage and family therapists cannot ignore the role the Internet plays in adolescent sexual development and its implication for the family. This article will serve as a primer for the marriage and family therapist when presented with adolescents who engage in online sexual behaviors. PMID:19017183

  11. Ages and Stages: Teen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Featured Article Meningococcal Disease: Information for Teens and College Students Certain teens and young adults have a higher ... Managing Money Meningococcal Disease: Information for Teens and College Students Mental Health and Teens: Watch for Danger Signs ...

  12. CATER: An online problem tracking facility for SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Sass, R.C.; Shoaee, H.

    1993-05-01

    An online facility has been developed for SLC to organize and simplify the management of all problems encountered in the operation of the accelerator. CATER (Computer Aided Trouble Entry and Reporting) may be used to make the initial entry of a problem, to enter one or more solutions to a problem, to modify or closeout a problem, to generate a variety of pre-defined reports giving status and statistical summaries, and to allow anyone to browse the database. All phases of CATER can take place on the operator console, workstations, or on any ANSI compatible terminal. The user interface is designed around a menu driven windowed environment with a large amount of context sensitive help information to alleviate the need for consulting user documentation. Currently, the CATER database contains information on more than 30,000 problems entered since it went online in January of 1988. The features of the software and some implementation details will be presented.

  13. Teen Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... shown that certain types of talk therapy or psychotherapy can help teens deal with depression. These include ... behaviors, and feelings related to depression, and interpersonal psychotherapy, which focuses on working on relationships. Read more ...

  14. Teens Take Stand on Bullying, but Resources Are Needed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Nine percent of 13- to 15-year-old teens and 3% of teens 16 to 18 years old say they are "always" or "often" bullied to a point that makes them feel very sad, angry, sad, or upset. Over one-quarter of all teens say they are "sometimes" bullied to this point. This article presents some results of a "Harris Poll" of 776 teens surveyed online in…

  15. Use of Media Technologies by Native American Teens and Young Adults: Evaluating Their Utility for Designing Culturally-Appropriate Sexual Health Interventions Targeting Native Youth in the Pacific Northwest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig Rushing, Stephanie Nicole

    2010-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth are disproportionally burdened by high rates of sexually transmitted infections and teen pregnancy, heightening their need for sexual health interventions that are aligned to their unique culture and social context. Media technologies, including the Internet, cell phones, and video games, offer new…

  16. The Effectiveness of an Intervention to Promote Awareness and Reduce Online Risk Behavior in Early Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Janneke D; Brusselaers, Marjolein B J; Bogaerts, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    The current study explored the effect of a school-based intervention on online risk awareness and behavior in order to shed light on a relatively unexplored field with high practical relevance. More than 800 Belgium primary school children (grade 4 and 6) were assessed at two measurements (n T1 = 812, 51.2 % female; n T2 = 819, 51.3 % female) before and after the intervention. Half of them received a 10 min classroom intervention indicating online risks. Children in the control group received a 10 min presentation concerning online applications without any emphasis on risks. Children in the intervention group were more likely to be aware of online risks directly after the intervention; this effect was still noticeable 4 months after. Reporting of online risk behavior in the intervention group was also higher compared to the control group who did not receive the intervention. Overall online risk awareness and online risk behavior were negatively associated and the awareness did not modulate the association between the intervention and online risk behavior. Furthermore, individual differences were assessed. Girls were more likely to be aware of online risks and asserted less online risk behavior than boys were. In line with the imperative in adolescence to become more risk taking, children in a higher grade were more likely to behave in a risky manner when online. The current study provides a valuable starting point for further research on how to decrease online risk behavior in early adolescence. PMID:26705253

  17. Employing a teen advisory board to adapt an evidence-based HIV/STD intervention for incarcerated African-American adolescent women.

    PubMed

    Latham, Teaniese P; Sales, Jessica M; Renfro, Tiffaney L; Boyce, Lorin S; Rose, Eve; Murray, Colleen C; Wingood, Gina M; DiClemente, Ralph J

    2012-10-01

    This manuscript assesses priorities and challenges of adolescent females by conducting a meeting with teen advisory board (TAB) members to collect information regarding their lives and experiences pre-, during and post-incarceration in a juvenile detention facility. Multiple themes emerged regarding the impact of incarceration on young African-American females, including experiencing a loss of personal liberties, the importance of making money upon release, unfaithfulness by partners on the 'outside', substance use and lack of control over their environment upon release, including parents, peers and male sexual partners. Based on feedback from TAB members, unique barriers and challenges were identified that suggested areas where adaptations to an evidenced-based HIV/sexually transmitted disease (STD) intervention would be justified to more adequately meet the needs of this particular subgroup of young African-American women. Adaptations to the evidence-based interventions included enhancing activities related to goal setting, emotion regulation skills, decision-making, recognizing and utilizing support networks and addressing the relationship between substance use and risky sexual behavior. Future health education efforts focusing on either the creation of new HIV/STD interventions or adaptations to existing interventions should consider utilizing advisory boards with members of the priority population at the earliest stages of intervention planning. PMID:21368023

  18. Early psychotic experiences: Interventions, problems and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakopoulos, S; Kollias, C; Stefanis, N C; Kontaxakis, V

    2015-01-01

    Psychotic or psychotic-like experiences and symptoms may precede and be indicative of later psychosis emergence. DSM-5 has introduced Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome (APS) as a condition for further study, arguing for its clinical validity and the need for identifying sub- threshold psychotic states. Early psychosis intervention has an already established role in reducing the Duration of Untreated Psychosis (DUP), delaying psychosis onset and relieving Ultra High Risk (UHR) individuals from their presenting symptoms. Pharmacological and mainly psycho-therapeutical approaches are suggested for this purpose. Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) seems to have clear evidence of favorable outcome concerning transition to psychosis rates, omega-3 fatty acids lower but promising evidence, while low-dose antipsychotic medication or antidepressant treatment may seem beneficial, but it remains unclear if the reported favorable effects persist in the long term and how long intervention in UHR subjects should be given for. Case management and close monitoring based on principles of social psychiatry are considered key elements for the management of UHR individuals. However, the blazing case about early psychosis concerns the accurate specification of the prodromal stage of psychosis, which may set the basis for meaningful and effective early intervention. Although psychometric tools have been developed and provide a common criteria-based recognition method, debate is alive and well regarding "false positive" cases, since most UHR subjects will not finally develop psychosis. Moreover, transition rates to psychosis have been declining over the years, leading to fierce criticism over the validity of the UHR/ APS state and legitimacy of its treatment. On this framework, ethical issues of stigmatizing through unnecessary diagnosing and antipsychotics' prescribing are matters of serious questioning. Clinical heterogeneity and high comorbidity are further implications of the UHR state

  19. Dissemination of a theory-based online bone health program: Two intervention approaches.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Resnick, Barbara; Bellantoni, Michele; Zhu, Shijun; Brown, Clayton; Brennan, Patricia F; Charters, Kathleen; Brown, Jeanine; Rietschel, Matthew; Pinna, Joanne; An, Minjeong; Park, Bu Kyung; Plummer, Lisa

    2015-06-01

    With the increasing nationwide emphasis on eHealth, there has been a rapid growth in the use of the Internet to deliver health promotion interventions. Although there has been a great deal of research in this field, little information is available regarding the methodologies to develop and implement effective online interventions. This article describes two social cognitive theory-based online health behavior interventions used in a large-scale dissemination study (N = 866), their implementation processes, and the lessons learned during the implementation processes. The two interventions were a short-term (8-week) intensive online Bone Power program and a longer term (12-month) Bone Power Plus program, including the Bone Power program followed by a 10-month online booster intervention (biweekly eHealth newsletters). This study used a small-group approach (32 intervention groups), and to effectively manage those groups, an eLearning management program was used as an upper layer of the Web intervention. Both interventions were implemented successfully with high retention rates (80.7% at 18 months). The theory-based approaches and the online infrastructure used in this study showed a promising potential as an effective platform for online behavior studies. Further replication studies with different samples and settings are needed to validate the utility of this intervention structure. PMID:26021668

  20. Adolescent Dating Violence Prevention and Intervention in a Community Setting: Perspectives of Young Adults and Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martsolf, Donna S.; Colbert, Crystal; Draucker, Claire B.

    2012-01-01

    Adolescent dating violence (ADV) is a significant community problem. In this study, we examine the perspectives of two groups (young adults who experienced ADV as teens and professionals who work with teens) on ADV prevention/intervention in a community context. We interviewed 88 young adults and 20 professionals. Our research team used Thorne's…

  1. Problem formulation, metrics, open government, and on-line collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, C. R.; Schofield, K.; Young, S.; Shaw, D.

    2010-12-01

    Problem formulation leading to effective environmental management, including synthesis and application of science by government agencies, may benefit from collaborative on-line environments. This is illustrated by two interconnected projects: 1) literature-based evidence tools that support causal assessment and problem formulation, and 2) development of output, outcome, and sustainability metrics for tracking environmental conditions. Specifically, peer-production mechanisms allow for global contribution to science-based causal evidence databases, and subsequent crowd-sourced development of causal networks supported by that evidence. In turn, science-based causal networks may inform problem formulation and selection of metrics or indicators to track environmental condition (or problem status). Selecting and developing metrics in a collaborative on-line environment may improve stakeholder buy-in, the explicit relevance of metrics to planning, and the ability to approach problem apportionment or accountability, and to define success or sustainability. Challenges include contribution governance, data-sharing incentives, linking on-line interfaces to data service providers, and the intersection of environmental science and social science. Degree of framework access and confidentiality may vary by group and/or individual, but may ultimately be geared at demonstrating connections between science and decision making and supporting a culture of open government, by fostering transparency, public engagement, and collaboration.

  2. Virtually There: Examining a Collaborative Online International Learning Pre-Departure Study Abroad Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojenski, Carrie Louise Prior

    2014-01-01

    As more guided study abroad interventions move online and into a collaborative format, it is important to not only examine the influence of students' social interactions as related to their intercultural development and experiences in the interventions, but also understand which variables influenced the success of an intervention. The purpose of…

  3. Does Helping Keep Teens Protected? Longitudinal Bidirectional Relations Between Prosocial Behavior and Problem Behavior.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Walker, Laura M; Carlo, Gustavo; Nielson, Matthew G

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined bidirectional, longitudinal links between prosocial and problem behavior. Participants (N = 500) were recruited from a Northwestern city in the United States and assessed for 3 consecutive years from 2009 to 2011 (M(age) of youth at Time 1 = 13.32, SD = 1.05; 52% girls; 67% European American, 33% single-parent families). Results suggested that effects of earlier prosocial behavior toward family and strangers were predictive of fewer problem behaviors 2 years later, while results for prosocial behavior toward friends were more mixed. Results also suggested depression predicted lower prosocial behavior toward family members and anxiety predicted higher prosocial behavior toward friends. Findings show a complex pattern of relations that demonstrate the need to consider targets of helping. PMID:26511897

  4. Climate Intervention as an Optimization Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, Ken; Ban-Weiss, George A.

    2010-05-01

    Typically, climate models simulations of intentional intervention in the climate system have taken the approach of imposing a change (eg, in solar flux, aerosol concentrations, aerosol emissions) and then predicting how that imposed change might affect Earth's climate or chemistry. Computations proceed from cause to effect. However, humans often proceed from "What do I want?" to "How do I get it?" One approach to thinking about intentional intervention in the climate system ("geoengineering") is to ask "What kind of climate do we want?" and then ask "What pattern of radiative forcing would come closest to achieving that desired climate state?" This involves defining climate goals and a cost function that measures how closely those goals are attained. (An important next step is to ask "How would we go about producing these desired patterns of radiative forcing?" However, this question is beyond the scope of our present study.) We performed a variety of climate simulations in NCAR's CAM3.1 atmospheric general circulation model with a slab ocean model and thermodynamic sea ice model. We then evaluated, for a specific set of climate forcing basis functions (ie, aerosol concentration distributions), the extent to which the climate response to a linear combination of those basis functions was similar to a linear combination of the climate response to each basis function taken individually. We then developed several cost functions (eg, relative to the 1xCO2 climate, minimize rms difference in zonal and annual mean land temperature, minimize rms difference in zonal and annual mean runoff, minimize rms difference in a combination of these temperature and runoff indices) and then predicted optimal combinations of our basis functions that would minimize these cost functions. Lastly, we produced forward simulations of the predicted optimal radiative forcing patterns and compared these with our expected results. Obviously, our climate model is much simpler than reality and

  5. Online Peer-to-Peer Support for Young People With Mental Health Problems: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Farrer, Louise; Gulliver, Amelia; Griffiths, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Background Adolescence and early adulthood are critical periods for the development of mental disorders. Online peer-to-peer communication is popular among young people and may improve mental health by providing social support. Previous systematic reviews have targeted Internet support groups for adults with mental health problems, including depression. However, there have been no systematic reviews examining the effectiveness of online peer-to-peer support in improving the mental health of adolescents and young adults. Objective The aim of this review was to systematically identify available evidence for the effectiveness of online peer-to peer support for young people with mental health problems. Methods The PubMed, PsycInfo, and Cochrane databases were searched using keywords and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms. Retrieved abstracts (n=3934) were double screened and coded. Studies were included if they (1) investigated an online peer-to-peer interaction, (2) the interaction discussed topics related to mental health, (3) the age range of the sample was between 12 to 25 years, and (4) the study evaluated the effectiveness of the peer-to-peer interaction. Results Six studies satisfied the inclusion criteria for the current review. The studies targeted a range of mental health problems including depression and anxiety (n=2), general psychological problems (n=1), eating disorders (n=1), and substance use (tobacco) (n=2). The majority of studies investigated Internet support groups (n=4), and the remaining studies focused on virtual reality chat sessions (n=2). In almost all studies (n=5), the peer support intervention was moderated by health professionals, researchers or consumers. Studies employed a range of study designs including randomized controlled trials (n=3), pre-post studies (n=2) and one randomized trial. Overall, two of the randomized controlled trials were associated with a significant positive outcome in comparison to the control group at post-intervention

  6. Teen Pregnancy: Why It Remains a Serious Social, Economic, and Educational Problem in the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldas, Stephen J.

    1994-01-01

    Disagrees with several points in Mike Males's teenage pregnancy article in the March 1993 "Kappan." Males emphasized that family formation among teenagers mirrors larger societal trends. Recent evidence shows otherwise. The economic and societal costs of early childbearing are worsening; 60% of teen families live in poverty. Providing adolescents…

  7. Comparison of Intervention Fidelity between COPE TEEN and an Attention-Control Program in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Stephanie A.; Oswalt, Krista; Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Jacobson, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Fidelity in implementing an intervention is critical to accurately determine and interpret the effects of an intervention. It is important to monitor the manner in which the behavioral intervention is implemented (e.g. adaptations, delivery as intended and dose). Few interventions are implemented with 100% fidelity. In this study, high school…

  8. Interactive Web Sites for Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Ken

    2005-01-01

    Eighty-three percent of teenagers are online. The average teen spends 5 to 10 hours a week on the Web. When using Web sites, teenagers are easily bored. Teenagers are also not nearly as skilled as adults at navigating the Web and do not really care for glitzy graphics. Insufficient reading skills, immature research strategies, and unwillingness to…

  9. Online and Social Media Suicide Prevention Interventions for Young People: A Focus on Implementation and Moderation

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Simon; Robinson, Jo; Bendall, Sarah; Hetrick, Sarah; Cox, Georgina; Bailey, Eleanor; Gleeson, John; Alvarez-Jimenez, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Suicide remains a major global public health issue for young people. The reach and accessibility of online and social media-based interventions herald a unique opportunity for suicide prevention. To date, the large body of research into suicide prevention has been undertaken atheoretically. This paper provides a rationale and theoretical framework (based on the interpersonal theory of suicide), and draws on our experiences of developing and testing online and social media-based interventions. Method: The implementation of three distinct online and social media-based intervention studies, undertaken with young people at risk of suicide, are discussed. We highlight the ways that these interventions can serve to bolster social connectedness in young people, and outline key aspects of intervention implementation and moderation. Results: Insights regarding the implementation of these studies include careful protocol development mindful of risk and ethical issues, establishment of suitably qualified teams to oversee development and delivery of the intervention, and utilisation of key aspects of human support (i.e., moderation) to encourage longer-term intervention engagement. Conclusions: Online and social media-based interventions provide an opportunity to enhance feelings of connectedness in young people, a key component of the interpersonal theory of suicide. Our experience has shown that such interventions can be feasibly and safely conducted with young people at risk of suicide. Further studies, with controlled designs, are required to demonstrate intervention efficacy. PMID:27274743

  10. Brief Report: An Online Support Intervention--Perceptions of Adolescents with Physical Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Miriam; Barnfather, Alison; Magill-Evans, Joyce; Ray, Lynne; Letourneau, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Adolescents with cerebral palsy and spina bifida report restricted interactions with peers and gaps in social support. A pilot online support intervention offered interactions with peers. Five mentors with cerebral palsy or spina bifida and 22 adolescents with the same disabilities met weekly online for 25 group sessions over six months.…

  11. Early Intervention of Eating- and Weight-Related Problems

    PubMed Central

    Vannucci, Anna; White, Emily K.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and other eating-related problems are widespread and are associated with harmful physical, psychological, and social problems. The dramatic increases in rates of pediatric obesity has created a mounting need for psychologists and other mental health care providers to play a significant role in the assessment and treatment of youth with eating- and weight-related problems. Therefore, it is imperative for providers to be aware of the causes and consequences of eating- and weight-related problems and to be familiar with evidence-based assessment and intervention approaches. Currently, the most well-established intervention approaches are family-based behavioral treatments, and weight loss maintenance treatments with a socio-ecological focus are promising. This paper provides a comprehensive review of these topics and highlights the important roles that mental health care providers can have. Medical settings are often the patient’s first point of contact within the healthcare system, making mental health care providers in such settings uniquely suited to assess for a broad range of eating- and weight-related problems and associated comorbidities, to deliver relevant evidence-based interventions, and to make appropriate referrals. Moving forward, providers and researchers must work together to address key questions related to the nature of eating- and weight-related problems in youth and to achieve breakthroughs in the prevention and treatment of such problems in this vulnerable population. PMID:20960039

  12. Successfully Promoting 21st Century Online Research Skills: Interventions in 5th-Grade Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsley, Tara L.; Cassady, Jerrell C.; Tancock, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    This quantitative study was developed to explore the ability to impact elementary student 21st Century online research skills with a planned classroom intervention curriculum. The repeated measures quasi-experimental study randomly assigned all 5th grade classes in a Midwestern, suburban school (n = 418) to a 12-week intervention or control…

  13. Teaching Problem-Solving and Critical-Thinking Skills Online Using Problem-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Liz; Orzechowski, Agnes; Rahatka, Ola

    2014-01-01

    The availability of technological tools is promoting a shift toward more student-centered online instruction. This article describes the implementation of a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) model and the technological tools used to meet the expectations of the model as well as the needs of the students. The end product is a hybrid course with eight…

  14. An online guided ACT intervention for enhancing the psychological wellbeing of university students: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Panajiota; Lappalainen, Päivi; Muotka, Joona; Tolvanen, Asko; Lappalainen, Raimo

    2016-03-01

    Stress, anxiety and depression are relatively common problems among university students. This study examined whether an online psychological intervention aiming at enhancing the wellbeing of university students could be an effective and practical alternative for meeting the needs of a university population. University students (N = 68; 85% female; 19-32 years old) were randomly assigned to either a guided seven-week online Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (iACT) intervention or a waiting list control condition (WLC). A between-groups pre-post (iACT vs WLC) design with 12-month follow-up for the iACT participants was conducted. The intervention participants were offered two face-to-face meetings, completed online exercises during a five-week period, and received personal weekly written feedback via the website from their randomly assigned, trained student coaches. Waitlist participants were offered the intervention program soon after the post measurements. Results in this small efficacy trial showed that the iACT participants had significantly higher gains in wellbeing (between group, d = 0.46), life satisfaction (d = 0.65), and mindfulness skills (d = 0.49). In addition, iACT participants' self-reported stress (d = 0.54) and symptoms of depression (d = 0.69) were significantly reduced compared to the participants in the control group. These benefits were maintained over a 12-month follow-up period (within iACT group, d = 0.65-0.69, for primary measures). The results suggest that an online-based, coach-guided ACT program with blended face-to-face and online sessions could be an effective and well-accepted alternative for enhancing the wellbeing of university students. PMID:26848517

  15. Health Problems of the Navajo Area and Suggested Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltenbach, Charles

    Analysis of morbidity, mortality, and demographic data on Navajo people was undertaken to identify leading health problems in the Navajo area and to suggest intervention activities. Comparisons with total U.S. population were made to provide perspective. Data on Navajo mortality showed: a ratio of male to female deaths of 2:1, more than 50 percent…

  16. New Routes from Books to Teens. Laurie Halse Anderson Speaks: An Interview; Celebrate Reading: A Literature Festival for the Whole Community; The Book Group behind Bars; Authors and Teens Online: Enhancing Book Discussions with Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Christine M.; Carlson, Chris; Sherman, Chris; Angier, Naomi; O'Dell, Katie; Diller, Kelly

    2000-01-01

    These four articles address issues related to teens and reading. Highlights include an interview with a young adult literature author; a community literature festival in St. Charles (Illinois) that introduces students to authors, poets, journalists, and storytellers; library services for youth in detention centers, including book discussion…

  17. Comparing School-Based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Programming: Mixed Outcomes in an At-Risk State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oman, Roy F.; Merritt, Breanca T.; Fluhr, Janene; Williams, Jean M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of a national comprehensive teen pregnancy prevention (TPP) intervention to a national abstinence-only TPP intervention on middle school students' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to teen sexual behaviors in a state with high teen birth rates. Methods: Pre- and…

  18. Focus-on-Teens, sexual risk-reduction intervention for high-school adolescents: impact on knowledge, change of risk-behaviours, and prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gaydos, C A; Hsieh, Y-H; Galbraith, J S; Barnes, M; Waterfield, G; Stanton, B

    2016-01-01

    Summary A community-based intervention, Focus-on-Kids (FOK) has demonstrated risk-behaviour reduction of urban youth. We modified FOK to Focus-on-Teens (FOT) for high schools. High school adolescents (n = 1190) were enrolled over successive school semesters. The small-group sessions were presented during the school-lunch hours. Confidential surveys were conducted at baseline, immediate, six-, and 12-month postintervention for demographics, parental communication/monitoring, sexual risk behaviours and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)/HIV/condom-usage knowledge. Sexually active participants were encouraged to volunteer for urine-based STDs testing at the School-Based Health Centres. Many (47.4%) students reported having had sexual intercourse at baseline. Overall behaviours changed towards ‘safer’ sex behaviours (intent-to-use and using condoms, communicating with partner/parents about sex/condoms/STDs) with time (P < 0.05). Proportion of students with complete correct knowledge of STDs/HIV increased to 88% at time 4 from 80% at baseline after adjusting for age, gender and sexual activity (P < 0.05). High prevalence of STDs was detected in 875 participants who reported for urine testing at time 1: trichomonas, 11.8%; chlamydia, 10.1% and gonorrhoea, 4.1%. Prevalence decreased significantly for 310 participants who re-tested; chlamydia: 27.4% to 6.1% and gonorrhoea: 11.3% to 3.2%. FOT was successfully implemented as an STDs/HIV risk-reduction intervention. Sustained improvements of knowledge about STDs/HIV/condom usage, decreases in sexual risk behaviours supported the effectiveness of this intervention. PMID:18824625

  19. Brief Online Training Enhances Competitive Performance: Findings of the BBC Lab UK Psychological Skills Intervention Study.

    PubMed

    Lane, Andrew M; Totterdell, Peter; MacDonald, Ian; Devonport, Tracey J; Friesen, Andrew P; Beedie, Christopher J; Stanley, Damian; Nevill, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In conjunction with BBC Lab UK, the present study developed 12 brief psychological skill interventions for online delivery. A protocol was designed that captured data via self-report measures, used video recordings to deliver interventions, involved a competitive concentration task against an individually matched computer opponent, and provided feedback on the effects of the interventions. Three psychological skills were used; imagery, self-talk, and if-then planning, with each skill directed to one of four different foci: outcome goal, process goal, instruction, or arousal-control. This resulted in 12 different intervention participant groups (randomly assigned) with a 13th group acting as a control. Participants (n = 44,742) completed a competitive task four times-practice, baseline, following an intervention, and again after repeating the intervention. Results revealed performance improved following practice with incremental effects for imagery-outcome, imagery-process, and self-talk-outcome and self-talk-process over the control group, with the same interventions increasing the intensity of effort invested, arousal and pleasant emotion. Arousal-control interventions associated with pleasant emotions, low arousal, and low effort invested in performance. Instructional interventions were not effective. Results offer support for the utility of online interventions in teaching psychological skills and suggest brief interventions that focus on increasing motivation, increased arousal, effort invested, and pleasant emotions were the most effective. PMID:27065904

  20. Brief Online Training Enhances Competitive Performance: Findings of the BBC Lab UK Psychological Skills Intervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew M.; Totterdell, Peter; MacDonald, Ian; Devonport, Tracey J.; Friesen, Andrew P.; Beedie, Christopher J.; Stanley, Damian; Nevill, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In conjunction with BBC Lab UK, the present study developed 12 brief psychological skill interventions for online delivery. A protocol was designed that captured data via self-report measures, used video recordings to deliver interventions, involved a competitive concentration task against an individually matched computer opponent, and provided feedback on the effects of the interventions. Three psychological skills were used; imagery, self-talk, and if-then planning, with each skill directed to one of four different foci: outcome goal, process goal, instruction, or arousal-control. This resulted in 12 different intervention participant groups (randomly assigned) with a 13th group acting as a control. Participants (n = 44,742) completed a competitive task four times—practice, baseline, following an intervention, and again after repeating the intervention. Results revealed performance improved following practice with incremental effects for imagery-outcome, imagery-process, and self-talk-outcome and self-talk-process over the control group, with the same interventions increasing the intensity of effort invested, arousal and pleasant emotion. Arousal-control interventions associated with pleasant emotions, low arousal, and low effort invested in performance. Instructional interventions were not effective. Results offer support for the utility of online interventions in teaching psychological skills and suggest brief interventions that focus on increasing motivation, increased arousal, effort invested, and pleasant emotions were the most effective. PMID:27065904

  1. Sleepy Teens Are Risk-Taking Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158191.html Sleepy Teens Are Risk-Taking Teens Sleep deprivation leads to unsafe behaviors, CDC researchers ... than 50,000 students, researchers found that those teens who got seven hours of sleep or less ...

  2. “IH8U”: confronting cyberbullying and exploring the use of cybertools in teen dating relationships.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Antonia R G

    2012-11-01

    Cyberbullying among adolescents has been a major focus of attention in mainstream media and has been documented to have many negative effects, as evidenced by several highly publicized suicides of teens who had been bullied online. The growing body of research about cyberbullying has rarely considered, however, the practice of cyberbullying between intimate partners. This article focuses on the frequency, types, and effect of cyberbullying between intimate partners in teen dating relationships. I examine the use of cybertools (electronic forms of communication) as mechanisms of power and control in relationships for both the target and the perpetrator. Suggested methods of prevention and intervention for adults working with teens who are experiencing cyberbullying in dating relationships are discussed. PMID:22961672

  3. Randomized controlled trial of a family problem-solving intervention.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Jane; Fleming, Darcy; McDonald, Linda; Kysela, Gerard M

    2005-02-01

    Adaptive problem solving contributes to individual and family health and development. In this article, the effect of the cooperative family learning approach (CFLA) on group family problem solving and on cooperative parenting communication is described. A pretest or posttest experimental design was used. Participant families were recruited from Head Start programs and exhibited two or more risk factors. Participant preschool children were screened to have two or more developmental delays. Direct behavioral observation measures were used to determine group family problem solving and cooperative parenting communication outcomes. Few group family problem-solving behaviors were coded, and they displayed little variability. However, intervention parents increased the length of time they played and extended the cooperative parent-child interactions. The evidence shows that CFLA has the potential to enhance parental-modeling of cooperative behavior while engaged in play activities with preschoolers. Direct measurement of group family problem solving was difficult. Solutions are suggested. PMID:15604228

  4. Rasch Measurement of Collaborative Problem Solving in an Online Environment.

    PubMed

    Harding, Susan-Marie E; Griffin, Patrick E

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to the assessment of human to human collaborative problem solving using a set of online interactive tasks completed by student dyads. Within the dyad, roles were nominated as either A or B and students selected their own roles. The question as to whether role selection affected individual student performance measures is addressed. Process stream data was captured from 3402 students in six countries who explored the problem space by clicking, dragging the mouse, moving the cursor and collaborating with their partner through a chat box window. Process stream data were explored to identify behavioural indicators that represented elements of a conceptual framework. These indicative behaviours were coded into a series of dichotomous items. These items represented actions and chats performed by students. The frequency of occurrence was used as a proxy measure of item difficulty. Then given a measure of item difficulty, student ability could be estimated using the difficulty estimates of the range of items demonstrated by the student. The Rasch simple logistic model was used to review the indicators to identify those that were consistent with the assumptions of the model and were invariant across national samples, language, curriculum and age of the student. The data were analysed using a one and two dimension, one parameter model. Rasch separation reliability, fit to the model, distribution of students and items on the underpinning construct, estimates for each country and the effect of role differences are reported. This study provides evidence that collaborative problem solving can be assessed in an online environment involving human to human interaction using behavioural indicators shown to have a consistent relationship between the estimate of student ability, and the probability of demonstrating the behaviour. PMID:26784377

  5. Structuring a Multi-Site Evaluation for Youth Mentoring Programs to Prevent Teen Alcohol and Drug Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellamy, Nikki D.; Springer, U. Fred; Sale, Elizabeth W.; Espiritu, Rachele C.

    2004-01-01

    Despite mentoring's rapidly increasing popularity as an intervention for the prevention of teen alcohol and drug abuse and associated problems, there is little research consensus on its overall effectiveness or on the core principles and components that define effective mentoring. To advance knowledge concerning this important prevention…

  6. Design and Methods of a Synchronous Online Motivational Interviewing Intervention for Weight Management

    PubMed Central

    DiLillo, Vicki; Ingle, Krista; Harvey, Jean Ruth; West, Delia Smith

    2016-01-01

    Background While Internet-based weight management programs can facilitate access to and engagement in evidence-based lifestyle weight loss programs, the results have generally not been as effective as in-person programs. Furthermore, motivational interviewing (MI) has shown promise as a technique for enhancing weight loss outcomes within face-to-face programs. Objective This paper describes the design, intervention development, and analysis of a therapist-delivered online MI intervention for weight loss in the context of an online weight loss program. Methods The MI intervention is delivered within the context of a randomized controlled trial examining the efficacy of an 18-month, group-based, online behavioral weight control program plus individually administered, synchronous online MI sessions relative to the group-based program alone. Six individual 30-minute MI sessions are conducted in private chat rooms over 18 months by doctoral-level psychologists. Sessions use a semistructured interview format for content and session flow and incorporate core MI components (eg, collaborative agenda setting, open-ended questions, reflective listening and summary statements, objective data, and a focus on evoking and amplifying change talk). Results The project was funded in 2010 and enrollment was completed in 2012. Data analysis is currently under way and the first results are expected in 2016. Conclusions This is the first trial to test the efficacy of a synchronous online, one-on-one MI intervention designed to augment an online group behavioral weight loss program. If the addition of MI sessions proves to be successful, this intervention could be disseminated to enhance other distance-based weight loss interventions. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01232699; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01232699 PMID:27095604

  7. Research Review: Teens as Authors of Web Culture [and] The State of Arts Education in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Susannah, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    In this Research Review, the authors first look at a recent study of online content creation by teens in America conducted by the Pew Internet & American Life Project ("Teens as Authors of Web Culture," Review by Keidra Chaney). The study both confirms and challenges some common beliefs about teens and technology, and raises questions about how…

  8. The "Healthy Teen Girls Project": Comparison of Health Education and STD Risk Reduction Intervention for Incarcerated Adolescent Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Angela R.; St. Lawrence, Janet; Morse, David T.; Baird-Thomas, Connie; Liew, Hui; Gresham, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Adolescent girls incarcerated in a state reformatory (N = 246) were recruited and assigned to an 18-session health education program or a time-equivalent HIV prevention program. Cohorts were assigned to conditions using a randomized block design separated by a washout period to reduce contamination. Post intervention, girls in the HIV risk…

  9. Online interventions for depression and anxiety – a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Saddichha, Sahoo; Al-Desouki, Majid; Lamia, Alsagob; Linden, Isabelle A.; Krausz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background: Access to mental health care is limited. Internet-based interventions (IBIs) may help bridge that gap by improving access especially for those who are unable to receive expert care. Aim: This review explores current research on the effectiveness of IBIs for depression and anxiety. Results: For depression, therapist-guided cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) had larger effect sizes consistently across studies, ranging from 0.6 to 1.9; while stand-alone CBT (without therapist guidance) had a more modest effect size of 0.3–0.7. Even other interventions for depression (non-CBT/non-randomized controlled trial (RCT)) showed modestly high effect sizes (0.2–1.7). For anxiety disorders, studies showed robust effect sizes for therapist-assisted interventions with effect sizes of 0.7–1.7 (efficacy similar to face-to-face CBT) and stand-alone CBT studies also showed large effect sizes (0.6–1.7). Non-CBT/Non-RCT studies (only 3) also showed significant reduction in anxiety scores at the end of the interventions. Conclusion: IBIs for anxiety and depression appear to be effective in reducing symptomatology for both depression and anxiety, which were enhanced by the guidance of a therapist. Further research is needed to identify various predictive factors and the extent to which stand-alone Internet therapies may be effective in the future as well as effects for different patient populations. PMID:25750823

  10. Using online computer tailoring to promote physical activity: a randomized trial of text, video, and combined intervention delivery modes.

    PubMed

    Soetens, Katja C M; Vandelanotte, Corneel; de Vries, Hein; Mummery, Kerry W

    2014-12-01

    Website-delivered interventions are increasingly used to deliver physical activity interventions, yet problems with engagement and retention result in reduced effectiveness. Hence, alternative modes of online intervention delivery need to be explored. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the acceptability and effectiveness of a computer-tailored physical activity intervention delivered on the Internet in 3 delivery modes: video, text, or both. Australian adults (N = 803), recruited through e-mail, were randomized into the three delivery modes and received personal physical activity advice. Intervention content was identical across groups. Repeated measures analyses of variance were used to compare the three groups regarding acceptability, website usability, and physical activity. Participants in the video group accepted the content of the physical activity advice significantly better (F = 5.59; p < .01), and spent significantly more time on the website (F = 21.19; p < .001) compared with the text and combination groups. Total physical activity improved significantly over time in all groups (F = 3.95; p < .01). Although the combination group increased physical activity the most, few significant differences between groups were observed. Providing video-tailored feedback has advantages over the conventional text-tailored interventions; however, this study revealed few behavioral differences. More studies, examining alternative delivery modes, that can overcome the limitations of the present study, are needed. PMID:24749983

  11. Attention problems among children with a positive family history of alcohol abuse or dependence and controls. Prevalence and course for the period from preteen to early teen years.

    PubMed

    Barnow, Sven; Schuckit, Marc; Smith, Tom; Spitzer, Carsten; Freyberger, Harald-J

    2007-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the scope and course of attention problems over a period of time from preteen (ages 7-12 years) to early teen years (ages 13-17 years). We compared symptoms in subjects with and without a family history (FH) of alcohol abuse or dependence from among families without evidence of antisocial personality disorder. Evaluations of attention problems for the offspring were based on the Child Behavior Checklist and a validated semistructured interview carried out with the mother. The findings indicate no higher risk for attention problems and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-like symptoms in the children of families with an alcohol use disorder. Regarding the course of problems, the ADHD symptom count tended to decrease over time, especially for children without a FH of alcohol abuse or dependence. Further research will be needed to determine whether results can be replicated with families from different social strata and including subjects with the antisocial personality disorder. PMID:17172772

  12. A theory-based online health behavior intervention for new university students: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Too few young people engage in behaviors that reduce the risk of morbidity and premature mortality, such as eating healthily, being physically active, drinking sensibly and not smoking. The present research developed an online intervention to target these health behaviors during the significant life transition from school to university when health beliefs and behaviors may be more open to change. This paper describes the intervention and the proposed approach to its evaluation. Methods/design Potential participants (all undergraduates about to enter the University of Sheffield) will be emailed an online questionnaire two weeks before starting university. On completion of the questionnaire, respondents will be randomly assigned to receive either an online health behavior intervention (U@Uni) or a control condition. The intervention employs three behavior change techniques (self-affirmation, theory-based messages, and implementation intentions) to target four heath behaviors (alcohol consumption, physical activity, fruit and vegetable intake, and smoking). Subsequently, all participants will be emailed follow-up questionnaires approximately one and six months after starting university. The questionnaires will assess the four targeted behaviors and associated cognitions (e.g., intentions, self-efficacy) as well as socio-demographic variables, health status, Body Mass Index (BMI), health service use and recreational drug use. A sub-sample of participants will provide a sample of hair to assess changes in biochemical markers of health behavior. A health economic evaluation of the cost effectiveness of the intervention will also be conducted. Discussion The findings will provide evidence on the effectiveness of online interventions as well as the potential for intervening during significant life transitions, such as the move from school to university. If successful, the intervention could be employed at other universities to promote healthy behaviors among new

  13. Feasibility of an Online Professional Development Program for Early Intervention Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyzar, Kathleen B.; Chiu, Caya; Kemp, Peggy; Aldersey, Heather Michelle; Turnbull, Ann P.; Lindeman, David P.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports findings from 2 studies situated within a larger scope of design research on a professional development program, "Early Years," for Part C early intervention practitioners, working with families in home and community settings. Early Years includes online modules and onsite mentor coaching, and its development has…

  14. Online Graduate Teacher Education: Establishing an EKG for Student Success Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Brett E.; Hung, Jui-Long; Baughman, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Predicting which students enrolled in graduate online education are at-risk for failure is an arduous yet important task for teachers and administrators alike. This research reports on a statistical analysis technique using both static and dynamic variables to determine which students are at-risk and when an intervention could be most helpful…

  15. HealthMpowerment.org: Building Community through a Mobile-Optimized, Online Health Promotion Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.; Muessig, Kathryn E.; Pike, Emily C.; LeGrand, Sara; Baltierra, Nina; Rucker, Alvin Justin; Wilson, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background: Both young Black men who have sex with men as well as young Black transgender women (YBMSM/TW) continue to experience a significant increase in HIV incidence. HealthMpowerment.org (HMP) is a mobile phone-optimized, online intervention for both YBMSM/TW to build community and facilitate supportive relationships. Methods: To assess the…

  16. An Online Health Prevention Intervention for Youth with Addicted or Mentally Ill Parents: Experiences and Perspectives of Participants and Providers from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bindels, Jill APM; Evers, Silvia MAA; Paulus, Aggie TG; van Asselt, Antoinette DI; van Schayck, Onno CP

    2015-01-01

    Background Mental illnesses affect many people around the world, either directly or indirectly. Families of persons suffering from mental illness or addiction suffer too, especially their children. In the Netherlands, 864,000 parents meet the diagnostic criteria for a mental illness or addiction. Evidence shows that offspring of mentally ill or addicted parents are at risk for developing mental disorders or illnesses themselves. The Kopstoring course is an online 8-week group course with supervision by 2 trained psychologists or social workers, aimed to prevent behavioral and psychological problems for children (aged 16 to 25 years) of parents with mental health problems or addictions. The course addresses themes such as roles in the family and mastery skills. An online randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted to assess the effectiveness of the Kopstoring course. Objective The aim was to gain knowledge about expectations, experiences, and perspectives of participants and providers of the online Kopstoring course. Methods A process evaluation was performed to evaluate the online delivery of Kopstoring and the experiences and perspectives of participants and providers of Kopstoring. Interviews were performed with members from both groups. Participants were drawn from a sample from the Kopstoring RCT. Results Thirteen participants and 4 providers were interviewed. Five main themes emerged from these interviews: background, the requirements for the intervention, experience with the intervention, technical aspects, and research aspects. Overall, participants and providers found the intervention to be valuable because it was online; therefore, protecting their anonymity was considered a key component. Most barriers existed in the technical sphere. Additional barriers existed with conducting the RCT, namely gathering informed consent and gathering parental consent in the case of minors. Conclusions This study provides valuable insight into participants’ and

  17. Smoking and Asthma (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Smoking and Asthma KidsHealth > For Teens > Smoking and Asthma Print A A A Text Size What's in ... the health problems it causes. If you have asthma, smoking is especially risky because of the damage ...

  18. Teen theaters grapple with issues.

    PubMed

    Pugni, J L

    1984-01-01

    At this time there are about 20 Planned Parenthood teen theater groups throughout the US. The idea originated in New York in 1973, when the staff of the Family Planning Division of the New York Medical College needed an effective way to reach adolescents about important issues. FOCUS, a teen family life theater sponsored by Planned Parenthood of Greater Charlotte, performs skits about life as seen from the teenager's perspective. The teenagers do not use a script but create their performances from their own experiences, expressed through carefully learned improvisational techniques. This approach gives the presentations an authentic flavor that enables the troupe to connect with the audience. The topics dealt with vary. For example, 1982-83 shows included peer pressure, divorce, teenage pregnancy, drinking, teenage suicide, parent-teen relationships, and loneliness. The performances do not offer absolute answers but rather pose important questions to the audience. Following the performance the actors and actresses return to the stage, still portraying their characters, and invite the audience to ask questions and discuss possible alternatives for the characters. THE SOURCE is the Teen Council of Planned Parenthood of Southwest Florida. It works to inform the community of problems teenagers face by presenting short plays, written, directed, and cast by teens themselves. Through education, honest answers, healthy building of self esteem, and parent support, SOURCE members reach a higher level of self awareness. They then share what they learn with their families, peers, and the community through performance and special events. THE SOURCE, formed in October 1980, grew out of Planned Parenthood's belief that if teens feel self worth, their decision-making process will be affected less by peer pressure and negative social influences. The Youth Expression Theater (YET) of Cambridge is an education outreach project of the Planned Parenthood League of Massachusetts (PPLM

  19. The relationship between self-harm and teen dating violence among youth in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Baker, Charlene K; Helm, Susana; Bifulco, Kristina; Chung-Do, Jane

    2015-05-01

    The connection between teen dating violence (TDV) and self-harm is important to consider because of the serious consequences for teens who engage in these behaviors. Self-harm includes nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicide behaviors such as suicide attempts or deaths. Although prior research shows that these two public health problems are related, the context in which they occur is missing, including what leads teens to engage in self-harm and the timing of self-harming behaviors within the relationship. To fill this gap, we conducted focus groups with 39 high-school-aged teens, all of whom had experienced prior relationship violence. Teens described incidents in which they and their partners engaged in NSSI and suicide attempts. Incidents often were associated with extreme alcohol and drug use and occurred during the break-up stage of the relationship. Prevention and intervention programs are needed that consider the intersections of TDV, substance use, and self-harm. PMID:25281243

  20. Joint hypermobility syndrome: problems that require psychological intervention.

    PubMed

    Baeza-Velasco, C; Gély-Nargeot, M C; Bulbena Vilarrasa, A; Bravo, J F

    2011-09-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), also known as Ehlers-Danlos III, is an inherited disorder of connective tissue, characterised by an exceptional increase in the joint's mobility and the presence of musculoskeletal and other symptoms. It is a benign syndrome if compared with the other types of Ehlers-Danlos, but it can become disabling particularly because it is a significant source of pain and distress. The purpose of this work is to describe some common problems in JHS that render psychological intervention in their overall management relevant. Chronic pain, associated psychopathological factors such as anxiety, depression and somatosensory amplification, and problems arising from a lack of recognition and knowledge of the syndrome, are frequent among those affected, having a negative impact on their quality of life. We emphasise the relevance of addressing JHS from a biopsychosocial approach. PMID:21373784

  1. Smoking (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... addictive. Like heroin or other addictive drugs, the body and mind quickly become so used to the nicotine in ...

  2. Help Teens Manage Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Help Teens Manage Diabetes Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... diabetes management. Its aim is to improve diabetic teens' coping and communication skills, healthy behaviors, and conflict ...

  3. Effectiveness of online word of mouth on exposure to an Internet-delivered intervention.

    PubMed

    Crutzen, Rik; de Nooijer, Jascha; Brouwer, Wendy; Oenema, Anke; Brug, Johannes; de Vries, Nanne

    2009-07-01

    The use of online word of mouth (WOM) seems a promising strategy to motivate young people to visit Internet-delivered interventions. An Internet-delivered intervention aimed at changing implicit attitudes related to alcohol was used in two experiments to test effectiveness of e-mail invitations on a first visit to the intervention. The results of the first experiment (N = 196) showed that an invitation by e-mail from a friend was more effective to attract young adults (aged 18-24 years) to the intervention website than an invitation from an institution. A 2 x 2 design was used in the second experiment (N = 236) to test manipulations of argument strength and the use of peripheral cues in invitations. Results showed that weak arguments were more effective to attract young adults to the intervention website when an incentive was withheld. These results need to be taken into account when using online WOM as a strategy to improve exposure to Internet-delivered interventions. PMID:20205018

  4. Marijuana: Facts for Teens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS), Rockville, MD. Div. of Research.

    Using a question and answer format, this booklet is designed to inform teens about the dangers of marijuana usage. Inset facts about marijuana and teen perspectives compliment the following topics: (1) What is marijuana? (2) How is marijuana used? (3) How long does marijuana stay in the user's body? (4) How many teens smoke marijuana? (5) Why do…

  5. Teen Fathers: An Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Colette

    2004-01-01

    Data from the National Center for Health Statistics suggests that about 17.4 per 1,000 males ages 15-19 years became teen fathers in 2002. Longitudinal studies suggest this number might be even higher. While the incidence of teen fatherhood is lower than that of teen motherhood, these young men are a potential resource for their child, as well as…

  6. Improving the Self-Sufficiency of Teen Parents. TASPP Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle-Williams, Maureen

    1989-01-01

    This document identifies the costs of teen pregnancy in terms of high dropout rates, long-term educational decrements, the increased risks of the children of teen parents, loss of human capital, and increased welfare costs. Prevention and intervention and the features of operationally successful program models are included under the topic of…

  7. Decrease in Behavioral Problems and Trauma Symptoms Among At-Risk Adopted Children Following Web-Based Trauma-Informed Parent Training Intervention.

    PubMed

    Razuri, Erin Becker; Howard, Amanda R Hiles; Parris, Sheri R; Call, Casey D; DeLuna, Jamie Hurst; Hall, Jordan S; Purvis, Karyn B; Cross, David R

    2016-01-01

    Children who have experienced early adversities are at risk for behavioral problems and trauma symptoms. Using a two-group, pre-post intervention design, the authors evaluated the effectiveness of an online parent training for Trust-Based Relational Intervention, a trauma-informed, attachment-based intervention, in reducing behavioral problems and trauma symptoms in at-risk adopted children. Children of parents in the treatment group (n = 48) demonstrated significant decreases in behavioral problems and trauma symptoms after intervention. Scores for children in a matched-sample control group did not change. Findings suggest this intervention can effectively reduce behavioral problems and trauma symptoms in children with histories of adversities. PMID:26072917

  8. Decrease in Behavioral Problems and Trauma Symptoms Among At-Risk Adopted Children Following Web-Based Trauma-Informed Parent Training Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Razuri, Erin Becker; Hiles Howard, Amanda R.; Parris, Sheri R.; Call, Casey D.; DeLuna, Jamie Hurst; Hall, Jordan S.; Purvis, Karyn B.; Cross, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Children who have experienced early adversities are at risk for behavioral problems and trauma symptoms. Using a two-group, pre–post intervention design, the authors evaluated the effectiveness of an online parent training for Trust-Based Relational Intervention, a trauma-informed, attachment-based intervention, in reducing behavioral problems and trauma symptoms in at-risk adopted children. Children of parents in the treatment group (n = 48) demonstrated significant decreases in behavioral problems and trauma symptoms after intervention. Scores for children in a matched-sample control group did not change. Findings suggest this intervention can effectively reduce behavioral problems and trauma symptoms in children with histories of adversities. PMID:26072917

  9. Extending the Reach of Early Intervention Training for Practitioners: A Preliminary Investigation of an Online Curriculum for Teaching Behavioral Intervention Knowledge in Autism to Families and Service Providers

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Charles D.; Serna, Richard W.; Morrison, Leslie; Fleming, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Early behavioral intervention, based on the methods of applied behavior analysis, has the strongest and most consistent scientific support as a means of teaching skills to young children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and reducing their restricted and maladaptive behavior. Though individual ABA-based treatment plans are usually developed, designed and supervised by a senior-level clinician, they are most often implemented by a practitioner, such as a parent, direct service provider, aide, or an early childhood professional from a related discipline. Unfortunately, few practitioner-orientated training programs are available to geographically disparate persons. Online distance-learning education offers a potential solution to this problem. Fifty-one individuals participated in an initial study of a short, three-module online course. The results showed a highly statistically significant difference between the mean pre-test and post-test score. The outcomes suggest the feasibility and user satisfaction of teaching BI knowledge acquisition online, and thus bolster confidence that future, larger-scale curricula aimed at teaching BI in a distance-learning format is warranted. PMID:23504540

  10. Effects of a Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program on Teens' Attitudes toward Sexuality: A Latent Trait Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Charles L.; Dimitrov, Dimiter M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of program interventions in a school-based teen pregnancy program on hypothesized constructs underlying teens' attitudes toward sexuality. An important task related to this purpose was the validation of the constructs and their stability from pre- to postintervention measures. Data from 1,136…

  11. Teen Appeal — Touching the Moving Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handford, Christina

    An article to discuss the difficulties of designing educational multimedia for the teen target audience (13 - 16 year olds). The report will assess techniques used in existing online artefacts and reveal major trends in the attempt to appeal to this notoriously hard to reach user group.

  12. Evaluation of a School-Based Intervention for Adolescent Sleep Problems

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, Lynette; Gradisar, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: The present study investigated the effectiveness of a school-based intervention in increasing sleep knowledge and improving adolescent sleep problems. Design: A randomized, controlled trial using 2 groups (program class, classes-as-usual: [CAU]) assessed over 3 time points (pre-program, post-program, 6-week follow-up). Participants/Setting: Eighty-one students (mean age = 15.6 ± 0.6 y; 33% male) from 2 schools in South Australia. Schools provided one class to participate in the sleep intervention program (N = 41) and a second class to act as a control class (N = 40). Intervention: Four 50-minute classes across a 4-week period. Classes consisted of educating adolescents on promoting and maintaining a healthy lifestyle based on a cognitive-behavior therapy framework. Measurements and Results: Data were collected pre-program, post-program, and at 6-week follow-up using an online questionnaire. Qualitative student and teacher data were collected at post-program. Baseline data indicated sleep problems were prevalent (53.1% insufficient sleep on school nights [ < 8 h] and 77.8% discrepant school/weekend rise times [ > 2 h]). These 2 criteria identified 36 adolescents with a delayed sleep timing (DST; Program, N = 21; CAU, N = 15). The program increased sleep knowledge (P = 0.001); however, analyses revealed no significant effects on target sleep variables as compared with the CAU class for the entire group (all P > 0.05). For DST adolescents, there was a significant interaction for reducing the discrepancy between school and weekend out of bed times (P = 0.002). There was no impact on other sleep parameters or depressed mood. Conclusions: School-based sleep interventions for adolescents are a novel method for addressing a prevalent problem. Future programs should develop ways to motivate adolescents to change sleep practices. Citation: Moseley L; Gradisar M. Evaluation of a school-based intervention for adolescent sleep problems. SLEEP 2009;32(3):334

  13. Use of Media Technologies by Native American Teens and Young Adults in the Pacific Northwest: Exploring Their Utility for Designing Culturally Appropriate Technology-Based Health Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushing, Stephanie Craig; Stephens, David

    2011-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth are disproportionally burdened by many common adolescent health issues, including drug and alcohol use, injury and violence, sexually transmitted infections, and teen pregnancy. Media technologies, including the Internet, cell phones, and video games, offer new avenues for reaching adolescents on a…

  14. Employing a Teen Advisory Board to Adapt an Evidence-Based HIV/STD Intervention for Incarcerated African-American Adolescent Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latham, Teaniese P.; Sales, Jessica M.; Renfro, Tiffaney L.; Boyce, Lorin S.; Rose, Eve; Murray, Colleen C.; Wingood, Gina M.; DiClemente, Ralph J.

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript assesses priorities and challenges of adolescent females by conducting a meeting with teen advisory board (TAB) members to collect information regarding their lives and experiences pre-, during and post-incarceration in a juvenile detention facility. Multiple themes emerged regarding the impact of incarceration on young…

  15. Development of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention Program to Treat Anxiety and Social Deficits in Teens with High-Functioning Autism

    PubMed Central

    Albano, Anne Marie; Johnson, Cynthia R.; Kasari, Connie; Ollendick, Thomas; Klin, Ami; Oswald, Donald; Scahill, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Anxiety is a common co-occurring problem among young people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Characterized by deficits in social interaction, communication problems, and stereotyped behavior and restricted interests, this group of disorders is more prevalent than previously realized. When present, anxiety may compound the social deficits of young people with ASD. Given the additional disability and common co-occurrence of anxiety in ASD, we developed a manual-based cognitive-behavioral treatment program to target anxiety symptoms as well as social skill deficits in adolescents with ASD [Multimodal Anxiety and Social Skills Intervention: MASSI]. In this paper, we describe the foundation, content, and development of MASSI. We also summarize data on treatment feasibility based on a pilot study that implemented the intervention. PMID:20091348

  16. Sensory-Based Intervention for Children with Behavioral Problems: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wan Yunus, Farahiyah; Liu, Karen P.; Bissett, Michelle; Penkala, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Sensory-based intervention is a common approach used to address behavioral problems in children. Types of sensory-based intervention for children and details of the intervention effectiveness have not been systematically examined. This review examined the effectiveness and ideal types of sensory-based interventions for children with behavioral…

  17. Differential Effects of the Gestalt Two-Chair Intervention and Problem Solving in Resolving Decisional Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Katherine M.; Greenberg, Leslie S.

    1986-01-01

    Compared an affective (Gestalt two-chair intervention) and a cognitive-behavioral (problem-solving) counseling intervention used to help clients resolve intrapersonal conflicts related to a decision. A one-way analysis of variance revealed that affective intervention was more effective than cognitive behavioral intervention or no treatment for…

  18. Development of an Online Well-Being Intervention for Young People: An Evaluation Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bidargaddi, Niranjan; Blake, Victoria; Schrader, Geoffrey; Kaambwa, Billingsley; Quinn, Stephen; Orlowski, Simone; Winsall, Megan; Battersby, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Background Research has shown that improving well-being using positive mental health interventions can be useful for predicting and preventing mental illness. Implementing online interventions may be an effective way to reach young people, given their familiarity with technology. Objective This study will assess the effectiveness of a website called the “Online Wellbeing Centre (OWC),” designed for the support and improvement of mental health and well-being in young Australians aged between 16 and 25 years. As the active component of the study, the OWC will introduce a self-guided app recommendation service called “The Toolbox: The best apps for your brain and body” developed by ReachOut.com. The Toolbox is a responsive website that serves as a personalized, ongoing recommendation service for technology-based tools and apps to improve well-being. It allows users to personalize their experience according to their individual needs. Methods This study will be a two-arm, randomized controlled trial following a wait-list control design. The primary outcome will be changes in psychological well-being measured by the Mental Health Continuum Short Form. The secondary outcomes will be drawn from a subsample of participants and will include depression scores measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, and quality of life measured by the Assessment of Quality of Life-four dimensions (AQOL-4D) index. Cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted based on a primary outcome of cost per unique visit to the OWC. Utility-based outcomes will also be incorporated into the analysis allowing a secondary outcome to be cost per quality-adjusted life year gained (based on the AQOL-4D values). Resource use associated with both the intervention and control groups will be collected using a customized questionnaire. Online- and community-based recruitment strategies will be implemented, and the effectiveness of each approach will be analyzed. Participants will

  19. Integrating Psychological Theory Into the Design of an Online Intervention for Sexual Health: The Sexunzipped Website

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Internet can provide a confidential and convenient medium for sexual health promotion for young people. Objective This paper describes the development of an interactive, theory-based website (Sexunzipped) aimed at increasing safe sexual behavior of young people, as well as an outline of the evaluation protocol. Methods The website focuses on safer sex, relationships, and sexual pleasure. An overview of the site is provided, including a description of the theoretical constructs which form the basis of the site development. An integrated behavioral model was chosen as the guiding theory for the Sexunzipped intervention. A randomized trial design will be used to evaluate the site quantitatively. Results The content of the site is described in detail with examples of the main content types: information pages, quizzes, and decision-making activities. We describe the protocol for quantitative evaluation of the website using a randomized trial design and discuss the principal challenges involved in developing the site, including the challenge of balancing the requirements of theory with young people’s views on website content and design. Conclusions Considerations for future interventions are discussed. Developing an online behavior-change intervention is costly and time consuming. Given the large public health potential, the cost involved in developing online interventions, and the need for attractive design, future interventions may benefit from collaborating with established sites that already have a user base, a brand, and a strong Internet presence. It is vital to involve users in decisions about intervention content, design, and features, paying attention to aspects that will attract and retain users’ interest. A central challenge in developing effective Internet-based interventions for young people is to find effective ways to operationalize theory in ways that address the views and perspectives of young people. PMID:23612122

  20. When Is a Teen Magazine Not a Teen Magazine?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Bonny

    2002-01-01

    Discovers two alternative teen magazines: "Teen Voices" and "Reluctant Hero." Shares her discussions she had with the editors of the magazines. Offers a reflective comment on conceptions of identity in these and other teen magazines. (SG)

  1. Are Health Behavior Change Interventions That Use Online Social Networks Effective? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Lucy K; Ferrar, Katia; Marshall, Simon; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Vandelanotte, Corneel

    2014-01-01

    Background The dramatic growth of Web 2.0 technologies and online social networks offers immense potential for the delivery of health behavior change campaigns. However, it is currently unclear how online social networks may best be harnessed to achieve health behavior change. Objective The intent of the study was to systematically review the current level of evidence regarding the effectiveness of online social network health behavior interventions. Methods Eight databases (Scopus, CINAHL, Medline, ProQuest, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane, Web of Science and Communication & Mass Media Complete) were searched from 2000 to present using a comprehensive search strategy. Study eligibility criteria were based on the PICOS format, where “population” included child or adult populations, including healthy and disease populations; “intervention” involved behavior change interventions targeting key modifiable health behaviors (tobacco and alcohol consumption, dietary intake, physical activity, and sedentary behavior) delivered either wholly or in part using online social networks; “comparator” was either a control group or within subject in the case of pre-post study designs; “outcomes” included health behavior change and closely related variables (such as theorized mediators of health behavior change, eg, self-efficacy); and “study design” included experimental studies reported in full-length peer-reviewed sources. Reports of intervention effectiveness were summarized and effect sizes (Cohen’s d and 95% confidence intervals) were calculated wherever possible. Attrition (percentage of people who completed the study), engagement (actual usage), and fidelity (actual usage/intended usage) with the social networking component of the interventions were scrutinized. Results A total of 2040 studies were identified from the database searches following removal of duplicates, of which 10 met inclusion criteria. The studies involved a total of 113,988 participants

  2. Comparing online and lab methods in a problem-solving experiment.

    PubMed

    Dandurand, Frédéric; Shultz, Thomas R; Onishi, Kristine H

    2008-05-01

    Online experiments have recently become very popular, and--in comparison with traditional lab experiments--they may have several advantages, such as reduced demand characteristics, automation, and generalizability of results to wider populations (Birnbaum, 2004; Reips, 2000, 2002a, 2002b). We replicated Dandurand, Bowen, and Shultz's (2004) lab-based problem-solving experiment as an Internet experiment. Consistent with previous results, we found that participants who watched demonstrations of successful problem-solving sessions or who read instructions outperformed those who were told only that they solved problems correctly or not. Online participants were less accurate than lab participants, but there was no interaction with learning condition. Thus, we conclude that online and Internet results are consistent. Disadvantages included high dropout rate for online participants; however, combining the online experiment with the department subject pool worked well. PMID:18522052

  3. Constructing a Theory- and Evidence-Based Treatment Rationale for Complex eHealth Interventions: Development of an Online Alcohol Intervention Using an Intervention Mapping Approach

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Ayna; Nesvåg, Sverre; Kok, Gerjo; Duckert, Fanny

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to limited reporting of intervention rationale, little is known about what distinguishes a good intervention from a poor one. To support improved design, there is a need for comprehensive reports on novel and complex theory-based interventions. Specifically, the emerging trend of just-in-time tailoring of content in response to change in target behavior or emotional state is promising. Objective The objective of this study was to give a systematic and comprehensive description of the treatment rationale of an online alcohol intervention called Balance. Methods We used the intervention mapping protocol to describe the treatment rationale of Balance. The intervention targets at-risk drinking, and it is delivered by email, mobile phone text messaging, and tailored interactive webpages combining text, pictures, and prerecorded audio. Results The rationale of the current treatment was derived from a self-regulation perspective, and the overarching idea was to support continued self-regulation throughout the behavior change process. Maintaining the change efforts over time and coping adaptively during critical moments (eg, immediately before and after a lapse) are key factors to successful behavior change. Important elements of the treatment rationale to achieving these elements were: (1) emotion regulation as an inoculation strategy against self-regulation failure, (2) avoiding lapses by adaptive coping, and (3) avoiding relapse by resuming the change efforts after a lapse. Two distinct and complementary delivery strategies were used, including a day-to-day tunnel approach in combination with just-in-time therapy. The tunnel strategy was in accordance with the need for continuous self-regulation and it functions as a platform from which just-in-time therapy was launched. Just-in-time therapy was used to support coping during critical moments, and started when the client reports either low self-efficacy or that they were drinking above target levels

  4. How Does Early Feedback in an Online Programming Course Change Problem Solving?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebrahimi, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    How does early feedback change the programming problem solving in an online environment and help students choose correct approaches? This study was conducted in a sample of students learning programming in an online course entitled Introduction to C++ and OOP (Object Oriented Programming) using the ANGEL learning management system platform. My…

  5. Online Problem-Based and Enquiry-Based Learning in the Training of Educational Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozic, Nick; Williams, Huw

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, problem-based learning (PBL) and enquiry-based learning (EBL) approaches have been used in a variety of professional training courses. More recently online versions of these pedagogies have been developed. This paper explains how online PBL and EBL activities have been incorporated into the professional training of…

  6. A Problem in Online Interpersonal Skills Training: Do Learners Practice Skills?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doo, Min Young

    2006-01-01

    One problem found when teaching interpersonal skills online is learners' lack of opportunity for skill practice. The online learning environment is deficient in face-to-face interaction, and opportunities for self-regulation make it difficult to ensure learners practice skills despite the positive effects of such practice on skill improvement. The…

  7. Learner Perspectives of Online Problem-Based Learning and Applications from Cognitive Load Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) courses have historically been situated in physical classrooms involving in-person interactions. As online learning is embraced in higher education, programs that use PBL can integrate online platforms to support curriculum delivery and facilitate student engagement. This report describes student perspectives of the…

  8. Middle-School Students' Online Information Problem Solving Behaviors on the Information Retrieval Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Yi-Fen; Hsu, Ying-Shao; Chuang, Fu-Tai; Hwang, Fu-Kwun

    2014-01-01

    With the near-overload of online information, it is necessary to equip our students with the skills necessary to deal with Information Problem Solving (IPS). This study also intended to help students develop major IPS strategies with the assistance of an instructor's scaffolding in a designed IPS course as well as on an Online Information…

  9. Women in interventional cardiology: Is there a problem?

    PubMed

    Safian, Robert D

    2016-03-01

    In the United States, women account for 4% of interventional cardiologists and perform 3% of interventional procedures. Male and female cardiology fellows share concerns that dissuade them from careers in interventional cardiology; unique issues for women include professional isolation and childbearing. Interventional fellowships should enhance female mentorship and develop friendly policies regarding maternity leave; other issues require comprehensive solutions to medical school debt, duration of training, and balancing professional goals with lifestyle. PMID:26994976

  10. Problem severity, technology adoption, and intent to seek online counseling among overseas Filipino workers.

    PubMed

    Hechanova, Ma Regina M; Tuliao, Antover P; Teh, Lota A; Alianan, Arsenio S; Acosta, Avegale

    2013-08-01

    This study examined the factors that influence the intent to seek online counseling among overseas Filipino workers (OFWs). A survey among 365 OFWs revealed that problem severity and technology adoption predict intent to use online counseling. Among the three factors of technology adoption, perceived ease in the use of technology and perceived presence of organization and technological infrastructure to support use predicted intent to use online counseling. Our hypothesis about the presence of interaction between problem severity and facilitating conditions was supported. Among individuals with low problem severity, those who perceive the presence of organization and technological infrastructure to support use have a higher intent to use online counseling. However, at higher levels of problem severity, the effect of facilitating conditions seems to disappear. These findings highlight the crucial role of preventive online mental health services. The study contributes to theory by integrating the stage model of help-seeking behaviors and technology adoption theory in predicting intent to use online counseling. Specifically, that intent to seek online counseling is affected by the existence and perceived gravity of a problem, moderated by technology adoption factors, particularly facilitating conditions. These have implications on the need to educate potential users on the advantages of counseling and ensure that migrant workers have access to technology and that the technology is easy to use. PMID:23738983

  11. Teen pregnancy prevention: do any programs work?

    PubMed

    Card, J J

    1999-01-01

    This paper begins with a review of the problem of teen pregnancy in the United States. Domestic trends are compared with those of other developed countries. Antecedents of the problem are discussed. New developments in addressing the problem are then described, including the following: (a) a renewed emphasis on abstinence on the one hand; (b) a move toward a more positive view of teen sexuality on the other; (c) the development of new prevention initiatives such as STD/HIV/AIDS prevention programs, community-wide teen pregnancy prevention collaboratives, broad-based youth development programs, and state and local government initiatives; and (d) the lauching of the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. An analysis of the different ways in which the problem can be framed and the implications for solutions of the problem follow. Examples of promising teen pregnancy and STD/HIV/AIDS prevention programs are provided. The paper ends with a recommendation for an eclectic approach to framing the problem and possible solutions. PMID:10352859

  12. Teen Birth Rates in Sexually Abused and Neglected Females

    PubMed Central

    Shenk, Chad E.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Prospectively track teen childbirths in maltreated and nonmaltreated females and test the hypothesis that child maltreatment is an independent predictor of subsequent teen childbirth over and above demographic characteristics and other risk factors. METHODS: Nulliparous adolescent females (N = 435) aged 14 to 17 years were assessed annually through age 19 years. Maltreated females were referred by Child Protective Services agencies for having experienced substantiated sexual abuse, physical abuse, or neglect within the preceding 12 months. Comparison females were matched on race, family income, age and family constellation. Teen childbirth was assessed via self-report during annual interviews. Births were confirmed using hospital delivery records. RESULTS: Seventy participants gave birth during the study, 54 in the maltreated group and 16 in the comparison group. Maltreated females were twice as likely to experience teen childbirth after controlling for demographic confounds and known risk factors (odds ratio = 2.17, P = 0.01). Birth rates were highest for sexually abused and neglected females. Sexual abuse and neglect were both independent predictors of teen childbirth after controlling for demographic confounds, other risk factors and alternative forms of maltreatment occurring earlier in development. CONCLUSIONS: Results provide evidence that sexual abuse and neglect are unique predictors of subsequent teen childbirth. Partnerships between protective service providers and teen childbirth prevention strategists hold the best promise for further reducing the US teen birth rate. Additional research illuminating the pathways to teen childbirth for differing forms of maltreatment is needed so that tailored interventions can be realized. PMID:23530173

  13. Primary School Students' Strategies in Early Algebra Problem Solving Supported by an Online Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja; Kolovou, Angeliki; Robitzsch, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    In this study we investigated the role of a dynamic online game on students' early algebra problem solving. In total 253 students from grades 4, 5, and 6 (10-12 years old) used the game at home to solve a sequence of early algebra problems consisting of contextual problems addressing covarying quantities. Special software monitored the…

  14. Dimensions of Problem Based Learning--Dialogue and Online Collaboration in Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreasen,, Lars Birch; Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche

    2013-01-01

    The article contributes to the discussions on problem based learning and project work, building on and reflecting the experiences of the authors. Four perspectives are emphasized as central to a contemporary approach to problem- and project-based learning: the exploration of problems, projects as a method, online collaboration, and the dialogic…

  15. Using Jigsaw-Style Spectroscopy Problem-Solving to Elucidate Molecular Structure through Online Cooperative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winschel, Grace A.; Everett, Renata K.; Coppola, Brian P.; Shultz, Ginger V.

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative learning was employed as an instructional approach to facilitate student development of spectroscopy problem solving skills. An interactive online environment was used as a framework to structure weekly discussions around spectroscopy problems outside of class. Weekly discussions consisted of modified jigsaw-style problem solving…

  16. Parenting teens with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Modesto-Lowe, Vania; Chaplin, Margaret; Godsay, Viraj; Soovajian, Victoria

    2014-09-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) presents in childhood with inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity and is associated with functional impairments. These children tend to display a variety of disruptive behaviors, which may worsen in adolescence. Teens with ADHD may show high levels of defiance, posing significant challenges for parents. Early efforts to understand parenting in the context of teen ADHD reveal high levels of parental stress and reactivity in response to the teen's ADHD symptoms. Subsequent research recognized that some of these parents have ADHD or other psychopathology that may contribute to maladaptive parenting. However, some parents adjust and demonstrate optimism and resilience in the face of their teens' ADHD. Recent research has identified parental factors (eg, emotional intelligence) and interventions (eg, mindfulness training) that may improve parenting/teen relationships and the developmental outcomes of teens. This article explores parenting teens with ADHD with a focus on these novel interventions. PMID:24982442

  17. [Multidimensional counseling and intervention in anxiety problems in school].

    PubMed

    Jeck, Stephan

    2003-01-01

    Multidimensional counselling and intervention in case of anxiety problems in school can be understood as a challenge for educational psychologists who has to solve individual anxiety disorders on the one hand and participate in processes of school development in order to prevent anxiety on the other hand. There are a lot of techniques and strategies to construct classroom settings which reduce anxiety. Improving self-efficacy and training stress management for teachers and students are possible programs presented in order to change the culture of educational organizations like schools. To realize such programs all members of the school community have to cooperate and teachers have to modify their instructional actions. Therefore they have to develop better diagnostic skills in order to detect anxious and inconspicuous students who need special fostering for better learning in school. For extreme anxiety disorders with school refusal there are many therapeutic treatments out of school, one of the best for children and adolescents are cognitive-behavioral settings. PMID:12951911

  18. Online Interventions for Social Marketing Health Behavior Change Campaigns: A Meta-Analysis of Psychological Architectures and Adherence Factors

    PubMed Central

    Thelwall, Mike; Dawes, Phil

    2011-01-01

    Background Researchers and practitioners have developed numerous online interventions that encourage people to reduce their drinking, increase their exercise, and better manage their weight. Motivations to develop eHealth interventions may be driven by the Internet’s reach, interactivity, cost-effectiveness, and studies that show online interventions work. However, when designing online interventions suitable for public campaigns, there are few evidence-based guidelines, taxonomies are difficult to apply, many studies lack impact data, and prior meta-analyses are not applicable to large-scale public campaigns targeting voluntary behavioral change. Objectives This meta-analysis assessed online intervention design features in order to inform the development of online campaigns, such as those employed by social marketers, that seek to encourage voluntary health behavior change. A further objective was to increase understanding of the relationships between intervention adherence, study adherence, and behavioral outcomes. Methods Drawing on systematic review methods, a combination of 84 query terms were used in 5 bibliographic databases with additional gray literature searches. This resulted in 1271 abstracts and papers; 31 met the inclusion criteria. In total, 29 papers describing 30 interventions were included in the primary meta-analysis, with the 2 additional studies qualifying for the adherence analysis. Using a random effects model, the first analysis estimated the overall effect size, including groupings by control conditions and time factors. The second analysis assessed the impacts of psychological design features that were coded with taxonomies from evidence-based behavioral medicine, persuasive technology, and other behavioral influence fields. These separate systems were integrated into a coding framework model called the communication-based influence components model. Finally, the third analysis assessed the relationships between intervention adherence

  19. Today's Teens, Their Problems, and Their Literature: Revisiting G. Robert Carlsen's "Books and the Teenage Reader" Thirty Years Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Pamela Sissi

    1997-01-01

    Revisits G. Robert Carlsen's call for the use of young adult literature in the classroom by looking specifically at the emotional and reading needs of older adolescents, those in the upper grades. Discusses problems associated with adolescence in the late twentieth century and lists recommended young adult books that touch on those issues. (TB)

  20. Teen Violence: A Global View. A World View of Social Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Allan M., Ed.; Summers, Randal W., Ed.

    Teen violence in 14 countries is examined to provide greater understanding of teen violence in the United States. An introduction provides an overview of similarities and differences in teen violence in the selected localities. Each chapter begins with a profile of the country and an overview of the impact of the problem, including basic policies,…

  1. A Mentor Manual: For Adults Who Work with Pregnant and Parenting Teens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanfer, Frederick H.; Englund, Susan; Lennhoff, Claudia; Rhodes, Jean

    Intended for adults working with expectant and new teen mothers, this guide provides techniques and strategies for helping the teen mother develop skills needed to achieve parenting and life goals. The first half of the guide explores the relationship between the adult mentor and teen parent, and steps toward problem solving and positive change.…

  2. Effect of Child Care Support on the Academic Achievement of Teen Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Teen motherhood is a problem in the United States, resulting in higher drop-out rates, lower GPAs, and worse attendance rates than for female teens without children. To address issues that teen mothers face, the California Department of Education implemented the Cal-SAFE program; however, budget cuts have closed many of the Cal-SAFE sites. While a…

  3. Well-Being on Campus: Testing the Effectiveness of an Online Strengths-Based Intervention for First Year College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koydemir, Selda; Sun-Selisik, Z. Eda

    2016-01-01

    The present research examined the effectiveness of an 8-week online strengths-based intervention in promoting subjective and psychological well-being of first year university students. The intervention was composed of five modules pertaining to (a) finding and cultivating on character strengths, (b) regulation of emotions and increasing positive…

  4. An Evaluation of Interventions to Facilitate Algebra Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayfield, Kristin H.; Glenn, Irene M.

    2008-01-01

    Three participants were trained on 6 target algebra skills and subsequently received a series of 5 instructional interventions (cumulative practice, tiered feedback, feedback plus solution sequence instruction, review practice, and transfer training) in a multiple baseline across skills design. The effects of the interventions on the performance…

  5. Problems and possible solutions for interventions among children and adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter provides an overview of childhood obesity causes and a discussion about the efficacy of potential preventive interventions. Interventions for obesity prevention generally have had no or limited effects with no obvious patterns in findings to guide program development. This chapter assum...

  6. Resonant Messages to Prevent Prescription Drug Misuse by Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twombly, Eric C.; Holtz, Kristen D.; Agnew, Christine B.

    2011-01-01

    Prescription drug misuse is a major health problem, particularly among teens. A key step in curbing misuse is the development of effective prescription drug prevention messages. This paper explores the elements of prescription drug misuse prevention messages that resonate with teens using data from focus groups with seventh and eighth grade…

  7. Teen Pregnancy and the Achievement Gap among Urban Minority Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basch, Charles E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To outline the prevalence and disparities of teen pregnancy among school-aged urban minority youth, causal pathways through which nonmarital teen births adversely affects academic achievement, and proven or promising approaches for schools to address this problem. Methods: Literature review. Results: In 2006, the birth rate among 15-…

  8. Teens, Crime, and the Community in Boys & Girls Clubs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Andrea

    Teens, Crime, and the Community (TCC) curriculum creates an awareness among teens of the crime problems facing our communities and how they affect our nation. It encourages youth to take responsibility for reducing crime and victimization, making schools and neighborhoods safer. Boys and Girls Clubs offer a variety of programs for youth, and TCC…

  9. Interventions to Assist Health Consumers to Find Reliable Online Health Information: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kenneth; Hoti, Kreshnik; Hughes, Jeffery D.; Emmerton, Lynne M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Health information on the Internet is ubiquitous, and its use by health consumers prevalent. Finding and understanding relevant online health information, and determining content reliability, pose real challenges for many health consumers. Purpose To identify the types of interventions that have been implemented to assist health consumers to find reliable online health information, and where possible, describe and compare the types of outcomes studied. Data Sources PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL Plus and Cochrane Library databases; WorldCat and Scirus ‘gray literature’ search engines; and manual review of reference lists of selected publications. Study Selection Publications were selected by firstly screening title, abstract, and then full text. Data Extraction Seven publications met the inclusion criteria, and were summarized in a data extraction form. The form incorporated the PICOS (Population Intervention Comparators Outcomes and Study Design) Model. Two eligible gray literature papers were also reported. Data Synthesis Relevant data from included studies were tabulated to enable descriptive comparison. A brief critique of each study was included in the tables. This review was unable to follow systematic review methods due to the paucity of research and humanistic interventions reported. Limitations While extensive, the gray literature search may have had limited reach in some countries. The paucity of research on this topic limits conclusions that may be drawn. Conclusions The few eligible studies predominantly adopted a didactic approach to assisting health consumers, whereby consumers were either taught how to find credible websites, or how to use the Internet. Common types of outcomes studied include knowledge and skills pertaining to Internet use and searching for reliable health information. These outcomes were predominantly self-assessed by participants. There is potential for further research to explore other avenues for assisting health

  10. Evaluating the Quality and Responsiveness of Reading Interventions Developed through Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahn-Blakeslee, Alecia; Ikeda, Martin J.; Gustafson, Jeri

    2005-01-01

    Research suggests that quality interventions, ambitious goals, and formative progress monitoring positively impact student achievement. This study evaluated 32 reading intervention cases, generated from problem-solving service delivery, for the inclusion of quality indices, goal ambitiousness, and student growth over time. Intervention quality was…

  11. Effects of Two Interventions on Solving Basic Fact Problems by Second Graders with Mathematics Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Minyi Shih; Sorrells, Audrey McCray; Falcomata, Terry S.

    2016-01-01

    This study used a multiple probe across participants design, replicated across two interventions and counterbalanced across participant groups to examine the effects of number sense intervention and extensive practice intervention on strategy transformation when students with mathematics learning disabilities (MLD) solved basic fact problems. In…

  12. "Why Should I Tell My Business?": An Emerging Theory of Coping and Disclosure in Teens.

    PubMed

    DeFrino, Daniela T; Marko-Holguin, Monika; Cordel, Stephanie; Anker, Lauren; Bansa, Melishia; Van Voorhees, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Disclosing predepression feelings of sadness is difficult for teens. Primary care providers are a potential avenue for teens to disclose these feelings and a bridge to mental health care before becoming more seriously ill. To explore how to more effectively recruit teens into a primary care-based, online depression prevention study, we held 5 focus groups with African American and Latino teens (n = 43) from a large Midwestern city. We conducted constant comparative analysis of the data and a theoretical conceptualization of coping and disclosure emerged. Our analysis revealed an internal coping continuum in reaction to sadness and pivotal elements of trust and judgment that either lead teens to disclose or not disclose these feelings. The teens' perspectives show the necessary characteristics of a relationship and comfortable community and virtual settings that can best allow for teens to take the step of disclosing to receive mental health care services. PMID:27333633

  13. Problem Solving Interventions: Impact on Young Children with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Lindsay Lile

    2012-01-01

    Problem-solving skills are imperative to a child's growth and success across multiple environments, including general and special education. Problem solving is comprised of: (a) attention to the critical aspects of a problem, (b) generation of solution(s) to solve the problem, (c) application of a solution(s) to the identified problem, and…

  14. Early Intervention in Conduct Problems in Children. Clinical Approaches to Early Intervention in Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Matthew R.; Gooley, Shylaja; Nicholson, Jan

    Conduct problems represent a complex set of symptoms and can have a range of negative effects in many areas of a child's life, including ongoing development; family functioning; peer relationships; and learning. These problems generally appear during the preschool years and early identification and intervention are critical to their treatment.…

  15. School-Based Approaches to Affect Adolescents' Diets: Results from the TEENS Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, Leslie A.; Murray, David M.; Perry, Cheryl L.; Story, Mary; Birnbaum, Amanda S.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Varnell, Sherri

    2004-01-01

    This article reports on the outcomes of the Teens Eating for Energy and Nutrition at School (TEENS) study, a 2-year intervention study conducted in 16 middle schools with a goal of increasing students' intakes of fruits, vegetables, and lower fat foods. Despite positive interim results for students randomized to intervention schools, the positive…

  16. Help Teens Manage Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Training (CST) as a part of routine diabetes management. Its aim is to improve diabetic teens' coping and communication skills, healthy behaviors, and conflict resolution. The CST training helps diabetic teens to make good decisions when it comes to managing food choices, making ...

  17. Teen Chick Lit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meloni, Christine

    2006-01-01

    For young teen girls, reading has become hot again. With their appealing covers, witty heroines and humorous plots, teen chick lit books are bringing girls out of the malls and into local libraries and bookstores in search of the next must-have title. These fun books are about boys, friendship, family, fitting in, and growing up. What makes the…

  18. Classroom intervention for illness-related problem behavior in children with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Carr, Edward G; Blakeley-Smith, Audrey

    2006-11-01

    There is growing evidence of an association between physical illness and problem behavior in children with developmental disabilities. Such behavior can compromise school performance. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate, using a group design, the effectiveness of medical intervention alone (N = 11) versus behavioral plus medical intervention (N = 10) for illness-related problem behavior in a school setting. Following intervention, the behavioral plus medical intervention group showed lower levels of problem behavior and completed more academic tasks than did the medical intervention alone group. The results are discussed with respect to the concept of illness and pain as a setting event for problem behavior. The need for research to develop algorithms that allow one to select the best combination of medical and behavioral interventions for specific illnesses and contexts is noted. PMID:17050770

  19. Prenatal and postnatal cocaine exposure predict teen cocaine use

    PubMed Central

    Delaney-Black, Virginia; Chiodo, Lisa M.; Hannigan, John H.; Greenwald, Mark K.; Janisse, James; Patterson, Grace; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Partridge, Robert T.; Ager, Joel; Sokol, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical studies have identified alterations in cocaine and alcohol self-administration and behavioral responses to pharmacological challenges in adolescent offspring following prenatal exposure. To date, no published human studies have evaluated the relation between prenatal cocaine exposure and postnatal adolescent cocaine use. Human studies of prenatal cocaine-exposed children have also noted an increase in behaviors previously associated with substance use/abuse in teens and young adults, specifically childhood and teen externalizing behaviors, impulsivity, and attention problems. Despite these findings, human research has not addressed prior prenatal exposure as a potential predictor of teen drug use behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relations between prenatal cocaine exposure and teen cocaine use in a prospective longitudinal cohort (n = 316) that permitted extensive control for child, parent and community risk factors. Logistic regression analyses and Structural Equation Modeling revealed that both prenatal exposure and postnatal parent/caregiver cocaine use were uniquely related to teen use of cocaine at age 14 years. Teen cocaine use was also directly predicted by teen community violence exposure and caregiver negativity, and was indirectly related to teen community drug exposure. These data provide further evidence of the importance of prenatal exposure, family and community factors in the intergenerational transmission of teen/young adult substance abuse/use. PMID:20609384

  20. Technology Confidence, Competence and Problem Solving Strategies: Differences within Online and Face-to-Face Formats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Sharon L.; Palmer, Louann Bierlein

    2011-01-01

    This study identified the problem solving strategies used by students within a university course designed to teach pre-service teachers educational technology, and whether those strategies were influenced by the format of the course (i.e., face-to-face computer lab vs. online). It also examined to what extent the type of problem solving strategies…

  1. The Role of Technology-Based Scaffolding in Problem-Based Online Asynchronous Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ak, Serife

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of technology-based scaffolds that were composed through the use of the seven-stage, problem-based learning strategy on knowledge construction in a problem-based online asynchronous discussion. In a quasi-experimental setting, 60 students in an undergraduate Instructional Technology and Material Design course were…

  2. Problem-Based Learning in an Online Course: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheaney, James D.; Ingebritsen, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is the use of a "real world" problem or situation as a context for learning. The present study explores the use of PBL in an online biotechnology course. In the PBL unit, student groups dealt with the ethical, legal, social, and human issues surrounding pre-symptomatic DNA testing for a genetic disease. Issues…

  3. Peer Acceptance and the Development of Emotional and Behavioural Problems: Results from a Preventive Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menting, Barbara; Koot, Hans; van Lier, Pol

    2015-01-01

    Difficulties in peer acceptance during elementary school have been associated with emotional and behavioural problems. This study used a randomized controlled intervention design to test whether improvements in peer acceptance mediated reduced rates of emotional and behavioural problems in intervention compared to control-group children. A total…

  4. The Taped Problems Intervention: Increasing the Math Fact Fluency of a Student with an Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCallum, Elizabeth; Schmitt, Ara J.

    2011-01-01

    The Taped Problems intervention is an evidence-based practice that involves a self-monitored, audio-recording procedure in which students follow along with automated recordings of math facts and their solutions. A multiple-probes-across-tasks design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the Taped Problems intervention on the division-fact…

  5. Internet-based interventions for disordered gamblers: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of online self-directed cognitive-behavioural motivational therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gambling disorders affect about one percent of adults. Effective treatments are available but only a small proportion of affected individuals will choose to attend formal treatment. As a result, self-directed treatments have also been developed and found effective. Self-directed treatments provide individuals with information and support to initiate a recovery program without attending formal treatment. In previous research we developed an telephone-based intervention package that helps people to be motivated to tackle their gambling problem and to use basic behavioral and cognitive change strategies. The present study will investigate the efficacy of this self-directed intervention offered as a free online resource. The Internet is an excellent modality in which to offer self-directed treatment for gambling problems. The Internet is increasingly accessible to members of the public and is frequently used to access health-related information. Online gambling sites are also becoming more popular gambling platforms. Method/Design A randomized clinical trial (N=180) will be conducted in which individuals with gambling problems who are not interested in attending formal treatment are randomly assigned to have access to an online self-directed intervention or to a comparison condition. The comparison condition will be an alternative website that offers a self-assessment of gambling involvement and gambling-related problems. The participant’s use of the resources and their gambling involvement (days of gambling, dollars loss) and their gambling problems will be tracked for a twelve month follow-up period. Discussion The results of this research will be important for informing policy-makers who are developing treatment systems. Trial registration ISRCTN06220098 PMID:23294668

  6. Improving mental health of adolescents with Type 1 diabetes: protocol for a randomized controlled trial of the Nothing Ventured Nothing Gained online adolescent and parenting support intervention

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Management of Type 1 diabetes comes with substantial personal and psychological demands particularly during adolescence, placing young people at significant risk for mental health problems. Supportive parenting can mitigate these risks, however the challenges associated with parenting a child with a chronic illness can interfere with a parent’s capacity to parent effectively. Interventions that provide support for both the adolescent and their parents are needed to prevent mental health problems in adolescents; to support positive parent-adolescent relationships; and to empower young people to better self-manage their illness. This paper presents the research protocol for a study evaluating the efficacy of the Nothing Ventured Nothing Gained online adolescent and parenting intervention which aims to improve the mental health outcomes of adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. Method/Design A randomized controlled trial using repeated measures with two arms (intervention and wait-list control) will be used to evaluate the efficacy and acceptability of the online intervention. Approximately 120 adolescents with Type 1 diabetes, aged 13–18 years and one of their parents/guardians will be recruited from pediatric diabetes clinics across Victoria, Australia. Participants will be randomized to receive the intervention immediately or to wait 6 months before accessing the intervention. Adolescent, parent and family outcomes will be assessed via self-report questionnaires at three time points (baseline, 6 weeks and 6 months). The primary outcome is improved adolescent mental health (depression and anxiety). Secondary outcomes include adolescent behavioral (diabetes self-management and risk taking behavior), psychosocial (diabetes relevant quality of life, parent reported child well-being, self-efficacy, resilience, and perceived illness benefits and burdens); metabolic (HbA1c) outcomes; parent psychosocial outcomes (negative affect and fatigue, self

  7. Designing Online Problem Representation Engine for Conceptual Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chwee Beng; Ling, Keck Voon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe the web-based scaffold dynamic simulation system (PRES-on) designed for pre-service teachers. Design/methodology/approach: The paper describes the initial design of a web-based scaffold dynamic simulation system (PRES-on) as a cognitive tool for learners to represent problems. For the widespread use of the…

  8. Online Community Use Predicts Abstinence in Combined Internet/Phone Intervention for Smoking Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Papandonatos, George D.; Erar, Bahar; Stanton, Cassandra A.; Graham, Amanda L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the causal effects of online community use on 30-day point prevalence abstinence at 3 months among smokers randomized to combined Internet+Phone intervention for smoking cessation. Method Participants were N=399 adult smokers in the Internet+Phone arm of The iQUITT Study, a randomized trial of Internet and proactive telephone counseling for smoking cessation. All participants accessed a web-based smoking-cessation program with an established online community and received telephone counseling. Automated tracking metrics of passive (e.g., reading posts, viewing profiles) and active (e.g., writing posts, sending messages) community use were extracted at 3 months. Self-selected community use defines the groups of interest: None, Passive, and Both (passive+active). Inverse probability of treatment weighting corrected for baseline imbalances on demographic, smoking, and psychosocial variables. Propensity weights estimated via generalized boosted models were used to calculate Average Treatment Effects (ATE) and Average Treatment effects on the Treated (ATT). Results Patterns of community use were: None=145 (36.3%), Passive=82 (20.6%), and Both=172 (43.1%). ATE-weighted abstinence rates were: None=12.2% (95% CI=6.7–17.7); Passive=25.2% (95% CI=15.1–35.2); Both=35.5% (95% CI=28.1–42.9). ATT-weighted abstinence rates indicated even greater benefits of passive community use by non-users. Conclusions More than one third of participants who received telephone counseling and used the community both passively and actively achieved abstinence. Participation in an established online community as part of a combined Internet+phone intervention has the potential to promote short-term abstinence. Results also demonstrated that information and support that originate in the community can serve as a resource for all users. PMID:27100127

  9. An approach to enrich online medical Problem-Based Learning with tacit healthcare knowledge.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Yu-N; Rashid, Faridah Abdul; Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    2003-01-01

    Existing Problem-Based Learning (PBL) problems, though suitable in their own right for teaching purposes, are limited in their potential to evolve by themselves and to create new knowledge. Presently, they are based on textbook examples of past cases and/or cases that have been transcribed by a clinician. In this paper, we present (a) a tacit healthcare knowledge representation formalism called Healthcare Scenarios, (b) the relevance of healthcare scenarios in PBL in healthcare and medicine, (c) a novel PBL-Scenario-based tacit knowledge explication strategy and (d) an online PBL Problem Composer and Presenter (PBL-Online) to facilitate the acquisition and utilisation of expert-quality tacit healthcare knowledge to enrich online PBL. We employ a confluence of healthcare knowledge management tools and Internet technologies to bring tacit healthcare knowledge-enriched PBL to a global and yet more accessible level. PMID:14664077

  10. Development of an Accelerometer-Linked Online Intervention System to Promote Physical Activity in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Nicole; Bradlyn, Andrew; Thompson, Sharon K.; Yen, Sophia; Haritatos, Jana; Dillon, Fred; Cole, Steve W.

    2015-01-01

    Most adolescents do not achieve the recommended levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), placing them at increased risk for a diverse array of chronic diseases in adulthood. There is a great need for scalable and effective interventions that can increase MVPA in adolescents. Here we report the results of a measurement validation study and a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment testing the impact of Zamzee, an accelerometer-linked online intervention system that combines proximal performance feedback and incentive motivation features to promote MVPA. In a calibration study that parametrically varied levels of physical activity in 31 12-14 year-old children, the Zamzee activity meter was shown to provide a valid measure of MVPA (sensitivity in detecting MVPA = 85.9%, specificity = 97.5%, and r = .94 correspondence with the benchmark RT3 accelerometer system; all p < .0001). In a subsequent randomized controlled multi-site experiment involving 182 middle school-aged children assessed for MVPA over 6 wks, intent-to-treat analyses found that those who received access to the Zamzee intervention had average MVPA levels 54% greater than those of a passive control group (p < 0.0001) and 68% greater than those of an active control group that received access to a commercially available active videogame (p < .0001). Zamzee’s effects on MVPA did not diminish significantly over the course of the 6-wk study period, and were statistically significant in both females and males, and in normal- vs. high-BMI subgroups. These results provide promising initial indications that combining the Zamzee activity meter with online proximal performance feedback and incentive motivation features can positively impact MVPA levels in adolescents. PMID:26010359

  11. Online Versus In-Person Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment Training in Pediatrics Residents

    PubMed Central

    Giudice, Erin L.; Lewin, Linda O.; Welsh, Christopher; Crouch, Taylor Berens; Wright, Katherine S.; Delahanty, Janine; DiClemente, Carlo C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pediatricians underestimate the prevalence of substance misuse among children and adolescents and often fail to screen for and intervene in practice. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends training in Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT), but training outcomes and skill acquisition are rarely assessed. Objective We compared the effects of online versus in-person SBIRT training on pediatrics residents' knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and skills. Methods Forty pediatrics residents were randomized to receive either online or in-person training. Skills were assessed by pre- and posttraining standardized patient interviews that were coded for SBIRT-adherent and -nonadherent behaviors and global skills by 2 trained coders. Thirty-two residents also completed pre- and postsurveys of their substance use knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors (KABs). Two-way repeated measures multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVAs) and analyses of variance (ANOVAs) estimates were used to assess group differences in skill acquisition and KABs. Results Findings indicated that both groups demonstrated skill improvement from pre- to postassessment. Results indicated that both groups increased their knowledge, self-reported behaviors, confidence, and readiness with no significant between-group differences. Follow-up univariate analyses indicated that, while both groups increased their SBIRT-adherent skills, the online training group displayed more “undesirable” behaviors posttraining. Conclusions The current study indicates that brief training, online or in-person, can increase pediatrics residents' SBIRT skills, knowledge, self-reported behaviors, confidence, and readiness. The findings further indicate that in-person training may have incremental benefit in teaching residents what not to do. PMID:26217423

  12. Online Suicide Risk Screening and Intervention with College Students: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    King, Cheryl A.; Eisenberg, Daniel; Zheng, Kai; Czyz, Ewa; Kramer, Anne; Horwitz, Adam; Chermack, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Objective This pilot randomized controlled trial examined the effect of an online intervention for college students at risk for suicide, Electronic Bridge to Mental Health Services (eBridge), which included personalized feedback and optional online counseling delivered in accordance with motivational interviewing principles. Primary outcomes were readiness to seek information or talk with family and friends about mental health treatment, readiness to seek mental health treatment, and actual treatment linkage. Method Participants were 76 college students (45 women, 31 men; mean age = 22.9 years, SD = 5.0 years) at a large public university who screened positive for suicide risk, defined by at least two of the following: suicidal thoughts, history of suicide attempt, depression, and alcohol abuse. Racial/ethnic self-identifications were primarily Caucasian (n = 54) and Asian (n = 21). Students were randomized to eBridge or the control condition (personalized feedback only, offered in plain report format). Outcomes were measured at 2-month follow-up. Results Despite relatively modest engagement in online counseling (29% of students posted ≥ 1 message), students assigned to eBridge reported significantly higher readiness for help-seeking scores, especially readiness to talk to family, talk to friends, and see a mental health professional. Students assigned to eBridge also reported lower stigma levels and were more likely to link to mental health treatment. Conclusions Findings suggest that offering students personalized feedback and the option of online counseling, using motivational interviewing principles, has a positive impact on students’ readiness to consider and engage in mental health treatment. Further research is warranted to determine the robustness of this effect, the mechanism by which improved readiness and treatment linkage occurs, and the longer term impact on student mental health outcomes. PMID:25688811

  13. Response to Intervention in Literacy: Problems and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Peter H.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that it is possible to substantially reduce the number of children classified as learning disabled in literacy. The 2004 reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act opens opportunities to do so through Response to Intervention (RTI). This article argues that institutional histories, structures, and…

  14. HealthMpowerment.org: Building Community Though a Mobile-Optimized, Online Health Promotion Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.; Muessig, Kathryn E.; Pike, Emily C.; LeGrand, Sara; Baltierra, Nina; Rucker, Alvin Justin; Wilson, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background Both young Black men who have sex with men as well as young Black transgender women (YBMSM/TW) continue to experience a significant increase in HIV incidence. HealthMpowerment.org (HMP) is a mobile phone-optimized, online intervention for both YBMSM/TW to build community and facilitate supportive relationships. Methods To assess the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary outcomes, a 1-month pilot trial of HMP among 15 YBMSM/TW was conducted. Results Retention was 100%. Mean age was 26 years, 60% were HIV-infected, 87% earned <$21,000, and 67% were uninsured. Despite the small sample size and limited intervention length, statistically significant improvements were seen in social support (p = .012), social isolation (p = .050), and depressive symptoms (p = .045). Conclusion The HMP pilot trial demonstrated feasibility and acceptability. Given the burden of the epidemic among YBMSM/TW, there is an imperative to develop, test, and scale up culturally appropriate interventions to both prevent HIV acquisition and limit onward transmission. PMID:25588932

  15. Study protocol: a randomised controlled trial of a theory-based online intervention to improve sun safety among Australian adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The effects of exposure to ultraviolet radiation are a significant concern in Australia which has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world. Despite most skin cancers being preventable by encouraging consistent adoption of sun-protective behaviours, incidence rates are not decreasing. There is a dearth of research examining the factors involved in engaging in sun-protective behaviours. Further, online multi-behavioural theory-based interventions have yet to be explored fully as a medium for improving sun-protective behaviour in adults. This paper presents the study protocol of a randomised controlled trial of an online intervention based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) that aims to improve sun safety among Australian adults. Methods/Design Approximately 420 adults aged 18 and over and predominantly from Queensland, Australia, will be recruited and randomised to the intervention (n = 200), information only (n = 200) or the control group (n = 20). The intervention focuses on encouraging supportive attitudes and beliefs toward sun-protective behaviour, fostering perceptions of normative support for sun protection, and increasing perceptions of control/self-efficacy over sun protection. The intervention will be delivered online over a single session. Data will be collected immediately prior to the intervention (Time 1), immediately following the intervention (Time 1b), and one week (Time 2) and one month (Time 3) post-intervention. Primary outcomes are intentions to sun protect and sun-protective behaviour. Secondary outcomes are the participants’ attitudes toward sun protection, perceptions of normative support for sun protection (i.e. subjective norms, group norms, personal norms and image norms) and perceptions of control/self-efficacy toward sun protection. Discussion The study will contribute to an understanding of the effectiveness of a TPB-based online intervention to improve Australian adults’ sun

  16. An Investigation into the Effects and Factors Influencing Computer-Based Online Math Problem-Solving in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eid, Ghada K.

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine if online computer-based math problem-solving and paper-and-pencil math problem-solving tests are suitable tools for measuring math problem-solving, by comparing student performance on traditional style paper-based tests to performance on the same tests online. Data collection for this study was…

  17. What Teens Want: Thirty Graphic Novels You Can't Live Without.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Michele

    2002-01-01

    Defines graphic novels as meatier and longer comic books and discusses their appeal for teens. Lists online and print sources of reviews; explains how to build a collection; and includes an annotated bibliography of 30 titles suitable for a middle school or high school library's core collection or for a public library's teen collection. (LRW)

  18. Common Sleep Problems (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... stages 1, 2, 3, 4, and REM (rapid eye movement) sleep make up a sleep cycle . One complete ... person can wake up easily. During these stages, eye movements slow down and eventually stop, heart and breathing ...

  19. Tackling Teens' No. 1 Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adair, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Drug Strategies' updated guide evaluates the 50 most popular U.S. prevention programs. Project ALERT scored high in overall quality, administrative ease, and rehearsal and role plays. Key components include age appropriateness, identification of social pressures, instruction in refusal skills, interactivity, normative education, family…

  20. The antecedents of teen fatherhood: a retrospective case-control study of Great Britain youth.

    PubMed Central

    Dearden, K A; Hale, C B; Woolley, T

    1995-01-01

    Historically, researchers have focused on identifying risk factors for teen motherhood, largely ignoring teen fathers. This study uses the 1958 National Child Development Study of Great Britain to examine antecedents of teen fatherhood. Teen fathers were compared with later fathers and nonfathers by using epidemiological methods. Results indicate that boys who became fathers while in their teens were at increased risk for experiencing problems at home and at school and were more likely to demonstrate aggressive, truant, and law-breaking behaviors. Many of these risk factors were also evident among those who became fathers while in their early 20s. PMID:7702121

  1. RESEARCH ON ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH INTERVENTIONS: ETHICAL PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS

    PubMed Central

    RESNIK, DAVID B.; ZELDIN, DARRYL C.; SHARP, RICHARD R.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews a variety of ethical issues one must consider when conducting research on environmental health interventions on human subjects. The paper uses the Kennedy Krieger Institute lead abatement study as well as a hypothetical asthma study to discuss questions concerning benefits and risks, risk minimization, safety monitoring, the duty to warn, the duty to report, the use of control groups, informed consent, equitable subject selection, privacy, conflicts of interest, and community consultation. Research on environmental health interventions can make an important contribution to our understanding of human health and disease prevention, provided it is conducted in a manner that meets prevailing scientific, ethical, and legal standards for research on human subjects. PMID:16220621

  2. Protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial of an online intervention for post-treatment cancer survivors with persistent fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Teresa; Walsh, Jane C; Groarke, AnnMarie; Moss-Morris, Rona; McGuire, Brian E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many post-treatment cancer survivors experience persistent fatigue that can disrupt attempts to resume normal everyday activities after treatment. Theoretical models that aim to explain contributory factors that initiate and sustain fatigue symptoms, or that influence the efficacy of interventions for cancer-related fatigue (CrF) require testing. Adjustment to fatigue is likely to be influenced by coping behaviours that are guided by the representations of the symptom. Objectives This paper describes the protocol for a pilot trial of a systematically and theoretically designed online intervention to enable self-management of CrF after cancer treatment. Methods and analysis This 2-armed randomised controlled pilot trial will study the feasibility and potential effectiveness of an online intervention. Participants will be allocated to either the online intervention (REFRESH (Recovery from Cancer-Related Fatigue)), or a leaflet comparator. Participants 80 post-treatment cancer survivors will be recruited for the study. Interventions An 8-week online intervention based on cognitive–behavioural therapy. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome is a change in fatigue as measured by the Piper Fatigue Scale (revised). Quality of life will be measured using the Quality of Life in Adult Survivors of Cancer Scale. Outcome measures will be collected at baseline, and at completion of intervention. Results The feasibility of trial procedures will be tested, as well as the effect of the intervention on the outcomes. Conclusions This study may lead to the development of a supportive resource to target representations and coping strategies of cancer survivors with CrF post-treatment. Setting Recruitment from general public in Ireland. Ethics and dissemination This trial was approved by the Research Ethics Committee at National University of Ireland Galway in January 2013. Trial results will be communicated in a peer-reviewed journal. Trial

  3. Teen Diabetes Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Teens with diabetes can eat sugar, sweets, and desserts. True False Carbs that have a lot of ... fruits and vegetables Sweetened fruit drinks Sweets and desserts If you have diabetes, you should: Get 60 ...

  4. Teen Pregnancy and Childbearing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Transmitted Diseases Teen Pregnancy & Childbearing In the States Adolescent Health Topics America's Adolescents Healthy Relationships Mental Health ... database Email Address> Health Insurance Marketplace Office of Adolescent Health 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700 Rockville, MD ...

  5. Endometriosis (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Endometriosis KidsHealth > For Teens > Endometriosis Print A A A ... doctor thought Anne might have endometriosis. What Is Endometriosis? When a woman has endometriosis, tissue that looks ...

  6. Confronting Practical Problems for Initiation of On-line Hemodiafiltration Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sihyung

    2016-01-01

    Conventional hemodialysis, which is based on the diffusive transport of solutes, is the most widely used renal replacement therapy. It effectively removes small solutes such as urea and corrects fluid, electrolyte and acid-base imbalance. However, solute diffusion coefficients decreased rapidly as molecular size increased. Because of this, middle and large molecules are not removed effectively and clinical problem such as dialysis amyloidosis might occur. Online hemodiafiltration which is combined by diffusive and convective therapies can overcome such problems by removing effectively middle and large solutes. Online hemodiafiltration is safe, very effective, economically affordable, improving session tolerance and may improve the mortality superior to high flux hemodialysis. However, there might be some potential limitations for setting up online hemodiafiltaration. In this article, we review the uremic toxins associated with dialysis, definition of hemodiafiltration, indication and prescription of hemodiafiltration and the limitations of setting up hemodiafiltration. PMID:27453712

  7. Parents, Teens, and Reading: A Winning Combination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Reading Association, Newark, DE.

    Noting that surveys show that teens still value their parents' opinions, this booklet contains many helpful suggestions designed to get parents and their teens reading and talking together. Sections of the booklet are: "Where To Begin? Know Your Teen"; "How Can I Get My Teen To Read?"; "Give Your Teen Reasons To Read"; "Teens, Technology, and…

  8. Parent-Teen Communication about Sexual Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffaelli, Marcela; Bogenschneider, Karen; Flood, Mary Fran

    1998-01-01

    Examines parent-teen communication about sexual topics in mother-teen (n=666) and father-teen (n=510) pairs. Results show that, aside from gender of parents and teens, demographic variables were insignificant; relationship and attitudinal variables were linked to sexual discussions in both mother-teen and father-teen dyads. (Author/MKA)

  9. A Randomized Control Trial of a Chronic Care Intervention for Homeless Women with Alcohol Use Problems

    PubMed Central

    Upshur, Carole; Weinreb, Linda; Bharel, Monica; Reed, George; Frisard, Christine

    2014-01-01

    A clinician-randomized trial was conducted using the chronic care model for disease management for alcohol use problems among n=82 women served in a health care for the homeless clinic. Women with problem alcohol use received either usual care or an intervention consisting of a Primary Care Provider (PCP) brief intervention, referral to addiction services, and on-going support from a Care Manager (CM) for 6 months. Both groups significantly reduced their alcohol consumption, with a small effect size favoring intervention at 3 months, but there were no significant differences between groups in reductions in drinking or in housing stability, or mental or physical health. However, intervention women had significantly more frequent participation in substance use treatment services. Baseline differences and small sample size limit generalizability, although substantial reductions in drinking for both groups suggest screening and PCP brief treatment are promising interventions for homeless women with alcohol use problems. PMID:25488504

  10. A randomized control trial of a chronic care intervention for homeless women with alcohol use problems.

    PubMed

    Upshur, Carole; Weinreb, Linda; Bharel, Monica; Reed, George; Frisard, Christine

    2015-04-01

    A clinician-randomized trial was conducted using the chronic care model for disease management for alcohol use problems among n = 82 women served in a health care for the homeless clinic. Women with problem alcohol use received either usual care or an intervention consisting of a primary care provider (PCP) brief intervention, referral to addiction services, and on-going support from a care manager (CM) for 6 months. Both groups significantly reduced their alcohol consumption, with a small effect size favoring intervention at 3 months, but there were no significant differences between groups in reductions in drinking or in housing stability, or mental or physical health. However, intervention women had significantly more frequent participation in substance use treatment services. Baseline differences and small sample size limit generalizability, although substantial reductions in drinking for both groups suggest that screening and PCP brief treatment are promising interventions for homeless women with alcohol use problems. PMID:25488504

  11. Gaming Against Violence: A Grassroots Approach to Teen Dating Violence.

    PubMed

    Crecente, Drew

    2014-08-01

    Teen dating violence is a pervasive problem that affects millions of adolescents worldwide. Although there have been various approaches to addressing this problem, using videogames had not been employed before 2008, when Jennifer Ann's Group, an Atlanta, GA-based nonprofit organization, created an annual competition. The Life.Love. Game Design Challenge rewards game developers for creating videogames about teen dating violence without using any violence in the games themselves. The resulting videogames have increased awareness about teen dating violence and provided educational information to assist adolescents, parents, and teachers in identifying abusive relationships. PMID:26192368

  12. Using the Solving Problems Together Psychoeducational Group Counseling Model as an Intervention for Negative Peer Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Kimberly R.; Rushing, Jeri Lynn; Khurshid, Ayesha

    2011-01-01

    Problem-focused interventions are considered to be one of the most effective group counseling strategies with adolescents. This article describes a problem-focused group counseling model, Solving Problems Together (SPT), that focuses on working with students who struggle with negative peer pressure. Adapted from the teaching philosophy of…

  13. Implementing a Problem-Solving Intervention with Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Debra L.

    2011-01-01

    Students with mild and moderate disabilities need to be skillful at problem solving. This article provides an overview of a problem-solving intervention designed to teach students with mild and moderate disabilities the skills of problem solving. An explanation of the assessments, materials, instructional outline, and methods is presented.…

  14. Differential social evaluation of pregnant teens, teen mothers and teen fathers by university students

    PubMed Central

    Weed, Keri; Nicholson, Jody S.

    2015-01-01

    Youth may be particularly attuned to social evaluation during the teen years with implications for physical and mental health. Negative attitudes and stereotypes constitute an important type of social evaluative threat. Pregnant and parenting teens not only encounter challenges associated with their early transition to parenthood, but also are confronted with unfavourable attitudes of others. A university sample of 255 men and women responded to surveys targeting their feelings and beliefs about pregnant teens, teen mothers and teen fathers. Teen mothers were generally perceived more positively than pregnant teens who were perceived more positively compared to teen fathers. Social evaluations were generally unrelated to respondents' sex or race, but respondents who had contact with a friend or family member who had experienced a teen pregnancy were selectively more positive, as were freshmen compared to seniors. Risks attributed to early childbearing may be exacerbated by negative social evaluations. PMID:25632168

  15. Online Problem-Based Learning in Postgraduate Medical Education--Content Analysis of Reflection Comments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Maria L.; Salmoni, Alan J.

    2008-01-01

    We developed the Med-e-Conference, an online tool to teach clinical skills to medical students, which integrated problem-based learning with collaborative group tasks. The final task asked students to consider what they had done (reflection). These comments were analysed using content analysis, and 10 themes were elicited. The number of agreements…

  16. Fostering Critical Thinking Skills in Students with Learning Disabilities through Online Problem-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    As a pedagogical approach, problem-based learning (PBL) has shown success for average and gifted students (HmeloSiver, 2004) and there are numerous incentives for its implementation in online learning environments (Savid-Baden, 2007; Chernobilsky, Nagarajan, & Hmelo-Silver, 2005). However, little research has been conducted regarding the…

  17. Problem-Based Learning in an Online Course of Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chagas, Isabel; Faria, Claudia; Mourato, Dulce; Pereira, Goncalo; Santos, Afonso

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to: i) describe the experience of implementing Problem-Based Learning in an online course over three consecutive academic years, ii) analyse the learning environment generated, iii) discuss impacts on students' active participation, based on the analysis of their interactions. The participants were 30 students,…

  18. Using Online Digital Tools and Video to Support International Problem-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lajoie, Susanne P.; Hmelo-Silver, Cindy; Wiseman, Jeffrey; Chan, Lap Ki; Lu, Jingyan; Khurana, Chesta; Cruz-Panesso, Ilian; Poitras, Eric; Kazemitabar, Maedeh

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study is to examine how to facilitate cross-cultural groups in problem-based learning (PBL) using online digital tools and videos. The PBL consisted of two video-based cases used to trigger student-learning issues about giving bad news to HIV-positive patients. Mixed groups of medical students from Canada and Hong Kong worked with…

  19. An Online Support System to Scaffold Real-World Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ge, Xun; Er, Nelson

    2005-01-01

    The article presents a reusable online support system, in which an open-ended learning environment is created to scaffold complex, real-world problem solving activities. The major learning components of the system are specifically described, and the internal interactions between different components within the system and the external interactions…

  20. On the Benefits of Seeking (and Avoiding) Help in Online Problem-Solving Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roll, Ido; Baker, Ryan S. J. d.; Aleven, Vincent; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2014-01-01

    Seeking the right level of help at the right time can support learning. However, in the context of online problem-solving environments, it is still not entirely clear which help-seeking strategies are desired. We use fine-grained data from 38 high school students who worked with the Geometry Cognitive Tutor for 2 months to better understand the…

  1. Assessment-Based Intervention for Severe Behavior Problems in a Natural Family Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Bobbie J.; Clarke, Shelley; Dunlap, Glen

    1997-01-01

    Functional assessments and assessment-based interventions were conducted with an 8-year-old boy with disabilities and severe problem behavior in the context of two family routines: using the home bathroom and dining in a fast-food restaurant. A multiple baseline design demonstrated the effectiveness of the intervention package as implemented by…

  2. Who Am I? A Life Story Intervention for Persons with Intellectual Disability and Psychiatric Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerhof, Gerben J.; Beernink, Janny; Sools, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    This article describes an innovative intervention based on narrative and life review therapy that is tailored to people with intellectual disability (ID) and psychiatric problems. The current study provides a first evaluation of the intervention. A symptom checklist (SCL-90) was used in a pre- and post-follow-up design, and a qualitative…

  3. Moderators of Outcome in a Brief Family-Centered Intervention for Preventing Early Problem Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Frances; Connell, Arin; Trentacosta, Christopher J.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Wilson, Melvin N.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated moderators of change in an empirically supported family-centered intervention (the Family Check-Up) for problem behavior in early childhood. Participants were 731 2- to 3-year-olds (49% girls; 28% African American, 50% European American, 13% biracial) from low-income families and had been screened for risk of family stress and early-onset problem behavior. They were randomized to the Family Check-Up intervention or to a no-intervention control group. Latent growth models examined sociodemographic and parent psychological risk factors as potential moderators of change in problem behavior between ages 2, 3, and 4. Results revealed 2 moderators of intervention effectiveness. Caregivers with the lowest educational levels were more responsive to the family-centered intervention, and 2-parent families were more responsive to the intervention. Other risk factors showed no predictive effects. Overall, findings suggest that this brief family-centered intervention can be equally effective in reaching the most distressed and most disadvantaged families, compared to those who are more advantaged. However, results suggest that more attention may be needed to address the intervention needs of single parent families in reducing problem behavior in early childhood. PMID:19485594

  4. Differential Effects of a Tier Two Behavior Intervention Based on Function of Problem Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Kent; Campbell, Amy L.; Carter, Deborah Russell; Dickey, Celeste Rossetto

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a tier two daily behavior card intervention and differential effects based on function of problem behavior. The participants were 36 elementary school students nominated for additional intervention beyond universal School-Wide Positive Behavior Support. Measures included…

  5. Behavioral Family Intervention for Children with Developmental Disabilities and Behavioral Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Clare; Mazzucchelli, Trevor; Studman, Lisa; Sanders, Matthew R.

    2006-01-01

    The outcomes of a randomized clinical trial of a new behavioral family intervention, Stepping Stones Triple P, for preschoolers with developmental and behavior problems are presented. Forty-eight children with developmental disabilities participated, 27 randomly allocated to an intervention group and 20 to a wait-list control group. Parents…

  6. Using Problem-Based Case Studies to Learn about Knowledge Translation Interventions: An Inside Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhogal, Sanjit K.; Murray, Mary Ann; McLeod, Katherine M.; Bergen, Anne; Bath, Brenna; Menon, Anita; Kho, Michelle E.; Stacey, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge translation (KT) interventions can facilitate the successful implementation of best practices by engaging and actively involving various stakeholders in the change process. However, for novices, the design of KT interventions can be overwhelming. In this article, we describe our experience as participants in a problem-based case study on…

  7. Culturally Competent Interventions in Schools for Children with Physical Health Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Daniel L.

    2007-01-01

    An estimated 5.2 to 7.8 million children with significant chronic health problems attend school every day in the United States requiring interventions in the school setting. A majority of these students will be from ethnic minority or low-income groups within two decades. Providing culturally competent interventions in schools is critical to…

  8. Cyberbullying, Violence Linked to PTSD in Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... results should serve as a reminder to parents, schools and physicians that these problems are prevalent in our community," she said. "This study also highlights that teens with a history of cyberbullying or peer violence are more likely to have PTSD, which is ...

  9. Designing, implementing and evaluating an online problem-based learning (PBL) environment--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ng, Manwa L; Bridges, Susan; Law, Sam Po; Whitehill, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been shown to be effective for promoting student competencies in self-directed and collaborative learning, critical thinking, self-reflection and tackling novel situations. However, the need for face-to-face interactions at the same place and time severely limits the potential of traditional PBL. The requirements of space and for meeting at a specific location at the same time create timetabling difficulties. Such limitations need to be tackled before all potentials of PBL learning can be realized. The present study aimed at designing and implementing an online PBL environment for undergraduate speech/language pathology students, and assessing the associated pedagogical effectiveness. A group of eight PBL students were randomly selected to participate in the study. They underwent 4 weeks of online PBL using Adobe Connect. Upon completion of the experiment, they were assessed via a self-reported questionnaire and quantitative comparison with traditional PBL students based on the same written assignment. The questionnaire revealed that all participating students enjoyed online PBL, without any perceived negative effects on learning. Online PBL unanimously saved the students travel time to and from school. Statistical analysis indicated no significant difference in assignment grades between the online and traditional PBL groups, indicating that online PBL learning appears to be similarly effective as traditional face-to-face PBL learning. PMID:23837407

  10. Online Information Searches and Help Seeking for Mental Health Problems in Urban China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Zhu, Shizhan

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, the Internet has emerged as an alternative information source on mental health problems. Yet, the profile of the typical Internet help seeker is to be determined. Based on data from a household survey of 2558 Beijing residents, the study investigates online information searches and help seeking for mental health problems. Multinomial logistic regressions are estimated for respondents' access to the Internet, and mental-health-related information searches and help seeking on the Internet for the whole community sample and the most psychologically distressed subsample. The study identifies a digital divide in online help seeking for mental health issues based on age, migration and hukou status, and socio-economic factors. Youth and high socio-economic status are significant predictors of Internet access and use. Among the whole community sample, rural-to-urban migrants are less likely to have access to the Internet and search information or seek help online. Among the most psychologically distressed subsample, urban-to-urban migrants are significantly more likely to have access to the Internet and search information or seek help online. Given the shortage of mental health professionals in China, online information dissemination and guided self-help, if properly designed, could offer a means to reach large numbers of individuals in a cost-effective manner. PMID:25981055

  11. Online peer support for mental health problems in the United States: 2004–2010

    PubMed Central

    DeAndrea, D. C.; Anthony, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Help seeking for online peer and other social support in response to depression and other mental health problems offers an electronic technology alternative to traditional mental health care. Here, with nationally representative samples of adult community residents in the USA, we study online peer support help seeking, estimate its occurrence, and investigate depression and other suspected predictors and correlates, some of which might prove to be causal influences. Method The data are from nationally representative probability sample surveys of the non-institutionalized US adult population, with a new independent sample assessed via confidential computerized self-assessment modules each year from 2004 to 2010, yielding estimates about online peer support. A total of 264 431 adults participated in these years. Results An estimated three per 1000 adults (0.3%) seek online peer support for mental health problems each year (95% confidence interval 0.0022–0.0036). Individuals with depression and/or serious psychological distress are strongly over-represented among these adult online peer support help seekers (odds ratio >7, p<0.001). Associations with college education, being non-Hispanic white, being female, and age are also noteworthy (p<0.05). Conclusions Online help seeking for mental health social support is becoming frequent enough for study in large sample national surveys, and might well be fostered by active neuropsychiatric ailments such as depression or other serious psychological distress. Open questions remain about whether the result is beneficial, or conditions required for efficacious online peer support, as might be disclosed in definitive evidence from randomized controlled trials. PMID:23410539

  12. Teen smoking cessation help via the Internet: a survey of search engines.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Christine C; Elliott, Sean P; Conway, Terry L; Woodruff, Susan I

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess Web sites related to teen smoking cessation on the Internet. Seven Internet search engines were searched using the keywords teen quit smoking. The top 20 hits from each search engine were reviewed and categorized. The keywords teen quit smoking produced between 35 and 400,000 hits depending on the search engine. Of 140 potential hits, 62% were active, unique sites; 85% were listed by only one search engine; and 40% focused on cessation. Findings suggest that legitimate on-line smoking cessation help for teens is constrained by search engine choice and the amount of time teens spend looking through potential sites. Resource listings should be updated regularly. Smoking cessation Web sites need to be picked up on multiple search engine searches. Further evaluation of smoking cessation Web sites need to be conducted to identify the most effective help for teens. PMID:14610996

  13. Increased HIV disclosure three months after an online video intervention for men who have sex with men (MSM).

    PubMed

    Chiasson, Mary Ann; Shaw, Francine Shuchat; Humberstone, Mike; Hirshfield, Sabina; Hartel, Diana

    2009-09-01

    A behavioral intervention for men who have sex with men (MSM) was created for online delivery. The nine-minute video drama "The Morning After" (www.hivbigdeal.org) was designed to promote critical thinking about HIV risk. MSM were recruited for the evaluation through banner ads on a subscription-based gay sexual meeting web site. Participants viewed the intervention online and completed online behavioral questionnaires at enrollment and three month follow-up. Each participant served as his own control. No participant incentives were provided. Follow-up was completed by 522 (54%) of 971 eligible men. Men completing follow-up were similar to those who did not by age and prevalence of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) but reported more lifetime sex partners. They also differed somewhat by race, education, and HIV testing. In the three months after the intervention, men were significantly more likely to disclose HIV status to partners (odds ratio [OR] = 3.37, p<0.001) and less likely to report a casual partner or UAI in their most recent sexual encounter than at baseline. Of 120 men HIV tested during follow-up, 17 (14%) reported being HIV seropositive. These findings show that MSM at high risk for HIV will participate in a brief online video intervention designed to engage critical thinking and that significant, self-reported increases in HIV disclosure and decreases in risk behavior occurred three months after MSM viewed the video. PMID:20024766

  14. Analysis of Social Worker and Educator's Areas of Intervention through Multimedia Concept Maps and Online Discussion Forums in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vázquez-Cano, Esteban; López Meneses, Eloy; Sánchez-Serrano, José Luis Sarasola

    2015-01-01

    This diachronic study describes an innovative university experience consisting of the development of multimedia concept maps (MCM) in relation to social educators and social workers main intervention areas and an active discussion in online forums about the results obtained. These MCMs were prepared by students who attended the Information…

  15. Effects of Using a Neuroeducational Intervention to Enhance Perseverance for Online EdD and EdS Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadle, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Developing and maintaining a "completion mindset" is a necessary mental condition for online educational doctorate (EdD) and educational specialist (EdS) students to obtain their advanced degrees. The purpose of this research study was to examine the effect of a neuroeducational intervention on a volunteer convenience sample of EdD and…

  16. The use of deception in public health behavioral intervention trials: a case study of three online alcohol trials.

    PubMed

    McCambridge, Jim; Kypri, Kypros; Bendtsen, Preben; Porter, John

    2013-01-01

    Some public health behavioral intervention research studies involve deception. A methodological imperative to minimize bias can be in conflict with the ethical principle of informed consent. As a case study, we examine the specific forms of deception used in three online randomized controlled trials evaluating brief alcohol interventions. We elaborate our own decision making about the use of deception in these trials, and present our ongoing findings and uncertainties. We discuss the value of the approach of pragmatism for examining these kinds of ethical issues that can arise in research on public health interventions. PMID:24161181

  17. The Use of Deception in Public Health Behavioral Intervention Trials: A Case Study of Three Online Alcohol Trials

    PubMed Central

    McCambridge, Jim; Kypri, Kypros; Bendtsen, Preben; Porter, John

    2013-01-01

    Some public health behavioral intervention research studies involve deception. A methodological imperative to minimize bias can be in conflict with the ethical principle of informed consent. As a case study, we examine the specific forms of deception used in three online randomized controlled trials evaluating brief alcohol interventions. We elaborate our own decision making about the use of deception in these trials, and present our ongoing findings and uncertainties. We discuss the value of the approach of pragmatism for examining these kinds of ethical issues that can arise in research on public health interventions. PMID:24161181

  18. Ethnic differences in problem perception: Immigrant mothers in a parenting intervention to reduce disruptive child behavior.

    PubMed

    Leijten, Patty; Raaijmakers, Maartje A J; Orobio de Castro, Bram; Matthys, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Ethnic minority families in Europe are underrepresented in mental health care-a profound problem for clinicians and policymakers. One reason for their underrepresentation seems that, on average, ethnic minority families tend to perceive externalizing and internalizing child behavior as less problematic. There is concern that this difference in problem perception might limit intervention effectiveness. We tested the extent to which ethnic differences in problem perception exist when ethnic minority families engage in mental health service and whether lower levels of problem perception diminish parenting intervention effects to reduce disruptive child behavior. Our sample included 136 mothers of 3- to 8-year-olds (35% female) from the 3 largest ethnic groups in the Netherlands (43% Dutch; 35% Moroccan; 22% Turkish). Mothers reported on their child's externalizing and internalizing behavior and their perception of this behavior as problematic. They were then randomly assigned to the Incredible Years parenting intervention or a wait list control condition. We contrasted maternal reports of problem perception to teacher reports of the same children. Moroccan and Turkish mothers, compared with Dutch mothers, perceived similar levels of child behavior problems as less problematic, and as causing less impairment and burden. Teacher problem perception did not vary across children from different ethnic groups. Importantly, maternal problem perception did not affect parenting intervention effectiveness to reduce disruptive child behavior. Our findings suggest that ethnic differences in problem perception exist once families engage in treatment, but that lower levels of problem perception do not diminish treatment effects. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26866477

  19. Posting Behaviour Patterns in an Online Smoking Cessation Social Network: Implications for Intervention Design and Development

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Benjamin; Hoek, Janet; Edwards, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Online Cessation Support Networks (OCSNs) are associated with increased quit success rates, but few studies have examined their use over time. We identified usage patterns in New Zealand's largest OCSN over two years and explored implications for OCSN intervention design and evaluation. Methods We analysed metadata relating to 133,096 OCSN interactions during 2011 and 2012. Metrics covered aggregate network activity, user posting activity and longevity, and between-user commenting. Binary logistic regression models were estimated to investigate the feasibility of predicting low user engagement using early interaction data. Results Repeating periodic peaks and troughs in aggregate activity related not only to seasonality (e.g., New Year), but also to day of the week. Out of 2,062 unique users, 69 Highly Engaged Users (180+ interactions each) contributed 69% of all OCSN interactions in 2012 compared to 1.3% contributed by 864 Minimally Engaged Users (< = 2 items each). The proportion of Highly Engaged Users increased with network growth between 2011 and 2012 (with marginal significance), but the proportion of Minimally Engaged Users did not decline substantively. First week interaction data enabled identification of Minimally Engaged Users with high specificity and sensitivity (AUROC  = 0.94). Implications Results suggest future research should develop and test interventions that promote activity, and hence cessation support, amongst specific user groups or at key time points. For example, early usage information could help identify Minimally Engaged Users for tests of targeted messaging designed to improve their integration into, or re-engagement with, the OCSN. Furthermore, although we observed strong growth over time on varied metrics including posts and comments, this change did not coincide with large gains in first-time user persistence. Researchers assessing intervention effects should therefore examine multiple measures when evaluating

  20. Intervention Strategies for Dealing with Multi-Problem Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloss, James; And Others

    This paper describes the Primary Prevention Project (PPP), a demonstration program of the Mendota Mental Health Institute in Madison, Wisconsin which provides services to multi-problem families with children under 3 years of age in order to prevent abuse and neglect, developmental delay, or future socio-emotional difficulty. The project's…

  1. Assessment for Intervention: A Problem-Solving Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown-Chidsey, Rachel, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This cutting-edge volume offers a complete primer on conducting problem-solving based assessments in school or clinical settings. Presented are an effective framework and up-to-date tools for identifying and remediating the many environmental factors that may contribute to a student's academic, emotional, or behavioral difficulties, and for…

  2. Early Predictors of Behavior Problems: Two Years after Early Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Darcy B.; Hauser-Cram, Penny

    2009-01-01

    Positive outcomes for children with developmental disabilities (DD) can be affected by children's behavior problems. This study examined the family environment of 125 children with DD at age 3, and the extent to which that environment, as well as children's cognitive and adaptive functioning, predicted the problematic behaviors that children with…

  3. Yoga as an Intervention for Children with Attention Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Heather L.; Kehle, Thomas J.; Bray, Melissa A.; Theodore, Lea A.

    2005-01-01

    A multiple baseline design across three grade level groups with a comparison group was employed to investigate the effectiveness of yoga for improving time on task with 10 elementary school children who evidenced attention problems. A yoga videotape, published by Gaiam, was used that required the children to follow an adult instructor and three…

  4. Attention Problems: Interventions and Resources. An Introductory Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for Mental Health in Schools.

    This introductory information packet is designed to increase awareness of assessment and treatment of attention problems in children. Included are excerpts from a variety of sources, including government fact sheets and the classification scheme developed by the American Pediatric Association. Symptoms are discussed in terms of degree of severity.…

  5. Use of Gaming in Self-Management of Diabetes in Teens.

    PubMed

    Swartwout, Ellen; El-Zein, Ashley; Deyo, Patricia; Sweenie, Rachel; Streisand, Randi

    2016-07-01

    With the growing prevalence of diabetes in teens and frequent concomitant problems with adherence, adolescents are a frequent target for diabetes self-management support and education. Due to widespread use of technology among teens in general, the use of serious games, games used for purposes beyond entertainment with the intention to educate and support health behavior for teens with diabetes self-management, is an emerging and promising practice. This report explores games intended for teens with diabetes, how the use of games may enhance clinical practice, and provides suggestions for future research and better utilization of these technologies. Current research on the use of gaming for promoting diabetes management in teens is fairly limited, with some initial support for improvements in both behavioral and clinical outcomes among teens. More research is clearly needed in order to further determine how gaming can best be utilized to impact health outcomes in these teens, as well as potential mechanisms of change. PMID:27155609

  6. Behavioral family intervention for children with developmental disabilities and behavioral problems.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Clare; Mazzucchelli, Trevor; Studman, Lisa; Sanders, Matthew R

    2006-06-01

    The outcomes of a randomized clinical trial of a new behavioral family intervention, Stepping Stones Triple P, for preschoolers with developmental and behavior problems are presented. Forty-eight children with developmental disabilities participated, 27 randomly allocated to an intervention group and 20 to a wait-list control group. Parents completed measures of parenting style and stress, and independent observers assessed parent-child interactions. The intervention was associated with fewer child behavior problems reported by mothers and independent observers, improved maternal and paternal parenting style, and decreased maternal stress. All effects were maintained at 6-month follow-up. PMID:16597214

  7. Teens with ADHD and Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... provisional licenses, and other limits on teen licenses. Operating a vehicle safely requires a set of skills ... that he or she can completely focus on operating the vehicle safely. You and your teen should ...

  8. All about Menstruation (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... between the ages of 8 and 13. Their bodies and minds change in many ways. Hormones kick off changes ...

  9. Helping your teen with depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... teen the most. The most effective treatments for depression are: Talk therapy Antidepressant medicines If your teen might have a ... 2014. US Preventive Services Task Force. Screening and treatment for ... in children and adolescents: US Preventive Services Task ...

  10. Diabetes in Children and Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... teens was type 1. It was called juvenile diabetes. With Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... TV, computer, and video Children and teens with type 1 diabetes may need to take insulin. Type 2 diabetes ...

  11. Taking It Online--The Effects of Delivery Medium and Facilitator on Student Achievement in Problem-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina; McConnell, Sherry; Kogan, Lori R.

    2004-01-01

    This study compares the effects of delivery medium (online vs. face-to-face) and facilitator content expertise on academic outcomes in a problem-based learning (PBL) course in anatomy for pre-health/medical majors. The content of online PBL sessions was examined to gain insight into the problem-solving process taking place in these situations.…

  12. Feasibility, acceptability, and initial efficacy of an online sexual health promotion program for LGBT youth: the Queer Sex Ed intervention.

    PubMed

    Mustanski, Brian; Greene, George J; Ryan, Daniel; Whitton, Sarah W

    2015-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth experience multiple sexual health inequities driven, in part, by deficits in parental and peer support, school-based sex education programs, and community services. Research suggests that the Internet may be an important resource in the development of sexual health among LGBT youth. We examined the feasibility of recruiting youth in same-sex relationships into an online sexual health intervention, evaluated intervention acceptability, and obtained initial estimates of intervention efficacy. LGBT youth (16 to 20 years old) completed Queer Sex Ed (QSE), an online, multimedia sexual health intervention consisting of five modules. The final sample (N = 202) completed the pretest, intervention, and posttest assessments. The primary study outcomes were sexual orientation identity and self-acceptance (e.g., coming-out self-efficacy), sexual health knowledge (e.g., sexual functioning), relationship variables (e.g., communication skills), and safer sex (e.g., sexual assertiveness). Analyses indicated that 15 of the 17 outcomes were found to be significant (p < .05). Effect sizes ranged from small for sexual orientation (e.g., internalized homophobia) and relationship variables (e.g., communication skills) to moderate for safer sex (e.g., contraceptive knowledge) outcomes. This study demonstrated the feasibility, acceptability, and initial efficacy of QSE, an innovative online comprehensive sexual health program for LGBT youth. PMID:24588408

  13. Analysis of the Efficacy of an Intervention to Improve Parent-Adolescent Problem Solving.

    PubMed

    Semeniuk, Yulia Yuriyivna; Brown, Roger L; Riesch, Susan K

    2016-07-01

    We conducted a two-group longitudinal partially nested randomized controlled trial to examine whether young adolescent youth-parent dyads participating in Mission Possible: Parents and Kids Who Listen, in contrast to a comparison group, would demonstrate improved problem-solving skill. The intervention is based on the Circumplex Model and Social Problem-Solving Theory. The Circumplex Model posits that families who are balanced, that is characterized by high cohesion and flexibility and open communication, function best. Social Problem-Solving Theory informs the process and skills of problem solving. The Conditional Latent Growth Modeling analysis revealed no statistically significant differences in problem solving among the final sample of 127 dyads in the intervention and comparison groups. Analyses of effect sizes indicated large magnitude group effects for selected scales for youth and dyads portraying a potential for efficacy and identifying for whom the intervention may be efficacious if study limitations and lessons learned were addressed. PMID:26936844

  14. Analysis of the Efficacy of an Intervention to Improve Parent-Adolescent Problem Solving

    PubMed Central

    Semeniuk, Yulia Yuriyivna; Brown, Roger L.; Riesch, Susan K.

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a two-group longitudinal partially nested randomized controlled trial to examine whether young adolescent youth-parent dyads participating in Mission Possible: Parents and Kids Who Listen, in contrast to a comparison group, would demonstrate improved problem solving skill. The intervention is based on the Circumplex Model and Social Problem Solving Theory. The Circumplex Model posits that families who are balanced, that is characterized by high cohesion and flexibility and open communication, function best. Social Problem Solving Theory informs the process and skills of problem solving. The Conditional Latent Growth Modeling analysis revealed no statistically significant differences in problem solving among the final sample of 127 dyads in the intervention and comparison groups. Analyses of effect sizes indicated large magnitude group effects for selected scales for youth and dyads portraying a potential for efficacy and identifying for whom the intervention may be efficacious if study limitations and lessons learned were addressed. PMID:26936844

  15. Is Teen Marriage a Solution?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiler, Naomi

    Many policy proposals related to welfare will have the effect, intended or unintended, of encouraging teens to marry. This paper discusses the implications of teen marriage. Marriage is one route to reducing out-of-wedlock births to teens who become pregnant, but there is reason to believe such marriages are often unstable. A review of the…

  16. Letting Teens Take the Lead.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Linda W.

    2001-01-01

    Considers the benefits of having teens train public library patrons in technology use. Discusses what teens want from libraries, including access to technology, technology training, and homework help; what teens need to learn, depending on the patrons they will be helping; and training methods, including role playing. (LRW)

  17. Schools, Society, and "Teen" Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Males, Mike

    1993-01-01

    Reality of widespread adult/teen sex--as revealed through age-specific pregnancy, birth, and sexually transmitted disease (STD) statistics--has profound implications for public school sex education and efforts to reduce incidence of teen pregnancy and STDs. Many public school "prevention" measures have failed because male half of "teen" pregnancy…

  18. Tobacco Use Patterns and Attitudes among Teens Being Seen for Routine Primary Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollis, Jack F.; Polen, Michael R.; Lichtenstein, Edward; Whitlock, Evelyn P.

    2003-01-01

    Investigated the tobacco-related attitudes, behaviors, and needs of smoking and nonsmoking teens being seen for routine primary care, identifying tobacco use predictors. Most teens approached were willing to receive tobacco and diet interventions. Smoking predictors included older age, lower educational aspirations, having parents or friends who…

  19. Anxiety, Fears, Phobias, and Related Problems: Intervention and Resources for School Aged Youth. An Introductory Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for Mental Health in Schools.

    This introductory packet provides an introduction to anxiety problems, framing the discussion within the classification scheme developed by the American Pediatric Association. The variations in degree of problem are discussed with respect to interventions that range from environmental accommodations to behavioral strategies to medication. The…

  20. An Intervention Framework Designed to Develop the Collaborative Problem-Solving Skills of Primary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gu, Xiaoqing; Chen, Shan; Zhu, Wenbo; Lin, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Considerable effort has been invested in innovative learning practices such as collaborative inquiry. Collaborative problem solving is becoming popular in school settings, but there is limited knowledge on how to develop skills crucial in collaborative problem solving in students. Based on the intervention design in social interaction of…

  1. Preventing Problem Behaviors: Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary Level Prevention Interventions for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Tary J.; Sugai, George

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to compare changes in social skills, problem behaviors, and academic competence for kindergarten or first grade students identified as being at risk for serious behavior problems who received primary, secondary, or tertiary level preventive interventions. Of the 93 participants in this study, 73% were male; 86% were…

  2. Behavioral Intervention for Problem Behavior in Children with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moskowitz, Lauren J.; Carr, Edward G.; Durand, V. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Parents and professionals typically report problem behavior as a significant concern for children with fragile X syndrome. In the present study, the authors explored whether behaviorally based interventions would result in a reduction in problem behavior and an improvement in quality of life for 3 children with fragile X syndrome and their…

  3. An Introductory Packet on Conduct and Behavior Problems: Intervention and Resources for School Aged Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Mental Health in Schools at UCLA, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In this introductory packet, the range of conduct and behavior problems are described using fact sheets and the classification scheme from the American Pediatric Association. Differences in intervention needed are discussed with respect to variations in the degree of problem manifested and include exploration of environmental accommodations,…

  4. Video-Based Intervention in Teaching Fraction Problem-Solving to Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakubova, Gulnoza; Hughes, Elizabeth M.; Hornberger, Erin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a point-of-view video modeling intervention to teach mathematics problem-solving when working on word problems involving subtracting mixed fractions with uncommon denominators. Using a multiple-probe across students design of single-case methodology, three high school students with…

  5. Sustained Effects of Incredible Years as a Preventive Intervention in Preschool Children with Conduct Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posthumus, Jocelyne A.; Raaijmakers, Maartje A. J.; Maassen, Gerard H.; van Engeland, Herman; Matthys, Walter

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated preventive effects of the Incredible Years program for parents of preschool children who were at risk for a chronic pattern of conduct problems, in the Netherlands. In a matched control design, 72 parents of children with conduct problems received the Incredible Years program. These families (intervention group) were…

  6. Inquiry-based Instruction with Archived, Online Data: An Intervention Study with Preservice Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucar, Sedat; Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Krissek, Lawrence

    2011-03-01

    This mixed methods study described preservice teachers' conceptions of tides and explored the efficacy of integrating online data into inquiry-based instruction. Data sources included a multiple-choice assessment and in-depth interviews. A total of 79 participants in secondary, middle, and early childhood teacher education programs completed the multiple-choice assessment of their baseline knowledge of tides-related concepts. A sub-group of 29 participants also was interviewed to explore their understanding of tides in more detail before instruction. Eighteen of those 29 teachers participated in the instruction, were interviewed again after the instruction, and completed the multiple-choice assessment as a posttest. The interview data sets were analyzed via a constant comparative method in order to produce profiles of each participant's pre- and post-instruction conceptual understandings of tides. Additional quantitative analysis consisted of a paired-sample t-test, which investigated the changes in scores before and after the instructional intervention. Before instruction, all participants held alternative or alternative fragments as their conceptual understandings of tides. After completing the inquiry-based instruction that integrated online tidal data, participants were more likely to hold a scientific conceptual understanding. After instruction, some preservice teachers continued to hold on to the conception that the rotation of the moon around the Earth during one 24-hour period causes the tides to move with the moon. The quantitative results, however, indicated that pre- to post-instruction gains were significant. The findings of this study provide evidence that integrating Web-based archived data into inquiry-based instruction can be used to effectively promote conceptual change among preservice teachers.

  7. Online Support Program for Parents of Children With a Chronic Kidney Disease Using Intervention Mapping: A Development and Evaluation Protocol

    PubMed Central

    van Gaal, Betsie GI; Knoll, Jacqueline L; Cornelissen, Elisabeth AM; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Kok, Gerjo

    2016-01-01

    Background The care for children with a chronic kidney disease (CKD) is complex. Parents of these children may experience high levels of stress in managing their child’s disease, potentially leading to negative effects on their child’s health outcomes. Although the experienced problems are well known, adequate (online) support for these parents is lacking. Objective The objective of the study is to describe the systematic development of an online support program for parents of children with CKD, and how this program will be evaluated. Methods Intervention Mapping (IM) was used for the development of the program. After conducting a needs assessment, defining program objectives, searching for theories, and selecting practical applications, the online program e-Powered Parents was developed. e-Powered Parents consist of three parts: (1) an informative part with information about CKD and treatments, (2) an interactive part where parents can communicate with other parents and health care professionals by chat, private messages, and a forum, and (3) a training platform consisting of four modules: Managing stress, Setting limits, Communication, and Coping with emotions. In a feasibility study, the potential effectiveness and effect size of e-Powered Parents will be evaluated using an explorative randomized controlled trial with parents of 120 families. The outcomes will be the child’s quality of life, parental stress and fatigue, self-efficacy in the communication with health care professionals, and family management. A process evaluation will provide insight in parents’ experiences, including their experienced level of support. Results Study results are expected to be published in the summer of 2016. Conclusions Although the development of e-Powered Parents using IM was time-consuming, IM has been a useful protocol. IM provided us with a systematic framework for structuring the development process. The participatory planning group was valuable as well; knowledge

  8. Development and Acceptability of a Co-Produced Online Intervention to Prevent Alcohol Misuse in Adolescents: A Think Aloud Study

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jilly; Foxcroft, David R

    2015-01-01

    Background The prototype willingness model (PWM) may offer an appropriate basis for explaining and preventing adolescent alcohol misuse. An intervention was developed using a co-production approach, and consisted of an online quiz featuring 10 questions linked to the PWM. Objective This study sought to determine the acceptability and relevance of the intervention content to young people, to incorporate their feedback into a final version. Methods A qualitative think aloud study with follow-up semistructured interviews was undertaken with 16 young people aged 11-15 (50%). Transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results The following 3 main themes relating the acceptability of the intervention were identified: “challenging expectations of alcohol education”; “motivations for drinking or not drinking,” and “the inevitability of drinking.” Participants found the intervention appealing because it was counter to their expectations. The content appeared to reflect their experiences of social pressure and drinking encounters. There was evidence that a focus on drinker/nondrinker prototypes was too narrow and that because adolescents perceived drinking as inevitable, it would be challenging to enact any plans to resist pressure to drink. Conclusions An online intervention based on the PWM has the potential to engage and interest adolescents. A wide range of alcohol prototypes should be targeted and a focus on short-term harms should ensure that the intervention is credible to young people. PMID:27025403

  9. “I feel free”: Experiences of a dance intervention for adolescent girls with internalizing problems

    PubMed Central

    Duberg, Anna; Möller, Margareta; Sunvisson, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent girls today suffer from internalizing problems such as somatic symptoms and mental health problems at higher rates compared to those of previous decades, and effective interventions are warranted. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of participating in an 8-month dance intervention. This qualitative study was embedded in a randomized controlled trial of a dance intervention for adolescent girls with internalizing problems. A total of 112 girls aged 13–18 were included in the study. The dance intervention group comprised 59 girls, 24 of whom were strategically chosen to be interviewed. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach. The experiences of the dance intervention resulted in five generic categories: (1) An Oasis from Stress, which represents the fundamental basis of the intervention; (2) Supportive Togetherness, the setting; (3) Enjoyment and Empowerment, the immediate effect; (4) Finding Acceptance and Trust in Own Ability, the outcome; and (5) Dance as Emotional Expression, the use of the intervention. One main category emerged, Finding Embodied Self-Trust That Opens New Doors, which emphasizes the increased trust in the self and the ability to approach life with a sense of freedom and openness. The central understanding of the adolescent girls’ experiences was that the dance intervention enriched and gave access to personal resources. With the non-judgmental atmosphere and supportive togetherness as a safe platform, the enjoyment and empowerment in dancing gave rise to acceptance, trust in ability, and emotional expression. Taken together, this increased self-trust and they discovered a new ability to “claim space.” Findings from this study may provide practical information on designing future interventions for adolescent girls with internalizing problems. PMID:27416014

  10. "I feel free": Experiences of a dance intervention for adolescent girls with internalizing problems.

    PubMed

    Duberg, Anna; Möller, Margareta; Sunvisson, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent girls today suffer from internalizing problems such as somatic symptoms and mental health problems at higher rates compared to those of previous decades, and effective interventions are warranted. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of participating in an 8-month dance intervention. This qualitative study was embedded in a randomized controlled trial of a dance intervention for adolescent girls with internalizing problems. A total of 112 girls aged 13-18 were included in the study. The dance intervention group comprised 59 girls, 24 of whom were strategically chosen to be interviewed. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach. The experiences of the dance intervention resulted in five generic categories: (1) An Oasis from Stress, which represents the fundamental basis of the intervention; (2) Supportive Togetherness, the setting; (3) Enjoyment and Empowerment, the immediate effect; (4) Finding Acceptance and Trust in Own Ability, the outcome; and (5) Dance as Emotional Expression, the use of the intervention. One main category emerged, Finding Embodied Self-Trust That Opens New Doors, which emphasizes the increased trust in the self and the ability to approach life with a sense of freedom and openness. The central understanding of the adolescent girls' experiences was that the dance intervention enriched and gave access to personal resources. With the non-judgmental atmosphere and supportive togetherness as a safe platform, the enjoyment and empowerment in dancing gave rise to acceptance, trust in ability, and emotional expression. Taken together, this increased self-trust and they discovered a new ability to "claim space." Findings from this study may provide practical information on designing future interventions for adolescent girls with internalizing problems. PMID:27416014

  11. A meta-analytic study of self-help interventions for anxiety problems.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Michiyo; Clum, George A

    2006-06-01

    The present study examined the effectiveness of self-help (SH) interventions for individuals with anxiety problems. Thirty-three studies, targeting a variety of anxiety disorders and problems, met criteria for inclusion with 1,582 clinical and subclinical participants. Self-help formats included books, audio/videotapes, and computer/Internet-based programs. The average effect sizes (Cohen's ds) comparing SH interventions to control groups for target symptoms were .62 at posttreatment and .51 at follow-up. When compared to therapist-directed interventions (TDIs), the average effect sizes (Cohen's ds) for target problems were -.42 at posttreatment and -.36 at follow-up. Format of SH materials, type of target disorder, presence of minimal therapist contact, and other study parameters were examined for their effect on treatment outcome. The results were discussed from the perspective of a stepped-care approach for anxiety problems. PMID:16942965

  12. A School-Based Environmental Intervention to Reduce Smoking among High School Students: The Acadiana Coalition of Teens against Tobacco (ACTT)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carolyn C.; Myers, Leann; Webber, Larry S.; Boris, Neil W.; He, Hao; Brewer, Dixye

    2009-01-01

    A school-based environmental program to reduce adolescent smoking was conducted in 20 schools (10 intervention; 10 control) in south central Louisiana. The 9th grade cohort (n = 4,763; mean age = 15.4 yrs; 51% female; 61% Caucasian; 30-day smoking prevalence at baseline = 25%) was followed over four years for 30-day smoking prevalence with the school as the unit of analysis. Although prevalence decreased in intervention schools and increased in control schools in Year 2 the significant difference between the two groups at baseline was not overcome by the intervention and increases in prevalence were observed in both groups in Years 3 and 4. The higher the percentage of white students in a school the higher the prevalence rates regardless of intervention/control status. Boys’ and girls’ smoking rates were similar. These outcome data, student feedback and process evaluation provide a basis for continuing to create more innovative adolescent tobacco control programs. PMID:19440519

  13. Problem-based learning in an on-line biotechnology course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheaney, James Daniel

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a pedagogical tool that uses a "real world" problem or situation as a context for learning. PBL encourages student development of critical thinking skills, a high professional competency, problem-solving ability, knowledge acquisition, the ability to work productively as a team member and make decisions in unfamiliar situations, and the acquisition of skills that support self-directed life-long learning, metacognition, and adaptation to change. However, little research has focused on the use of PBL in on-line "virtual" classes. We conducted two studies exploring the use of PBL in an on-line biotechnology course. In the first study, ethical, legal, social, and human issues were used as a motivation for learning about DNA testing technologies, applications, and bioethical issues. In the second study, we combined PBL pedagogy with a rich multimedia environment of streaming video interviews, physical artifacts, and extensive links to articles and databases to create a multidimensional immersive PBL environment called "Robert's World". In "Robert's World", a man is determining whether to undergo a pre-symptomatic DNA test for an untreatable, incurable, fatal genetic disease for which he has a family history. In both studies, design and implementation issues of the on-line PBL environment are discussed, as are differences between on-line PBL and face-to-face PBL. Both studies provide evidence to suggest that PBL stimulates higher-order learning in students. However, in both studies, student performance on an exam testing acquisition of lower-order factual learning was lower for PBL students than for students who learned the same material through a traditional lecture-based approach. Possible reasons for this lower level of performance are explored. Student feedback expressed engagement with the issues and material covered, with reservations about some aspects of the PBL format, such as the lack of flexibility provided in cooperative

  14. Video-Based Intervention in Teaching Fraction Problem-Solving to Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Yakubova, Gulnoza; Hughes, Elizabeth M; Hornberger, Erin

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a point-of-view video modeling intervention to teach mathematics problem-solving when working on word problems involving subtracting mixed fractions with uncommon denominators. Using a multiple-probe across students design of single-case methodology, three high school students with ASD completed the study. All three students demonstrated greater accuracy in solving fraction word problems and maintained accuracy levels at a 1-week follow-up. PMID:25911304

  15. The Impact of Targeted Classroom Interventions and Function-Based Behavior Interventions on Problem Behaviors of Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trussell, Robert P.; Lewis, Timothy J.; Stichter, Janine P.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of both functional behavior assessment-based interventions and targeted classroom interventions for reducing problem behaviors of children with emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD) in special education classrooms. Specifically, this study was interested in how interventions based on changes in…

  16. The response to intervention of English language learners at risk for reading problems.

    PubMed

    Linan-Thompson, Sylvia; Vaughn, Sharon; Prater, Kathryn; Cirino, Paul T

    2006-01-01

    The response to intervention (RTI) of English language learners identified as at risk for reading difficulties in the fall of first grade was examined at the end of first grade and at the end of second grade. Students at risk for reading problems were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. Intervention students received supplemental reading intervention daily for 50 minutes in small groups from October to April. Students in the comparison condition received the school's existing instructional program for struggling readers. Criteria were established to determine adequate RTI at the end of first grade and at the end of second grade. The results indicated that more students who participated in the first-grade intervention in either Spanish or English met the established RTI standards than students who did not, and this finding was maintained through the end of second grade. PMID:17004672

  17. Who Am I? A Life Story Intervention for Persons With Intellectual Disability and Psychiatric Problems.

    PubMed

    Westerhof, Gerben J; Beernink, Janny; Sools, Anneke

    2016-06-01

    This article describes an innovative intervention based on narrative and life review therapy that is tailored to people with intellectual disability (ID) and psychiatric problems. The current study provides a first evaluation of the intervention. A symptom checklist (SCL-90) was used in a pre- and post-follow-up design, and a qualitative evaluation of the intervention was carried out with 25 participants. Results showed large changes in psychiatric symptoms, in particular on depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and interpersonal sensitivity. Participants were mainly positive in their general explicit evaluations of the therapy as well as on personal learning points, intervention-specific, group-related, and therapist-related aspects. It is concluded that the intervention is promising for the treatment of people with ID and psychiatric complaints. PMID:27268473

  18. Librarians and Teen Privacy in the Age of Social Networking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kranich, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Teenagers will freely give up personal information to join social networks on the Internet. However, a 2007 study by the Pew Internet and American Life project found that most of the 55 percent of teens who place their personal profiles online take steps to protect themselves from the most obvious areas of risk. Parents, teachers, and librarians…

  19. The Original Handhelds: Magazines that Teens Can't Resist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Carlie

    2009-01-01

    In a world of instant messages, Twitter, and Facebook, what do magazines have to offer teens? Well, as it turns out, plenty. For starters, they feature celebrity gossip, humor, beauty tips, sports, and even manga. Some magazines offer online content that can only be accessed by using a special code that's available in the print edition. Recently,…

  20. Implementation and Evaluation of the Keep It Up! Online HIV Prevention Intervention in a Community-Based Setting.

    PubMed

    Greene, George J; Madkins, Krystal; Andrews, Katie; Dispenza, Jill; Mustanski, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Once HIV prevention programs have proven efficacy in research settings, it is important that ongoing data are collected to demonstrate effects in public health applications, yet such evaluations are rare in the published literature. This project describes the adaptation, implementation, and outcome evaluation of the Keep It Up! (KIU!) online HIV prevention intervention as a prevention service delivered in a community-based organization. Compared to pilot research examining KIU! feasibility and efficacy, intervention outcomes were robust to service delivery and client characteristics. In a sample of ethnically and racially diverse young men who have sex with men (N = 343), the intervention produced significant decreases in condomless anal sex acts with casual male partners at the 3-month follow-up compared to baseline (p < .05). In both qualitative and quantitative measures, participants reported that the intervention was highly acceptable and valuable to their sexual health needs. PMID:27244191

  1. The free boundary problem describing information diffusion in online social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Chengxia; Lin, Zhigui; Wang, Haiyan

    In this paper we consider a free boundary problem for a reaction-diffusion logistic equation with a time-dependent growth rate. Such a problem arises in the modeling of information diffusion in online social networks, with the free boundary representing the spreading front of news among users. We present several sharp thresholds for information diffusion that either lasts forever or suspends in finite time. In the former case, we give the asymptotic spreading speed which is determined by a corresponding elliptic equation.

  2. An emotion-focused early intervention for children with emerging conduct problems.

    PubMed

    Havighurst, Sophie S; Duncombe, Melissa; Frankling, Emma; Holland, Kerry; Kehoe, Christiane; Stargatt, Robyn

    2015-05-01

    This paper evaluates the real-world effectiveness of an emotion-focused, multi-systemic early intervention combining an emotion socialization parenting program with a child and school socio-emotional intervention for children with emerging conduct problems. Schools in lower socioeconomic areas of Victoria, Australia were randomized into intervention or wait-list control. Children in the first 4 years of elementary school were screened for behavior problems and those in the top 8 % of severity were invited to participate in the intervention. The study sample consisted of 204 primary caregivers and their children (Mage = 7.05, SD = 1.06; 74 % boys). Data were collected at baseline and 10 months later using parent and teacher reports and direct child assessment. Measures of parent emotion socialization, family emotion expressiveness, and children's emotion competence, social competence and behavior were administered. Results showed intervention parents but not controls became less emotionally dismissive and increased in empathy, and children showed better emotion understanding and behavior compared to control children. These outcomes lend support for an emotion-focused approach to early intervention in a real-world context for children with conduct problems. PMID:25249470

  3. A Visualization Tool to Analyse Usage of Web-Based Interventions: The Example of Positive Online Weight Reduction (POWeR)

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily; Bradbury, Katherine; Morrison, Leanne; Dennison, Laura; Michaelides, Danius; Yardley, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Background Attrition is a significant problem in Web-based interventions. Consequently, this research aims to identify the relation between Web usage and benefit from such interventions. A visualization tool has been developed that enables researchers to more easily examine large datasets on intervention usage that can be difficult to make sense of using traditional descriptive or statistical techniques alone. Objective This paper demonstrates how the visualization tool was used to explore patterns in participants’ use of a Web-based weight management intervention, termed "positive online weight reduction (POWeR)." We also demonstrate how the visualization tool can be used to perform subsequent statistical analyses of the association between usage patterns, participant characteristics, and intervention outcome. Methods The visualization tool was used to analyze data from 132 participants who had accessed at least one session of the POWeR intervention. Results There was a drop in usage of optional sessions after participants had accessed the initial, core POWeR sessions, but many users nevertheless continued to complete goal and weight reviews. The POWeR tools relating to the food diary and steps diary were reused most often. Differences in participant characteristics and usage of other intervention components were identified between participants who did and did not choose to access optional POWeR sessions (in addition to the initial core sessions) or reuse the food and steps diaries. Reuse of the steps diary and the getting support tools was associated with greater weight loss. Conclusions The visualization tool provided a quick and efficient method for exploring patterns of Web usage, which enabled further analyses of whether different usage patterns were associated with participant characteristics or differences in intervention outcome. Further usage of visualization techniques is recommended to (1) make sense of large datasets more quickly and efficiently; (2

  4. An online intervention for reducing depressive symptoms: secondary benefits for self-esteem, empowerment and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Dimity; Griffiths, Kathleen; Mackinnon, Andrew; Bennett, Kylie; Christensen, Helen

    2014-04-30

    Internet-based interventions are increasingly recognized as effective for the treatment and prevention of depression; however, there is a paucity of research investigating potential secondary benefits. From a consumer perspective, improvements in indicators of wellbeing such as perceived quality of life may represent the most important outcomes for evaluating the effectiveness of an intervention. This study investigated the 'secondary' benefits for self-esteem, empowerment, quality of life and perceived social support of two 12-week online depression interventions when delivered alone and in combination. Participants comprised 298 adults displaying elevated psychological distress. Participants were randomised to receive: an Internet Support Group (ISG); an automated Internet psycho-educational training program for depression; a combination of these conditions; or a control website. Analyses were performed on an intent-to-treat basis. Following the automated training program immediate improvements were shown in participants׳ self-esteem and empowerment relative to control participants. Improvements in perceived quality of life were reported 6-months following the completion of the intervention when combined with an ISG. These findings provide initial evidence for the effectiveness of this online intervention for improving individual wellbeing beyond the primary aim of the treatment. However, further research is required to investigate the mechanisms underlying improvement in these secondary outcomes. PMID:24534125

  5. Children's Online Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aidman, Amy

    2000-01-01

    The first federal Internet privacy law (the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act) provides safeguards for children by regulating collection of their personal information. Unfortunately, teens are not protected. Legislation is pending to protect children from online marketers such as ZapMe! Interactive technologies require constant vigilance.…

  6. The Teening of Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hymowitz, Kay S.

    2000-01-01

    The market and advertising media aimed at children has skyrocketed in recent years. Many new products targeting 8-12-year-olds appeal to their sense of teen fashion, image consciousness, and independence from adults. Describes the development of this market aimed at early adolescents and how it is changing childhood as Americans have known it. (SM)

  7. Picture Books for Teens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kan, Kat

    2002-01-01

    Discusses picture books that are suitable for teens, particularly middle school readers, and provides detailed reviews for five titles that have appealing story themes and illustrations including: Tony Millionaires' Sock Monkey: A Children's Book; Mick Foley's Christmas Chaos; Mick Foley's Halloween Hijinx; The Book of Jack; and Moby Dick. (LRW)

  8. Teens in the Twenty-First Century Still Prefer People over Machines: Importance of Intervention Delivery Style in Adolescent HIV/STD Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendleton, Sara M.; Stanton, Bonita; Cottrell, Lesley A.; Marshall, Sharon; Pack, Robert; Burns, James; Gibson, Catherine; Wu, Ying; Li, Xiaoming; Cole, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare youth satisfaction with two delivery approaches to a HIV/STD risk reduction intervention targeting adolescents: an on-site, face-to-face (FTF) approach versus a long distance interactive televised (DIT) approach. Methods: A convenience sample of 571 rural adolescents ages 12-16 years who participated in an HIV/STD…

  9. Teens, Crime, and the Community: Education and Action for Safer Schools and Neighborhoods. Second Edition. [and] Teens, Crime, and the Community: Education and Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Crime Prevention Council, Washington, DC.

    The Teens, Crime, and the Community Program presents practical information and problem-solving opportunities to help students develop the knowledge and skills necessary to deal with crime issues. The program and its curriculum advance the idea that teens can contribute energy and talent to the improvement of their communities. This text is part of…

  10. Meta-Heuristic Combining Prior Online and Offline Information for the Quadratic Assignment Problem.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianyong; Zhang, Qingfu; Yao, Xin

    2014-03-01

    The construction of promising solutions for NP-hard combinatorial optimization problems (COPs) in meta-heuristics is usually based on three types of information, namely a priori information, a posteriori information learned from visited solutions during the search procedure, and online information collected in the solution construction process. Prior information reflects our domain knowledge about the COPs. Extensive domain knowledge can surely make the search effective, yet it is not always available. Posterior information could guide the meta-heuristics to globally explore promising search areas, but it lacks local guidance capability. On the contrary, online information can capture local structures, and its application can help exploit the search space. In this paper, we studied the effects of using this information on metaheuristic's algorithmic performances for the COPs. The study was illustrated by a set of heuristic algorithms developed for the quadratic assignment problem. We first proposed an improved scheme to extract online local information, then developed a unified framework under which all types of information can be combined readily. Finally, we studied the benefits of the three types of information to meta-heuristics. Conclusions were drawn from the comprehensive study, which can be used as principles to guide the design of effective meta-heuristic in the future. PMID:23757559

  11. The Role of Social Network Technologies in Online Health Promotion: A Narrative Review of Theoretical and Empirical Factors Influencing Intervention Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Catriona M; Buchan, Iain; Powell, John; Ainsworth, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Social network technologies have become part of health education and wider health promotion—either by design or happenstance. Social support, peer pressure, and information sharing in online communities may affect health behaviors. If there are positive and sustained effects, then social network technologies could increase the effectiveness and efficiency of many public health campaigns. Social media alone, however, may be insufficient to promote health. Furthermore, there may be unintended and potentially harmful consequences of inaccurate or misleading health information. Given these uncertainties, there is a need to understand and synthesize the evidence base for the use of online social networking as part of health promoting interventions to inform future research and practice. Objective Our aim was to review the research on the integration of expert-led health promotion interventions with online social networking in order to determine the extent to which the complementary benefits of each are understood and used. We asked, in particular, (1) How is effectiveness being measured and what are the specific problems in effecting health behavior change?, and (2) To what extent is the designated role of social networking grounded in theory? Methods The narrative synthesis approach to literature review was used to analyze the existing evidence. We searched the indexed scientific literature using keywords associated with health promotion and social networking. The papers included were only those making substantial study of both social networking and health promotion—either reporting the results of the intervention or detailing evidence-based plans. General papers about social networking and health were not included. Results The search identified 162 potentially relevant documents after review of titles and abstracts. Of these, 42 satisfied the inclusion criteria after full-text review. Six studies described randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating

  12. A Meta-Analytic and Qualitative Review of Online versus Face-to-Face Problem-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurewitsch, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an instructional strategy that is poised for widespread application in the current, growing, on-line digital learning environment. While enjoying a track record as a defensible strategy in face-to-face learning settings, the research evidence is not clear regarding PBL in on-line environments. A review of the…

  13. Online Health-Related Fitness Courses: A Wolf in Sheep's Clothing or a Solution to Some Common Problems?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ransdell, Lynda B.; Rice, Kerry; Snelson, Chareen; DeCola, Josh

    2008-01-01

    Distance education is growing rapidly at the collegiate and secondary levels. Online courses, which deliver information via a computer, are a form of distance education that has been both praised and condemned. Those skeptical of online courses maintain that learners have to deal with technology problems, low motivation, isolation, and lack of…

  14. Implementing health information technology in a patient-centered manner: patient experiences with an online evidence-based lifestyle intervention.

    PubMed

    Lyden, Jennifer R; Zickmund, Susan L; Bhargava, Tina D; Bryce, Cindy L; Conroy, Molly B; Fischer, Gary S; Hess, Rachel; Simkin-Silverman, Laurey R; McTigue, Kathleen M

    2013-01-01

    The patient-centered care (PCC) model and the use of health information technology (HIT) are major initiatives for improving U.S. healthcare quality and delivery. A lack of published data on patient perceptions of Internet-based care makes patient-centered implementation of HIT challenging. To help ascertain patients' perceptions of an online intervention, patients completing a 1-year web-based lifestyle intervention were asked to complete a semistructured interview. We used qualitative methodology to determine frequency and types of interview responses. Overall satisfaction with program features was coded on a Likert-type scale. High levels of satisfaction were seen with the online lifestyle coaching (80%), self-monitoring tools (57%), and structured lesson features (54%). Moderated chat sessions and online resources were rarely used. Frequently identified helpful aspects were those that allowed for customized care and shared decision-making consistent with the tenets of PCC. Unhelpful program aspects were reported less often. Findings suggest that despite challenges for communicating effectively in an online forum, the personalized support, high-tech data management capabilities, and easily followed evidence-based curricula afforded by HIT may be a means of providing PCC and improving healthcare delivery and quality. PMID:24004039

  15. Time to Talk: 5 Tips on Safety of Mind and Body Practices for Children and Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... X Y Z 5 Tips on Safety of Mind and Body Practices for Children and Teens Share: Nearly 12 ... such as chiropractic care, deep breathing, and yoga. Mind and body interventions are physical techniques usually administered by a ...

  16. Assessing Change in Psychosocial Functioning of Incarcerated Girls with a Substance Use Disorder: Gender Sensitive Substance Abuse Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts-Lewis, Amelia C.; Welch-Brewer, Chiquitia L.; Jackson, Mary S.; Kirk, Raymond; Pharr, O. Martin

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to determine the effectiveness of a female gender-specific substance abuse treatment intervention (Holistic Enrichment for At-Risk Teens, or HEART) in improving problems related to personal and social functioning. A quasi-experimental, 2-group pretest and posttest repeated measures design was used to…

  17. Having a Baby (Especially for Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... FAQs Having a Baby (Especially for Teens) Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Having a Baby (Especially for Teens) Especially for ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  18. HIV-infected women’s perspectives on the use of the Internet for social support: A potential role for online group-based interventions

    PubMed Central

    Blackstock, Oni J.; Shah, Pooja A.; Haughton, Lorlette J.; Horvath, Keith J.; Cunningham, Chinazo O.

    2015-01-01

    While the development and implementation of HIV-related online interventions has expanded, few have been tailored for women or have leveraged Web 2.0’s capabilities to provide social support. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 27 women with HIV at an urban community health center to understand their perspectives on the potential role of the Internet and the use of an online group format to provide social support. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method. We identified six themes: a need for groups and increased sense of connectedness, convenience and accessibility, trust as a precondition for participating, online groups as a potential facilitator or barrier to expression, limited digital access and literacy, and privacy concerns. Overall, women were highly supportive of online group-based interventions but acknowledged the need for increased digital access and Internet navigation training. Hybrid (in-person and online) interventions may be most useful for women with HIV. PMID:25749532

  19. HIV-infected Women's Perspectives on the Use of the Internet for Social Support: A Potential Role for Online Group-based Interventions.

    PubMed

    Blackstock, Oni J; Shah, Pooja A; Haughton, Lorlette J; Horvath, Keith J; Cunningham, Chinazo O

    2015-01-01

    While the development and implementation of HIV-related online interventions has expanded, few have been tailored for women or have leveraged Web 2.0's capabilities to provide social support. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 27 women with HIV at an urban community health center to understand their perspectives on the potential role of the Internet and the use of an online group format to provide social support. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method. We identified six themes: a need for groups and increased sense of connectedness, convenience and accessibility, trust as a precondition for participating, online groups as a potential facilitator or barrier to expression, limited digital access and literacy, and privacy concerns. Overall, women were highly supportive of online group-based interventions but acknowledged the need for increased digital access and Internet navigation training. Hybrid (in-person and online) interventions may be most useful for women with HIV. PMID:25749532

  20. Interventions for comorbid problem gambling and psychiatric disorders: Advancing a developing field of research.

    PubMed

    Dowling, N A; Merkouris, S S; Lorains, F K

    2016-07-01

    Despite significant psychiatric comorbidity in problem gambling, there is little evidence on which to base treatment recommendations for subpopulations of problem gamblers with comorbid psychiatric disorders. This mini-review draws on two separate systematic searches to identify possible interventions for comorbid problem gambling and psychiatric disorders, highlight the gaps in the currently available evidence base, and stimulate further research in this area. In this mini-review, only 21 studies that have conducted post-hoc analyses to explore the influence of psychiatric disorders or problem gambling subtypes on gambling outcomes from different types of treatment were identified. The findings of these studies suggest that most gambling treatments are not contraindicated by psychiatric disorders. Moreover, only 6 randomized studies comparing the efficacy of interventions targeted towards specific comorbidity subgroups with a control/comparison group were identified. The results of these studies provide preliminary evidence for modified dialectical behavior therapy for comorbid substance use, the addition of naltrexone to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for comorbid alcohol use problems, and the addition of N-acetylcysteine to tobacco support programs and imaginal desensitisation/motivational interviewing for comorbid nicotine dependence. They also suggest that lithium for comorbid bipolar disorder, escitalopram for comorbid anxiety disorders, and the addition of CBT to standard drug treatment for comorbid schizophrenia may be effective. Future research evaluating interventions sequenced according to disorder severity or the functional relationship between the gambling behavior and comorbid symptomatology, identifying psychiatric disorders as moderators of the efficacy of problem gambling interventions, and evaluating interventions matched to client comorbidity could advance this immature field of study. PMID:26900888

  1. Development of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention Program to Treat Anxiety and Social Deficits in Teens with High-Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan W.; Albano, Anne Marie; Johnson, Cynthia R.; Kasari, Connie; Ollendick, Thomas; Klin, Ami; Oswald, Donald; Scahill, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Anxiety is a common co-occurring problem among young people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Characterized by deficits in social interaction, communication problems, and stereotyped behavior and restricted interests, this group of disorders is more prevalent than previously realized. When present, anxiety may compound the social deficits of…

  2. Early Oral-Motor Interventions for Pediatric Feeding Problems: What, When and How

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manno, Cecilia J.; Fox, Catherine; Eicher, Peggy S.; Kerwin, MaryLouise E.

    2005-01-01

    Children with developmental delays often have feeding difficulties resulting from oral-motor problems. Based on both clinical experience and a review of published studies, oral-motor interventions have been shown to be effective in improving the oral function of preterm infants and children with neuromotor disorders, such as cerebral palsy.…

  3. Family-Centered Intervention for Young Children At-Risk for Language and Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Pen-Chiang; Bryan, Tanis; Burstein, Karen; Ergul, Cevriye

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a family-centered intervention that involved parents in weekly assessments and daily routine activities for promoting young children's language and behavior. Forty-one 3-5-year-old children at-risk for language and behavior problems, recruited from three developmental preschools, were randomly assigned to a…

  4. The Ethnic Context of Child and Adolescent Problem Behavior: Implications for Child and Family Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasui, Miwa; Dishion, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    This article links the empirical literature on race and ethnicity in developmental psychopathology with interventions designed to reduce adolescent problem behavior. We present a conceptual framework in which culture is endogenous to the socialization of youth and the development of specific self-regulatory strategies. The importance of cultural…

  5. Can Targeted Intervention Mitigate Early Emotional and Behavioral Problems?: Generating Robust Evidence within Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Orla; McGlanaghy, Edel; O’Farrelly, Christine; Tremblay, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a targeted Irish early intervention program on children’s emotional and behavioral development using multiple methods to test the robustness of the results. Data on 164 Preparing for Life participants who were randomly assigned into an intervention group, involving home visits from pregnancy onwards, or a control group, was used to test the impact of the intervention on Child Behavior Checklist scores at 24-months. Using inverse probability weighting to account for differential attrition, permutation testing to address small sample size, and quantile regression to characterize the distributional impact of the intervention, we found that the few treatment effects were largely concentrated among boys most at risk of developing emotional and behavioral problems. The average treatment effect identified a 13% reduction in the likelihood of falling into the borderline clinical threshold for Total Problems. The interaction and subgroup analysis found that this main effect was driven by boys. The distributional analysis identified a 10-point reduction in the Externalizing Problems score for boys at the 90th percentile. No effects were observed for girls or for the continuous measures of Total, Internalizing, and Externalizing problems. These findings suggest that the impact of this prenatally commencing home visiting program may be limited to boys experiencing the most difficulties. Further adoption of the statistical methods applied here may help to improve the internal validity of randomized controlled trials and contribute to the field of evaluation science more generally. Trial Registration: ISRCTN Registry ISRCTN04631728 PMID:27253184

  6. Teacher-Reported Effects of the Playing-2-Gether Intervention on Child Externalising Problem Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vancraeyveldt, Caroline; Verschueren, Karine; Van Craeyevelt, Sanne; Wouters, Sofie; Colpin, Hilde

    2015-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines the teacher-perceived effect of a school-based intervention (i.e. Playing-2-gether) targeting teacher-child interactions to reduce externalising problem behaviour (EPB) amongst preschoolers. Boys with the highest score for EPB in the classroom and their teacher participated in the study. Teacher-child dyads…

  7. Project Integrate: Translating Screening and Brief Interventions for Alcohol Problems to a Community Hospital Emergency Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mello, Michael J.; Baird, Janette; Nirenberg, Ted D.; Smith, Jennifer C.; Woolard, Robert H.; Dinwoodie, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Screening and brief intervention (SBI) for alcohol problems in the emergency department (ED) is effective. The objective of this study was to examine the translation of SBI into a busy community ED environment. The authors assessed key stakeholders views of SBI delivery model, then utilized feedback to adapt model. Adoption of SBI was recorded,…

  8. Teacher Training Intervention for Early Identification of Common Child Mental Health Problems in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussein, S. A.; Vostanis, P.

    2013-01-01

    School-based interventions involving teacher training programmes have been shown to benefit teachers' ability to identify and manage child mental health problems in developed countries. However, very few studies have been conducted in low-income countries with limited specialist services. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of the…

  9. Types of Motivating Operations in Interventions with Problem Behavior: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simo-Pinatella, David; Font-Roura, Josep; Planella-Morato, Joaquima; McGill, Peter; Alomar-Kurz, Elisabeth; Gine, Climent

    2013-01-01

    A motivating operation (MO) alters both the effectiveness of a stimulus as a reinforcer and the current frequency of all behavior that has been reinforced by that particular stimulus. This article reviews studies that have manipulated a MO during interventions with school-age participants with intellectual disabilities and problem behavior. A…

  10. Experimental Intervention Studies on Word Problem Solving and Math Disabilities: A Selective Analysis of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Xinhua; Flynn, Lindsay J.; Swanson, H. Lee

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a quantitative synthesis of the published literature on word problem solving intervention studies for children with math disabilities (MD). Seven group and eight single-subject design studies met inclusion criteria. Mean effect sizes ("ES"s) for solution accuracy for group design studies were 0.95 (SE = 0.19) for children…

  11. Feasibility, Acceptability and Preliminary Efficacy of an Online Peer-to-Peer Social Support ART Adherence Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Keith J.; Oakes, J. Michael; Rosser, B.R. Simon; Danilenko, Gene; Vezina, Heather; Amico, K. Rivet; Williams, Mark L.; Simoni, Jane

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the results of an online social support intervention, called “Thrive With Me” (TWM), to improve antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. HIV-positive gay or bisexually-identified men self-reporting imperfect ART adherence in the past month were randomized to receive usual care (n=57) or the eight-week TWM intervention (n=67). Self-reported ART outcome measures (0–100% in the past month) were collected at baseline, post-intervention, and 1-month follow-up. Follow-up assessment completion rate was 90%. Participants rated (1–7 scale) the intervention high in information and system quality and overall satisfaction (Means≥5.0). The intervention showed modest effects for the overall sample. However, among current drug-using participants, the TWM (v. Control) group reported significantly higher overall ART adherence (90.1% v. 57.5% at follow-up; difference=31.1, p=.02) and ART taken correctly with food (81.6% v. 55.7% at follow-up; difference=47.9, p=.01). The TWM intervention appeared feasible to implement, acceptable to users, and demonstrated greatest benefits for current drug users. PMID:23553347

  12. Aligning Theory and Design: The Development of an Online Learning Intervention to Teach Evidence-based Practice for Maximal Reach

    PubMed Central

    Vihstadt, Corrie; Evans, Roni

    2015-01-01

    Background: Online educational interventions to teach evidence-based practice (EBP) are a promising mechanism for overcoming some of the barriers to incorporating research into practice. However, attention must be paid to aligning strategies with adult learning theories to achieve optimal outcomes. Methods: We describe the development of a series of short self-study modules, each covering a small set of learning objectives. Our approach, informed by design-based research (DBR), involved 6 phases: analysis, design, design evaluation, redesign, development/implementation, and evaluation. Participants were faculty and students in 3 health programs at a complementary and integrative educational institution. Results: We chose a reusable learning object approach that allowed us to apply 4 main learning theories: events of instruction, cognitive load, dual processing, and ARCS (attention, relevance, confidence, satisfaction). A formative design evaluation suggested that the identified theories and instructional approaches were likely to facilitate learning and motivation. Summative evaluation was based on a student survey (N=116) that addressed how these theories supported learning. Results suggest that, overall, the selected theories helped students learn. Conclusion: The DBR approach allowed us to evaluate the specific intervention and theories for general applicability. This process also helped us define and document the intervention at a level of detail that covers almost all the proposed Guideline for Reporting Evidence-based practice Educational intervention and Teaching (GREET) items. This thorough description will facilitate the interpretation of future research and implementation of the intervention. Our approach can also serve as a model for others considering online EBP intervention development. PMID:26421233

  13. Community-directed interventions for priority health problems in Africa: results of a multicountry study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the extent to which the community-directed approach used in onchocerciasis control in Africa could effectively and efficiently provide integrated delivery of other health interventions. Methods A three-year experimental study was undertaken in 35 health districts from 2005 to 2007 in seven research sites in Cameroon, Nigeria and Uganda. Four trial districts and one comparison district were randomly selected in each site. All districts had established ivermectin treatment programmes, and in the trial districts four other established interventions – vitamin A supplementation, use of insecticide-treated nets, home management of malaria and short-course, directly-observed treatment for tuberculosis patients – were progressively incorporated into a community-directed intervention (CDI) process. At the end of each of the three study years, we performed quantitative evaluations of intervention coverage and provider costs, as well as qualitative assessments of the CDI process. Findings With the CDI strategy, significantly higher coverage was achieved than with other delivery approaches for all interventions except for short-course, directly-observed treatment. The coverage of malaria interventions more than doubled. The district-level costs of delivering all five interventions were lower in the CDI districts, but no cost difference was found at the first-line health facility level. Process evaluation showed that: (i) participatory processes were important; (ii) recurrent problems with the supply of intervention materials were a major constraint to implementation; (iii) the communities and community implementers were deeply committed to the CDI process; (iv) community implementers were more motivated by intangible incentives than by external financial incentives. Conclusion The CDI strategy, which builds upon the core principles of primary health care, is an effective and efficient model for integrated delivery of appropriate health

  14. Guide to Implementing TAP. Teens for AIDS Prevention Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Population Options, Washington, DC.

    Teens for AIDS Prevention (TAP) is a model peer intervention program designed by the Center for Population Options to increase knowledge and change attitudes and behaviors among youth to reduce their risk of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. The program utilizes peer pressure in a positive sense: to encourage youth to protect…

  15. Teen Risk-Taking: Promising Prevention Programs and Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisen, Marvin; Pallitto, Christina; Bradner, Carolyn; Bolshun, Natalya

    This guidebook explores some of the practical issues associated with finding, choosing, and starting potentially effective prevention programs for at-risk preteens and teens. The guidebook is based on a study of 51 intervention programs that identified elements and delivery mechanisms that were associated with their effectiveness. A closer look at…

  16. Behavioral Activation for Depressed Teens: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritschel, Lorie A.; Ramirez, Cynthia L.; Jones, Meredith; Craighead, W. Edward

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral activation (BA) is a psychosocial intervention that has shown promising treatment outcome results with depressed adults. The current pilot study evaluated a version of BA adapted for depressed adolescents. Six teens (3 male, 3 female, ages 14-17) who met criteria for major depressive disorder participated in the study. Participants were…

  17. Gauging the Gaps in Student Problem-Solving Skills: Assessment of Individual and Group Use of Problem-Solving Strategies Using Online Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, William L.; Mitchell, Steven M.; Osgood, Marcy P.

    2008-01-01

    For the past 3 yr, faculty at the University of New Mexico, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology have been using interactive online Problem-Based Learning (PBL) case discussions in our large-enrollment classes. We have developed an illustrative tracking method to monitor student use of problem-solving strategies to provide targeted…

  18. Predictive Modeling to Forecast Student Outcomes and Drive Effective Interventions in Online Community College Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Vernon C.; Lange, Adam; Huston, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Community colleges continue to experience growth in online courses. This growth reflects the need to increase the numbers of students who complete certificates or degrees. Retaining online students, not to mention assuring their success, is a challenge that must be addressed through practical institutional responses. By leveraging existing student…

  19. A Review of Online Social Networking Profiles by Adolescents: Implications for Future Research and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Amanda L.; Merten, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored content posted and interactions taking place on adolescent online social networking profiles. Although "blogging" continues to soar in popularity, with over half of teenagers online participating in some form, little research has comprehensively explored blog communication within the context of adolescent development. Content…

  20. An investigation of the effects of interventions on problem-solving strategies and abilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Charles Terrence, Jr.

    Problem-solving has been described as being the "heart" of the chemistry classroom, and students' development of problem-solving skills is essential for their success in chemistry. Despite the importance of problem-solving, there has been little research within the chemistry domain, largely because of the lack of tools to collect data for large populations. Problem-solving was assessed using a software package known as IMMEX (for Interactive Multimedia Exercises) which has an HTML tracking feature that allows for collection of problem-solving data in the background as students work the problems. The primary goal of this research was to develop methods (known as interventions) that could promote improvements in students' problem-solving and most notably aid in their transition from the novice to competent level. Three intervention techniques that were incorporated within the chemistry curricula: collaborative grouping (face-to-face and distance), concept mapping, and peer-led team learning. The face-to-face collaborative grouping intervention was designed to probe the factors affecting the quality of the group interaction. Students' logical reasoning abilities were measured using the Group Assessment of Logical Thinking (GALT) test which classifies students as formal, transitional, or concrete. These classifications essentially provide a basis for identifying scientific aptitude. These designations were used as the basis for forming collaborative groups of two students. The six possibilities (formal-formal, formal-transitional, etc.) were formed to determine how the group composition influences the gains in student abilities observed from collaborative grouping interventions. Students were given three assignments (an individual pre-collaborative, an individual post collaborative, and a collaborative assignment) each requiring them to work an IMMEX problem set. Similar gains in performance of 10% gains were observed for each group with two exceptions. The

  1. Demonstration of Benefits of Early Identification of Psychosocial Problems and Early Intervention Toward Rehabilitation of Cancer Patients. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diller, Leonard; And Others

    Early identification of psychosocial problems and early intervention with cancer patients can be beneficial to patient rehabilitation. This report focusses on: (1) developing and implementing an effective "model program" of psychosocial intervention for adult cancer patients; (2) evaluating the impact of intervention in ameliorating cancer…

  2. Social Tools And Rules for Teens (The START Program): Program Description and Preliminary Outcomes of an Experiential Socialization Intervention for Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Ty W; Miller, Amber R; Ko, Jordan A; Wu, Victoria L

    2016-05-01

    Experiential learning is an essential process in the development of core social competencies. Unfortunately, adolescents with autism spectrum disorders often do not possess the prerequisite skillset and motivation to sustain the level of social immersion needed to benefit from this learning process. These persisting social vulnerabilities can limit their long-term relational success and associated quality of life, creating a need for comprehensive social programming. This paper describes a multi-component socialization intervention that simultaneously targets motivational, conceptual, and skill deficits using a hybrid experiential/didactic treatment approach. Evidence of social competence improvements was noted in survey and live conversational measures, indicating that the START program may hold promise as a method for improving the social success of participating adolescents with ASD. PMID:26861720

  3. The bidirectional relationships between online victimization and psychosocial problems in adolescents: a comparison with real-life victimization.

    PubMed

    van den Eijnden, Regina; Vermulst, Ad; van Rooij, Antonius J; Scholte, Ron; van de Mheen, Dike

    2014-05-01

    Although peer victimization is of major concern and adolescents spend increasing amounts of time on the Internet, relatively little is known about the psychosocial antecedents and consequences of online victimization. The main aim of this study was to compare the psychosocial antecedents and consequences of online versus real-life victimization. More specifically, the bidirectional relationship between online and real-life victimization on the one hand and psychosocial problems (i.e., loneliness and social anxiety) on the other was examined. In addition, the moderating role of online aggression in the relationship between online victimization and subsequent psychosocial problems was studied. This prospective study, consisting of three annual measurements, was conducted among a sample of 831 adolescents (50.3 % girls) aged 11-15, of which most (80.2 %) had a Dutch ethnic background. The results indicate a unidirectional relationship whereby loneliness and social anxiety predict an increase in latter online victimization rather than the reverse. A bidirectional relationship was found for real-life victimization: loneliness (but not social anxiety) predicted an increase in latter real-life victimization, which in turn predicted an increase in subsequent social anxiety (but not loneliness). No moderating effects of online aggression were found. The findings of the present study suggest that negative online and in real life peer interactions have a differential meaning for, and impact on adolescents' well-being. PMID:23979296

  4. On-Task Behavior, Academic Performance, and Classroom Disruptions: Untangling the Target Selection Problem in Classroom Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lentz, Francis E., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The research literature on measurement problems with such outcome variables as student on-task behavior, classroom disruption, and academic performance is examined. Focus is on how the problems relate to understanding the interrelationships among these common intervention targets. (TJH)

  5. The PROblem Gambling RESearch Study (PROGRESS) research protocol: a pragmatic randomised controlled trial of psychological interventions for problem gambling

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Shane A; Merkouris, Stephanie S; Browning, Colette J; Radermacher, Harriet; Feldman, Susan; Enticott, Joanne; Jackson, Alun C

    2015-01-01

    Introduction International prevalence rates for problem gambling are estimated at 2.3%. Problem gambling is a serious global public health concern due to adverse personal and social consequences. Previous research evaluating the effectiveness of psychological interventions for the treatment of problem gambling has been compromised by methodological limitations, including small sample sizes and the use of waitlist control groups. This article describes the study protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial (RCT) evaluating the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), behaviour therapy (BT), motivational interviewing (MI) against a non-directive supportive therapy (NDST) control, in treating problem gambling. Methods and analysis This study was a mixed-methods design, with a parallel group, pragmatic RCT as the primary component, and embedded qualitative studies conducted alongside. A total of 297 participants were recruited from the community in Victoria, Australia. Individuals aged 18 years and over, could communicate in English and wished to receive treatment for a gambling problem were eligible. Participants were randomly allocated in to 1 of the 4 psychological interventions: CBT, BT, MI and NDST. Repeated measures were conducted at pretreatment and post-treatment, and 6 and 12 months post-treatment. The statistical analysis will use an intention-to-treat approach. Multilevel mixed modelling will be used to examine changes in the primary outcome measures: gambling symptom severity, using the Gambling Symptom Assessment Scale, and gambling behaviours (frequency, time and expenditure). Secondary outcomes are depression, anxiety, stress and alcohol use. Individual semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted at pretreatment and post-treatment and 12 months post-treatment for a subset of participants (n=66). Ethics and dissemination This study was approved by the Victorian Department of Justice, Monash University and the University

  6. Smells Like Teen Spirit: Evaluating a Midwestern Teen Court

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Michael; Twill, Sarah; Kim, Chigon

    2011-01-01

    Teen courts have grown rapidly in the United States despite little evidence of their effectiveness. A survival analysis of 635 teen court and 186 regular diversion participants showed no significant differences in recidivism, although program completers were half as likely to reoffend as noncompleters. Older offenders survived significantly better…

  7. Responding to the Needs of Foster Teens in a Rural School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGarmo, John Nelson

    2012-01-01

    As more children are placed under foster care, schools often have difficulty in responding to newly placed foster teens. Foster teens often exhibit both academic and behavioral adjustment issues, leading to disciplinary problems and high failure, and dropout rates. Attachment theory related to placement disruptions, school performance and…

  8. Peer Justice and Youth Empowerment: An Implementation Guide for Teen Court Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godwin, Tracy M.

    Growing evidence indicates that teen courts give a community's children and adults a practical response to the problems associated with delinquency, traffic safety, and substance abuse. Developing and implementing teen courts requires a collaborative effort and juvenile justice agencies need baseline information that will aid them in creating teen…

  9. First Time: Characteristics of Teens' First Sexual Relationships. Child Trends Research Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Suzanne; Manlove, Jennifer; Franzetta, Kerry

    Understanding characteristics of teens' sexual relationships may help us to better understand how to reduce teens' risk of early unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), as well as the psychological and emotional problems that may be associated with teenage romantic relationships and sexual activity. Using data from the…

  10. The Role of Critical Self-Reflection of Assumptions in an Online HIV Intervention for Men Who Have Sex with Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, J. Michael; Danilenko, Gene P.; Smolenski, Derek J.; Myer, Bryn B.; Rosser, B. R. Simon

    2011-01-01

    The Men's INTernet Study II included a randomized controlled trial to develop and test an Internet-based HIV prevention intervention for U.S men who use the Internet to seek sex with men. In 2008, participants (n = 560) were randomized to an online, interactive, sexual risk-reduction intervention or to a wait list null control. After 3 months,…

  11. Evaluation of QuitNow Men: An Online, Men-Centered Smoking Cessation Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Paul; Mackay, Martha H; Stolp, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Background Men continue to smoke cigarettes in greater numbers than women. There is growing evidence for the value of developing targeted, men-centered health promotion programs. However, few smoking cessation interventions have been designed for men. A gender-specific website, QuitNow Men, was developed based on focus group interview findings, stakeholder feedback, and evidence-based cessation strategies. The website was designed to incorporate a masculine look and feel through the use of images, direct language, and interactive content. Usability experts and end-users provided feedback on navigation and functionality of the website prior to pilot testing. Objectives The objectives of the pilot study were to describe (1) men’s use and evaluations of the interactive resources and information on the QuitNow Men website, and (2) the potential of QuitNow Men to engage men in reducing and quitting smoking. Methods A one-group, pretest-posttest study design was used. Men who were interested in quitting were recruited and invited to use the website over a 6-month period. Data were collected via online questionnaires at baseline, 3-month, and 6-month follow-up. A total of 117 men completed the baseline survey. Over half of those (67/117, 57.3%) completed both follow-up surveys. Results At baseline, participants (N=117) had been smoking for an average of 24 years (SD 12.1) and smoked on average 15 cigarettes a day (SD 7.4). The majority had not previously used a quit smoking website (103/117, 88.0%) or websites focused on men’s health (105/117, 89.7%). At the 6-month follow-up, the majority of men used the QuitNow Men website at least once (64/67, 96%). Among the 64 users, 29 (43%) reported using the website more than 6 times. The men using QuitNow Men agreed or strongly agreed that the website was easy to use (51/64, 80%), the design and images were appealing (42/64, 66%), they intended to continue to use the website (42/64, 66%), and that they would recommend Quit

  12. A Review of Intervention Programs to Prevent and Treat Behavioral Problems in Young Children with Developmental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Petrenko, Christie L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Children with developmental disabilities are at higher risk for internalizing and externalizing behavioral problems than children in the general population. Effective prevention and treatment programs are necessary to reduce the burden of behavioral problems in this population. The current review identified 17 controlled trials of nine intervention programs for young children with developmental disabilities, with parent training the most common type of intervention in this population. Nearly all studies demonstrated medium to large intervention effects on child behavior post-intervention. Preliminary evidence suggests interventions developed for the general population can be effective for children with developmental disabilities and their families. A greater emphasis on the prevention of behavior problems in young children with developmental disabilities prior to the onset of significant symptoms or clinical disorders is needed. Multi-component interventions may be more efficacious for child behavior problems and yield greater benefits for parent and family adjustment. Recommendations for future research directions are provided. PMID:24222982

  13. Measuring Time Costs in Interventions Designed to Reduce Behavior Problems Among Children and Youth

    PubMed Central

    Foster, E. Michael; Johnson‐Shelton, Deborah; Taylor, Ted K.

    2007-01-01

    The economic evaluation of psychosocial interventions is a growing area of research. Though time costs are central to the economist’s understanding of social costs, these costs generally have been ignored by prevention scientists. This article highlights the need to measure such costs and then reviews the principles economists use in valuing time. It then considers the specific time costs that often arise in interventions designed to reduce behavior problems among children and youth. These include classroom time devoted to program activities, the time of parents or other caregivers, the time of teachers (outside of the classroom), and the time of volunteers. We consider the economic principles that govern how economists value these inputs and then apply these principles to data from an evaluation of a prominent intervention in the field, the Incredible Years Program. We find that the time costs are potentially rather large and consider the implications for public policy of ignoring them. PMID:17592769

  14. Brief Intervention for Problem Drug Use in Safety-Net Primary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Roy-Byrne, Peter; Bumgardner, Kristin; Krupski, Antoinette; Dunn, Chris; Ries, Richard; Donovan, Dennis; West, Imara I.; Maynard, Charles; Atkins, David C.; Graves, Meredith C.; Joesch, Jutta M.; Zarkin, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Although brief intervention is effective for reducing problem alcohol use, few data exist on its effectiveness for reducing problem drug use, a common issue in disadvantaged populations seeking care in safety-net medical settings (hospitals and community health clinics serving low-income patients with limited or no insurance). OBJECTIVE To determine whether brief intervention improves drug use outcomes compared with enhanced care as usual. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A randomized clinical trial with blinded assessments at baseline and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months conducted in 7 safety-net primary care clinics in Washington State. Of 1621 eligible patients reporting any problem drug use in the past 90 days, 868 consented and were randomized between April 2009 and September 2012. Follow-up participation was more than 87% at all points. INTERVENTIONS Participants received a single brief intervention using motivational interviewing, a handout and list of substance abuse resources, and an attempted 10-minute telephone booster within 2 weeks (n = 435) or enhanced care as usual, which included a handout and list of substance abuse resources (n = 433). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcomes were self-reported days of problem drug use in the past 30 days and Addiction Severity Index–Lite (ASI) Drug Use composite score. Secondary outcomes were admission to substance abuse treatment; ASI composite scores for medical, psychiatric, social, and legal domains; emergency department and inpatient hospital admissions, arrests, mortality, and human immunodeficiency virus risk behavior. RESULTS Mean days used of the most common problem drug at baseline were 14.40 (SD, 11.29) (brief intervention) and 13.25 (SD, 10.69) (enhanced care as usual); at 3 months postintervention, means were 11.87 (SD, 12.13) (brief intervention) and 9.84 (SD, 10.64) (enhanced care as usual) and not significantly different (difference in differences, β = 0.89 [95% CI, –0.49 to 2

  15. An Assessment of a Survey Feedback-Problem Solving-Collective Decision Intervention in Schools. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughlan, Robert J.; And Others

    This report presents a theoretical model and a practical guide for a survey feedback-problem solving-collective decision intervention in educational systems. The intervention focuses on work roles and relationships; job function, authority, and communication patterns; and on reviewing group progress and problems. One objective of the strategy is…

  16. Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prenatal Baby (0-12 mos.) Toddler 1-3yrs. Preschool 3-5yrs Grade School 5-12yrs. Teen 12- ... Find a Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Dating & Sex Fitness Nutrition Driving Safety ...

  17. Ten Smart Snacks for Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Teens | Share External Link Disclaimer Youth and Teens Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. [ Top ] June 2013 ​​​​​​​ Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  18. The Development of Online Tutorial Program Design Using Problem-Based Learning in Open Distance Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Said, Asnah; Syarif, Edy

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to evaluate of online tutorial program design by applying problem-based learning Research Methods currently implemented in the system of Open Distance Learning (ODL). The students must take a Research Methods course to prepare themselves for academic writing projects. Problem-based learning basically emphasizes the process of…

  19. Pattern of drug therapy problems and interventions in ambulatory patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ojeh, Victor B.; Naima, Nasir; Abah, Isaac O.; Falang, Kakjing D.; Lucy, Ogwuche; London, Ibrahim; Dady, Christiana; Agaba, Patricia; Agbaji, Oche

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We describe the frequency and types of drug therapy problems (DTPs), and interventions carried out to resolve them, among a cohort of HIV-infected patients on ART in Jos, Nigeria. Methods: A prospective pharmacists’ intervention study was conducted between January and August 2012 at the outpatient HIV clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH). Pharmacists identified DTPs and made recommendations to resolve them. The main outcome measures were number of DTPs encountered, interventions proposed and acceptance rate of recommendations. Results: A total of 42,416 prescriptions were dispensed to 9339 patients during the eight months study. A total of 420 interventions (Intervention rate of 1 per 100 prescriptions) were made to resolve DTPs in 401 (4.3%) patients with a mean age of 41 (SD=10) years, and made up of 73% females. DTPs encountered were drug omission (n=89, 21.2%), unnecessary drug (n=55, 13.1%) and wrong drug indication (n=55, 13.1%). Recommendations offered included; Addition of another drug to the therapy (n=87, 20.7%), rectification of incomplete prescriptions (n=85, 20.2%), change of drug or dosage (n=67, 16.0%), and discontinuation of the offending drug (n=59, 14.0%). A total of 389 (93%) out of 420 of the recommendations were accepted. In all, 50.4% (212) of the problematic prescriptions were changed and dispensed, 22.2% (89) were clarified and dispensed, while wrong identities were corrected in 11.7% (49). However, 7.5% (30) prescriptions were dispensed as prescribed, 5.2% (21) were not dispensed, and 3% (12) were unresolved. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that pharmacists-initiated interventions can ameliorate DTPs in patients receiving ART given the high intervention acceptance rate recorded. The implication of this finding is that pharmacists with requisite training in HIV pharmacotherapy are an excellent resource in detecting and minimizing the effect of antiretroviral drug-related errors. PMID:26131046

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF READING PROBLEMS IN FIRST GRADE WITHIN A RESPONSE-TO-INTERVENTION FRAMEWORK.

    PubMed

    Speece, Deborah L; Schatschneider, Christopher; Silverman, Rebecca; Case, Lisa Pericola; Cooper, David H; Jacobs, Dawn M

    2011-06-01

    Models of Response to Intervention (RTI) include parameters of assessment and instruction. This study focuses on assessment with the purpose of developing a screening battery that validly and efficiently identifies first-grade children at risk for reading problems. In an RTI model, these children would be candidates for early intervention. We examined accuracy, fluency, growth, and teacher rating measures as predictors of child status (at risk, not at risk) at the end of the school year based on an unselected sample of 243 children. The prediction model that best fit our selection criteria included 2-word fluency measures and a teacher rating of reading problems. Word-fluency growth was an equally plausible choice statistically, but, because the measure would require an additional data point, it was not the most efficient choice. The receiver-operator characteristic curve analysis yielded an area-under-the-curve index of .96, which indicates the selected 3-variable model is highly accurate. PMID:22058431

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF READING PROBLEMS IN FIRST GRADE WITHIN A RESPONSE-TO-INTERVENTION FRAMEWORK

    PubMed Central

    Speece, Deborah L.; Schatschneider, Christopher; Silverman, Rebecca; Case, Lisa Pericola; Cooper, David H.; Jacobs, Dawn M.

    2011-01-01

    Models of Response to Intervention (RTI) include parameters of assessment and instruction. This study focuses on assessment with the purpose of developing a screening battery that validly and efficiently identifies first-grade children at risk for reading problems. In an RTI model, these children would be candidates for early intervention. We examined accuracy, fluency, growth, and teacher rating measures as predictors of child status (at risk, not at risk) at the end of the school year based on an unselected sample of 243 children. The prediction model that best fit our selection criteria included 2-word fluency measures and a teacher rating of reading problems. Word-fluency growth was an equally plausible choice statistically, but, because the measure would require an additional data point, it was not the most efficient choice. The receiver-operator characteristic curve analysis yielded an area-under-the-curve index of .96, which indicates the selected 3-variable model is highly accurate. PMID:22058431

  2. College Students' Positivity toward Teen Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eshbaugh, Elaine M.

    2011-01-01

    Although teen pregnancy and parenthood are more visible in society than in the past, teen mothers are often stereotyped and stigmatized. The study examined positivity toward teen mothers among college students (N = 316) at a midwestern university. Although students responded positively to some items regarding teen mothers, other statements showed…

  3. Calls to Teen Line: Representative Concerns of Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehm, Kathryn E.; Schondel, Connie K.; Ivoska, William J.; Marlowe, Alison L.; Manke-Mitchell, Laurie

    1998-01-01

    Study examines whether the concerns of teenagers calling a peer listening service are representative of the concerns of teenagers in the area served. Results indicate that students' biggest concerns involve family problems, peer relationships, self-esteem, and school problems. Concludes that calls to the teen line are representative. (Author/GCP)

  4. A Qualitative Study to Examine Feasibility and Design of an Online Social Networking Intervention to Increase Physical Activity in Teenage Girls

    PubMed Central

    Van Kessel, Gisela; Kavanagh, Madeleine; Maher, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Background Online social networks present wide-reaching and flexible platforms through which to deliver health interventions to targeted populations. This study used a social marketing approach to explore teenage girls’ perceptions of physical activity and the potential use of online social networks to receive a physical activity intervention. Methods Six focus groups were conducted with 19 Australian teenage girls (ages 13 to 18 years) with varying levels of physical activity and socioeconomic status. A semi-structured format was used, with groups discussion transcribed verbatim. Content analysis identified emergent themes, with triangulation and memos used to ensure accuracy. Results Physical activity was most appealing when it emphasised sport, exercise and fitness, along with opportunities for socialisation with friends and self-improvement. Participants were receptive to delivery of a physical activity intervention via online social networks, with Facebook the most widely reported site. Participants commonly accessed online social networks via mobile devices and particularly smartphones. Undesirable features included promotion of physical activity in terms of walking; use of cartoon imagery; use of humour; and promotion of the intervention via schools, each of which were considered “uncool”. Participants noted that their parents were likely to be supportive of them using an online social networking physical activity intervention, particularly if not promoted as a weight loss intervention. Conclusion This study identified key features likely to increase the feasibility and retention of an online social networking physical activity intervention for teenage girls. Guidelines for the design of interventions for teenage girls are provided for future applications. PMID:26934191

  5. Urban Teens and Young Adults Describe Drama, Disrespect, Dating Violence and Help- seeking Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Caitlin Eileen; Houston, Avril Melissa; Mmari, Kristin N.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Adolescent dating violence is increasingly recognized as a public health problem. Our qualitative investigation sought input from urban, African-American adolescents at risk for dating violence concerning (1) dating violence descriptions, (2) preferences for help-seeking for dating violence, and (3) recommendations for a teen dating violence resource center. Methods Four focus groups were conducted with urban, African American adolescents (n=32) aged 13 to 24 recruited from an urban adolescent clinic's community outreach partners. Qualitative analysis was conducted. Results Participants assigned a wide range of meanings for the term “relationship drama”, and used dating violence using language not typically heard among adults, e.g., “disrespect”. Participants described preferences for turning to family or friends before seeking formal services for dating violence, but reported barriers to their ability to rely on these informal sources. When asked to consider formal services, they described their preferred resource center as confidential and safe, with empathetic, non-judgmental staff. Teens also gave insight into preferred ways to outreach and publicize dating violence resources. Conclusions Findings inform recommendations for youth-specific tailoring of violence screening and intervention efforts. Current evidence that slang terms, i.e., “drama”, lack specificity suggests that they should not be integrated within screening protocols. These data highlight the value of formative research in understanding terminology and help-seeking priorities so as to develop and refine dating violence prevention and intervention efforts for those most affected. PMID:21611717

  6. My Road Ahead study protocol: a randomised controlled trial of an online psychological intervention for men following treatment for localised prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a need for psychosocial interventions for men with prostate cancer to promote adaptive coping with the challenges and distress associated with diagnosis, treatment and recovery. In addition, interventions are needed that help to overcome barriers to psychosocial treatment such as limited face-to-face psychosocial support services, a shortage of adequately trained professionals, geographical distance, perceived and personal stigma and a preference for consumer-centric and self-directed learning. My Road Ahead is an online cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) intervention for prostate cancer. This protocol describes a randomised controlled trial (RCT) that will evaluate the efficacy of this online intervention alone, the intervention in combination with a moderated online forum, and the moderated online forum alone. Methods/design This study utilises a RCT design with three groups receiving: 1) the 6-module My Road Ahead intervention alone; 2) the My Road Ahead intervention plus a moderated online forum; and 3) the moderated online forum alone. It is expected that 150 men with localised prostate cancer will be recruited into the RCT. Online measures will assess men’s psychological distress as well as sexual and relationship adjustment at baseline, post-intervention, 3 month follow-up and 6 month follow-up. The study is being conducted in Australia and participants will be recruited from April 2012 to Feb 2014. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of My Road Ahead in reducing psychological distress. Discussion To our knowledge, My Road Ahead is the first self-directed online psychological intervention developed for men who have been treated for localised prostate cancer. The RCT will assess the efficacy of this intervention in improving psychological well-being, sexual satisfaction, relationship satisfaction and overall quality of life. If successful, this intervention could provide much needed support to men receiving

  7. Effects of a Research-Based Intervention to Improve Seventh-Grade Students' Proportional Problem Solving: A Cluster Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jitendra, Asha K.; Harwell, Michael R.; Dupuis, Danielle N.; Karl, Stacy R.; Lein, Amy E.; Simonson, Gregory; Slater, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    This experimental study evaluated the effectiveness of a research-based intervention, schema-based instruction (SBI), on students' proportional problem solving. SBI emphasizes the underlying mathematical structure of problems, uses schematic diagrams to represent information in the problem text, provides explicit problem-solving and metacognitive…

  8. Dimensions of callousness in early childhood: Links to problem behavior and family intervention effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Luke W.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Gardner, Frances; Cheong, JeeWon; Dishion, Thomas J.; Wilson, Melvin

    2012-01-01

    This study examined dimensions of callous behaviors in early childhood and the role of these behaviors in the development of conduct problems, as well as responsiveness to a family-centered preventative intervention. Caregiver reports of callous behaviors were examined using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Problem behavior was examined using within- and cross-informant reports of these behaviors. Parenting was measured using observational methods within the context of a randomized control trial of the Family Check-Up with a sample of 731 ethnically diverse boys and girls (followed from age 2 to 4) at high risk for later conduct problems. Results demonstrated that a measure of deceitful-callous (D-C) behaviors had acceptable factor loadings and internal consistency at ages 3 and 4. D-C behaviors at age 3 predicted problem behavior concurrently and longitudinally within and across informant. However, D-C behaviors did not reduce the effectiveness of the family preventative intervention. These findings have implications for our understanding of behaviors that may precede later callous-unemotional traits and for our understanding of the development and prevention of early starting conduct problems. PMID:23627949

  9. Supporting Collaborative Efforts in Implementing Evidence-Based Reading Interventions: The Role of Online Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffee, Gina; Newell, Markeda L.; Kennedy, Adam S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an explanation of how effective reading interventions are identified. Through a review of the National Reading Panel's general findings, along with a review of systems currently used to evaluate and disseminate specific reading interventions, a discussion of what works in reading is presented. The…

  10. The COPE healthy lifestyles TEEN randomized controlled trial with culturally diverse high school adolescents: baseline characteristics and methods.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Kelly, Stephanie; Jacobson, Diana; Belyea, Michael; Shaibi, Gabriel; Small, Leigh; O'Haver, Judith; Marsiglia, Flavio Francisco

    2013-09-01

    Obesity and mental health disorders remain significant public health problems in adolescents. Substantial health disparities exist with minority youth experiencing higher rates of these problems. Schools are an outstanding venue to provide teens with skills needed to improve their physical and mental health, and academic performance. In this paper, the authors describe the design, intervention, methods and baseline data for a randomized controlled trial with 779 culturally diverse high-school adolescents in the southwest United States. Aims for this prevention study include testing the efficacy of the COPE TEEN program versus an attention control program on the adolescents' healthy lifestyle behaviors, Body Mass Index (BMI) and BMI%, mental health, social skills and academic performance immediately following the intervention programs, and at six and 12 months post interventions. Baseline findings indicate that greater than 40% of the sample is either overweight (n = 148, 19.00%) or obese (n = 182, 23.36%). The predominant ethnicity represented is Hispanic (n = 526, 67.52%). At baseline, 15.79% (n = 123) of the students had above average scores on the Beck Youth Inventory Depression subscale indicating mildly (n = 52, 6.68%), moderately (n = 47, 6.03%), or extremely (n = 24, 3.08%) elevated scores (see Table 1). Anxiety scores were slightly higher with 21.56% (n = 168) reporting responses suggesting mildly (n = 81, 10.40%), moderately (n = 58, 7.45%) or extremely (n = 29, 3.72%) elevated scores. If the efficacy of the COPE TEEN program is supported, it will offer schools a curriculum that can be easily incorporated into high school health courses to improve adolescent healthy lifestyle behaviors, psychosocial outcomes and academic performance. PMID:23748156

  11. A Feasibility and Efficacy Randomized Controlled Trial of an Online Preventative Program for Childhood Obesity: Protocol for the EMPOWER Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manoj

    2012-01-01

    for the intervention will be collected at three intervals: baseline (week 0), posttest (week 4), and follow-up (8 weeks). At each phase of data collection, we will collect from both groups (1) measures of the four obesogenic protective factors, and (2) summated SCT construct scores. Constructs will be measured by a psychometrically valid and reliable SCT-based instrument. Behaviors will be evaluated by a behavior log. We will use a repeated-measures one-between-, one-within-participants design to evaluate intervention results. Constructs will be modified through Web-based learning modules, online interactive worksheets, and mother–child home-based activities. Process evaluation will assess program fidelity. PMID:23611831

  12. A component-based problem list subsystem for the HOLON testbed. Health Object Library Online.

    PubMed Central

    Law, V.; Goldberg, H. S.; Jones, P.; Safran, C.

    1998-01-01

    One of the deliverables of the HOLON (Health Object Library Online) project is the specification of a reference architecture for clinical information systems that facilitates the development of a variety of discrete, reusable software components. One of the challenges facing the HOLON consortium is determining what kinds of components can be made available in a library for developers of clinical information systems. To further explore the use of component architectures in the development of reusable clinical subsystems, we have incorporated ongoing work in the development of enterprise terminology services into a Problem List subsystem for the HOLON testbed. We have successfully implemented a set of components using CORBA (Common Object Request Broker Architecture) and Java distributed object technologies that provide a functional problem list application and UMLS-based "Problem Picker." Through this development, we have overcome a variety of obstacles characteristic of rapidly emerging technologies, and have identified architectural issues necessary to scale these components for use and reuse within an enterprise clinical information system. PMID:9929252

  13. Health on the Web: Randomised Controlled Trial of Online Screening and Brief Alcohol Intervention Delivered in a Workplace Setting

    PubMed Central

    Khadjesari, Zarnie; Freemantle, Nick; Linke, Stuart; Hunter, Rachael; Murray, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol misuse in England costs around £7.3 billion (US$12.2 billion) annually from lost productivity and absenteeism. Delivering brief alcohol interventions to employees as part of a health check may be acceptable, particularly with online delivery which can provide privacy for this stigmatised behaviour. Research to support this approach is limited and methodologically weak. The aim was to determine the effectiveness of online screening and personalised feedback on alcohol consumption, delivered in a workplace as part of a health check. Methods and Findings This two-group online individually randomised controlled trial recruited employees from a UK-based private sector organisation (approx. 100,000 employees). 3,375 employees completed the online health check in the three week recruitment period. Of these, 1,330 (39%) scored five or more on the AUDIT-C (indicating alcohol misuse) and were randomised to receive personalised feedback on their alcohol intake, alongside feedback on other health behaviours (n = 659), or to receive feedback on all health behaviours except alcohol intake (n = 671). Participants were mostly male (75%), with a median age of 48 years and half were in managerial positions (55%). Median Body Mass Index was 26, 12% were smokers, median time undertaking moderate/vigorous physical activity a week was 173 minutes and median fruit and vegetable consumption was three portions a day. Eighty percent (n = 1,066) of participants completed follow-up questionnaires at three months. An intention to treat analysis found no difference between experimental groups for past week drinking (primary outcome) (5.6% increase associated with the intervention (95% CI −4.7% to 16.9%; p = .30)), AUDIT (measure of alcohol-related harm) and health utility (EQ-5D). Conclusions There was no evidence to support the use of personalised feedback within an online health check for reducing alcohol consumption among employees in this organisation

  14. An Online Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating HIV Prevention Digital Media Interventions for Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Hirshfield, Sabina; Chiasson, Mary Ann; Joseph, Heather; Scheinmann, Roberta; Johnson, Wayne D.; Remien, Robert H.; Shaw, Francine Shuchat; Emmons, Reed; Yu, Gary; Margolis, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    Background As HIV infection continues unabated, there is a need for effective interventions targeting at-risk men who have sex with men (MSM). Engaging MSM online where they meet sexual partners is critical for HIV prevention efforts. Methods A randomized controlled trial (RCT) conducted online among U.S. MSM recruited from several gay sexual networking websites assessed the impact of 2 HIV prevention videos and an HIV prevention webpage compared to a control condition for the study outcomes HIV testing, serostatus disclosure, and unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) at 60-day follow-up. Video conditions were pooled due to reduced power from low retention (53%, n = 1,631). No participant incentives were provided. Principal Findings Follow-up was completed by 1,631 (53%) of 3,092 eligible men. In the 60 days after the intervention, men in the pooled video condition were significantly more likely than men in the control to report full serostatus disclosure (‘asked and told’) with their last sexual partner (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.01–1.74). Comparing baseline to follow-up, HIV-negative men in the pooled video (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.54–0.91) and webpage condition (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.25–0.72) significantly reduced UAI at follow-up. HIV-positive men in the pooled video condition significantly reduced UAI (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.20–0.67) and serodiscordant UAI (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.28–0.96) at follow-up. Conclusions/Significance Findings from this online RCT of MSM recruited from sexual networking websites suggest that a low cost, brief digital media intervention designed to engage critical thinking can increase HIV disclosure to sexual partners and decrease sexual risk. Effective, brief HIV prevention interventions featuring digital media that are made widely available may serve as a complementary part of an overall behavioral and biomedical strategy for reducing sexual risk by addressing the specific needs and circumstances of the target population, and by changing

  15. Mitigation of musculoskeletal problems and body discomfort of agricultural workers through educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Rekha

    2012-01-01

    Farming is a physically arduous occupation that places farm workers' at potential risk of musculoskeletal disorders, which has been observed to impose a greater impact on their health. Each activity in agriculture brings about certain stress and strain on bones and muscles leading to work-related musculoskeletal disorders which can lead to several permanent diseases and disabilities. The purpose of analyzing musculoskeletal problems among male and female workers engaged in agriculture was to know about the risk factors dangerous to health so that interventions can be planned for mitigating them thereby increasing the efficiency of work. Educational intervention included audio-visual aids as well as printed literature. It was hoped that awareness of these factors through dissemination of information would contribute at preventing hazards amongst farmers and their families. The results revealed that the workers reported very severe to severe pain in low back while performing agricultural activities. Weeding was the most strenuous activity for females and threshing crop for males. Training and education on MSDs through educational intervention proved that the knowledge of the farm workers could be enhanced and can help reduce risk of many musculoskeletal problems. It can be help in empowering the community and mitigate MSDs in agriculture. PMID:22317076

  16. Dosimetric Effect of Online Image-Guided Anatomical Interventions for Postprostatectomy Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Diot, Quentin; Olsen, Christine; Kavanagh, Brian; Raben, David; Miften, Moyed

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To assess daily variations in delivered doses in postprostatectomy patients, using kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) datasets acquired before and after interventions to correct for observed distortions in volume/shape of rectum and bladder. Methods and Materials: Seventeen consecutive patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the prostate bed were studied. For patients with large anatomical variations, quantified by either a rectal wall displacement of >5 mm or bladder volume change of >50% on the CBCT compared with the planning CT, an intervention was performed to adjust the rectum and/or bladder filling. Cumulative doses over the pre- and post-intervention fractions were calculated by tracking the position of the planning CT voxels on different CBCTs using a deformable surface-mapping algorithm. Dose and displacements vectors were projected on two-dimensional maps, the minimal dose received by the highest 95% of the planing target volume (PTV D95) and the highest 10% of the rectum volume (D10) as well as the bladder volume receiving >2 Gy (V2) were evaluated. Results: Of 544 fractions, 96 required intervention. Median (range) number of interventions per patient was 5 (2-12). Compared with the planning values, the mean (SD) pre- vs. postintervention value for PTV D95 was -2% (2%) vs. -1% (2%) (p < 0.12), for rectum D10 was -1% (4%) vs. +1% (4%) (p < 0.24), and for bladder V2 was +6% vs. +20% (p < 0.84). Conclusions: Interventions to reduce treatment volume deformations due to bladder and rectum fillings are not necessary when patients receive daily accurate CBCT localization, and the frequency of those potential interventions is low. However, for hypofractionated treatments, the relative frequency can significantly increase, and interventions can become more dosimetrically beneficial.

  17. Preventing Internalizing and Externalizing Problems in Girls in Foster Care as they Enter Middle School: Immediate Impact of an Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Dana K.; Leve, Leslie D.; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Girls in foster care have been shown to be at risk for emotional and behavioral problems, especially during the preadolescent and adolescent years. Based on these findings and on the lack of research-based preventive interventions for such youths, the current study examined the immediate impact of an intervention targeting the prevention of internalizing and externalizing problems for girls in foster care prior to middle school entry. Study participants included 100 girls in state-supported foster homes who were randomly assigned to an intervention condition or to a control condition (foster care services as usual). The intervention girls were hypothesized to have fewer internalizing problems, fewer externalizing problems, and more prosocial behavior at 6-months postbaseline compared to the control girls. The results confirmed the hypotheses for internalizing and externalizing problems, but not for prosocial behavior. Limitations and future directions are discussed. PMID:21475990

  18. Pilot Testing "Okay with Asthma"[TM]: An Online Asthma Intervention for School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Tami H.; Hauenstein, Emily J.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is the leading cause of missed school days despite advancements in asthma treatment. This may be, in part, due to a lack of understanding about asthma. "Okay With Asthma"[TM], an online story with psychosocial management strategies for school-age children, was pilot tested to measure its effect on asthma knowledge and attitude. The online…

  19. Inquiry-Based Instruction with Archived, Online Data: An Intervention Study with Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ucar, Sedat; Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Krissek, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    This mixed methods study described preservice teachers' conceptions of tides and explored the efficacy of integrating online data into inquiry-based instruction. Data sources included a multiple-choice assessment and in-depth interviews. A total of 79 participants in secondary, middle, and early childhood teacher education programs completed the…

  20. Factors Affecting Student Retention in Online Courses: Overcoming This Critical Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaytan, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what a panel of 15 experts would identify as critical factors affecting student retention in online courses that will serve as implications for educational leaders to guide their student retention strategies, online organizational structures, institutional policies, and online instructional activities. A…

  1. Meet the New You: In Teen Second Life, Librarians Can Leap Tall Buildings in a Single Bound and Save Kids from Boring Assignments--All before Lunch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czarnecki, Kelly; Gullett, Matt

    2007-01-01

    This article presents and discusses a 3-D online environment known as Teen Second Life. TSL is a virtual environment geared just for youth, ages 13-17. Its social appeal is huge, especially for teens who are developmentally inclined to seek out the company of their peers. In TSL one can meet friends or make new ones, hang out, listen to music and…

  2. It's Not Tough, It's Tender Love: Problem Teens Need Compassion That the "Tough-Love" Approach to Child-Rearing Doesn't Offer Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieper, Martha Heineman; Pieper, William J.

    1992-01-01

    Maintains that parents and physicians should adopt a tender love, rather than a tough love, approach when dealing with adolescents with behavior problems. The discussion is highlighted by a case study of a 15-year-old boy. (BB)

  3. Relief-oriented use of marijuana by teens

    PubMed Central

    Bottorff, Joan L; Johnson, Joy L; Moffat, Barbara M; Mulvogue, Tamsin

    2009-01-01

    Background There are indications that marijuana is increasingly used to alleviate symptoms and for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions both physical and psychological. The purpose of this study was to describe the health concerns and problems that prompt some adolescents to use marijuana for therapeutic reasons, and their beliefs about the risks and benefits of the therapeutic use of marijuana. Methods As part of a larger ethnographic study of 63 adolescents who were regular marijuana users, we analyzed interviews conducted with 20 youth who self-identified as using marijuana to relieve or manage health problems. Results Thematic analysis revealed that these teens differentiated themselves from recreational users and positioned their use of marijuana for relief by emphasizing their inability to find other ways to deal with their health problems, the sophisticated ways in which they titrated their intake, and the benefits that they experienced. These teens used marijuana to gain relief from difficult feelings (including depression, anxiety and stress), sleep difficulties, problems with concentration and physical pain. Most were not overly concerned about the risks associated with using marijuana, maintaining that their use of marijuana was not 'in excess' and that their use fit into the realm of 'normal.' Conclusion Marijuana is perceived by some teens to be the only available alternative for teens experiencing difficult health problems when medical treatments have failed or when they lack access to appropriate health care. PMID:19389223

  4. Development and pilot testing of an online intervention to support young couples' coping and adjustment to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fergus, K D; McLeod, D; Carter, W; Warner, E; Gardner, S L; Granek, L; Cullen, K I

    2014-07-01

    Couplelinks is an original, professionally facilitated online intervention tailored to the unique challenges facing young women with breast cancer and their male partners. The purpose of this evaluation was to determine the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention and areas for improvement. Sixteen couples were sequentially enrolled over an 18-month period. Couples provided feedback via a treatment satisfaction survey, and post-treatment interviews with a sub-group of participants. Qualitative information was analysed for themes relevant to the program's acceptability, perceived benefits and limitations, and directions for improvement. Of the 16 couples who enrolled, six completed four modules or less, and 10 completed the entire program. Completers reported satisfaction with the program overall, as well as with the website useability and professional facilitation. Reported benefits were: enhanced communication and self-other knowledge; creation of opportunities for meaningful, cancer-related discussion; affirmation of relationship strengths; and a greater sense of closeness between partners. The main reported limitation was how program participation disrupted the couple's usual routine. Themes related to non-completion suggest that partners with particularly elevated relational or illness-related distress, or with differential levels of motivation, are less likely to finish. These findings have led to targeted improvements to the website and intervention protocol. PMID:24472013

  5. Effects of School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports on Internalizing Problems: Current Evidence and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Kent; Ty, Sophie V.; Miller, Lynn D.

    2014-01-01

    School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (SWPBIS) has a large evidence base for preventing and addressing externalizing problem behavior, but there is little research examining its effects on internalizing problems, such as anxiety and depression. Given the prevalence of internalizing problems in today's children and youth,…

  6. Building Local Capacity for Training and Coaching Data-Based Problem Solving with Positive Behavior Intervention and Support Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, J. Stephen; Algozzine, Bob; Algozzine, Kate; Horner, Robert H.; Todd, Anne W.

    2011-01-01

    Positive Behavior Intervention and Support Teams use data to guide decisions about student social and academic behavior problems. In previous evaluation and research efforts, the authors taught team members to use Team-Initiated Problem Solving, a model that embeds data-based decision making into a broader problem-solving framework. In this study,…

  7. Defining the Content of an Online Sexual Health Intervention: The MenSS Website

    PubMed Central

    Gerressu, Makeda; Michie, Susan; Estcourt, Claudia; Anderson, Jane; Ang, Chee Siang; Murray, Elizabeth; Rait, Greta; Stephenson, Judith; Bailey, Julia V

    2015-01-01

    Background Health promotion and risk reduction are essential components of sexual health care. However, it can be difficult to prioritize these within busy clinical services. Digital interventions may provide a new method for supporting these. Objective The MenSS (Men’s Safer Sex) website is an interactive digital intervention developed by a multidisciplinary team, which aims to improve condom use in men who have sex with women (MSW). This paper describes the content of this intervention, and the rationale for it. Methods Content was informed by a literature review regarding men’s barriers to condom use, workshops with experts in sexual health and technology (N=16) and interviews with men in sexual health clinics (N=20). Data from these sources were analyzed thematically, and synthesized using the Behavior Change Wheel framework. Results The MenSS intervention is a website optimized for delivery via tablet computer within a clinic waiting room setting. Key targets identified were condom use skills, beliefs about pleasure and knowledge about risk. Content was developed using behavior change techniques, and interactive website features provided feedback tailored for individual users. Conclusions This paper provides a detailed description of an evidence-based interactive digital intervention for sexual health, including how behavior change techniques were translated into practice within the design of the MenSS website. Triangulation between a targeted literature review, expert workshops, and interviews with men ensured that a range of potential influences on condom use were captured. PMID:26142304

  8. Spondylitis Web Info for Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... teens near you with spondylitis. Follow SAA on Facebook Follow SAA on Twitter home Your Stories About Spondylitis Staying Active Academics Friends & Family Join Us © 2011 Spondylitis Association of America, All ...

  9. Diabetes in Children and Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... now younger people are also getting type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes used to be called adult-onset diabetes. But ... children and teens, due to more obesity. With Type 2 diabetes, the body does not make or use insulin ...

  10. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants Print ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  11. Teen Brain: Still Under Construction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol and the Teen Brain Reprints For more information ... illness is by studying the development of the brain from birth to adulthood. Powerful new technologies have enabled them to track the growth of ...

  12. Atrial Septal Defect (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Atrial Septal Defect KidsHealth > For Teens > Atrial Septal Defect Print A ... Care of Yourself What Is an Atrial Septal Defect? Having a doctor listen to your heart is ...

  13. Types of Cancer Teens Get

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms and how these cancers can be treated. Osteosarcoma Osteosarcoma (pronounced: os-tee-oh-sahr-KOH-muh) is the most common type of bone cancer. In teens, it can sometimes appear during their ...

  14. The Early Impact Program: An Early Intervention and Prevention Program for Children and Families At-Risk of Conduct Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larmar, Stephen; Gatfield, Terry

    2007-01-01

    The Early Impact (EI) program is an early intervention and prevention program for reducing the incidence of conduct problems in pre-school aged children. The EI intervention framework is ecological in design and includes universal and indicated components. This paper delineates key principles and associated strategies that underpin the EI program.…

  15. Enhancing Instructional Problem Solving: An Efficient System for Assisting Struggling Learners. Practical Intervention in the Schools Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begeny, John C.; Schulte, Ann C.; Johnson, Kent

    2012-01-01

    This book presents a schoolwide model of instructional support designed to make the most of available time, resources, and personnel--one that is also fully compatible with other problem-solving models, such as response to intervention. The authors provide a comprehensive and cohesive framework for linking assessment and intervention. They show…

  16. Effects of Intervention to Improve At-Risk Fourth Graders' Understanding, Calculations, and Word Problems with Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Schumacher, Robin F.; Long, Jessica; Namkung, Jessica; Malone, Amelia S.; Wang, Amber; Hamlett, Carol L.; Jordan, Nancy C.; Siegler, Robert S.; Changas, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) investigate the efficacy of a core fraction intervention program on understanding and calculation skill and (b) isolate the effects of different forms of fraction word-problem (WP) intervention. At-risk fourth graders (n = 213) were randomly assigned to the school's business-as-usual program, or one of two…

  17. Effects of Intervention to Improve At-Risk Fourth Graders' Understanding, Calculations, and Word Problems with Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Schumacher, Robin F.; Long, Jessica; Namkung, Jessica; Malone, Amelia S.; Wang, Amber; Hamlett, Carol L.; Jordan, Nancy C.; Siegler, Robert S.; Changas, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) investigate the efficacy of a core fraction intervention program on understanding and calculation skill and (b) isolate the effects of different forms of fraction word-problem (WP) intervention delivered as part of the larger program. At-risk 4th graders (n = 213) were randomly assigned at the individual…

  18. Asymptotic analysis of online algorithms and improved scheme for the flow shop scheduling problem with release dates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Danyu

    2015-08-01

    This paper discusses the flow shop scheduling problem to minimise the total quadratic completion time (TQCT) with release dates in offline and online environments. For this NP-hard problem, the investigation is focused on the performance of two online algorithms based on the Shortest Processing Time among Available jobs rule. Theoretical results indicate the asymptotic optimality of the algorithms as the problem scale is sufficiently large. To further enhance the quality of the original solutions, the improvement scheme is provided for these algorithms. A new lower bound with performance guarantee is provided, and computational experiments show the effectiveness of these heuristics. Moreover, several results of the single-machine TQCT problem with release dates are also obtained for the deduction of the main theorem.

  19. Efficacy of an Online Resource for Teaching Interpersonal Problem Solving Skills to Women Graduate Students in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekki, Jennifer M.; Bernstein, Bianca; Fabert, Natalie; Gildar, Natalie; Way, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Interpersonal problem solving skills allow engineers to prevent interpersonal difficulties more effectively and to manage conflict, both of which are critical to successful participation on teams. This research provides evidence that the "Career"WISE online learning environment can improve those skills among women in engineering graduate…

  20. Exploring the Use of Three-Dimensional Multi-User Virtual Environments for Online Problem-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omale, Nicholas M.

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory case study examines how three media attributes in 3-D MUVEs--avatars, 3-D spaces and bubble dialogue boxes--affect interaction in an online problem-based learning (PBL) activity. The study participants were eleven undergraduate students enrolled in a 200-level, three-credit-hour technology integration course at a Midwestern…

  1. Developing Authentic Online Problem-Based Learning Case Scenarios for Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLinden, Mike; McCall, Steve; Hinton, Danielle; Weston, Annette

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on the development of online problem-based learning case scenarios for use in a distance education program for teachers of students with visual impairments in the United Kingdom. Following participation in two case scenarios, a cohort of teachers provided feedback. This feedback was analyzed in relation to the relevant…

  2. Developing an Effective Tool for Teaching Teens about Workplace Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miara, Christine; Gallagher, Susan; Bush, Diane; Dewer, Robin

    2003-01-01

    Paid employment is an important feature of adolescent life. Too often, it has negative health consequences, including more than 200,000 workplace injuries to 14 to 17 year olds every year. Training teens about occupational safety is part of an overall strategy to address this problem. When the project described in this article began, there were…

  3. Seizures and Teens: The Practical Aspects of Managing Seizure Medications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne; Israel, Beth

    2007-01-01

    Medications are the primary treatment for epilepsy, yet many teens and their families have problems managing seizure medicines. Fear of side effects, difficulties remembering to take medicines and figuring out how to take them are common challenges. Unfortunately, not taking medicine as prescribed can lead to breakthrough seizures, which in turn…

  4. Developing a Teen Suicide Prevention Program in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Mary Jane

    2004-01-01

    The problem of adolescent suicide worldwide is discussed. Teen suicide is the second leading cause of death among 15-19 year olds in the United States, and has become an increasing concern for counselors employed in schools. Contributing factors to suicide, such as cultural and socio-demographic factors, dysfunctional family patterns, cognitive…

  5. Chat Rooms: Teens Hanging Out on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdy, Rebecca; Web Surfers from Central Rappahannock Regional Library

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the use of chat rooms by teens in libraries, including educational reasons and socialization. Considers problems encountered when using chat, including viruses; stresses the need for establishing safety tips; and provides descriptions of five Web sites that allow chat, including instant messaging. (LRW)

  6. Understanding the Human Volcano: What Teens Can Do about Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipp, Earl

    Anger and violence among children has moved from the streets to the schools, with tragic, and well-documented, results. This book addresses anger and violence among children and is, in essence, an anger-management course for teens, written at about an eighth-grade level. Part 1, "The Problems of Violence in Our World," explores human violence. It…

  7. SSIC model: A multi-layer model for intervention of online rumors spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ru-Ya; Zhang, Xue-Fu; Liu, Yi-Jun

    2015-06-01

    SIR model is a classical model to simulate rumor spreading, while the supernetwork is an effective tool for modeling complex systems. Based on the Opinion SuperNetwork involving Social Sub-network, Environmental Sub-network, Psychological Sub-network, and Viewpoint Sub-network, drawing from the modeling idea of SIR model, this paper designs super SIC model (SSIC model) and its evolution rules, and also analyzes intervention effects on public opinion of four elements of supernetwork, which are opinion agent, opinion environment, agent's psychology and viewpoint. Studies show that, the SSIC model based on supernetwork has effective intervention effects on rumor spreading. It is worth noting that (i) identifying rumor spreaders in Social Sub-network and isolating them can achieve desired intervention results, (ii) improving environmental information transparency so that the public knows as much information as possible to reduce the rumors is a feasible way to intervene, (iii) persuading wavering neutrals has better intervention effects than clarifying rumors already spread everywhere, so rumors should be intervened in properly in time by psychology counseling.

  8. An Adaptive Approach to Family Intervention: Linking Engagement in Family-Centered Intervention to Reductions in Adolescent Problem Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Arin M.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Yasui, Miwa; Kavanagh, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    This study used Complier Average Causal Effect analysis (CACE; see G. Imbens & D. Rubin, 1997) to examine the impact of an adaptive approach to family intervention in the public schools on rates of substance use and antisocial behavior among students ages 11-17. Students were randomly assigned to a family-centered intervention (N = 998) in 6th…

  9. Brief Intervention Impact on Truant Youth Attitudes to School and School Behavior Problems: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Dembo, Richard; Briones-Robinson, Rhissa; Wareham, Jennifer; Winters, Ken C.; Ungaro, Rocío; Schmeidler, James

    2014-01-01

    Truancy continues to be a major problem, affecting most school districts in the U.S. Truancy is related to school dropout, with associated adverse consequences, including unemployment and delinquency. It is important to obtain a more complete picture of truants' educational experience. First, the present study sought to examine the longitudinal growth (increasing/decreasing trend) in truant youths' attitudes toward school and misbehavior in school (disobedience, inappropriate behavior, skipping school). Second, this study focused on examining the impact of a Brief Intervention (BI) targeting the youths’ substance use, as well as socio-demographic and background covariates, on their attitudes toward school and school behavior problems over time. A linear growth model was found to fit the attitudes toward school longitudinal data, suggesting the youths’ attitudes toward school are related across time. An auto-regressive lag model was estimated for each of the school misbehaviors, indicating that, once initiated, youth continued to engage in them. Several socio-demographic covariates effects were found on the youths’ attitudes towards school and school misbehaviors over time. However, no significant, overall BI effects were uncovered. Some statistically significant intervention effects were found at specific follow-up points for some school misbehaviors, but none were significant when applying the Holm procedure taking account of the number of follow-ups. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25247027

  10. Brief Intervention Impact on Truant Youth Attitudes to School and School Behavior Problems: A Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Dembo, Richard; Briones-Robinson, Rhissa; Wareham, Jennifer; Winters, Ken C; Ungaro, Rocío; Schmeidler, James

    2014-01-01

    Truancy continues to be a major problem, affecting most school districts in the U.S. Truancy is related to school dropout, with associated adverse consequences, including unemployment and delinquency. It is important to obtain a more complete picture of truants' educational experience. First, the present study sought to examine the longitudinal growth (increasing/decreasing trend) in truant youths' attitudes toward school and misbehavior in school (disobedience, inappropriate behavior, skipping school). Second, this study focused on examining the impact of a Brief Intervention (BI) targeting the youths' substance use, as well as socio-demographic and background covariates, on their attitudes toward school and school behavior problems over time. A linear growth model was found to fit the attitudes toward school longitudinal data, suggesting the youths' attitudes toward school are related across time. An auto-regressive lag model was estimated for each of the school misbehaviors, indicating that, once initiated, youth continued to engage in them. Several socio-demographic covariates effects were found on the youths' attitudes towards school and school misbehaviors over time. However, no significant, overall BI effects were uncovered. Some statistically significant intervention effects were found at specific follow-up points for some school misbehaviors, but none were significant when applying the Holm procedure taking account of the number of follow-ups. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25247027

  11. Concussion treatment after combat trauma: development of a telephone based, problem solving intervention for service members.

    PubMed

    Bell, Kathleen R; Brockway, Jo Ann; Fann, Jesse R; Cole, Wesley R; St De Lore, Jef; Bush, Nigel; Lang, Ariel J; Hart, Tessa; Warren, Michael; Dikmen, Sureyya; Temkin, Nancy; Jain, Sonia; Raman, Rema; Stein, Murray B

    2015-01-01

    Military service members (SMs) and veterans who sustain mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) during combat deployments often have co-morbid conditions but are reluctant to seek out therapy in medical or mental health settings. Efficacious methods of intervention that are patient-centered and adaptable to a mobile and often difficult-to-reach population would be useful in improving quality of life. This article describes a new protocol developed as part of a randomized clinical trial of a telephone-mediated program for SMs with mTBI. The 12-session program combines problem solving training (PST) with embedded modules targeting depression, anxiety, insomnia, and headache. The rationale and development of this behavioral intervention for implementation with persons with multiple co-morbidities is described along with the proposed analysis of results. In particular, we provide details regarding the creation of a treatment that is manualized yet flexible enough to address a wide variety of problems and symptoms within a standard framework. The methods involved in enrolling and retaining an often hard-to-study population are also highlighted. PMID:25460344

  12. Very-Brief, Web-Based Interventions for Reducing Alcohol Use and Related Problems among College Students: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Leeman, Robert F.; Perez, Elliottnell; Nogueira, Christine; DeMartini, Kelly S.

    2015-01-01

    Very-brief, web-based alcohol interventions have great potential due to their convenience, ease of dissemination, and college students’ stated preference for this intervention modality. To address the efficacy of these interventions, we conducted a review of the literature to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Fifteen published reports were included. All RCTs meeting criteria for inclusion tested an intervention that featured personalized feedback on students’ patterns of alcohol consumption. This review found some evidence to support the efficacy of very-brief, web-based interventions among college students for alcohol use reduction. Several trials, however, reported no evidence of efficacy and the methods of multiple trials raised concerns about potential bias that may have influenced study results. By contrast, this review did not yield evidence to support the efficacy of very-brief, web-based interventions for reduction of alcohol-­related problems among college students. We found evidence to support the efficacy of two main types of intervention content: (a) focused solely on personalized normative feedback designed to correct misconceptions about peer alcohol consumption and (b) multi-component interventions. Future research is needed to test enhancements to very-brief, web-based interventions that feature personalized feedback on patterns of alcohol use and to determine for which types of college drinkers (e.g., heavier or lighter drinkers) these interventions are most efficacious. In addition, future studies are needed to test novel, very-brief, web-based interventions featuring approaches other than personalized feedback. In summary, this review yielded some evidence supporting very-brief, web-based interventions in reducing alcohol use but not related problems in college students. Very-brief, web-based interventions are worth pursuing given their convenience, privacy, and potential public health benefit. PMID:26441690

  13. Very-Brief, Web-Based Interventions for Reducing Alcohol Use and Related Problems among College Students: A Review.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Robert F; Perez, Elliottnell; Nogueira, Christine; DeMartini, Kelly S

    2015-01-01

    Very-brief, web-based alcohol interventions have great potential due to their convenience, ease of dissemination, and college students' stated preference for this intervention modality. To address the efficacy of these interventions, we conducted a review of the literature to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Fifteen published reports were included. All RCTs meeting criteria for inclusion tested an intervention that featured personalized feedback on students' patterns of alcohol consumption. This review found some evidence to support the efficacy of very-brief, web-based interventions among college students for alcohol use reduction. Several trials, however, reported no evidence of efficacy and the methods of multiple trials raised concerns about potential bias that may have influenced study results. By contrast, this review did not yield evidence to support the efficacy of very-brief, web-based interventions for reduction of alcohol--related problems among college students. We found evidence to support the efficacy of two main types of intervention content: (a) focused solely on personalized normative feedback designed to correct misconceptions about peer alcohol consumption and (b) multi-component interventions. Future research is needed to test enhancements to very-brief, web-based interventions that feature personalized feedback on patterns of alcohol use and to determine for which types of college drinkers (e.g., heavier or lighter drinkers) these interventions are most efficacious. In addition, future studies are needed to test novel, very-brief, web-based interventions featuring approaches other than personalized feedback. In summary, this review yielded some evidence supporting very-brief, web-based interventions in reducing alcohol use but not related problems in college students. Very-brief, web-based interventions are worth pursuing given their convenience, privacy, and potential public health benefit. PMID:26441690

  14. Association of a polymorphism of the dopamine transporter gene with externalizing behavior problems and associated temperament traits: a longitudinal study from infancy to the mid-teens.

    PubMed

    Jorm, A F; Prior, M; Sanson, A; Smart, D; Zhang, Y; Easteal, S

    2001-05-01

    There have been reports that a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism situated in the 3' untranslated region of the dopamine transporter gene is associated with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. On the basis of these findings, we predicted an association of this polymorphism with hyperactivity, other externalizing behavior problems, and related temperament traits in a general population sample. The association was investigated using children participating in a longitudinal study of childhood temperament and development. DNA was taken from 660 children who had been assessed for temperament from 4-8 months to 15-16 years, and for behavior problems from 3-4 to 15-16 years. No significant associations were found at any age. There are a number of methodological differences from earlier studies that might explain the lack of associations with hyperactivity. It is also possible that the earlier findings are not replicable. PMID:11378848

  15. With One Voice: America's Adults and Teens Sound Off about Teen Pregnancy. A National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Campaign To Prevent Teen Pregnancy, Washington, DC.

    These charts describe adults' and adolescents' views on teen sex and pregnancy. Data come from national surveys of adults and adolescents that examined attitudes toward teen sex and pregnancy, factors influencing teens' sexual decisions, parents' roles, and adults' and teens' advice for policymakers. There is near unanimous agreement among both…

  16. Promoting Positive Mental and Emotional Health in Teens: Some Lessons from Research. American Teens. Child Trends Research Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaff, Jonathan F.; Calkins, Julia; Bridges, Lisa J.; Margie, Nancy Geyelin

    A significant minority of teens and preteens suffer from anxiety disorders, depression and other mood disorders, behavior problems, and drug and alcohol addiction. Others have low self-esteem, difficulty coping, and feelings of insecurity. Given the harmful consequences of such disorders, policymakers and practitioners should be alert to teens…

  17. When Your Teen Is Having a Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... car seat and stroller? Can you assist with childcare while your she's at school and/or work? ... offer special services for teen mothers, such as childcare, transportation, or tutoring. Help your teen understand that ...

  18. Parent-teen communication about sexual topics.

    PubMed

    Raffaelli, M; Bogenschneider, K; Flood, M F

    1998-05-01

    This study examined parent-teen communication about sexual topics in matched samples of 666 mother-teen and 510 father-teen pairs in the US. Parents and their 8th- through 12th-grade children completed parallel surveys that assessed demographic, relationship, and attitudinal variables hypothesized to be associated with sexual communication. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine which variables were linked to teens¿ reports of ¿one good talk¿ about each of three sexual topics (whether teen sex is okay, the dangers of AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, and birth control) in the past year. Aside from gender of parents and teens, demographic variables were largely nonsignificant in the final models. Instead, relationship and attitudinal variables were linked to sexual discussions in both mother-teen and father-teen dyads. Implications for program development and directions for future research were discussed. PMID:12295941

  19. Kidney Stones in Children and Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Kidney Stones in Children and Teens Page Content Article ... teen girls having the highest incidence. Types of Kidney Stones There are many different types of kidney ...

  20. Driving Curfews May Curb Teen Crime

    MedlinePlus

    ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Motor Vehicle Safety Teen Health Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Motor Vehicle Safety Teen Health About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact ...

  1. Special considerations in distracted driving with teens.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Dennis R; McGehee, Daniel V; Fisher, Donald; McCartt, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Novice teen drivers have long been known to have an increased risk of crashing, as well as increased tendencies toward unsafe and risky driving behaviors. Teens are unique as drivers for several reasons, many of which have implications specifically in the area of distracted driving. This paper reviews several of these features, including the widespread prevalence of mobile device use by teens, their lack of driving experience, the influence of peer passengers as a source of distraction, the role of parents in influencing teens' attitudes and behaviors relevant to distracted driving and the impact of laws designed to prevent mobile device use by teen drivers. Recommendations for future research include understanding how engagement in a variety of secondary tasks by teen drivers affects their driving performance or crash risk; understanding the respective roles of parents, peers and technology in influencing teen driver behavior; and evaluating the impact of public policy on mitigating teen crash risk related to driver distraction. PMID:24776228

  2. The Teen Brain Likes Social Media 'Likes'

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159169.html The Teen Brain Likes Social Media 'Likes' Effect is similar to ... to have a powerful effect on the teen brain, new research suggests. Getting a large number of ...

  3. Immunization Schedules for Preteens and Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Preteens and Teens Recommend on Facebook ... on track. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Preteens and Teens (7-18 years) 2016 ...

  4. Pediatric Acid Reflux and GERD in Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Share Reflux and GERD : Teen GERD Pediatric Acid Reflux and GERD in Teens If you’re ... And here’s the better news: Most kids with acid reflux are able to lead normal, active, healthy ...

  5. Supporting Online Learning for Advanced Placement Students in Small Rural Schools: Conceptual Foundations and Intervention Components of the Facilitator Preparation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvin, Matthew J.; Hannum, Wallace H.; Farmer, Thomas W.; de la Varre, Claire; Keane, Julie

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the need for interventions to support students who are taking advanced placement courses in small rural districts and describes the Facilitator Preparation Program (FPP) as a strategy to address this need. Issues in the delivery of Online Distance Education (ODE) in small rural schools are summarized and the conceptual…

  6. An e-Learning Collaborative Filtering Approach to Suggest Problems to Solve in Programming Online Judges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toledo, Raciel Yera; Mota, Yailé Caballero

    2014-01-01

    The paper proposes a recommender system approach to cover online judge's domains. Online judges are e-learning tools that support the automatic evaluation of programming tasks done by individual users, and for this reason they are usually used for training students in programming contest and for supporting basic programming teachings. The…

  7. Computer Vision Syndrome for Non-Native Speaking Students: What Are the Problems with Online Reading?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tseng, Min-chen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the online reading performances and the level of visual fatigue from the perspectives of non-native speaking students (NNSs). Reading on a computer screen is more visually more demanding than reading printed text. Online reading requires frequent saccadic eye movements and imposes continuous focusing and alignment demand.…

  8. Our Anonymous Online Research Participants Are Not Always Anonymous: Is This a Problem?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    When educational research is conducted online, we sometimes promise our participants that they will be anonymous--but do we deliver on this promise? We have been warned since 1996 to be careful when using direct quotes in Internet research, as full-text web search engines make it easy to find chunks of text online. This paper details an empirical…

  9. The Mental Health Needs of Low-Income Pregnant Teens: A Nursing-Social Work Partnership in Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Nancy A.; Anastas, Jeane W.

    2015-01-01

    While the rates of teen childbearing have declined in the United States, adolescents who become pregnant and decide to bear and rear their babies are often from low-income, highly stressed families and communities. This article will describe the psychosocial problems of pregnant urban teens and how exposure to interpersonal trauma and current…

  10. Consequences of teen-age parenting.

    PubMed

    Nord, C W; Moore, K A; Morrison, D R; Brown, B; Myers, D E

    1992-09-01

    The changing context of teen-age childbearing and current related controversies are reviewed. Recent research about the consequences of teen-age childbearing for the teen-age mother, the father, and for the children born is examined. The article also summarizes current knowledge about the consequences of teen-age childbearing with regard to the mother's educational attainment, marital experience, subsequent fertility behavior, labor force experience and occupational attainment, and experience with poverty and welfare. PMID:1434559

  11. Effectiveness of online mindfulness-based interventions in improving mental health: A review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Spijkerman, M P J; Pots, W T M; Bohlmeijer, E T

    2016-04-01

    Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) are increasingly being delivered through the Internet. Whereas numerous meta-analyses have investigated the effectiveness of face-to-face MBIs in the context of mental health and well-being, thus far a quantitative synthesis of the effectiveness of online MBIs is lacking. The aim of this meta-analysis was to estimate the overall effects of online MBIs on mental health. Fifteen randomised controlled trials were included in this study. A random effects model was used to compute pre-post between-group effect sizes, and the study quality of each of the included trials was rated. Results showed that online MBIs have a small but significant beneficial impact on depression (g=0.29), anxiety (g=0.22), well-being (g=0.23) and mindfulness (g=0.32). The largest effect was found for stress, with a moderate effect size (g=0.51). For stress and mindfulness, exploratory subgroup analyses demonstrated significantly higher effect sizes for guided online MBIs than for unguided online MBIs. In addition, meta-regression analysis showed that effect sizes for stress were significantly moderated by the number of intervention sessions. Effect sizes, however, were not significantly related to study quality. The findings indicate that online MBIs have potential to contribute to improving mental health outcomes, particularly stress. Limitations, directions for future research and practical implications are discussed. PMID:27111302

  12. Development of a Self-Help Web-Based Intervention Targeting Young Cancer Patients With Sexual Problems and Fertility Distress in Collaboration With Patient Research Partners

    PubMed Central

    Obol, Claire Micaux; Lampic, Claudia; Eriksson, Lars E; Pelters, Britta; Wettergren, Lena

    2016-01-01

    Background The Internet should be suitable for delivery of interventions targeting young cancer patients. Young people are familiar with the technologies, and this patient group is small and geographically dispersed. Still, only few psycho-educational Web-based interventions are designed for this group. Young cancer patients consider reproductive health, including sexuality, an area of great importance and approximately 50% report sexual problems and fertility-related concerns following cancer treatment. Therefore, we set out to develop a self-help Web-based intervention, Fex-Can, to alleviate such problems. To improve its quality, we decided to involve patients and significant others as research partners. The first 18 months of our collaboration are described in this paper. The intervention will subsequently be tested in a feasibility study followed by a randomized controlled trial. Objective The study aims to describe the development of a Web-based intervention in long-term collaboration with patient research partners (PRPs). Methods Ten former cancer patients and two significant others participated in building the Web-based intervention, using a participatory design. The development process is described according to the design step in the holistic framework presented by van Gemert-Pijnen et al and evaluates the PRPs’ impact on the content, system, and service quality of the planned intervention. Results The collaboration between the research group and the PRPs mainly took place in the form of 1-day meetings to develop the key components of the intervention: educational and behavior change content, multimedia (pictures, video vignettes, and audios), interactive online activities (eg, self-monitoring), and partial feedback support (discussion forum, tailored feedback from experts). The PRPs influenced the intervention’s content quality in several ways. By repeated feedback on prototypes, the information became more comprehensive, relevant, and understandable

  13. Youth and Teens Page

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parents & Guardians Donate More Close Support Youth In Crisis Donate Volunteer Free Promotional Materials National Runaway Prevention ... Call NRS Publications Free Promotional Materials Runaway Statistics Crisis Hotline & Online Service Statistics Third Party Statistics NRS ...

  14. Enhancing the Communication Abilities of Preschoolers at Risk for Behavior Problems: Effectiveness of a Parent-Implemented Language Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brassart, Elise; Schelstraete, Marie-Anne

    2015-01-01

    Communication deficits are frequently associated with externalizing behavior problems in preschoolers but, in most cases, unsuspected in clinical practice. This exploratory study evaluated the effectiveness of a relatively brief parent-implemented language intervention on preschoolers at risk for behavior problems. Participants were randomly…

  15. Comparison of the Explicit Timing and Interspersal Interventions: Analysis of Problem Completion Rates, Student Preference, and Teacher Acceptability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhymer, Katrina N.; Morgan, Sandra K.

    2005-01-01

    Explicit timing and interspersal interventions were investigated using a within-subjects design with 45 third-grade students. A control assignment consisted of subtraction of a two digit number from a two digit number (i.e., target problem) and served as a baseline. An explicit timing assignment consisted of similar problems as those for the…

  16. Extending Research on a Math Fluency Building Intervention: Applying Taped Problems in a Second-Grade Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windingstad, Sunny; Skinner, Christopher H.; Rowland, Emily; Cardin, Elizabeth; Fearrington, Jamie Y.

    2009-01-01

    A multiple-baseline, across-tasks design was used to extend research on the taped-problems (TP) intervention with an intact, rural, second-grade classroom. During TP sessions an audio recording paced the class through a series of 15 or 16 addition facts four times. Problems and answers were read and students were instructed to attempt to provide…

  17. A Follow-Up Meta-Analysis for Word-Problem-Solving Interventions for Students with Mathematics Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Dake; Xin, Yan Ping

    2012-01-01

    Following a meta-analysis study conducted by Y. P. Xin and A. Jitendra (1999), the authors carried out a follow-up meta-analysis of word problem-solving interventions published from 1996 to 2009 for students with learning problems in mathematics. The authors examined the influence of education reforms as moderator variables on intervention…

  18. Teen Birth Rate. Facts at a Glance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kristin A., Comp.; Snyder, Nancy O., Comp.

    Between 1986 and 1991 the teen birth rate rose by nearly one-fourth, although very small declines were evident in 1992 and 1993. This decline was concentrated among older teens; the number of births to adolescents aged 17 and younger continued to rise. The percentage of teen births that occurred outside of marriage rose to 72%. In 1991, the most…

  19. Teens, Technology, and School. Data Memo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitlin, Paul; Rainie, Lee

    2005-01-01

    Teen use of the internet at school has grown 45% since 2000. The vast majority of teens and their parents believe that the use of the internet helps students in the classroom and in their studies, but some teens believe too many of their peers use the internet to cheat. The internet is an important element in the overall educational experience of…

  20. Three Years of Teen Court Offender Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forgays, Deborah Kirby

    2008-01-01

    Since 1983, Teen Courts have offered a judicial alternative for many adolescent offenders. In the first year of the Whatcom County Teen Court Program, a small sample of Teen Court offenders had more favorable outcomes than did Court Diversion offenders. In the current study, the results are based on a three-year sample of 84 Whatcom County…

  1. Socioeconomic Disadvantage as a Social Determinant of Teen Childbearing in the U.S.

    PubMed Central

    Penman-Aguilar, Ana; Carter, Marion; Snead, M. Christine; Kourtis, Athena P.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We reviewed the literature focused on socioeconomic influences on teen childbearing and suggested directions for future research and practice related to this important indicator of teen sexual health. Methods We conducted an electronic search of Medline, ERIC, PsychLit, and Sociological Abstracts databases for articles published from January 1995 to November 2011. Selected articles from peer-reviewed journals included original quantitative analyses addressing socioeconomic influences on first birth among teen women in the U.S. Articles were abstracted for key information, ranked for quality according to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines, assessed for bias, and synthesized. Results We selected articles with a range of observational study designs. Risk for bias varied across studies. All 12 studies that considered socioeconomic factors as influences on teen childbearing (vs. moderators or mediators of other effects) reported at least one statistically significant association relating low socioeconomic status, underemployment, low income, low education levels, neighborhood disadvantage, neighborhood physical disorder, or neighborhood-level income inequality to teen birth. Few reports included any associations contradicting this pattern. Conclusions This review suggests that unfavorable socioeconomic conditions experienced at the community and family levels contribute to the high teen birth rate in the U.S. Future research into social determinants of sexual health should include multiple levels of measurement whenever possible. Root causes of teen childbearing should be evaluated in various populations and contexts. Interventions that address socioeconomic influences at multiple levels could positively affect large numbers of teens and help eliminate disparities in teen childbearing. PMID:23450881

  2. Furthering the Understanding of Parent–Child Relationships: A Nursing Scholarship Review Series. Part 5: Parent–Adolescent and Teen Parent–Child Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Riesch, Susan K.; Anderson, Lori S.; Pridham, Karen A.; Lutz, Kristin F.; Becker, Patricia T.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this paper is to examine nursing’s contribution to understanding the parent–adolescent and the teen parent–child relationships. CONCLUSION Relationships between parents and adolescents may reflect turmoil and affect adolescents’ health and development. The social and developmental contexts for teen parenting are powerful and may need strengthening. Several interventions to help teen mothers interact sensitively with their infants have been developed and tested. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS Nurse researchers have begun to provide evidence for practitioners to use in caring for families of adolescents and teen parents to acquire interaction skills that, in turn, may promote optimal health and development of the child. PMID:20618633

  3. Tic-related school problems: impact on functioning, accommodations, and interventions.

    PubMed

    Packer, Leslie E

    2005-11-01

    Children with Tourette's syndrome (TS) are statistically overrepresented in special education classes; however, the extent to which tics contribute to such placement is unclear. In this article, the results of a survey of parents or guardians of 71 children and adolescents with TS are described within the broader context of discussing the impact of tics and educational practices. One half of the respondents reported moderate to significant tic-related academic impact, and 48% reported moderate to significant tic-related peer problems. Peer education and in-school counseling were generally not offered nor provided. In the minority of cases where behavioral interventions for tics were reported, contingent aversive consequences were reported to be ineffective or counterproductive, while positive reinforcement for modifying tics reportedly produced some successful results. The identification of research-validated academic accommodations and increased involvement of school psychologists are suggested as necessary and potentially helpful supports for students with TS and their teachers. PMID:16204421

  4. Is my drinking a problem? A community-based alcohol intervention programme post-Haiyan in Tacloban City

    PubMed Central

    Czaicki, Adam Edward; Fabrigas, Gloria; Hall, Julie Lyn

    2015-01-01

    Problem Evidence on alcohol use following disasters is scarce. After Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines we wanted to determine whether there were alcohol-related problems among the disaster survivors and to strengthen the appropriate local health service support in Tacloban City. Context Tacloban City is a highly urbanized city that was one of the areas worst hit by Typhoon Haiyan. Prior to Haiyan there was very little support for people with alcohol problems, and the rehabilitation facility was located about 40 km away. Action A pilot community-based alcohol intervention programme was conducted that included: assessment of the extent of alcohol problems in the community and health-care workers baseline knowledge and skills; training of health-care workers on primary care alcohol intervention provision; and community outreach with post-training supervision. Outcome The alcohol screening found 26 (22%) of those attending health care facilities would benefit from some form of alcohol intervention. Health-care workers knowledge on basic alcohol intervention was low. This was strengthened during the training, and at outreach clinics the trained health-care workers were able to identify people with alcohol problems and provide them with treatment plans. Lessons learnt We learnt that there was a problem with alcohol in Tacloban City and that it was possible to run an alcohol intervention programme in the community using minimal resources. Addressing alcohol-related issues in the community is an important public health intervention. While there is a need for policies and guidelines at the national level, a community-based intervention is possible to establish with referral mechanism to specialized care. Training modules for such programs can be further developed and institutionalized. PMID:26767145

  5. Achieving Consensus for the Design and Delivery of an Online Intervention to Support Midwives in Work-Related Psychological Distress: Results From a Delphi Study

    PubMed Central

    Clyne, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Background Some midwives are known to experience both professional and organizational sources of psychological distress, which can manifest as a result of the emotionally demanding midwifery work, and the traumatic work environments they endure. An online intervention may be one option midwives may engage with in pursuit of effective support. However, the priorities for the development of an online intervention to effectively support midwives in work-related psychological distress have yet to be explored. Objective The aim of this study was to explore priorities in the development of an online intervention to support midwives in work-related psychological distress. Methods A two-round online Delphi study was conducted. This study invited both qualitative and quantitative data from experts recruited via a scoping literature search and social media channels. Results In total, 185 experts were invited to participate in this Delphi study. Of all participants invited to contribute, 35.7% (66/185) completed Round 1 and of those who participated in this first round, 67% (44/66) continued to complete Round 2. Out of 39 questions posed over two rounds, 18 statements (46%) achieved consensus, 21 (54%) did not. Participants were given the opportunity to write any additional comments as free text. In total, 1604 free text responses were collected and categorized into 2446 separate statements of opinion, creating a total of 442 themes. Overall, participants agreed that in order to effectively support midwives in work-related psychological distress, online interventions should make confidentiality and anonymity a high priority, along with 24-hour mobile access, effective moderation, an online discussion forum, and additional legal, educational, and therapeutic components. It was also agreed that midwives should be offered a simple user assessment to identify those people deemed to be at risk of either causing harm to others or experiencing harm themselves, and direct them to

  6. Process evaluation of a problem solving intervention to prevent recurrent sickness absence in workers with common mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Arends, Iris; Bültmann, Ute; Nielsen, Karina; van Rhenen, Willem; de Boer, Michiel R; van der Klink, Jac J L

    2014-01-01

    Common mental disorders (CMDs) are a major cause of sickness absence. Twenty to 30% of the workers who return to work after sickness absence due to CMDs experience recurrent sickness absence. We developed the Stimulating Healthy participation And Relapse Prevention (SHARP)-at work intervention, a problem solving intervention delivered by occupational physicians (OPs), to prevent recurrent sickness absence in this worker population in The Netherlands. A process evaluation was conducted alongside a cluster-randomised controlled trial to (1) evaluate whether the SHARP-at work intervention was implemented according to the protocol and differed from treatment in the control group, and (2) to investigate the relationship between the key elements of the intervention and the effect outcome (i.e. recurrent sickness absence). We collected process data for both the intervention and control group on recruitment, reach, dose delivered, dose received, fidelity, context and satisfaction. Data on recurrent sickness absence was collected through the registry system of the collaborating occupational health service. The study was performed in the Netherlands, and between 2010 and 2012, 154 OPs and 158 participants participated. Compared to the control group, participants in the intervention group more frequently had two or more consultations with the OP (odds ratio [OR] = 3.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2-8.8) and completed more assignments (OR = 33.8, 95% CI = 10.4-109.5) as recommended in the intervention protocol. OPs and participants were satisfied with the intervention and rated it as applicable. Several individual intervention components were linked to the effect outcome. The process evaluation showed that the SHARP-at work intervention was conducted according to the protocol for the majority of the participants and well-received by OPs and participants. Furthermore, the intervention differed from treatment in the control group. Overall, the results provide

  7. An Online Game Approach for Improving Students' Learning Performance in Web-Based Problem-Solving Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Wu, Po-Han; Chen, Chi-Chang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an online game was developed in the form of a competitive board game for conducting web-based problem-solving activities. The participants of the game determined their move by throwing a dice. Each location of the game board corresponds to a gaming task, which could be a web-based information-searching question or a mini-game; the…

  8. BrdsNBz: Sexually Experienced Teens More Likely to Use Sexual Health Text Message Service.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Jessica Fitts

    2015-12-01

    Text messaging services are becoming an increasingly popular way to provide sexual health information to teens, but little is known about who uses such services. This study assessed whether teens at a greater risk for negative sexual health outcomes use a sexual health text message service. A text message service that connects teens with sexual health educators was promoted in six public schools in one state in the Southeast. Students (n = 2,125) in four schools completed an online questionnaire assessing personal risk factors associated with negative sexual health outcomes and use of the text message service. Text message service users (n = 144) were more likely to have had sex, to have been in a relationship, and to come from a lower socioeconomic status background. Users also felt less connected to their schools and were slightly older than nonservice users. When all variables were entered into a logistic regression, only sexual experience was associated with service use. Sexual health text message services are designed to provide information to teens in an effort to prevent negative sexual outcomes. Such services seem to be reaching youth with increased risk of teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease acquisition. This study provides evidence that teens most likely to benefit are also those most likely to use a sexual health text message service. PMID:25889699

  9. Reputation mechanism: From resolution for truthful online auctions to the model of optimal one-gambler problem

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study reputation mechanisms, and show how the notion of reputation can help us in building truthful online auction mechanisms. From the mechanism design prospective, we derive the conditions on and design a truthful online auction mechanism. Moreover, in the case when some agents may lay or cannot have the real knowledge about the other agents reputations, we derive the resolution of the auction, such that the mechanism is truthful. Consequently, we move forward to the optimal one-gambler/one-seller problem, and explain how that problem is refinement of the previously discussed online auction design in the presence of reputation mechanism. In the setting of the optimal one-gambler problem, we naturally rise and solve the specific question: What is an agent's optimal strategy, in order to maximize his revenue? We would like to stress that our analysis goes beyond the scope, which game theory usually discusses under the notion of reputation. We model one-player games, by introducing a new parameter (reputation), which helps us in predicting the agent's behavior, in real-world situations, such as, behavior of a gambler, real-estate dealer, etc.

  10. The impact of Wii Fit intervention on dynamic balance control in children with probable Developmental Coordination Disorder and balance problems.

    PubMed

    Jelsma, Dorothee; Geuze, Reint H; Mombarg, Remo; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C M

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in the performance of children with probable Developmental Coordination Disorder (p-DCD) and balance problems (BP) and typical developing children (TD) on a Wii Fit task and to measure the effect on balance skills after a Wii Fit intervention. Twenty-eight children with BP and 20 TD-children participated in the study. Motor performance was assessed with the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (MABC2), three subtests of the Bruininks Oseretsky Test (BOT2): Bilateral Coordination, Balance and Running Speed & Agility, and a Wii Fit ski slalom test. The TD children and half of the children in the BP group were tested before and after a 6weeks non-intervention period. All children with BP received 6weeks of Wii Fit intervention (with games other than the ski game) and were tested before and afterwards. Children with BP were less proficient than TD children in playing the Wii Fit ski slalom game. Training with the Wii Fit improved their motor performance. The improvement was significantly larger after intervention than after a period of non-intervention. Therefore the change cannot solely be attributed to spontaneous development or test-retest effect. Nearly all children enjoyed participation during the 6weeks of intervention. Our study shows that Wii Fit intervention is effective and is potentially a method to support treatment of (dynamic) balance control problems in children. PMID:24444657

  11. Teen Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... worthless could be warning signs of a mental health problem. Mental health problems are real, painful, and sometimes severe. You ... things that could harm you or others Mental health problems can be treated. To find help, talk ...

  12. Sociotechnical Human Factors Involved in Remote Online Usability Testing of Two eHealth Interventions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Research in the fields of human performance technology and human computer interaction are challenging the traditional macro focus of usability testing arguing for methods that help test moderators assess “use in context” (ie, cognitive skills, usability understood over time) and in authentic “real world” settings. Human factors in these complex test scenarios may impact on the quality of usability results being derived yet there is a lack of research detailing moderator experiences in these test environments. Most comparative research has focused on the impact of the physical environment on results, and rarely on how the sociotechnical elements of the test environment affect moderator and test user performance. Improving our understanding of moderator roles and experiences with conducting “real world” usability testing can lead to improved techniques and strategies Objective To understand moderator experiences of using Web-conferencing software to conduct remote usability testing of 2 eHealth interventions. Methods An exploratory case study approach was used to study 4 moderators’ experiences using Blackboard Collaborate for remote testing sessions of 2 different eHealth interventions. Data collection involved audio-recording iterative cycles of test sessions, collecting summary notes taken by moderators, and conducting 2 90-minute focus groups via teleconference. A direct content analysis with an inductive coding approach was used to explore personal accounts, assess the credibility of data interpretation, and generate consensus on the thematic structure of the results. Results Following the convergence of data from the various sources, 3 major themes were identified: (1) moderators experienced and adapted to unpredictable changes in cognitive load during testing; (2) moderators experienced challenges in creating and sustaining social presence and untangling dialogue; and (3) moderators experienced diverse technical demands, but were able

  13. Special Considerations in Distracted Driving with Teens

    PubMed Central

    Durbin, Dennis R; McGehee, Daniel V; Fisher, Donald; McCartt, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Novice teen drivers have long been known to have an increased risk of crashing, as well as increased tendencies toward unsafe and risky driving behaviors. Teens are unique as drivers for several reasons, many of which have implications specifically in the area of distracted driving. This paper reviews several of these features, including the widespread prevalence of mobile device use by teens, their lack of driving experience, the influence of peer passengers as a source of distraction, the role of parents in influencing teens’ attitudes and behaviors relevant to distracted driving and the impact of laws designed to prevent mobile device use by teen drivers. Recommendations for future research include understanding how engagement in a variety of secondary tasks by teen drivers affects their driving performance or crash risk; understanding the respective roles of parents, peers and technology in influencing teen driver behavior; and evaluating the impact of public policy on mitigating teen crash risk related to driver distraction. PMID:24776228

  14. Cybersex and the E-Teen: What Marriage and Family Therapists Should Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delmonico, David L.; Griffin, Elizabeth J.

    2008-01-01

    Adolescents who use the Internet regularly (the "e-teen") present a new set of challenges for marriage and family therapists. This article introduces marriage and family therapists to (a) the basic technological concepts and unique psychological characteristics of the Internet important in understanding and addressing adolescent online sexual…

  15. Development and pilot of a group skills-and-support intervention for mothers of children with feeding problems.

    PubMed

    Jones, C J; Bryant-Waugh, R

    2012-04-01

    Child feeding problems are often associated with parental factors which may influence and maintain difficulties. This paper reports the development, pilot and preliminary evaluation of a group intervention for mothers of children with feeding problems. Themes for the group were derived from a survey of parents and professionals. Three pilot interventions were conducted in order to make an assessment of the feasibility, acceptability and potential for achieving change in levels of maternal mood, parenting stress and concerns related to feeding. While single case analysis revealed little change in standardised measures of mood and parenting stress, participants valued the social and emotional support offered by the group and reported improvements in concerns and maladaptive behaviours related to feeding. An intervention which provides support and a sense of a shared experience appears to have beneficial effects for mothers of children with feeding problems and therefore, may offer a constructive means of supporting this population. PMID:22245132

  16. Feasibility, Acceptability, and Preliminary Efficacy of an Online HIV Prevention Program for Diverse Young Men who have Sex with Men: The Keep It Up! Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Mustanski, Brian; Garofalo, Robert; Monahan, Colleen; Gratzer, Beau; Andrews, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) are disproportionately infected with HIV/AIDS and there are few prevention programs with published efficacy for this population. This study evaluated the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of an online, interactive, and highly engaging HIV prevention program called Keep It Up! The intervention was designed to be delivered to diverse YMSM upon receiving an HIV negative text result, with the goal for them to “Keep It Up” and stay negative. In a randomized clinical trial, the intervention was compared to an online didactic HIV knowledge condition. The study sample included 102 sexually active YMSM. Participants reported completing online modules in settings that were private and not distracting. Mixed methods data showed intervention participants felt the program was valuable and acceptable. Compared to the control condition, participants in the intervention arm had a 44 % lower rate of unprotected anal sex acts at the 12-week follow-up (p < 0.05). PMID:23673793

  17. Reduced Disparities in Birth Rates Among Teens Aged 15-19 Years - United States, 2006-2007 and 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Romero, Lisa; Pazol, Karen; Warner, Lee; Cox, Shanna; Kroelinger, Charlan; Besera, Ghenet; Brittain, Anna; Fuller, Taleria R; Koumans, Emilia; Barfield, Wanda

    2016-01-01

    counties with higher teen birth rates. State and county data can be used to understand disparities in teen births and implement community-level interventions that address the social and structural conditions associated with high teen birth rates. PMID:27124706

  18. Nutritional Online Information for Cancer Patients: a Randomized Trial of an Internet Communication Plus Social Media Intervention.

    PubMed

    Gnagnarella, Patrizia; Misotti, Alessandro Maria; Santoro, Luigi; Akoumianakis, Demosthenes; Del Campo, Laura; De Lorenzo, Francesco; Lombardo, Claudio; Milolidakis, Giannis; Sullivan, Richard; McVie, John Gordon

    2016-09-01

    We hypothesized that cancer patients using an Internet website would show an improvement in the knowledge about healthy eating habits, and this might be enhanced by social media interaction. A 6-month randomized intervention was set up. Eligible subjects were allocated in intervention (IG) and control groups (CG). IG had access to the website, and CG was provided with printed versions. All enrolled participants filled in Nutrition Questionnaire (NQ), Quality of Life Questionnaire (QoL) and Psychological Distress Inventory (PDI), at baseline and after 6 months. The difference between post- vs pre-questionnaires was calculated. Seventy-four subjects (CG 39; IG 35) completed the study. There was an increase in the score after the intervention in both groups for the NQ, even if not statistically significant. Dividing the IG into three categories, no (NI), low (LI) and high interactions (HI), we found a decreased score (improvement) in the CG (-0.2) and in the HI (-1.7), and an increased score (worsening) in the NI (+3.3) (p = NS) analysing the PDI. We found an increased score in the QoL both in CG and IG (adjusted LSMeans +3.5 and +2.8 points, respectively; p = NS). This study represents an example for support cancer patients. Despite the lack of significant effects, critical points and problems encountered may be of interest to researchers and organization working in the cancer setting. Intervention strategies to support patients during the care process are needed in order to attain the full potential of patient-centred care on cancer outcomes. PMID:25820605

  19. Freeze Frame 2012: A Snapshot of America's Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Alison; Kaye, Kelleen

    2012-01-01

    When it comes to making decisions about sex, teens today are doing far better than they were 20 years ago. Fewer teens are having sex, and among those who are, more teens are using contraception. The happy result is that teen pregnancy and birth rates have declined dramatically. Despite this extraordinary progress, teen pregnancy and childbearing…

  20. When Teens Turn Cyberbullies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strom, Paris S.; Strom, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    Cyber harassment involves using an electronic medium to threaten or harm others. E-mail, chat rooms, cell phones, instant messaging, pagers, text messaging, and online voting booths are tools used to inflict humiliation, fear, and a sense of helplessness. This type of intimidation differs from traditional bullying in several important ways. Unlike…

  1. Coping with Common Period Problems (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse ... to treat primary dysmenorrhea. As with cramps, exercise, hot water bottles, and birth control pills might also ...

  2. Development of Child-Teen Obesity Treatment Service Platform

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kahyun; Lee, Byung Mun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to develop an effective and efficient obesity treatment and management service platform for obese children/teenagers. Methods The integrated smart platform was planned and established through cooperation with service providers such as hospitals and public health centers, obese children/teenagers who constitute the service's user base, and IT development and policy institutions and companies focusing on child-teen obesity management and treatment. Results Based on guidelines on intervention strategies to manage child-teen obesity, we developed two patient/parent mobile applications, one web-monitoring service for medical staff, one mobile application for food-craving endurance, and one mobile application for medical examinations. Conclusions The establishment of the integrated service platform was successfully completed; however, this study was restrictively to the hospital where the pilot program took place. The effectiveness of the proposed platform will be verified in the future in tests involving other organizations. PMID:27525166

  3. [Information retrieval on ethical problems by online consultation of bioethics bibliographic data bases].

    PubMed

    Pizzarelli, S

    1998-01-01

    In an age when the ever-expanding limits of sciences are requiring an adjustment of moral principles and values, the Bioethics file is an essential tool for those who are in need of updated guidelines on bioethical issues. This database--produced by the Kennedy Institute of Ethics (KIE) in collaboration with the National Library of Medicine (NLM)--is distributed online by different hosts and is also available in print version and on CD-ROM. Structure and contents of the online version of the Bioethics file searchable through MEDLARS are described in details. PMID:9810756

  4. A Pre-Post Study on the Appropriateness and Effectiveness of a Web- and Text Messaging-Based Intervention to Reduce Problem Drinking in Emerging Adults

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Michael P; Venzin, Vigeli; Meyer, Christian; John, Ulrich; Gmel, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Background Problem drinking, particularly risky single-occasion drinking (RSOD), also called “binge drinking”, is widespread among adolescents and young adults in most Western countries. Few studies have tested the effectiveness of interventions to reduce RSOD in young people with heterogeneous and particularly lower educational background. Objective To test the appropriateness and initial effectiveness of a combined, individually tailored Web- and text messaging (SMS)–based intervention program to reduce problem drinking in vocational school students. Methods The fully automated program provided: (1) online feedback about an individual’s drinking pattern compared to the drinking norms of an age- and gender-specific reference group, and (2) recurrent individualized SMS messages over a time period of 3 months. Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) analyses were used to investigate the longitudinal courses of the following outcomes over the study period of 3 months: RSOD, alcohol-related problems, mean number of standard drinks per week, and maximum number of standard drinks on an occasion. Results The program was tested in 36 school classes at 7 vocational schools in Switzerland. Regardless of their drinking behavior, 477 vocational school students who owned a mobile phone were invited to participate in the program. Of these, 364 (76.3%) participated in the program. During the intervention period, 23 out of 364 (6.3%) persons unsubscribed from participating in the program. The GEE analyses revealed decreases in the percentage of persons with RSOD from baseline (75.5%, 210/278) to follow-up assessment (67.6%, 188/278, P<.001), in the percentage of persons with alcohol-related problems (20.4%, 57/280 to 14.3%, 40/280, P=.009), and in the mean number of standard drinks per week: 13.4 (SD 15.3) to 11.3 (SD 14.0), P=.002. They also revealed a trend toward a decrease in the mean of the maximum number of drinks consumed on an occasion: 11.3 (SD 10.3) to 10.5 (SD 10

  5. Discoveries: Fiction for Young Teens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped.

    This bibliography lists selected fiction books for the enjoyment of visually or physically disabled sixth through ninth graders. The books extend the literary experience of young teens, while allowing them to glimpse life as it is lived by others and find greater understanding of themselves. The bibliography lists books available on disc, on…

  6. E-Cigarettes (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? E-Cigarettes KidsHealth > For Teens > E-Cigarettes Print A ... Habit en español Los cigarrillos electrónicos What Are E-Cigarettes? E-cigarettes look high tech, so it's ...

  7. Marijuana: Facts for Teens. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This booklet provides teenagers with information concerning the use of marijuana. It is presented in a question/answer format. The following sixteen questions are briefly answered: What is marijuana? How is marijuana used? How long does marijuana stay in the user's body? How many teens smoke marijuana? Why do young people use marijuana? What…

  8. Reaching Out to Gay Teens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caywood, Carolyn

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the need to provide appropriate materials in school libraries that offer support to gay and lesbian teens. Topics addressed include the presentation of role models, in fiction as well as in biographies; religious diversity; confidentiality of circulation records; and censorship issues. (LRW)

  9. Teen Parents and Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, Karen M.; Dorman, Karen A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the personal life stories of women who became mothers while still in their teen years. The focus was on themes that evolved as important in the lives of these women, including family support, partner support, mentor support, economic opportunity, resiliency, optimism, and spirituality. Each of the 22 women…

  10. The International Teen STAR Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaus, Hanna

    The program "Teen STAR (Sexuality Teaching in the context of Adult Responsibility)" begins by helping young people understand the woman's cyclic and the man's constant fertility in order to encourage pre-marital abstinence in adolescents. Students then discover the values of fertility and begin to derive the norms that govern possessing it.…

  11. Embedding Online Problem-Based Learning Case Scenarios in a Distance Education Programme for Specialist Teachers of Children with Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLinden, Mike; McCall, Steve; Hinton, Danielle; Weston, Annette

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on work undertaken within phase 2 of a research study concerned with the use of online problem-based learning (PBL) resources with teachers studying for a specialist qualification through distance education. The principal aim of this phase was to explore how pilot online PBL resources could be effectively embedded within two…

  12. Early elementary school intervention to reduce conduct problems: a randomized trial with Hispanic and non-Hispanic children.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Manuel; Biglan, Anthony; Taylor, Ted K; Gunn, Barbara K; Smolkowski, Keith; Black, Carol; Ary, Dennis V; Fowler, Rollen C

    2002-06-01

    Children's aggressive behavior and reading difficulties during early elementary school years are risk factors for adolescent problem behaviors such as delinquency, academic failure, and substance use. This study determined if a comprehensive intervention that was designed to address both of these risk factors could affect teacher, parent, and observer measures of internalizing and externalizing problems. European American (n = 116) and Hispanic (n = 168) children from 3 communities who were selected for aggressiveness or reading difficulties were randomly assigned to an intervention or no-intervention control condition. Intervention families received parent training, and their children received social behavior interventions and supplementary reading instruction over a 2-year period. At the end of intervention, playground observations showed that treated children displayed less negative social behavior than controls. At the end of a 1-year follow-up, treated children showed less teacher-rated internalizing and less parent-rated coercive and antisocial behavior than controls. The study's limitations and implications for prevention are discussed. PMID:12088139

  13. Assessment Effects in Educational and Psychosocial Intervention Trials: An Important but Often-Overlooked Problem

    PubMed Central

    Song, Mi-Kyung; Ward, Sandra E.

    2015-01-01

    Baseline assessments and repeated measures are an essential part of educational and psychosocial intervention trials, but merely measuring an outcome of interest can modify that outcome, either by the measurement process alone or by interacting with the intervention to strengthen or weaken the intervention effects. Assessment effects can result in biased estimates of intervention effects and may not be controlled by the usual two-group randomized controlled trial design. In this paper, we review the concept of assessment effects and other related phenomena, briefly describe study designs that estimate assessment effects separately from intervention effects and discuss their strengths and limitations, review evidence regarding the strength of assessment effects in intervention trials targeting behavior change, and discuss implications for intervention research. PMID:25728502

  14. Online Pestkoppenstoppen: systematic and theory-based development of a web-based tailored intervention for adolescent cyberbully victims to combat and prevent cyberbullying

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this article is to give an integrative insight into the theoretical and empirical-based development of the Online Pestkoppenstoppen (Stop Bullies Online/Stop Online Bullies). This intervention aims to reduce the number of cyberbully victims and their symptoms of depression and anxiety (program goal), by teaching cyberbully victims how to cope in an adequate and effective manner with cyberbully incidents (program’s outcomes). Method/Design In developing the program the different steps of the Intervention Mapping protocol are systematically used. In this article we describe each step of Intervention Mapping. Sources used for the development were a literature review, a Delphi study among experts, focus group interviews with the target group, and elements from a proven effective anti-bullying program. The result is a fully automated web-based tailored intervention for cyberbully victims (12-15 years) consisting of three web-based advice sessions delivered over three months. The first advice aims to teach participants how behavior is influenced by the thoughts they have, how to recognize and dispute irrational thoughts and how to form rational thoughts. In the second advice, participants will learn about the way bullying emerges, how their behavior influences bullying and how they can use effective coping strategies in order to stop (online) bullying. In the third advice, participants receive feedback and will learn how to use the Internet and mobile phones in a safe manner. Each advice is tailored to the participant’s personal characteristics (e.g., personality, self-efficacy, coping strategies used and (ir)rational thoughts). To ensure implementation of the program after testing it for effectiveness, the intervention was pretested in the target-population and an implementation plan was designed. Finally, we will elaborate on the planned randomized controlled trial in which the intervention will be compared to a general information group

  15. Urban teens and young adults describe drama, disrespect, dating violence and help-seeking preferences.

    PubMed

    Martin, Caitlin Eileen; Houston, Avril Melissa; Mmari, Kristin N; Decker, Michele R

    2012-07-01

    Adolescent dating violence is increasingly recognized as a public health problem. Our qualitative investigation sought input from urban, African-American adolescents at risk for dating violence concerning (Tjaden and Thoennes in Full report of the prevelance, incidence, and consequences of violence against women: findings from the national violence against women survey. US Department of Justice, Washington, DC, 2000) dating violence descriptions, (WHO multi-country study on women's health and domestic violence against women: Summary report of initial results on prevalence, health outcomes and women's responses. World Health Organization, Geneva, 2005) preferences for help-seeking for dating violence, and (Intimate partner violence in the United States. Bureau of Justice Statistics, US Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Washington, DC, 2007) recommendations for a teen dating violence resource center. Four focus groups were conducted with urban, African American adolescents (n = 32) aged 13-24 recruited from an urban adolescent clinic's community outreach partners. Qualitative analysis was conducted. Participants assigned a wide range of meanings for the term "relationship drama", and used dating violence using language not typically heard among adults, e.g., "disrespect". Participants described preferences for turning to family or friends before seeking formal services for dating violence, but reported barriers to their ability to rely on these informal sources. When asked to consider formal services, they described their preferred resource center as confidential and safe, with empathetic, non-judgmental staff. Teens also gave insight into preferred ways to outreach and publicize dating violence resources. Findings inform recommendations for youth-specific tailoring of violence screening and intervention efforts. Current evidence that slang terms, i.e., "drama", lack specificity suggests that they should not be integrated within screening protocols

  16. A Comparison of Taped-Problem Interventions to Increase Math Fact Fluency: Does the Length of Time Delay Affect Student Learning Rates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poncy, Brian C.; Jaspers, Kathryn E.; Hansmann, Paul R.; Bui, Levita; Matthew, William B.

    2015-01-01

    An alternating treatments design with a control condition was used to evaluate and compare the effects of two taped-problem interventions on addition fact fluency. Both taped-problem interventions were identical with the exception of the time delay between the auditory cue of the problem and the answer. One condition used a 2-s delay and the other…

  17. Extended Subject Access to Hypertext Online Documentation. Part III: The Document-Boundaries Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girill, T. R.

    1991-01-01

    This article continues the description of DFT (Document, Find, Theseus), an online documentation system that provides computer-managed on-demand printing of software manuals as well as the interactive retrieval of reference passages. Document boundaries in the hypertext database are discussed, search vocabulary complexities are described, and text…

  18. Learning by Choosing: Fourth Graders Use of an Online Multimedia Tutoring System for Math Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloy, Robert W.; Razzaq, Leena; Edwards, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the use of an online mathematics tutoring system in eight fourth grade classrooms in two Massachusetts communities--a small rural city with a low 2010 Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) math performance rating and a small suburban district with a high 2010 AYP math performance rating. 165 fourth graders completed 11 modules…

  19. Fostering Students' Participation in Online Environments: Focus on Interaction, Communication and Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacharis, Nick Z.

    2009-01-01

    Rapid technological advances in the areas of telecommunications, computer technology and the Internet have made available to tutors and learners in the domain of online learning, a broad array of tools that provide the possibility to facilitate and enhance learning to higher levels of critical reflective thinking. Computer mediated communication…

  20. The Effects of Case Libraries in Supporting Collaborative Problem-Solving in an Online Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tawfik, Andrew A.; Sánchez, Lenny; Saparova, Dinara

    2014-01-01

    Various domains require practitioners to encounter and resolve ill-structured problems using collaborative problem-solving. As such, problem-solving is an essential skill that educators must emphasize to prepare learners for practice. One potential way to support problem-solving is through further investigation of instructional design methods that…