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Sample records for intestinal barrier permeability

  1. Protective effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in intestinal barrier permeability after heterotopic intestinal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Shen, Zhong-Yang; Song, Hong-Li; Yang, Yang; Wu, Ben-Juan; Fu, Nan-Nan; Liu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To explore the protective effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM MSCs) in the small intestinal mucosal barrier following heterotopic intestinal transplantation (HIT) in a rat model. METHODS: BM MSCs were isolated from male Lewis rats by density gradient centrifugation, cultured, and analyzed by flow cytometry. The HIT models were divided into a non-rejection group, saline-treated rejection group (via penile vein), and BM MSC–treated group (via penile vein). Intestinal mucosal barrier injury was estimated by diamine oxidase (DAO) and D-lactic acid (D-LA) expression levels. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (INF-γ), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Ultrastructural change of tight junctions (TJs) was observed under transmission electron microscope. Expression levels of the TJ proteins occludin and zona occludens (ZO)-1, affected by the inflammatory factors, were measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. RESULTS: The pathological score at each time point after surgery indicated significantly less serious injury in the BM MSCs-treated group than in the rejection group (P < 0.05). In the former, graft levels of DAO and D-LA were reduced, and TNF-α and INF-γ production was inhibited (at day 7: 10.6473 ± 0.0710 vs 17.2128 ± 0.4991, P < 0.05; 545.1506 ± 31.9416 vs 810.2637 ± 25.1175, P < 0.05). IL-10 and TGF-β production was increased greatly (at day 7: 125.7773 ± 4.7719 vs 80.3756 ± 2.5866, P < 0.05; 234.5273 ± 9.3980 vs 545.1506 ± 31.9416, P < 0.05). There was increased expression of occludin and ZO-1 protein (at day 7: 0.2674 ± 0.0128 vs 0.1352 ± 0.0142, P < 0.05; at day 5: 0.7189 ± 0.0289 vs 0.4556 ± 0.0242, P < 0.05) and mRNA (at day 7: 0.3860 ± 0.0254 vs 0.1673 ± 0.0369, P < 0.05; at day 5: 0.5727 ± 0.0419 vs 0.3598 ± 0.0242, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: BM MSCs can improve intestinal barrier permeability

  2. The food contaminant deoxynivalenol, decreases intestinal barrier permeability and reduces claudin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Pinton, Philippe; Nougayrede, Jean-Philippe; Del Rio, Juan-Carlos; Moreno, Carolina; Marin, Daniela E.; Ferrier, Laurent; Bracarense, Ana-Paula; Kolf-Clauw, Martine; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2009-05-15

    'The gastrointestinal tract represents the first barrier against food contaminants as well as the first target for these toxicants. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin that commonly contaminates cereals and causes various toxicological effects. Through consumption of contaminated cereals and cereal products, human and pigs are exposed to this mycotoxin. Using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo approaches, we investigated the effects of DON on the intestinal epithelium. We demonstrated that, in intestinal epithelial cell lines from porcine (IPEC-1) or human (Caco-2) origin, DON decreases trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and increases in a time and dose-dependent manner the paracellular permeability to 4 kDa dextran and to pathogenic Escherichia coli across intestinal cell monolayers. In pig explants treated with DON, we also observed an increased permeability of intestinal tissue. These alterations of barrier function were associated with a specific reduction in the expression of claudins, which was also seen in vivo in the jejunum of piglets exposed to DON-contaminated feed. In conclusion, DON alters claudin expression and decreases the barrier function of the intestinal epithelium. Considering that high levels of DON may be present in food or feed, consumption of DON-contaminated food/feed may induce intestinal damage and has consequences for human and animal health.

  3. Breaking down the barriers: the gut microbiome, intestinal permeability and stress-related psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, John R.; Kennedy, Paul J.; Cryan, John F.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Clarke, Gerard; Hyland, Niall P.

    2015-01-01

    The emerging links between our gut microbiome and the central nervous system (CNS) are regarded as a paradigm shift in neuroscience with possible implications for not only understanding the pathophysiology of stress-related psychiatric disorders, but also their treatment. Thus the gut microbiome and its influence on host barrier function is positioned to be a critical node within the brain-gut axis. Mounting preclinical evidence broadly suggests that the gut microbiota can modulate brain development, function and behavior by immune, endocrine and neural pathways of the brain-gut-microbiota axis. Detailed mechanistic insights explaining these specific interactions are currently underdeveloped. However, the concept that a “leaky gut” may facilitate communication between the microbiota and these key signaling pathways has gained traction. Deficits in intestinal permeability may underpin the chronic low-grade inflammation observed in disorders such as depression and the gut microbiome plays a critical role in regulating intestinal permeability. In this review we will discuss the possible role played by the gut microbiota in maintaining intestinal barrier function and the CNS consequences when it becomes disrupted. We will draw on both clinical and preclinical evidence to support this concept as well as the key features of the gut microbiota which are necessary for normal intestinal barrier function. PMID:26528128

  4. Effects of Soybean Agglutinin on Intestinal Barrier Permeability and Tight Junction Protein Expression in Weaned Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Qin, Guixin; Sun, Zewei; Che, Dongsheng; Bao, Nan; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2011-01-01

    This study was developed to provide further information on the intestinal barrier permeability and the tight junction protein expression in weaned piglets fed with different levels of soybean agglutinin (SBA). Twenty-five weaned crossbred barrows (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire) were selected and randomly allotted to five groups, each group with five replicates. The piglets in the control group were not fed with leguminous products. 0.05, 0.1, 0.15 and 0.2% SBA was added to the control diet to form four experimental diets, respectively. After the experimental period of 7 days (for each group), all the piglets were anesthetized with excess procaine and slaughtered. The d-lactic acid in plasma and the Ileal mucosa diamine oxidase (DAO) was analyzed to observe the change in the intestinal permeability. The tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1 in the jejunum tissue distribution and relative expression were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western Blot. The results illustrated that a high dose of SBA (0.1–0.2%) could increase the intestinal permeability and reduce piglet intestinal epithelial tight junction protein occludin or ZO-1 expression, while low dose of SBA (0.05% of total diet) had no significant affects. The contents of DAO, d-lactic acid, occludin or ZO-1, had a linear relationship with the SBA levels (0–0.2%) in diets. The high dose SBA (0.1–0.2%) could increase the intestinal permeability and reduce piglet intestinal epithelial tight junction protein occludin or ZO-1 expression, while low dose of SBA (0.05% of total diet) had no affects. PMID:22272087

  5. Low Dosage of Chitosan Supplementation Improves Intestinal Permeability and Impairs Barrier Function in Mice.

    PubMed

    Guan, Guiping; Wang, Hongbing; Peng, Hanhui; Li, Guanya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore relationships between low dose dietary supplementation with chitosan (COS) and body weight, feed intake, intestinal barrier function, and permeability in mice. Twenty mice were randomly assigned to receive an unadulterated control diet (control group) or a dietary supplementation with 30 mg/kg dose of chitosan (COS group) for two weeks. Whilst no significant differences were found between the conditions for body weight or food and water intake, mice in the COS group had an increased serum D-lactate content (P < 0.05) and a decreased jejunal diamine oxidase (DAO) activity (P < 0.05). Furthermore, mice in COS group displayed a reduced expression of occludin and ZO-1 (P < 0.05) and a reduced expression of occludin in the ileum (P < 0.05). The conclusion drawn from these findings showed that although 30 mg/kg COS-supplemented diet had no effect on body weight or feed intake in mice, this dosage may compromise intestinal barrier function and permeability. This research will contribute to the guidance on COS supplements. PMID:27610376

  6. Low Dosage of Chitosan Supplementation Improves Intestinal Permeability and Impairs Barrier Function in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hanhui; Li, Guanya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore relationships between low dose dietary supplementation with chitosan (COS) and body weight, feed intake, intestinal barrier function, and permeability in mice. Twenty mice were randomly assigned to receive an unadulterated control diet (control group) or a dietary supplementation with 30 mg/kg dose of chitosan (COS group) for two weeks. Whilst no significant differences were found between the conditions for body weight or food and water intake, mice in the COS group had an increased serum D-lactate content (P < 0.05) and a decreased jejunal diamine oxidase (DAO) activity (P < 0.05). Furthermore, mice in COS group displayed a reduced expression of occludin and ZO-1 (P < 0.05) and a reduced expression of occludin in the ileum (P < 0.05). The conclusion drawn from these findings showed that although 30 mg/kg COS-supplemented diet had no effect on body weight or feed intake in mice, this dosage may compromise intestinal barrier function and permeability. This research will contribute to the guidance on COS supplements. PMID:27610376

  7. Contributions of altered permeability of intestinal barrier and defecation behavior to toxicity formation from graphene oxide in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiuli; Yin, Li; Li, Xing; Tang, Meng; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Dayong

    2013-09-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been extensively studied for potential biomedical applications. Meanwhile, potential GO toxicity arises in both biomedical applications and non-biomedical products where environmental exposures may occur. In the present study, we examined the potential adverse effects of GO and the underlying mechanism using nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as the assay system. We compared the in vivo effects of GO between acute exposure and prolonged exposure, and found that prolonged exposure to 0.5-100 mg L-1 of GO caused damage on functions of both primary (intestine) and secondary (neuron and reproductive organ) targeted organs. In the intestine, ROS production was significantly correlated with the formation of adverse effects on functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs. GO could be translocated into intestinal cells with loss of microvilli, and distributed to be adjacent to or surrounding mitochondria. Prolonged exposure to GO resulted in a hyper-permeable state of the intestinal barrier, an increase in mean defecation cycle length, and alteration of genes required for intestinal development and defecation behavior. Thus, our data suggest that prolonged exposure to GO may cause potential risk to environmental organisms after release into the environment. GO toxicity may be due to the combinational effects of oxidative stress in the intestinal barrier, enhanced permeability of the biological barrier, and suppressed defecation behavior in C. elegans.Graphene oxide (GO) has been extensively studied for potential biomedical applications. Meanwhile, potential GO toxicity arises in both biomedical applications and non-biomedical products where environmental exposures may occur. In the present study, we examined the potential adverse effects of GO and the underlying mechanism using nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as the assay system. We compared the in vivo effects of GO between acute exposure and prolonged exposure, and found that prolonged

  8. The feed contaminant deoxynivalenol affects the intestinal barrier permeability through inhibition of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Awad, Wageha A; Zentek, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) has critical health effects if the contaminated grains consumed by humans or animals. DON can have negative effects on the active transport of glucose and amino acids in the small intestine of chickens. As the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated, the present study was performed to delineate more precisely the effects of cycloheximide (protein synthesis inhibitor, CHX) and DON on the intestinal absorption of nutrients. This was to confirm whether DON effects on nutrient absorption are due to an inhibition of protein synthesis. Changes in ion transport and barrier function were assessed by short-circuit current (Isc) and transepithelial ion conductance (Gt) in Ussing chambers. Addition of D-glucose or L-glutamine to the luminal side of the isolated mucosa of the jejunum increased (P < 0.001) the Isc compared with basal conditions in the control tissues. However, the Isc was not increased by the glucose or glutamine addition after pre-incubation of tissues with DON or CHX. Furthermore, both DON and CHX reduced Gt, indicating that the intestinal barrier is compromised and consequently induced a greater impairment of the barrier function. The remarkable similarity between the activity of CHX and DON on nutrient uptake is consistent with their common ability to inhibit protein synthesis. It can be concluded that the decreases in transport activity by CHX was evident in this study using the chicken as experimental model. Similarly, DON has negative effects on the active transport of some nutrients, and these can be explained by its influence on protein synthesis. PMID:24888376

  9. Intestinal and Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability of Ginkgolides and Bilobalide: In Vitro and In Vivo Approaches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study intestinal and blood brain barrier (BBB) transport of ginkgolides A, B, C, J and bilobalide, isolated from Ginkgo biloba (Family-Ginkgoaceae), was evaluated in Caco-2 and MDR1-MDCK cell monolayer models. Transepithelial transport was examined for 2 hours in both absorptive and secretor...

  10. Cutaneous thermal injury alters macromolecular permeability of rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Carter, E A; Tompkins, R G; Schiffrin, E; Burke, J F

    1990-03-01

    The intestinal epithelium normally provides a barrier function that prevents absorption of potentially harmful materials from the intestinal lumen. It has been postulated but never demonstrated that a cutaneous thermal injury will result in increased small-intestinal permeability. In a standardized 20% body surface area full-thickness scald injury, with polyethylene glycol 3350 and horseradish peroxidase used as permeability probes, small-intestinal permeability was examined regionally in an everted intestinal sac model. In the normal animals, the upper (proximal) and lower (distal) small intestine were less permeable to these probes than the middle segment. Within 6 hours after the injury, an increase in the mucosal uptake and transmural permeability was seen in all three small-intestinal segments; the most dramatic increase in permeability occurred in the ileum, p less than 0.01. The maximum increase in permeability was seen at 18 hours, and permeability was normal by 72 hours after the injury. This increase in intestinal permeability may represent a transient failure of the intestinal barrier function and may allow absorption of potentially toxic macromolecules from the intestinal lumen into the portal circulation early after thermal injury. Absorption of these macromolecules, such as endotoxin, may be potentially harmful by direct toxic actions or potentially helpful by activation of the immune system. PMID:2309150

  11. Bacterial translocation and in vivo assessment of intestinal barrier permeability in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) with and without soyabean meal-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mosberian-Tanha, Peyman; Øverland, Margareth; Landsverk, Thor; Reveco, Felipe E; Schrama, Johan W; Roem, Andries J; Agger, Jane W; Mydland, Liv T

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this experiment was to evaluate the intestinal barrier permeability in vivo in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed increasing levels of soyabean meal (SBM). The relationship between SBM-induced enteritis (SBMIE) and the permeability markers was also investigated. Our results showed that the mean score of morphological parameters was significantly higher as a result of 37·5 % SBM inclusion in the diet, while the scores of fish fed 25 % SBM or lower were not different from those of the fish meal-fed controls (P < 0·05). SBMIE was found in the distal intestine (DI) in 18 % of the fish (eleven of sixty): ten in the 37·5 % SBM-fed group and one in the 25 % SBM-fed group. Sugar markers in plasma showed large variation among individuals probably due to variation in feed intake. We found, however, a significant linear increase in the level of plasma d-lactate with increasing SBM inclusion level (P < 0·0001). Plasma concentration of endotoxin was not significantly different in groups with or without SBMIE. Some individual fish showed high values of endotoxin in blood, but the same individuals did not show any bacterial translocation. Plasma bacterial DNA was detected in 28 % of the fish with SBMIE, and 8 % of non-SBMIE fish (P = 0·07). Plasma concentration of d-lactate was significantly higher in fish with SBMIE (P < 0·0001). To conclude, SBMIE in the DI of rainbow trout was associated with an increase in bacterial translocation and plasma d-lactate concentration, suggesting that these permeability markers can be used to evaluate intestinal permeability in vivo. PMID:27547389

  12. Small intestinal permeability in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Luzia; Ramminger, Sara; Haas, Verena; Postrach, Elisa; Werich, Martina; Fischer, André; Koller, Michael; Swidsinski, Alexander; Bereswill, Stefan; Lochs, Herbert; Schulzke, Jörg‐Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract It is not yet clear whether intestinal mucosal permeability changes with advancing age in humans. This question is of high importance for drug and nutrition approaches for older adults. Our main objective was to answer the question if small intestinal barrier integrity deteriorates with healthy aging. We conducted a cross‐sectional study including the pooled data of 215 nonsmoking healthy adults (93 female/122 male), 84 of whom were aged between 60 and 82 years. After a 12‐h fast, all participants ingested 10 g of lactulose and 5 g of mannitol. Urine was collected for 5 h afterwards and analyzed for test sugars. The permeability index (PI = lactulose/mannitol) was used to assess small intestinal permeability. Low‐grade inflammation defined by high‐sensitivity C‐reactive protein ≥1 mL/L and kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate) were determined in the older age group. The PI was similar in older compared to younger adults (P =0.887). However, the urinary recovery of lactulose and mannitol was lower in the older adults and this change was neither associated with urinary volume nor glomerular filtration rate. The PI was not significantly correlated with low‐grade inflammation or presence of noninsulin‐dependent type 2 diabetes. However, it significantly deteriorated in the copresence of both conditions compared to low‐grade inflammation alone (P =0.043) or type 2 diabetes alone (P =0.015). Small intestinal mucosal barrier does not deteriorate with age per se. But low‐grade inflammation coupled with minor disease challenges, such as type 2 diabetes, can compromise the small intestinal barrier. PMID:24771689

  13. Intestinal permeability defects: Is it time to treat?

    PubMed Central

    Odenwald, Matthew A.; Turner, Jerrold R.

    2013-01-01

    An essential role of the intestinal epithelium is to separate luminal contents from the interstitium, a function primarily determined by the integrity of the epithelium and the tight junction that seals the paracellular space. Intestinal tight junctions are selectively-permeable, and intestinal permeability can be increased physiologically in response to luminal nutrients or pathologically by mucosal immune cells and cytokines, the enteric nervous system, and pathogens. Compromised intestinal barrier function is associated with an array of clinical conditions, both intestinal and systemic. While most available data are correlative, some studies support a model where cycles of increased intestinal permeability, intestinal immune activation, and subsequent immune-mediated barrier loss contribute to disease progression. This model is applicable to intestinal and systemic diseases. However, it has not been proven and both mechanistic and therapeutic studies are ongoing. Nevertheless, the correlation between increased intestinal permeability and disease has caught the attention of the public, leading to a rise in popularity of the diagnosis of “leaky gut syndrome,” which encompasses a range of systemic disorders. Proponents claim that barrier restoration will cure underlying disease, but this has not been demonstrated in clinical trials. Moreover, human and mouse studies show that intestinal barrier loss alone is insufficient to initiate disease. It is therefore uncertain if increased permeability in these patients is a cause or effect of the underlying disorder. Although drug targets that may mediate barrier restoration have been proposed, none have been proven effective. As such, current treatments for barrier dysfunction should target the underlying disease. PMID:23851019

  14. Nutritional Keys for Intestinal Barrier Modulation

    PubMed Central

    De Santis, Stefania; Cavalcanti, Elisabetta; Mastronardi, Mauro; Jirillo, Emilio; Chieppa, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal tract represents the largest interface between the external environment and the human body. Nutrient uptake mostly happens in the intestinal tract, where the epithelial surface is constantly exposed to dietary antigens. Since inflammatory response toward these antigens may be deleterious for the host, a plethora of protective mechanisms take place to avoid or attenuate local damage. For instance, the intestinal barrier is able to elicit a dynamic response that either promotes or impairs luminal antigens adhesion and crossing. Regulation of intestinal barrier is crucial to control intestinal permeability whose increase is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions. The cross talk among bacteria, immune, and dietary factors is able to modulate the mucosal barrier function, as well as the intestinal permeability. Several nutritional products have recently been proposed as regulators of the epithelial barrier, even if their effects are in part contradictory. At the same time, the metabolic function of the microbiota generates new products with different effects based on the dietary content. Besides conventional treatments, novel therapies based on complementary nutrients are now growing. Fecal therapy has been recently used for the clinical treatment of refractory Clostridium difficile infection instead of the classical antibiotic therapy. In the present review, we will outline the epithelial response to nutritional components derived from dietary intake and microbial fermentation focusing on the consequent effects on the integrity of the epithelial barrier. PMID:26697008

  15. Genetic aspects of intestinal permeability in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Ken; Maiden, Laurence; Bjarnason, Ingvar

    2004-01-01

    There is a long-standing belief that disruption of the intestinal barrier function may lead to systemic and local intestinal disease. The role of increased intestinal permeability in Crohn's disease is reviewed here. What is not in doubt is that intestinal permeability in patients with Crohn's disease is increased proportional to disease activity; it can be used to predict clinical relapse of disease and prognosis; and a small proportion of first-degree relatives have increased intestinal permeability. This last finding has been subject to much speculation. In particular it has been suggested that it represents a genetically determined abnormality. If so it might play an important pathogenic process in the disease. However this permeability change in relatives does not conform to a classical inheritance pattern and in some studies it is found in the patients' spouses. This suggests an environmental cause for the changes. However proponents of an environmental factor have been singularly inactive in attempting to identify this agent(s). In view of recent research it seems likely that the increased intestinal permeability in relatives of Crohn's patients may be secondary to sub-clinical intestinal inflammation. This inflammation conforms to an inherited additive trait. The genetic basis for this inflammation is being studied. PMID:15669640

  16. Validation of UHPLC-MS/MS methods for the determination of kaempferol and its metabolite 4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid, and application to in vitro blood-brain barrier and intestinal drug permeability studies.

    PubMed

    Moradi-Afrapoli, Fahimeh; Oufir, Mouhssin; Walter, Fruzsina R; Deli, Maria A; Smiesko, Martin; Zabela, Volha; Butterweck, Veronika; Hamburger, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Sedative and anxiolytic-like properties of flavonoids such as kaempferol and quercetin, and of some of their intestinal metabolites, have been demonstrated in pharmacological studies. However, routes of administration were shown to be critical for observing in vivo activity. Therefore, the ability to cross intestinal and blood-brain barriers was assessed in cell-based models for kaempferol (KMF), and for the major intestinal metabolite of KMF, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPAA). Intestinal transport studies were performed with Caco-2 cells, and blood-brain barrier transport studies with an immortalized monoculture human model and a primary triple-co-culture rat model. UHPLC-MS/MS methods for KMF and 4-HPAA in Ringer-HEPES buffer and in Hank's balanced salt solution were validated according to industry guidelines. For all methods, calibration curves were fitted by least-squares quadratic regression with 1/X(2) as weighing factor, and mean coefficients of determination (R(2)) were >0.99. Data obtained with all barrier models showed high intestinal and blood-brain barrier permeation of KMF, and no permeability of 4-HPAA, when compared to barrier integrity markers. PMID:27281582

  17. Probiotic bacteria and intestinal epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Ohland, Christina L; Macnaughton, Wallace K

    2010-06-01

    The intestinal tract is a diverse microenvironment where more than 500 species of bacteria thrive. A single layer of epithelium is all that separates these commensal microorganisms and pathogens from the underlying immune cells, and thus epithelial barrier function is a key component in the arsenal of defense mechanisms required to prevent infection and inflammation. The epithelial barrier consists of a dense mucous layer containing secretory IgA and antimicrobial peptides as well as dynamic junctional complexes that regulate permeability between cells. Probiotics are live microorganisms that confer benefit to the host and that have been suggested to ameliorate or prevent diseases including antibiotic-associated diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Probiotics likely function through enhancement of barrier function, immunomodulation, and competitive adherence to the mucus and epithelium. This review summarizes the evidence about effects of the many available probiotics with an emphasis on intestinal barrier function and the mechanisms affected by probiotics. PMID:20299599

  18. Intestinal permeability and contractility in murine colitis.

    PubMed Central

    van Meeteren, M E; van Bergeijk, J D; van Dijk, A P; Tak, C J; Meijssen, M A; Zijlstra, F J

    1998-01-01

    We developed an in vitro organ bath method to measure permeability and contractility simultaneously in murine intestinal segments. To investigate whether permeability and contractility are correlated and influenced by mucosal damage owing to inflammation, BALB/c mice were exposed to a 10% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) solution for 8 days to induce colitis. The effect of pharmacologically induced smooth muscle relaxation and contraction on permeability was tested in vitro. Regional permeability differences were observed in both control and 10% DSS-treated mice. Distal colon segments were less permeable to 3H-mannitol and 14C-PEG 400 molecules compared with proximal colon and ileum. Intestinal permeability in control vs. 10% DSS mice was not altered, although histologic inflammation score and IFN-gamma pro-inflammatory cytokine levels were significantly increased in proximal and distal colon. IL-1beta levels were enhanced in these proximal and distal segments, but not significantly different from controls. Any effect of pharmacologically induced contractility on intestinal permeability could not be observed. In conclusion, intestinal permeability and contractility are not correlated in this model of experimentally induced colitis in mice. Although simultaneous measurement in a physiological set-up is possible, this method has to be further validated. PMID:9705603

  19. Intestinal permeability in children/adolescents with functional dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An altered intestinal mucosal barrier has been demonstrated in subsets of patients with IBS and FAP and may be an additional biological factor contributing to symptom generation in children with FD. The objective of this study was to determine if intestinal permeability is increased in children/adolescents with functional dyspepsia (FD) and whether intestinal permeability is correlated with mucosal inflammation and/or symptoms of anxiety or depression in this population. Methods A sugar absorption test was performed in 19 patients with FD and 19 controls. Anxiety and depression were assessed in both groups utilizing a standard questionnaire. In FD patients, duodenal mean and peak mast cell and eosinophil densities were determined. Results Intestinal permeability as measured by the sugar absorption test did not differ between children with FD and controls. In children with FD, there was no correlation between permeability and mast cell density, eosinophil density, anxiety scores, or depression scores, respectively. Conclusions Pediatric FD does not appear to be associated with increased small bowel intestinal permeability, however, there are some limitations to the current study. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT00363597. PMID:24886078

  20. Intestinal inflammation and mucosal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Sánchez de Medina, Fermín; Romero-Calvo, Isabel; Mascaraque, Cristina; Martínez-Augustin, Olga

    2014-12-01

    Intestinal mucosal barrier function is the capacity of the intestine to provide adequate containment of luminal microorganisms and molecules while preserving the ability to absorb nutrients. The central element is the epithelial layer, which physically separates the lumen and the internal milieu and is in charge of vectorial transport of ions, nutrients, and other substances. The secretion of mucus-forming mucins, sIgA, and antimicrobial peptides reinforces the mucosal barrier on the extraepithelial side, while a variety of immune cells contributes to mucosal defense in the inner side. Thus, the mucosal barrier is of physical, biochemical, and immune nature. In addition, the microbiota may be viewed as part of this system because of the mutual influence occurring between the host and the luminal microorganisms. Alteration of the mucosal barrier function with accompanying increased permeability and/or bacterial translocation has been linked with a variety of conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease. Genetic and environmental factors may converge to evoke a defective function of the barrier, which in turn may lead to overt inflammation of the intestine as a result of an exacerbated immune reaction toward the microbiota. According to this hypothesis, inflammatory bowel disease may be both precipitated and treated by either stimulation or downregulation of the different elements of the mucosal barrier, with the outcome depending on timing, the cell type affected, and other factors. In this review, we cover briefly the elements of the barrier and their involvement in functional defects and the resulting phenotype. PMID:25222662

  1. The complex task of measuring intestinal permeability in basic and clinical science.

    PubMed

    Galipeau, H J; Verdu, E F

    2016-07-01

    Intestinal permeability is a key feature of intestinal barrier function. Altered intestinal permeability is described in many chronic diseases and may be a risk factor for disease development and a target for emerging therapeutics. Thus, reliable and sensitive methods to measure intestinal permeability in both the clinical and preclinical setting are needed. There is currently a large array of tests to choose from, each with advantages and disadvantages. When possible, a combination of methods should be used. The choice of tests should be based on a deep understanding of intestinal barrier physiology and the recognition of their limitations. This mini-review will highlight the advantages and limitations associated with intestinal permeability tests and will identify current problems in the field and how they can be addressed in the future. PMID:27339216

  2. Mechanisms of Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yoseph, Benyam P; Klingensmith, Nathan J; Liang, Zhe; Breed, Elise R; Burd, Eileen M; Mittal, Rohit; Dominguez, Jessica A; Petrie, Benjamin; Ford, Mandy L; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2016-07-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction is thought to contribute to the development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in sepsis. Although there are similarities in clinical course following sepsis, there are significant differences in the host response depending on the initiating organism and time course of the disease, and pathways of gut injury vary widely in different preclinical models of sepsis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the timecourse and mechanisms of intestinal barrier dysfunction are similar in disparate mouse models of sepsis with similar mortalities. FVB/N mice were randomized to receive cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham laparotomy, and permeability was measured to fluoresceinisothiocyanate conjugated-dextran (FD-4) six to 48 h later. Intestinal permeability was elevated following CLP at all timepoints measured, peaking at 6 to 12 h. Tight junction proteins claudin 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 13, and 15, Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A), occludin, and ZO-1 were than assayed by Western blot, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry 12 h after CLP to determine potential mechanisms underlying increases in intestinal permeability. Claudin 2 and JAM-A were increased by sepsis, whereas claudin-5 and occludin were decreased by sepsis. All other tight junction proteins were unchanged. A further timecourse experiment demonstrated that alterations in claudin-2 and occludin were detectable as early as 1 h after the onset of sepsis. Similar experiments were then performed in a different group of mice subjected to Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Mice with pneumonia had an increase in intestinal permeability similar in timecourse and magnitude to that seen in CLP. Similar changes in tight junction proteins were seen in both models of sepsis although mice subjected to pneumonia also had a marked decrease in ZO-1 not seen in CLP. These results indicate that two disparate, clinically relevant models of sepsis

  3. Permeability Barrier Generation in the Martian Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schools, Joe; Montési, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Permeability barriers develop when a magma produced in the interior of a planet rises into the cooler lithosphere and crystallizes more rapidly than the lithosphere can deform (Sparks and Parmentier, 1991). Crystallization products may then clog the porous network in which melt is propagating, reducing the permeability to almost zero, i.e., forming a permeability barrier. Subsequent melts cannot cross the barrier. Permeability barriers have been useful to explain variations in crustal thickness at mid-ocean ridges on Earth (Magde et al., 1997; Hebert and Montési, 2011; Montési et al., 2011). We explore here under what conditions permeability barriers may form on Mars.We use the MELTS thermodynamic calculator (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995; Ghiorso et al., 2002; Asimow et al., 2004) in conjunction with estimated Martian mantle compositions (Morgan and Anders, 1979; Wänke and Dreibus, 1994; Lodders and Fegley, 1997; Sanloup et al., 1999; Taylor 2013) to model the formation of permeability barriers in the lithosphere of Mars. In order to represent potential past and present conditions of Mars, we vary the lithospheric thickness, mantle potential temperature (heat flux), oxygen fugacity, and water content.Our results show that permeability layers can develop in the thermal boundary layer of the simulated Martian lithosphere if the mantle potential temperature is higher than ~1500°C. The various Martian mantle compositions yield barriers in the same locations, under matching variable conditions. There is no significant difference in barrier location over the range of accepted Martian oxygen fugacity values. Water content is the most significant influence on barrier development as it reduces the temperature of crystallization, allowing melt to rise further into the lithosphere. Our lower temperature and thicker lithosphere model runs, which are likely the most similar to modern Mars, show no permeability barrier generation. Losing the possibility of having a permeability

  4. Sodium butyrate protects the intestinal barrier function in peritonitic mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaofeng; Song, Huimin; Wang, Yunlei; Sheng, Yingmo; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Peritonitis is a commonly seen disease with high morbidity and mortality. It is prevalently considered that the impaired intestinal barrier during peritonitis is the access point of gut microbes into the blood system, and acts as the engine of the following systemic infection. In our previous study, we found that Sodium Butyrate (NaB) was protective on intestinal barrier function. In this study, we aim to evaluate the effects of NaB on overwhelming infection animal models of peritonitis. Methods: Mouse cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model was used to study the effects of NaB on the intestinal barrier. Experimental animals were fed of NaB by gavage. Post-CLP mortality, gut permeability and intestinal histological alterations were studied. Results: Gastrointestinal NaB pharmacodynamics profiles after medication were studied. Measurements of NaB concentration in chyme showed significantly higher intestinal concentration of NaB in the NaB treated group than that of the control group. CLP-induced mortality was significantly decreased by oral NaB treatments. Gut permeability was largely increased after CLP, which was partially prevented by NaB feeding. Histological study showed that intestinal, especially ileal injury following peritonitis was substantially alleviated by NaB treatments. Moreover, tissue regeneration was also prompted by NaB. Conclusion: NaB has a potential protective effect on intestinal barrier function in peritonitis. PMID:26064302

  5. Intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation following small bowel transplantation in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, D.; Hurlbut, D.; Zhong, R.; Wang, P.Z.; Chen, H.F.; Garcia, B.; Behme, R.; Stiller, C.; Duff, J. )

    1991-08-01

    In addition to its role in absorbing nutrients, the intestinal mucosa provides an important barrier against toxins and bacteria in the bowel lumen. The present study evaluated gut barrier function following orthotopic (in continuity) intestinal grafting in rats. Graft histology, intestinal permeability, and bacterial translocation to the grafted mesenteric lymph nodes, the host's liver, and the host's spleen were assessed on the 3rd, 5th, and 7th postoperative days. The study group received no immunosuppression after allotransplantation. The two control groups included rats with isografts and rats with cyclosporine-treated allografts. On the 7th POD, the study animals had moderate transmural inflammation due to rejection, with normal histology in the isografts and CsA-treated allografts; increased intestinal permeability, measured by urinary excretion of oral 51Cr-EDTA (P less than 0.01); and increased number of bacteria in the MLN and spleen (P less than 0.05). The number of bacteria in the MLN and spleen of the study group positively correlated with the changes in intestinal permeability (P less than 0.05). Rejection of the orthotopic intestinal graft leads to increased intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation from the lumen of the graft to the host's reticuloendothelial system. Measures to improve gut barrier function and antibiotic therapy during rejection episodes may help reduce the incidence of septic complications after intestinal grafting.

  6. Claudins, dietary milk proteins, and intestinal barrier regulation.

    PubMed

    Kotler, Belinda M; Kerstetter, Jane E; Insogna, Karl L

    2013-01-01

    The family of claudin proteins plays an important role in regulating the intestinal barrier by modulating the permeability of tight junctions. The impact of dietary protein on claudin biology has not been studied extensively. Whey proteins have been reported to improve intestinal barrier function, but their mechanism of action is not clear. Recent studies, however, have demonstrated increased intestinal claudin expression in response to milk protein components. Reviewed here are new findings suggesting that whey-protein-derived transforming growth factor β transcriptionally upregulates claudin-4 expression via a Smad-4-dependent pathway. These and other data, including limited clinical studies, are summarized below and, in the aggregate, suggest a therapeutic role for whey protein in diseases of intestinal barrier dysfunction, perhaps, in part, by regulating claudin expression. PMID:23282252

  7. Biomimetic PVPA in vitro model for estimation of the intestinal drug permeability using fasted and fed state simulated intestinal fluids.

    PubMed

    Naderkhani, Elenaz; Vasskog, Terje; Flaten, Gøril Eide

    2015-06-20

    A prerequisite for successful oral drug therapy is the drug's ability to cross the gastrointestinal barrier. Considering the increasing number of new chemical entities in modern drug discovery, reliable and fast in vitro models are required for early and efficient prediction of intestinal permeability. To mimic the intestinal environment, use of biorelevant media may provide valuable information on in vivo drug permeation. The present study aims at improving the novel biomimetic phospholipid vesicle-based permeation assay's (PVPAbiomimetic) biorelevance by investigating the applicability of the biorelevant media; fasted state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF) and fed state simulated intestinal fluid (FeSSIF). The FaSSIF and FeSSIF's influence on the permeability of the model drugs acyclovir, indomethacin, griseofulvin and nadolol was then assessed. The barriers' robustness in terms of storage stability was also evaluated. The barriers were found to maintain their integrity in presence of FaSSIF and FeSSIF. The model drugs showed changes in permeability in presence of the different simulated intestinal fluids that were in agreement with previous reports. Moreover, the barrier showed improved storage stability by maintaining its integrity for 6months. Altogether, this study moves the PVPAbiomimetic an important step towards a better in vitro permeability model for use in drug development. PMID:25840125

  8. Enhanced intestinal permeability to 51Cr-labeled EDTA in dogs with small intestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Hall, E J; Batt, R M

    1990-01-01

    Intestinal permeability in dogs with small intestinal disease was measured by quantitation of 24-hour urinary excretion of 51Cr-labeled EDTA following intragastric administration. Permeability was high in dogs with a variety of naturally acquired small intestinal diseases including wheat-sensitive enteropathy of Irish Setters, small intestinal bacterial over-growth, and giardiasis, and permeability was decreased after successful treatment. These findings indicate that the assessment of intestinal permeability may be a useful technique for detecting small intestinal disease and for monitoring the efficacy of treatment in dogs. PMID:2104825

  9. Large intestine permeability is increased in patients with compensated liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Pijls, Kirsten E; Koek, Ger H; Elamin, Elhaseen E; de Vries, Hanne; Masclee, Ad A M; Jonkers, Daisy M A E

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction, facilitating translocation of bacteria and bacterial products, plays an important role in the pathophysiology of liver cirrhosis and its complications. Increased intestinal permeability has been found in patients with liver cirrhosis, but data on small and large intestine permeability and tight junctions (TJs) in patients with compensated cirrhosis are scarce. We aimed to investigate both small and large intestine permeability in patients with stable compensated cirrhosis compared with healthy controls and evaluated the expression of TJ proteins in mucosal biopsies at duodenal and sigmoid level. Intestinal permeability was assessed in 26 patients with compensated cirrhosis and 27 matched controls using a multisugar test. Duodenal and sigmoid biopsies were available from a subgroup for analyses of gene transcription and expression of key TJ proteins by qRT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. Median 0-5-h urinary sucrose excretion and lactulose/rhamnose ratio were comparable between patients with compensated cirrhosis and controls, whereas 5-24-h urinary sucralose/erythritol ratio was increased in these patients. Downregulation of gene transcription was found for claudin-3 in duodenal biopsies and claudin-4 in sigmoid biopsies, and at the protein level occludin expression was significantly increased in both duodenal and sigmoid biopsies. This study shows that gastroduodenal and small intestine permeability are not altered, whereas large intestine permeability is increased in patients with stable compensated cirrhosis. Only limited alterations were found regarding the expression of TJ proteins in both the small and large intestine. PMID:24264047

  10. Hepatic Injury in Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Contributes to Altered Intestinal Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Luther, Jay; Garber, John J.; Khalili, Hamed; Dave, Maneesh; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Jindal, Rohit; Motola, Daniel L.; Luther, Sanjana; Bohr, Stefan; Jeoung, Soung Won; Deshpande, Vikram; Singh, Gurminder; Turner, Jerrold R.; Yarmush, Martin L.; Chung, Raymond T.; Patel, Suraj J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Emerging data suggest that changes in intestinal permeability and increased gut microbial translocation contribute to the inflammatory pathway involved in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) development. Numerous studies have investigated the association between increased intestinal permeability and NASH. Our meta-analysis of this association investigates the underlying mechanism. METHODS A meta-analysis was performed to compare the rates of increased intestinal permeability in patients with NASH and healthy controls. To further address the underlying mechanism of action, we studied changes in intestinal permeability in a diet-induced (methionine-and-choline-deficient; MCD) murine model of NASH. In vitro studies were also performed to investigate the effect of MCD culture medium at the cellular level on hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, and intestinal epithelial cells. RESULTS Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients, and in particular those with NASH, are more likely to have increased intestinal permeability compared with healthy controls. We correlate this clinical observation with in vivo data showing mice fed an MCD diet develop intestinal permeability changes after an initial phase of liver injury and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) induction. In vitro studies reveal that MCD medium induces hepatic injury and TNFα production yet has no direct effect on intestinal epithelial cells. Although these data suggest a role for hepatic TNFα in altering intestinal permeability, we found that mice genetically resistant to TNFα-myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)–induced intestinal permeability changes fed an MCD diet still develop increased permeability and liver injury. CONCLUSIONS Our clinical and experimental results strengthen the association between intestinal permeability increases and NASH and also suggest that an early phase of hepatic injury and inflammation contributes to altered intestinal permeability in a fashion independent of TNF

  11. Intestinal Permeability in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Pathogenesis, Clinical Evaluation, and Therapy of Leaky Gut

    PubMed Central

    Michielan, Andrea; D'Incà, Renata

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is multifactorial with data suggesting the role of a disturbed interaction between the gut and the intestinal microbiota. A defective mucosal barrier may result in increased intestinal permeability which promotes the exposition to luminal content and triggers an immunological response that promotes intestinal inflammation. IBD patients display several defects in the many specialized components of mucosal barrier, from the mucus layer composition to the adhesion molecules that regulate paracellular permeability. These alterations may represent a primary dysfunction in Crohn's disease, but they may also perpetuate chronic mucosal inflammation in ulcerative colitis. In clinical practice, several studies have documented that changes in intestinal permeability can predict IBD course. Functional tests, such as the sugar absorption tests or the novel imaging technique using confocal laser endomicroscopy, allow an in vivo assessment of gut barrier integrity. Antitumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) therapy reduces mucosal inflammation and restores intestinal permeability in IBD patients. Butyrate, zinc, and some probiotics also ameliorate mucosal barrier dysfunction but their use is still limited and further studies are needed before considering permeability manipulation as a therapeutic target in IBD. PMID:26582965

  12. IL-1β Causes an Increase in Intestinal Epithelial Tight Junction Permeability1

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sadi, Rana M.; Ma, Thomas Y.

    2011-01-01

    IL-1β is a prototypical proinflammatory cytokine that plays a central role in the intestinal inflammation amplification cascade. Recent studies have indicated that a TNF-α- and IFN-γ-induced increase in intestinal epithelial paracellular permeability may be an important mechanism contributing to intestinal inflammation. Despite its central role in promoting intestinal inflammation, the role of IL-1β on intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ) barrier function remains unclear. The major aims of this study were to determine the effect of IL-1β on intestinal epithelial TJ permeability and to elucidate the mechanisms involved in this process, using a well-established in vitro intestinal epithelial model system consisting of filter-grown Caco-2 intestinal epithelial monolayers. IL-1β (0–100 ng/ml) produced a concentration- and time-dependent decrease in Caco-2 transepithelial resistance. Conversely, IL-1β caused a progressive time-dependent increase in transepithelial permeability to paracellular marker inulin. IL-1β-induced increase in Caco-2 TJ permeability was accompanied by a rapid activation of NF-κB. NF-κB inhibitors, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and curcumin, prevented the IL-1β-induced increase in Caco-2 TJ permeability. To further confirm the role of NF-κB in the IL-1β-induced increase in Caco-2 TJ permeability, NF-κB p65 expression was silenced by small interfering RNA transfection. NF-κB p65 depletion completely inhibited the IL-1β-induced increase in Caco-2 TJ permeability. IL-1β did not induce apoptosis in the Caco-2 cell. In conclusion, our findings show for the first time that IL-1β at physiologically relevant concentrations causes an increase in intestinal epithelial TJ permeability. The IL-1β-induced increase in Caco-2 TJ permeability was mediated in part by the activation of NF-κB pathways but not apoptosis. PMID:17372023

  13. Neutralization of IL-6 and TNF-α ameliorates intestinal permeability in DSS-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yong-Tao; Yan, Wei-Hui; Cao, Yi; Yan, Jun-Kai; Cai, Wei

    2016-07-01

    The cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) have been implicated as important mediators of the inflammatory reaction in patients with intestinal inflammation. The present study was designed to investigate the roles of these cytokines on mucosal barrier function in a mouse model of acute colitis with using anti-cytokine strategies. Mice received 3% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in their drinking water for 7days showed morphological alteration of mucosa and increase of intestinal permeability. Administration of IL-6 monoclonal antibody (mAb) or TNF-α mAb significantly attenuated intestinal permeability. IL-6 mAb and TNF-α mAb treatment also effectively suppressed the expression of claudin-2 and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Taken together, we indicated that anti-IL-6 and anti-TNF-α therapy prevent intestinal permeability induced by intestinal inflammation. PMID:27155817

  14. The Effect of Peritoneal Air Exposure on Intestinal Mucosal Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Jun; Tan, Shanjun; Yu, Wenkui; Lin, Zhiliang; Dong, Yi; Chen, Qiyi; Shi, Jialiang; Duan, Kaipeng; Bai, Xiaowu; Xu, Lin; Li, Jieshou

    2014-01-01

    Background. Damage of the intestinal mucosa barrier may result in intestinal bacterial and endotoxin translocation, leading to local and systemic inflammation. The present study was designed to investigate whether peritoneal air exposure induces damage of intestinal mucosal barrier. Methods. Sprague-Dawley rats (weighing 210 to 230 g) were randomized into five groups (6/group): a control group, a sham group, and three exposure groups with peritoneal air exposure for 1, 2, and 3 h, respectively. At 24 h after surgery, blood and terminal ileum were sampled. The serum D-lactate levels were determined using an ELISA kit. The intestinal permeability was determined by measuring the intestinal clearance of FITC-dextran (FD4). The histopathological changes in terminal ileum were also assessed. Results. Compared with the controls, peritoneal air exposure caused an increase in both serum D-lactate level and intestinal FD4 clearance, which were proportional to the length of peritoneal air exposure and correlated to Chiu's scores, indices for intestinal mucosal injury. Edema and inflammatory cells were also observed in mucosa and submucosa of ileum in three exposure groups. Conclusions. Peritoneal air exposure could induce damage to the intestinal mucosal barrier, which is proportional to the time length of peritoneal air exposure. PMID:25210511

  15. Regulation of the Intestinal Barrier Function by Host Defense Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Kelsy; Deng, Zhuo; Hou, Yongqing; Zhang, Guolong

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal barrier function is achieved primarily through regulating the synthesis of mucins and tight junction (TJ) proteins, which are critical for maintaining optimal gut health and animal performance. An aberrant expression of TJ proteins results in increased paracellular permeability, leading to intestinal and systemic disorders. As an essential component of innate immunity, host defense peptides (HDPs) play a critical role in mucosal defense. Besides broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities, HDPs promotes inflammation resolution, endotoxin neutralization, wound healing, and the development of adaptive immune response. Accumulating evidence has also indicated an emerging role of HDPs in barrier function and intestinal homeostasis. HDP deficiency in the intestinal tract is associated with barrier dysfunction and dysbiosis. Several HDPs were recently shown to enhance mucosal barrier function by directly inducing the expression of multiple mucins and TJ proteins. Consistently, dietary supplementation of HDPs often leads to an improvement in intestinal morphology, production performance, and feed efficiency in livestock animals. This review summarizes current advances on the regulation of epithelial integrity and homeostasis by HDPs. Major signaling pathways mediating HDP-induced mucin and TJ protein synthesis are also discussed. As an alternative strategy to antibiotics, supplementation of exogenous HDPs or modulation of endogenous HDP synthesis may have potential to improve intestinal barrier function and animal health and productivity. PMID:26664984

  16. EVALUATION OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology represents a passive option for long-term treatment of ground-water contamination. PRBs are a potentially more cost-effective treatment option for a variety of dissolved contaminants, such as certain types of chlorinated solvents, ...

  17. "Green" synthesized and coated nanaosilver alters the membrance permeability of barrier (intestinal, brain, endothelial) cells and stimulates oxidative stress pathways in neurons.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanosilver's (nanoAg) use in medical applications and consumer products is increasing. Because of this, its "green" synthesis and surface modification with beneficial coatings are desirable. Given nanoAg's potential exposure routes (e.g., dermal, intestin...

  18. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Hu; Yang, Shufen; Li, Zuohua; Zhong, Jinfeng; Fang, Rejun

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health. PMID:27524860

  19. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hu; Yang, Shufen; Li, Zuohua; Zhong, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health. PMID:27524860

  20. Comparative assessment of two indices of drug induced permeability changes in the perfused rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Lane, Majella E; Levis, Karl; McDonald, George S A; Corrigan, Owen I

    2006-04-01

    In the present study, two indices of acute intestinal permeability changes were investigated as measurements of drug induced intestinal damage. The first method was based on 14C-polyethylene glycol (PEG) 4000 permeability assessment and the second was based on histological evaluation of the intestine. The test compounds were ibuprofen, ketoprofen and naproxen and the alanine, glycine and phenylalanine amide derivatives of ibuprofen. Perfusion studies were carried out using a rat model. Post-perfusion, the gut was fixed and tissue changes were assessed and scored. Ibuprofen, ketoprofen and naproxen altered the barrier properties of the intestine to PEG 4000 with significantly higher scores (p<0.05) for gastrointestinal toxicity relative to blank buffer. For ketoprofen, PEG 4000 permeability and intestinal damage scores increased with increasing ketoprofen concentration. Ibuprofen amide derivatives did not induce significant histological damage or PEG 4000 permeability when compared with ibuprofen. A correlation coefficient of 0.91 is obtained when intestinal damage scores are plotted against PEG 4000 permeability for all compounds. Both indices are proposed as rapid and useful measures of drug induced acute intestinal damage. PMID:16476530

  1. Interleukin-23-Independent IL-17 Production Regulates Intestinal Epithelial Permeability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jacob S; Tato, Cristina M; Joyce-Shaikh, Barbara; Gulen, Muhammet F; Gulan, Fatih; Cayatte, Corinne; Chen, Yi; Blumenschein, Wendy M; Judo, Michael; Ayanoglu, Gulesi; McClanahan, Terrill K; Li, Xiaoxia; Cua, Daniel J

    2015-10-20

    Whether interleukin-17A (IL-17A) has pathogenic and/or protective roles in the gut mucosa is controversial and few studies have analyzed specific cell populations for protective functions within the inflamed colonic tissue. Here we have provided evidence for IL-17A-dependent regulation of the tight junction protein occludin during epithelial injury that limits excessive permeability and maintains barrier integrity. Analysis of epithelial cells showed that in the absence of signaling via the IL-17 receptor adaptor protein Act-1, the protective effect of IL-17A was abrogated and inflammation was enhanced. We have demonstrated that after acute intestinal injury, IL-23R(+) γδ T cells in the colonic lamina propria were the primary producers of early, gut-protective IL-17A, and this production of IL-17A was IL-23 independent, leaving protective IL-17 intact in the absence of IL-23. These results suggest that IL-17-producing γδ T cells are important for the maintenance and protection of epithelial barriers in the intestinal mucosa. PMID:26431948

  2. Clamshell excavation of a permeable reactive barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molfetta, Antonio Di; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2006-06-01

    Nowadays, permeable reactive barriers (PRB) are one of the most widespread techniques for the remediation of contaminated aquifers. Over the past 10 years, the use of iron-based PRBs has evolved from innovative to accepted standard practice for the treatment of a variety of groundwater contaminants (ITRC in: Permeable reactive barriers: lessons learned/new directions. The Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council, Permeable Reactive Barriers Team 2005). Although, a variety of excavation methods have been developed, backhoe excavators are often used for the construction of PRBs. The aim of this study is to describe the emplacement of a full-scale PRB and the benefits deriving from the use of a crawler crane equipped with a hydraulic grab (also known as clamshell excavator) in the excavation phases. The studied PRB was designed to remediate a chlorinated hydrocarbons plume at an old industrial landfill site, in Avigliana, near the city of Torino, in Italy. The continuous reactive barrier was designed to be 120 m long, 13 m deep, and 0.6 m thick. The installation of the barrier was accomplished using a clamshell for the excavation of the trench and a guar-gum slurry to support the walls. The performance of this technique was outstanding and allowed the installation of the PRB in 7 days. The degree of precision of the excavation was very high because of the intrinsic characteristics of this excavation tool and of the use of a concrete curb to guide the hydraulic grab. Moreover, the adopted technique permitted a saving of bioslurry thus minimizing the amount of biocide required.

  3. Measurement of the intestinal permeability in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, Matty L; Singh, Ramandeep; Geerlings, Suzanne E; Bemelman, Frederike J

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate methods measuring the intestinal per-meability in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and clarify whether there is an increased intestinal permeability in CKD. METHODS: We reviewed the literature in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) protocol and performed a systematic literature search through MEDline and EMBASE. All controlled trials and cohort studies using non-invasive methods to assess intestinal permeability in CKD patients were included. Excluded were: Conference abstracts and studies including patients younger than 18 years or animals. From the included studies we summarized the used methods and their advantages and disadvantages. For the comparison of their results we divided the included studies in two categories based on their included patient population, either assessing the intestinal permeability in mild to moderate CKD patients or in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Results were graphically displayed in two plots, one comparing the intestinal permeability in mild to moderate CKD patients to healthy controls and one comparing the intestinal permeability in ESRD patients to healthy controls. RESULTS: From the 480 identified reports, 15 met our inclusion criteria. Methods that were used to assess the intestinal permeability varied from markers measured in plasma to methods based on calculating the urinary excretion of an orally administered test substance. None of the applied methods has been validated in CKD patients and the influence of decreased renal function on the different methods remains unclear to a certain extent. Methods that seem the least likely to be influenced by decreased renal function are the quantitative PCR (qPCR) for bacterial DNA in blood and D-lactate. Considering the results published by the included studies; the studies including patients with mild to moderate CKD conducted conflicting results. Some studies did report an increase in intestinal

  4. Chronic Kidney Disease Induced Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Damage Associated with Intestinal Oxidative Stress Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chao; Wang, Qiang; Zhou, Chunyu; Kang, Xin; Zhao, Shuang; Liu, Shuai; Fu, Huijun; Yu, Zhen; Peng, Ai

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate whether intestinal mucosal barrier was damaged or not in chronic kidney disease progression and the status of oxidative stress. Methods. Rats were randomized into two groups: a control group and a uremia group. The uremia rat model was induced by 5/6 kidney resection. In postoperative weeks (POW) 4, 6, 8, and 10, eight rats were randomly selected from each group to prepare samples for assessing systemic inflammation, intestinal mucosal barrier changes, and the status of intestinal oxidative stress. Results. The uremia group presented an increase trend over time in the serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-10, serum D-lactate and diamine oxidase, and intestinal permeability, and these biomarkers were significantly higher than those in control group in POW 8 and/or 10. Chiu's scores in uremia group were also increased over time, especially in POW 8 and 10. Furthermore, the intestinal malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase levels were significantly higher in uremia group when compared with those in control group in POW 8 and/or 10. Conclusions. The advanced chronic kidney disease could induce intestinal mucosal barrier damage and further lead to systemic inflammation. The underlying mechanism may be associated with the intestinal oxidative stress injury. PMID:27493661

  5. Blood-ocular barrier permeability in monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, A; Ishiko, S; Kojima, M; Lipsky, S N

    1992-01-01

    The permeability of the blood-ocular barrier was investigated in five monkeys using vitreous fluorophotometry (VFP). Inward permeability (Pin) of the blood-retinal barrier was calculated by a computer simulation method. Kinetic VFP was performed after intravitreal injection of fluorescein (F) or fluorescein monoglucuronide (FG). The estimated mean value of Pin (x10(-6) cm/min) was 4.8 (SD 1.2). The mean rates of loss (per hour) of F from the anterior chamber (Ka) and the vitreous (Kv) were 0.11 (SD 0.01) and 0.13 (SD 0.03), respectively, which were approximately three and four times greater than those of FG (0.04 (SD 0.01) and 0.03 (SD 0.01), respectively). Probenecid administered intraperitoneally decreased both the Ka and the Kv of F significantly but had no effect on the Ka or the Kv of FG, suggesting that F was excreted from the eye with the aid of the active transport mechanism. The results of comparative studies of the rates of loss of F from the anterior chamber (Ka) and from the vitreous (Kv) suggested that active transport was more predominant in the blood-retinal barrier than in the blood-aqueous barrier. PMID:1739721

  6. Intestinal barrier: Molecular pathways and modifiers.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Min Kyung; Klaus, Christina; Kaemmerer, Elke; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2013-11-15

    The gastrointestinal tract is frequently challenged by pathogens/antigens contained in food and water and the intestinal epithelium must be capable of rapid regeneration in the event of tissue damage. Disruption of the intestinal barrier leads to a number of immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, food allergy, and celiac disease. The intestinal mucosa is composed of different types of epithelial cells in specific barrier functions. Epithelial cells control surface-associated bacterial populations without disrupting the intestinal microflora that is crucial for host health. They are also capable of modulating mucosal immune system, and are thus essential in maintaining homeostasis in the gut. Thus, the regulation of intestinal epithelial homeostasis is crucial for the maintenance of the structure of the mucosa and the defensive barrier functions. Recent studies have demonstrated that multiple molecular pathways are involved in the regulation of intestinal epithelial cell polarity. These include the Wnt, Notch, Hippo, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Hedgehog pathways, most of which were identified in lower organisms where they play important roles during embryogenesis. These pathways are also used in adult organisms to regulate multiple self-renewing organs. Understanding the interactions between these molecular mechanisms and intestinal barrier function will therefore provide important insight into the pathogenesis of intestinal-based immune-mediated diseases. PMID:24244877

  7. EPA/ITRC-RTDF permeable reactive barrier short course. Permeable reactive barriers: Application and deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    This report focuses on the following: Permeable Reactive Barriers: Application and Deployment; Introduction to Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs) for Remediating and Managing Contaminated Groundwater in Situ; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 1: Site Characterization for PRBs; Reactive Materials: Zero-Valent Iron; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 2: Laboratory and Pilot Scale Tests; Design Calculations; Compliance Monitoring, Performance Monitoring and Long-Term Maintenance for PRBs; PRB Emplacement Techniques; PRB Permitting and Implementation; Treatment of Metals; Non-Metallic Reactive Materials; Economic Considerations for PRB Deployment; and Bibliography.

  8. EPA/ITRC-RTDF permeable reactive barrier short course. Permeable reactive barriers: Application and deployment

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    This report focuses on the following: Permeable Reactive Barriers: Application and Deployment; Introduction to Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs) for Remediating and Managing Contaminated Groundwater in Situ; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 1: Site Characterization for PRBs; Reactive Materials: Zero-Valent Iron; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 2: Laboratory and Pilot Scale Tests; Design Calculations; Compliance Monitoring, Performance Monitoring and Long-Term Maintenance for PRBs; PRB Emplacement Techniques; PRB Permitting and Implementation; Treatment of Metals; Non-Metallic Reactive Materials; Economic Considerations for PRB Deployment; and Bibliography.

  9. Bovine colostrum supplementation during running training increases intestinal permeability.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Jonathan D; Butler, Ross N; Southcott, Emma; Brinkworth, Grant D

    2009-02-01

    Endurance exercise training can increase intestinal permeability which may contribute to the development of gastrointestinal symptoms in some athletes. Bovine colostrum (BC) supplementation reduces intestinal permeability induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This study aimed to determine whether BC could also reduce intestinal permeability induced by endurance exercise. Thirty healthy adult males (25.0 ± 4.7 yr; mean ± SD) completed eight weeks of running three times per week for 45 minutes at their lactate threshold while consuming 60 g/day of BC, whey protein (WP) or control (CON). Intestinal permeability was assessed at baseline and after eight weeks by measuring the ratio of urinary lactulose (L) and rhamnose (R) excretion. After eight weeks the L/R ratio increased significantly more in volunteers consuming BC (251 ± 140%) compared with WP (21 ± 35%, P < 0.05) and CON (-7 ± 13%, P < 0.02). The increase in intestinal permeability with BC may have been due to BC inducing greater leakiness of tight junctions between enterocytes or by increasing macromolecular transport as it does in neonatal gut. Further research should investigate the potential for BC to increase intestinal macromolecular transport in adults. PMID:22253980

  10. Age-associated modifications of intestinal permeability and innate immunity in human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Man, Angela L; Bertelli, Eugenio; Rentini, Silvia; Regoli, Mari; Briars, Graham; Marini, Mario; Watson, Alastair J M; Nicoletti, Claudio

    2015-10-01

    The physical and immunological properties of the human intestinal epithelial barrier in aging are largely unknown. Ileal biopsies from young (7-12 years), adult (20-40 years) and aging (67-77 years) individuals not showing symptoms of gastrointestinal (GI) pathologies were used to assess levels of inflammatory cytokines, barrier integrity and cytokine production in response to microbial challenges. Increased expression of interleukin (IL)-6, but not interferon (IFN)γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1β was observed during aging; further analysis showed that cluster of differentiation (CD)11c(+) dendritic cells (DCs) are one of the major sources of IL-6 in the aging gut and expressed higher levels of CD40. Up-regulated production of IL-6 was accompanied by increased expression of claudin-2 leading to reduced transepithelial electric resistance (TEER); TEER could be restored in in vitro and ex vivo cultures by neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibody. In contrast, expression of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), occludin and junctional-adhesion molecule-A1 did not vary with age and overall permeability to macromolecules was not affected. Finally, cytokine production in response to different microbial stimuli was assessed in a polarized in vitro organ culture (IVOC). IL-8 production in response to flagellin declined progressively with age although the expression and distribution of toll-like receptor (TLR)-5 on intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) remained unchanged. Also, flagellin-induced production of IL-6 was less pronounced in aging individuals. In contrast, TNF-α production in response to probiotics (VSL#3) did not decline with age; however, in our experimental model probiotics did not down-regulate the production of IL-6 and expression of claudin-2. These data suggested that aging affects properties of the intestinal barrier likely to impact on age-associated disturbances, both locally and systemically. PMID:25948052

  11. Quantitation of small intestinal permeability during normal human drug absorption

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the quantitative relationship between a drug’s physical chemical properties and its rate of intestinal absorption (QSAR) is critical for selecting candidate drugs. Because of limited experimental human small intestinal permeability data, approximate surrogates such as the fraction absorbed or Caco-2 permeability are used, both of which have limitations. Methods Given the blood concentration following an oral and intravenous dose, the time course of intestinal absorption in humans was determined by deconvolution and related to the intestinal permeability by the use of a new 3 parameter model function (“Averaged Model” (AM)). The theoretical validity of this AM model was evaluated by comparing it to the standard diffusion-convection model (DC). This analysis was applied to 90 drugs using previously published data. Only drugs that were administered in oral solution form to fasting subjects were considered so that the rate of gastric emptying was approximately known. All the calculations are carried out using the freely available routine PKQuest Java (http://www.pkquest.com) which has an easy to use, simple interface. Results Theoretically, the AM permeability provides an accurate estimate of the intestinal DC permeability for solutes whose absorption ranges from 1% to 99%. The experimental human AM permeabilities determined by deconvolution are similar to those determined by direct human jejunal perfusion. The small intestinal pH varies with position and the results are interpreted in terms of the pH dependent octanol partition. The permeability versus partition relations are presented separately for the uncharged, basic, acidic and charged solutes. The small uncharged solutes caffeine, acetaminophen and antipyrine have very high permeabilities (about 20 x 10-4 cm/sec) corresponding to an unstirred layer of only 45 μm. The weak acid aspirin also has a large AM permeability despite its low octanol partition at pH 7.4, suggesting

  12. Intestinal barrier in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Antoni, Lena; Nuding, Sabine; Wehkamp, Jan; Stange, Eduard F

    2014-01-01

    A complex mucosal barrier protects as the first line of defense the surface of the healthy intestinal tract from adhesion and invasion by luminal microorganisms. In this review, we provide an overview about the major components of this protective system as for example an intact epithelium, the synthesis of various antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and the formation of the mucus layer. We highlight the crucial importance of their correct functioning for the maintenance of a proper intestinal function and the prevention of dysbiosis and disease. Barrier disturbances including a defective production of AMPs, alterations in thickness or composition of the intestinal mucus layer, alterations of pattern-recognition receptors, defects in the process of autophagy as well as unresolved endoplasmic reticulum stress result in an inadequate host protection and are thought to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory bowel diseases Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. PMID:24574793

  13. The role of immunomodulators on intestinal barrier homeostasis in experimental models.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Maria Emília Rabelo; Araújo, Raquel Silva; de Barros, Patrícia Aparecida Vieira; Soares, Anne Danieli Nascimento; Abrantes, Fernanda Alves; Generoso, Simone de Vasconcelos; Fernandes, Simone Odília Antunes; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento

    2015-12-01

    The intestinal epithelium is composed of specialized epithelial cells that form a physical and biochemical barrier to commensal and pathogenic microorganisms. However, dysregulation of the epithelial barrier function can lead to increased intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation across the intestinal mucosa, which contributes to local and systemic immune activation. The increase in these parameters is associated with inflammatory bowel disease, physical exercise under heat stress, intestinal obstruction, ischemia, and mucositis, among other conditions. Lately, there has been growing interest in immunomodulatory nutrients and probiotics that can regulate host immune and inflammatory responses and possibly restore the intestinal barrier. Immunomodulators such as amino acids (glutamine, arginine, tryptophan, and citrulline), fatty acids (short-chain and omega-3 fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acids), and probiotics (Bifidobacterium, Saccharomyces, and Lactobacillus) have been reported in the literature. Here, we review the critical roles of immunomodulatory nutrients in supporting gut barrier integrity and function. PMID:25660317

  14. Myosin Light Chain Kinase Mediates Intestinal Barrier Disruption following Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chuanli; Wang, Pei; Su, Qin; Wang, Shiliang; Wang, Fengjun

    2012-01-01

    Background Severe burn injury results in the loss of intestinal barrier function, however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation mediated by MLC kinase (MLCK) is critical to the pathophysiological regulation of intestinal barrier function. We hypothesized that the MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation mediates the regulation of intestinal barrier function following burn injury, and that MLCK inhibition attenuates the burn-induced intestinal barrier disfunction. Methodology/Principal Findings Male balb/c mice were assigned randomly to either sham burn (control) or 30% total body surface area (TBSA) full thickness burn without or with intraperitoneal injection of ML-9 (2 mg/kg), an MLCK inhibitor. In vivo intestinal permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran was measured. Intestinal mucosa injury was assessed histologically. Tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin and claudin-1 was analyzed by immunofluorescent assay. Expression of MLCK and phosphorylated MLC in ileal mucosa was assessed by Western blot. Intestinal permeability was increased significantly after burn injury, which was accompanied by mucosa injury, tight junction protein alterations, and increase of both MLCK and MLC phosphorylation. Treatment with ML-9 attenuated the burn-caused increase of intestinal permeability, mucosa injury, tight junction protein alterations, and decreased MLC phosphorylation, but not MLCK expression. Conclusions/Significance The MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation mediates intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction after severe burn injury. It is suggested that MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation may be a critical target for the therapeutic treatment of intestinal epithelial barrier disruption after severe burn injury. PMID:22529961

  15. Intestinal permeability of chlorpyrifos using the single-pass intestinal perfusion method in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cook, Thomas J; Shenoy, Smriti S

    2003-03-01

    The intestinal transport of chlorpyrifos (CPF), an organothiophosphate pesticide, was investigated using the single-pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) technique in male, Sprague-Dawley rats. SPIP was performed in each isolated region of the small intestine (i.e. duodenum, jejunum and ileum) with three concentrations of CPF (0.1, 2.0 and 10 microM) at a flow rate of 0.25 ml/min. Preliminary binding and stability studies were conducted to ensure that the loss of CPF in the SPIP study can be attributed to intestinal absorption. The effective permeability (P(eff)) of CPF was determined for each segment and concentration. CPF exhibits a high intestinal permeability over the length of the small intestine indicative of compounds that are well absorbed. Decreases in permeability values at the highest CPF concentration studied in the duodenum and ileum suggest a saturable transport process. Based on these results, passive, transcellular diffusion dominates the intestinal transport mechanism of CPF, with a saturable transport process evident in the duodenum and ileum. The P(eff) of CPF is in the range of drugs with high intestinal permeability and high fraction of dose absorbed indicating that CPF readily crosses the intestine. The dependence of CPF's P(eff) on concentration in the duodenum and ileum suggests that CPF is transported by a combination of mechanisms across the intestine. Using established relationships, the human fraction dose absorbed for CPF was estimated to be >99%. The permeability values obtained from this study may be useful in models of exposure assessment. PMID:12499115

  16. Genetic basis for increased intestinal permeability in families with Crohn's disease: role of CARD15 3020insC mutation?

    PubMed Central

    Buhner, S; Buning, C; Genschel, J; Kling, K; Herrmann, D; Dignass, A; Kuechler, I; Krueger, S; Schmidt, H H‐J; Lochs, H

    2006-01-01

    Background and aim A genetically impaired intestinal barrier function has long been suspected to be a predisposing factor for Crohn's disease (CD). Recently, mutations of the capsase recruitment domain family, member 15 (CARD15) gene have been identified and associated with CD. We hypothesise that a CARD15 mutation may be associated with an impaired intestinal barrier. Methods We studied 128 patients with quiescent CD, 129 first degree relatives (CD‐R), 66 non‐related household members (CD‐NR), and 96 healthy controls. The three most common CARD15 polymorphisms (R702W, G908R, and 3020insC) were analysed and intestinal permeability was determined by the lactulose/mannitol ratio. Results Intestinal permeability was significantly increased in CD and CD‐R groups compared with CD‐NR and controls. Values above the normal range were seen in 44% of CD and 26% of CD‐R but only in 6% of CD‐NR, and in none of the controls. A household community with CD patients, representing a common environment, was not associated with increased intestinal permeability in family members. However, 40% of CD first degree relatives carrying a CARD15 3020insC mutation and 75% (3/4) of those CD‐R with combined 3020insC and R702W mutations had increased intestinal permeability compared with only 15% of wild‐types, indicating a genetic influence on barrier function. R702W and G908R mutations were not associated with high permeability. Conclusions In healthy first degree relatives, high mucosal permeability is associated with the presence of a CARD15 3020insC mutation. This indicates that genetic factors may be involved in impairment of intestinal barrier function in families with IBD. PMID:16000642

  17. Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide Promotes Intestinal Barrier Homeostasis and Protection Against Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiujuan; Conlin, Victoria S.; Morampudi, Vijay; Ryz, Natasha R.; Nasser, Yasmin; Bhinder, Ganive; Bergstrom, Kirk S.; Yu, Hong B.; Waterhouse, Chris C. M.; Buchan, Allison M. J.; Popescu, Oana E.; Gibson, William T.; Waschek, James A.; Vallance, Bruce A.; Jacobson, Kevan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory disorder associated with changes in neuropeptide expression and function, including vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP regulates intestinal vasomotor and secretomotor function and motility; however, VIP’s role in development and maintenance of colonic epithelial barrier homeostasis is unclear. Using VIP deficient (VIPKO) mice, we investigated VIP’s role in epithelial barrier homeostasis, and susceptibility to colitis. Colonic crypt morphology and epithelial barrier homeostasis were assessed in wildtype (WT) and VIPKO mice, at baseline. Colitic responses were evaluated following dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) or dextran-sodium sulfate (DSS) exposure. Mice were also treated with exogenous VIP. At baseline, VIPKO mice exhibited distorted colonic crypts, defects in epithelial cell proliferation and migration, increased apoptosis, and altered permeability. VIPKO mice also displayed reduced goblet cell numbers, and reduced expression of secreted goblet cell factors mucin 2 and trefoil factor 3. These changes were associated with reduced expression of caudal type homeobox 2 (Cdx2), a master regulator of intestinal function and homeostasis. DNBS and DSS-induced colitis were more severe in VIPKO than WT mice. VIP treatment rescued the phenotype, protecting VIPKO mice against DSS colitis, with results comparable to WT mice. In conclusion, VIP plays a crucial role in the development and maintenance of colonic epithelial barrier integrity under physiological conditions and promotes epithelial repair and homeostasis during colitis. PMID:25932952

  18. Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin increases the small intestinal permeability in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Jorge; Morris, Winston E; Loidl, César Fabián; Tironi-Farinati, Carla; Tironi-Farinatti, Carla; McClane, Bruce A; Uzal, Francisco A; Fernandez Miyakawa, Mariano E

    2009-01-01

    Epsilon toxin is a potent neurotoxin produced by Clostridium perfringens types B and D, an anaerobic bacterium that causes enterotoxaemia in ruminants. In the affected animal, it causes oedema of the lungs and brain by damaging the endothelial cells, inducing physiological and morphological changes. Although it is believed to compromise the intestinal barrier, thus entering the gut vasculature, little is known about the mechanism underlying this process. This study characterizes the effects of epsilon toxin on fluid transport and bioelectrical parameters in the small intestine of mice and rats. The enteropooling and the intestinal loop tests, together with the single-pass perfusion assay and in vitro and ex vivo analysis in Ussing's chamber, were all used in combination with histological and ultrastructural analysis of mice and rat small intestine, challenged with or without C. perfringens epsilon toxin. Luminal epsilon toxin induced a time and concentration dependent intestinal fluid accumulation and fall of the transepithelial resistance. Although no evident histological changes were observed, opening of the mucosa tight junction in combination with apoptotic changes in the lamina propria were seen with transmission electron microscopy. These results indicate that C. perfringens epsilon toxin alters the intestinal permeability, predominantly by opening the mucosa tight junction, increasing its permeability to macromolecules, and inducing further degenerative changes in the lamina propria of the bowel. PMID:19763257

  19. Clostridium perfringens Epsilon Toxin Increases the Small Intestinal Permeability in Mice and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Jorge; Morris, Winston E.; Loidl, César Fabián; Tironi-Farinatti, Carla; McClane, Bruce A.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Fernandez Miyakawa, Mariano E.

    2009-01-01

    Epsilon toxin is a potent neurotoxin produced by Clostridium perfringens types B and D, an anaerobic bacterium that causes enterotoxaemia in ruminants. In the affected animal, it causes oedema of the lungs and brain by damaging the endothelial cells, inducing physiological and morphological changes. Although it is believed to compromise the intestinal barrier, thus entering the gut vasculature, little is known about the mechanism underlying this process. This study characterizes the effects of epsilon toxin on fluid transport and bioelectrical parameters in the small intestine of mice and rats. The enteropooling and the intestinal loop tests, together with the single-pass perfusion assay and in vitro and ex vivo analysis in Ussing's chamber, were all used in combination with histological and ultrastructural analysis of mice and rat small intestine, challenged with or without C. perfringens epsilon toxin. Luminal epsilon toxin induced a time and concentration dependent intestinal fluid accumulation and fall of the transepithelial resistance. Although no evident histological changes were observed, opening of the mucosa tight junction in combination with apoptotic changes in the lamina propria were seen with transmission electron microscopy. These results indicate that C. perfringens epsilon toxin alters the intestinal permeability, predominantly by opening the mucosa tight junction, increasing its permeability to macromolecules, and inducing further degenerative changes in the lamina propria of the bowel. PMID:19763257

  20. The diffusion-active permeable reactive barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Alex O.; Rittmann, Bruce E.

    2010-03-01

    Using the biogeochemical model CCBATCH, which we expanded to include transport processes, we study a novel approach for the treatment of aquifers contaminated with toxic concentrations of metals, the diffusion-active permeable reactive barrier (DAPRB), which is based on generation of sulfide by Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) as the groundwater moves through a layered treatment zone. In the DAPRB, layers of low conductivity (low-K) containing reactive materials are intercalated between layers of high conductivity (high-K) that transport the groundwater across the barrier. Because diffusion dominates transport in the reactive layers, microbial communities can take advantage there of the chemical-gradient mechanism for protection from toxicants. The ideal sulfidic DAPRB design includes particulate organic matter (POM) and solid sulfate mineral inside the reactive (low-K) layer. This leads to sulfate reduction and the formation of sulfide ligands that complex with toxic metals, such as Zn 2+ in the high-K layer. We perform a theoretical biogeochemical analysis of the ideal configuration of a DAPRB for treatment of Zn-contaminated groundwater. Our analysis using the expanded CCBATCH confirms the gradient-resistance mechanism for bio-protection, with the ZnS bio-sink forming at the intersection of the Zn and sulfide plumes inside the high-K layers of the DAPRB. The detailed DAPRB analysis also shows that total alkalinity and pH distributions are representative footprints of the two key biogeochemical processes taking place, sulfidogenesis and Zn immobilization as sulfide mineral. This is so because these two reactions consume or produce acidic hydrogen and alkalinity. Additionally, because Zn immobilization is due to ZnS mineral precipitation, the ZnS mineral distribution is a good indicator for the bio-sink. Bio-sinks are located for the most part within the high-K layers, and their exact position depends on the relative magnitude of metal and sulfide fluxes. Finally

  1. TREATMENT OF INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS USING PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers are an emerging alternative to traditional pump and treat systems for groundwater remediation. This technique has progressed rapidly over the past decade from laboratory bench-scale studies to full-scale implementation. Laboratory studies indicate the ...

  2. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG culture supernatant ameliorates acute alcohol-induced intestinal permeability and liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhua; Liu, Yanlong; Sidhu, Anju; Ma, Zhenhua; McClain, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Endotoxemia is a contributing cofactor to alcoholic liver disease (ALD), and alcohol-induced increased intestinal permeability is one of the mechanisms of endotoxin absorption. Probiotic bacteria have been shown to promote intestinal epithelial integrity and protect barrier function in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and in ALD. Although it is highly possible that some common molecules secreted by probiotics contribute to this action in IBD, the effect of probiotic culture supernatant has not yet been studied in ALD. We examined the effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG culture supernatant (LGG-s) on the acute alcohol-induced intestinal integrity and liver injury in a mouse model. Mice on standard chow diet were supplemented with supernatant from LGG culture (109 colony-forming unit/mouse) for 5 days, and one dose of alcohol at 6 g/kg body wt was administered via gavage. Intestinal permeability was measured by FITC-FD-4 ex vivo. Alcohol-induced liver injury was examined by measuring the activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in plasma, and liver steatosis was evaluated by triglyceride content and Oil Red O staining of the liver sections. LGG-s pretreatment restored alcohol-induced reduction in ileum mRNA levels of claudin-1, intestine trefoil factor (ITF), P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and cathelin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP), which play important roles on intestinal barrier integrity. As a result, LGG-s pretreatment significantly inhibited the alcohol-induced intestinal permeability, endotoxemia and subsequently liver injury. Interestingly, LGG-s pretreatment increased ileum mRNA expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α, an important transcription factor of ITF, P-gp, and CRAMP. These results suggest that LGG-s ameliorates the acute alcohol-induced liver injury by promoting HIF signaling, leading to the suppression of alcohol-induced increased intestinal permeability and endotoxemia. The use of bacteria-free LGG culture supernatant provides a novel

  3. Lactobacillus gasseri SBT2055 inhibits adipose tissue inflammation and intestinal permeability in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Michio; Miyoshi, Masaya; Ogawa, Akihiro; Sakai, Fumihiko; Kadooka, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The probiotic Lactobacillus gasseri SBT2055 (LG2055) has anti-obesity effects. Obesity is closely correlated with inflammation in adipose tissue, and maintaining adipose tissue in a less-inflamed state requires intestinal integrity or a barrier function to protect the intestine from the disruption that can be caused by a high-fat diet (HFD). Here, we examined the anti-inflammatory and intestinal barrier-protecting effects of LG2055 in C57BL/6 mice fed a normal-fat diet (NFD), HFD, or the HFD containing LG2055 (HFD-LG) for 21 weeks. HFD-LG intake significantly prevented HFD-induced increases in body weight, visceral fat mass, and the ratio of inflammatory-type macrophages to anti-inflammatory ones in adipose tissue. Mice fed the HFD showed higher intestinal permeability to a fluorescent dextran administered by oral administration and an elevated concentration of antibodies specific to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in the blood compared with those fed the NFD, suggesting an increased penetration of the gut contents into the systemic circulation. These elevations of intestinal permeability and anti-LPS antibody levels were significantly suppressed in mice fed the HFD-LG. Moreover, treatment with LG2055 cells suppressed an increase in the cytokine-induced permeability of Caco-2 cell monolayers. These results suggest that LG2055 improves the intestinal integrity, reducing the entry of inflammatory substances like LPS from the intestine, which may lead to decreased inflammation in adipose tissue. PMID:27293560

  4. Single-pass intestinal perfusion to establish the intestinal permeability of model drugs in mouse.

    PubMed

    Escribano, Elvira; Sala, Xavier García; Salamanca, Jorge; Navarro, Claudia Roig; Regué, Josep Queralt

    2012-10-15

    The aim of the present work was to study the intestinal permeabilities (P(eff)) of five model drugs: furosemide, piroxicam, naproxen, ranitidine and amoxicillin in the in situ intestinal perfusion technique in mice and compare them with corresponding rat and human in vivo P(eff) values. The main experimental conditions were: mice CD1 30-35 g, test drug concentrations in perfusion experiments (the highest dose strength dissolved in 250 mL of PBS pH 6.2) and flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. The test compounds were assayed following a validated HPLC method. The effective permeability coefficients at steady-state were calculated after correcting the outlet concentration following the gravimetric correction method proposed by Sutton et al. (2001). The permeability coefficient values ranged from 0.1751±0.0756×10(-4) cm/s for ranitidine to 17.19±4.16×10(-4) cm/s for naproxen. The mouse method correctly assigned the BCS permeability classification of a given drug and a correlation between mouse permeability data and the fraction of an oral dose absorbed in humans was achieved (FA=1-exp(-34,745·P(eff(mouse))); R=0.9631). Based on the results obtained, we conclude that mouse can be considered a valuable tool in the evaluation of intestinal permeability in order to predict the extent of human gastrointestinal absorption following oral administration of a drug. PMID:22814225

  5. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER TECHNOLOGIES FOR CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental scientists are generally familiar with the concept of barriers for restricting the movement of contaminant plumes in ground water. Such barriers are typically constructed of highly impermeable emplacements of materials such as grouts, slurries, or sheet pilings to ...

  6. Limited Nesting Stress Alters Maternal Behavior and In Vivo Intestinal Permeability in Male Wistar Pup Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moussaoui, Nabila; Larauche, Muriel; Biraud, Mandy; Molet, Jenny; Million, Mulugeta; Mayer, Emeran; Taché, Yvette

    2016-01-01

    A few studies indicate that limited nesting stress (LNS) alters maternal behavior and the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis of dams and offspring in male Sprague Dawley rats. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of LNS on maternal behavior in Wistar rats, and on the HPA axis, glycemia and in vivo intestinal permeability of male and female offspring. Intestinal permeability is known to be elevated during the first week postnatally and influenced by glucocorticoids. Dams and neonatal litters were subjected to LNS or normal nesting conditions (control) from days 2 to 10 postnatally. At day 10, blood was collected from pups for determination of glucose and plasma corticosterone by enzyme immunoassay and in vivo intestinal permeability by oral gavage of fluorescein isothiocyanate–dextran 4kDa. Dams exposed to LNS compared to control showed an increase in the percentage of time spent building a nest (118%), self-grooming (69%), and putting the pups back to the nest (167%). LNS male and female pups exhibited a reduction of body weight by 5% and 4%, adrenal weights/100g body weight by 17% and 18%, corticosterone plasma levels by 64% and 62% and blood glucose by 11% and 12% respectively compared to same sex control pups. In male LNS pups, intestinal permeability was increased by 2.7-fold while no change was observed in females compared to same sex control. There was no sex difference in any of the parameters in control pups except the body weight. These data indicate that Wistar dams subjected to LNS during the first postnatal week have an altered repertoire of maternal behaviors which affects the development of the HPA axis in both sexes and intestinal barrier function in male offspring. PMID:27149676

  7. Stress Induces Endotoxemia and Low-Grade Inflammation by Increasing Barrier Permeability

    PubMed Central

    de Punder, Karin; Pruimboom, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading causes of work absence, disability, and mortality worldwide. Most of these diseases are associated with low-grade inflammation. Here, we hypothesize that stresses (defined as homeostatic disturbances) can induce low-grade inflammation by increasing the availability of water, sodium, and energy-rich substances to meet the increased metabolic demand induced by the stressor. One way of triggering low-grade inflammation is by increasing intestinal barrier permeability through activation of various components of the stress system. Although beneficial to meet the demands necessary during stress, increased intestinal barrier permeability also raises the possibility of the translocation of bacteria and their toxins across the intestinal lumen into the blood circulation. In combination with modern life-style factors, the increase in bacteria/bacterial toxin translocation arising from a more permeable intestinal wall causes a low-grade inflammatory state. We support this hypothesis with numerous studies finding associations with NCDs and markers of endotoxemia, suggesting that this process plays a pivotal and perhaps even a causal role in the development of low-grade inflammation and its related diseases. PMID:26029209

  8. Fructokinase, Fructans, Intestinal Permeability, and Metabolic Syndrome: An Equine Connection?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Richard J; Rivard, Chris; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Otabachian-Smith, Silvia; Ishimoto, Takuji; Cicerchi, Christina; Cheeke, Peter R.; MacIntosh, Bridgett; Hess, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Fructose is a simple sugar present in honey and fruit, but can also exist as a polymer (fructans) in pasture grasses. Mammals are unable to metabolize fructans, but certain gram positive bacteria contain fructanases and can convert fructans to fructose in the gut. Recent studies suggest that fructose generated from bacteria, or directly obtained from the diet, can induce both increased intestinal permeability and features of metabolic syndrome, especially the development of insulin resistance. The development of insulin resistance is driven in part by the metabolism of fructose by fructokinase C in the liver, which results in oxidative stress in the hepatocyte. Similarly, the metabolism of fructose in the small bowel by intestinal fructokinase may lead to increased intestinal permeability and endotoxemia. While speculative, these observations raise the possibility that the mechanism by which fructans induce laminitis could involve intestinal and hepatic fructokinase. Further studies are indicated to determine the role of fructanases, fructose and fructokinase in equine metabolic syndrome and laminitis. PMID:23439477

  9. Review of potential subsurface permeable barrier emplacement and monitoring technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Riggsbee, W.H.; Treat, R.L.; Stansfield, H.J.; Schwarz, R.M.; Cantrell, K.J.; Phillips, S.J.

    1994-02-01

    This report focuses on subsurface permeable barrier technologies potentially applicable to existing waste disposal sites. This report describes candidate subsurface permeable barriers, methods for emplacing these barriers, and methods used to monitor the barrier performance. Two types of subsurface barrier systems are described: those that apply to contamination.in the unsaturated zone, and those that apply to groundwater and to mobile contamination near the groundwater table. These barriers may be emplaced either horizontally or vertically depending on waste and site characteristics. Materials for creating permeable subsurface barriers are emplaced using one of three basic methods: injection, in situ mechanical mixing, or excavation-insertion. Injection is the emplacement of dissolved reagents or colloidal suspensions into the soil at elevated pressures. In situ mechanical mixing is the physical blending of the soil and the barrier material underground. Excavation-insertion is the removal of a soil volume and adding barrier materials to the space created. Major vertical barrier emplacement technologies include trenching-backfilling; slurry trenching; and vertical drilling and injection, including boring (earth augering), cable tool drilling, rotary drilling, sonic drilling, jetting methods, injection-mixing in drilled holes, and deep soil mixing. Major horizontal barrier emplacement technologies include horizontal drilling, microtunneling, compaction boring, horizontal emplacement, longwall mining, hydraulic fracturing, and jetting methods.

  10. Adenosine A2B receptor modulates intestinal barrier function under hypoxic and ischemia/reperfusion conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Qiu, Yuan; Wang, Wensheng; Xiao, Weidong; Liang, Hongyin; Zhang, Chaojun; Yang, Hanwenbo; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Sun, Li-Hua; Yang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intestinal barrier function failure from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and acute hypoxia has been implicated as a critical determinant in the predisposition to intestinal inflammation and a number of inflammatory disorders. Here, we identified the role of Adenosine A2B receptor (A2BAR) in the regulation of intestinal barrier function under I/R and acute hypoxic conditions. Methods: C57BL/6J mice were used, and were randomized into three groups: Sham, I/R, IR+PSB1115 (a specific A2BAR antagonist) groups. After surgery, the small bowel was harvested for immunohistochemical staining, RNA and protein content, and intestinal permeability analyses. Using an epithelial cell culture model, we investigated the influence of hypoxia on the epithelial function, and the role of A2BAR in the expressions of tight junction and epithelial permeability. The expressions of Claudin-1, occludin and ZO-1 were detected by RT-PCR and Western-Blot. Epithelial barrier function was assessed with transepithelial resistance (TER). Results and conclusions: The A2BAR antagonist, PSB1115, significantly increased tight junction protein expression after intestinal I/R or acute hypoxia conditions. PSB1115 also attenuated the disrupted distribution of TJ proteins. Furthermore, inhibition of A2BAR attenuated the decrease in TER induced by I/R or acute hypoxic conditions, and maintained intestinal barrier function. Antagonism of A2BAR activity improves intestinal epithelial structure and barrier function in a mouse model of intestinal I/R and a cell model of acute hypoxia. These findings support a potentially destructive role for A2BAR under intestinal I/R and acute hypoxic conditions. PMID:24966910

  11. Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii (Seed of Burdock) Reinforces Intestinal Barrier Function in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee Soon; Jung, Sun Young; Back, Su Yeon; Do, Jeong-Ryong; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Fructus Arctii is used as a traditional herbal medicine to treat inflammatory diseases in oriental countries. This study aimed to investigate effect of F. Arctii extract on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and to reveal the active component of F. Arctii. We measured transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) value (as an index of barrier function) and ovalbumin (OVA) permeation (as an index of permeability) to observe the changes of intestinal barrier function. The treatment of F. Arctii increased TEER value and decreased OVA influx on Caco-2 cell monolayers. Furthermore, we found that arctigenin as an active component of F. Arctii increased TEER value and reduced permeability of OVA from apical to the basolateral side but not arctiin. In the present study, we revealed that F. Arctii could enhance intestinal barrier function, and its active component was an arctigenin on the functionality. We expect that the arctigenin from F. Arctii could contribute to prevention of inflammatory, allergic, and infectious diseases by reinforcing intestinal barrier function. PMID:26550018

  12. Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii (Seed of Burdock) Reinforces Intestinal Barrier Function in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hee Soon; Jung, Sun Young; Back, Su Yeon; Do, Jeong-Ryong; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Fructus Arctii is used as a traditional herbal medicine to treat inflammatory diseases in oriental countries. This study aimed to investigate effect of F. Arctii extract on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and to reveal the active component of F. Arctii. We measured transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) value (as an index of barrier function) and ovalbumin (OVA) permeation (as an index of permeability) to observe the changes of intestinal barrier function. The treatment of F. Arctii increased TEER value and decreased OVA influx on Caco-2 cell monolayers. Furthermore, we found that arctigenin as an active component of F. Arctii increased TEER value and reduced permeability of OVA from apical to the basolateral side but not arctiin. In the present study, we revealed that F. Arctii could enhance intestinal barrier function, and its active component was an arctigenin on the functionality. We expect that the arctigenin from F. Arctii could contribute to prevention of inflammatory, allergic, and infectious diseases by reinforcing intestinal barrier function. PMID:26550018

  13. Controlling ferrofluid permeability across the blood–brain barrier model.

    PubMed

    Shi, Di; Sun, Linlin; Mi, Gujie; Sheikh, Lubna; Bhattacharya, Soumya; Nayar, Suprabha; Webster, Thomas J

    2014-02-21

    In the present study, an in vitro blood–brain barrier model was developed using murine brain endothelioma cells (b.End3 cells). Confirmation of the blood–brain barrier model was completed by examining the permeability of FITCDextran at increasing exposure times up to 96 h in serum-free medium and comparing such values with values from the literature. After such confirmation, the permeability of five novel ferrofluid (FF) nanoparticle samples, GGB (ferrofluids synthesized using glycine, glutamic acid and BSA), GGC (glycine, glutamic acid and collagen), GGP (glycine, glutamic acid and PVA), BPC (BSA, PEG and collagen) and CPB (collagen, PVA and BSA), was determined using this blood–brain barrier model. All of the five FF samples were characterized by zeta potential to determine their charge as well as TEM and dynamic light scattering for determining their hydrodynamic diameter. Results showed that FF coated with collagen passed more easily through the blood–brain barrier than FF coated with glycine and glutamic acid based on an increase of 4.5% in permeability. Through such experiments, diverse magnetic nanomaterials (such as FF) were identified for: (1) MRI use since they were less permeable to penetrate the blood–brain barrier to avoid neural tissue toxicity (e.g. GGB) or (2) brain drug delivery since they were more permeable to the blood–brain barrier (e.g. CPB). PMID:24457539

  14. Controlling ferrofluid permeability across the blood-brain barrier model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Di; Sun, Linlin; Mi, Gujie; Sheikh, Lubna; Bhattacharya, Soumya; Nayar, Suprabha; Webster, Thomas J.

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, an in vitro blood-brain barrier model was developed using murine brain endothelioma cells (b.End3 cells). Confirmation of the blood-brain barrier model was completed by examining the permeability of FITC-Dextran at increasing exposure times up to 96 h in serum-free medium and comparing such values with values from the literature. After such confirmation, the permeability of five novel ferrofluid (FF) nanoparticle samples, GGB (ferrofluids synthesized using glycine, glutamic acid and BSA), GGC (glycine, glutamic acid and collagen), GGP (glycine, glutamic acid and PVA), BPC (BSA, PEG and collagen) and CPB (collagen, PVA and BSA), was determined using this blood-brain barrier model. All of the five FF samples were characterized by zeta potential to determine their charge as well as TEM and dynamic light scattering for determining their hydrodynamic diameter. Results showed that FF coated with collagen passed more easily through the blood-brain barrier than FF coated with glycine and glutamic acid based on an increase of 4.5% in permeability. Through such experiments, diverse magnetic nanomaterials (such as FF) were identified for: (1) MRI use since they were less permeable to penetrate the blood-brain barrier to avoid neural tissue toxicity (e.g. GGB) or (2) brain drug delivery since they were more permeable to the blood-brain barrier (e.g. CPB).

  15. Test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Matthew; Dameron, Arrelaine; Kempe, Michael

    2014-03-04

    A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed thereon and an edge seal which seals the test card to the barrier material. Another exemplary embodiment is an electrical calcium test device comprising: a test card an impermeable spacer, an edge seal which seals the test card to the spacer and an edge seal which seals the spacer to the barrier material.

  16. Increased intestinal permeability during cytomegalovirus infection in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    de Maar, E F; Kleibeuker, J H; Boersma-van Ek, W; The, T H; van Son, W J

    1996-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections in renal transplant recipients can affect the gastrointestinal tract, but significant clinical manifestations are seldom seen. We hypothesize that subclinical involvement of the gastrointestinal tract may be quite frequent during CMV infection. In order to study this, we measured intestinal permeability by calculating the urinary lactulose mannitol (LM) excretion ratio after oral administration of lactulose and mannitol (normal < 0.030) in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic CMV infection. A total of 111 patients were enrolled in the study, 104 of whom were tested on postoperative day (POD) 10. Twenty-nine patients developed CMV infection, 12 of whom could be studied with the permeability test (median POD 40). Another nine patients without CMV infection were also studied at day 40 and served as controls. The LM ratio increased significantly during CMV infection compared to measurements before active infection (median 0.060 vs. 0.030, P < 0.01) and was significantly higher during the infection than in the control group (median 0.007, P < 0.01). No correlation could be found between the LM ratio and viral load, humoral response to the virus, or symptomatology of infection. We conclude that an increased intestinal permeability is found in a substantial number of patients with an active, albeit asymptomatic, CMV infection after renal transplantation. Pathophysiological mechanisms and clinical implications remain speculative but will be subject to further study. PMID:8914238

  17. The Effect of DA-6034 on Intestinal Permeability in an Indomethacin-Induced Small Intestinal Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Dong Shin; Lee, Oh Young; Lee, Kang Nyeong; Jun, Dae Won; Lee, Hang Lak; Yoon, Byung Chul; Choi, Ho Soon

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims DA-6034 has anti-inflammatory activities and exhibits cytoprotective effects in acute gastric injury models. However, explanations for the protective effects of DA-6034 on intestinal permeability are limited. This study sought to investigate the effect of DA-6034 on intestinal permeability in an indomethacin-induced small intestinal injury model and its protective effect against small intestinal injury. Methods Rats in the treatment group received DA-6034 from days 0 to 2 and indomethacin from days 1 to 2. Rats in the control group received indomethacin from days 1 to 2. On the fourth day, the small intestines were examined to compare the severity of inflammation. Intestinal permeability was evaluated by using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran. Western blotting was performed to confirm the association between DA-6034 and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Results The inflammation scores in the treatment group were lower than those in the control group, but the difference was statistically insignificant. Hemorrhagic lesions in the treatment group were broader than those in the control group, but the difference was statistically insignificant. Intestinal permeability was lower in the treatment group than in the control group. DA-6034 enhanced extracellular signal-regulated kinase expression, and intestinal permeability was negatively correlated with ERK expression. Conclusions DA-6034 may decrease intestinal permeability in an indomethacin-induced intestinal injury model via the ERK pathway. PMID:27114435

  18. Permeability of rhynchophylline across human intestinal cell in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bo; Wang, Jing; Sun, Jing; Li, Ming; Xu, Huibo; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Rhynchophylline (Rhy) is the major component of Uncaria species, which is used in Chinese traditional medicine for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. However, its oral bioavailability has not been known. This study aims to investigate the intestinal permeability and related mechanisms of Rhy using cultured human epithelial Caco-2 cells. The cytotoxicity of Rhy on Caco-2 cells was evaluated with MTT assay. The effect of Rhy on the integrity of Caco-2 cell monolayer was assayed with transepithelial electrical resistance. The permeability of Rhy across cell monolayer was assayed by measuring Rhy quantity in received side with HPLC. The effect of Rhy on the expression of P-glycoprotein and MDR1 was detected with Western blot and flow cytometry, respectively. In the concentration of Rhy, which did not produce toxicity on cell viability and integrity of Caco-2 cell monolayer, Rhy crossed the monolayer with velocity 2.76~5.57×10^-6 cm/sec and 10.68~15.66×10^-6 cm/sec from apical to basolateral side and from basolateral to apical side, respectively. The permeability of Rhy was increased by verapamil, a P-glycoprotein inhibitor, or rhodamine123, a P-glycoprotein substrate. Rhy revealed an induction effect on P-glycoprotein expression in Caco-2 cells. These results demonstrate the low permeability of Rhy in intro, and suggest that P-glycoprotein may underlie the mechanism. PMID:24966905

  19. Lactic Acid Bacteria Protects Caenorhabditis elegans from Toxicity of Graphene Oxide by Maintaining Normal Intestinal Permeability under different Genetic Backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunli; Yu, Xiaoming; Jia, Ruhan; Yang, Ruilong; Rui, Qi; Wang, Dayong

    2015-11-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is safe and useful for food and feed fermentation. We employed Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the possible beneficial effect of LAB (Lactobacillus bulgaricus) pretreatment against toxicity of graphene oxide (GO) and the underlying mechanisms. LAB prevented GO toxicity on the functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs in wild-type nematodes. LAB blocked translocation of GO into secondary targeted organs through intestinal barrier by maintaining normal intestinal permeability in wild-type nematodes. Moreover, LAB prevented GO damage on the functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs in exposed nematodes with mutations of susceptible genes (sod-2, sod-3, gas-1, and aak-2) to GO toxicity by sustaining normal intestinal permeability. LAB also sustained the normal defecation behavior in both wild-type nematodes and nematodes with mutations of susceptible genes. Therefore, the beneficial role of LAB against GO toxicity under different genetic backgrounds may be due to the combinational effects on intestinal permeability and defecation behavior. Moreover, the beneficial effects of LAB against GO toxicity was dependent on the function of ACS-22, homologous to mammalian FATP4 to mammalian FATP4. Our study provides highlight on establishment of pharmacological strategy to protect intestinal barrier from toxicity of GO.

  20. Lactic Acid Bacteria Protects Caenorhabditis elegans from Toxicity of Graphene Oxide by Maintaining Normal Intestinal Permeability under different Genetic Backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunli; Yu, Xiaoming; Jia, Ruhan; Yang, Ruilong; Rui, Qi; Wang, Dayong

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is safe and useful for food and feed fermentation. We employed Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the possible beneficial effect of LAB (Lactobacillus bulgaricus) pretreatment against toxicity of graphene oxide (GO) and the underlying mechanisms. LAB prevented GO toxicity on the functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs in wild-type nematodes. LAB blocked translocation of GO into secondary targeted organs through intestinal barrier by maintaining normal intestinal permeability in wild-type nematodes. Moreover, LAB prevented GO damage on the functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs in exposed nematodes with mutations of susceptible genes (sod-2, sod-3, gas-1, and aak-2) to GO toxicity by sustaining normal intestinal permeability. LAB also sustained the normal defecation behavior in both wild-type nematodes and nematodes with mutations of susceptible genes. Therefore, the beneficial role of LAB against GO toxicity under different genetic backgrounds may be due to the combinational effects on intestinal permeability and defecation behavior. Moreover, the beneficial effects of LAB against GO toxicity was dependent on the function of ACS-22, homologous to mammalian FATP4 to mammalian FATP4. Our study provides highlight on establishment of pharmacological strategy to protect intestinal barrier from toxicity of GO. PMID:26611622

  1. Chlorogenic Acid Decreases Intestinal Permeability and Increases Expression of Intestinal Tight Junction Proteins in Weaned Rats Challenged with LPS

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Zheng; Liu, Shiqiang; Zhou, Yan; Mi, Shumei; Liu, Gang; Wu, Xin; Yao, Kang; Assaad, Houssein; Deng, Zeyuan; Hou, Yongqing; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2014-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid, a natural phenolic acid present in fruits and plants, provides beneficial effects for human health. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether chlorogenic acid (CHA) could improve the intestinal barrier integrity for weaned rats with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Thirty-two weaned male Sprague Dawley rats (21±1 d of age; 62.26±2.73 g) were selected and randomly allotted to four treatments, including weaned rat control, LPS-challenged and chlorogenic acid (CHA) supplemented group (orally 20 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg body). Dietary supplementation with CHA decreased (P<0.05) the concentrations of urea and albumin in the serum, compared to the LPS-challenged group. The levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α were lower (P<0.05) in the jejunal and colon of weaned rats receiving CHA supplementation, in comparison with the control group. CHA supplementation increased (P<0.05) villus height and the ratio of villus height to crypt depth in the jejunal and ileal mucosae under condictions of LPS challenge. CHA supplementation decreased (P<0.05) intestinal permeability, which was indicated by the ratio of lactulose to mannitol and serum DAO activity, when compared to weaned rats with LPS challenge. Immunohistochemical analysis of tight junction proteins revealed that ZO-1 and occludin protein abundances in the jejunum and colon were increased (P<0.05) by CHA supplementation. Additionally, results of immunoblot analysis revealed that the amount of occludin in the colon was also increased (P<0.05) in CHA-supplemented rats. In conclusion, CHA decreases intestinal permeability and increases intestinal expression of tight junction proteins in weaned rats challenged with LPS. PMID:24887396

  2. Actin-interacting protein 1 controls assembly and permeability of intestinal epithelial apical junctions

    PubMed Central

    Baranwal, Somesh

    2015-01-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and tight junctions (TJs) are crucial regulators of the integrity and restitution of the intestinal epithelial barrier. The structure and function of epithelial junctions depend on their association with the cortical actin cytoskeleton that, in polarized epithelial cells, is represented by a prominent perijunctional actomyosin belt. The assembly and stability of the perijunctional cytoskeleton is controlled by constant turnover (disassembly and reassembly) of actin filaments. Actin-interacting protein (Aip) 1 is an emerging regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, playing a critical role in filament disassembly. In this study, we examined the roles of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of AJs and TJs in human intestinal epithelium. Aip1 was enriched at apical junctions in polarized human intestinal epithelial cells and normal mouse colonic mucosa. Knockdown of Aip1 by RNA interference increased the paracellular permeability of epithelial cell monolayers, decreased recruitment of AJ/TJ proteins to steady-state intercellular contacts, and attenuated junctional reassembly in a calcium-switch model. The observed defects of AJ/TJ structure and functions were accompanied by abnormal organization and dynamics of the perijunctional F-actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, loss of Aip1 impaired the apico-basal polarity of intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and inhibited formation of polarized epithelial cysts in 3-D Matrigel. Our findings demonstrate a previously unanticipated role of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of intestinal epithelial junctions and early steps of epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:25792565

  3. Maintenance of superior mesenteric arterial perfusion prevents increased intestinal mucosal permeability in endotoxic pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, M.P.; Kaups, K.L.; Wang, H.L.; Rothschild, H.R. )

    1991-08-01

    Lipopolysaccharide increases intestinal mucosal permeability to hydrophilic compounds such as chromium 51-labeled edetate (51Cr-EDTA). The authors sought to determine whether this phenomenon is partly mediated by lipopolysaccharide-induced mesenteric hypoperfusion. They assessed permeability in an isolated segment of ileum by measuring plasma-to-lumen clearances (C) for two probes, 51Cr-EDTA and urea, and expressing the results as a ratio (CEDTA/CUREA). In control pigs (n = 6) resuscitated with Ringer's lactate (RL), mucosal permeability was unchanged during the 210-minute period of observation. In pigs (n = 7) infused with lipopolysaccharide (50 micrograms/kg) and similarly resuscitated with RL, mesenteric perfusion (Qsma) decreased significantly and permeability increased progressively and significantly. When endotoxic pigs (n = 6) were resuscitated with a regimen (RL plus hetastarch plus dobutamine) that preserved normal Qsma, lipopolysaccharide-induced mucosal hyperpermeability was prevented. Resuscitation of endotoxic pigs (n = 6) with RL plus hetastarch provided intermediate protection against both mesenteric hypoperfusion and increased permeability. These data suggest that diminished Qsma contributes to impaired ileal mucosal barrier function in experimental endotoxicosis.

  4. Foamed gel barriers in porous media: Breakdown and permeability evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.; Fogler, H.S.

    1995-11-01

    Foamed gel has begun to play an important role in permeability modification applications because of the reduced chemical requirements. Foamed gels create impermeable barriers in porous media; however, once a critical pressure differential is exceeded, the permeability increases with increasing pressure. A two-dimensional network model was developed to estimate foamed gel barrier performance in terms of the maximum pressure a barrier can withstand and the evolution of the foamed gel barrier`s permeability. The formation of conductive pathways and the accompanying permeability increase were estimated for a model of the pressure-induced deformation and rupture of individual lenses. The evolution of conductive pathways changed from invasion percolation (high elastic modulus, rigid gel) to a lens rupture chain reaction initiated by the rupture of a single lens (low elastic modulus gel) as the elastic modulus of the gel was decreased. The apparent fractal dimension of the first conductive channel ranged from 1.89 to 1.06 for high and low elastic modulus gels., respectively. This dependency of breakthrough and breakdown is unique and produces a large range of breakdown behavior for any degree of microscopic heterogeneity.

  5. Early increase in intestinal permeability in patients with severe acute pancreatitis: correlation with endotoxemia, organ failure, and mortality.

    PubMed

    Ammori, B J; Leeder, P C; King, R F; Barclay, G R; Martin, I G; Larvin, M; McMahon, M J

    1999-01-01

    Sepsis accounts for 80% of deaths from acute pancreatitis. This study aimed to investigate early changes in intestinal permeability in patients with acute pancreatitis, and to correlate these changes with subsequent disease severity and endotoxemia. The renal excretion of enterally administered polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350 and PEG 400 was measured within 72 hours of onset of acute pancreatitis to determine intestinal permeability. Severity was assessed on the basis of APACHE II scores and C-reactive protein measurements. Serum endotoxin and antiendotoxin antibodies were measured on admission. Eight-five patients with acute pancreatitis (mild in 56, severe in 29) and 25 healthy control subjects were studied. Urinary excretion of PEG 3350 (median) was significantly greater in patients who had severe attacks (0.61%) compared to those with mild disease (0.09%) and health control subjects (0.12%) (P <0. 0001), as was the permeability index (PEG 3350/400 excretion) (P <0. 00001). The permeability index was significantly greater in patients who subsequently developed multiple organ system failure and/or died compared with other severe cases (0.16 vs. 0.04) (P = 0.0005). The excretion of PEG 3350 correlated strongly with endotoxemia (r = 0.8; P = 0.002). Early increased intestinal permeability may play an important role in the pathophysiology of severe acute pancreatitis. Therapies that aim to restore intestinal barrier function may improve outcome. PMID:10481118

  6. The effect of elemental diet on intestinal permeability and inflammation in Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Teahon, K.; Smethurst, P.; Pearson, M.; Levi, A.J.; Bjarnason, I. )

    1991-07-01

    This study examines whether treatment of acute Crohn's disease with an elemental diet improves intestinal integrity and inflammation as assessed by a 51Cr-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetatic acid (EDTA) permeability test and the fecal excretion of 111In-labeled autologous leukocytes, respectively. Thirty-four patients with active Crohn's disease completed a 4-week treatment course with an elemental diet. Active disease was characterized by increased intestinal permeability (24-hour urine excretion of orally administered 51Cr-EDTA, 6.4% {plus minus} 0.6% (mean {plus minus} SE); normal, less than 3.0%) and by high fecal excretion of 111In-labeled leukocytes (14.2% {plus minus} 1.1%; normal, less than 1.0%). Twenty-seven (80%) went into clinical remission, usually within a week of starting treatment. After 4 weeks of treatment, there was a significant decrease in both the urine excretion of 51Cr-EDTA (to 3.4% {plus minus} 0.5%; P less than 0.01) and the fecal excretion of 111In (to 5.7% {plus minus} 1.0%; P less than 0.001), indicating that such treatment is not just symptomatic. A framework for the mechanism by which elemental diet works, centering around the importance of the integrity of the intestinal barrier function, is proposed, and also appears to provide a logical explanation for some relapses of the disease.

  7. Sodium alginate decreases the permeability of intestinal mucus

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, Alan R.; Macierzanka, Adam; Aarak, Kristi; Rigby, Neil M.; Parker, Roger; Channell, Guy A.; Harding, Stephen E.; Bajka, Balazs H.

    2016-01-01

    In the small intestine the nature of the environment leads to a highly heterogeneous mucus layer primarily composed of the MUC2 mucin. We set out to investigate whether the soluble dietary fibre sodium alginate could alter the permeability of the mucus layer. The alginate was shown to freely diffuse into the mucus and to have minimal effect on the bulk rheology when added at concentrations below 0.1%. Despite this lack of interaction between the mucin and alginate, the addition of alginate had a marked effect on the diffusion of 500 nm probe particles, which decreased as a function of increasing alginate concentration. Finally, we passed a protein stabilised emulsion through a simulation of oral, gastric and small intestinal digestion. We subsequently showed that the addition of 0.1% alginate to porcine intestinal mucus decreased the diffusion of fluorescently labelled lipid present in the emulsion digesta. This reduction may be sufficient to reduce problems associated with high rates of lipid absorption such as hyperlipidaemia. PMID:26726279

  8. In vivo analysis of intestinal permeability following hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Alsaigh, Tom; Chang, Marisol; Richter, Michael; Mazor, Rafi; Kistler, Erik B

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the time course of intestinal permeability changes to proteolytically-derived bowel peptides in experimental hemorrhagic shock. METHODS: We injected fluorescently-conjugated casein protein into the small bowel of anesthetized Wistar rats prior to induction of experimental hemorrhagic shock. These molecules, which fluoresce when proteolytically cleaved, were used as markers for the ability of proteolytically cleaved intestinal products to access the central circulation. Blood was serially sampled to quantify the relative change in concentration of proteolytically-cleaved particles in the systemic circulation. To provide spatial resolution of their location, particles in the mesenteric microvasculature were imaged using in vivo intravital fluorescent microscopy. The experiments were then repeated using an alternate measurement technique, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextrans 20, to semi-quantitatively verify the ability of bowel-derived low-molecular weight molecules (< 20 kD) to access the central circulation. RESULTS: Results demonstrate a significant increase in systemic permeability to gut-derived peptides within 20 min after induction of hemorrhage (1.11 ± 0.19 vs 0.86 ± 0.07, P < 0.05) compared to control animals. Reperfusion resulted in a second, sustained increase in systemic permeability to gut-derived peptides in hemorrhaged animals compared to controls (1.2 ± 0.18 vs 0.97 ± 0.1, P < 0.05). Intravital microscopy of the mesentery also showed marked accumulation of fluorescent particles in the microcirculation of hemorrhaged animals compared to controls. These results were replicated using FITC dextrans 20 [10.85 ± 6.52 vs 3.38 ± 1.11 fluorescent intensity units (× 105, P < 0.05, hemorrhagic shock vs controls)], confirming that small bowel ischemia in response to experimental hemorrhagic shock results in marked and early increases in gut membrane permeability. CONCLUSION: Increased small bowel permeability in hemorrhagic

  9. Acute Modulations in Permeability Barrier Function Regulate Epidermal Cornification

    PubMed Central

    Demerjian, Marianne; Hachem, Jean-Pierre; Tschachler, Erwin; Denecker, Geertrui; Declercq, Wim; Vandenabeele, Peter; Mauro, Theodora; Hupe, Melanie; Crumrine, Debra; Roelandt, Truus; Houben, Evi; Elias, Peter M.; Feingold, Kenneth R.

    2008-01-01

    Stratum corneum comprises corneocytes, derived from outer stratum granulosum during terminal differentiation, embedded in a lipid-enriched extracellular matrix, secreted from epidermal lamellar bodies. Permeability barrier insults stimulate rapid secretion of preformed lamellar bodies from the outer stratum granulosum, regulated through modulations in ionic gradients and serine protease (SP)/protease-activated receptor type 2 (PAR2) signaling. Because corneocytes are also required for barrier function, we hypothesized that corneocyte formation could also be regulated by barrier function. Barrier abrogation by two unrelated methods initiated a wave of cornification, assessed as TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling-positive cells in stratum granulosum and newly cornified cells by electron microscopy. Because cornification was blocked by occlusion, corneocytes formed specifically in response to barrier, rather than injury or cell replacement, requirements. SP inhibitors and hyperacidification (which decreases SP activity) blocked cornification after barrier disruption. Similarly, cornification was delayed in PAR2−/− mice. Although classical markers of apoptosis [poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase and caspase (Casp)-3] remained unchanged, barrier disruption activated Casp-14. Moreover, the pan-Casp inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK delayed cornification, and corneocytes were structurally aberrant in Casp14−/− mice. Thus, permeability barrier requirements coordinately drive both the generation of the stratum corneum lipid-enriched extracellular matrix and the transformation of granular cells into corneocytes, in an SP- and Casp-14-dependent manner, signaled by PAR2. PMID:18156206

  10. Antimicrobial peptide Cathelicidin-BF prevents intestinal barrier dysfunction in a mouse model of endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Song, Deguang; Zong, Xin; Zhang, Haiwen; Wang, Tenghao; Yi, Hongbo; Luan, Chao; Wang, Yizhen

    2015-03-01

    Intestinal barrier functions are altered during the development of sepsis. Cathelicidin antimicrobial peptides, such as LL-37 and mCRAMP, can protect animals against intestinal barrier dysfunction. Cathelicidin-BF (C-BF), a new cathelicidin peptide purified from the venom of the snake Bungarus fasciatus, has been shown to have both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. This study investigated whether C-BF pretreatment could protect the intestinal barrier against dysfunction in a mouse model of endotoxemia, induced by intraperitoneal injection of LPS (10mg/kg). Mice were treated with low or high dose C-BF before treatment with LPS, and samples were collected 5h after LPS treatment. C-BF reduced LPS induced intestinal histological damage and gut permeability to 4 KD Fluorescein-isothiocyanate-conjugated dextran. Pretreatment with C-BF prevented LPS induced intestinal tight junction disruption and epithelial cell apoptosis. Moreover, C-BF down regulated the expression and secretion of TNF-α, a process involving the NF-κB signaling pathway. C-BF also reduced LPS induced TNF-α expression through the NF-κB signaling pathway in mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages. These findings indicate that C-BF can prevent gut barrier dysfunction induced by LPS, suggesting that C-BF may be used to develop a prophylactic agent for intestinal injury in endotoxemia. PMID:25639228

  11. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR REMEDIATION OF INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology is an in-situ approach for groundwater remediation that couples subsurface flow management with a passive chemical or biochemical treatment zone. The development and application of the PRB technology has progressed over the last de...

  12. Permeable Reactive Barriers for Treatment of Cr6

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several options are available for treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in groundwater using the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) approach. They include conventional trench-and-fill systems, chemical redox curtains, and organic carbon redox curtains. Each of these PRB syste...

  13. MICROBIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF MANURE BASED PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The implementation of permeable reactive barriers (PRB) provides a viable option for the remediation of contaminants of environmental significance such as dissolved metals (i.e., chromium), chlorinated solvents, and nitrate/ammonia. The designs of PRBs are usually based on the a...

  14. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS: LESSONS LEARNED

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will provide an overview of research efforts at EPA on the application, monitoring, and performance of Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs) for groundwater restoration. Over the past 10 years, research projects conducted by research staff at EPA's National Risk M...

  15. COLLECTION OF DESIGN DATA: SITE CHARACTERIZATION FOR PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for the restoration of contaminated ground water are no longer innovative. PRBs have evolved from innovative to accepted, standard practice, for the containment and treatment of a variety of contaminants in ground water. Like any remedial tech...

  16. Modeling Fe0 permeable reactive barriers for groundwater remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniato, Luca; Schoups, Gerrit; Seuntjens, Piet; Bastiaens, Leen

    2010-05-01

    Remediation of groundwater pollution has traditionally been achieved by energy-intensive and drastic methods such as pump and treat (P&T) systems. Recently, more economically viable and less invasive methods such as permeable reactive barriers have been used to clean up a wide variety of groundwater pollutants (volatile organic compounds, VOCl). Permeable reactive barriers are installed in the subsurface and the naturally present hydraulic gradient makes the groundwater flow through the barrier where the contaminants are removed by different removal processes (biodegradation, sorption, precipitation, chemical destruction). Effective application of these techniques requires a solid understanding of the site-specific hydrogeological and biochemical conditions, as well as a predictive assessment of long-term remediation efficiency. For example, secondary mineral precipitation has been shown to reduce reactivity and efficiency of permeable reactive barriers and the interactions between biological and chemical processes may also influence the long-term efficiency of such systems. In this study a multi-component transport model based on PHAST USGS has been developed to simulate the removal processes in the barrier and to make quantitative predictions about the long-term efficiency of the system. In particular the modelling approach will be presented together with the model application in lab-scale experiments and in field.

  17. Endocannabinoids modulate human blood–brain barrier permeability in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hind, William H; Tufarelli, Cristina; Neophytou, Maria; Anderson, Susan I; England, Timothy J; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Endocannabinoids alter permeability at various epithelial barriers, and cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoid levels are elevated by stroke, with potential neuroprotective effects. We therefore explored the role of endocannabinoids in modulating blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability in normal conditions and in an ischaemia/reperfusion model. Experimental Approach Human brain microvascular endothelial cell and astrocyte co-cultures modelled the BBB. Ischaemia was modelled by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and permeability was measured by transepithelial electrical resistance. Endocannabinoids or endocannabinoid-like compounds were assessed for their ability to modulate baseline permeability or OGD-induced hyperpermeability. Target sites of action were investigated using receptor antagonists and subsequently identified with real-time PCR. Key Results Anandamide (10 μM) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA, 10 μM) decreased BBB permeability (i.e. increased resistance). This was mediated by cannabinoid CB2 receptors, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels, calcitonin gene-regulated peptide (CGRP) receptor (anandamide only) and PPARα (OEA only). Application of OEA, palmitoylethanolamide (both PPARα mediated) or virodhamine (all 10 μM) decreased the OGD-induced increase in permeability during reperfusion. 2-Arachidonoyl glycerol, noladin ether and oleamide did not affect BBB permeability in normal or OGD conditions. N-arachidonoyl-dopamine increased permeability through a cytotoxic mechanism. PPARα and γ, CB1 receptors, TRPV1 channels and CGRP receptors were expressed in both cell types, but mRNA for CB2 receptors was only present in astrocytes. Conclusion and Implication The endocannabinoids may play an important modulatory role in normal BBB physiology, and also afford protection to the BBB during ischaemic stroke, through a number of target sites. PMID:25651941

  18. Barrier protection via Toll-like receptor 2 signaling in porcine intestinal epithelial cells damaged by deoxynivalnol.

    PubMed

    Gu, Min Jeong; Song, Sun Kwang; Lee, In Kyu; Ko, Seongyeol; Han, Seung Eun; Bae, Suhan; Ji, Sang Yun; Park, Byung-Chul; Song, Ki-Duk; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Han, Seung Hyun; Yun, Cheol-Heui

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal barrier is the first line of defense inside the body and comprises intercellular tight junction (TJ) proteins that regulate paracellular permeability. Deoxynivalenol (DON), a fungal metabolite often found in the contaminated food of domestic animals, is known to impair intestinal barrier function and may be involved in intestinal inflammation. Unlike in humans and mice, the importance of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 expressed in porcine intestinal epithelial cells is largely unclear. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether TLR2 stimulation enhances intestinal barrier function and protects against DON exposure. We found that the cells treated with TLR2 ligands decreased the epithelial barrier permeability and enhanced TJ protein expression in intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2). In addition, pretreatment with TLR2 ligand, including Pam3CSK4 (PCSK) and lipoteichoic acid from Bacillus subtilis, prevented DON-induced barrier dysfunction by increasing the expression of TJ proteins via the PI3K-Akt-dependent pathway. It is likely that the DON-disrupted intestinal barrier caused biological changes of immune cells in the lamina propria. Thus, we conducted co-culture of differentiated IPEC-J2 cells in the upper well together with peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the bottom well and found that apical TLR2 stimulation of IPEC-J2 cells could alleviate the reduction in cell survival and proliferation of immune cells. Conclusively, TLR2 signaling on intestinal epithelial cells may enhance intestinal barrier function and prevent DON-induced barrier dysfunction of epithelial cells. PMID:26857454

  19. Blockage of protease-activated receptor 1 ameliorates heat-stress induced intestinal high permeability and bacterial translocation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiu-lin; Guo, Xiao-hua; Liu, Jing-xian; Chen, Bin; Liu, Zhi-feng; Su, Lei

    2015-04-01

    Accumulated evidences indicate intestinal lesions play an important role in the pathogenesis of heatstroke. However, the underlying mechanisms by which heat stress causes intestinal barrier dysfunction and bacterial translocation remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) in heat stress-induced intestinal hyper-permeability and bacterial translocation. Intestinal permeability in heat stressed mouse was evaluated by determining plasma endotoxin concentration and urinal lactulose/mannitol (L/M) ratio with gastric administration of L/M solution. Venous blood, liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph node tissues were collected for bacterial load test. Real time PCR was used to determine ileum PAR1 mRNA expression. In vitro study, permeability was assessed by determining trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) in human intestinal Caco-2 cell line. RWJ-58259, a selective antagonist of PAR1, was used both in vivo and in vitro studies. The results showed that heat stress could increase ileum PAR1 mRNA level, urinal L/M ratio, plasma endotoxin concentration and bacterial load in the blood, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. Blocking PAR1 with RWJ-58259 (10 mg/kg) pretreatment could significantly reduce heat stress-induced above changes, but have no role to PAR1 mRNA level. In Caco-2 cells, heat stress-induced high permeability could also be reduced by RWJ-58259 (5-20 µmol/L). In summary, our results demonstrated that PAR1 signaling pathway may play an important role in the heat stress-induced elevation of intestinal permeability, bacterial translocation and the occurrence of endotoxemia. PMID:25492552

  20. GUCY2C opposes systemic genotoxic tumorigenesis by regulating AKT-dependent intestinal barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jieru Egeria; Snook, Adam Eugene; Li, Peng; Stoecker, Brian Arthur; Kim, Gilbert Won; Magee, Michael Sullivan; Garcia, Alex Vladimir Mejia; Valentino, Michael Anthony; Hyslop, Terry; Schulz, Stephanie; Waldman, Scott Arthur

    2012-01-01

    The barrier separating mucosal and systemic compartments comprises epithelial cells, annealed by tight junctions, limiting permeability. GUCY2C recently emerged as an intestinal tumor suppressor coordinating AKT1-dependent crypt-villus homeostasis. Here, the contribution of GUCY2C to barrier integrity opposing colitis and systemic tumorigenesis is defined. Mice deficient in GUCY2C (Gucy2c(-/-)) exhibited barrier hyperpermeability associated with reduced junctional proteins. Conversely, activation of GUCY2C in mice reduced barrier permeability associated with increased junctional proteins. Further, silencing GUCY2C exacerbated, while activation reduced, chemical barrier disruption and colitis. Moreover, eliminating GUCY2C amplified, while activation reduced, systemic oxidative DNA damage. This genotoxicity was associated with increased spontaneous and carcinogen-induced systemic tumorigenesis in Gucy2c(-/-) mice. GUCY2C regulated barrier integrity by repressing AKT1, associated with increased junction proteins occludin and claudin 4 in mice and Caco2 cells in vitro. Thus, GUCY2C defends the intestinal barrier, opposing colitis and systemic genotoxicity and tumorigenesis. The therapeutic potential of this observation is underscored by the emerging clinical development of oral GUCY2C ligands, which can be used for chemoprophylaxis in inflammatory bowel disease and cancer. PMID:22384056

  1. Disruption of the Circadian Clock in Mice Increases Intestinal Permeability and Promotes Alcohol-Induced Hepatic Pathology and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Christopher B.; Shaikh, Maliha; Cavanaugh, Kate; Tang, Yueming; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Song, Shiwen

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock orchestrates temporal patterns of physiology and behavior relative to the environmental light:dark cycle by generating and organizing transcriptional and biochemical rhythms in cells and tissues throughout the body. Circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate the physiology and function of the gastrointestinal tract. Disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier enables the translocation of proinflammatory bacterial products, such as endotoxin, across the intestinal wall and into systemic circulation; a process that has been linked to pathologic inflammatory states associated with metabolic, hepatic, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases – many of which are commonly reported in shift workers. Here we report, for the first time, that circadian disorganization, using independent genetic and environmental strategies, increases permeability of the intestinal epithelial barrier (i.e., gut leakiness) in mice. Utilizing chronic alcohol consumption as a well-established model of induced intestinal hyperpermeability, we also found that both genetic and environmental circadian disruption promote alcohol-induced gut leakiness, endotoxemia and steatohepatitis, possibly through a mechanism involving the tight junction protein occludin. Circadian organization thus appears critical for the maintenance of intestinal barrier integrity, especially in the context of injurious agents, such as alcohol. Circadian disruption may therefore represent a previously unrecognized risk factor underlying the susceptibility to or development of alcoholic liver disease, as well as other conditions associated with intestinal hyperpermeability and an endotoxin-triggered inflammatory state. PMID:23825629

  2. IBD Candidate Genes and Intestinal Barrier Regulation

    PubMed Central

    McCole, Declan F.

    2015-01-01

    Technological advances in the large scale analysis of human genetics have generated profound insights into possible genetic contributions to chronic diseases including the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. To date, 163 distinct genetic risk loci have been associated with either Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, with a substantial degree of genetic overlap between these 2 conditions. Although many risk variants show a reproducible correlation with disease, individual gene associations only affect a subset of patients, and the functional contribution(s) of these risk variants to the onset of IBD is largely undetermined. Although studies in twins have demonstrated that the development of IBD is not mediated solely by genetic risk, it is nevertheless important to elucidate the functional consequences of risk variants for gene function in relevant cell types known to regulate key physiological processes that are compromised in IBD. This article will discuss IBD candidate genes that are known to be, or are suspected of being, involved in regulating the intestinal epithelial barrier and several of the physiological processes presided over by this dynamic and versatile layer of cells. This will include assembly and regulation of tight junctions, cell adhesion and polarity, mucus and glycoprotein regulation, bacterial sensing, membrane transport, epithelial differentiation, and restitution. PMID:25215613

  3. Epidermal Permeability Barrier Defects and Barrier Repair Therapy in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hae-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease perpetuated by gene-environmental interactions and which is characterized by genetic barrier defects and allergic inflammation. Recent studies demonstrate an important role for the epidermal permeability barrier in AD that is closely related to chronic immune activation in the skin during systemic allergic reactions. Moreover, acquired stressors (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus infection) to the skin barrier may also initiate inflammation in AD. Many studies involving patients with AD revealed that defective skin barriers combined with abnormal immune responses might contribute to the pathophysiology of AD, supporting the outside-inside hypothesis. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in human and animal models, focusing on the defects of the epidermal permeability barrier, its immunologic role and barrier repair therapy in AD. PMID:24991450

  4. Interleukin-23 Increases Intestinal Epithelial Cell Permeability In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Heinzerling, Nathan P; Donohoe, Deborah; Fredrich, Katherine; Gourlay, David M; Liedel, Jennifer L

    2016-06-01

    Background Breast milk has a heterogeneous composition that differs between mothers and changes throughout the first weeks after birth. The proinflammatory cytokine IL-23 has a highly variable expression in human breast milk. We hypothesize that IL-23 found in human breast milk is biologically active and promotes epithelial barrier dysfunction. Methods The immature rat small intestinal epithelial cell line, IEC-18, was grown on cell inserts or standard cell culture plates. Confluent cultures were exposed to human breast milk with high or low levels of IL-23 and barrier function was measured using a flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD-70). In addition, protein and mRNA expression of occludin and ZO-1 were measured and immunofluorescence used to stain occludin and ZO-1. Results Exposure to breast milk with high levels of IL-23 caused an increase flux of FD-70 compared with both controls and breast milk with low levels of IL-23. The protein expression of ZO-1 but not occludin was decreased by exposure to high levels of IL-23. These results correlate with immunofluorescent staining of ZO-1 and occludin which show decreased staining of occludin in both the groups exposed to breast milk with high and low IL-23. Conversely, cells exposed to high IL-23 breast milk had little peripheral staining of ZO-1 compared with controls and low IL-23 breast milk. Conclusion IL-23 in human breast milk is biologically active and negatively affects the barrier function of intestinal epithelial cells through the degradation of tight junction proteins. PMID:26007691

  5. Deoxynivalenol affects in vitro intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity through inhibition of protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Van De Walle, Jacqueline; Sergent, Therese; Piront, Neil; Toussaint, Olivier; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Larondelle, Yvan

    2010-06-15

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common mycotoxin contaminants of raw and processed cereal food, adversely affects the gastrointestinal tract. Since DON acts as a protein synthesis inhibitor, the constantly renewing intestinal epithelium could be particularly sensitive to DON. We analyzed the toxicological effects of DON on intestinal epithelial protein synthesis and barrier integrity. Differentiated Caco-2 cells, as a widely used model of the human intestinal barrier, were exposed to realistic intestinal concentrations of DON (50, 500 and 5000 ng/ml) during 24 h. DON caused a concentration-dependent decrease in total protein content associated with a reduction in the incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-leucine, demonstrating its inhibitory effect on protein synthesis. DON simultaneously increased the paracellular permeability of the monolayer as reflected through a decreased transepithelial electrical resistance associated with an increased paracellular flux of the tracer [{sup 3}H]-mannitol. A concentration-dependent reduction in the expression level of the tight junction constituent claudin-4 was demonstrated by Western blot, which was not due to diminished transcription, increased degradation, or NF-{kappa}B, ERK or JNK activation, and was also observed for a tight junction independent protein, i.e. intestinal alkaline phosphatase. These results demonstrate a dual toxicological effect of DON on differentiated Caco-2 cells consisting in an inhibition of protein synthesis as well as an increase in monolayer permeability, and moreover suggest a possible link between them through diminished synthesis of the tight junction constituent claudin-4.

  6. Intestinal barrier: A gentlemen’s agreement between microbiota and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Caricilli, Andrea Moro; Castoldi, Angela; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2014-01-01

    Our body is colonized by more than a hundred trillion commensals, represented by viruses, bacteria and fungi. This complex interaction has shown that the microbiome system contributes to the host’s adaptation to its environment, providing genes and functionality that give flexibility of diet and modulate the immune system in order not to reject these symbionts. In the intestine, specifically, the microbiota helps developing organ structures, participates of the metabolism of nutrients and induces immunity. Certain components of the microbiota have been shown to trigger inflammatory responses, whereas others, anti-inflammatory responses. The diversity and the composition of the microbiota, thus, play a key role in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and explain partially the link between intestinal microbiota changes and gut-related disorders in humans. Tight junction proteins are key molecules for determination of the paracellular permeability. In the context of intestinal inflammatory diseases, the intestinal barrier is compromised, and decreased expression and differential distribution of tight junction proteins is observed. It is still unclear what is the nature of the luminal or mucosal factors that affect the tight junction proteins function, but the modulation of the immune cells found in the intestinal lamina propria is hypothesized as having a role in this modulation. In this review, we provide an overview of the current understanding of the interaction of the gut microbiota with the immune system in the development and maintenance of the intestinal barrier. PMID:24891972

  7. Effects of acute intra-abdominal hypertension on multiple intestinal barrier functions in rats

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Yuxin; Yi, Min; Fan, Jie; Bai, Yu; Ge, Qinggang; Yao, Gaiqi

    2016-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) is a common and serious complication in critically ill patients for which there is no well-defined treatment strategy. Here, we explored the effect of IAH on multiple intestinal barriers and discussed whether the alteration in microflora provides clues to guide the rational therapeutic treatment of intestinal barriers during IAH. Using a rat model, we analysed the expression of tight junction proteins (TJs), mucins, chemotactic factors, and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) by immunohistochemistry. We also analysed the microflora populations using 16S rRNA sequencing. We found that, in addition to enhanced permeability, acute IAH (20 mmHg for 90 min) resulted in significant disturbances to mucosal barriers. Dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota was also induced, as represented by decreased Firmicutes (relative abundance), increased Proteobacteria and migration of Bacteroidetes from the colon to the jejunum. At the genus level, Lactobacillus species and Peptostreptococcaceae incertae sedis were decreased, whereas levels of lactococci remained unchanged. Our findings outline the characteristics of IAH-induced barrier changes, indicating that intestinal barriers might be treated to alleviate IAH, and the microflora may be an especially relevant target. PMID:26980423

  8. Co-Regulation and Interdependence of the Mammalian Epidermal Permeability and Antimicrobial Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Aberg, Karin M.; Man, Mao-Qiang; Gallo, Richard L.; Ganz, Tomas; Crumrine, Debra; Brown, Barbara E.; Choi, Eung-Ho; Kim, Dong-Kun; Schröder, Jens M.; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Elias, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    Human epidermis elaborates two small cationic, highly hydrophobic antimicrobial peptides (AMP), β-defensin 2 (hBD2), and the carboxypeptide cleavage product of human cathelicidin (hCAP18), LL-37, which are co-packaged along with lipids within epidermal lamellar bodies (LBs) before their secretion. Because of their colocalization, we hypothesized that AMP and barrier lipid production could be coregulated by altered permeability barrier requirements. mRNA and immunostainable protein levels for mBD3 and cathelin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) (murine homologues of hBD2 and LL-37, respectively) increase 1–8 hours after acute permeability barrier disruption and normalize by 24 hours, kinetics that mirror the lipid metabolic response to permeability barrier disruption. Artificial permeability barrier restoration, which inhibits the lipid-synthetic response leading to barrier recovery, blocks the increase in AMP mRNA/protein expression, further evidence that AMP expression is linked to permeability barrier function. Conversely, LB-derived AMPs are also important for permeability barrier homeostasis. Despite an apparent increase in mBD3 protein, CRAMP−/− mice delayed permeability barrier recovery, attributable to defective LB contents and abnormalities in the structure of the lamellar membranes that regulate permeability barrier function. These studies demonstrate that (1) the permeability and antimicrobial barriers are coordinately regulated by permeability barrier requirements and (2) CRAMP is required for permeability barrier homeostasis. PMID:17943185

  9. Regulation of intestinal epithelial cells transcriptome by enteric glial cells: impact on intestinal epithelial barrier functions

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Emerging evidences suggest that enteric glial cells (EGC), a major constituent of the enteric nervous system (ENS), are key regulators of intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) functions. Indeed EGC inhibit intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) proliferation and increase IEB paracellular permeability. However, the role of EGC on other important barrier functions and the signalling pathways involved in their effects are currently unknown. To achieve this goal, we aimed at identifying the impact of EGC upon IEC transcriptome by performing microarray studies. Results EGC induced significant changes in gene expression profiling of proliferating IEC after 24 hours of co-culture. 116 genes were identified as differentially expressed (70 up-regulated and 46 down-regulated) in IEC cultured with EGC compared to IEC cultured alone. By performing functional analysis of the 116 identified genes using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, we showed that EGC induced a significant regulation of genes favoring both cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix adhesion as well as cell differentiation. Consistently, functional studies showed that EGC induced a significant increase in cell adhesion. EGC also regulated genes involved in cell motility towards an enhancement of cell motility. In addition, EGC profoundly modulated expression of genes involved in cell proliferation and cell survival, although no clear functional trend could be identified. Finally, important genes involved in lipid and protein metabolism of epithelial cells were shown to be differentially regulated by EGC. Conclusion This study reinforces the emerging concept that EGC have major protective effects upon the IEB. EGC have a profound impact upon IEC transcriptome and induce a shift in IEC phenotype towards increased cell adhesion and cell differentiation. This concept needs to be further validated under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:19883504

  10. Hydroxyethyl Starch (HES 130/0.4) Impairs Intestinal Barrier Integrity and Metabolic Function: Findings from a Mouse Model of the Isolated Perfused Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Dombrowsky, Heike; Zitta, Karina; Bein, Berthold; Krause, Thorsten; Goldmann, Torsten; Frerichs, Inez; Steinfath, Markus; Weiler, Norbert; Albrecht, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background The application of hydroxyethyl starch (HES) for volume resuscitation is controversially discussed and clinical studies have suggested adverse effects of HES substitution, leading to increased patient mortality. Although, the intestine is of high clinical relevance and plays a crucial role in sepsis and inflammation, information about the effects of HES on intestinal function and barrier integrity is very scarce. We therefore evaluated the effects of clinically relevant concentrations of HES on intestinal function and barrier integrity employing an isolated perfused model of the mouse small intestine. Methods An isolated perfused model of the mouse small intestine was established and intestines were vascularly perfused with a modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing 3% Albumin (N=7) or 3% HES (130/0.4; N=7). Intestinal metabolic function (galactose uptake, lactate-to-pyruvate ratio), edema formation (wet-to-dry weight ratio), morphology (histological and electron microscopical analysis), fluid shifts within the vascular, lymphatic and luminal compartments, as well as endothelial and epithelial barrier permeability (FITC-dextran translocation) were evaluated in both groups. Results Compared to the Albumin group, HES perfusion did not significantly change the wet-to-dry weight ratio and lactate-to-pyruvate ratio. However, perfusing the small intestine with 3% HES resulted in a significant loss of vascular fluid (p<0.01), an increased fluid accumulation in the intestinal lumen (p<0.001), an enhanced translocation of FITC-dextran from the vascular to the luminal compartment (p<0.001) and a significantly impaired intestinal galactose uptake (p<0.001). Morphologically, these findings were associated with an aggregation of intracellular vacuoles within the intestinal epithelial cells and enlarged intercellular spaces. Conclusion A vascular perfusion with 3% HES impairs the endothelial and epithelial barrier integrity as well as metabolic function of the small

  11. Monitoring Permeable Reactive Barriers using Electrical Resistance Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A; Bratton, W; Maresca, J; Daily, W; Dickerson, W

    2003-12-08

    An electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method is being evaluated as a measurement tool to determine the integrity of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) during and after construction of the barrier and as a monitoring tool to determine the long-term operational health of the barrier. The method is novel because it inserts the electrodes directly into the barrier itself. Numerical modeling calculations indicate that the ERT method can detect flaws (voids) in the barrier as small as 0.11 m{sup 2} (0.33 m x 0.33 m) when the aspect ratio of the electrodes are 2:1. Laboratory measurements indicate that the change in resistance over time of the iron-filling mixture used to create the PRB is sufficient for ERT to monitor the long-term health of the barrier. The use of this ERT method allows for the cost-effective installation of the barrier, especially when the vadose zone is large, because borehole installation methods, rather than trenching methods, can be used.

  12. Biorelevant media resistant co-culture model mimicking permeability of human intestine.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Delphine; Pellequer, Yann; Tempesta, Camille; Lorscheidt, Stefan; Kettel, Bernadette; Tamaddon, Lana; Jannin, Vincent; Demarne, Frédéric; Lamprecht, Alf; Béduneau, Arnaud

    2015-03-15

    Cell culture models are currently used to predict absorption pattern of new compounds and formulations in the human gastro-intestinal tract (GIT). One major drawback is the lack of relevant apical incubation fluids allowing mimicking luminal conditions in the GIT. Here, we suggest a culture model compatible with biorelevant media, namely Fasted State Simulated Intestinal Fluid (FaSSIF) and Fed State Simulated Intestinal Fluid (FeSSIF). Co-culture was set up from Caco-2 and mucus-secreting HT29-MTX cells using an original seeding procedure. Viability and cytotoxicity assays were performed following incubation of FeSSIF and FaSSIF with co-culture. Influence of biorelevant fluids on paracellular permeability or transporter proteins were also evaluated. Results were compared with Caco-2 and HT29-MTX monocultures. While Caco-2 viability was strongly affected with FeSSIF, no toxic effect was detected for the co-cultures in terms of viability and lactate dehydrogenase release. The addition of FeSSIF to the basolateral compartment of the co-culture induced cytotoxic effects which suggested the apical mucus barrier being cell protective. In contrast to FeSSIF, FaSSIF induced a slight increase of the paracellular transport and both tested media inhibited partially the P-gp-mediated efflux in the co-culture. Additionally, the absorptive transport of propranolol hydrochloride, a lipophilic β-blocker, was strongly affected by biorelevant fluids. This study demonstrated the compatibility of the Caco-2/HT29-MTX model with some of the current biorelevant media. Combining biorelevant intestinal fluids with features such as mucus secretion, adjustable paracellular and P-gp mediated transports, is a step forward to more realistic in-vitro models of the human intestine. PMID:25601199

  13. Electroacupuncture at Bilateral Zusanli Points (ST36) Protects Intestinal Mucosal Immune Barrier in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mei-Fei; Xing, Xi; Lei, Shu; Wu, Jian-Nong; Wang, Ling-Cong; Huang, Li-Quan; Jiang, Rong-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis results in high morbidity and mortality. Immunomodulation strategies could be an adjunctive therapy to treat sepsis. Acupuncture has also been used widely for many years in China to treat sepsis. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well-defined. We demonstrated here that EA preconditioning at ST36 obviously ameliorated CLP-induced intestinal injury and high permeability and reduced the mortality of CLP-induced sepsis rats. Moreover, electroacupuncture (EA) pretreatment exerted protective effects on intestinal mucosal immune barrier by increasing the concentration of sIgA and the percentage of CD3+, γ/δ, and CD4+ T cells and the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T cells. Although EA at ST36 treatments immediately after closing the abdomen in the CLP procedure with low-frequency or high-frequency could not reduce the mortality of CLP-induced sepsis in rats, these EA treatments could also significantly improve intestinal injury index in rats with sepsis and obviously protected intestinal mucosal immune barrier. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that EA at ST36 could improve intestinal mucosal immune barrier in sepsis induced by CLP, while the precise mechanism underlying the effects needs to be further elucidated. PMID:26346309

  14. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1–Dependent Induction of Intestinal Trefoil Factor Protects Barrier Function during Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Glenn T.; Turner, Jerrold R.; Taylor, Cormac T.; Hershberg, Robert M.; Comerford, Katrina; Narravula, Sailaja; Podolsky, Daniel K.; Colgan, Sean P.

    2001-01-01

    Mucosal organs such as the intestine are supported by a rich and complex underlying vasculature. For this reason, the intestine, and particularly barrier-protective epithelial cells, are susceptible to damage related to diminished blood flow and concomitant tissue hypoxia. We sought to identify compensatory mechanisms that protect epithelial barrier during episodes of intestinal hypoxia. Initial studies examining T84 colonic epithelial cells revealed that barrier function is uniquely resistant to changes elicited by hypoxia. A search for intestinal-specific, barrier-protective factors revealed that the human intestinal trefoil factor (ITF) gene promoter bears a previously unappreciated binding site for hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1. Hypoxia resulted in parallel induction of ITF mRNA and protein. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay analysis using ITF-specific, HIF-1 consensus motifs resulted in a hypoxia-inducible DNA binding activity, and loading cells with antisense oligonucleotides directed against the α chain of HIF-1 resulted in a loss of ITF hypoxia inducibility. Moreover, addition of anti-ITF antibody resulted in a loss of barrier function in epithelial cells exposed to hypoxia, and the addition of recombinant human ITF to vascular endothelial cells partially protected endothelial cells from hypoxia-elicited barrier disruption. Extensions of these studies in vivo revealed prominent hypoxia-elicited increases in intestinal permeability in ITF null mice. HIF-1–dependent induction of ITF may provide an adaptive link for maintenance of barrier function during hypoxia. PMID:11342587

  15. Impaired function of the intestinal barrier in a novel sub-health rat model

    PubMed Central

    FENG, SISI; LIU, WEIDONG; ZUO, SHENGNAN; XIE, TINGYAN; DENG, HUI; ZHANG, QIUHUAN; ZHONG, BAIYUN

    2016-01-01

    Sub-health is a state featuring a deterioration in physiological function between health and illness, and the sub-health condition has surfaced as life-threatening in humans. The aim of the present study was to establish a sub-health model in rats, and investigate the function of the intestinal barrier in the sub-health rats and rats following intervention. To establish a sub-health model, the rats were subjected to a high-fat and sugar diet, motion restriction and chronic stress. Their serum glucose and triglyceride levels, immune function and adaptability were then measured. The levels of diamine oxidase and D-lactic acid in the plasma were analyzed as markers of the intestinal permeability. The protein and mRNA expression levels of anti-apoptotic YWHAZ in the colonic tissue was detected using immunohistochemical and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses In the present study, the sub-health rat model was successfully established, and sub-health factors increased the intestinal permeability and reduced the expression of YWHAZ. Providing sub-health rats with normal living conditions did not improve the function of the intestinal barrier. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that intestinal disorders in the sub-health rat model may result from the damage caused by reduce intestinal barrier function as well as the decreased expression levels of YWHAZ. Additionally, rats in the sub-health condition did not recover following subsequent exposure to normal living conditions, suggesting that certain exercises or medical intervention may be necessary to improve sub-health symptoms. PMID:26957295

  16. Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 Restores Gut Barrier Permeability in Chronically Low-Grade Inflamed Mice.

    PubMed

    Martín, Rebeca; Laval, Laure; Chain, Florian; Miquel, Sylvie; Natividad, Jane; Cherbuy, Claire; Sokol, Harry; Verdu, Elena F; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan; Bermudez-Humaran, Luis G; Smokvina, Tamara; Langella, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the efficacy of many probiotic strains in the management of gastrointestinal disorders associated with deregulated intestinal barrier function and/or structure. In particular, bifidobacteria have been studied for their efficacy to both prevent and treat a broad spectrum of animal and/or human gut disorders. The aim of the current work was thus to evaluate effects on intestinal barrier function of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494, a strain used in fermented dairy products. A chronic dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced low-grade inflammation model causing gut dysfunction in mice was used in order to study markers of inflammation, intestinal permeability, and immune function in the presence of the bacterial strain. In this chronic low-grade inflammation mice model several parameters pointed out the absence of an over active inflammation process. However, gut permeability, lymphocyte populations, and colonic cytokines were found to be altered. B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 was able to protect barrier functions by restoring intestinal permeability, colonic goblet cell populations, and cytokine levels. Furthermore, tight junction (TJ) proteins levels were also measured by qRT-PCR showing the ability of this strain to specifically normalize the level of several TJ proteins, in particular for claudin-4. Finally, B. lactis strain counterbalanced CD4(+) lymphocyte alterations in both spleen and mesenteric lymphoid nodes. It restores the Th1/Th2 ratio altered by the DNBS challenge (which locally augments CD4(+) Th1 cells) by increasing the Th2 response as measured by the increase in the production of major representative Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10). Altogether, these data suggest that B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 may efficiently prevent disorders associated with increased barrier permeability. PMID:27199937

  17. Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 Restores Gut Barrier Permeability in Chronically Low-Grade Inflamed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Rebeca; Laval, Laure; Chain, Florian; Miquel, Sylvie; Natividad, Jane; Cherbuy, Claire; Sokol, Harry; Verdu, Elena F.; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan; Bermudez-Humaran, Luis G.; Smokvina, Tamara; Langella, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the efficacy of many probiotic strains in the management of gastrointestinal disorders associated with deregulated intestinal barrier function and/or structure. In particular, bifidobacteria have been studied for their efficacy to both prevent and treat a broad spectrum of animal and/or human gut disorders. The aim of the current work was thus to evaluate effects on intestinal barrier function of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494, a strain used in fermented dairy products. A chronic dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced low-grade inflammation model causing gut dysfunction in mice was used in order to study markers of inflammation, intestinal permeability, and immune function in the presence of the bacterial strain. In this chronic low-grade inflammation mice model several parameters pointed out the absence of an over active inflammation process. However, gut permeability, lymphocyte populations, and colonic cytokines were found to be altered. B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 was able to protect barrier functions by restoring intestinal permeability, colonic goblet cell populations, and cytokine levels. Furthermore, tight junction (TJ) proteins levels were also measured by qRT-PCR showing the ability of this strain to specifically normalize the level of several TJ proteins, in particular for claudin-4. Finally, B. lactis strain counterbalanced CD4+ lymphocyte alterations in both spleen and mesenteric lymphoid nodes. It restores the Th1/Th2 ratio altered by the DNBS challenge (which locally augments CD4+ Th1 cells) by increasing the Th2 response as measured by the increase in the production of major representative Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10). Altogether, these data suggest that B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 may efficiently prevent disorders associated with increased barrier permeability. PMID:27199937

  18. Fucoidan enhances intestinal barrier function by upregulating the expression of claudin-1

    PubMed Central

    Iraha, Atsushi; Chinen, Hiroshi; Hokama, Akira; Yonashiro, Takumi; Kinjo, Tetsu; Kishimoto, Kazuto; Nakamoto, Manabu; Hirata, Tetsuo; Kinjo, Nagisa; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao; Kinjo, Fukunori; Fujita, Jiro

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the protective effects of fucoidan on oxidative stress-induced barrier disruption in human intestinal epithelial cells. METHODS: In Caco-2 cell monolayer models, the disruption of barrier function by oxidative stress is mediated by H2O2. The integrity of polarized Caco-2 cell monolayers was determined by measuring the transepithelial resistance (TER) and permeability was estimated by measuring the paracellular transport of FITC-labeled 4-kDa dextran (FD4). The protective effects of fucoidan on epithelial barrier functions on polarized Caco-2 cell monolayers were evaluated by TER and FD4 flux. The expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins was assessed using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescence staining. RESULTS: Without H2O2 treatment, fucoidan significantly increased the TER compared to control (P < 0.05), indicating a direct enhancement of intestinal epithelial barrier function. Next, H2O2 disrupted the epithelial barrier function in a time-dependent manner. Fucoidan prevented the H2O2-induced destruction in a dose-dependent manner. Fucoidan significantly decreased H2O2-induced FD4 flux (P < 0.01), indicating the prevention of disruption in paracellular permeability. RT-PCR showed that Caco-2 cells endogenously expressed claudin-1 and -2, and occludin and that H2O2 reduced the mRNA expression of these TJ proteins. Treatment with fucoidan attenuated the reduction in the expressions of claudin-1 and claudin-2 but not occludin. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the expression of claudin-1 was intact and high on the cell surface. H2O2 disrupted the integrity of claudin-1. Treatment with fucoidan dramatically attenuated the expression of claudin-1. CONCLUSION: Fucoidan enhanced intestinal epithelial barrier function by upregulating the expression of claudin-1. Thus, fucoidan may be an appropriate therapy for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:24023493

  19. Nitric oxide attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced barrier disruption and protein tyrosine phosphorylation in monolayers of intestinal epithelial cell.

    PubMed

    Katsube, Takanori; Tsuji, Hideo; Onoda, Makoto

    2007-06-01

    The intestinal epithelium provides a barrier to the transport of harmful luminal molecules into the systemic circulation. A dysfunctional epithelial barrier is closely associated with the pathogenesis of a variety of intestinal and systemic disorders. We investigated here the effects of nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on the barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2. When treated with H(2)O(2), Caco-2 cell monolayers grown on permeable supports exhibited several remarkable features of barrier dysfunction as follows: a decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance, an increase in paracellular permeability to dextran, and a disruption of the intercellular junctional localization of the scaffolding protein ZO-1. In addition, an induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous cellular proteins including ZO-1, E-cadherin, and beta-catenin, components of tight and adherens junctions, was observed. On the other hand, combined treatment of Caco-2 monolayers with H(2)O(2) and an NO donor (NOC5 or NOC12) relieved the damage to the barrier function and suppressed the protein tyrosine phosphorylation induced by H(2)O(2) alone. These results suggest that NO protects the barrier function of intestinal epithelia from oxidative stress by modulating some intracellular signaling pathways of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in epithelial cells. PMID:17451824

  20. Automated Impedance Tomography for Monitoring Permeable Reactive Barrier Health

    SciTech Connect

    LaBrecque, D J; Adkins, P L

    2009-07-02

    The objective of this research was the development of an autonomous, automated electrical geophysical monitoring system which allows for near real-time assessment of Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) health and aging and which provides this assessment through a web-based interface to site operators, owners and regulatory agencies. Field studies were performed at four existing PRB sites; (1) a uranium tailing site near Monticello, Utah, (2) the DOE complex at Kansas City, Missouri, (3) the Denver Federal Center in Denver, Colorado and (4) the Asarco Smelter site in East Helena, Montana. Preliminary surface data over the PRB sites were collected (in December, 2005). After the initial round of data collection, the plan was modified to include studies inside the barriers in order to better understand barrier aging processes. In September 2006 an autonomous data collection system was designed and installed at the EPA PRB and the electrode setups in the barrier were revised and three new vertical electrode arrays were placed in dedicated boreholes which were in direct contact with the PRB material. Final data were collected at the Kansas City, Denver and Monticello, Utah PRB sites in the fall of 2007. At the Asarco Smelter site in East Helena, Montana, nearly continuous data was collected by the autonomous monitoring system from June 2006 to November 2007. This data provided us with a picture of the evolution of the barrier, enabling us to examine barrier changes more precisely and determine whether these changes are due to installation issues or are normal barrier aging. Two rounds of laboratory experiments were carried out during the project. We conducted column experiments to investigate the effect of mineralogy on the electrical signatures resulting from iron corrosion and mineral precipitation in zero valent iron (ZVI) columns. In the second round of laboratory experiments we observed the electrical response from simulation of actual field PRBs at two sites: the

  1. Transmural Intestinal Wall Permeability in Severe Ischemia after Enteral Protease Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Altshuler, Angelina E.; Lamadrid, Itze; Li, Diana; Ma, Stephanie R.; Kurre, Leena; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.; Penn, Alexander H.

    2014-01-01

    In intestinal ischemia, inflammatory mediators in the small intestine's lumen such as food byproducts, bacteria, and digestive enzymes leak into the peritoneal space, lymph, and circulation, but the mechanisms by which the intestinal wall permeability initially increases are not well defined. We hypothesize that wall protease activity (independent of luminal proteases) and apoptosis contribute to the increased transmural permeability of the intestine's wall in an acutely ischemic small intestine. To model intestinal ischemia, the proximal jejunum to the distal ileum in the rat was excised, the lumen was rapidly flushed with saline to remove luminal contents, sectioned into equal length segments, and filled with a tracer (fluorescein) in saline, glucose, or protease inhibitors. The transmural fluorescein transport was determined over 2 hours. Villi structure and epithelial junctional proteins were analyzed. After ischemia, there was increased transmural permeability, loss of villi structure, and destruction of epithelial proteins. Supplementation with luminal glucose preserved the epithelium and significantly attenuated permeability and villi damage. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors (doxycycline, GM 6001), and serine protease inhibitor (tranexamic acid) in the lumen, significantly reduced the fluorescein transport compared to saline for 90 min of ischemia. Based on these results, we tested in an in-vivo model of hemorrhagic shock (90 min 30 mmHg, 3 hours observation) for intestinal lesion formation. Single enteral interventions (saline, glucose, tranexamic acid) did not prevent intestinal lesions, while the combination of enteral glucose and tranexamic acid prevented lesion formation after hemorrhagic shock. The results suggest that apoptotic and protease mediated breakdown cause increased permeability and damage to the intestinal wall. Metabolic support in the lumen of an ischemic intestine with glucose reduces the transport from the lumen across the wall

  2. Intestinal permeability of forskolin by in situ single pass perfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen-Jun; Jiang, Dong-bo; Tian, Lu-Lu; Yin, Jia-Jun; Huang, Jian-Ming; Weng, Wei-Yu

    2012-05-01

    The intestinal permeability of forskolin was investigated using a single pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) technique in rats. SPIP was performed in different intestinal segments (duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon) with three concentrations of forskolin (11.90, 29.75, and 59.90 µg/mL). The investigations of adsorption and stability were performed to ensure that the disappearance of forskolin from the perfusate was due to intestinal absorption. The results of the SPIP study indicated that forskolin could be absorbed in all segments of the intestine. The effective permeability (P (eff)) of forskolin was in the range of drugs with high intestinal permeability. The P (eff) was highest in the duodenum as compared to other intestinal segments. The decreases of P (eff) in the duodenum and ileum at the highest forskolin concentration suggested a saturable transport process. The addition of verapamil, a P-glycoprotein inhibitor, significantly enhanced the permeability of forskolin across the rat jejunum. The absorbed fraction of dissolved forskolin after oral administration in humans was estimated to be 100 % calculated from rat P (eff). In conclusion, dissolved forskolin can be absorbed readily in the intestine. The low aqueous solubility of forskolin might be a crucial factor for its poor oral bioavailability. PMID:22411728

  3. Intestinal Permeability and Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 in Children with Autism: A Controlled Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Marli A.; Sigalet, David L.; Holst, Jens J.; Meddings, Jon B.; Wood, Julie; Sharkey, Keith A.

    2008-01-01

    We measured small intestinal permeability using a lactulose:mannitol sugar permeability test in a group of children with autism, with current or previous gastrointestinal complaints. Secondly, we examined whether children with autism had an abnormal glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) response to feeding. Results were compared with sibling controls…

  4. Long-Term Monitoring of Permeable Reactive Barriers - Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, L.

    2001-04-12

    The purpose of this project is to conduct collaborative research to evaluate and maximize the effectiveness of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) with a broad-based working group including representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) and its project partner, Battelle, are leading the DoD effort with funding from DoD's Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) and Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is coordinating the DOE effort with support from Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area (SCFA), a research program under DOEs Office of Science and Technology. The National Risk Management Research Laboratory's Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division is leading EPA's effort. The combined effort of these three agencies allows the evaluation of a large number of sites. Documents generated by this joint project will be reviewed by the participating agencies' principal investigators, the Permeable Barriers Group of the Remediation Technologies Development Forum (RTDF), and the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Cooperation (ITRC). The technical objectives of this project are to collect and review existing field data at selected PRB sites, identify data gaps, conduct additional measurements, and provide recommendations to DOE users on suitable long-term monitoring strategies. The specific objectives are to (1) evaluate geochemical and hydraulic performance of PRBs, (2) develop guidelines for hydraulic and geochemical characterization/monitoring, and (3) devise and implement long-term monitoring strategies through the use of hydrological and geochemical models. Accomplishing these objectives will provide valuable information regarding the optimum configuration and lifetime of barriers at specific sites. It will also permit

  5. Permeapad™ for investigation of passive drug permeability: The effect of surfactants, co-solvents and simulated intestinal fluids (FaSSIF and FeSSIF).

    PubMed

    Bibi, Hanady Ajine; di Cagno, Massimiliano; Holm, Rene; Bauer-Brandl, Annette

    2015-09-30

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the potential of the new and innovative artificial barrier, Permeapad™, when exposed to surfactants and co-solvents, often employed for poorly water soluble compounds. The barrier was in addition also exposed to fasted and fed state simulated intestinal fluids versions 1 and 2 (FaSSIF and FeSSIF), all of which the Permeapad™ barrier was compatible with based upon relative comparison of the permeability of the hydrophilic marker calcein in phosphate buffer. The new barrier therefore holds a huge potential due to its functional stability and robustness. It can be used as a standard tool to investigate permeability of drugs in the presence of different surfactants and co-solvents, from DMSO stock solutions at even high concentrations and for the evaluation of permeability in the presence of biomimetic media (BMM). PMID:26192628

  6. Glycoprotein A33 deficiency: a new mouse model of impaired intestinal epithelial barrier function and inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Benjamin B; Tebbutt, Niall C; Buchert, Michael; Putoczki, Tracy L; Doggett, Karen; Bao, Shisan; Johnstone, Cameron N; Masson, Frederick; Hollande, Frederic; Burgess, Antony W; Scott, Andrew M; Ernst, Matthias; Heath, Joan K

    2015-08-01

    The cells of the intestinal epithelium provide a selectively permeable barrier between the external environment and internal tissues. The integrity of this barrier is maintained by tight junctions, specialised cell-cell contacts that permit the absorption of water and nutrients while excluding microbes, toxins and dietary antigens. Impairment of intestinal barrier function contributes to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, including food hypersensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colitis-associated cancer (CAC). Glycoprotein A33 (GPA33) is an intestinal epithelium-specific cell surface marker and member of the CTX group of transmembrane proteins. Roles in cell-cell adhesion have been demonstrated for multiple CTX family members, suggesting a similar function for GPA33 within the gastrointestinal tract. To test a potential requirement for GPA33 in intestinal barrier function, we generated Gpa33(-/-) mice and subjected them to experimental regimens designed to produce food hypersensitivity, colitis and CAC. Gpa33(-/-) mice exhibited impaired intestinal barrier function. This was shown by elevated steady-state immunosurveillance in the colonic mucosa and leakiness to oral TRITC-labelled dextran after short-term exposure to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) to injure the intestinal epithelium. Gpa33(-/-) mice also exhibited rapid onset and reduced resolution of DSS-induced colitis, and a striking increase in the number of colitis-associated tumours produced by treatment with the colon-specific mutagen azoxymethane (AOM) followed by two cycles of DSS. In contrast, Gpa33(-/-) mice treated with AOM alone showed no increase in sporadic tumour formation, indicating that their increased tumour susceptibility is dependent on inflammatory stimuli. Finally, Gpa33(-/-) mice displayed hypersensitivity to food allergens, a common co-morbidity in humans with IBD. We propose that Gpa33(-/-) mice provide a valuable model to study the mechanisms linking intestinal

  7. Treatment of inorganic contaminants using permeable reactive barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blowes, David W.; Ptacek, Carol J.; Benner, Shawn G.; McRae, Che W. T.; Bennett, Timothy A.; Puls, Robert W.

    2000-09-01

    Permeable reactive barriers are an emerging alternative to traditional pump and treat systems for groundwater remediation. This technique has progressed rapidly over the past decade from laboratory bench-scale studies to full-scale implementation. Laboratory studies indicate the potential for treatment of a large number of inorganic contaminants, including As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, Tc, U, V, NO 3, PO 4 and SO 4. Small-scale field studies have demonstrated treatment of Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, NO 3, PO 4 and SO 4. Permeable reactive barriers composed of zero-valent iron have been used in full-scale installations for the treatment of Cr, U, and Tc. Solid-phase organic carbon in the form of municipal compost has been used to remove dissolved constituents associated with acid-mine drainage, including SO 4, Fe, Ni, Co and Zn. Dissolved nutrients, including NO 3 and PO 4, have been removed from domestic septic-system effluent and agricultural drainage.

  8. Cellular uptake and transcytosis of lipid-based nanoparticles across the intestinal barrier: Relevance for oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Neves, Ana Rute; Queiroz, Joana Fontes; Costa Lima, Sofia A; Figueiredo, Francisco; Fernandes, Rui; Reis, Salette

    2016-02-01

    Oral administration is the preferred route for drug delivery and nanosystems represent a promising tool for protection and transport of hardly soluble, chemically unstable and poorly permeable drugs through the intestinal barrier. In the present work, we have studied lipid nanoparticles cellular uptake, internalization pathways and transcytosis routes through Caco-2 cell monolayers. Both lipid nanosystems presented similar size (∼180nm) and surface charge (-30mV). Nanostructured lipid carriers showed a higher cellular uptake and permeability across the barrier, but solid lipid nanoparticles could enter cells faster than the former. The internalization of lipid nanoparticles occurs mainly through a clathrin-mediated endocytosis mechanism, although caveolae-mediated endocytosis is also involved in the uptake. Both lipid nanoparticles were able to cross the intestinal barrier by a preferential transcellular route. This work contributed to a better knowledge of the developed nanosystems for the oral delivery of a wide spectrum of drugs. PMID:26550783

  9. Nonmuscle Myosin IIA Regulates Intestinal Epithelial Barrier in vivo and Plays a Protective Role During Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Naydenov, Nayden G.; Feygin, Alex; Wang, Dongdong; Kuemmerle, John F.; Harris, Gianni; Conti, Mary Anne; Adelstein, Robert S.; Ivanov, Andrei I.

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a critical regulator of intestinal mucosal barrier permeability, and the integrity of epithelial adherens junctions (AJ) and tight junctions (TJ). Non muscle myosin II (NM II) is a key cytoskeletal motor that controls actin filament architecture and dynamics. While NM II has been implicated in the regulation of epithelial junctions in vitro, little is known about its roles in the intestinal mucosa in vivo. In this study, we generated a mouse model with an intestinal epithelial-specific knockout of NM IIA heavy chain (NM IIA cKO) and examined the structure and function of normal gut barrier, and the development of experimental colitis in these animals. Unchallenged NM IIA cKO mice showed increased intestinal permeability and altered expression/localization of several AJ/TJ proteins. They did not develop spontaneous colitis, but demonstrated signs of a low-scale mucosal inflammation manifested by prolapses, lymphoid aggregates, increased cytokine expression, and neutrophil infiltration in the gut. NM IIA cKO animals were characterized by a more severe disruption of the gut barrier and exaggerated mucosal injury during experimentally-induced colitis. Our study provides the first evidence that NM IIA plays important roles in establishing normal intestinal barrier, and protection from mucosal inflammation in vivo. PMID:27063635

  10. Excised segments of rat small intestine in Ussing chamber studies: A comparison of native and stripped tissue viability and permeability to drugs.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Erik; Eriksson, Johanna; Vedin, Charlotta; Breitholtz, Katarina; Hilgendorf, Constanze

    2016-05-30

    Excised rat intestinal tissue mounted in an Ussing chamber can be used for intestinal permeability assessments in drug development. The outer layer of the intestine, the serosa and part of the muscle layer, is traditionally removed since it is considered a barrier to the diffusion of nutrients and oxygen as well as to that of pharmaceutical substances. However, the procedure for removing the serosal-muscle layer, i.e. stripping, is a technically challenging process in the pre-experimental preparation of the tissue which may result in tissue damage and reduced viability of the segment. In this study, the viability of stripped and native (non-stripped) rat small intestine tissue segments mounted in Ussing chambers was monitored and the apparent permeability of the tissue to a set of test compounds across both tissue preparations was determined. Electrical measurements, in particular the potential difference (PD) across the intestinal membrane, were used to evaluate the viability. In this study, there were no differences in initial PD (health status of the tissue) or PD over time (viability throughout the experiment) between native and stripped rat jejunum segments. Overall, there were also no significant differences in permeability between stripped and native rat intestinal tissue for the compounds in this study. Based on these results, we propose that stripping can be excluded from the preparation procedures for rat jejunal tissue for permeability studies when using the Ussing chamber technique. PMID:27073083

  11. Pseudomonas fluorescens alters epithelial permeability and translocates across Caco-2/TC7 intestinal cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas fluorescens has long been considered as a psychrotrophic microorganism. Recently, we have shown that clinical strains of P. fluorescens (biovar 1) are able to adapt at a growth temperature of 37°C or above and induce a specific inflammatory response. Interestingly, a highly specific antigen of P. fluorescens, I2, is detected in the serum of patients with Crohn's disease but the possible role of this bacterium in the disease has not yet been explored. In the present study, we examined the ability of a psychrotrophic and a clinical strain of P. fluorescens to modulate the permeability of a Caco-2/TC7 intestinal epithelial model, reorganize the actin cytoskeleton, invade the target cells and translocate across the epithelium. The behaviour of these two strains was compared to that of the well known opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa PAO1. Results Both strains of P. fluorescens were found to decrease the transepithelial resistance (TER) of Caco-2/TC7 differentiated monolayers. This was associated with an increase in paracellular permeability and F-actin microfilaments rearrangements. Moreover, the invasion and translocation tests demonstrated that the two strains used in this study can invade and translocate across the differentiated Caco-2/TC7 cell monolayers. Conclusions The present work shows for the first time, that P. fluorescens is able to alter the intestinal epithelial barrier function by disorganizing the F-actin microfilament network. Moreover, we reveal that independently of their origins, the two P. fluorescens strains can translocate across differentiated Caco-2/TC7 cell monolayers by using the transcellular pathway. These findings could, at least in part, explain the presence of the P. fluorescens specific I2 antigen in the serum of patients with Crohn's disease. PMID:21110894

  12. Human in vivo regional intestinal permeability: quantitation using site-specific drug absorption data.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Erik; Dahlgren, David; Roos, Carl; Lennernäs, Hans

    2015-06-01

    Application of information on regional intestinal permeability has been identified as a key aspect of successful pharmaceutical product development. This study presents the results and evaluation of an approach for the indirect estimation of site-specific in vivo intestinal effective permeability (Peff) in humans. Plasma concentration-time profiles from 15 clinical studies that administered drug solutions to specific intestinal regions were collected and analyzed. The intestinal absorption rate for each drug was acquired by deconvolution, using historical intravenous data as reference, and used with the intestinal surface area and the dose remaining in the lumen to estimate the Peff. Forty-three new Peff values were estimated (15 from the proximal small intestine, 11 from the distal small intestine, and 17 from the large intestine) for 14 active pharmaceutical ingredients representing a wide range of biopharmaceutical properties. A good correlation (r(2) = 0.96, slope = 1.24, intercept = 0.030) was established between these indirect jejunal Peff estimates and jejunal Peff measurements determined directly using the single-pass perfusion double balloon technique. On average, Peff estimates from the distal small intestine and large intestine were 90% and 40%, respectively, of those from the proximal small intestine. These results support the use of the evaluated deconvolution method for indirectly estimating regional intestinal Peff in humans. This study presents the first comprehensive data set of estimated human regional intestinal permeability values for a range of drugs. These biopharmaceutical data can be used to improve the accuracy of gastrointestinal absorption predictions used in drug development decision-making. PMID:25919764

  13. Development and validation of a dissolution test for lutein tablets and evaluation of intestinal permeability.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Carina de Souza; Mendes, Thamara de Carvalho; Honorio, Thiago da Silva; do Carmo, Flávia Almada; Cabral, Lucio Mendes; de Sousa, Valeria Pereira

    2016-11-01

    Lutein is a carotenoid with antioxidant activity that is present in various dosage forms. The bioavailability of carotenoid from oral dosage formulations depends on their release, dissolution and its permeability through the gastrointestinal tract. Here, a dissolution test was developed for evaluating formulations and the bioavailability was assessed. The test utilized a USP-apparatus II with rotations of 50, 75 and 100rpm in water with P80 at 1, 2 and 5% (w/v). A non-everted rat intestinal sac model was used in conjunction to assess the intestinal permeability. The most discriminative conditions were 100rpm in water with 2% polysorbate 80, which showed profile differences between two formulations. The intestinal permeation studies showed a lag-time and apparent permeability coefficient that were characteristic of highly permeable drugs. We suggest that a dissolution test can be an essential quality control tool for formulations containing compounds as lutein, although not mandatory by the regulation agencies. PMID:27211621

  14. Evidence of multiple permeability barriers in sarcolemmal (SL) aortic vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, L.J.; Kahn, A.M.; Allen, J.C.

    1986-03-05

    SL vesicles from canine aorta were prepared using Mg aggregation and differential centrifugation. Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase (NKA) and K/sup +/-Phosphatase (K-Pase) were determined in native and SDS treated SL with either 0.4 mM ouabain (OB) or the lipophilic inhibitor, digitoxigenin (DG). Native SL: OB inhibited NKA=0, DG inhibited NKA=7.7 ..mu..m/mg/hr; SDS treated SL: OB inhibited NKA=4.6, DG inhibited NKA=9.5; Native SL: OB inhibited K-Pase = 177nm/mg/hr, DG inhibited K-Pase = 285, SDS treated SL: OB inhibited K-Pase = 217, DG inhibited K- Pase = 283. Thus, native SL, primarily unbroken and both right side- and inside-out, may be impermeable to ATP and OB. Specific /sup 3/H-OB binding (Mg, P/sub i/) to SL was 5.0 pm/mg in native and 9.6 pm/mg in SL treated with the Mg chelator, CDTA. Altered binding was due to increased B/sub max/, not K/sub m/. Thus, in addition to the permeability barrier of SL, the Mg-bound basement membrane may present another barrier by obscuring OB binding sites. Gel filtration revealed that only the higher molecular weight fractions demonstrated specific OB binding which decreased with decreasing molecular weight, a finding consistent with varying vesicular size. These data indicate that SL prepared by Mg aggregation contain vesicles of differing size with at least two permeability barriers, SL and basement membrane.

  15. The complexity of intestinal permeability: Assigning the correct BCS classification through careful data interpretation.

    PubMed

    Zur, Moran; Hanson, Allison S; Dahan, Arik

    2014-09-30

    While the solubility parameter is fairly straightforward when assigning BCS classification, the intestinal permeability (Peff) is more complex than generally recognized. In this paper we emphasize this complexity through the analysis of codeine, a commonly used antitussive/analgesic drug. Codeine was previously classified as a low-permeability compound, based on its lower LogP compared to metoprolol, a marker for the low-high permeability class boundary. In contrast, high fraction of dose absorbed (Fabs) was reported for codeine, which challenges the generally recognized Peff-Fabs correlation. The purpose of this study was to clarify this ambiguity through elucidation of codeine's BCS solubility/permeability class membership. Codeine's BCS solubility class was determined, and its intestinal permeability throughout the small intestine was investigated, both in vitro and in vivo in rats. Codeine was found to be unequivocally a high-solubility compound. All in vitro studies indicated that codeine's permeability is higher than metoprolol's. In vivo studies in rats showed similar permeability for both drugs throughout the entire small-intestine. In conclusion, codeine was found to be a BCS Class I compound. No Peff-Fabs discrepancy is involved in its absorption; rather, it reflects the risk of assigning BCS classification based on merely limited physicochemical characteristics. A thorough investigation using multiple experimental methods is prudent before assigning a BCS classification, to avoid misjudgment in various settings, e.g., drug discovery, formulation design, drug development and regulation. PMID:24262076

  16. Heat stress: intestinal barrier and immune disruption in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Economic losses to the livestock industry due to heat stress (HS) are estimated to be greater than $2.0 billion annually. HS morbidity is linked to disruption of normal intestinal tract (IT) absorptive and barrier functions, is often manifested as decreased performance; however, extreme HS can have ...

  17. Boswellia serrata Preserves Intestinal Epithelial Barrier from Oxidative and Inflammatory Damage.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Daniela; Rancan, Serena; Orso, Genny; Dall'Acqua, Stefano; Brun, Paola; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Carrara, Maria; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Caparrotta, Laura; Montopoli, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Aminosalicylates, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants are currently the therapeutic choices in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), however, with limited remission and often serious side effects. Meanwhile complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is increasing, particularly herbal medicine. Boswellia serrata is a traditional Ayurvedic remedy with anti-inflammatory properties, of interest for its usefulness in IBDs. The mechanism of this pharmacological potential of Boswellia serrata was investigated in colonic epithelial cell monolayers exposed to H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α, chosen as in vitro experimental model of intestinal inflammation. The barrier function was evaluated by the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and paracellular permeability assay, and by the tight junction proteins (zonula occludens-1, ZO-1 and occludin) immunofluorescence. The expression of phosphorylated NF-κB and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were determined by immunoblot and cytofluorimetric assay, respectively. Boswellia serrata oleo-gum extract (BSE) and its pure derivative acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA), were tested at 0.1-10 μg/ml and 0.027 μg/ml, respectively. BSE and AKBA safety was demonstrated by no alteration of intestinal cell viability and barrier function and integrity biomarkers. H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α treatment of Caco-2 cell monolayers significantly reduced TEER, increased paracellular permeability and caused the disassembly of tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1. BSE and AKBA pretreatment significantly prevented functional and morphological alterations and also the NF-κB phosphorylation induced by the inflammatory stimuli. At the same concentrations BSE and AKBA counteracted the increase of ROS caused by H2O2 exposure. Data showed the positive correlation of the antioxidant activity with the mechanism involved in the physiologic maintenance of the integrity and function of the intestinal epithelium. This study elucidates the

  18. Functional changes of intestinal mucosal barrier in surgically critical patients

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuan-yuan; Liu, Mu-lin; He, Xian-di; Jiang, Cong-qiao; Liu, Rui-lin

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The gut is capable of inducing multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). In the diagnosis and treatment of critical ill patients, doctors should pay particular attention to the protection or recovery of intestinal barrier function. However, no reliable diagnostic criteria are available clinically. This study aimed to assess the changes of intestinal mucosal barrier function in surgically critical ill patients as well as their significance. METHODS: Thirty-eight surgically critical ill patients were enrolled as a study group (APACHE II>8 scores), and 15 non-critical ill patients without intestinal dysfunction were selected as a control group (APACHE II<6). General information, symptoms, physical signs, and APACHE II scores of the patients were recorded. The patients in the study group were subdivided into an intestinal dysfunction group (n=26) and a non-intestinal dysfunction group (n=12). Three ml venous blood was collected from the control group on admission and the same volume of plasma was collected from the study group both on admission and in the period of recovery. The plasma concentrations of endotoxin, diamine oxidase (DAO), D-lactate, and intestinal fatty-acid binding protein (iFABP) were detected respectively. The data collected were analyzed by the SPSS 17.0 software for Windows. RESULTS: The levels of variables were significantly higher in the study group than in the control group (P<0.01). They were higher in the intestinal dysfunction group than in the non-intestinal dysfunction group (DAO P<0.05, endotoxin, D-lactate, iFABP P<0.01). In the non-intestinal dysfunction group compared with the control group, the level of endotoxin was not significant (P>0.05), but the levels of DAO, D-lactate and iFABP were statistically significant (P<0.05). The levels of variables in acute stage were higher than those in recovery stage (P<0.01). The death group showed higher levels of variables than the survival group (endotoxin and D-lactate P<0.01, DAO

  19. Mechanism of IL-1β-Induced Increase in Intestinal Epithelial Tight Junction Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sadi, Rana; Ye, Dongmei; Dokladny, Karol; Ma, Thomas Y.

    2011-01-01

    The IL-1β-induced increase in intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ) permeability has been postulated to be an important mechanism contributing to intestinal inflammation of Crohn's disease and other inflammatory conditions of the gut. The intra-cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate the IL-1β-induced increase in intestinal TJ permeability remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms that mediate the IL-1β-induced increase in intestinal TJ permeability. Specifically, the role of myosin L chain kinase (MLCK) was investigated. IL-1β caused a progressive increase in MLCK protein expression. The time course of IL-1β-induced increase in MLCK level correlated linearly with increase in Caco-2 TJ permeability. Inhibition of the IL-1β-induced increase in MLCK protein expression prevented the increase in Caco-2 TJ permeability. Inhibition of the IL-1β-induced increase in MLCK activity also prevented the increase in Caco-2 TJ permeability. Additionally, knock-down of MLCK protein expression by small interference RNA prevented the IL-1β-induced increase in Caco-2 TJ permeability. The IL-1β-induced increase in MLCK protein expression was preceded by an increase in MLCK mRNA expression. The IL-1β-induced increase in MLCK mRNA transcription and subsequent increase in MLCK protein expression and Caco-2 TJ permeability was mediated by activation of NF-κB. In conclusion, our data indicate that the IL-1β increase in Caco-2 TJ permeability was mediated by an increase in MLCK expression and activity. Our findings also indicate that the IL-1β-induced increase in MLCK protein expression and Caco-2 TJ permeability was mediated by an NF-κB-dependent increase in MLCK gene transcription. PMID:18390750

  20. A Lactobacillus mutant capable of accumulating long-chain polyphosphates that enhance intestinal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Asako; Ishida, Yasuaki; Segawa, Shuichi; Hirota, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Takeshi; Kuroda, Akio

    2016-05-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) was previously identified as a probiotic-derived substance that enhances intestinal barrier function. PolyP-accumulating bacteria are expected to have beneficial effects on the human gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we selected Lactobacillus paracasei JCM 1163 as a strain with the potential to accumulate polyP, because among the probiotic bacteria stored in our laboratory, it had the largest amount of polyP. The chain length of polyP accumulated in L. paracasei JCM 1163 was approximately 700 phosphate (Pi) residues. L. paracasei JCM 1163 accumulated polyP when Pi was added to Pi-starved cells. We further improved the ability of L. paracasei JCM 1163 to accumulate polyP by nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. The mutant accumulated polyP at a level of 1500 nmol/mg protein-approximately 190 times that of the wild-type strain. PolyP extracted from the L. paracasei JCM 1163 significantly suppressed the oxidant-induced intestinal permeability in mouse small intestine. In conclusion, we have succeeded in breeding the polyP-accumulating Lactobacillus mutant that is expected to enhance intestinal barrier function. PMID:26966939

  1. THE ROLE OF MIR-212 AND INOS IN ALCOHOL-INDUCED INTESTINAL BARRIER DYSFUNCTION AND STEATOHEPATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yueming; Zhang, Lijuan; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Shaikh, Maliha; Song, Shiwen; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is commonly associated with intestinal barrier dysfunction. Alcohol-induced dysregulation of intestinal tight junction (TJ) proteins, such as Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1), plays an important role in alcohol-induced gut leakiness. However, the mechanism of alcohol-induced disruption of TJ proteins is not well established. The goal of this study was to elucidate this mechanism by studying the role of MicroRNA 212 (miR-212) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in alcohol-induced gut leakiness. Methods The permeability of the Caco-2 monolayer was assessed by transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and flux of fluorescein sulfonic acid (FSA). miR-212 was measured by real time PCR. The wild type, iNOS knockout, and miR-212 knockdown mice were fed with alcohol diet (29% of total calories, 4.5% v/v) for 8 weeks. The LNA-anti-miR-212 was used to inhibit miR-212 expression in mice. The alcohol-induced intestinal permeability, miR-212 expression and liver injuries in mice were measured. Results Our in vitro monolayer and in vivo mice studies showed that: (1) alcohol-induced over-expression of the intestinal miR-212 and intestinal hyperpermeability is prevented by using miR-212 knock-down techniques; and (2). iNOS is upregulated in the intestine by alcohol and that iNOS signaling is required for alcohol-induced miR-212 over-expression, ZO-1 disruption, gut leakiness and steatohepatis. Conclusions These studies thus support a novel miR-212 mechanism for alcohol-induced gut leakiness and a potential target that could be exploited for therapeutic intervention to prevent leaky gut and liver injury in alcoholics. PMID:26207424

  2. Protective Effects of Bifidobacterium on Intestinal Barrier Function in LPS-Induced Enterocyte Barrier Injury of Caco-2 Monolayers and in a Rat NEC Model

    PubMed Central

    Weixia, Du; Hong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Zonulin protein is a newly discovered modulator which modulates the permeability of the intestinal epithelial barrier by disassembling intercellular tight junctions (TJ). Disruption of TJ is associated with neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). It has been shown bifidobacterium could protect the intestinal barrier function and prophylactical administration of bifidobacterium has beneficial effects in NEC patients and animals. However, it is still unknown whether the zonulin is involved in the gut barrier dysfunction of NEC, and the protective mechanisms of bifidobacterium on intestinal barrier function are also not well understood. The present study aims to investigate the effects of bifidobacterium on intestinal barrier function, zonulin regulation, and TJ integrity both in LPS-induced enterocyte barrier injury of Caco-2 monolayers and in a rat NEC model. Our results showed bifidobacterium markedly attenuated the decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and the increase in paracellular permeability in the Caco-2 monolayers treated with LPS (P < 0.01). Compared with the LPS group, bifidobacterium significantly decreased the production of IL-6 and TNF-α (P < 0.01) and suppressed zonulin release (P < 0.05). In addition, bifidobacterium pretreatment up-regulated occludin, claudin-3 and ZO-1 expression (P < 0.01) and also preserved these proteins localization at TJ compared with the LPS group. In the in vivo study, bifidobacterium decreased the incidence of NEC from 88 to 47% (P < 0.05) and reduced the severity in the NEC model. Increased levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in the ileum of NEC rats were normalized in bifidobacterium treated rats (P < 0.05). Moreover, administration of bifidobacterium attenuated the increase in intestinal permeability (P < 0.01), decreased the levels of serum zonulin (P < 0.05), normalized the expression and localization of TJ proteins in the ileum compared with animals with NEC. We concluded that bifidobacterium may protect against

  3. Directed site exploration for permeable reactive barrier design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.; Graettinger, A.J.; Moylan, J.; Reeves, H.W.

    2009-01-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are being employed for in situ site remediation of groundwater that is typically flowing under natural gradients. Site characterization is of critical importance to the success of a PRB. A design-specific site exploration approach called quantitatively directed exploration (QDE) is presented. The QDE approach employs three spatially related matrices: (1) covariance of input parameters, (2) sensitivity of model outputs, and (3) covariance of model outputs to identify the most important location to explore based on a specific design. Sampling at the location that most reduces overall site uncertainty produces a higher probability of success of a particular design. The QDE approach is demonstrated on the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO, a case study where a PRB was installed and failed. It is shown that additional quantitatively directed site exploration during the design phase could have prevented the remedial failure that was caused by missing a geologic body having high hydraulic conductivity at the south end of the barrier. The most contributing input parameter approach using head uncertainty clearly indicated where the next sampling should be made toward the high hydraulic conductivity zone. This case study demonstrates the need to include the specific design as well as site characterization uncertainty when choosing the sampling locations. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Wave scattering by a permeable barrier over undulating bed topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, A.; Martha, S. C.

    2016-06-01

    The scattering of surface water waves by bottom undulation in the presence of a permeable vertical barrier is investigated for its solution. A mixed boundary value problem (BVP) arises here in a natural way while examining this physical problem. Regular perturbation analysis is employed to determine the solution of the BVP. By utilizing this analysis the given BVP reduces to two different BVPs up to first order. The solution of the zeroth order BVP is obtained with the aid of eigenfunction expansion method in conjunction with least-squares approximation. The first order BVP is solved with the help of the Green's integral theorem and the physical quantities, namely the reflection and transmission coefficients, are obtained in the form of integrals which involve the bottom undulation and the solution of the zeroth order BVP. A particular form of the bottom undulation which closely resembles to some obstacles made by nature due to sedimentation and ripple growth of sand, is considered to evaluate these integrals. The variation of these coefficients is examined for different values of the porous effect parameter, barrier length, number of ripples and ripple amplitude.

  5. Intestinal barrier dysfunction: implications for chronic inflammatory conditions of the bowel.

    PubMed

    Miner-Williams, Warren M; Moughan, Paul J

    2016-06-01

    The intestinal epithelium of adult humans acts as a differentially permeable barrier that separates the potentially harmful contents of the lumen from the underlying tissues. Any dysfunction of this boundary layer that disturbs the homeostatic equilibrium between the internal and external environments may initiate and sustain a biochemical cascade that results in inflammation of the intestine. Key to such dysfunction are genetic, microbial and other environmental factors that, singularly or in combination, result in chronic inflammation that is symptomatic of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of the present review is to assess the scientific evidence to support the hypothesis that defective transepithelial transport mechanisms and the heightened absorption of intact antigenic proinflammatory oligopeptides are important contributing factors in the pathogenesis of IBD. PMID:27087106

  6. Epigenetic control of intestinal barrier function and inflammation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Marjoram, Lindsay; Alvers, Ashley; Deerhake, M. Elizabeth; Bagwell, Jennifer; Mankiewicz, Jamie; Cocchiaro, Jordan L.; Beerman, Rebecca W.; Willer, Jason; Sumigray, Kaelyn D.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Rawls, John F.; Goll, Mary G.; Bagnat, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium forms a barrier protecting the organism from microbes and other proinflammatory stimuli. The integrity of this barrier and the proper response to infection requires precise regulation of powerful immune homing signals such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Dysregulation of TNF leads to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), but the mechanism controlling the expression of this potent cytokine and the events that trigger the onset of chronic inflammation are unknown. Here, we show that loss of function of the epigenetic regulator ubiquitin-like protein containing PHD and RING finger domains 1 (uhrf1) in zebrafish leads to a reduction in tnfa promoter methylation and the induction of tnfa expression in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). The increase in IEC tnfa levels is microbe-dependent and results in IEC shedding and apoptosis, immune cell recruitment, and barrier dysfunction, consistent with chronic inflammation. Importantly, tnfa knockdown in uhrf1 mutants restores IEC morphology, reduces cell shedding, and improves barrier function. We propose that loss of epigenetic repression and TNF induction in the intestinal epithelium can lead to IBD onset. PMID:25730872

  7. Epigenetic control of intestinal barrier function and inflammation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Marjoram, Lindsay; Alvers, Ashley; Deerhake, M Elizabeth; Bagwell, Jennifer; Mankiewicz, Jamie; Cocchiaro, Jordan L; Beerman, Rebecca W; Willer, Jason; Sumigray, Kaelyn D; Katsanis, Nicholas; Tobin, David M; Rawls, John F; Goll, Mary G; Bagnat, Michel

    2015-03-01

    The intestinal epithelium forms a barrier protecting the organism from microbes and other proinflammatory stimuli. The integrity of this barrier and the proper response to infection requires precise regulation of powerful immune homing signals such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Dysregulation of TNF leads to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), but the mechanism controlling the expression of this potent cytokine and the events that trigger the onset of chronic inflammation are unknown. Here, we show that loss of function of the epigenetic regulator ubiquitin-like protein containing PHD and RING finger domains 1 (uhrf1) in zebrafish leads to a reduction in tnfa promoter methylation and the induction of tnfa expression in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). The increase in IEC tnfa levels is microbe-dependent and results in IEC shedding and apoptosis, immune cell recruitment, and barrier dysfunction, consistent with chronic inflammation. Importantly, tnfa knockdown in uhrf1 mutants restores IEC morphology, reduces cell shedding, and improves barrier function. We propose that loss of epigenetic repression and TNF induction in the intestinal epithelium can lead to IBD onset. PMID:25730872

  8. TNF-α Modulation of Intestinal Tight Junction Permeability Is Mediated by NIK/IKK-α Axis Activation of the Canonical NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Al-Sadi, Rana; Guo, Shuhong; Ye, Dongmei; Rawat, Manmeet; Ma, Thomas Y

    2016-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, a key mediator of intestinal inflammation, causes an increase in intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ) permeability by activating myosin light chain kinase (MLCK; official name MYLK3) gene. However, the precise signaling cascades that mediate the TNF-α-induced activation of MLCK gene and increase in TJ permeability remain unclear. Our aims were to delineate the upstream signaling mechanisms that regulate the TNF-α modulation of intestinal TJ barrier function with the use of in vitro and in vivo intestinal epithelial model systems. TNF-α caused a rapid activation of both canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathway. NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1 (MEKK-1) were activated in response to TNF-α. NIK mediated the TNF-α activation of inhibitory κB kinase (IKK)-α, and MEKK1 mediated the activation of IKK complex, including IKK-β. NIK/IKK-α axis regulated the activation of both NF-κB p50/p65 and RelB/p52 pathways. Surprisingly, the siRNA induced knockdown of NIK, but not MEKK-1, prevented the TNF-α activation of both NF-κB p50/p65 and RelB/p52 and the increase in intestinal TJ permeability. Moreover, NIK/IKK-α/NF-κB p50/p65 axis mediated the TNF-α-induced MLCK gene activation and the subsequent MLCK increase in intestinal TJ permeability. In conclusion, our data show that NIK/IKK-α/regulates the activation of NF-κB p50/p65 and plays an integral role in the TNF-α-induced activation of MLCK gene and increase in intestinal TJ permeability. PMID:26948423

  9. Raltegravir permeability across blood-tissue barriers and the potential role of drug efflux transporters.

    PubMed

    Hoque, M Tozammel; Kis, Olena; De Rosa, María F; Bendayan, Reina

    2015-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate raltegravir transport across several blood-tissue barrier models and the potential interactions with drug efflux transporters. Raltegravir uptake, accumulation, and permeability were evaluated in vitro in (i) P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1), or MRP4-overexpressing MDA-MDR1 (P-gp), HEK-ABCG2, HeLa-MRP1, or HEK-MRP4 cells, respectively; (ii) cell culture systems of the human blood-brain (hCMEC/D3), mouse blood-testicular (TM4), and human blood-intestinal (Caco-2) barriers; and (iii) rat jejunum and ileum segments using an in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion model. [(3)H]Raltegravir accumulation by MDA-MDR1 (P-gp) and HEK-ABCG2-overexpressing cells was significantly enhanced in the presence of PSC833 {6-[(2S,4R,6E)-4-methyl-2-(methylamino)-3-oxo-6-octenoic acid]-7-L-valine-cyclosporine}, a P-gp inhibitor, or Ko143 [(3S,6S,12aS)-1,2,3,4,6,7,12,12a-octahydro-9-methoxy-6-(2-methylpropyl)-1,4-dioxopyrazino[1',2':1,6]pyrido[3,4-b]indole-3-propanoic acid 1,1-dimethylethyl ester], a BCRP inhibitor, suggesting the inhibition of a P-gp- or BCRP-mediated efflux process, respectively. Furthermore, [(3)H]raltegravir accumulation by human cerebral microvessel endothelial hCMEC/D3 and mouse Sertoli TM4 cells was significantly increased by PSC833 and Ko143. In human intestinal Caco-2 cells grown on Transwell filters, PSC833, but not Ko143, significantly decreased the [(3)H]raltegravir efflux ratios. In rat intestinal segments, [(3)H]raltegravir in situ permeability was significantly enhanced by the concurrent administration of PSC833 and Ko143. In contrast, in the transporter inhibition assays, raltegravir (10 to 500 μM) did not increase the accumulation of substrate for P-gp (rhodamine-6G), BCRP ([(3)H]mitoxantrone), or MRP1 [2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF)] by MDA-MDR1 (P-gp)-, HEK-ABCG2-, or HeLa-MRP1-overexpressing

  10. [Study of attribution of multicomponent original medicinal materials in gegen qinlian decoction with intestinal permeability].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mei-Ling; Yang, Wen-Ning; Dong, Ling; Dong, Hong-Huan; Hou, Cheng-Bo; Liu, Yang

    2014-12-01

    The complex level of constructing biopharmaceutics classification system of Chinese materia medica CMMBCS) was the study of traditional Chinese compound, on the premise of insisting that the multicomponent simultaneous determination, when carrying out the study of intestinal permeability, the primary task was to define the source of the components that was absorbed through the intestinal wall, namely, which medicinal material the components belonged to in traditional Chinese compound. The technology of chemical fingerprint and in vitro everted gut sac model were used in this research to make multicomponent an intuitive source attribution which permeated the intestine in the classic formula Gegen Qinlian decoction, and to lay the foundation for the further qualitative and quantitative research of intestinal permeability. PMID:25911788

  11. ECONOMICS ANALYSIS OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents an analysis of the cost of using permeable reactive barriers to remediate contaminated ground water. When possible, these costs are compared with the cost of pump-and-treat technology for similar situations. Permeable reactive barriers are no longer perceiv...

  12. Surface altered zeolites as permeable barriers for in situ treatment of contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The authors characterized surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) for its ability to sorb organic and inorganic contaminants from water. The ultimate objective is to use SMZ as a permeable barrier to prevent migration of contaminants in groundwater. This report summarizes results under Phase 1 of a three-phase project leading to a full-scale field demonstration of SMZ permeable- barrier technology.

  13. SURFACE-ALTERED ZEOLITES AS PERMEABLE BARRIERS FOR IN SITU TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Bowman; Zhaohui Li; Stephen J. Roy; Todd Burt; Timothy L. Johnson; Richard L. Johnson

    1999-08-30

    The overall objective of this effort is to develop and test a zeolite-based permeable barrier system for containing and remediating contaminated groundwater. The projected product is an engineered and tested permeable barrier system that can be adopted by the commercial sector.

  14. Stress-induced breakdown of intestinal barrier function in the rat: reversal by wood creosote.

    PubMed

    Kuge, Tomoo; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2006-07-24

    Our previous studies demonstrated that wood creosote (Seirogan) inhibits intestinal secretion and normalizes the transport of electrolytes and water in rats subjected to restraint stress. The goal of the present study was to examine whether wood creosote has a protective effect against stress-induced breakdown of intestinal barrier function. F-344 rats were subjected to 90-min water avoidance stress (WAS) with wood creosote (30 mg/kg) or vehicle administered intragastrically 30 min prior to WAS. Sham stressed rats received wood creosote or vehicle treatment but did not experience the WAS. All rats were euthanized at the end of the WAS or sham-stress and the jejunum and colon were isolated. Epithelial transport was studied in modified Ussing chambers. Spontaneous secretion was assessed by electrophysiological measurement of the short circuit current (I(sc)) while electrical conductance (G) was calculated from the potential difference (PD) and I(sc) using Ohm's law. Intestinal permeability was defined by the mucosal-to-serosal flux of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). WAS significantly elevated basal I(sc) and G and increased epithelial permeability to HRP in the jejunum but not in the colon. Wood creosote resulted in a significant reduction of the stress-induced increase in I(sc), G and the mucosal-to-serosal flux of HRP compared to the vehicle-treated group. Wood creosote caused no significant effects in sham-stressed rats. The results suggest that oral administration of wood creosote may prevent stress-induced diarrhea by preventing aversive effects on small intestinal secretion and barrier function. PMID:16643959

  15. Self-Microemulsifying Drug Delivery System: Formulation and Study Intestinal Permeability of Ibuprofen in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Subudhi, Bharat Bhushan; Mandal, Surjyanarayan

    2013-01-01

    The study was aimed at developing a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) of Ibuprofen for investigating its intestinal transport behavior using the single-pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) method in rat. Methods. Ibuprofen loaded SMEDDS (ISMEDDS) was developed and was characterized. The permeability behavior of Ibuprofen over three different concentrations (20, 30, and 40 µg/mL) was studied in each isolated region of rat intestine by SPIP method at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. The human intestinal permeability was predicted using the Lawrence compartment absorption and transit (CAT) model since effective permeability coefficients (Peff) values for rat are highly correlated with those of human, and comparative intestinal permeability of Ibuprofen was carried out with plain drug suspension (PDS) and marketed formulation (MF). Results. The developed ISMEDDS was stable, emulsified upon mild agitation with 44.4 nm ± 2.13 and 98.86% ± 1.21 as globule size and drug content, respectively. Higher Peff in colon with no significant Peff difference in jejunum, duodenum, and ileum was observed. The estimated human absorption of Ibuprofen for the SMEDDS was higher than that for PDS and MF (P < 0.01). Conclusion. Developed ISMEDDS would possibly be advantageous in terms of minimized side effect, increased bioavailability, and hence the patient compliance. PMID:26555973

  16. Design of vancomycin RS-100 nanoparticles in order to increase the intestinal permeability

    PubMed Central

    Loveymi, Badir Delf; Jelvehgari, Mitra; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin; Valizadeh, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to preparation of vancomycin (VCM) biodegradable nanoparticles to improve the intestinal permeability, using water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) multiple emulsion method. Methods: The vancomycin-loaded nanoparticles were created using double-emulsion solvent evaporation method. Using Eudragit RS100 as a coating material. The prepared nanoparticles were identifyed for their micromeritic and crystallographic properties, drug loading, particle size, drug release, Zeta potential, effective permeability (Peff) and oral fractional absorption. Intestinal permeability of VCM nanoparticles was figured out, in different concentrations using SPIP technique in rats. Results: Particle sizes were between 362 and 499 nm for different compositions of VCM-RS-100 nanoparticles. Entrapment efficiency expansed between 63%-94.76%. The highest entrapment efficiency 94.76% was obtained when the ratio of drug to polymer was 1:3. The in vitro release studies were accomplished in pH 7.4. The results showed that physicochemical properties were impressed by drug to polymer ratio. The FT-IR, XRPD and DSC results ruled out any chemical interaction betweenthe drug and RS-100. Effective intestinal permeability values of VCM nanoparticles in concentrations of 200, 300 and 400 μg/ml were higher than that of solutions at the same concentrations. Oral fractional absorption was achieved between 0.419-0.767. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that RS-100 nanoparticles could provide a delivery system for VCM, with enhanced intestinal permeability. PMID:24312770

  17. Permeability of the small intestine to substances of different molecular weight

    PubMed Central

    Loehry, C. A.; Axon, A. T. R.; Hilton, P. J.; Hider, R. C.; Creamer, B.

    1970-01-01

    The permeability of the rabbit small intestine has been studied by measuring the plasma clearances of water-soluble molecules over the molecular weight range 60-33,000. An inverse relationship has been demonstrated between permeability and molecular weight. The significance of these findings in relation to current concepts of the `pore hypotheses' is discussed, and the possible physiological and pathological implications are considered. PMID:5430371

  18. Compromised intestinal epithelial barrier induces adaptive immune compensation that protects from colitis

    PubMed Central

    Khounlotham, Manirath; Kim, Wooki; Peatman, Eric; Nava, Porfirio; Medina-Contreras, Oscar; Addis, Caroline; Koch, Stefan; Fournier, Benedicte; Nusrat, Asma; Denning, Timothy L.; Parkos, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Mice lacking Junctional Adhesion Molecule A (JAM-A, encoded by F11r) exhibit enhanced intestinal epithelial permeability, bacterial translocation, and elevated colonic lymphocyte numbers, yet do not develop colitis. To investigate the contribution of adaptive immune compensation in response to increased intestinal epithelial permeability, we examined the susceptibility of F11r-/-Rag1-/- mice to acute colitis. Although negligible contributions of adaptive immunity in F11r-/-Rag1-/- mice were observed, F11r-/-Rag1-/- mice exhibited increased microflora-dependent colitis. Elimination of T cell subsets and cytokine analyses revealed a protective role for TGF-β-producing CD4+ T cells in F11r-/- mice. Additionally, loss of JAM-A resulted in elevated mucosal and serum IgA that was dependent upon CD4+ T cells and TGF-β. Absence of IgA in F11r+/+Igha-/- mice did not affect disease whereas F11r-/-Igha-/- mice displayed markedly increased susceptibility to acute injury induced colitis. These data establish a role for adaptive immune mediated protection from acute colitis under conditions of intestinal epithelial barrier compromise. PMID:22981539

  19. CXCR4 Antagonist AMD3100 Modulates Claudin Expression and Intestinal Barrier Function in Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xian-Ming; Wang, Fang-Yu; Zhou, Ju; Hu, Kai-Feng; Li, Su-Wen; Zou, Bing-Bing

    2011-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a gastrointestinal disorder characterized by local inflammation and impaired epithelial barrier. Previous studies demonstrated that CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) antagonists could reduce colonic inflammation and mucosal damage in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Whether CXCR4 antagonist has action on intestinal barrier and the possible mechanism, is largely undefined. In the present study, the experimental colitis was induced by administration of 5% DSS for 7 days, and CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 was administered intraperitoneally once daily during the study period. For in vitro study, HT-29/B6 colonic cells were treated with cytokines or AMD3100 for 24 h until assay. DSS-induced colitis was characterized by morphologic changes in mice. In AMD3100-treated mice, epithelial destruction, inflammatory infiltration, and submucosal edema were markedly reduced, and the disease activity index was also significantly decreased. Increased intestinal permeability in DSS-induced colitis was also significantly reduced by AMD3100. The expressions of colonic claudin-1, claudin-3, claudin-5, claudin-7 and claudin-8 were markedly decreased after DSS administration, whereas colonic claudin-2 expression was significantly decreased. Treatment with AMD3100 prevented all these changes. However, AMD3100 had no influence on claudin-3, claudin-5, claudin-7 and claudin-8 expression in HT-29/B6 cells. Cytokines as TNF-α, IL-6, and IFN-γ increased apoptosis and monolayer permeability, inhibited the wound-healing and the claudin-3, claudin-7 and claudin-8 expression in HT-29/B6 cells. We suggest that AMD3100 acted on colonic claudin expression and intestinal barrier function, at least partly, in a cytokine-dependent pathway. PMID:22073304

  20. A coculture model mimicking the intestinal mucosa reveals a regulatory role for myofibroblasts in immune-mediated barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, L E M; Schreurs, C C H M; Kroes, H; Spillenaar Bilgen, E J; Van Deventer, S J H; Van Tol, E A F

    2002-10-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease involves a mucosal inflammatory response affecting the barrier function of the gut. Myofibroblasts directly underlining the intestinal epithelium may have a regulatory role in immune-mediated barrier disruption. A coculture system of T84 epithelial and CCD-18Co myofibroblasts was established in order to mimic the in situ spatial interactions between these cell types and to evaluate their role in barrier: integrity. Lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) were introduced in co- and monocultures. Effects of immune cells on barrier integrity was determined by measuring resistance and permeability for macromolecules. Introduction of LPMC in both culture systems caused a time-dependent decrease in barrier integrity. This was found to be less pronounced in cocultures indicating a regulatory role for mesenchymal cells. The effects were also found to depend on the route of LPMC stimulation. Additional analyses suggested that the regulatory role of myofibroblasts in barrier integrity involves production of growth factors. PMID:12395905

  1. Enteropathogenic E. coli: breaking the intestinal tight junction barrier

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anand Prakash; Aijaz, Saima

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) causes acute intestinal infections in infants in the developing world. Infection typically spreads through contaminated food and water and leads to severe, watery diarrhea. EPEC attaches to the intestinal epithelial cells and directly injects virulence factors which modulate multiple signaling pathways leading to host cell dysfunction. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the onset of diarrhea are poorly defined. A major target of EPEC is the host cell tight junction complex which acts as a barrier and regulates the passage of water and solutes through the paracellular space. In this review, we focus on the EPEC effectors that target the epithelial barrier, alter its functions and contribute to leakage through the tight junctions. PMID:27239268

  2. Regional Intestinal Permeability in Dogs: Biopharmaceutical Aspects for Development of Oral Modified-Release Dosage Forms.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, David; Roos, Carl; Johansson, Pernilla; Lundqvist, Anders; Tannergren, Christer; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Sjögren, Erik; Lennernäs, Hans

    2016-09-01

    The development of oral modified-release (MR) dosage forms requires an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) with a sufficiently high absorption rate in both the small and large intestine. Dogs are commonly used in preclinical evaluation of regional intestinal absorption and in the development of novel MR dosage forms. This study determined regional intestinal effective permeability (Peff) in dogs with the aim to improve regional Peff prediction in humans. Four model drugs, atenolol, enalaprilat, metoprolol, and ketoprofen, were intravenously and regionally dosed twice as a solution into the proximal small intestine (P-SI) and large intestine (LI) of three dogs with intestinal stomas. Based on plasma data from two separate study occasions for each dog, regional Peff values were calculated using a validated intestinal deconvolution method. The determined mean Peff values were 0.62, 0.14, 1.06, and 3.66 × 10(-4) cm/s in the P-SI, and 0.13, 0.02, 1.03, and 2.20 × 10(-4) cm/s in the LI, for atenolol, enalaprilat, metoprolol, and ketoprofen, respectively. The determined P-SI Peff values in dog were highly correlated (R(2) = 0.98) to the historically directly determined human jejunal Peff after a single-pass perfusion. The determined dog P-SI Peff values were also successfully implemented in GI-Sim to predict the risk for overestimation of LI absorption of low permeability drugs. We conclude that the dog intestinal stoma model is a useful preclinical tool for determination of regional intestinal permeability. Still, further studies are recommended to evaluate additional APIs, sources of variability, and formulation types, for more accurate determination of the dog model in the drug development process. PMID:27500599

  3. Intestinal hypoperfusion contributes to gut barrier failure in severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Sakhawat H; Ammori, Basil J; Holmfield, John; Larvin, Michael; McMahon, Michael J

    2003-01-01

    Intestinal barrier failure and subsequent bacterial translocation have been implicated in the development of organ dysfunction and septic complications associated with severe acute pancreatitis. Splanchnic hypoperfusion and ischemia/reperfusion injury have been postulated as a cause of increased intestinal permeability. The urinary concentration of intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP) has been shown to be a sensitive marker of intestinal ischemia, with increased levels being associated with ischemia/reperfusion. The aim of the current study was to assess the relationship between excretion of IFABP in urine, gut mucosal barrier failure (intestinal hyperpermeability and systemic exposure to endotoxemia), and clinical severity. Patients with a clinical and biochemical diagnosis of acute pancreatitis were studied within 72 hours of onset of pain. Polyethylene glycol probes of 3350 kDa and 400 kDa were administered enterally, and the ratio of the percentage of retrieval of each probe after renal excretion was used as a measure of intestinal macromolecular permeability. Collected urine was also used to determine the IFABP concentration (IFABP-c) and total IFABP (IFABP-t) excreted over the 24-hour period, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique. The systemic inflammatory response was estimated from peak 0 to 72-hour plasma C-reactive protein levels, and systemic exposure to endotoxins was measured using serum IgM endotoxin cytoplasmic antibody (EndoCAb) levels. The severity of the attack was assessed on the basis of the Atlanta criteria. Sixty-one patients with acute pancreatitis (severe in 19) and 12 healthy control subjects were studied. Compared to mild attacks, severe attacks were associated with significantly higher urinary IFABP-c (median 1092 pg/ml vs. 84 pg/ml; P < 0.001) and IFABP-t (median 1.14 microg vs. 0.21 microg; P = 0.003). Furthermore, the control group had significantly lower IFABP-c (median 37 pg/ml; P = 0.029) and IFABP-t (median

  4. Zeolite in horizontal permeable reactive barriers for artificial groundwater recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, María; Martínez-Hernández, Virtudes; Lillo, Javier; Meffe, Raffaella; de Bustamante, Irene

    2013-04-01

    The Spanish Water Reuse Royal Decree 1620/2007 considers groundwater recharge as a feasible use of reclaimed water. To achieve the water quality established in the above-mentioned legislation, a tertiary wastewater treatment is required. In this context, the infiltration of effluents generated by secondary wastewater treatments through a Horizontal Permeable Reactive Barrier (HPRB) may represent a suitable regeneration technology. Some nutrients (phosphate and ammonium) and some Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) are not fully removed in conventional wastewater treatment plants. To avoid groundwater contamination when effluents of wastewater treatments plants are used in artificial recharge activities, these contaminants have to be removed. Due to its sorption capacities, zeolite is among the most used reactive materials in Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB). Therefore, the main goal of this study is to evaluate the zeolite retention effectiveness of nutrients and PPCPs occurring in treated wastewater. Batch sorption experiments using synthetic wastewater (SWW) and zeolite were performed. A 1:4 zeolite/SWW ratio was selected due to the high sorption capacity of the reactive material.The assays were carried out by triplicate. All the bottles containing the SWW-zeolite mixture were placed on a mechanical shaker during 24 hours at 140 rpm and 25 °C. Ammonium and phosphate, as main nutrients, and a group of PPCPs were selected as compounds to be tested during the experiments. Nutrients were analyzed by ion chromatography. For PPCPs determination, Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) was applied before their analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry time of flight (LC-MS/ TOF). The experimental data were fitted to linearized Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm equations to obtain sorption parameters. In general, Freundlich model shows a greater capability of reproducing experimental data. To our knowledge, sorption of the investigated compounds on zeolite

  5. Adrenomedullin reduces intestinal epithelial permeability in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Temmesfeld-Wollbrück, Bettina; Brell, Bernhard; zu Dohna, Corinna; Dorenberg, Martin; Hocke, Andreas C; Martens, Holger; Klar, Jürgen; Suttorp, Norbert; Hippenstiel, Stefan

    2009-07-01

    Leakage of the gut mucosal barrier in the critically ill patient may allow translocation of bacteria and their virulence factors, thereby perpetuating sepsis and inflammation. Present evidence suggests that adrenomedullin (AM) improves endothelial barrier function and stabilizes circulatory function in systemic inflammation. We tested the hypothesis that exogenously applied AM stabilizes gut epithelial barrier function. Infusion of Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin induced septic shock in rats. AM infusion in a therapeutic setting reduced translocation of labeled dextran from the gut into the systemic circulation in this model. AM also reduced alpha-toxin and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-related barrier disruption in Caco-2 cells in vitro and reduced H2O2-related rat colon barrier malfunction in Ussing chamber experiments. AM was shown to protect endothelial barrier function via cAMP elevation, but AM failed to induce cAMP accumulation in Caco-2 cells. cAMP is degraded via phosphodiesterases (PDE), and Caco-2 cells showed high activity of cAMP-degrading PDE3 and 4. However, AM failed to induce cAMP accumulation in Caco-2 cells even in the presence of sufficient PDE3/4 inhibition, whereas adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin induced strong cAMP elevation. Furthermore, PDE3/4 inhibition neither amplified AM-induced epithelial barrier stabilization nor affected AM cAMP-related rat colon short-circuit current, furthermore indicating that AM may act independently of cAMP in Caco-2 cells. Finally, experiments using chemical inhibitors indicated that PKC, phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase, p38, and ERK did not contribute to AM-related stabilization of barrier function in Caco-2 cells. In summary, during severe inflammation, elevated AM levels may substantially contribute to the stabilization of gut barrier function. PMID:19423749

  6. CRF Induces Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Injury via the Release of Mast Cell Proteases and TNF-α

    PubMed Central

    Overman, Elizabeth L.; Rivier, Jean E.; Moeser, Adam J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Psychological stress is a predisposing factor in the onset and exacerbation of important gastrointestinal diseases including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The pathophysiology of stress-induced intestinal disturbances is known to be mediated by corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) but the precise signaling pathways remain poorly understood. Utilizing a porcine ex vivo intestinal model, the aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which CRF mediates intestinal epithelial barrier disturbances. Methodology Ileum was harvested from 6–8 week-old pigs, mounted on Ussing Chambers, and exposed to CRF in the presence or absence of various pharmacologic inhibitors of CRF-mediated signaling pathways. Mucosal-to-serosal flux of 4 kDa-FITC dextran (FD4) and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) were recorded as indices of intestinal epithelial barrier function. Results Exposure of porcine ileum to 0.05–0.5 µM CRF increased (p<0.05) paracellular flux compared with vehicle controls. CRF treatment had no deleterious effects on ileal TER. The effects of CRF on FD4 flux were inhibited with pre-treatment of tissue with the non-selective CRF1/2 receptor antagonist Astressin B and the mast cell stabilizer sodium cromolyn (10−4 M). Furthermore, anti-TNF-α neutralizing antibody (p<0.01), protease inhibitors (p<0.01) and the neural blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX) inhibited CRF-mediated intestinal barrier dysfunction. Conclusion These data demonstrate that CRF triggers increases in intestinal paracellular permeability via mast cell dependent release of TNF-α and proteases. Furthermore, CRF-mast cell signaling pathways and increases in intestinal permeability require critical input from the enteric nervous system. Therefore, blocking the deleterious effects of CRF may address the enteric signaling of mast cell degranulation, TNFα release, and protease secretion, hallmarks of IBS and IBD. PMID:22768175

  7. Application of controlled nutrient release to permeable reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Freidman, Benjamin L; Gras, Sally L; Snape, Ian; Stevens, Geoff W; Mumford, Kathryn A

    2016-03-15

    The application of controlled release nutrient (CRN) materials to permeable reactive barriers to promote biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater was investigated. The longevity of release, influence of flow velocity and petroleum hydrocarbon concentration on nutrient release was assessed using soluble and ion exchange CRN materials; namely Polyon™ and Zeopro™. Both CRN materials, assessed at 4 °C and 23 °C, demonstrated continuing release of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (N-P-K) at 3500 bed volumes passing, with longer timeframes of N-P-K release at 4 °C. Zeopro™-activated carbon mixtures demonstrated depletion of N-P-K prior to 3500 bed volumes passing. Increased flow velocity was shown to lower nutrient concentrations in Polyon™ flow cells while nutrient release from Zeopro™ was largely unchanged. The presence of petroleum hydrocarbons, at 1.08 mmol/L and 3.25 mmol/L toluene, were not shown to alter nutrient release from Polyon™ and Zeopro™ across 14 days. These findings suggest that Polyon™ and Zeopro™ may be suitable CRN materials for application to PRBs in low nutrient environments. PMID:26735866

  8. Simplified, noninvasive PET measurement of blood-brain barrier permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Iannotti, F.; Fieschi, C.; Alfano, B.; Picozzi, P.; Mansi, L.; Pozzilli, C.; Punzo, A.; Del Vecchio, G.; Lenzi, G.L.; Salvatore, M.

    1987-05-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability to (/sup 68/Ga)EDTA was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) in four normal volunteers and in 11 patients with brain tumors. A unidirectional transfer constant, Ki, was calculated applying multiple-time graphical analysis (MTGA). This method allows the detection of backflux from brain to blood and, by generalization, the measurement of the constant Kb (brain to blood). Furthermore, the need for an independent measurement of the intravascular tracer is obviated: MTGA itself provides an estimate of the cerebral plasma volume (Vp). In the four normal volunteers the Ki was 3.0 +/- 0.8 X 10(-4) ml g-1 min-1 (mean +/- SD) and the Vp 0.034 +/- 0.007 ml g-1. A net increase in Ki up to a maximum of 121.0 X 10(-4) ml g-1 min-1 (correspondent value of Kb = 0.025 min-1) as well as an increase of Vp was observed in malignant tumors. The input function was calculated using both the (/sup 68/Ga)EDTA concentration in sequential arterial blood samples and, noninvasively, the activity derived from the superior sagittal sinus image. The values of Ki and Vp from these two calculations were in good agreement. The application of MTGA to PET permits the evaluation of passage of substances across the BBB without making assumptions about the compartments in which the tracer distributes.

  9. Ussing Chamber Technique to Measure Intestinal Epithelial Permeability.

    PubMed

    Vidyasagar, Sadasivan; MacGregor, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial cells are polarized and have tight junctions that contribute to barrier function. Assessment of barrier function typically involves measurement of electrophysiological parameters or movement of nonionic particles across an epithelium. Here, we describe measurement of transepithelial electrical conductance or resistance, determination of dilution potential, and assessment of flux of nonionic particles such as dextran or mannitol, with particular emphasis on Ussing chamber techniques. PMID:27246022

  10. Direct In Vivo Human Intestinal Permeability (Peff ) Determined with Different Clinical Perfusion and Intubation Methods.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, David; Roos, Carl; Sjögren, Erik; Lennernäs, Hans

    2015-09-01

    Regional in vivo human intestinal effective permeability (Peff ) is calculated by measuring the disappearance rate of substances during intestinal perfusion. Peff is the most relevant parameter in the prediction of rate and extent of drug absorption from all parts of the intestine. Today, human intestinal perfusions are not performed on a routine basis in drug development. Therefore, it would be beneficial to increase the accuracy of the in vitro and in silico tools used to evaluate the intestinal Peff of novel drugs. This review compiles historical Peff data from 273 individual measurements of 80 substances from 61 studies performed in all parts of the human intestinal tract. These substances include: drugs, monosaccharaides, amino acids, dipeptides, vitamins, steroids, bile acids, ions, fatty acids, and water. The review also discusses the determination and prediction of Peff using in vitro and in silico methods such as quantitative structure-activity relationship, Caco-2, Ussing chamber, animal intestinal perfusion, and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. Finally, we briefly outline how to acquire accurate human intestinal Peff data by deconvolution of plasma concentration-time profiles following regional intestinal bolus dosing. PMID:25410736

  11. Role of regenerating gene I in claudin expression and barrier function in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Yoshitaka; Fukui, Hirokazu; Hara, Ken; Eda, Hirotsugu; Kodani, Mio; Yang, Mo; Sun, Chao; Yamagishi, Hidetsugu; Tomita, Toshihiko; Oshima, Tadayuki; Watari, Jiro; Takasawa, Shin; Miwa, Hiroto

    2016-07-01

    We have recently shown that loss of the regenerating gene (Reg) I causes susceptibility to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastrointestinal damage. However, the mechanism by which Reg I plays a protective role against this pathophysiological condition is unclear. Here, we investigated whether Reg I plays roles in the induction of tight junction proteins and mucosal barrier function in the small intestine. The small-intestinal permeability was evaluated in Reg I-deficient mice by FITC-dextran and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) assay. The effect of REG Iα on TEER, claudins expression, and intracellular signaling was examined using Caco2 cells in vitro. Small-intestinal expression of claudins 3 and 4 was investigated in Reg I-deficient mice in vivo. REG I deficiency significantly decreased the expression of claudin 3 in the small-intestinal epithelium. When mice were treated with indomethacin, the serum level of FITC-dextran in Reg I knockout mice was significantly higher than that in wild-type (WT) mice. The level of small-intestinal TEER was significantly decreased in Reg I knockout mice compared with WT mice under normal condition. REG Iα stimulation significantly enhanced the level of TEER in Caco2 cells. Treatment with REG Iα enhanced the expression of claudins 3 and 4 and promoted Sp1, Akt, and ERK phosphorylation in Caco2 cells, whereas these effects were attenuated by treatment with anti-REG Iα antibody. Reg I may play a role in the maintenance of mucosal barrier function by inducing tight junction proteins such as claudins 3 and 4. PMID:27055226

  12. The biopharmaceutics of successful controlled release drug product: Segmental-dependent permeability of glipizide vs. metoprolol throughout the intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Zur, Moran; Cohen, Noa; Agbaria, Riad; Dahan, Arik

    2015-07-15

    The purpose of this work was to study the challenges and prospects of regional-dependent absorption in a controlled-release scenario, through the oral biopharmaceutics of the sulfonylurea antidiabetic drug glipizide. The BCS solubility class of glipizide was determined, and its physicochemical properties and intestinal permeability were thoroughly investigated, both in-vitro (PAMPA and Caco-2) and in-vivo in rats. Metoprolol was used as the low/high permeability class boundary marker. Glipizide was found to be a low-solubility compound. All intestinal permeability experimental methods revealed similar trend; a mirror image small intestinal permeability with opposite regional/pH-dependency was obtained, a downward trend for glipizide, and an upward trend for metoprolol. Yet the lowest permeability of glipizide (terminal Ileum) was comparable to the lowest permeability of metoprolol (proximal jejunum). At the colon, similar permeability was evident for glipizide and metoprolol, that was higher than metoprolol's jejunal permeability. We present an analysis that identifies metoprolol's jejunal permeability as the low/high permeability class benchmark anywhere throughout the intestinal tract; we show that the permeability of both glipizide and metoprolol matches/exceeds this threshold throughout the entire intestinal tract, accounting for their success as controlled-release dosage form. This represents a key biopharmaceutical characteristic for a successful controlled-release dosage form. PMID:25957705

  13. Ursodeoxycholic acid ameliorates experimental ileitis counteracting intestinal barrier dysfunction and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Bernardes-Silva, Carlos Felipe; Damião, Adérson O M C; Sipahi, Aytan M; Laurindo, Francisco R M; Iriya, Kiyoshi; Lopasso, Fabio P; Buchpiguel, Carlos A; Lordello, Maria Laura L; Agostinho, Carmem L O; Laudanna, Antonio A

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on intestinal permeability (IP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in indomethacin-induced enteropathy, a well-known experimental model of Crohn's disease. Seventy-eight male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to receive indomethacin, indomethacin + UDCA, or vehicles. Indomethacin induced a significant increase in the fraction of urinary excretion of 51Cr-EDTA following oral administration (7.9 +/- 1.3 vs 2.3 +/- 0.2%; P < 0.05) and lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence in intestinal fragments ex vivo (10.1 +/- 1.9 vs 2.6 +/- 0.4 cpm x 10(3)/mg; P < 0.05) compared to controls. UDCA significantly reversed these effects (P < 0.05), without being incorporated in biliary bile acid composition (HPLC analysis). These findings support a local protective effect of UDCA in experimental ileitis by the modulation of intestinal barrier dysfunction and oxidative stress. In short, they provide insights into mechanisms of action of UDCA in intestinal inflammation and a new perspective on the treatment of Crohn's disease. PMID:15573906

  14. Ascorbate Reverses High Glucose- and RAGE-induced Leak of the Endothelial Permeability Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, M. Elizabeth; Qu, Zhi-chao; May, James M.

    2014-01-01

    High glucose concentrations due to diabetes increase leakage of plasma constituents across the endothelial permeability barrier. We sought to determine whether vitamin C, or ascorbic acid (ascorbate), could reverse such high glucose-induced increases in endothelial barrier permeability. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells and two brain endothelial cell lines cultured at 25 mM glucose showed increases in endothelial barrier permeability to radiolabeled inulin compared to cells cultured at 5 mM glucose. Acute loading of the cells for 30–60 min with ascorbate before the permeability assay prevented the high glucose-induced increase in permeability and decreased basal permeability at 5 mM glucose. High glucose-induced barrier leakage was mediated largely by activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), since it was prevented by RAGE blockade and mimicked by RAGE ligands. Intracellular ascorbate completely prevented RAGE ligand-induced increases in barrier permeability. The high glucose-induced increase in endothelial barrier permeability was also acutely decreased by several cell-penetrant antioxidants, suggesting that at least part of the ascorbate effect could be due to its ability to act as an antioxidant. PMID:24472555

  15. Assessment of intestinal permeability and absorption in cirrhotic patients with ascites using combined sugar probes.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Marc J; Menzies, Ian S; Ho, Hoi; Gregory, Gavin G; Casner, Nancy A; Crane, Roger S; Hernandez, Jesus A

    2004-04-01

    Gastrointestinal dysfunction in patients with cirrhosis may contribute to complications such as malnutrition and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. To determine whether cirrhotic patients with ascites have altered intestinal function, we compared intestinal permeability and absorption in patients with liver disease and normal subjects. Intestinal permeability and absorption were investigated in 66 cirrhotic patients (48 with ascites, 18 without ascites) and 74 healthy control subjects. Timed recovery of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose, D-xylose, L-rhamnose, and lactulose in urine following oral administration was measured in order to assess active and passive carrier-mediated, and nonmediated, absorptive capacity, as well as intestinal large-pore/small-pore (lactulose/rhamnose) permeability. Test sugars were measured by quantitative thin-layer chromatography and results are expressed as a percentage of test dose recovered in a 5-h urine collection. Sugar excretion ratios relating to small intestinal permeability (lactulose/rhamnose) and absorption (rhamnose/3-O-methyl-D-glucose) were calculated to avoid the effects of nonmucosal factors such as renal clearance, portal hypertension, and ascites on the recovery of sugar probes in urine. Compared with normal subjects, the mean lactulose/rhamnose permeability ratio in cirrhotic patients with ascites was significantly higher (0.058 vs. 0.037, P < 0.001) but not in cirrhotic patients without ascites (0.041 vs. 0.037). Cirrhotic patients with ascites had significantly lower mean recoveries of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (23.0 vs. 49.1%; P < 0.001), D-xylose (18.8 vs. 34.5%; P < 0.001), L-rhamnose (4.0 vs. 9.1%; P < 0.001), and lactulose (0.202 vs. 0.337%; P < 0.001) than normal subjects. However, the mean rhamnose/3-O-methyl-D-glucose ratio was the same in cirrhotic patients with ascites as normal subjects (0.189 vs. 0.189), indicating that the reduction in probe recovery was due to nonmucosal factors. Compared with normal subjects

  16. Stress does not increase blood-brain barrier permeability in mice.

    PubMed

    Roszkowski, Martin; Bohacek, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have reported that exposure to acute psychophysiological stressors can lead to an increase in blood-brain barrier permeability, but these findings remain controversial and disputed. We thoroughly examined this issue by assessing the effect of several well-established paradigms of acute stress and chronic stress on blood-brain barrier permeability in several brain areas of adult mice. Using cerebral extraction ratio for the small molecule tracer sodium fluorescein (NaF, 376 Da) as a sensitive measure of blood-brain barrier permeability, we find that neither acute swim nor restraint stress lead to increased cerebral extraction ratio. Daily 6-h restraint stress for 21 days, a model for the severe detrimental impact of chronic stress on brain function, also does not alter cerebral extraction ratio. In contrast, we find that cold forced swim and cold restraint stress both lead to a transient, pronounced decrease of cerebral extraction ratio in hippocampus and cortex, suggesting that body temperature can be an important confounding factor in studies of blood-brain barrier permeability. To additionally assess if stress could change blood-brain barrier permeability for macromolecules, we measured cerebral extraction ratio for fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (70 kDa). We find that neither acute restraint nor cold swim stress affected blood-brain barrier permeability for macromolecules, thus corroborating our findings that various stressors do not increase blood-brain barrier permeability. PMID:27146513

  17. Bile enhances glucose uptake, reduces permeability, and modulates effects of lectins, trypsin inhibitors and saponins on intestinal tissue.

    PubMed

    Bakke, Anne Marie; Chikwati, Elvis M; Venold, Fredrik F; Sahlmann, Christian; Holm, Halvor; Penn, Michael H; Oropeza-Moe, Marianne; Krogdahl, Åshild

    2014-02-01

    Antinutritional factors (ANFs) can disrupt digestive and other intestinal functions. ANFs in soybean meal (SBM) are implicated in proliferative and inflammatory responses in the intestine of various (functionally) monogastric animals, including Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). The goal of the current study was to investigate the effect of ex vivo exposure of mid and distal intestinal tissue of salmon to soybean saponins (SAP), lectin (LEC) and Kunitz' trypsin inhibitor (KTI), singly and in combination, on epithelial function, as assessed by measuring in vitro glucose uptake pathways along a glucose concentration gradient. As solubilization of SAP in the calcium-containing Ringer's solution was problematic but resolved with the addition of a physiological concentration of bile collected from the gall bladder of salmon, an evaluation of bile effects became an added element. Results indicated that bile increased baseline glucose absorption and possibly transport, and also had a protective effect on the epithelial barrier, at least partially due to taurocholate. Compared to controls, tissues exposed to LEC+bile, KTI+bile and LEC+KTI+bile exhibited increased glucose uptake at the higher glucose concentrations, apparently due to markedly increased tissue permeability. Addition of SAP, however, attenuated the response, possibly by binding bile components. SAP+bile, also in combination with LEC and/or KTI, as well as LEC, KTI and LEC+KTI without bile often reduced transcellular glucose uptake pathways, while maintaining low tissue permeability. SAP+LEC+KTI+bile, LEC and KTI caused the most marked reductions. The distal intestine was more affected, reflecting the restriction of in vivo SBM-induced inflammatory changes to this region. PMID:24291392

  18. Long noncoding RNA SPRY4-IT1 regulates intestinal epithelial barrier function by modulating the expression levels of tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lan; Rao, Jaladanki N.; Cao, Shan; Liu, Lan; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Jennifer; Liu, Yulan; Gorospe, Myriam; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial cells line the intestinal mucosa and form an important barrier to a wide array of noxious substances in the lumen. Disruption of the barrier integrity occurs commonly in various pathologies. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) control diverse biological processes, but little is known about the role of lncRNAs in regulation of the gut permeability. Here we show that the lncRNA SPRY4-IT1 regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier function by altering expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins. SPRY4-IT1 silencing led to dysfunction of the epithelial barrier in cultured cells by decreasing the stability of mRNAs encoding TJ proteins claudin-1, claudin-3, occludin, and JAM-1 and repressing their translation. In contrast, increasing the levels of SPRY4-IT1 in the intestinal mucosa protected the gut barrier in mice exposed to septic stress by increasing the abundance of TJ proteins. SPRY4-IT1 directly interacted with TJ mRNAs, and this process was enhanced through the association with the RNA-binding protein HuR. Of interest, the intestinal mucosa from patients with increased gut permeability exhibited a decrease in the levels of SPRY4-IT1. These findings highlight a novel role for SPRY4-IT1 in controlling the intestinal epithelial barrier and define a mechanism by which SPRY4-IT1 modulates TJ expression by altering the stability and translation of TJ mRNAs. PMID:26680741

  19. cis-Peptide Bonds: A Key for Intestinal Permeability of Peptides? .

    PubMed

    Marelli, Udaya Kiran; Ovadia, Oded; Frank, Andreas Oliver; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Gilon, Chaim; Hoffman, Amnon; Kessler, Horst

    2015-10-19

    Recent structural studies on libraries of cyclic hexapeptides led to the identification of common backbone conformations that may be instrumental to the oral availability of peptides. Furthermore, the observation of differential Caco-2 permeabilities of enantiomeric pairs of some of these peptides strongly supports the concept of conformational specificity driven uptake and also suggests a pivotal role of carrier-mediated pathways for peptide transport, especially for scaffolds of polar nature. This work presents investigations on the Caco-2 and PAMPA permeability profiles of 13 selected N-methylated cyclic pentaalanine peptides derived from the basic cyclo(-D-Ala-Ala4 -) template. These molecules generally showed moderate to low transport in intestinal epithelia with a few of them exhibiting a Caco-2 permeability equal to or slightly higher than that of mannitol, a marker for paracellular permeability. We identified that the majority of the permeable cyclic penta- and hexapeptides possess an N-methylated cis-peptide bond, a structural feature that is also present in the orally available peptides cyclosporine A and the tri-N-methylated analogue of the Veber-Hirschmann peptide. Based on these observations it appears that the presence of N-methylated cis-peptide bonds at certain locations may promote the intestinal permeability of peptides through a suitable conformational preorganization. PMID:26337831

  20. Simultaneous gas-chromatographic urinary measurement of sugar probes to assess intestinal permeability: use of time course analysis to optimize its use to assess regional gut permeability

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Maliha; Rajan, Kumar; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Robin M.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Measurement of intestinal permeability is important in several diseases but currently several methods are employed. We sought to: (1) develop a new GC based method to measure urinary mannitol, lactulose and sucralose to assess regional and total gut permeability; (2) analyze the kinetics of these sugars in the urine to determine which ratio is useful to represent intestinal permeability; and (3) determine whether age, gender, race and BMI impact these values. Methods Subjects drank a cocktail of sucrose, lactulose, mannitol and sucralose and these sugars were measured in the urine at 5, 12 and 24 h with gas chromatography. Results Urinary mannitol exhibited significantly different kinetics than lactulose and sucralose which were similar to each other and varied little over the 24 h. No permeability differences were observed for renal function, age, race, sex, or BMI. Conclusions Our data do not support the use of the widely used L/M ratio as an accurate estimate of intestinal permeability. Our data support the use of: The sucralose/lactulose (S/M) ratio to measure: small intestine permeability (first 5 h); small and large intestine (first 12 hours), and total gut permeability (24 h). This was also found to be true in a Parkinson’s disease model. PMID:25591964

  1. Corticosterone mediates stress-related increased intestinal permeability in a region-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Gen; Wu, Shu-Pei; Hu, Yongjun; Smith, David E; Wiley, John W.; Hong, Shuangsong

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic psychological stress (CPS) is associated with increased intestinal epithelial permeability and visceral hyperalgesia. It is unknown whether corticosterone (CORT) plays a role in mediating alterations of epithelial permeability in response to CPS. Methods Male rats were subjected to 1-hour water avoidance (WA) stress or subcutaneous CORT injection daily for 10 consecutive days in the presence or absence of corticoid-receptor antagonist RU-486. The visceromotor response (VMR) to colorectal distension (CRD) was measured. The in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion was used to measure intestinal permeability in jejunum and colon simultaneously. Key Results We observed significant decreases in the levels of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and tight junction proteins in the colon but not the jejunum in stressed rats. These changes were largely reproduced by serial CORT injections in control rats and were significantly reversed by RU-486. Stressed and CORT-injected rats demonstrated a 3-fold increase in permeability for PEG-400 (MW) in colon but not jejunum and significant increase in VMR to CRD, which was significantly reversed by RU-486. In addition, no differences in permeability to PEG-4,000 and PEG-35,000 were detected between control and WA groups. Conclusions & Inferences Our findings indicate that CPS was associated with region-specific decrease in epithelial tight junction protein levels in the colon, increased colon epithelial permeability to low-molecular weight macromolecules which were largely reproduced by CORT treatment in control rats and prevented by RU-486. These observations implicate a novel, region-specific role for CORT as a mediator of CPS-induced increased permeability to macromolecules across the colon epithelium. PMID:23336591

  2. The intestinal epithelium as guardian of gut barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaiyi; Hornef, Mathias W; Dupont, Aline

    2015-11-01

    A single layer of epithelial cells separates the intestinal lumen from the underlying sterile tissue. It is exposed to a multitude of nutrients and a large number of commensal bacteria. Although the presence of commensal bacteria significantly contributes to nutrient digestion, vitamin synthesis and tissue maturation, their high number represents a permanent challenge to the integrity of the epithelial surface keeping the local immune system constantly on alert. In addition, the intestinal mucosa is challenged by a variety of enteropathogenic microorganisms. In both circumstances, the epithelium actively contributes to maintaining host-microbial homeostasis and antimicrobial host defence. It deploys a variety of mechanisms to restrict the presence of commensal bacteria to the intestinal lumen and to prevent translocation of commensal and pathogenic microorganisms to the underlying tissue. Enteropathogenic microorganisms in turn have learnt to evade the host's immune system and circumvent the antimicrobial host response. In the present article, we review recent advances that illustrate the intense and intimate host-microbial interaction at the epithelial level and improve our understanding of the mechanisms that maintain the integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier. PMID:26294173

  3. Permeability of plumbagin across human intestinal cell in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sumsakul, Wiriyaporn; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2016-03-01

    Plumbagin is the active compound isolated from plants used in traditional medicine for treatment of various diseases such as activities malaria, leishmaniasis, viral infections and cancers. The aim of the study was to investigate the permeability of plumbagin across Caco-2 (human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma) cell monolayer and its effects on the expression and function of P-glycoprotein. The integrity of Caco-2 cell monolayer was evaluated by measuring trans-epithelial electrical resistance and permeation (Papp) of Lucifer yellow across the cell monolayer. The effect of plumbagin on P-glycoprotein was detected by measuring its interference with the transport of the P-glycoprotein substrate (R123) and the effect on MDR-1 mRNA expression was detected by RT-PCR. The Papp of plumbagin (2-8 µM) for the apical to basolateral and basolateral to apical directions were 10.29-15.96 × 10(-6) and 7.40-9.02 × 10(-6) cm/s, respectively, with the efflux ratios of 0.57-0.73. Plumbagin is not either a substrate or inhibitor of P-glycoprotein. It did not interfere with the P-glycoprotein-mediated R123 transport across Caco-2 cell monolayer, as well as the function of P-glycoprotein and the expression of MDR-1 mRNA. Results suggest moderate permeability of plumbagin across the Caco-2 cell monolayer in both directions. The transport mechanism is likely to be a passive transport. PMID:26620575

  4. Intestinal barrier function in neonatal foals: options for improvement.

    PubMed

    Vendrig, Johannes C; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna

    2012-07-01

    Gastrointestinal defence in the new-born is limited in comparison to adults, due to an immature epithelial barrier function and deficits in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Consequently, neonates (including foals) are at increased risk of disturbance to mucosal homeostasis during initial intestinal colonisation that may lead to excessive inflammation and bacterial translocation into the bloodstream, resulting in septicaemia. Bacterial recognition by Pattern Recognition Receptors (PRRs) and their downstream regulation of cytokine release have been shown to be pivotal for gastrointestinal mucosal homeostasis and the development of a functional intestinal barrier. Evidence suggests that selective PRR agonists limit the inflammatory responses and improve epithelial barrier function. Milk, and in particular colostrum, contain a broad array of oligosaccharides which seem to act as PRR agonists. This class of compounds forms a source for new dietary formulas that may orchestrate gut colonisation by the commensal flora in the early phase of life and so reduce the risks of inflammation and pathogen invasion. PMID:22377327

  5. Heavy Cigarette Smokers in a Chinese Population Display a Compromised Permeability Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Shujun; Ye, Li; Lv, Chengzhi; Elias, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with various cutaneous disorders with defective permeability. Yet, whether cigarette smoking influences epidermal permeability barrier function is largely unknown. Here, we measured skin biophysical properties, including permeability barrier homeostasis, stratum corneum (SC) integrity, SC hydration, skin surface pH, and skin melanin/erythema index, in cigarette smokers. A total of 99 male volunteers were enrolled in this study. Smokers were categorized as light-to-moderate (<20 cigarettes/day) or heavy smokers (≥20 cigarettes/day). An MPA5 was used to measure SC hydration and skin melanin/erythema index on the dorsal hand, forehead, and cheek. Basal transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and barrier recovery rates were assessed on the forearm. A Skin-pH-Meter pH900 was used to measure skin surface pH. Our results showed that heavy cigarette smokers exhibited delayed barrier recovery after acute abrogation (1.02% ± 13.06 versus 16.48% ± 6.07), and barrier recovery rates correlated negatively with the number of daily cigarettes consumption (p = 0.0087). Changes in biophysical parameters in cigarette smokers varied with body sites. In conclusion, heavy cigarette smokers display compromised permeability barrier homeostasis, which could contribute, in part, to the increased prevalence of certain cutaneous disorders characterized by defective permeability. Thus, improving epidermal permeability barrier should be considered for heavy cigarette smokers. PMID:27437403

  6. Heavy Cigarette Smokers in a Chinese Population Display a Compromised Permeability Barrier.

    PubMed

    Xin, Shujun; Ye, Li; Man, George; Lv, Chengzhi; Elias, Peter M; Man, Mao-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with various cutaneous disorders with defective permeability. Yet, whether cigarette smoking influences epidermal permeability barrier function is largely unknown. Here, we measured skin biophysical properties, including permeability barrier homeostasis, stratum corneum (SC) integrity, SC hydration, skin surface pH, and skin melanin/erythema index, in cigarette smokers. A total of 99 male volunteers were enrolled in this study. Smokers were categorized as light-to-moderate (<20 cigarettes/day) or heavy smokers (≥20 cigarettes/day). An MPA5 was used to measure SC hydration and skin melanin/erythema index on the dorsal hand, forehead, and cheek. Basal transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and barrier recovery rates were assessed on the forearm. A Skin-pH-Meter pH900 was used to measure skin surface pH. Our results showed that heavy cigarette smokers exhibited delayed barrier recovery after acute abrogation (1.02% ± 13.06 versus 16.48% ± 6.07), and barrier recovery rates correlated negatively with the number of daily cigarettes consumption (p = 0.0087). Changes in biophysical parameters in cigarette smokers varied with body sites. In conclusion, heavy cigarette smokers display compromised permeability barrier homeostasis, which could contribute, in part, to the increased prevalence of certain cutaneous disorders characterized by defective permeability. Thus, improving epidermal permeability barrier should be considered for heavy cigarette smokers. PMID:27437403

  7. The role of intestinal epithelial barrier function in the development of NEC

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Melissa D; Denning, Patricia W

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial barrier plays an important role in maintaining host health. Breakdown of intestinal barrier function is known to play a role in many diseases such as infectious enteritis, idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease, and neonatal inflammatory bowel diseases. Recently, increasing research has demonstrated the importance of understanding how intestinal epithelial barrier function develops in the premature neonate in order to develop strategies to promote its maturation. Optimizing intestinal barrier function is thought to be key to preventing neonatal inflammatory bowel diseases such as necrotizing enterocolitis. In this review, we will first summarize the key components of the intestinal epithelial barrier, what is known about its development, and how this may explain NEC pathogenesis. Finally, we will review what therapeutic strategies may be used to promote optimal development of neonatal intestinal barrier function in order to reduce the incidence and severity of NEC. PMID:25927016

  8. 'You shall not pass!': quantifying barrier permeability and proximity avoidance by animals.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Hawthorne L; Gurarie, Eliezer; Börger, Luca; Panzacchi, Manuela; Basille, Mathieu; Herfindal, Ivar; Van Moorter, Bram; R Lele, Subhash; Matthiopoulos, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Impediments to animal movement are ubiquitous and vary widely in both scale and permeability. It is essential to understand how impediments alter ecological dynamics via their influence on animal behavioural strategies governing space use and, for anthropogenic features such as roads and fences, how to mitigate these effects to effectively manage species and landscapes. Here, we focused primarily on barriers to movement, which we define as features that cannot be circumnavigated but may be crossed. Responses to barriers will be influenced by the movement capabilities of the animal, its proximity to the barriers, and habitat preference. We developed a mechanistic modelling framework for simultaneously quantifying the permeability and proximity effects of barriers on habitat preference and movement. We used simulations based on our model to demonstrate how parameters on movement, habitat preference and barrier permeability can be estimated statistically. We then applied the model to a case study of road effects on wild mountain reindeer summer movements. This framework provided unbiased and precise parameter estimates across a range of strengths of preferences and barrier permeabilities. The quality of permeability estimates, however, was correlated with the number of times the barrier is crossed and the number of locations in proximity to barriers. In the case study we found that reindeer avoided areas near roads and that roads are semi-permeable barriers to movement. There was strong avoidance of roads extending up to c. 1 km for four of five animals, and having to cross roads reduced the probability of movement by 68·6% (range 3·5-99·5%). Human infrastructure has embedded within it the idea of networks: nodes connected by linear features such as roads, rail tracks, pipelines, fences and cables, many of which divide the landscape and limit animal movement. The unintended but potentially profound consequences of infrastructure on animals remain poorly understood

  9. Burn Injury Alters the Intestinal Microbiome and Increases Gut Permeability and Bacterial Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Earley, Zachary M.; Akhtar, Suhail; Green, Stefan J.; Naqib, Ankur; Khan, Omair; Cannon, Abigail R.; Hammer, Adam M.; Morris, Niya L.; Li, Xiaoling; Eberhardt, Joshua M.; Gamelli, Richard L; Kennedy, Richard H.; Choudhry, Mashkoor A.

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis remains one of the leading causes of death in burn patients who survive the initial insult of injury. Disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier has been shown after burn injury; this can lead to the translocation of bacteria or their products (e.g., endotoxin) from the intestinal lumen to the circulation, thereby increasing the risk for sepsis in immunocompromised individuals. Since the maintenance of the epithelial barrier is largely dependent on the intestinal microbiota, we examined the diversity of the intestinal microbiome of severely burned patients and a controlled mouse model of burn injury. We show that burn injury induces a dramatic dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiome of both humans and mice and allows for similar overgrowths of Gram-negative aerobic bacteria. Furthermore, we show that the bacteria increasing in abundance have the potential to translocate to extra-intestinal sites. This study provides an insight into how the diversity of the intestinal microbiome changes after burn injury and some of the consequences these gut bacteria can have in the host. PMID:26154283

  10. PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER AT U.S. COAST GUARD SITE, ELIZABETH CITY, NC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers are innovative and cost-effective remedial technologies and are becoming more desirable methods for in-situ passive remediation of ground water contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons and redox-sensitive metals. As contaminated water passes through ...

  11. PERFORMANCE MONITORING OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS TO REMEDIATE CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. Removal of contaminants from the groundwater plume is achieved by alt...

  12. APPLICATION OF THE PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT OF ARSENIC IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research approach will involve hydrogeological and geochemical studies to provide information needed in order to select an appropriate design configuration and to evaluate the performance of a pilot-scale subsurface permeable reactive barrier to remediate arsenic-contaminated...

  13. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS TO REMEDIATE CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. The few pilot and commercial installations which have been implemented ...

  14. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER STRATEGIES FOR REMEDIATION OF ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER: ABSTRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-ADA-01152 Wilkin*, R.T., and Paul*, C.J. "Permeable Reactive Barrier Strategies for Remediation of Arsenic- Contaminated Groundwater." In: Geological Society of America, Abstracts with programs., Geological Society of America Annua...

  15. BIFUNCTIONAL ALUMINUN: A PERMEABLE BARRIER MATERIAL FOR THE DEGRADATION OF MTBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bifunctional aluminum is an innovative remedial material for the treatment of gasoline oxygenates in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). PRBs represent a promising environmental technology for remediation of groundwater contamination. Although zero-valent metals (ZVM) have been...

  16. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR IN-SITU TREATMENT OF ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory and field research has shown that permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) containing a variety of materials can treat arsenic (As) contaminated groundwater. Sites where these PRBs are located include a mine tailings facility, fertilizer and chemical manufacturing sites, a...

  17. Performance Assessment of a Permeable Reactive Barrier for Ground Water Remediation Fifteen Years After Installation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fifteen-year performance of a granular iron, permeable reactive barrier (PRB; Elizabeth City, North Carolina) is reviewed with respect to contaminanttreatment (hexavalent chromium and trichloroethylene) and hydraulic performance. Due to in-situ treatment of the chromium sourc...

  18. Iron Hydroxy Carbonate Formation in Zerovalent Iron Permeable Reactive Barriers: Characterization and Evaluation of Phase Stability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predicting the long-term potential of permeable reactive barriers for treating contaminated groundwater relies on understanding the endpoints of biogeochemical reactions between influent groundwater and the reactive medium. Iron hydroxy carbonate (chukanovite) is frequently obs...

  19. COST ANALYSIS OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR REMEDIATION OF GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating contaminated groundwater that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. PRB's are a potentially more cost effective treatment...

  20. Central role of the gut epithelial barrier in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation: lessons learned from animal models and human genetics.

    PubMed

    Pastorelli, Luca; De Salvo, Carlo; Mercado, Joseph R; Vecchi, Maurizio; Pizarro, Theresa T

    2013-01-01

    The gut mucosa is constantly challenged by a bombardment of foreign antigens and environmental microorganisms. As such, the precise regulation of the intestinal barrier allows the maintenance of mucosal immune homeostasis and prevents the onset of uncontrolled inflammation. In support of this concept, emerging evidence points to defects in components of the epithelial barrier as etiologic factors in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). In fact, the integrity of the intestinal barrier relies on different elements, including robust innate immune responses, epithelial paracellular permeability, epithelial cell integrity, as well as the production of mucus. The purpose of this review is to systematically evaluate how alterations in the aforementioned epithelial components can lead to the disruption of intestinal immune homeostasis, and subsequent inflammation. In this regard, the wealth of data from mouse models of intestinal inflammation and human genetics are pivotal in understanding pathogenic pathways, for example, that are initiated from the specific loss of function of a single protein leading to the onset of intestinal disease. On the other hand, several recently proposed therapeutic approaches to treat human IBD are targeted at enhancing different elements of gut barrier function, further supporting a primary role of the epithelium in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation and emphasizing the importance of maintaining a healthy and effective intestinal barrier. PMID:24062746

  1. Glycoprotein A33 deficiency: a new mouse model of impaired intestinal epithelial barrier function and inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Benjamin B.; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Buchert, Michael; Putoczki, Tracy L.; Doggett, Karen; Bao, Shisan; Johnstone, Cameron N.; Masson, Frederick; Hollande, Frederic; Burgess, Antony W.; Scott, Andrew M.; Ernst, Matthias; Heath, Joan K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cells of the intestinal epithelium provide a selectively permeable barrier between the external environment and internal tissues. The integrity of this barrier is maintained by tight junctions, specialised cell-cell contacts that permit the absorption of water and nutrients while excluding microbes, toxins and dietary antigens. Impairment of intestinal barrier function contributes to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, including food hypersensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colitis-associated cancer (CAC). Glycoprotein A33 (GPA33) is an intestinal epithelium-specific cell surface marker and member of the CTX group of transmembrane proteins. Roles in cell-cell adhesion have been demonstrated for multiple CTX family members, suggesting a similar function for GPA33 within the gastrointestinal tract. To test a potential requirement for GPA33 in intestinal barrier function, we generated Gpa33−/− mice and subjected them to experimental regimens designed to produce food hypersensitivity, colitis and CAC. Gpa33−/− mice exhibited impaired intestinal barrier function. This was shown by elevated steady-state immunosurveillance in the colonic mucosa and leakiness to oral TRITC-labelled dextran after short-term exposure to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) to injure the intestinal epithelium. Gpa33−/− mice also exhibited rapid onset and reduced resolution of DSS-induced colitis, and a striking increase in the number of colitis-associated tumours produced by treatment with the colon-specific mutagen azoxymethane (AOM) followed by two cycles of DSS. In contrast, Gpa33−/− mice treated with AOM alone showed no increase in sporadic tumour formation, indicating that their increased tumour susceptibility is dependent on inflammatory stimuli. Finally, Gpa33−/− mice displayed hypersensitivity to food allergens, a common co-morbidity in humans with IBD. We propose that Gpa33−/− mice provide a valuable model to study the mechanisms linking

  2. New biomimetic barrier Permeapad™ for efficient investigation of passive permeability of drugs.

    PubMed

    di Cagno, Massimiliano; Bibi, Hanady A; Bauer-Brandl, Annette

    2015-06-20

    In this work the suitability of a newly invented physical patch comprising a biomimetic barrier (named Permeapad™) for drug permeability tests has been investigated. Exemplars of Permeapad™ were adapted to Franz diffusion cells and apparent permeability (Papp) of a series of drugs were measured and compared with calculated partition coefficients (logPcal) of the investigated drugs as well as literature reference values obtained from Parallel Artificial Membrane Permeation Assay (PAMPA) and the cellular based method Caco-2. Moreover, tightness of the barrier to hydrophilic marker's permeation, resistance of these barriers to proton permeation (pH changes) and shelf-life functionality were also investigated. Comparison with the published data indicated a good correlation between the permeability values measured and partition coefficients (logPcal). Moreover, a good correlation between the permeabilities measured with the new barrier and well-established in vitro permeability methods (PAMPA and Caco-2 respectively) was found for both highly absorbed and poorly permeable compounds. Permeapad™ also proved to maintain high integrity over time and in different pH environments. In conclusion, Permeapad™ as an innovative barrier appears to be a promising tool for fast, cost effective and reliable screening of drugs and chemical entities' passive permeability. PMID:25840123

  3. Comparison study of ferrofluid and powder iron oxide nanoparticle permeability across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Dan; Sheikh, Lubna; Bhattacharya, Soumya; Nayar, Suprabha; Webster, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the permeability of 11 different iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP) samples (eight fluids and three powders) was determined using an in vitro blood-brain barrier model. Importantly, the results showed that the ferrofluid formulations were statistically more permeable than the IONP powder formulations at the blood-brain barrier, suggesting a role for the presently studied in situ synthesized ferrofluid formulations using poly(vinyl) alcohol, bovine serum albumin, collagen, glutamic acid, graphene, and their combinations as materials which can cross the blood-brain barrier to deliver drugs or have other neurological therapeutic efficacy. Conversely, the results showed the least permeability across the blood-brain barrier for the IONP with collagen formulation, suggesting a role as a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent but limiting IONP passage across the blood-brain barrier. Further analysis of the data yielded several trends of note, with little correlation between permeability and fluid zeta potential, but a larger correlation between permeability and fluid particle size (with the smaller particle sizes having larger permeability). Such results lay the foundation for simple modification of iron oxide nanoparticle formulations to either promote or inhibit passage across the blood-brain barrier, and deserve further investigation for a wide range of applications. PMID:23426527

  4. Food Derived Bioactive Peptides and Intestinal Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Rivero-Gutiérrez, Belén; Mascaraque, Cristina; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of food-derived bioactive peptides have been shown to exert health-promoting actions and are therefore considered functional foods or nutraceuticals. Some of these actions are related to the maintenance, reinforcement or repairment of the intestinal barrier function (IBF) whose role is to selectively allow the absorption of water, nutrients and ions while preventing the influx of microorganisms from the intestinal lumen. Alterations in the IBF have been related to many disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease or metabolic syndrome. Components of IBF are the intestinal epithelium, the mucus layer, secretory immunoglobulin A and cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Here we review the effects of food derived bioactive peptides on these IBF components. In vitro and in vivo effects, both in healthy and disease states, have been reviewed. Although limited, the available information indicates a potential for food-derived peptides to modify IBF and to contribute to disease treatment, but further research is needed to better isolate responsible peptides, and to help define their mode of action. PMID:25501338

  5. Protective Effects of Ferulic Acid against Heat Stress-Induced Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    He, Shasha; Liu, Fenghua; Xu, Lei; Yin, Peng; Li, Deyin; Mei, Chen; Jiang, Linshu; Ma, Yunfei; Xu, Jianqin

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress is important in the pathogenesis of intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction. Ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic acid widely found in fruits and vegetables, can scavenge free radicals and activate cell stress responses. This study is aimed at investigating protective effects of FA on heat stress-induced dysfunction of the intestinal epithelial barrier in vitro and in vivo. Intestinal epithelial (IEC-6) cells were pretreated with FA for 4 h and then exposed to heat stress. Heat stress caused decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and increased permeability to 4-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran (FD4). Both effects were inhibited by FA in a dose-dependent manner. FA significantly attenuated the decrease in occludin, ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression observed with heat stress. The distortion and redistribution of occludin, ZO-1 and E-cadherin proteins were also effectively prevented by FA pretreatment. Moreover, heat stress diminished electron-dense material detected in tight junctions (TJs), an effect also alleviated by FA in a dose-dependent manner. In an in vivo heat stress model, FA (50 mg/kg) was administered to male Sprague–Dawley rats for 7 consecutive days prior to exposure to heat stress. FA pretreatment significantly attenuated the effects of heat stress on the small intestine, including the increased FD4 permeability, disrupted tight junctions and microvilli structure, and reduced occludin, ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that FA pretreatment is potentially protective against heat stress-induced intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:26894689

  6. Protective Effects of Ferulic Acid against Heat Stress-Induced Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    He, Shasha; Liu, Fenghua; Xu, Lei; Yin, Peng; Li, Deyin; Mei, Chen; Jiang, Linshu; Ma, Yunfei; Xu, Jianqin

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress is important in the pathogenesis of intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction. Ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic acid widely found in fruits and vegetables, can scavenge free radicals and activate cell stress responses. This study is aimed at investigating protective effects of FA on heat stress-induced dysfunction of the intestinal epithelial barrier in vitro and in vivo. Intestinal epithelial (IEC-6) cells were pretreated with FA for 4 h and then exposed to heat stress. Heat stress caused decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and increased permeability to 4-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran (FD4). Both effects were inhibited by FA in a dose-dependent manner. FA significantly attenuated the decrease in occludin, ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression observed with heat stress. The distortion and redistribution of occludin, ZO-1 and E-cadherin proteins were also effectively prevented by FA pretreatment. Moreover, heat stress diminished electron-dense material detected in tight junctions (TJs), an effect also alleviated by FA in a dose-dependent manner. In an in vivo heat stress model, FA (50 mg/kg) was administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats for 7 consecutive days prior to exposure to heat stress. FA pretreatment significantly attenuated the effects of heat stress on the small intestine, including the increased FD4 permeability, disrupted tight junctions and microvilli structure, and reduced occludin, ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that FA pretreatment is potentially protective against heat stress-induced intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:26894689

  7. Decreased melatonin secretion is associated with increased intestinal permeability and marker of endotoxemia in alcoholics

    PubMed Central

    Gorenz, Annika; Shaikh, Maliha; Desai, Vishal; Forsyth, Christopher; Fogg, Louis; Burgess, Helen J.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Chronic heavy alcohol use is known to cause gut leakiness and alcoholic liver disease (ALD), but only 30% of heavy drinkers develop increased intestinal permeability and ALD. The hypothesis of this study was that disruption of circadian rhythms is a potential risk factor in actively drinking alcoholics for gut leakiness and endotoxemia. We studied 20 subjects with alcohol use disorder (AD) and 17 healthy controls (HC, 6 day workers, 11 night workers). Subjects wore a wrist actiwatch for 7 days and underwent a 24-h dim light phase assessment and urine collection for intestinal permeability. The AD group had significantly less total sleep time and increased fragmentation of sleep (P < 0.05). AD also had significantly lower plasma melatonin levels compared with the HC [mean area under the curve (AUC) 322.78 ± 228.21 vs. 568.75 ± 304.26 pg/ml, P = 0.03]. In the AD group, AUC of melatonin was inversely correlated with small bowel and colonic intestinal permeability (lactulose-to-mannitol ratio, r = −0.39, P = 0.03; urinary sucralose, r = −0.47, P = 0.01). Cosinor analysis of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (marker of endotoxemia) and lipopolysaccharide every 4 h for 24 h in HC and AD subjects had a midline estimating statistic of rhythm of 5,026.15 ± 409.56 vs. 6,818.02 ± 628.78 ng/ml (P < 0.01) and 0.09 ± 0.03 vs. 0.15 ± 0.19 EU/ml (P < 0.05), respectively. We found plasma melatonin was significantly lower in the AD group, and lower melatonin levels correlated with increased intestinal permeability and a marker of endotoxemia. Our study suggests the suppression of melatonin in AD may promote gut leakiness and endotoxemia. PMID:25907689

  8. Decreased melatonin secretion is associated with increased intestinal permeability and marker of endotoxemia in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Garth R; Gorenz, Annika; Shaikh, Maliha; Desai, Vishal; Forsyth, Christopher; Fogg, Louis; Burgess, Helen J; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-06-15

    Chronic heavy alcohol use is known to cause gut leakiness and alcoholic liver disease (ALD), but only 30% of heavy drinkers develop increased intestinal permeability and ALD. The hypothesis of this study was that disruption of circadian rhythms is a potential risk factor in actively drinking alcoholics for gut leakiness and endotoxemia. We studied 20 subjects with alcohol use disorder (AD) and 17 healthy controls (HC, 6 day workers, 11 night workers). Subjects wore a wrist actiwatch for 7 days and underwent a 24-h dim light phase assessment and urine collection for intestinal permeability. The AD group had significantly less total sleep time and increased fragmentation of sleep (P < 0.05). AD also had significantly lower plasma melatonin levels compared with the HC [mean area under the curve (AUC) 322.78 ± 228.21 vs. 568.75 ± 304.26 pg/ml, P = 0.03]. In the AD group, AUC of melatonin was inversely correlated with small bowel and colonic intestinal permeability (lactulose-to-mannitol ratio, r = -0.39, P = 0.03; urinary sucralose, r = -0.47, P = 0.01). Cosinor analysis of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (marker of endotoxemia) and lipopolysaccharide every 4 h for 24 h in HC and AD subjects had a midline estimating statistic of rhythm of 5,026.15 ± 409.56 vs. 6,818.02 ± 628.78 ng/ml (P < 0.01) and 0.09 ± 0.03 vs. 0.15 ± 0.19 EU/ml (P < 0.05), respectively. We found plasma melatonin was significantly lower in the AD group, and lower melatonin levels correlated with increased intestinal permeability and a marker of endotoxemia. Our study suggests the suppression of melatonin in AD may promote gut leakiness and endotoxemia. PMID:25907689

  9. Protective Effect of Huoxiang Zhengqi Oral Liquid on Intestinal Mucosal Mechanical Barrier of Rats with Postinfectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome Induced by Acetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yao; Liu, Wei; Peng, Qiu-Xian; Peng, Jiang-Li; Yu, Lin-Zhong; Hu, Jian-Lan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a rat model with acetic acid-induced PI-IBS was used to study the role of HXZQ oral liquid in repairing the colonic epithelial barrier and reducing intestinal permeability. Pathomorphism of colonic tissue, epithelial ultrastructure, DAO activity in serum, and the protein expression of ZO-1 and occludin were examined to investigate protective effect mechanisms of HXZQ on intestinal mucosa barrier and then present experimental support for its use for prevention and cure of PI-IBS. PMID:25254052

  10. Probiotic-derived polyphosphate enhances the epithelial barrier function and maintains intestinal homeostasis through integrin-p38 MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Shuichi; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Konishi, Hiroaki; Ueno, Nobuhiro; Kobayashi, Naoyuki; Shigyo, Tatsuro; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    Probiotics exhibit beneficial effects on human health, particularly in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis in a complex manner notwithstanding the diversity of an intestinal flora between individuals. Thus, it is highly probable that some common molecules secreted by probiotic and/or commensal bacteria contribute to the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and protect the intestinal epithelium from injurious stimuli. To address this question, we aimed to isolate the cytoprotective compound from a lactobacillus strain, Lactobacillus brevis SBC8803 which possess the ability to induce cytoprotective heat shock proteins in mouse small intestine. L. brevis was incubated in MRS broth and the supernatant was passed through with a 0.2-µm filter. Caco2/bbe cells were treated with the culture supernatant, and HSP27 expression was evaluated by Western blotting. HSP27-inducible components were separated by ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE anion exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and HPLC. Finally, we identified that the HSP27-inducible fraction was polyphosphate (poly P), a simple repeated structure of phosphates, which is a common product of lactobacilli and other bacteria associated with intestinal microflora without any definitive physiological functions. Then, poly P was synthesized by poly P-synthesizing enzyme polyphosphate kinase. The synthesized poly P significantly induced HSP27 from Caco2/BBE cells. In addition, Poly P suppressed the oxidant-induced intestinal permeability in the mouse small intestine and pharmacological inhibitors of p38 MAPK and integrins counteract its protective effect. Daily intrarectal administration of poly P (10 µg) improved the inflammation grade and survival rate in 4% sodium dextran sulfate-administered mice. This study, for the first time, demonstrated that poly P is the molecule responsible for maintaining intestinal barrier actions which are mediated through the intestinal integrin β1-p38 MAPK. PMID:21858054

  11. Protective Capacity of Resveratrol, a Natural Polyphenolic Compound, against Deoxynivalenol-Induced Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction and Bacterial Translocation.

    PubMed

    Ling, Ka-Ho; Wan, Murphy Lam Yim; El-Nezami, Hani; Wang, Mingfu

    2016-05-16

    Contamination of food/feedstuffs by mycotoxins is a serious problem worldwide, causing severe economic losses and serious health problems in animals/humans. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a major mycotoxin contaminant and is known to impair intestinal barrier function. Grapes and red wine are rich in polyphenols, such as resveratrol (RES), which has striking antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. RES is a food-derived component; therefore, it may be simultaneously present with DON in the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to explore in vitro protective effects of RES against DON-induced intestinal damage. The results showed that RES could protect DON-induced bacteria translocation because of enhanced of intestinal barrier function by restoring the DON-induced decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and increase in paracellular permeability. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that RES protects against DON-induced barrier dysfunction by promoting the assembly of claudin-4 in the tight junction complex. This is probably mediated through modulation of IL-6 and IL-8 secretion via mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathways. Our results imply that RES can protect against DON-induced intestinal damage and that RES may be used as a novel dietary intervention strategy to reduce DON toxicity in animals/humans. PMID:27058607

  12. REMEDIATION OF TCE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER BY A PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FILLED WITH PLANT MULCH (BIOWALL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot-scale permeable reactive barrier filled with plant mulch was installed at Altus Air Force Base (in Oklahoma, USA) to treat trichloroethylene (TCE) contamination in ground water emanating from a landfill. The barrier was constructed in June 2002. It was 139 meters long, 7 ...

  13. (51Cr)EDTA intestinal permeability in children with cow's milk intolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Schrander, J.J.; Unsalan-Hooyen, R.W.; Forget, P.P.; Jansen, J. )

    1990-02-01

    Making use of ({sup 51}Cr)EDTA as a permeability marker, we measured intestinal permeability in a group of 20 children with proven cow's milk intolerance (CMI), a group of 17 children with similar complaints where CMI was excluded (sick controls), and a group of 12 control children. ({sup 51}Cr)EDTA test results (mean +/- SD) were 6.85 +/- 3.64%, 3.42 +/- 0.94%, and 2.61 +/- 0.67% in the group with CMI, the sick control, and the control group, respectively. When compared to both control groups, patients with cow's milk intolerance (CMI) showed a significantly increased small bowel permeability. We conclude that the ({sup 51}Cr)EDTA test can be helpful for the diagnosis of cow's milk intolerance.

  14. Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 and the commensal bacterium Faecalibacterium prausnitzii A2-165 exhibit similar protective effects to induced barrier hyper-permeability in mice.

    PubMed

    Laval, L; Martin, R; Natividad, J N; Chain, F; Miquel, S; Desclée de Maredsous, C; Capronnier, S; Sokol, H; Verdu, E F; van Hylckama Vlieg, J E T; Bermúdez-Humarán, L G; Smokvina, T; Langella, P

    2015-01-01

    Impaired gut barrier function has been reported in a wide range of diseases and syndromes and in some functional gastrointestinal disorders. In addition, there is increasing evidence that suggests the gut microbiota tightly regulates gut barrier function and recent studies demonstrate that probiotic bacteria can enhance barrier integrity. Here, we aimed to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 on intestinal barrier function. In vitro results using a Caco-2 monolayer cells stimulated with TNF-α confirmed the anti-inflammatory nature of the strain CNCM I-3690 and pointed out a putative role for the protection of the epithelial function. Next, we tested the protective effects of L. rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 in a mouse model of increased colonic permeability. Most importantly, we compared its performance to that of the well-known beneficial human commensal bacterium Faecalibacterium prauznitzii A2-165. Increased colonic permeability was normalized by both strains to a similar degree. Modulation of apical tight junction proteins expression was then analyzed to decipher the mechanism underlying this effect. We showed that CNCM I-3690 partially restored the function of the intestinal barrier and increased the levels of tight junction proteins Occludin and E-cadherin. The results indicate L. rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 is as effective as the commensal anti-inflammatory bacterium F. prausnitzii to treat functional barrier abnormalities. PMID:25517879

  15. Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 and the commensal bacterium Faecalibacterium prausnitzii A2-165 exhibit similar protective effects to induced barrier hyper-permeability in mice

    PubMed Central

    Laval, L; Martin, R; Natividad, JN; Chain, F; Miquel, S; de Maredsous, C Desclée; Capronnier, S; Sokol, H; Verdu, EF; van Hylckama Vlieg, JET; Bermúdez-Humarán, LG; Smokvina, T; Langella, P

    2015-01-01

    Impaired gut barrier function has been reported in a wide range of diseases and syndromes and in some functional gastrointestinal disorders. In addition, there is increasing evidence that suggests the gut microbiota tightly regulates gut barrier function and recent studies demonstrate that probiotic bacteria can enhance barrier integrity. Here, we aimed to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 on intestinal barrier function. In vitro results using a Caco-2 monolayer cells stimulated with TNF-α confirmed the anti-inflammatory nature of the strain CNCM I-3690 and pointed out a putative role for the protection of the epithelial function. Next, we tested the protective effects of L. rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 in a mouse model of increased colonic permeability. Most importantly, we compared its performance to that of the well-known beneficial human commensal bacterium Faecalibacterium prauznitzii A2-165. Increased colonic permeability was normalized by both strains to a similar degree. Modulation of apical tight junction proteins expression was then analyzed to decipher the mechanism underlying this effect. We showed that CNCM I-3690 partially restored the function of the intestinal barrier and increased the levels of tight junction proteins Occludin and E-cadherin. The results indicate L. rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 is as effective as the commensal anti-inflammatory bacterium F. prausnitzii to treat functional barrier abnormalities. PMID:25517879

  16. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor promotes barrier maturation and wound healing in intestinal epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Meir, Michael; Flemming, Sven; Burkard, Natalie; Bergauer, Lisa; Metzger, Marco; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Schlegel, Nicolas

    2015-10-15

    Recent data suggest that neurotrophic factors from the enteric nervous system are involved in intestinal epithelial barrier regulation. In this context the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was shown to affect gut barrier properties in vivo directly or indirectly by largely undefined processes in a model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We further investigated the potential role and mechanisms of GDNF in the regulation of intestinal barrier functions. Immunostaining of human gut specimen showed positive GDNF staining in enteric neuronal plexus and in enterocytes. In Western blots of the intestinal epithelial cell lines Caco2 and HT29B6, significant amounts of GDNF were detected, suggesting that enterocytes represent an additional source of GDNF. Application of recombinant GDNF on Caco2 and HT29B6 cells for 24 h resulted in significant epithelial barrier stabilization in monolayers with immature barrier functions. Wound-healing assays showed a significantly faster closure of the wounded areas after GDNF application. GDNF augmented cAMP levels and led to significant inactivation of p38 MAPK in immature cells. Activation of p38 MAPK signaling by SB-202190 mimicked GDNF-induced barrier maturation, whereas the p38 MAPK activator anisomycin blocked GDNF-induced effects. Increasing cAMP levels had adverse effects on barrier maturation, as revealed by permeability measurements. However, increased cAMP augmented the proliferation rate in Caco2 cells, and GDNF-induced proliferation of epithelial cells was abrogated by the PKA inhibitor H89. Our data show that enterocytes represent an additional source of GDNF synthesis. GDNF contributes to wound healing in a cAMP/PKA-dependent manner and promotes barrier maturation in immature enterocytes cells by inactivation of p38 MAPK signaling. PMID:26294673

  17. Using FLIM in the study of permeability barrier function of aged and young skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, P.; Choi, E. H.; Man, M. Q.; Crumrine, D.; Mauro, T.; Elias, P.

    2006-02-01

    Aged skin commonly is afflicted by inflammatory skin diseases or xerosis/eczema that can be triggered or exacerbated by impaired epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. It has been previously described a permeability barrier defect in humans of advanced age (> 75 years), which in a murine analog >18 mos, could be attributed to reduced lipid synthesis synthesis. However, the functional abnormality in moderately aged mice is due not to decreased lipid synthesis, but rather to a specific defect in stratum corneum (SC) acidification causing impaired lipid processing processing. Endogenous Na +/H + antiporter (NHE1) level was found declined in moderately aged mouse epidermis. This acidification defect leads to perturbed permeability barrier homeostasis through more than one pathways, we addressed suboptimal activation of the essential, lipid-processing enzyme, β-glucocerebrosidase (BGC) is linked to elevated SC pH. Finally, the importance of the epidermis acidity is shown by the normalization of barrier function after exogenous acidification of moderately aged skin.

  18. Novel sulpiride-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles with enhanced intestinal permeability

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Waheed M; AlOmrani, Abdullah H; B Yassin, Alaa Eldeen

    2014-01-01

    Background Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), novel drug delivery carriers, can be utilized in enhancing both intestinal permeability and dissolution of poorly absorbed drugs. The aim of this work was to enhance the intestinal permeability of sulpiride by loading into SLN. Methods A unique ultrasonic melt-emulsification method with minimum stress conditions was used for the preparation of SLN. The mixture of the drug and the melted lipids was simply dispersed in an aqueous solution of a surfactant at a temperature that was 10°C higher than the melting points of the lipids using probe sonication, and was then simultaneously dispersed in cold water. Several formulation parameters were optimized, including the drug-to-lipid ratio, and the types of lipids and surfactants used. The produced SLN were evaluated for their particle size and shape, surface charge, entrapment efficiency, crystallinity of the drug and lipids, and the drug release profile. The rat everted sac intestine model was utilized to evaluate the change in intestinal permeability of sulpiride by loading into SLN. Results The method adopted allowed successful preparation of SLN with a monodispersed particle size of 147.8–298.8 nm. Both scanning electron microscopic and atomic force microscopic images showed uniform spherical particles and confirmed the sizes determined by the light scattering technique. Combination of triglycerides with stearic acid resulted in a marked increase in zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, and drug loading; however, the particle size was increased. The type of surfactant used was critical for particle size, charge, drug loading, and entrapment efficiency. Generally, the in vitro release profile demonstrated by all formulations showed the common biphasic mode with a varying degree of burst release. The everted sac model showed markedly enhanced sulpiride permeability in the case of the SLN-loaded formulation. The in situ results showed a very good correlation with the in

  19. Evaluation of physicochemical properties and intestinal permeability of six dietary polyphenols in human intestinal colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Himanshu; Jana, Snehasis

    2016-02-01

    Phenolic compounds are common ingredients in many dietary supplements and functional foods. However, data concerning physicochemical properties and permeability of polyphenols on the intestinal epithelial cells are scarce. The aims of this study were to determine the experimental partition coefficient (Log P), and parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA), to characterize the bi-directional transport of six phenolic compounds viz. caffeic acid, chrysin, gallic acid, quercetin, resveratrol and rutin in Caco-2 cells. The experimental Log P values of six polyphenols were correlated (R (2) = 0.92) well with the calculated Log P values. The apparent permeability (P app) range of all polyphenols in PAMPA for the apical (AP) to basolateral (BL) was 1.18 ± 0.05 × 10(-6) to 5.90 ± 0.16 × 10(-6) cm/s. The apparent Caco-2 permeability (P app) range for the AP-BL was 0.96 ± 0.03 × 10(-6) to 3.80 ± 0.45 × 10(-6) cm/s. The efflux ratio of P app (BL → AP) to P app (AP → BL) for all phenolics was <2, suggesting greater permeability in the absorptive direction. Six compounds exhibited strong correlations between Log P and PAMPA/Caco-2 cell monolayer permeation data. Dietary six polyphenols were poorly absorbed through PAMPA and Caco-2 cells, and their transepithelial transports were mainly by passive diffusion. PMID:25351179

  20. Effects of Soybean Agglutinin on Mechanical Barrier Function and Tight Junction Protein Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells from Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Qin, Guixin; Zhao, Yuan; Wang, Jun; Liu, Feifei; Che, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we sought to investigate the role of soybean agglutinin (SBA) in mediating membrane permeability and the mechanical barrier function of intestinal epithelial cells. The IPEC-J2 cells were cultured and treated with 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, or 3.0 mg/mL SBA. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity were measured to evaluate membrane permeability. The results showed a significant decrease in TEER values (p < 0.05) in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and a pronounced increase in AP activity (p < 0.05). Cell growth and cell morphology were used to evaluate the cell viability. A significant cell growth inhibition (p < 0.05) and alteration of morphology were observed when the concentration of SBA was increased. The results of western blotting showed that the expression levels of occludin and claudin-3 were decreased by 31% and 64% compared to those of the control, respectively (p < 0.05). In addition, immunofluorescence labeling indicated an obvious decrease in staining of these targets and changes in their localizations. In conclusion, SBA increased the membrane permeability, inhibited the cell viability and reduced the levels of tight junction proteins (occludin and claudin-3), leading to a decrease in mechanical barrier function in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:24189218

  1. Effects of simulated weightlessness on the intestinal mucosal barrier of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Yang, Chun-min; Mao, Gao-ping; Liu, Qing-sen; Guo, Ming-zhou

    2011-07-01

    This study employed a rat tail-suspension model to investigate the effects of simulated weightlessness on the intestinal mucosal barrier. Twenty-four Wistar rats were randomly divided into control (CON), 14-day tail-suspension (SUS-14d), and 21-day tail-suspension (SUS-21d) groups ( n = 8 per group). Expression of occludin and zonula occludins-1 (ZO-1), proteins of the tight junction (TJ), in the intestinal mucosa was measured by immunohistochemical analysis, Western blotting, and mRNA fluorescent quantitation PCR. Plasma concentrations of diamine oxidase (DAO) and D-lactate were determined using an enzymatic spectrophotometric assay. Expression of occludin and ZO-1 was reduced in the SUS-14d and SUS-21d groups as compared to the CON group, with lowest expression observed in the SUS-21d group ( P < 0.01). Examination by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the jejunal epithelium revealed increased intercellular space, decreased TJ and desmosome densities, and destruction of microvilli in the SUS-14d and SUS-21d groups. Plasma DAO and D-lactate concentrations in the SUS-21d group were higher than those in SUS-14d group and significantly higher than those in the CON group ( P < 0.01). In all three groups, the expression of occludin and ZO-1 was found to correlate negatively with DAO ( P < 0.01) and D-lactate ( P < 0.01) concentrations. It is concluded that simulated weightless results in down-regulation of expression of TJ proteins in the rat intestinal mucosa. Simulated weightlessness is proposed to increase intestinal permeability through damage to the TJ.

  2. A new role for reticulon-4B/NOGO-B in the intestinal epithelial barrier function and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Feo, Juan Antonio; Puerto, Marta; Fernández-Mena, Carolina; Verdejo, Cristina; Lara, José Manuel; Díaz-Sánchez, María; Álvarez, Emilio; Vaquero, Javier; Marín-Jiménez, Ignacio; Bañares, Rafael; Menchén, Luis

    2015-06-15

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by an impaired intestinal barrier function. We aimed to investigate the role of reticulon-4B (RTN-4B/NOGO-B), a structural protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, in intestinal barrier function and IBD. We used immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, real-time PCR, and Western blotting to study tissue distribution and expression levels of RTN-4B/NOGO-B in control and IBD samples from mouse and humans. We also targeted RTN-4B/NOGO-B using siRNAs in cultured human intestinal epithelial cell (IECs). Epithelial barrier permeability was assessed by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurement. RTN-4B/NOGO-B is expressed in the intestine mainly by IECs. Confocal microscopy revealed a colocalization of RTN-4B, E-cadherin, and polymerized actin fibers in tissue and cultured IECs. RTN-4B mRNA and protein expression were lower in the colon of IL-10(-/-) compared with wild-type mice. Colocalization of RTN-4B/E-cadherin/actin was reduced in the colon of IL-10(-/-) mice. Analysis of endoscopic biopsies from IBD patients showed a significant reduction of RTN-4B/NOGO-B expression in inflamed mucosa compared with control. Treatment of IECs with H2O2 reduced TEER values and triggered phosphorylation of RTN-4B in serine 107 residues as well as downregulation of RTN-4B expression. Acute RTN-4B/NOGO-B knockdown by siRNAs resulted in a decreased TEER values and reduction of E-cadherin and α-catenin expression and in the amount of F-actin-rich filaments in IECs. Epithelial RTN-4B/NOGO-B was downregulated in human and experimental IBD. RTN-4B participates in the intestinal epithelial barrier function, most likely via its involvement in E-cadherin, α-catenin expression, and actin cytoskeleton organization at sites of cell-to-cell contacts. PMID:25907690

  3. Bovine Colostrum Increases Pore-Forming Claudin-2 Protein Expression but Paradoxically Not Ion Permeability Possibly by a Change of the Intestinal Cytokine Milieu

    PubMed Central

    Maletzki, Claudia; Lamprecht, Georg

    2013-01-01

    An impaired intestinal barrier function is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Several nutritional factors are supposed to be effective in IBD treatment but scientific data about the effects on the intestinal integrity remain scarce. Bovine colostrum was shown to exert beneficial effects in DSS-induced murine colitis, and the present study was undertaken to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms. Western blot revealed increased claudin-2 expression in the distal ileum of healthy mice after feeding with colostrum for 14 days, whereas other tight junction proteins (claudin-3, 4, 10, 15) remained unchanged. The colostrum-induced claudin-2 induction was confirmed in differentiated Caco-2 cells after culture with colostrum for 48 h. Paradoxically, the elevation of claudin-2, which forms a cation-selective pore, was neither accompanied by increased ion permeability nor impaired barrier function. In an in situ perfusion model, 1 h exposure of the colonic mucosa to colostrum induced significantly increased mRNA levels of barrier-strengthening cytokine transforming growth factor-β, while interleukine-2, interleukine-6, interleukine-10, interleukine-13, and tumor-necrosis factor-α remained unchanged. Thus, modulation of the intestinal transforming growth factor-β expression might have compensated the claudin-2 increase and contributed to the observed barrier strengthening effects of colostrum in vivo and in vitro. PMID:23717570

  4. Restoration of barrier function in injured intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Blikslager, Anthony T; Moeser, Adam J; Gookin, Jody L; Jones, Samuel L; Odle, Jack

    2007-04-01

    Mucosal repair is a complex event that immediately follows acute injury induced by ischemia and noxious luminal contents such as bile. In the small intestine, villous contraction is the initial phase of repair and is initiated by myofibroblasts that reside immediately beneath the epithelial basement membrane. Subsequent events include crawling of healthy epithelium adjacent to the wound, referred to as restitution. This is a highly regulated event involving signaling via basement membrane integrins by molecules such as focal adhesion kinase and growth factors. Interestingly, however, ex vivo studies of mammalian small intestine have revealed the importance of closure of the interepithelial tight junctions and the paracellular space. The critical role of tight junction closure is underscored by the prominent contribution of the paracellular space to measures of barrier function such as transepithelial electrical resistance. Additional roles are played by subepithelial cell populations, including neutrophils, related to their role in innate immunity. The net result of reparative mechanisms is remarkably rapid closure of mucosal wounds in mammalian tissues to prevent the onset of sepsis. PMID:17429041

  5. Apical effect of diosmectite on damage to the intestinal barrier induced by basal tumour necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Mahraoui, L; Heyman, M; Plique, O; Droy-Lefaix, M T; Desjeux, J F

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In many digestive diseases the intestinal barrier is weakened by the release of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha). AIM: To investigate the protective effect of apical diosmectite on the intestinal dysfunction induced by the proinflammatory cytokine TNF alpha. METHODS: Filter grown monolayers of the intestinal cell line HT29-19A were incubated for 48 hours in basal medium containing 10 ng/ml TNF alpha and 5 U/ml interferon-gamma (IFN gamma). Next, 1, 10, or 100 mg/ml diosmectite was placed in the apical medium for one hour. Intestinal function was then assessed in Ussing chambers by measuring ionic conductance (G) and apicobasal fluxes of 14C-mannitol (Jman), and intact horseradish peroxidase. In control intestinal monolayers, diosmectite did not significantly modify G, Jman, or intact horseradish peroxidase. RESULTS: After incubation with TNF alpha and IFN gamma, intestinal function altered, as shown by the increases compared with control values for G (22.8 (3.7) v (9.6 (0.5) mS/cm2), Jman (33.8 (7.5) v 7.56 (0.67) micrograms/h x cm2), and intact horseradish peroxidase (1.95 (1.12) v 0.14 (0.04) micrograms/h x cm2). G and Jman were closely correlated, suggesting that the increase in permeability was paracellular. Treatment with diosmectite restored al the variables to control values. CONCLUSIONS: Basal TNF alpha disrupts the intestinal barrier through the tight junctions, and apical diosmectite counteracts this disruption. PMID:9135522

  6. EPHA4-FC TREATMENT REDUCES ISCHEMIA/REPERFUSION-INDUCED INTESTINAL INJURY BY INHIBITING VASCULAR PERMEABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Trent M.; Wu, Mike C.-L.; Morgan, Michael; Bain, Nathan T.; Jeanes, Angela; Lipman, Jeffrey; Ting, Michael J.; Boyd, Andrew W.; Taylor, Stephen M.; Coulthard, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The inflammatory response is characterized by increased endothelial permeability, which permits the passage of fluid and inflammatory cells into interstitial spaces. The Eph/ephrin receptor ligand system plays a role in inflammation through a signaling cascade, which modifies Rho-GTPase activity. We hypothesized that blocking Eph/ephrin signaling using an EphA4-Fc would result in decreased inflammation and tissue injury in a model of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Mice undergoing intestinal I/R pretreated with the EphA4-Fc had significantly reduced intestinal injury compared to mice injected with the control Fc. This reduction in I/R injury was accompanied by significantly reduced neutrophil infiltration, but did not affect intestinal inflammatory cytokine generation. Using microdialysis, we identified that intestinal I/R induced a marked increase in systemic vascular leakage, which was completely abrogated in EphA4-Fc-treated mice. Finally, we confirmed the direct role of Eph/ephrin signaling in endothelial leakage by demonstrating that EphA4-Fc inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α–induced vascular permeability in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. This study identifies that Eph/ephrin interaction induces proinflammatory signaling in vivo by inducing vascular leak and neutrophil infiltration, which results in tissue injury in intestinal I/R. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of Eph/ephrin interaction using inhibitors, such as EphA4-Fc, may be a novel method to prevent tissue injury in acute inflammation by influencing endothelial integrity and by controlling vascular leak. PMID:26771935

  7. SURFACE-ALTERED ZEOLITES AS PERMEABLE BARRIERS FOR IN SITU TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Bowman; Pengfei Zhang; Xian Tao

    2002-03-01

    This report summarizes experiments to develop and test surfactant-modified zeolite/zero-valent iron (SMZ/ZVI) pellets for permeable reactive barriers to treat groundwater contamination. Coating a glass foam core with a mixture of hexadecyltrimethylammonium surfactant, zeolite, and ZVI produced a high hydraulic conductivity, mechanically stable pellet. Laboratory experiments showed that the pellets completely removed soluble chromate from aqueous solution, and reduced perchloroethylene (PCE) concentrations more than pellets that lacked surfactant. Based upon the laboratory results, they predicted a 1-m-wide SMZ/ZVI barrier that would reduce PCE concentrations by four orders of magnitude. Thirteen cubic meters (470 cubic feet) of SMZ/ZVI pellets were manufactured and emplaced in a permeable barrier test facility. A controlled plume of chromate and PCE was allowed to contact the barrier for four weeks. The entire plume was captured by the barrier. No chromate was detected downgradient of the barrier. The PCE broke through the barrier after four weeks, and downgradient concentrations ultimately exceeded 10% of the influent PCE. The less-than-expected PCE reduction was attributed to insufficient surfactant content, the large size, and pH-altering characteristics of the bulk-produced pellets. The pellets developed here can be improved to yield a performance- and cost-competitive permeable barrier material.

  8. Effect of wild-type Shigella species and attenuated Shigella vaccine candidates on small intestinal barrier function, antigen trafficking, and cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Maria; Levine, Myron M; Sztein, Marcelo B; Fasano, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial dysentery due to Shigella species is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The pathogenesis of Shigella is based on the bacteria's ability to invade and replicate within the colonic epithelium, resulting in severe intestinal inflammatory response and epithelial destruction. Although the mechanisms of pathogenesis of Shigella in the colon have been extensively studied, little is known on the effect of wild-type Shigella on the small intestine and the role of the host response in the development of the disease. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge no studies have described the effects of apically administered Shigella flexneri 2a and S. dysenteriae 1 vaccine strains on human small intestinal enterocytes. The aim of this study was to assess the coordinated functional and immunological human epithelial responses evoked by strains of Shigella and candidate vaccines on small intestinal enterocytes. To model the interactions of Shigella with the intestinal mucosa, we apically exposed monolayers of human intestinal Caco2 cells to increasing bacterial inocula. We monitored changes in paracellular permeability, examined the organization of tight-junctions and the pro-inflammatory response of epithelial cells. Shigella infection of Caco2 monolayers caused severe mucosal damage, apparent as a drastic increase in paracellular permeability and disruption of tight junctions at the cell-cell boundary. Secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-8 was independent of epithelial barrier dysfunction. Shigella vaccine strains elicited a pro-inflammatory response without affecting the intestinal barrier integrity. Our data show that wild-type Shigella infection causes a severe alteration of the barrier function of a small intestinal cell monolayer (a proxy for mucosa) and might contribute (along with enterotoxins) to the induction of watery diarrhea. Diarrhea may be a mechanism by which the host attempts to eliminate harmful bacteria and transport them from the small to

  9. Intestinal permeability to (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA in children with Crohn's disease and celiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Turck, D.; Ythier, H.; Maquet, E.; Deveaux, M.; Marchandise, X.; Farriaux, J.P.; Fontaine, G.

    1987-07-01

    (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA was used as a probe molecule to assess intestinal permeability in 7 healthy control adults, 11 control children, 17 children with Crohn's disease, and 6 children with untreated celiac disease. After subjects fasted overnight, 75 kBq/kg (= 2 microCi/kg) /sup 51/Cr-labeled EDTA was given by mouth; 24-h urinary excretion of (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA was measured and expressed as a percentage of the total oral dose. Mean and SD were as follows: control adults 1.47 +/- 0.62, control children 1.59 +/- 0.55, and patients with Crohn's disease or celiac disease 5.35 +/- 1.94. The difference between control children and patients was statistically significant (p less than 0.001). These results show that intestinal permeability to (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA is increased among children with active or inactive Crohn's disease affecting small bowel only or small bowel and colon, and with untreated celiac disease. The (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA permeability test could facilitate the decision to perform more extensive investigations in children suspected of small bowel disease who have atypical or poor clinical and biological symptomatology.

  10. The methionine precursor DL-2-hydroxy-(4-methylthio)butanoic acid protects intestinal epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Martín-Venegas, Raquel; Brufau, M Teresa; Guerrero-Zamora, Ana Maria; Mercier, Yves; Geraert, Pierre-André; Ferrer, Ruth

    2013-12-01

    DL-2-hydroxy-(4-methylthio)butanoic acid (HMTBA) is a source of dietary methionine (Met) that is widely used in poultry nutrition. We have previously shown that HMTBA is preferentially diverted to the transsulfuration pathway, which gives antioxidant metabolites such as taurine and glutathione. Therefore, here we hypothesize that this Met source can protect epithelial barrier function in an in vitro model of intestinal inflammation of Caco-2 cells. The results show that HMTBA prevents the increase in paracellular permeability induced by H2O2 or tumour necrosis factor-α. This effect can be attributed to the increased production of taurine and reduced glutathione. Similar results were obtained for DL-Met, although the protective role of the amino acid was less pronounced than that of the hydroxy analogue. In conclusion, the diversion to the transsulfuration pathway means that this Met precursor is of greater value than previously thought, due to its capacity to improve intestinal homeostasis and the quality of poultry products destined for human consumption. PMID:23870881

  11. Zinc oxide influences mitogen-activated protein kinase and TGF-β1 signaling pathways, and enhances intestinal barrier integrity in weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Song, Ze He; Xiao, Kan; Ke, Ya Lu; Jiao, Le Fei; Hu, Cai Hong

    2015-05-01

    Weaning is the most significant event in the life of pigs and is always related with intestinal disruption. Although it is well known that zinc oxide (ZnO) exerts beneficial effects on the intestinal barrier, the mechanisms underlying these effects have not yet been fully elucidated. We examined whether ZnO protects the intestinal barrier via mitogen-activated protein kinases and TGF-β1 signaling pathways. Twelve barrows weaned at 21 d of age were randomly assigned to two treatments (0 verus 2200 mg Zn/kg from ZnO) for 1 wk. The results showed that supplementation with ZnO increased daily gain and feed intake, and decreased postweaning scour scores. ZnO improved intestinal morphology, as indicated by increased villus height and villus height:crypt depth ratio, and intestinal barrier function, indicated by increased transepithelial electrical resistance and decreased mucosal-to-serosal permeability to 4-ku FITC dextran. ZnO decreased the ratios of the phosphorylated to total JNK and p38 (p-JNK/JNK and p-p38/p38), while it increased the ratio of ERK (p-ERK/ERK). Supplementation with ZnO increased intestinal TGF-β1 expression. The results indicate that supplementation with ZnO activates ERK ½, and inhibits JNK and p38 signaling pathways, and increases intestinal TGF-β1 expression in weaned pigs. PMID:24917655

  12. Permeability of the blood–brain barrier predicts conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Modvig, Signe; Simonsen, Helle J.; Frederiksen, Jette L.; Larsson, Henrik B. W.

    2015-01-01

    Optic neuritis is an acute inflammatory condition that is highly associated with multiple sclerosis. Currently, the best predictor of future development of multiple sclerosis is the number of T2 lesions visualized by magnetic resonance imaging. Previous research has found abnormalities in the permeability of the blood–brain barrier in normal-appearing white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis and here, for the first time, we present a study on the capability of blood–brain barrier permeability in predicting conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis and a direct comparison with cerebrospinal fluid markers of inflammation, cellular trafficking and blood–brain barrier breakdown. To this end, we applied dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T to measure blood–brain barrier permeability in 39 patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis, all referred for imaging as part of the diagnostic work-up at time of diagnosis. Eighteen healthy controls were included for comparison. Patients had magnetic resonance imaging and lumbar puncture performed within 4 weeks of onset of optic neuritis. Information on multiple sclerosis conversion was acquired from hospital records 2 years after optic neuritis onset. Logistic regression analysis showed that baseline permeability in normal-appearing white matter significantly improved prediction of multiple sclerosis conversion (according to the 2010 revised McDonald diagnostic criteria) within 2 years compared to T2 lesion count alone. There was no correlation between permeability and T2 lesion count. An increase in permeability in normal-appearing white matter of 0.1 ml/100 g/min increased the risk of multiple sclerosis 8.5 times whereas having more than nine T2 lesions increased the risk 52.6 times. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of permeability in normal-appearing white matter gave a cut-off of 0.13 ml/100 g/min, which predicted conversion to multiple sclerosis with a

  13. Protein tyrosine phosphatase σ targets apical junction complex proteins in the intestine and regulates epithelial permeability

    PubMed Central

    Murchie, Ryan; Guo, Cong-Hui; Persaud, Avinash; Muise, Aleixo; Rotin, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)σ (PTPRS) was shown previously to be associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). PTPσ−/− mice exhibit an IBD-like phenotype in the intestine and show increased susceptibility to acute models of murine colitis. However, the function of PTPσ in the intestine is uncharacterized. Here, we show an intestinal epithelial barrier defect in the PTPσ−/− mouse, demonstrated by a decrease in transepithelial resistance and a leaky intestinal epithelium that was determined by in vivo tracer analysis. Increased tyrosine phosphorylation was observed at the plasma membrane of epithelial cells lining the crypts of the small bowel and colon of the PTPσ−/− mouse, suggesting the presence of PTPσ substrates in these regions. Using mass spectrometry, we identified several putative PTPσ intestinal substrates that were hyper–tyrosine-phosphorylated in the PTPσ−/− mice relative to wild type. Among these were proteins that form or regulate the apical junction complex, including ezrin. We show that ezrin binds to and is dephosphorylated by PTPσ in vitro, suggesting it is a direct PTPσ substrate, and identified ezrin-Y353/Y145 as important sites targeted by PTPσ. Moreover, subcellular localization of the ezrin phosphomimetic Y353E or Y145 mutants were disrupted in colonic Caco-2 cells, similar to ezrin mislocalization in the colon of PTPσ−/− mice following induction of colitis. Our results suggest that PTPσ is a positive regulator of intestinal epithelial barrier, which mediates its effects by modulating epithelial cell adhesion through targeting of apical junction complex-associated proteins (including ezrin), a process impaired in IBD. PMID:24385580

  14. Mucosal Mast Cell Count Is Associated With Intestinal Permeability in Patients With Diarrhea Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyuk; Park, Dong Il; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Chae, Seoung Wan

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Although mucosal mast cell tryptase is known to significantly increase intestinal permeability, the relationship between mucosal mast cells and intestinal permeability remains unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation among intestinal permeability, tryptase activity and mucosal mast cell count. Methods Rectal biopsies from 16 patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) and 7 normal subjects were assessed for tryptase activity and macromolecular permeability using horseradish peroxidase in Ussing chambers. In addition, mucosal mast cell levels were immunohistochemically quantified via image analysis. Results Rectal biopsy of tissues from IBS-D patients showed significantly increased permeability compared with those from normal controls (0.644 ± 0.08 and 0.06 ± 0.00 ng/2 hr/mm2, P < 0.01). Tryptase activity was also substantially higher in rectal biopsy samples from IBS-D patients than those from normal controls (0.86 ± 0.18 and 0.28 ± 0.04 mU/mg protein, P < 0.05). Mucosal mast cell counts were not significantly different between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). However, correlation analysis revealed that only mucosal mast cell count was significantly correlated with intestinal permeability in IBS-D patients (r = 0.558, P < 0.05). Conclusions This study demonstrated a positive correlation between the number of mucosal mast cells and intestinal permeability, suggesting that mucosal mast cells play an important role for increased intestinal permeability in patients with IBS-D. PMID:23667756

  15. Modulation of Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability in Mice Using Synthetic E-Cadherin Peptide

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The present work characterizes the effects of synthetic E-cadherin peptide (HAV) on blood–brain barrier (BBB) integrity using various techniques including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared fluorescent imaging (NIRF). The permeability of small molecular weight permeability marker gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) contrast agent, the large molecular weight permeability marker, IRDye 800CW PEG, and the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux transporter contrast agent, rhodamine 800 (R800), were examined in the presence and absence of HAV peptide. The results consistently demonstrated that systemic iv administration of HAV peptide resulted in a reversible disruption of BBB integrity and enhanced the accumulation of all the dyes examined. The magnitude of increase ranged from 2-fold to 5-fold depending on the size and the properties of the permeability markers. The time frame for BBB disruption with HAV peptide was rapid, occurring within 3–6 min following injection of the peptide. Furthermore, modulation of BBB permeability was reversible with the barrier integrity being restored within 60 min of the injection. The increased BBB permeability observed following HAV peptide administration was not attributable to changes in cerebral blood flow. These studies support the potential use of cadherin peptides to rapidly and reversibly modulate BBB permeability of a variety of therapeutic agents. PMID:24495091

  16. Antibiotic Treatment Affects Intestinal Permeability and Gut Microbial Composition in Wistar Rats Dependent on Antibiotic Class

    PubMed Central

    Tulstrup, Monica Vera-Lise; Christensen, Ellen Gerd; Carvalho, Vera; Linninge, Caroline; Ahrné, Siv; Højberg, Ole; Licht, Tine Rask; Bahl, Martin Iain

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics are frequently administered orally to treat bacterial infections not necessarily related to the gastrointestinal system. This has adverse effects on the commensal gut microbial community, as it disrupts the intricate balance between specific bacterial groups within this ecosystem, potentially leading to dysbiosis. We hypothesized that modulation of community composition and function induced by antibiotics affects intestinal integrity depending on the antibiotic administered. To address this a total of 60 Wistar rats (housed in pairs with 6 cages per group) were dosed by oral gavage with either amoxicillin (AMX), cefotaxime (CTX), vancomycin (VAN), metronidazole (MTZ), or water (CON) daily for 10–11 days. Bacterial composition, alpha diversity and caecum short chain fatty acid levels were significantly affected by AMX, CTX and VAN, and varied among antibiotic treatments. A general decrease in diversity and an increase in the relative abundance of Proteobacteria was observed for all three antibiotics. Additionally, the relative abundance of Bifidobacteriaceae was increased in the CTX group and both Lactobacillaceae and Verrucomicrobiaceae were increased in the VAN group compared to the CON group. No changes in microbiota composition or function were observed following MTZ treatment. Intestinal permeability to 4 kDa FITC-dextran decreased after CTX and VAN treatment and increased following MTZ treatment. Plasma haptoglobin levels were increased by both AMX and CTX but no changes in expression of host tight junction genes were found in any treatment group. A strong correlation between the level of caecal succinate, the relative abundance of Clostridiaceae 1 family in the caecum, and the level of acute phase protein haptoglobin in blood plasma was observed. In conclusion, antibiotic-induced changes in microbiota may be linked to alterations in intestinal permeability, although the specific interactions remain to be elucidated as changes in permeability did

  17. Intestinal permeability to (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA in children with cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Leclercq-Foucart, J.; Forget, P.; Sodoyez-Goffaux, F.; Zappitelli, A.

    1986-05-01

    Intestinal permeability was investigated in 14 children with cystic fibrosis making use of (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA as probe molecule. Ten normal young adults and 11 children served as controls. After oral administration of (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA, 24 h urine was collected. Urinary radioactivity was calculated and results expressed as percentage of oral dose excreted in 24 h urine. Mean and SEM were as follows: 2.51 +/- 0.21, 2.35 +/- 0.24, and 13.19 +/- 1.72 for control children, normal adults, and cystic fibrosis patients, respectively. The permeability differences between cystic fibrosis patients and either control children or control adults are significant (p less than 0.001).

  18. Selenium and vitamin E together improve intestinal epithelial barrier function and alleviate oxidative stress in heat-stressed pigs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fan; Cottrell, Jeremy J; Furness, John B; Rivera, Leni R; Kelly, Fletcher W; Wijesiriwardana, Udani; Pustovit, Ruslan V; Fothergill, Linda J; Bravo, David M; Celi, Pietro; Leury, Brian J; Gabler, Nicholas K; Dunshea, Frank R

    2016-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? Oxidative stress may play a role in compromising intestinal epithelial barrier integrity in pigs subjected to heat stress, but it is unknown whether an increase of dietary antioxidants (selenium and vitamin E) could alleviate gut leakiness in heat-stressed pigs. What is the main finding and its importance? Levels of dietary selenium (1.0 p.p.m.) and vitamin E (200 IU kg(-1) ) greater than those usually recommended for pigs reduced intestinal leakiness caused by heat stress. This finding suggests that oxidative stress plays a role in compromising intestinal epithelial barrier integrity in heat-stressed pigs and also provides a nutritional strategy for mitigating these effects. Heat stress compromises the intestinal epithelial barrier integrity of mammals through mechanisms that may include oxidative stress. Our objective was to test whether dietary supplementation with antioxidants, selenium (Se) and vitamin E (VE), protects intestinal epithelial barrier integrity in heat-stressed pigs. Female growing pigs (n = 48) were randomly assigned to four diets containing from 0.2 p.p.m. Se and 17 IU kg(-1) VE (control, National Research Council recommended) to 1.0 p.p.m. Se and 200 IU kg(-1) VE for 14 days. Six pigs from each dietary treatment were then exposed to either thermoneutral (20°C) or heat-stress conditions (35°C 09.00-17.00 h and 28°C overnight) for 2 days. Transepithelial electrical resistance and fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (4 kDa; FD4) permeability were measured in isolated jejunum and ileum using Ussing chambers. Rectal temperature, respiratory rate and intestinal HSP70 mRNA abundance increased (all P < 0.001), and respiratory alkalosis occurred, suggesting that pigs were heat stressed. Heat stress also increased FD4 permeability and decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (both P < 0.01). These changes were associated with changes indicative of oxidative stress, a decreased

  19. Botulinum toxin complex increases paracellular permeability in intestinal epithelial cells via activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Inui, Ken; Hayashi, Shintaro; Miyata, Keita; Suzuki, Tomonori; Ohyama, Tohru; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Niwa, Koichi

    2013-12-30

    Clostridium botulinum produces a large toxin complex (L-TC) that increases paracellular permeability in intestinal epithelial cells by a mechanism that remains unclear. Here, we show that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are involved in this permeability increase. Paracellular permeability was measured by FITC-dextran flux through a monolayer of rat intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cells, and MAPK activation was estimated from western blots. L-TC of C. botulinum serotype D strain 4947 increased paracellular dextran flux and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in IEC-6 cells. The permeability increase induced by L-TC was abrogated by the p38 inhibitor SB203580. These results indicate that L-TC increases paracellular permeability by activating p38, but not JNK and ERK. PMID:23884081

  20. Intestinal permeability to 99mTc-diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid in inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Casellas, F.; Aguade, S.; Soriano, B.; Accarino, A.; Molero, J.; Guarner, L.

    1986-09-01

    Intestinal permeability in inflammatory bowel disease and its relation to periods of disease activity has been investigated by measuring the urinary excretion of DTPA labeled with 99mTc. Urine excretion in 10 control subjects was 2.7 +/- 1% of the test dose. Twelve patients with ulcerative colitis excreted 5.08 +/- 1.6% in remission, 10.61 +/- 2% during periods of mild activity, 19.41 +/- 0.9% during moderate activity, and 15.41 +/- 6.3% with severe activity. Sixteen patients with Crohn's disease excreted 5.7 +/- 1.9% in remission, 8.47 +/- 2.8% during mild activity of the disease, and 14.29 +/- 5.8% during moderate activity. No differences were observed between ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, or between ileal and colonic forms of Crohn's disease. Excretion in remission was significantly greater than in control subjects and there was a correlation between excretion and disease activity. In serial determinations done in seven patients we found that urine excretion of the test substance correlated with disease activity. We also studied DTPA excretion in 10 cases with gastric or duodenal ulcer (2.28 +/- 1.4%), six cases of acute gastroenteritis (4.87 +/- 3.1%) and nine cases with other intestinal diseases (3.6 +/- 1.1%). In all these cases, DTPA excretion was lower than in inflammatory bowel disease. Our results show that the urinary excretion of DTPA is a simple test that measures accurately the degree of activity of inflammatory bowel disease. The test is useful in Crohn's disease as well as in ulcerative colitis, and detects intestinal permeability abnormalities even in clinical remission. Significantly lower excretions are found in other intestinal diseases. The test may be recommended as a screening test for use in clinical practice.

  1. Bacillus cereus Induces Permeability of the Blood Ocular Barrier During Experimental Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, A. L.; Ramadan, R. T.; Novosad, B.; Astley, R.; Callegan, M. C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent blood retina barrier (BRB) permeability occurred during experimental Bacillus cereus endophthalmitis and whether tight junction alterations were involved in permeability. Methods Mice were intravitreally injected with 100 CFU B. cereus and eyes were analyzed at specific times postinfection for permeability to fibrin and albumin, quantitation of intraocular plasma constituent leakage, production of inflammatory cytokines, and alterations in tight junction protein localization and expression at the level of the RPE. Results B. cereus-induced leakage of albumin and fibrin into the aqueous and vitreous humor by 8 h postinfection. BRB permeability occurred as early as 4 h and increased 13.30-fold compared to uninfected controls by 8 h. Production of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, MIP-1α, IL-1β, and KC increased over the course of infection. In the retina, ZO-1 disruption begins by 4 h, followed by decreasing occludin and ZO-1 expression at 4 and 8 h, respectively. Tubulin condensation and RPE65 degradation occurred by 12 h. A quorum sensing mutant B. cereus strain caused BRB permeability comparable to that of wild-type B. cereus. Both wild-type and mutant B. cereus sterile supernatants induced blood ocular barrier permeability similarly to that of wild-type infection. Conclusions These results indicate that BRB permeability occurs during the early stages of experimental B. cereus endophthalmitis, beginning as early as 4 h postinfection. Disruption of tight junctions at the level of the RPE may contribute to barrier breakdown. Quorum-sensing dependent factors may not significantly contribute to BRB permeability. PMID:19264886

  2. Fecal microbiota transplantation and bacterial consortium transplantation have comparable effects on the re-establishment of mucosal barrier function in mice with intestinal dysbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Liang, Pin; Li, Zhenzhen; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Guobin; Gao, Hongwei; Wen, Shu; Tang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a promising therapy, despite some reports of adverse side effects. Bacterial consortia transplantation (BCT) for targeted restoration of the intestinal ecosystem is considered a relatively safe and simple procedure. However, no systematic research has assessed the effects of FMT and BCT on immune responses of intestinal mucosal barrier in patients. We conducted complementary studies in animal models on the effects of FMT and BCT, and provide recommendations for improving the clinical outcomes of these treatments. To establish the dysbiosis model, male BALB/c mice were treated with ceftriaxone intra-gastrically for 7 days. After that, FMT and BCT were performed on ceftriaxone-treated mice for 3 consecutive days to rebuild the intestinal ecosystem. Post-FMT and post-BCT changes of the intestinal microbial community and mucosal barrier functions were investigated and compared. Disruption of intestinal microbial homeostasis impacted the integrity of mucosal epithelial layer, resulting in increased intestinal permeability. These outcomes were accompanied by overexpression of Muc2, significant decrease of SIgA secretion, and overproduction of defensins and inflammatory cytokines. After FMT and BCT, the intestinal microbiota recovered quickly, this was associated with better reconstruction of mucosal barriers and re-establishment of immune networks compared with spontaneous recovery (SR). Although based on a short-term study, our results suggest that FMT and BCT promote the re-establishment of intestinal microbial communities in mice with antibiotic-induced dysbiosis, and contribute to the temporal and spatial interactions between microbiota and mucosal barriers. The effects of BCT are comparable to that of FMT, especially in normalizing the intestinal levels of Muc2, SIgA, and defensins. PMID:26217323

  3. Pathogenesis of permeability barrier abnormalities in the ichthyoses: inherited disorders of lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.; Williams, Mary L.; Holleran, Walter M.; Jiang, Yan J.; Schmuth, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Many of the ichthyoses are associated with inherited disorders of lipid metabolism. These disorders have provided unique models to dissect physiologic processes in normal epidermis and the pathophysiology of more common scaling conditions. In most of these disorders, a permeability barrier abnormality “drives” pathophysiology through stimulation of epidermal hyperplasia. Among primary abnormalities of nonpolar lipid metabolism, triglyceride accumulation in neutral lipid storage disease as a result of a lipase mutation provokes a barrier abnormality via lamellar/nonlamellar phase separation within the extracellular matrix of the stratum corneum (SC). Similar mechanisms account for the barrier abnormalities (and subsequent ichthyosis) in inherited disorders of polar lipid metabolism. For example, in recessive X-linked ichthyosis (RXLI), cholesterol sulfate (CSO4) accumulation also produces a permeability barrier defect through lamellar/nonlamellar phase separation. However, in RXLI, the desquamation abnormality is in part attributable to the plurifunctional roles of CSO4 as a regulator of both epidermal differentiation and corneodesmosome degradation. Phase separation also occurs in type II Gaucher disease (GD; from accumulation of glucosylceramides as a result of to β-glucocerebrosidase deficiency). Finally, failure to assemble both lipids and desquamatory enzymes into nascent epidermal lamellar bodies (LBs) accounts for both the permeability barrier and desquamation abnormalities in Harlequin ichthyosis (HI). The barrier abnormality provokes the clinical phenotype in these disorders not only by stimulating epidermal proliferation, but also by inducing inflammation. PMID:18245815

  4. Mapping the Fluid Pathways and Permeability Barriers of a Large Gas Hydrate Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A.; Zhang, Y. L.; Sun, L. F.; Saleh, R.; Pun, W.; Bellefleur, G.; Milkereit, B.

    2012-12-01

    An understanding of the relationship between the physical properties of gas hydrate saturated sedimentary basins aids in the detection, exploration and monitoring one of the world's upcoming energy resources. A large gas hydrate reservoir is located in the MacKenzie Delta of the Canadian Arctic and geophysical logs from the Mallik test site are available for the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) between depths of approximately 850 m to 1100 m. The geophysical data sets from two neighboring boreholes at the Mallik test site are analyzed. Commonly used porosity logs, as well as nuclear magnetic resonance, compressional and Stoneley wave velocity dispersion logs are used to map zones of elevated and severely reduced porosity and permeability respectively. The lateral continuity of horizontal permeability barriers can be further understood with the aid of surface seismic modeling studies. In this integrated study, the behavior of compressional and Stoneley wave velocity dispersion and surface seismic modeling studies are used to identify the fluid pathways and permeability barriers of the gas hydrate reservoir. The results are compared with known nuclear magnetic resonance-derived permeability values. The aim of investigating this heterogeneous medium is to map the fluid pathways and the associated permeability barriers throughout the gas hydrate stability zone. This provides a framework for an understanding of the long-term dissociation of gas hydrates along vertical and horizontal pathways, and will improve the knowledge pertaining to the production of such a promising energy source.

  5. A framework for understanding semi-permeable barrier effects on migratory ungulates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sawyer, Hall; Kauffman, Matthew J.; Middleton, Arthur D.; Morrison, Thomas A.; Nielson, Ryan M.; Wyckoff, Teal B.

    2013-01-01

    1. Impermeable barriers to migration can greatly constrain the set of possible routes and ranges used by migrating animals. For ungulates, however, many forms of development are semi-permeable, and making informed management decisions about their potential impacts to the persistence of migration routes is difficult because our knowledge of how semi-permeable barriers affect migratory behaviour and function is limited. 2. Here, we propose a general framework to advance the understanding of barrier effects on ungulate migration by emphasizing the need to (i) quantify potential barriers in terms that allow behavioural thresholds to be considered, (ii) identify and measure behavioural responses to semi-permeable barriers and (iii) consider the functional attributes of the migratory landscape (e.g. stopovers) and how the benefits of migration might be reduced by behavioural changes. 3. We used global position system (GPS) data collected from two subpopulations of mule deer Odocoileus hemionus to evaluate how different levels of gas development influenced migratory behaviour, including movement rates and stopover use at the individual level, and intensity of use and width of migration route at the population level. We then characterized the functional landscape of migration routes as either stopover habitat or movement corridors and examined how the observed behavioural changes affected the functionality of the migration route in terms of stopover use. 4. We found migratory behaviour to vary with development intensity. Our results suggest that mule deer can migrate through moderate levels of development without any noticeable effects on migratory behaviour. However, in areas with more intensive development, animals often detoured from established routes, increased their rate of movement and reduced stopover use, while the overall use and width of migration routes decreased. 5. Synthesis and applications. In contrast to impermeable barriers that impede animal movement

  6. Zinc modulates cytokine-induced lung epithelial cell barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Bao, Shenying; Knoell, Daren L

    2006-12-01

    Apoptosis plays a causative role in acute lung injury in part due to epithelial cell loss. We recently reported that zinc protects the lung epithelium during inflammatory stress whereas depletion of intracellular zinc enhances extrinsic apoptosis. In this investigation, we evaluated the relationship between zinc, caspase-3, and cell-to-cell contact via proteins that form the adherens junction complex. Cell adhesion proteins are directly responsible for formation of the mechanical barrier of the lung epithelium. We hypothesized that exposure to inflammatory cytokines, in conjunction with zinc deprivation, would induce caspase-3, leading to degradation of junction proteins, loss of cell-to-cell contact, and compromised barrier function. Primary human upper airway and type I/II alveolar epithelial cultures were obtained from multiple donors and exposed to inflammatory stimuli that provoke extrinsic apoptosis in addition to depletion of intracellular zinc. We observed that zinc deprivation combined with tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma, and Fas receptor ligation accelerates caspase-3 activation, proteolysis of E-cadherin and beta-catenin, and cellular apoptosis, leading to increased paracellular leak across monolayers of both upper airway and alveolar lung epithelial cultures. Zinc supplementation inhibited apoptosis and paracellular leak, whereas caspase inhibition was less effective. We conclude that zinc is a vital factor in the lung epithelium that protects against death receptor-mediated apoptosis and barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, our findings suggest that although caspase-3 inhibition reduces lung epithelial apoptosis it does not prevent mechanical dysfunction. These findings facilitate future studies aimed at developing therapeutic strategies to prevent acute lung injury. PMID:16844947

  7. Spatiotemporal Dysfunction of the Vascular Permeability Barrier in Transgenic Mice with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Samit; Tan, Fang; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by chronic intravascular hemolysis that generates excess cell-free hemoglobin in the blood circulation. Hemoglobin causes multiple endothelial dysfunctions including increased vascular permeability, impaired reactivity to vasoactive agonists, and increased adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelium. While the adhesive and vasomotor defects of SCD associated with cell-free hemoglobin are well defined, the vascular permeability phenotype remains poorly appreciated. We addressed this issue in two widely used and clinically relevant mouse models of SCD. We discovered that the endothelial barrier is normal in most organs in the young but deteriorates with aging particularly in the lung. Indeed, middle-aged sickle mice developed pulmonary edema revealing for the first time similarities in the chronic permeability phenotypes of the lung in mice and humans with SCD. Intravenous administration of lysed red blood cells into the circulation of sickle mice increased vascular permeability significantly in the lung without impacting permeability in other organs. Thus, increased vascular permeability is an endothelial dysfunction of SCD with the barrier in the lung likely the most vulnerable to acute inflammation. PMID:22778926

  8. A PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FOR TREATMENT OF HEAVY METALS: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-ADA-00327 Ludwig*, R., McGregor, R.G., Blowes, D.W., Benner, S.G., and Mountjoy, K. A Permeable Reactive Barrier for Treatment of Heavy Metals. Ground Water 40 (1):59-66 (2002) Historical storage of ore concentrate containing sulfid...

  9. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS TO REMEDIATE CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research brief presents findings over the past four years at two sites where detailed investigations by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) have focused on the long-term performance of PRBs under a Tri-Agency Permeable Reactive Barrier Initiative (TRI). This ...

  10. CHROMIUM REMOVAL PROCESSES DURING GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION BY A ZEROVALENT IRON PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solid-phase associations of chromium were examined in core materials collected from a full-scale, zerovalent iron, permeable reactive barrier (PRB) at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center located near Elizabeth City (NC). The PRB was installed in 1996 to treat groundwater contami...