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Sample records for intestinal crypt survival

  1. Dietary Pectin Increases Intestinal Crypt Stem Cell Survival following Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sureban, Sripathi M.; May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Weygant, Nathaniel; Ali, Naushad; Lightfoot, Stan A.; Ding, Kai; Umar, Shahid; Schlosser, Michael J.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal damage is a devastating adverse effect of radiation therapy. We have recently reported that expression of Dclk1, a Tuft cell and tumor stem cell (TSC) marker, 24h after high dose total-body gamma-IR (TBI) can be used as a surrogate marker for crypt survival. Dietary pectin has been demonstrated to possess chemopreventive properties, whereas its radioprotective property has not been studied. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of dietary pectin on ionizing radiation (IR)-induced intestinal stem cell (ISC) deletion, crypt and overall survival following lethal TBI. C57BL/6 mice received a 6% pectin diet and 0.5% pectin drinking water (pre-IR mice received pectin one week before TBI until death; post-IR mice received pectin after TBI until death). Animals were exposed to TBI (14 Gy) and euthanized at 24 and 84h post-IR to assess ISC deletion and crypt survival respectively. Animals were also subjected to overall survival studies following TBI. In pre-IR treatment group, we observed a three-fold increase in ISC/crypt survival, a two-fold increase in Dclk1+ stem cells, increased overall survival (median 10d vs. 7d), and increased expression of Dclk1, Msi1, Lgr5, Bmi1, and Notch1 (in small intestine) post-TBI in pectin treated mice compared to controls. We also observed increased survival of mice treated with pectin (post-IR) compared to controls. Dietary pectin is a radioprotective agent; prevents IR-induced deletion of potential reserve ISCs; facilitates crypt regeneration; and ultimately promotes overall survival. Given the anti-cancer activity of pectin, our data support a potential role for dietary pectin as an agent that can be administered to patients receiving radiation therapy to protect against radiation-induces mucositis. PMID:26270561

  2. Selective irradiation of the vascular endothelium has no effect on the survival of murine intestinal crypt stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, Bradley W.; Binns, Peter J.; Riley, Kent J.; Ma, Ling; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Coderre, Jeffrey A.

    2006-03-01

    The possible role of vascular endothelial cell damage in the loss of intestinal crypt stem cells and the subsequent development of the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome is addressed. Mice received whole-body epithermal neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 0.57 ± 0.04 Gy·min-1. An additional dose was selectively targeted to endothelial cells from the short-ranged (5-9 μm) particles released from neutron capture reactions in 10B confined to the blood by incorporation into liposomes 70-90 nm in diameter. Different liposome formulations produced 45 ± 7 or 118 ± 12 μg/g 10B in the blood at the time of neutron irradiation, which resulted in total absorbed dose rates in the endothelial cells of 1.08 ± 0.09 or 1.90 ± 0.16 Gy·min-1, respectively. At 3.5 d after irradiation, the intestinal crypt microcolony assay showed that the 2- to 3-fold increased doses to the microvasculature, relative to the nonspecific whole-body neutron beam doses, caused no additional crypt stem cell loss beyond that produced by the neutron beam alone. The threshold dose for death from the GI syndrome after neutron-beam-only irradiation was 9.0 ± 0.6 Gy. There were no deaths from the GI syndrome, despite calculated absorbed doses to endothelial cells as high as 27.7 Gy, in the groups that received neutron beam doses of <9.0 Gy with boronated liposomes in the blood. These data indicate that endothelial cell damage is not causative in the loss of intestinal crypt stem cells and the eventual development of the GI syndrome. gastrointestinal syndrome | boron | liposomes | neutron capture

  3. Optimality in the Development of Intestinal Crypts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    Intestinal crypts in mammals are comprised of long-lived stem cells and shorter-lived progenies, maintained under tight proportions during adult life. Here we ask what are the design principles that govern the dynamics of these proportions during crypt morphogenesis. We use optimal control theory to show that a stem cell proliferation strategy known as a `bang-bang' control minimizes the time to obtain a mature crypt. This strategy consists of a surge of symmetric stem cell divisions, establishing the entire stem cell pool first, followed by a sharp transition to strictly asymmetric stem cell divisions, producing non-stem cells with a delay. We validate these predictions using lineage tracing and single molecule fluorescent in-situ hybridization of intestinal crypts in newborn mice and find that small crypts are entirely composed of Lgr5 stem cells, which become a minority as crypts further grow. Our approach can be used to uncover similar design principles in other developmental systems.

  4. The RBE-LET relationship for rodent intestinal crypt cell survival, testes weight loss, and multicellular spheroid cell survival after heavy-ion irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, A.; Alpen, E. L.; Powers-Risius, P.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents data for survival of mouse intestinal crypt cells, mouse testes weight loss as an indicator of survival of spermatogonial stem cells, and survival of rat 9L spheroid cells after irradiation in the plateau region of unmodified particle beams ranging in mass from 4He to 139La. The LET values range from 1.6 to 953 keV/microns. These studies examine the RBE-LET relationship for two normal tissues and for an in vitro tissue model, multicellular spheroids. When the RBE values are plotted as a function of LET, the resulting curve is characterized by a region in which RBE increases with LET, a peak RBE at an LET value of 100 keV/microns, and a region of decreasing RBE at LETs greater than 100 keV/microns. Inactivation cross sections (sigma) for these three biological systems have been calculated from the exponential terminal slope of the dose-response relationship for each ion. For this determination the dose is expressed as particle fluence and the parameter sigma indicates effect per particle. A plot of sigma versus LET shows that the curve for testes weight loss is shifted to the left, indicating greater radiosensitivity at lower LETs than for crypt cell and spheroid cell survival. The curves for cross section versus LET for all three model systems show similar characteristics with a relatively linear portion below 100 keV/microns and a region of lessened slope in the LET range above 100 keV/microns for testes and spheroids. The data indicate that the effectiveness per particle increases as a function of LET and, to a limited extent, Z, at LET values greater than 100 keV/microns. Previously published results for spread Bragg peaks are also summarized, and they suggest that RBE is dependent on both the LET and the Z of the particle.

  5. Paneth cells: maestros of the small intestinal crypts.

    PubMed

    Clevers, Hans C; Bevins, Charles L

    2013-01-01

    Paneth cells are highly specialized epithelial cells of the small intestine, where they coordinate many physiological functions. First identified more than a century ago on the basis of their readily discernible secretory granules by routine histology, these cells are located at the base of the crypts of Lieberkühn, tiny invaginations that line the mucosal surface all along the small intestine. Investigations over the past several decades determined that these cells synthesize and secrete substantial quantities of antimicrobial peptides and proteins. More recent studies have determined that these antimicrobial molecules are key mediators of host-microbe interactions, including homeostatic balance with colonizing microbiota and innate immune protection from enteric pathogens. Perhaps more intriguing, Paneth cells secrete factors that help sustain and modulate the epithelial stem and progenitor cells that cohabitate in the crypts and rejuvenate the small intestinal epithelium. Dysfunction of Paneth cell biology contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:23398152

  6. A novel culture system for adult porcine intestinal crypts.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Hassan A; Lei, Nan Ye; Brinkley, Garrett; Scott, Andrew; Wang, Jiafang; Kar, Upendra K; Jabaji, Ziyad B; Lewis, Michael; Martín, Martín G; Dunn, James C Y; Stelzner, Matthias G

    2016-07-01

    Porcine models are useful for investigating therapeutic approaches to short bowel syndrome and potentially to intestinal stem cell (ISC) transplantation. Whereas techniques for the culture and genetic manipulation of ISCs from mice and humans are well established, similar methods for porcine stem cells have not been reported. Jejunal crypts were isolated from murine, human, and juvenile and adult porcine small intestine, suspended in Matrigel, and co-cultured with syngeneic intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs) or cultured without feeder cells in various culture media. Media containing epidermal growth factor, noggin, and R-spondin 1 (ENR medium) were supplemented with various combinations of Wnt3a- or ISEMF-conditioned medium (CM) and with glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitor (GSK3i), and their effects were studied on cultured crypts. Cell lineage differentiation was assessed by immunohistochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Cultured porcine cells were serially passaged and transduced with a lentiviral vector. Whereas ENR medium supported murine enteroid growth, it did not sustain porcine crypts beyond 5 days. Supplementation of Wnt3a-CM and GSK3i resulted in the formation of complex porcine enteroids with budding extensions. These enteroids contained a mixture of stem and differentiated cells and were successfully passaged in the presence of GSK3i. Crypts grown in media supplemented with porcine ISEMF-CM formed spheroids that were less well differentiated than enteroids. Enteroids and spheroids were transfected with a lentivirus with high efficiency. Thus, our method maintains juvenile and adult porcine crypt cells long-term in culture. Porcine enteroids and spheroids can be successfully passaged and transduced by using lentiviral vectors. PMID:26928041

  7. Stem cell self-renewal in intestinal crypt

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, Benjamin D.

    2011-11-15

    As a rapidly cycling tissue capable of fast repair and regeneration, the intestinal epithelium has emerged as a favored model system to explore the principles of adult stem cell biology. However, until recently, the identity and characteristics of the stem cell population in both the small intestine and colon has remained the subject of debate. Recent studies based on targeted lineage tracing strategies, combined with the development of an organotypic culture system, have identified the crypt base columnar cell as the intestinal stem cell, and have unveiled the strategy by which the balance between proliferation and differentiation is maintained. These results show that intestinal stem cells operate in a dynamic environment in which frequent and stochastic stem cell loss is compensated by the proliferation of neighboring stem cells. We review the basis of these experimental findings and the insights they offer into the mechanisms of homeostatic stem cell regulation.

  8. Application of Three-Dimensional Imaging to the Intestinal Crypt Organoids and Biopsied Intestinal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Tsai, Ya-Hui; Liu, Yuan-An; Lee, Shih-Hua; Tang, Shiue-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) histopathology is the standard analytical method for intestinal biopsied tissues; however, the role of 3-dimensional (3D) imaging system in the analysis of the intestinal tissues is unclear. The 3D structure of the crypt organoids from the intestinal stem cell culture and intestinal tissues from the donors and recipients after intestinal transplantation was observed using a 3D imaging system and compared with 2D histopathology and immunohistochemistry. The crypt organoids and intestinal tissues showed well-defined 3D structures. The 3D images of the intestinal tissues with acute rejection revealed absence of villi and few crypts, which were consistent with the histopathological features. In the intestinal transplant for megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome, the donor's intestinal tissues had well-developed nerve networks and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in the muscle layer, while the recipient's intestinal tissues had distorted nerve network and the ICCs were few and sparsely distributed, relative to those of the donor. The 3D images showed a clear spatial relationship between the microstructures of the small bowel and the features of graft rejection. In conclusion, integration of the 3D imaging and 2D histopathology provided a global view of the intestinal tissues from the transplant patients. PMID:24348177

  9. Fluorescent labelling of intestinal epithelial cells reveals independent long-lived intestinal stem cells in a crypt

    SciTech Connect

    Horita, Nobukatsu; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Hayashi, Ryohei; Fukushima, Keita; Hibiya, Shuji; Fukuda, Masayoshi; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Yui, Shiro; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Lentivirus mixed with Matrigel enables direct infection of intestinal organoids. • Our original approach allows the marking of a single stem cell in a crypt. • Time-lapse imaging shows the dynamics of a single stem cell. • Our lentivirus transgene system demonstrates plural long-lived stem cells in a crypt. - Abstract: Background and aims: The dynamics of intestinal stem cells are crucial for regulation of intestinal function and maintenance. Although crypt stem cells have been identified in the intestine by genetic marking methods, identification of plural crypt stem cells has not yet been achieved as they are visualised in the same colour. Methods: Intestinal organoids were transferred into Matrigel® mixed with lentivirus encoding mCherry. The dynamics of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using time-lapse imaging, and the localisation of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using 3D immunofluorescence. Results: We established an original method for the introduction of a transgene into an organoid generated from mouse small intestine that resulted in continuous fluorescence of the mCherry protein in a portion of organoid cells. Three-dimensional analysis using confocal microscopy showed a single mCherry-positive cell in an organoid crypt that had been cultured for >1 year, which suggested the presence of long-lived mCherry-positive and -negative stem cells in the same crypt. Moreover, a single mCherry-positive stem cell in a crypt gave rise to both crypt base columnar cells and transit amplifying cells. Each mCherry-positive and -negative cell contributed to the generation of organoids. Conclusions: The use of our original lentiviral transgene system to mark individual organoid crypt stem cells showed that long-lived plural crypt stem cells might independently serve as intestinal epithelial cells, resulting in the formation of a completely functional villus.

  10. β-Arrestin-2 modulates radiation-induced intestinal crypt progenitor/stem cell injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Tian, H; Jiang, J; Yang, Y; Tan, S; Lin, X; Liu, H; Wu, B

    2016-09-01

    Intestinal crypt progenitor/stem (ICPS) cell apoptosis and vascular endothelial cell apoptosis are responsible for the initiation and development of ionizing radiation (IR)-evoked gastrointestinal syndrome. The signaling mechanisms underlying IR-induced ICPS cell apoptosis remain largely unclear. Our findings provide evidence that β-arrestin-2 (βarr2)-mediated ICPS cell apoptosis is crucial for IR-stimulated intestinal injury. βArr2-deficient mice exhibited decreased ICPS cell and intestinal Lgr5(+) (leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5-positive) stem cell apoptosis, promoted crypt proliferation and reproduction, and protracted survival following lethal doses of radiation. Radioprotection in the ICPS cells isolated from βarr2-deficient mice depended on prolonged nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation via direct interaction of βarr2 with IκBα and subsequent inhibition of p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Unexpectedly, βarr2 deficiency had little effect on IR-induced intestinal vascular endothelial cell apoptosis in mice. Consistently, βarr2 knockdown also provided significant radioresistance by manipulating NF-κB/PUMA signaling in Lgr5(+) cells in vitro. Collectively, these observations show that targeting the βarr2/NF-κB/PUMA novel pathway is a potential radiomitigator for limiting the damaging effect of radiotherapy on the gastrointestinal system. Significance statement: acute injury to the intestinal mucosa is a major dose-limiting complication of abdominal radiotherapy. The issue of whether the critical factor for the initiation of radiation-induced intestinal injury is intestinal stem cell apoptosis or endothelial cell apoptosis remains unresolved. βArrs have recently been found to be multifunctional adaptor of apoptosis. Here, we found that β-arrestin-2 (βarr2) deficiency was associated with decreased radiation-induced ICPS cell apoptosis, which prolonged survival in

  11. BVES Regulates Intestinal Stem Cell Programs and Intestinal Crypt Viability after Radiation.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vishruth K; Short, Sarah P; Barrett, Caitlyn W; Mittal, Mukul K; Keating, Cody E; Thompson, Joshua J; Harris, Elizabeth I; Revetta, Frank; Bader, David M; Brand, Thomas; Washington, M Kay; Williams, Christopher S

    2016-06-01

    Blood vessel epicardial substance (BVES/Popdc1) is a junctional-associated transmembrane protein that is underexpressed in a number of malignancies and regulates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. We previously identified a role for BVES in regulation of the Wnt pathway, a modulator of intestinal stem cell programs, but its role in small intestinal (SI) biology remains unexplored. We hypothesized that BVES influences intestinal stem cell programs and is critical to SI homeostasis after radiation injury. At baseline, Bves(-/-) mice demonstrated increased crypt height, as well as elevated proliferation and expression of the stem cell marker Lgr5 compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Intercross with Lgr5-EGFP reporter mice confirmed expansion of the stem cell compartment in Bves(-/-) mice. To examine stem cell function after BVES deletion, we used ex vivo 3D-enteroid cultures. Bves(-/-) enteroids demonstrated increased stemness compared to WT, when examining parameters such as plating efficiency, stem spheroid formation, and retention of peripheral cystic structures. Furthermore, we observed increased proliferation, expression of crypt-base columnar "CBC" and "+4" stem cell markers, amplified Wnt signaling, and responsiveness to Wnt activation in the Bves(-/-) enteroids. Bves expression was downregulated after radiation in WT mice. Moreover, after radiation, Bves(-/-) mice demonstrated significantly greater SI crypt viability, proliferation, and amplified Wnt signaling in comparison to WT mice. Bves(-/-) mice also demonstrated elevations in Lgr5 and Ascl2 expression, and putative damage-responsive stem cell populations marked by Bmi1 and TERT. Therefore, BVES is a key regulator of intestinal stem cell programs and mucosal homeostasis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1626-1636. PMID:26891025

  12. Cdx2 modulates proliferation in normal human intestinal epithelial crypt cells

    SciTech Connect

    Escaffit, Fabrice; Pare, Frederic; Gauthier, Remy; Rivard, Nathalie; Boudreau, Francois; Beaulieu, Jean-Francois . E-mail: Jean-Francois.Beaulieu@USherbrooke.ca

    2006-03-31

    The homeobox gene Cdx2 is involved in the regulation of the expression of intestine specific markers such as sucrase-isomaltase and lactase-phlorizin hydrolase. Previous studies performed with immortalized or transformed intestinal cell lines have provided evidence that Cdx2 can promote morphological and functional differentiation in these experimental models. However, no data exist concerning the implication of this factor in normal human intestinal cell physiology. In the present work, we have investigated the role of Cdx2 in normal human intestinal epithelial crypt (HIEC) cells that lack this transcription factor. The establishment of HIEC cells expressing Cdx2 in an inducible manner shows that forced expression of Cdx2 significantly alters the proliferation of intestinal crypt cells and stimulates dipeptidylpeptidase IV expression but is not sufficient to trigger intestinal terminal differentiation. These observations suggest that Cdx2 requires additional factors to activate the enterocyte differentiation program in normal undifferentiated cells.

  13. Energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along the crypt-villus axis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huansheng; Wang, Xiaocheng; Xiong, Xia; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells continuously migrate and mature along crypt-villus axis (CVA), while the changes in energy metabolism during maturation are unclear in neonates. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells would be changed during maturation along CVA in neonates. Eight 21-day-old suckling piglets were used. Intestinal epithelial cells were isolated sequentially along CVA, and proteomics was used to analyze the changes in proteins expression in epithelial cells along CVA. The identified differentially expressed proteins were mainly involved in cellular process, metabolic process, biological regulation, pigmentation, multicellular organizational process and so on. The energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells of piglets was increased from the bottom of crypt to the top of villi. Moreover, the expression of proteins related to the metabolism of glucose, most of amino acids, and fatty acids was increased in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA, while the expression of proteins related to glutamine metabolism was decreased from crypt to villus tip. The expression of proteins involved in citrate cycle was also increased intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA. Moreover, dietary supplementation with different energy sources had different effects on intestinal structure of weaned piglets. PMID:27558220

  14. Energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along the crypt-villus axis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huansheng; Wang, Xiaocheng; Xiong, Xia; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells continuously migrate and mature along crypt-villus axis (CVA), while the changes in energy metabolism during maturation are unclear in neonates. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells would be changed during maturation along CVA in neonates. Eight 21-day-old suckling piglets were used. Intestinal epithelial cells were isolated sequentially along CVA, and proteomics was used to analyze the changes in proteins expression in epithelial cells along CVA. The identified differentially expressed proteins were mainly involved in cellular process, metabolic process, biological regulation, pigmentation, multicellular organizational process and so on. The energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells of piglets was increased from the bottom of crypt to the top of villi. Moreover, the expression of proteins related to the metabolism of glucose, most of amino acids, and fatty acids was increased in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA, while the expression of proteins related to glutamine metabolism was decreased from crypt to villus tip. The expression of proteins involved in citrate cycle was also increased intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA. Moreover, dietary supplementation with different energy sources had different effects on intestinal structure of weaned piglets. PMID:27558220

  15. Investigating the Relation between Stochastic Differentiation, Homeostasis and Clonal Expansion in Intestinal Crypts via Multiscale Modeling

    PubMed Central

    De Matteis, Giovanni; Antoniotti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal tumors originate and develop within intestinal crypts. Even though some of the essential phenomena that characterize crypt structure and dynamics have been effectively described in the past, the relation between the differentiation process and the overall crypt homeostasis is still only partially understood. We here investigate this relation and other important biological phenomena by introducing a novel multiscale model that combines a morphological description of the crypt with a gene regulation model: the emergent dynamical behavior of the underlying gene regulatory network drives cell growth and differentiation processes, linking the two distinct spatio-temporal levels. The model relies on a few a priori assumptions, yet accounting for several key processes related to crypt functioning, such as: dynamic gene activation patterns, stochastic differentiation, signaling pathways ruling cell adhesion properties, cell displacement, cell growth, mitosis, apoptosis and the presence of biological noise. We show that this modeling approach captures the major dynamical phenomena that characterize the regular physiology of crypts, such as cell sorting, coordinate migration, dynamic turnover, stem cell niche correct positioning and clonal expansion. All in all, the model suggests that the process of stochastic differentiation might be sufficient to drive the crypt to homeostasis, under certain crypt configurations. Besides, our approach allows to make precise quantitative inferences that, when possible, were matched to the current biological knowledge and it permits to investigate the role of gene-level perturbations, with reference to cancer development. We also remark the theoretical framework is general and may be applied to different tissues, organs or organisms. PMID:24869488

  16. Sodium Selenite Radiosensitizes Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer Xenograft Tumors but Not Intestinal Crypt Cells In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Junqiang; Ning Shouchen; Knox, Susan J.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that sodium selenite (SSE) increases radiation-induced cell killing of human prostate carcinoma cells in vitro. In this study we further evaluated the in vivo radiosensitizing effect of SSE in prostate cancer xenograft tumors and normal radiosensitive intestinal crypt cells. Methods and Materials: Immunodeficient (SCID) mice with hormone-independent LAPC-4 (HI-LAPC-4) and PC-3 xenograft tumors (approximately 200 mm{sup 3}) were divided into four groups: control (untreated), radiation therapy (XRT, local irradiation), SSE (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, 3 times/week), and XRT plus SSE. The XRT was given at the beginning of the regimen as a single dose of 5 Gy for HI-LAPC-4 tumors and a single dose of 7 Gy followed by a fractional dose of 3 Gy/d for 5 days for PC-3 tumors. The tumor volume was measured 3 times per week. The radiosensitizing effect of SSE on normal intestinal epithelial cells was assessed by use of a crypt cell microcolony assay. Results: In the efficacy study, SSE alone significantly inhibited the tumor growth in HI-LAPC-4 tumors but not PC-3 tumors. Sodium selenite significantly enhanced the XRT-induced tumor growth inhibition in both HI-LAPC-4 and PC-3 tumors. In the toxicity study, SSE did not affect the intestinal crypt cell survival either alone or in combination with XRT. Conclusions: Sodium selenite significantly enhances the effect of radiation on well-established hormone-independent prostate tumors and does not sensitize the intestinal epithelial cells to radiation. These results suggest that SSE may increase the therapeutic index of XRT for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  17. Scap is required for sterol synthesis and crypt growth in intestinal mucosa[S

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, Matthew R.; Cantoria, Mary Jo; Linden, Albert G.; January, Brandon A.; Liang, Guosheng; Engelking, Luke J.

    2015-01-01

    SREBP cleavage-activating protein (Scap) is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein required for cleavage and activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), which activate the transcription of genes in sterol and fatty acid biosynthesis. Liver-specific loss of Scap is well tolerated; hepatic synthesis of sterols and fatty acids is reduced, but mice are otherwise healthy. To determine whether Scap loss is tolerated in the intestine, we generated a mouse model (Vil-Scap−) in which tamoxifen-inducible Cre-ERT2, a fusion protein of Cre recombinase with a mutated ligand binding domain of the human estrogen receptor, ablates Scap in intestinal mucosa. After 4 days of tamoxifen, Vil-Scap− mice succumb with a severe enteropathy and near-complete collapse of intestinal mucosa. Organoids grown ex vivo from intestinal crypts of Vil-Scap− mice are readily killed when Scap is deleted by 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Death is prevented when culture medium is supplemented with cholesterol and oleate. These data show that, unlike the liver, the intestine requires Scap to sustain tissue integrity by maintaining the high levels of lipid synthesis necessary for proliferation of intestinal crypts. PMID:25896350

  18. Intestinal stem cells and epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in the crypt and stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Shaker, Anisa; Rubin, Deborah C.

    2010-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium contains a rapidly proliferating and perpetually differentiating epithelium. The principal functional unit of the small intestine is the crypt-villus axis. Stem cells located in the crypts of Lieberkühn give rise to proliferating progenitor or transit amplifying cells that differentiate into the four major epithelial cell types. The study of adult gastrointestinal tract stem cells has progressed rapidly with the recent discovery of a number of putative stem cell markers. Substantial evidence suggests that there are two populations of stem cells: long-term quiescent (reserved) and actively cycling (primed) stem cells. These are in adjoining locations and are presumably maintained by the secretion of specific proteins generated in a unique microenvironment or stem cell niche surrounding each population. The relationship between these two populations, and the cellular sources and composition of the surrounding environment remains to be defined, and is an active area of research. In this review we will outline progress in identifying stem cells and defining epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in the crypt. We will summarize early advances using stem cells for therapy of gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:20801415

  19. Brachyury identifies a class of enteroendocrine cells in normal human intestinal crypts and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Filipe; Sammut, Stephen J.; Williams, Geraint T.; Gollins, Simon; McFarlane, Ramsay J.; Reis, Rui Manuel; Wakeman, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    Normal homeostasis of adult intestinal epithelium and repair following tissue damage is maintained by a balance of stem and differentiated cells, many of which are still only poorly characterised. Enteroendocrine cells of the gut are a small population of differentiated, secretory cells that are critical for integrating nutrient sensing with metabolic responses, dispersed amongst other epithelial cells. Recent evidence suggests that sub-sets of secretory enteroendocrine cells can act as reserve stem cells. Given the link between cells with stem-like properties and cancer, it is important that we identify factors that might provide a bridge between the two. Here, we identify a sub-set of chromogranin A-positive enteroendocrine cells that are positive for the developmental and cancer-associated transcription factor Brachyury in normal human small intestinal and colonic crypts. Whilst chromogranin A-positive enteroendocrine cells are also Brachyury-positive in colorectal tumours, expression of Brachyury becomes more diffuse in these samples, suggesting a more widespread function in cancer. The finding of the developmental transcription factor Brachyury in normal adult human intestinal crypts may extend the functional complexity of enteroendocrine cells and serves as a platform for assessment of the molecular processes of intestinal homeostasis that underpins our understanding of human health, cancer and aging. PMID:26862851

  20. Impaired Cell Volume Regulation in Intestinal Crypt Epithelia of Cystic Fibrosis Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, M. A.; O'Brien, J. A.; Sepulveda, F. V.; Ratcliff, R. A.; Evans, M. J.; Colledge, W. H.

    1995-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a disease characterized by abnormalities in the epithelia of the lungs, intestine, salivary and sweat glands, liver, and reproductive systems, often as a result of inadequate hydration of their secretions. The primary defect in cystic fibrosis is the altered activity of a cAMP-activated Cl^- channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel. However, it is not clear how a defect in the CFTR Cl^- channel function leads to the observed pathological changes. Although much is known about the structural properties and regulation of the CFTR, little is known of its relationship to cellular functions other than the cAMP-dependent Cl^- secretion. Here we report that cell volume regulation after hypotonic challenge is also defective in intestinal crypt epithelial cells isolated from CFTR -/- mutant mice. Moreover, the impairment of the regulatory volume decrease in CFTR -/- crypts appears to be related to the inability of a K^+ conductance to provide a pathway for the exit of this cation during the volume adjustments. This provides evidence that the lack of CFTR protein may have additional consequences for the cellular function other than the abnormal cAMP-mediated Cl^- secretion.

  1. The Interplay between Wnt Mediated Expansion and Negative Regulation of Growth Promotes Robust Intestinal Crypt Structure and Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Huijing; Nie, Qing; Holmes, William R.

    2015-01-01

    The epithelium of the small intestinal crypt, which has a vital role in protecting the underlying tissue from the harsh intestinal environment, is completely renewed every 4–5 days by a small pool of stem cells at the base of each crypt. How is this renewal controlled and homeostasis maintained, particularly given the rapid nature of this process? Here, based on the recent observations from in vitro “mini gut” studies, we use a hybrid stochastic model of the crypt to investigate how exogenous niche signaling (from Wnt and BMP) combines with auto-regulation to promote homeostasis. This model builds on the sub-cellular element method to account for the three-dimensional structure of the crypt, external regulation by Wnt and BMP, internal regulation by Notch signaling, as well as regulation by internally generated diffusible signals. Results show that Paneth cell derived Wnt signals, which have been observed experimentally to sustain crypts in cultured organs, have a dramatically different influence on niche dynamics than does mesenchyme derived Wnt. While this signaling can indeed act as a redundant backup to the exogenous gradient, it introduces a positive feedback that destabilizes the niche and causes its uncontrolled expansion. We find that in this setting, BMP has a critical role in constraining this expansion, consistent with observations that its removal leads to crypt fission. Further results also point to a new hypothesis for the role of Ephrin mediated motility of Paneth cells, specifically that it is required to constrain niche expansion and maintain the crypt’s spatial structure. Combined, these provide an alternative view of crypt homeostasis where the niche is in a constant state of expansion and the spatial structure of the crypt arises as a balance between this expansion and the action of various sources of negative regulation that hold it in check. PMID:26288152

  2. The response of murine intestinal crypts to short-range promethium-147 beta irradiation: Deductions concerning clonogenic cell numbers and positions

    SciTech Connect

    Hendry, J.H.; Potten, C.S.; Ghafoor, A.; Moore, J.V.; Roberts, S.A.; Williams, P.C.

    1989-05-01

    An exteriorized loop of mouse intestine was exposed to /sup 147/Pm low-energy electrons, where the dose rate decreased by a factor of 5 from the base of the crypt to the top of the proliferative zone. A crypt survival curve was obtained, expressed in terms of exposure time. The shape of the curve was interpreted in terms of survival parameters for colony-forming cells (clonogens) derived using /sup 137/Cs gamma rays and the depth-dose curve measured for /sup 147/Pm electrons. It is concluded that the shape of the crypt survival curve using /sup 147/Pm electrons is inconsistent with the notion of either the presence of a large number of clonogens or a small number near the top of the proliferative zone. A computer fitting procedure showed that the best agreement between predicted and observed curves was achieved with 2.7 +/- 0.5 clonogens at cell position 5.6 +/- 0.6, in the putative stem-cell zone.

  3. The response of murine intestinal crypts to short-range promethium-147 beta irradiation: deductions concerning clonogenic cell numbers and positions.

    PubMed

    Hendry, J H; Potten, C S; Ghafoor, A; Moore, J V; Roberts, S A; Williams, P C

    1989-05-01

    An exteriorized loop of mouse intestine was exposed to 147Pm low-energy electrons, where the dose rate decreased by a factor of 5 from the base of the crypt to the top of the proliferative zone. A crypt survival curve was obtained, expressed in terms of exposure time. The shape of the curve was interpreted in terms of survival parameters for colony-forming cells (clonogens) derived using 137Cs gamma rays and the depth-dose curve measured for 147Pm electrons. It is concluded that the shape of the crypt survival curve using 147Pm electrons is inconsistent with the notion of either the presence of a large number of clonogens or a small number near the top of the proliferative zone. A computer fitting procedure showed that the best agreement between predicted and observed curves was achieved with 2.7 +/- 0.5 clonogens at cell position 5.6 +/- 0.6, in the putative stem-cell zone. PMID:2727264

  4. APC mutation and the crypt cycle in murine and human intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Bjerknes, M.; Cheng, H.; Hay, K.; Gallinger, S.

    1997-01-01

    Dysplastic colon adenomas are thought to arise from growth of clones of APC -/- colonic epithelial cells. Isolated clusters of dysplastic crypts are often observed in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis. These patients have genotype APC +/-, and the clusters of dysplastic crypts (called microadenoma or aberrant crypt foci) are thought to represent an early stage in the expansion of a mutant clone of APC -/- cells. It is thought that the growth of these clusters of mutant crypts results from crypt replication through a process similar to what occurs in the normal crypt cycle. We measured the relative replication rate of mutant crypts by analyzing the size of clusters of mutant crypts in APC +/- individuals and found that mutant APC -/- crypts replicate more rapidly than do normal APC +/- (i.e., nonneoplastic) crypts. In contrast, the replication rate of mutant crypts in Apc +/- mice is not significantly different from that of normal crypts, thus supporting previous findings that aberrant crypt foci do not contribute significantly to the colon adenoma population in adult Apc +/- mice. Intriguingly, we found an effect of Apc heterozygosity on the frequency of branching crypts in young mice. PMID:9060821

  5. Survival after total body irradiation: Effects of irradiation of exteriorized small intestine. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Vigneulle, R.M.; Kitto, G.; Pelky, T.; Taylor, P.

    1993-12-31

    Rats receiving lethal irradiation to their exteriorized small intestine with pulsed 18 MVp bremsstrahlung radiation live about 4 days longer than rats receiving a dose of total-body irradiation (TBI) causing intestinal death. The LD50 for intestinal irradiation is approximately 6 Gy higher than the LD50 for intestinal death after TBI. Survival time after exteriorized intestinal irradiation can be decreased, by adding abdominal irradiation. Adding thoracic or pelvic irradiation does not alter survival time. Shielding of large intestine improves survival after irradiation of the rest of the abdomen while the small intestine is also shielded. The kinetics of histological changes in small intestinal tissues implicate the release of humoral factors after irradiation of the abdomen. Radiation injury develops faster in the first (proximal) 40 cm of the small intestine and is expressed predominantly as shortening in villus height. In the last (distal) 40 cm of the small intestine, the most pronounced radiation effect is a decrease in the number of crypts per millimeter. Irradiation (20 Gy) of the proximal small intestine causes 92 % mortality (median survival 10 days). Irradiation (20 Gy) of the distal small intestine causes 27% mortality (median survival > 30 days). In addition to depletion of crypt stem cells in the small intestine, other issues (humoral factors, irradiated subsection of the small intestine and shielding of the large intestine) appear to influence radiation-induced intestinal mortality.

  6. Human crypt intestinal epithelial cells are capable of lipid production, apolipoprotein synthesis, and lipoprotein assembly.

    PubMed

    Levy, E; Beaulieu, J F; Delvin, E; Seidman, E; Yotov, W; Basque, J R; Ménard, D

    2000-01-01

    The recent availability of spontaneously proliferating, non-transformed human crypt intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC) affords an opportunity to investigate lipid metabolism in undifferentiated enterocytes. The major purpose of this study was to explore the capability of undifferentiated crypt cells to synthesize, assemble, and secrete lipids and apolipoproteins. HIEC were cultured in medium with 5% fetal bovine serum for 5 to 21 d. The cells were clearly able to incorporate [(14)C]oleic acid (dpm/mg protein) into triglycerides (128,279 +/- 16,988), phospholipids (30, 278 +/- 2,107), and cholesteryl esters (2,180 +/- 207). Although improvement in lipid secretion was noted with prolongation of cell culture periods, low efficiency of lipid export (10.3 +/- 2.2% of intracellular content) characterized the HIEC. All phospholipid classes were elaborated, with phosphatidylcholine accounting for 79. 3 +/- 1.3% of cellular phospholipids. Chylomicrons were the dominant (46.4%) lipoproteins secreted, followed by high, low, and very low density lipoproteins (HDL, LDL, and VLDL) comprising 22.5, 20.2, and 10.8% of the total, respectively. HIEC elaborated most of the major apolipoprotein (apo) classes (A-I, A-IV, B-100, C, and E), but were less efficient in producing apoB-48. In contrast to the production of apoA-I and C as early as 5 days after confluence, apoA-I and A-IV were maximally expressed at 11 d. Culture media accumulated much more apoB-100 than apoB-48 (B-48/B-100 ratio 0.21 +/- 0.03), reflecting limited apoB mRNA editing. HIEC demonstrated both endogenous cholesterol synthesis and LDL receptor expression. Cholesterol synthesis was sensitive to 25-hydroxycholesterol and mevinolin, but unresponsive to LDL treatment, suggesting independent regulation pathways. In contrast, LDL inhibited receptor activity. The present findings provide the first solid evidence that immature HIEC are capable of key fat absorptive functions of well-differentiated enterocytes. The

  7. Pattern recognition receptors in the gut: analysis of their expression along the intestinal tract and the crypt/villus axis

    PubMed Central

    Gourbeyre, Pascal; Berri, Mustapha; Lippi, Yannick; Meurens, François; Vincent-Naulleau, Silvia; Laffitte, Joëlle; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire; Pinton, Philippe; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2015-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) play a critical role in the detection of microorganisms and the induction of inflammatory and immune responses. Using PCR and Western-blot analysis, this study investigated the differential expression in the intestine of 14 PRRs and nine associated cytokines. Thirty-two pigs were used to determine the expression of these markers (1) along the proximal/distal axis of the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum) and (2) between the intestinal segments and their respective lymphoid organs (Peyer's patches [PP] and mesenteric lymph nodes [MLN]). Six additional animals were used to quantify the expression of these genes along the crypt/villus axis of jejunum, using microdissected samples. Most genes showed increased expression (1) in the distal than in the proximal parts of the small intestine (TLR3, 5, RIG-I, IL-1β, IL-8, and IFN-γ); (2) in lymphoid organs (TLR1, 2, 6, 9, 10, IL-10, TNF-α), especially the MLN (TLR4, 7, 8, NOD1, NOD2, NALP3, IFN-α, IL-6, IL-12, and TGF-β), than in intestinal segments. The analysis along the crypt/villus identified: (1) genes with higher expression in lamina propria (TLR1, 2, 4, 9, NOD1, NOD2, IL-1β, IL-10, TGF-β, TNF-α) and (2) genes with higher expression in the villus (TLR3, 5, 6, RIG-I, IL-6). These results highlight the differential expression of PRRs and cytokines along the proximal/distal and the crypt/villus axis of the intestine, contributing to a fine analysis of the complex functional architecture of the small intestine and should be related to the gut microbiota. PMID:25677543

  8. MicroRNA mir-16 is anti-proliferative in enterocytes and exhibits diurnal rhythmicity in intestinal crypts

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishnan, Anita; Stearns, Adam T.; Park, Peter J.; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M.; Ashley, Stanley W.; Rhoads, David B.; Tavakkolizadeh, Ali

    2010-12-10

    Background and aims: The intestine exhibits profound diurnal rhythms in function and morphology, in part due to changes in enterocyte proliferation. The regulatory mechanisms behind these rhythms remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that microRNAs are involved in mediating these rhythms, and studied the role of microRNAs specifically in modulating intestinal proliferation. Methods: Diurnal rhythmicity of microRNAs in rat jejunum was analyzed by microarrays and validated by qPCR. Temporal expression of diurnally rhythmic mir-16 was further quantified in intestinal crypts, villi, and smooth muscle using laser capture microdissection and qPCR. Morphological changes in rat jejunum were assessed by histology and proliferation by immunostaining for bromodeoxyuridine. In IEC-6 cells stably overexpressing mir-16, proliferation was assessed by cell counting and MTS assay, cell cycle progression and apoptosis by flow cytometry, and cell cycle gene expression by qPCR and immunoblotting. Results: mir-16 peaked 6 hours after light onset (HALO 6) with diurnal changes restricted to crypts. Crypt depth and villus height peaked at HALO 13-14 in antiphase to mir-16. Overexpression of mir-16 in IEC-6 cells suppressed specific G1/S regulators (cyclins D1-3, cyclin E1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 6) and produced G1 arrest. Protein expression of these genes exhibited diurnal rhythmicity in rat jejunum, peaking between HALO 11 and 17 in antiphase to mir-16. Conclusions: This is the first report of circadian rhythmicity of specific microRNAs in rat jejunum. Our data provide a link between anti-proliferative mir-16 and the intestinal proliferation rhythm and point to mir-16 as an important regulator of proliferation in jejunal crypts. This function may be essential to match proliferation and absorptive capacity with nutrient availability.

  9. Interactions of radiation and 5-fluorouracil, cyclophosphamide or methotrexate in intestinal crypt cells

    SciTech Connect

    von der Maase, H.

    1984-01-01

    The interactions of radiation and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cyclophosphamide (CTX), or methotrexate (MTX) in mouse jejunal crypt cells were studied using the microcolony survival assay. 5-FU given from 48 hr before to 24 hr after irradiation resulted in an almost constant, increased cell kill except at injection 6 hr after irradiation, which resulted in a more pronounced effect. CTX enhanced the radiation effect only when given simultaneously with or up to 3 hr after irradiation. The effect of MTX, extremely dependent on the sequence and interval between drug administration and irradiation, was most prominent when administered 1 hr before irradiation. At this drug-radiation interval, the D/sub 0/ surprisingly increased by a factor of 2.4, whereas MTX 15 min before irradiation displaced the survival curve to the left without changing the D/sub 0/. The influence of MTX on the radiation response disappeared when the drug was given either 96 hr before or 3 hr after irradiation.

  10. The Cytosolic Microbial Receptor Nod2 Regulates Small Intestinal Crypt Damage and Epithelial Regeneration following T Cell-Induced Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Zanello, Galliano; Goethel, Ashleigh; Rouquier, Sandrine; Prescott, David; Robertson, Susan J; Maisonneuve, Charles; Streutker, Catherine; Philpott, Dana J; Croitoru, Kenneth

    2016-07-01

    Loss of function in the NOD2 gene is associated with a higher risk of developing Crohn's disease (CD). CD is characterized by activation of T cells and activated T cells are involved in mucosal inflammation and mucosal damage. We found that acute T cell activation with anti-CD3 mAb induced stronger small intestinal mucosal damage in NOD2(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice. This enhanced mucosal damage was characterized by loss of crypt architecture, increased epithelial cell apoptosis, delayed epithelial regeneration and an accumulation of inflammatory cytokines and Th17 cells in the small intestine. Partial microbiota depletion with antibiotics did not decrease mucosal damage 1 d after anti-CD3 mAb injection, but it significantly reduced crypt damage and inflammatory cytokine secretion in NOD2(-/-) mice 3 d after anti-CD3 mAb injection, indicating that microbial sensing by Nod2 was important to control mucosal damage and epithelial regeneration after anti-CD3 mAb injection. To determine which cells play a key role in microbial sensing and regulation of mucosal damage, we engineered mice carrying a cell-specific deletion of Nod2 in villin and Lyz2-expressing cells. T cell activation did not worsen crypt damage in mice carrying either cell-specific deletion of Nod2 compared with wild-type mice. However, increased numbers of apoptotic epithelial cells and higher expression of TNF-α and IL-22 were observed in mice carrying a deletion of Nod2 in Lyz2-expressing cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that microbial sensing by Nod2 is an important mechanism to regulate small intestinal mucosal damage following acute T cell activation. PMID:27206769

  11. Physiological relevance of cell-specific distribution patterns of CFTR, NKCC1, NBCe1, and NHE3 along the crypt-villus axis in the intestine

    PubMed Central

    Jakab, Robert L.; Collaco, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the cell-specific subcellular expression patterns for sodium- and potassium-coupled chloride (NaK2Cl) cotransporter 1 (NKCC1), Na+ bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), and Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3) to understand the functional plasticity and synchronization of ion transport functions along the crypt-villus axis and its relevance to intestinal disease. In the unstimulated intestine, all small intestinal villus enterocytes coexpressed apical CFTR and NHE3, basolateral NBCe1, and mostly intracellular NKCC1. All (crypt and villus) goblet cells strongly expressed basolateral NKCC1 (at approximately three-fold higher levels than villus enterocytes), but no CFTR, NBCe1, or NHE3. Lower crypt cells coexpressed apical CFTR and basolateral NKCC1, but no NHE3 or NBCe1 (except NBCe1-expressing proximal colonic crypts). CFTR, NBCe1, and NKCC1 colocalized with markers of early and recycling endosomes, implicating endocytic recycling in cell-specific anion transport. Brunner's glands of the proximal duodenum coexpressed high levels of apical/subapical CFTR and basolateral NKCC1, but very low levels of NBCe1, consistent with secretion of Cl−-enriched fluid into the crypt. The cholinergic agonist carbachol rapidly (within 10 min) reduced cell volume along the entire crypt/villus axis and promoted NHE3 internalization into early endosomes. In contrast, carbachol induced membrane recruitment of NKCC1 and CFTR in all crypt and villus enterocytes, NKCC1 in all goblet cells, and NBCe1 in all villus enterocytes. These observations support regulated vesicle traffic in Cl− secretion by goblet cells and Cl− and HCO3− secretion by villus enterocytes during the transient phase of cholinergic stimulation. Overall, the carbachol-induced membrane trafficking profile of the four ion transporters supports functional plasticity of the small intestinal villus epithelium that enables it to conduct both absorptive and

  12. DIETARY BILE ACID SUPPLEMENTATION IMPROVES INTESTINAL INTEGRITY AND SURVIVAL IN A MURINE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Erin E.; Chen, Chen; Longshore, Shannon W.; Okezie, Oneybuchi; Warner, Brad W.; Sun, Chen-Chih; Alaish, Samuel M.; Strauch, Eric D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In vitro supplementation of the bile salt, taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA), has been shown to stimulate proliferation and prevent intestinal apoptosis in IEC-6 cells. We hypothesize that addition of TDCA to a rodent liquid diet will be protective against induced intestinal injury. Methods C57Bl6 mice were fed a liquid diet with or without 50mg/kg/day TDCA supplementation. After 6 days, the mice were injected with LPS (10mg/kg) to induce intestinal injury. Specimens were obtained 24 hours later and evaluated for intestinal apoptosis, crypt proliferation, and villus length. A separate cohort of animals were injected with LPS (25mg/kg) and followed 7 days for survival. Results Mice whose diet was supplemented with TDCA had significantly increased survival. After LPS-induced injury, mice supplemented with TDCA showed decreased intestinal apoptosis by both H&E and caspase-3. They also had increased intestinal proliferation by BrdU-staining and increased villus length. Conclusions Dietary taurodeoxycholic acid supplementation alleviates mucosal damage and improves survival after LPS-induced intestinal injury. TDCA is protective of the intestinal mucosa by increasing resistance to injury-induced apoptosis, stimulating enterocyte proliferation and increasing villus length. TDCA supplementation also results in an increased survival benefit. Therefore, bile acid supplementation may potentially protect the intestine from injury or infection. PMID:20620329

  13. Paneth Cell-Rich Regions Separated by a Cluster of Lgr5+ Cells Initiate Crypt Fission in the Intestinal Stem Cell Niche.

    PubMed

    Langlands, Alistair J; Almet, Axel A; Appleton, Paul L; Newton, Ian P; Osborne, James M; Näthke, Inke S

    2016-06-01

    The crypts of the intestinal epithelium house the stem cells that ensure the continual renewal of the epithelial cells that line the intestinal tract. Crypt number increases by a process called crypt fission, the division of a single crypt into two daughter crypts. Fission drives normal tissue growth and maintenance. Correspondingly, it becomes less frequent in adulthood. Importantly, fission is reactivated to drive adenoma growth. The mechanisms governing fission are poorly understood. However, only by knowing how normal fission operates can cancer-associated changes be elucidated. We studied normal fission in tissue in three dimensions using high-resolution imaging and used intestinal organoids to identify underlying mechanisms. We discovered that both the number and relative position of Paneth cells and Lgr5+ cells are important for fission. Furthermore, the higher stiffness and increased adhesion of Paneth cells are involved in determining the site of fission. Formation of a cluster of Lgr5+ cells between at least two Paneth-cell-rich domains establishes the site for the upward invagination that initiates fission. PMID:27348469

  14. Paneth Cell-Rich Regions Separated by a Cluster of Lgr5+ Cells Initiate Crypt Fission in the Intestinal Stem Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Langlands, Alistair J.; Almet, Axel A.; Appleton, Paul L.; Newton, Ian P.; Osborne, James M.; Näthke, Inke S.

    2016-01-01

    The crypts of the intestinal epithelium house the stem cells that ensure the continual renewal of the epithelial cells that line the intestinal tract. Crypt number increases by a process called crypt fission, the division of a single crypt into two daughter crypts. Fission drives normal tissue growth and maintenance. Correspondingly, it becomes less frequent in adulthood. Importantly, fission is reactivated to drive adenoma growth. The mechanisms governing fission are poorly understood. However, only by knowing how normal fission operates can cancer-associated changes be elucidated. We studied normal fission in tissue in three dimensions using high-resolution imaging and used intestinal organoids to identify underlying mechanisms. We discovered that both the number and relative position of Paneth cells and Lgr5+ cells are important for fission. Furthermore, the higher stiffness and increased adhesion of Paneth cells are involved in determining the site of fission. Formation of a cluster of Lgr5+ cells between at least two Paneth-cell-rich domains establishes the site for the upward invagination that initiates fission. PMID:27348469

  15. Naturally Occurring Deletion Mutants of the Pig-Specific, Intestinal Crypt Epithelial Cell Protein CLCA4b without Apparent Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Plog, Stephanie; Klymiuk, Nikolai; Binder, Stefanie; Van Hook, Matthew J.; Thoreson, Wallace B.; Gruber, Achim D.; Mundhenk, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The human CLCA4 (chloride channel regulator, calcium-activated) modulates the intestinal phenotype of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients via an as yet unknown pathway. With the generation of new porcine CF models, species-specific differences between human modifiers of CF and their porcine orthologs are considered critical for the translation of experimental data. Specifically, the porcine ortholog to the human CF modulator gene CLCA4 has recently been shown to be duplicated into two separate genes, CLCA4a and CLCA4b. Here, we characterize the duplication product, CLCA4b, in terms of its genomic structure, tissue and cellular expression patterns as well as its in vitro electrophysiological properties. The CLCA4b gene is a pig-specific duplication product of the CLCA4 ancestor and its protein is exclusively expressed in small and large intestinal crypt epithelial cells, a niche specifically occupied by no other porcine CLCA family member. Surprisingly, a unique deleterious mutation of the CLCA4b gene is spread among modern and ancient breeds in the pig population, but this mutation did not result in an apparent phenotype in homozygously affected animals. Electrophysiologically, neither the products of the wild type nor of the mutated CLCA4b genes were able to evoke a calcium-activated anion conductance, a consensus feature of other CLCA proteins. The apparently pig-specific duplication of the CLCA4 gene with unique expression of the CLCA4b protein variant in intestinal crypt epithelial cells where the porcine CFTR is also present raises the question of whether it may modulate the porcine CF phenotype. Moreover, the naturally occurring null variant of CLCA4b will be valuable for the understanding of CLCA protein function and their relevance in modulating the CF phenotype. PMID:26474299

  16. Activation of two distinct Sox9-EGFP-expressing intestinal stem cell populations during crypt regeneration after irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Santoro, M. Agostina; Krebs, Adrienne E.; Mah, Amanda T.; Dehmer, Jeffrey J.; Gracz, Adam D.; Scull, Brooks P.; McNaughton, Kirk; Magness, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent identification of intestinal epithelial stem cell (ISC) markers and development of ISC reporter mice permit visualization and isolation of regenerating ISCs after radiation to define their functional and molecular phenotypes. Previous studies in uninjured intestine of Sox9-EGFP reporter mice demonstrate that ISCs express low levels of Sox9-EGFP (Sox9-EGFP Low), whereas enteroendocrine cells (EEC) express high levels of Sox9-EGFP (Sox9-EGFP High). We hypothesized that Sox9-EGFP Low ISCs would expand after radiation, exhibit enhanced proliferative capacities, and adopt a distinct gene expression profile associated with rapid proliferation. Sox9-EGFP mice were given 14 Gy abdominal radiation and studied between days 3 and 9 postradiation. Radiation-induced changes in number, growth, and transcriptome of the different Sox9-EGFP cell populations were determined by histology, flow cytometry, in vitro culture assays, and microarray. Microarray confirmed that nonirradiated Sox9-EGFP Low cells are enriched for Lgr5 mRNA and mRNAs enriched in Lgr5-ISCs and identified additional putative ISC markers. Sox9-EGFP High cells were enriched for EEC markers, as well as Bmi1 and Hopx, which are putative markers of quiescent ISCs. Irradiation caused complete crypt loss, followed by expansion and hyperproliferation of Sox9-EGFP Low cells. From nonirradiated intestine, only Sox9-EGFP Low cells exhibited ISC characteristics of forming organoids in culture, whereas during regeneration both Sox9-EGFP Low and High cells formed organoids. Microarray demonstrated that regenerating Sox9-EGFP High cells exhibited transcriptomic changes linked to p53-signaling and ISC-like functions including DNA repair and reduced oxidative metabolism. These findings support a model in which Sox9-EGFP Low cells represent active ISCs, Sox9-EGFP High cells contain radiation-activatable cells with ISC characteristics, and both participate in crypt regeneration. PMID:22361729

  17. Preferential entry of botulinum neurotoxin A Hc domain through intestinal crypt cells and targeting to cholinergic neurons of the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Couesnon, Aurélie; Molgó, Jordi; Connan, Chloé; Popoff, Michel R

    2012-01-01

    Botulism, characterized by flaccid paralysis, commonly results from botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) absorption across the epithelial barrier from the digestive tract and then dissemination through the blood circulation to target autonomic and motor nerve terminals. The trafficking pathway of BoNT/A passage through the intestinal barrier is not yet fully understood. We report that intralumenal administration of purified BoNT/A into mouse ileum segment impaired spontaneous muscle contractions and abolished the smooth muscle contractions evoked by electric field stimulation. Entry of BoNT/A into the mouse upper small intestine was monitored with fluorescent HcA (half C-terminal domain of heavy chain) which interacts with cell surface receptor(s). We show that HcA preferentially recognizes a subset of neuroendocrine intestinal crypt cells, which probably represent the entry site of the toxin through the intestinal barrier, then targets specific neurons in the submucosa and later (90-120 min) in the musculosa. HcA mainly binds to certain cholinergic neurons of both submucosal and myenteric plexuses, but also recognizes, although to a lower extent, other neuronal cells including glutamatergic and serotoninergic neurons in the submucosa. Intestinal cholinergic neuron targeting by HcA could account for the inhibition of intestinal peristaltism and secretion observed in botulism, but the consequences of the targeting to non-cholinergic neurons remains to be determined. PMID:22438808

  18. PepT1 Expression Helps Maintain Intestinal Homeostasis by Mediating the Differential Expression of miRNAs along the Crypt-Villus Axis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuchen; Viennois, Emilie; Zhang, Mingzhen; Xiao, Bo; Han, Moon Kwon; Walter, Lewins; Garg, Pallavi; Merlin, Didier

    2016-01-01

    In the jejunum, PepT1 is particularly enriched in the well-differentiated absorptive epithelial cells in the villi. Studies of expression and function of PepT1 along the crypt-villus axis demonstrated that this protein is crucial to the process of di/tripeptide absorption. We recently exhibited that PepT1 plays an important role in multiple biological functions, including the ability to regulate the expression/secretion of specific microRNAs (miRNAs) and the expression levels of multiple proteins. In this study, we observed that PepT1 knockout (KO) mice exhibited reduced body weight and shorten intestinal microvilli. We then examined the expression levels of various miRNAs and their target proteins along the crypt-villi axis in the jejunum of PepT1 KO mice. We found that PepT1 KO altered the distribution of miRNAs along the crypt-villus axis and changed the miRNA profiles of both villi and crypts. Using miRNA-target prediction and 2D-DIGE/mass spectrometry on villi and crypts samples, we found that ablation of PepT1 further directly or indirectly altered expression levels of certain protein targets. Collectively, our results suggest that PepT1 contributes to maintain balance of homeostasis and proper functions in the small intestine, and dysregulated miRNAs and proteins along the crypt-villus axis are highly related to this process. PMID:27250880

  19. PepT1 Expression Helps Maintain Intestinal Homeostasis by Mediating the Differential Expression of miRNAs along the Crypt-Villus Axis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuchen; Viennois, Emilie; Zhang, Mingzhen; Xiao, Bo; Han, Moon Kwon; Walter, Lewins; Garg, Pallavi; Merlin, Didier

    2016-01-01

    In the jejunum, PepT1 is particularly enriched in the well-differentiated absorptive epithelial cells in the villi. Studies of expression and function of PepT1 along the crypt-villus axis demonstrated that this protein is crucial to the process of di/tripeptide absorption. We recently exhibited that PepT1 plays an important role in multiple biological functions, including the ability to regulate the expression/secretion of specific microRNAs (miRNAs) and the expression levels of multiple proteins. In this study, we observed that PepT1 knockout (KO) mice exhibited reduced body weight and shorten intestinal microvilli. We then examined the expression levels of various miRNAs and their target proteins along the crypt-villi axis in the jejunum of PepT1 KO mice. We found that PepT1 KO altered the distribution of miRNAs along the crypt-villus axis and changed the miRNA profiles of both villi and crypts. Using miRNA-target prediction and 2D-DIGE/mass spectrometry on villi and crypts samples, we found that ablation of PepT1 further directly or indirectly altered expression levels of certain protein targets. Collectively, our results suggest that PepT1 contributes to maintain balance of homeostasis and proper functions in the small intestine, and dysregulated miRNAs and proteins along the crypt-villus axis are highly related to this process. PMID:27250880

  20. Proliferation and mRNA expression of absorptive villous cell markers and mineral transporters in prolactin-exposed IEC-6 intestinal crypt cells.

    PubMed

    Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Wongdee, Kannikar; Thongbunchoo, Jirawan; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2012-06-01

    During pregnancy and lactation, prolactin (PRL) enhances intestinal absorption of calcium and other minerals for fetal development and milk production. Although an enhanced absorptive efficiency is believed to mainly result from the upregulation of mineral transporters in the absorptive villous cells, some other possibilities, such as PRL-enhanced crypt cell proliferation and differentiation to increase the absorptive area, have never been ruled out. Here, we investigated cell proliferation and mRNA expression of mineral absorption-related genes in the PRL-exposed IEC-6 crypt cells. As expected, the cell proliferation was not altered by PRL. Inasmuch as the mRNA expressions of villous cell markers, including dipeptidylpeptidase-4, lactase and glucose transporter-5, were not increased, PRL was not likely to enhance crypt cell differentiation into the absorptive villous cells. In contrast to the previous findings in villous cells, PRL was found to downregulate the expression of calbindin-D(9k), claudin-3 and occludin in IEC-6 crypt cells, while having no effect on transient receptor potential vanilloid family channels-5/6, plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA)-1b and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger-1 expression. In conclusion, IEC-6 crypt cells did not respond to PRL by increasing proliferation or differentiation into villous cells. The present results thus supported the previous hypothesis that PRL enhanced mineral absorption predominantly by increasing transporter expression and activity in the absorptive villous cells. PMID:22281785

  1. RAB and RHO GTPases regulate intestinal crypt cell homeostasis and enterocyte function.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Gao, Nan

    2016-04-01

    Recent human and mouse genetic studies have highlighted important contributions of several small GTPases, in particular Rab8a, (1) Cdc42, (2-4) and Rab11a, (5-8) to the proper morphogenesis and function of the mature intestinal epithelia. Additional insights about the involvement of these factors in maintaining intestinal stem cell homeostasis have also been obtained. (9,10) These studies suggest a conserved vesicular and membrane trafficking program utilized by the gastrointestinal tissue to support the rapid epithelial cell turnover and the highly sophisticated physiology of mature epithelial cells. PMID:27142493

  2. Crypts, villi and microvilli in the small intestine of the rat. A stereological study of their variability within and between animals.

    PubMed Central

    Mayhew, T M; Middleton, C

    1985-01-01

    Small intestines from normal adult rats were quantified by optical and electron microscopy using stereological principles devised for the purpose. Five segments per bowel were examined. Baseline data characterising villi, microvilli and crypts of Lieberkühn were used to study differences between segments and between animals. Intestines fixed by in situ perfusion had, on average, 100 cm2 of primary mucosa. This basic surface was amplified to 500 cm2 by villi and to 1 m2 by the microvilli of enterocytes. Villous and microvillous surface areas may scale to body weight in the same way as metabolic requirements. Proximodistal gradients in mucosal architecture existed for the volumes and surface areas of villi and for the numbers, lengths, diameters and surface areas of microvilli. Most variables were higher proximally and declined towards the terminal ileum. The volume of crypts stayed constant throughout the entire intestine and ratios between villous dimensions (volumes and surface areas) and crypt volume did not vary between animals. Findings are discussed in the context of regional differences in bowel function and of their relevance to studies of epithelial kinetics. PMID:4077708

  3. Serum and fecal canine α1-proteinase inhibitor concentrations reflect the severity of intestinal crypt abscesses and/or lacteal dilation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, Romy M; Parnell, Nolie K; Grützner, Niels; Mansell, Joanne; Berghoff, Nora; Schellenberg, Stefan; Reusch, Claudia E; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) protein loss, due to lymphangiectasia or chronic inflammation, can be challenging to diagnose. This study evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of serum and fecal canine α1-proteinase inhibitor (cα1PI) concentrations to detect crypt abscesses and/or lacteal dilation in dogs. Serum and fecal cα1PI concentrations were measured in 120 dogs undergoing GI tissue biopsies, and were compared between dogs with and without crypt abscesses/lacteal dilation. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for dichotomous outcomes. Serial serum cα1PI concentrations were also evaluated in 12 healthy corticosteroid-treated dogs. Serum cα1PI and albumin concentrations were significantly lower in dogs with crypt abscesses and/or lacteal dilation than in those without (both P <0.001), and more severe lesions were associated with lower serum cα1PI concentrations, higher 3 days-mean fecal cα1PI concentrations, and lower serum/fecal cα1PI ratios. Serum and fecal cα1PI, and their ratios, distinguished dogs with moderate or severe GI crypt abscesses/lacteal dilation from dogs with only mild or none such lesions with moderate sensitivity (56-92%) and specificity (67-81%). Serum cα1PI concentrations increased during corticosteroid administration. We conclude that serum and fecal α1PI concentrations reflect the severity of intestinal crypt abscesses/lacteal dilation in dogs. Due to its specificity for the GI tract, measurement of fecal cα1PI appears to be superior to serum cα1PI for diagnosing GI protein loss in dogs. In addition, the serum/fecal cα1PI ratio has an improved accuracy in hypoalbuminemic dogs, but serum cα1PI concentrations should be carefully interpreted in corticosteroid-treated dogs. PMID:26631946

  4. Stem cell factor enhances the survival of murine intestinal stem cells after photon irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, B.R.; Khan, W.; Hancock, S.L.

    1995-04-01

    Recombinant rat stem cell factor (SCF) has been shown to decrease lethality in mice exposed to total-body irradiation (TBI) in the lower range of lethality through radioprotection of hematopoietic stem cells and acceleration of bone marrow repopulation. This study evaluates the effect of SCF on the survival of the intestinal mucosal stem cell after TBI. This non-hematopoietic cell is clinically relevant. Gastrointestinal toxicity is common during and after abdominal and pelvic radiation therapy and limits the radiation dose in these regions. As observed with bone marrow, the administration of SCF to mice prior to TBI enhanced the survival of mouse duodenal crypt stem cells. The maximum enhancement of survival was seen when 100 {mu}/kg of SCF was given intraperitoneally 8 h before irradiation. This regimen increased the survival of duodenal crypt stem cells after 12.0 Gy TBI from 22.5 {+-} 0.7 per duodenal cross section for controls to 30.0 {+-} 1.7 after treatment with SCF (P=0.03). The TBI dose producing 50% mortality of 6 days (LD{sub 50/6}) was increased from 14.9 Gy for control mice to 19.0 Gy for mice treated with SCF (dose modification factor = 1.28). These findings demonstrate that SCF (dose modification factor = 1.28). These findings demonstrate that SCF has radioprotective effects on a non-hematopoietic stem cell population and suggest that SCF may be of clinical value in preventing radiation injury to the intestine. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Combined changes in Wnt signaling response and contact inhibition induce altered proliferation in radiation-treated intestinal crypts

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, S.-J.; Osborne, J. M.; Appleton, P. L.; Näthke, I.

    2016-01-01

    Curative intervention is possible if colorectal cancer is identified early, underscoring the need to detect the earliest stages of malignant transformation. A candidate biomarker is the expanded proliferative zone observed in crypts before adenoma formation, also found in irradiated crypts. However, the underlying driving mechanism for this is not known. Wnt signaling is a key regulator of proliferation, and elevated Wnt signaling is implicated in cancer. Nonetheless, how cells differentiate Wnt signals of varying strengths is not understood. We use computational modeling to compare alternative hypotheses about how Wnt signaling and contact inhibition affect proliferation. Direct comparison of simulations with published experimental data revealed that the model that best reproduces proliferation patterns in normal crypts stipulates that proliferative fate and cell cycle duration are set by the Wnt stimulus experienced at birth. The model also showed that the broadened proliferation zone induced by tumorigenic radiation can be attributed to cells responding to lower Wnt concentrations and dividing at smaller volumes. Application of the model to data from irradiated crypts after an extended recovery period permitted deductions about the extent of the initial insult. Application of computational modeling to experimental data revealed how mechanisms that control cell dynamics are altered at the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. PMID:27053661

  6. Combined changes in Wnt signaling response and contact inhibition induce altered proliferation in radiation-treated intestinal crypts.

    PubMed

    Dunn, S-J; Osborne, J M; Appleton, P L; Näthke, I

    2016-06-01

    Curative intervention is possible if colorectal cancer is identified early, underscoring the need to detect the earliest stages of malignant transformation. A candidate biomarker is the expanded proliferative zone observed in crypts before adenoma formation, also found in irradiated crypts. However, the underlying driving mechanism for this is not known. Wnt signaling is a key regulator of proliferation, and elevated Wnt signaling is implicated in cancer. Nonetheless, how cells differentiate Wnt signals of varying strengths is not understood. We use computational modeling to compare alternative hypotheses about how Wnt signaling and contact inhibition affect proliferation. Direct comparison of simulations with published experimental data revealed that the model that best reproduces proliferation patterns in normal crypts stipulates that proliferative fate and cell cycle duration are set by the Wnt stimulus experienced at birth. The model also showed that the broadened proliferation zone induced by tumorigenic radiation can be attributed to cells responding to lower Wnt concentrations and dividing at smaller volumes. Application of the model to data from irradiated crypts after an extended recovery period permitted deductions about the extent of the initial insult. Application of computational modeling to experimental data revealed how mechanisms that control cell dynamics are altered at the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. PMID:27053661

  7. Effect of enzyme supplementation of a rye-based diet on xylanase activity in the small intestine of broilers, on intestinal crypt cell proliferation and on nutrient digestibility and growth performance of the birds.

    PubMed

    Silva, S S P; Smithard, R R

    2002-05-01

    1. A study was undertaken to investigate the susceptibility to peptic digestion of exogenous xylanase (EC 3.2.1.8) from Trichoderma longibrachiatum, added to a rye-based diet for broiler chickens, in order to elucidate its possible site of action. 2. It was also designed to investigate the effects of the enzyme (plus exogenous protease EC 3.4-24.28) when added to a rye-containing diet (60% rye/kg diet) on crypt cell proliferation in the mucosa of the small intestine, on short chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations in the small intestine digesta and in portal blood and on nutrient digestibilities. 3. In Experiment 1, the enzymes were added at activities 10x and 30x those recommended in commercial practice, but in Experiment 2 the activities were the recommended levels. 4. A significant proportion (estimated to be 15 to 20%) of the xylanase added at the higher concentration (15,000 and 45,000 units/kg diet) remained active in the small intestine of the growing chicken. 5. The crypt cell proliferation rate in birds fed on the control diet (45 cells/2 h) was significantly higher than in birds fed on the diets supplemented with enzyme at the higher level (29 and 33 cells/ 2 h), but there was no significant effect on SCFA. In birds fed on the diet supplemented with enzyme at the commercial level there was no clear-cut effect on crypt cell proliferation but exogenous xylanase could be detected in the small intestine. Intestinal fluid viscosity was reduced and growth performance of the birds was improved by the supplementation with exogenous enzymes. 6. Part of the improvement in growth performance could be ascribed to a 25% increase in the digestibility of nitrogen and a doubling of the digestibility of fat. PMID:12047093

  8. Survival of nisin activity in intestinal environment.

    PubMed

    Reunanen, J; Saris, P E J

    2009-08-01

    The sensitivity of nisin to proteolytical breakdown in intestinal environment was studied in an ex vivo model using jejunal chyme from fistulated dogs. Sixty six percentage of the added nisin retained induction activity after 30 min incubation in jejunal chyme, indicating that nisin has potential to be used as an inducing agent in in situ delivery systems of bioactive peptides and proteins by genetically modified bacteria in the intestine. PMID:19365605

  9. Lawsonia intracellularis infection of intestinal crypt cells is associated with specific depletion of secreted MUC2 in goblet cells

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Rebecca J.; MacIntyre, Neil; Guthrie, Jack; Wilson, Alison D.; Finlayson, Heather; Matika, Oswald; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Smith, Sionagh H.; Archibald, Alan L.; Ait-Ali, Tahar

    2015-01-01

    The expression patterns of secreted (MUC2 and MUC5AC) and membrane-tethered (MUC1, MUC4, MUC12 and MUC13) mucins were monitored in healthy pigs and pigs challenged orally with Lawsonia intracellularis. These results showed that the regulation of mucin gene expression is distinctive along the GI tract of the healthy pig, and may reflect an association between the function of the mucin subtypes and different physiological demands at various sites. We identified a specific depletion of secreted MUC2 from goblet cells in infected pigs that correlated with the increased level of intracellular bacteria in crypt cells. We concluded that L. intracellularis may influence MUC2 production, thereby altering the mucus barrier and enabling cellular invasion. PMID:26377360

  10. Lawsonia intracellularis infection of intestinal crypt cells is associated with specific depletion of secreted MUC2 in goblet cells.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Rebecca J; MacIntyre, Neil; Guthrie, Jack; Wilson, Alison D; Finlayson, Heather; Matika, Oswald; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Smith, Sionagh H; Archibald, Alan L; Ait-Ali, Tahar

    2015-11-15

    The expression patterns of secreted (MUC2 and MUC5AC) and membrane-tethered (MUC1, MUC4, MUC12 and MUC13) mucins were monitored in healthy pigs and pigs challenged orally with Lawsonia intracellularis. These results showed that the regulation of mucin gene expression is distinctive along the GI tract of the healthy pig, and may reflect an association between the function of the mucin subtypes and different physiological demands at various sites. We identified a specific depletion of secreted MUC2 from goblet cells in infected pigs that correlated with the increased level of intracellular bacteria in crypt cells. We concluded that L. intracellularis may influence MUC2 production, thereby altering the mucus barrier and enabling cellular invasion. PMID:26377360

  11. The effect of hyperthermia on the radiation response of crypt cells in mouse jejunum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of hyperthermia and/or gamma-radiation on the survival of intestinal crypt cells was studied in BDF sub 1 mice using a microcolony assay. Hyperthermia treatments, which in themselves caused no detectable cell lethality, inhibited the capacity of crypt cells to repair sublethal radiation damage. In addition, heat applied either before or after single radiation exposures potentiated lethal damage to crypt cells; the degree of enhancement was dependent on the time interval between treatments. At the levels of heating employed, DNA synthesis in the intestinal epithelium was significantly reduced immediately following exposure, but returned rapidly to normal levels. No further disturbances in cellular kinetics were observed for up to 10 days after heating.

  12. Different effects of short- and long-chained fructans on large intestinal physiology and carcinogen-induced aberrant crypt foci in rats.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Morten; Mølck, Anne-Marie; Jacobsen, Bodil Lund

    2002-01-01

    Inulin-type fructans, which are nondigestible carbohydrates, have been shown to modulate the number of induced preneoplastic lesions in the colon as well as the colonic microflora in laboratory animals. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of a short- and long-chained inulin-type fructan on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the rat colon. In addition, the present study investigated the influence of chain length, dietary level (5% or 15%), and duration of feeding (5 or 10 wk) on the following intestinal parameters supposed to be involved in the development of ACF: microflora, short-chain fatty acids, pH, and cell proliferation. A 3-wk pretreatment period with both fructans was included. Feeding the long-chained fructan (5% or 15%) significantly inhibited the numbers of small and total ACF after 5 and 10 wk. The short-chained fructan (15%) inhibited the number of small and total ACF after 5 and 10 wk but significantly increased the numbers of medium and large ACF after 10 wk. In conclusion, the effect on ACF outcome was influenced by the chain length of the fructans. PMID:12416260

  13. Hydrolysed inulin alleviates the azoxymethane-induced preneoplastic aberrant crypt foci by altering selected intestinal microbiota in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Pattananandecha, Thanawat; Sirilun, Sasithorn; Duangjitcharoen, Yodsawee; Sivamaruthi, Bhagavathi Sundaram; Suwannalert, Prasit; Peerajan, Sartjin; Chaiyasut, Chaiyavat

    2016-09-01

    Context Inulin, a non-digestible carbohydrate isolated from Helianthus tuberosus L. (Asteraceae), has been shown to alter the gut beneficial bacteria including Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacteria. Inulin also influences the activities of intestinal microbiota that could prevent the colon cancer development. Objective This study determines the effect of hydrolysed inulin with different degrees of polymerisation on alteration of intestinal microbiota and their activities on azoxymethane (AOM)-induced preneoplastic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. Materials and methods Seventy-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups (three control and three AOM-treated groups) and the animal were fed with either a normal diet or diet containing 10% of long-chain inulin (InuL) or short-chain inulin (InuS), respectively, for 17 weeks. Colon cancer was induced in rats by injecting AOM subcutaneously at the 8th and 9th week of the study period. At the end of the experiment, cecal contents of rats were examined for selected microbiota, organic acids, putrefactive compounds and microbial enzymes. ACF formation was microscopically examined. Results The inulin diets significantly increased the weight and decreased the pH of the caecal content. The rats fed with InuL-supplemented diet showed approximately 2.9- and 6.8-fold increases in the biomass of Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacteria, respectively. Naive and AOM-treated rats fed with inulin-supplemented diet showed ∼1.3- and ∼2.2-fold decreases in the biomass of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, respectively. Inulins significantly decreased the colonic concentration of phenol, p-cresol and indole. Reduction in the activity of microbial enzymes such as β-glucuronidase, azoreductase and nitroreductase were observed in inulin-treated animals. Reduction in the ACF formation has been observed in inulin-treated groups. Discussion and conclusion The present study demonstrates that dietary

  14. Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients. PMID:26755265

  15. The Somatostatin Analog SOM230 (Pasireotide) Ameliorates Injury of the Intestinal Mucosa and Increases Survival after Total-Body Irradiation by Inhibiting Exocrine Pancreatic Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiang; Berbée, Maaike; Boerma, Marjan; Wang, Junru; Schmid, Herbert A.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Somatostatin analogs ameliorate intestinal injury after localized irradiation. This study investigated whether SOM230, a novel, metabolically stable analog with broad receptor affinity, reduces intestinal injury and lethality in mice exposed to total-body irradiation (TBI). Male CD2F1 mice were exposed to 7–15 Gy TBI. Twice-daily administration of SOM230 (1, 4 or 10 mg/kg per day) or vehicle was started either 2 days before or 4 h after TBI and continued for either 14 or 21 days. Parameters of intestinal and hematopoietic radiation injury, bacterial translocation, and circulating cytokine levels were assessed. Animal survival was monitored for up to 30 days. SOM230 increased survival (P < 0.001) and prolonged survival time (P < 0.001) whether administration was initiated before or after TBI. There was no benefit from administration for 21 compared to 14 days. The survival benefit of SOM230 was completely reversed by co-administration of pancreatic enzymes (P = 0.009). Consistent with the presumed non-cytoprotective mechanism of action, SOM230 did not influence hematopoietic injury or intestinal crypt lethality. However, SOM230 preserved mucosal surface area (P < 0.001) and reduced bacterial translocation in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.001). Circulating IL-12 levels were reduced in SOM230-treated mice (P = 0.007). No toxicity from SOM230 was observed. SOM230 enhances animal survival whether administration begins before or after TBI; i.e., it is effective both as a protector and as a mitigator. The mechanism likely involves reduction of intraluminal pancreatic enzymes. Because of its efficacy and favorable safety profile, SOM230 is a promising countermeasure against radiation and should undergo further development. PMID:19580476

  16. Radioprotector WR-2721 and mitigating peptidoglycan synergistically promote mouse survival through the amelioration of intestinal and bone marrow damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Qiu; Wu, Shu; Xia, Xiaochun; Wu, Anqing; Cui, Fengmei; Gu, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Xueguang; Cao, Jianping

    2015-03-01

    The identification of an agent effective for the treatment of intestinal and bone marrow injury following radiation exposure remains a major issue in radiological medicine. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic impact of single agent or combination treatments with 2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylsulphanyl phosphonic acid (WR-2721) and peptidoglycan (PGN, a toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) agonist) on radiation-induced injury of the intestine and bone marrow in lethally irradiated male C57BL/6 mice. A dose of 3 mg of WR-2721 per mouse (167 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was given 30 min before irradiation, and 30 μg of PGN per mouse (1.7 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 24 h after 10 Gy irradiation. Bone marrow cluster of differentiation (CD)45(+) and CD34(+) markers of multiple haematopoietic lineages, number of granulocyte-erythroid-macrophage-megakaryocyte (GEMM) progenitor colonies, bone marrow histopathology, leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) expression in the intestines, xylose absorption and intestinal histopathology were all assessed at various time-points after irradiation. Furthermore, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 protein in the ileum was stained by immunofluorescent labelling. PGN-treated irradiated mice showed an increase in CD45(+)CD34(+) cells compared with untreated mice 1.25 days after 10 Gy ionizing radiation (IR) (P < 0.05). Furthermore, combined PGN and WR-2721 treatment had an obviously synergistic radio-protective effect in nucleated cells in the bone marrow, including GEMM progenitors and CD45(+)CD34(+) cells 4 days after 10 Gy IR. Single agent PGN or WR-2721 treatment after 10 Gy IR clearly increased Lgr5-positive pit cells (P < 0.05) and xylose absorption (P < 0.05). However only PGN and WR-2721 combination treatment markedly increased villus height (P < 0.05), number of crypts (P < 0.05) and whole-body weights after 10 Gy whole-body irradiation (WBI). The NF-κB p65 subunit was translocated to the

  17. Novel Regenerative Peptide TP508 Mitigates Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Damage By Activating Stem Cells and Preserving Crypt Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Kantara, Carla; Moya, Stephanie M.; Houchen, Courtney W.; Umar, Shahid; Ullrich, Robert L.; Singh, Pomila; Carney, Darrell H.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, increasing threats of radiation exposure and nuclear disasters have become a significant concern for the United States and countries worldwide. Exposure to high doses of radiation triggers a number of potentially lethal effects. Among the most severe is the gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity syndrome caused by the destruction of the intestinal barrier, resulting in bacterial translocation, systemic bacteremia, sepsis and death. The lack of effective radioprotective agents capable of mitigating radiation-induced damage has prompted a search for novel countermeasures that can mitigate the effects of radiation post-exposure, accelerate tissue repair in radiation-exposed individuals, and prevent mortality. We report that a single injection of regenerative peptide TP508 (rusalatide acetate, Chrysalin®) 24h after lethal radiation exposure (9Gy, LD100/15) appears to significantly increase survival and delay mortality by mitigating radiation-induced intestinal and colonic toxicity. TP508 treatment post-exposure prevents the disintegration of gastrointestinal crypts, stimulates the expression of adherens junction protein E-cadherin, activates crypt cell proliferation, and decreases apoptosis. TP508 post-exposure treatment also up-regulates the expression of DCLK1 and LGR5 markers of stem cells that have been shown to be responsible for maintaining and regenerating intestinal crypts. Thus, TP508 appears to mitigate the effects of GI toxicity by activating radioresistant stem cells and increasing the stemness potential of crypts to maintain and restore intestinal integrity. These results suggest that TP508 may be an effective emergency nuclear countermeasure that could be delivered within 24h post-exposure to increase survival and delay mortality, giving victims time to reach clinical sites for advanced medical treatment. PMID:26280221

  18. mTOR disruption causes intestinal epithelial cell defects and intestinal atrophy postinjury in mice.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Leesa L; Davis, Ashley K; Grogg, Matthew W; Zheng, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) drive small intestinal epithelial homeostasis and regeneration. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates stem and progenitor cell metabolism and is frequently dysregulated in human disease, but its physiologic functions in the mammalian small intestinal epithelium remain poorly defined. We disrupted the genes mTOR, Rptor, Rictor, or both Rptor and Rictor in mouse ISCs, progenitors, and differentiated intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) using Villin-Cre. Mutant tissues and wild-type or heterozygous littermate controls were analyzed by histologic immunostaining, immunoblots, and proliferation assays. A total of 10 Gy irradiation was used to injure the intestinal epithelium and induce subsequent crypt regeneration. We report that mTOR supports absorptive enterocytes and secretory Paneth and goblet cell function while negatively regulating chromogranin A-positive enteroendocrine cell number. Through additional Rptor, Rictor, and Rptor/Rictor mutant mouse models, we identify mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 as the major IEC regulatory pathway, but mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 also contributes to ileal villus maintenance and goblet cell size. Homeostatic adult small intestinal crypt cell proliferation, survival, and canonical wingless-int (WNT) activity are not mTOR dependent, but Olfm4(+) ISC/progenitor population maintenance and crypt regeneration postinjury require mTOR. Overall, we conclude that mTOR regulates multiple IEC lineages and promotes stem and progenitor cell activity during intestinal epithelium repair postinjury. PMID:26631481

  19. [A case of total intestinal aganglionosis. 2 years of survival].

    PubMed

    López Gútiérrez, J C; de Agustín, J C; Murcia, J; Carrero, C; Muguerza, R; Soto, C; Utrilla, J G; Lassaletta, L

    1991-10-01

    A two-year-old male is presented. Small bowel aganglionosis was proved to extend to 3 cm below ligament of Treitz. Gastrostomy and ileostomy was done. He received his caloric intake by cyclic home parenteral nutrition trough implantable venous system. At eighteen months of age, intestinal transplantation was refused and reoperation was done. The child underwent Ziegler's miotomymiectomy on 60 cm of aganglionic jejunum. Now at twenty seven months of age he receives cyclic parenteral nutrition, and enteral feedings are being increased slowly. The weight/height was at 91 per 100 standard, intestinal motility appears much better on contrast study and he is developmentally a normal child. PMID:1760266

  20. Teduglutide ([Gly2]GLP-2) protects small intestinal stem cells from radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Booth, C; Booth, D; Williamson, S; Demchyshyn, L L; Potten, C S

    2004-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 and its dipeptidyl peptidase (DP-IV) resistant analogue teduglutide are trophic for the gastrointestinal epithelium. Exposure increases villus height and crypt size and results in increased overall intestinal weight. As these effects may be mediated through stimulation of the stem cell compartment, they may promote intestinal healing and act as potential anti-mucositis agents in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy. A study was initiated to investigate the protective effects of teduglutide on the murine small intestinal epithelium following gamma-irradiation using the crypt microcolony assay as a measure of stem cell survival and functional competence. Teduglutide demonstrated intestinotrophic effects in both CD1 and BDF1 mouse strains. In BDF1 mice, subcutaneous injection of GLP-2 or teduglutide (0.2 mg/kg/day, b.i.d.) for 14 days increased intestinal weight by 28% and resulted in comparable increases in crypt size, villus height and area. Teduglutide given daily for 6 or 14 days prior to whole body, gamma-irradiation significantly increased crypt stem cell survival when compared with vehicle-treated controls. The mean levels of protection over a range of doses provided protection factors from 1.3 to 1.5. A protective effect was only observed when teduglutide was given before irradiation. These results suggest that teduglutide has the ability to modulate clonogenic stem cell survival in the small intestine and this may have a useful clinical application in the prevention of cancer therapy-induced mucositis. PMID:15548172

  1. [The megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome: apropos of a case with prolonged survival].

    PubMed

    Magaña Pintiado, M I; Al-Kassam Martínez, M; Bousoño García, C; Ramos Polo, E; Gómez Alvarez, M E

    2008-01-01

    Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a severe congenital disease with autosomal recessive inheritance, characterized by vesical distension and intestinal hypoperistalsis what causes intestinal obstruction in newborn, with other abnormalities associated. It presents a low incidence, about a hundred cases are reported in the bibliography. Life expectancy doesn't reach a year because of the sepsis failure generally. In our study the survival is higher than the majority of the cases reported, with good cuality of life and acceptable ponderal development. Home parenteral nutrition with the following and multidisciplinary collaboration in a strict way, establish the success' key in this pathology. PMID:19160903

  2. ERK-associated changes in E2F4 phosphorylation, localization and transcriptional activity during mitogenic stimulation in human intestinal epithelial crypt cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The transcription factor E2F4 controls proliferation of normal and cancerous intestinal epithelial cells. E2F4 localization in normal human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC) is cell cycle-dependent, being cytoplasmic in quiescent differentiated cells but nuclear in proliferative cells. However, the intracellular signaling mechanisms regulating such E2F4 localization remain unknown. Results Treatment of quiescent HIEC with serum induced ERK1/2 activation, E2F4 phosphorylation, E2F4 nuclear translocation and G1/S phase transition while inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling by U0126 prevented these events. Stimulation of HIEC with epidermal growth factor (EGF) also led to the activation of ERK1/2 but, in contrast to serum or lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), EGF failed to induce E2F4 phosphorylation, E2F4 nuclear translocation and G1/S phase transition. Furthermore, Akt and GSK3β phosphorylation levels were markedly enhanced in serum- or LPA-stimulated HIEC but not by EGF. Importantly, E2F4 phosphorylation, E2F4 nuclear translocation and G1/S phase transition were all observed in response to EGF when GSK3 activity was concomitantly inhibited by SB216763. Finally, E2F4 was found to be overexpressed, phosphorylated and nuclear localized in epithelial cells from human colorectal adenomas exhibiting mutations in APC and KRAS or BRAF genes, known to deregulate GSK3/β-catenin and MEK/ERK signaling, respectively. Conclusions The present results indicate that MEK/ERK activation and GSK3 inhibition are both required for E2F4 phosphorylation as well as its nuclear translocation and S phase entry in HIEC. This finding suggests that dysregulated E2F4 nuclear localization may be an instigating event leading to hyperproliferation and hence, of tumor initiation and promotion in the colon and rectum. PMID:23919615

  3. Using crypts as iris minutiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Feng; Flynn, Patrick J.

    2013-05-01

    Iris recognition is one of the most reliable biometric technologies for identity recognition and verification, but it has not been used in a forensic context because the representation and matching of iris features are not straightforward for traditional iris recognition techniques. In this paper we concentrate on the iris crypt as a visible feature used to represent the characteristics of irises in a similar way to fingerprint minutiae. The matching of crypts is based on their appearances and locations. The number of matching crypt pairs found between two irises can be used for identity verification and the convenience of manual inspection makes iris crypts a potential candidate for forensic applications.

  4. Survivability of Kudoa septempunctata in human intestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Takahiro; Fujiwara, Marina; Tomaru, Akiko; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko

    2016-06-01

    To elucidate whether Kudoa septempunctata was able to live in the human intestine, we assessed viability of K. septempunctata sporoplasms under conditions that mimicked human and ragworm digestive tracts. To study the effect of osmotic pressure on viability, sporoplasms were incubated in 0.9 or 3.4 % sodium chloride solutions, which roughly corresponded to the osmotic pressure in human or ragworm tissues, respectively. While viability in 3.4 % sodium chloride did not change after 72 h, it dropped to 21 % in 0.9 % sodium chloride. To study the effect of temperature on viability, sporoplasms were incubated at 37, 15, or 25 °C, which were representative of human, winter ragworm, or summer ragworm temperatures, respectively. Viability decreased sharply to 8.4 % after 48 h at 37 °C, but remained essentially unchanged at 15 and 25 °C. In addition, sporoplasms showed strong susceptibility to bile. These results indicate that K. septempunctata could not live in the human intestine for a long time. PMID:27038250

  5. Intestine-specific overexpression of IL-10 improves survival in polymicrobial sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Saju; Vyas, Dinesh; Clark, Andrew T; Woolsey, Cheryl A; Clark, Jessica A; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2007-01-01

    Targeted Interleukin (IL)-10 therapy improves survival in preclinical models of critical illness, and intestine-specific IL-10 decreases inflammation in models of chronic inflammatory disease. We therefore sought to determine whether intestine-specific overexpression of IL-10 would improve survival in sepsis. Transgenic mice that overexpress IL-10 in their gut epithelium (Fabpi-IL-10 mice) and wild type (WT) littermates (n=127) were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture with a 27-gauge needle. Seven-day survival was 45% in transgenic animals and 30% in WT animals (p≤0.05). Systemic levels of IL-10 were undetectable in both groups of animals under basal conditions and were elevated to a similar degree in septic animals, regardless of whether they expressed the transgene. Local parameters of injury including gut epithelial apoptosis, intestinal permeability, peritoneal lavage cytokines and stimulated cytokines from intraepithelial lymphocytes were similar between transgenic and wildtype mice. However, in stimulated splenocytes, pro-inflammatory cytokines MCP-1 (189 ± 43 pg/ml vs. 40 ± 8 pg/ml) and IL-6 (116 ± 28 pg/ml vs. 34 ± 9 pg/ml) were lower in Fabpi-IL-10 mice than WT littermates despite the intestine-specific nature of the transgene (p<0.05). Cytokine levels were similar in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid between the two groups as were circulating LPS levels. Transgenic mice also had lower white blood cell counts, associated with lower absolute neutrophil counts (0.5 ± 0.1 103/mm3 vs. 1.0 ± 0.2 103/mm3, p<0.05). These results indicate that gut-specific overexpression of IL-10 improves survival in a murine model of sepsis, and interactions between the intestinal epithelium and the systemic immune system may play a role in conferring this survival advantage. PMID:17998890

  6. Intestine-specific overexpression of IL-10 improves survival in polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Saju; Vyas, Dinesh; Clark, Andrew T; Woolsey, Cheryl A; Clark, Jessica A; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2008-04-01

    Targeted IL-10 therapy improves survival in preclinical models of critical illness, and intestine-specific IL-10 decreases inflammation in models of chronic Inflammatory disease. We therefore sought to determine whether intestine-specific overexpression of IL-10 would improve survival in sepsis. Transgenic mice that overexpress IL-10 in their gut epithelium (Fabpi-IL-10 mice) and wild-type (WT) littermates (n = 127) were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture with a 27-gauge needle. The 7-day survival rate was 45% in transgenic animals and 30% in WT animals (P < or = 0.05). Systemic levels of IL-10 were undetectable in both groups of animals under basal conditions and were elevated to a similar degree in septic animals regardless of whether they expressed the transgene. Local parameter of injury, including gut epithelial apoptosis, intestinal permeability, peritoneal lavage cytokines, and stimulated cytokines from intraepithelial lymphocytes, were similar between transgenic and WT mice. However, in stimulated splenocytes, proinflammatory cytokines monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (189 +/- 43 vs. 40 +/- 8 pg/mL) and IL-6 (116 +/- 28 vs. 34 +/- 9 pg/mL) were lower in Fabpi-IL-10 mice than WT littermates despite the intestine-specific nature of the transgene (P < 0.05). Cytokine levels were similar in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid between the 2 groups, as were circulating LPS levels. Transgenic mice also had lower white blood cell counts associated with lower absolute neutrophil counts (0.5 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.0 +/- 0.2 10(3)/mm3; P < 0.05). These results indicate that gut-specific overexpression of IL-10 improves survival in a murine model of sepsis, and interactions between the intestinal epithelium and the systemic immune system may play a role in conferring this survival advantage. PMID:17998890

  7. Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 Requires a Full Complement of Bmi-1 for Its Proliferative Effects in the Murine Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smither, Bradley R; Pang, Hilary Y M; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2016-07-01

    The intestinal hormone, glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), stimulates growth, survival, and function of the intestinal epithelium through increased crypt cell proliferation, and a long-acting analog has recently been approved to enhance intestinal capacity in patients with short bowel syndrome. The goal of the present study was to determine whether GLP-2-induced crypt cell proliferation requires a full complement of B-cell lymphoma Moloney murine leukemia virus insertion region-1 homolog (Bmi-1), using the Bmi-1(eGFP/+) mouse model in comparison with age- and sex-matched Bmi-1(+/+) littermates. Bmi-1 is a member of the polycomb-repressive complex family that promotes stem cell proliferation and self-renewal and is expressed by both stem cells and transit-amplifying (TA) cells in the crypt. The acute (6 h) and chronic (11 d) proliferative responses to long-acting human (Gly(2))GLP-2 in the crypt TA zone, but not in the active or reserve stem cell zones, were both impaired by Bmi-1 haploinsufficiency. Similarly, GLP-2-induced crypt regeneration after 10-Gy irradiation was reduced in the Bmi-1(eGFP/+) animals. Despite these findings, chronic GLP-2 treatment enhanced overall intestinal growth in the Bmi-1(eGFP/+) mice, as demonstrated by increases in small intestinal weight per body weight and in the length of the crypt-villus axis, in association with decreased apoptosis and an adaptive increase in crypt epithelial cell migration rate. The results of these studies therefore demonstrate that a full complement of Bmi-1 is required for the intestinal proliferative effects of GLP-2 in both the physiological and pathological setting, and mediates, at least in part, the proliferation kinetics of cells in the TA zone. PMID:27187177

  8. Lactobacillus probiotic protects intestinal epithelium from radiation injury in a TLR-2/cyclo-oxygenase-2-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Matthew A; Riehl, Terrence E; Rao, M Suprada; Moon, Clara; Ee, Xueping; Nava, Gerardo M; Walker, Monica R; Marinshaw, Jeffrey M; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S

    2011-01-01

    Background The small intestinal epithelium is highly sensitive to radiation and is a major site of injury during radiation therapy and environmental overexposure. Objective To examine probiotic bacteria as potential radioprotective agents in the intestine. Methods 8-week-old C57BL/6 wild-type or knockout mice were administered probiotic by gavage for 3 days before 12 Gy whole body radiation. The intestine was evaluated for cell-positional apoptosis (6 h) and crypt survival (84 h). Results Gavage of 5×107 Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) improved crypt survival about twofold (p<0.01); the effect was observed when administered before, but not after, radiation. Conditioned medium (CM) from LGG improved crypt survival (1.95-fold, p<0.01), and both LGG and LGG-CM reduced epithelial apoptosis particularly at the crypt base (33% to 18%, p<0.01). LGG was detected in the distal ileal contents after the gavage cycle, but did not lead to a detectable shift in bacterial family composition. The reduction in epithelial apoptosis and improved crypt survival offered by LGG was lost in MyD88−/−, TLR-2−/− and cyclo-oxygenase-2−/− (COX-2) mice but not TLR-4−/− mice. LGG administration did not lead to increased jejunal COX-2 mRNA or prostaglandin E2 levels or a change in number of COX-2-expressing cells. However, a location shift was observed in constitutively COX-2-expressing cells of the lamina propria from the villi to a position near the crypt base (villi to crypt ratio 80:20 for control and 62:38 for LGG; p<0.001). Co-staining revealed these COX-2-expressing small intestinal lamina propria cells to be mesenchymal stem cells. Conclusions LGG or its CM reduce radiation-induced epithelial injury and improve crypt survival. A TLR-2/MyD88 signalling mechanism leading to repositioning of constitutive COX-2-expressing mesenchymal stem cells to the crypt base is invoked. PMID:22027478

  9. Protective effect of an herbal preparation (HemoHIM) on radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Ho; Lee, Hae June; Kim, Joong Sun; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Jong Choon; Park, Hae-Ran; Jung, Uhee; Jang, Jong Sik; Jo, Sung Kee

    2009-12-01

    The protective properties of an herbal preparation (HemoHIM) against intestinal damage were examined by evaluating its effects on jejunal crypt survival, morphological changes, and apoptosis in gamma-irradiated mice. The mice were whole-body irradiated with 12 Gy for the examination of jejunal crypt survival and any morphological changes and with 2 Gy for the detection of apoptosis and Ki-67 labeling. Irradiation was conducted using (60)Co gamma-rays. HemoHIM treatment was administered intraperitonially at a dosage of 50 mg/kg of body weight at 36 and 12 hours pre-irradiation and 30 minutes post-irradiation or orally at a dosage of 250 mg/kg of body weight/day for 7 or 11 days before necropsy. The HemoHIM-treated group displayed a significant increase in survival of jejunal crypts, when compared to the irradiation controls. HemoHIM treatment decreased intestinal morphological changes such as crypt depth, villus height, mucosal length, and basal lamina length of 10 enterocytes after irradiation. Furthermore, the administration of HemoHIM protected intestinal cells from irradiation-induced apoptosis. These results suggested that HemoHIM may be therapeutically useful to reduce intestinal injury following irradiation. PMID:20041793

  10. Oxytocin evokes a pulsatile PGE2 release from ileum mucosa and is required for repair of intestinal epithelium after injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dawei; Zhao, Junhan; Wang, Haoyi; An, Ning; Zhou, Yuping; Fan, Jiahui; Luo, Junwen; Su, Wenlong; Liu, Chuanyong; Li, Jingxin

    2015-01-01

    We measured the short-circuit current (Isc) in rat ileum mucosa to identify the effect of oxytocin (OT) on mucosal secretion in small intestine. We identified a COX-2-derived pulsatile PGE2 release triggered by OT in rat ileum mucosa. OT receptors (OTR) are expressed in intestine crypt epithelial cells. Notably, OT evoked a dynamic change of [Ca2+]i in ileum crypts, which was responsible for this pulsatile release of PGE2. OT ameliorated 5-FU-, radiation- or DSS- induced injury in vivo, including the improvement of weight loss, reduced villus height and impaired survival of crypt transit-amplifying cells as well as crypt. Moreover, these protective effects of OT against intestinal injury were eliminated by coadministration of a selective inhibitor of PGE2, AH6809. Our findings strongly suggest that OT, a novel and important regulator of intestine mucosa barrier, is required for repair of intestinal epithelium after injury. Considering that OT is an FDA-approved drug, this work reveals a potential novel and safe way to combat or prevent chemo-radiotherapy induced intestine injury or to treat IBD. PMID:26159321

  11. Cell Organisation in the Colonic Crypt: A Theoretical Comparison of the Pedigree and Niche Concepts

    PubMed Central

    van der Wath, Richard C.; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Burgess, Antony W.; Smith, David W.

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa is a monolayer of rapidly self-renewing epithelial cells which is not only responsible for absorption of water and nutrients into the bloodstream but also acts as a protective barrier against harmful microbes entering the body. New functional epithelial cells are produced from stem cells, and their proliferating progeny. These stem cells are found within millions of crypts (tubular pits) spaced along the intestinal tract. The entire intestinal epithelium is replaced every 2–3 days in mice (3–5 days in humans) and hence cell production, differentiation, migration and turnover need to be tightly regulated. Malfunctions in this regulation are strongly linked to inflammatory bowel diseases and to the formation of adenomas and ultimately cancerous tumours. Despite a great deal of biological experimentation and observation, precisely how colonic crypts are regulated to produce mature colonocytes remains unclear. To assist in understanding how cell organisation in crypts is achieved, two very different conceptual models of cell behaviour are developed here, referred to as the ‘pedigree’ and the ‘niche’ models. The pedigree model proposes that crypt cells are largely preprogrammed and receive minimal prompting from the environment as they move through a routine of cell differentiation and proliferation to become mature colonocytes. The niche model proposes that crypt cells are primarily influenced by the local microenvironments along the crypt, and that predetermined cell behaviour plays a negligible role in their development. In this paper we present a computational model of colonic crypts in the mouse, which enables a comparison of the quality and controllability of mature coloncyte production by crypts operating under these two contrasting conceptual models of crypt regulation. PMID:24069177

  12. Membrane distribution of sodium-hydrogen and chloride-bicarbonate exchangers in crypt and villus cell membranes from rabbit ileum.

    PubMed Central

    Knickelbein, R G; Aronson, P S; Dobbins, J W

    1988-01-01

    Present evidence suggests that in the small intestine, villus cells are primarily absorptive and crypt cells are primarily secretory. In order to further confirm that there are differences in transport properties between villus and crypt cells, we have separated villus from crypt cells, using calcium chelations techniques, and determined the distribution of Na:H and Cl:HCO3 exchange activity on brush border membrane and basolateral membrane preparations from these two cell populations. Separation of cells was determined utilizing alkaline phosphatase and maltase activity as a marker of villus cells and thymidine kinase activity as a marker of crypt cells. Utilizing these techniques, we were able to sequentially collect cells along the villus-crypt axis. Na-stimulated glucose and alanine uptake in brush border membrane vesicles diminished from the villus to the crypt region in the sequentially collected cells fractions, further suggesting separation of these cells. Brush border and basolateral membranes were then prepared from cells from the villus and crypt areas, utilizing a continuous sucrose gradient. In the villus cells, Na:H exchange activity was found associated with both the brush border and basolateral membrane, whereas, in crypt cells, Na:H exchange activity was only found on the basolateral membrane. Cl:HCO3 exchange activity was found only on the brush border membrane, in both villus and crypt cells. These studies suggest functional heterogeneity in ion transport between villus and crypt cells. PMID:2848868

  13. Survival of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota in the intestines of healthy Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ran; Chen, Shanbin; Jin, Junhua; Ren, Fazheng; Li, Yang; Qiao, Zhenxing; Wang, Yue; Zhao, Liang

    2015-05-01

    Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS) is a widely used probiotic strain with health benefits. In this study, the survival of LcS in the intestines of healthy Chinese adults was assessed and the effects of LcS on stool consistency, stool SCFAs and intestinal microbiota evaluated. Subjects consumed 100 mL per day of a probiotic beverage containing 1.0 × 10(8) CFU/mL of LcS for 14 days. LcS were enumerated using a culture method and the colony identity confirmed by ELISA. Fourteen days after ingestion, the amount of LcS recovered from fecal samples was between 6.86 ± 0.80 and 7.17 ± 0.57 Log10 CFU/g of feces (mean ± SD). The intestinal microbiotas were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Principal component analysis showed that consuming LcS significantly changed fecal microbiota profiles. According to redundancy analysis, the amounts of 25 bacterial strains were significantly correlated with LcS intake (P < 0.05), 11 of them positively and fourteen negatively. Concentrations of acetic acid and propionic acid in feces were significantly lower during the ingestion period than during the baseline period (P < 0.05). These results confirm that LcS can survive passage through the gastrointestinal tract of Chinese people; however, they were found to have little ability to persist once their consumption had ceased. Furthermore, consumption of probiotic beverages containing LcS can modulate the composition of the intestinal microbiota on a long-term basis, resulting in decreased concentrations of SCFAs in the gut. PMID:25707300

  14. Survival and passage of ingested New Zealand mudsnails through the intestinal tract of rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bruce, R. Louise; Moffitt, Christine M.; Dennis, Brian

    2009-01-01

    We conducted laboratory trials to determine the transit time and survival of New Zealand mudsnails Potamopyrgus antipodarum in the gastrointestinal tract of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. To assess the rate of snail passage, we force-fed groups of fish a known quantity of snails and then held them in tanks. At selected intervals we removed individual fish from the test tanks and recorded the number of snails, their condition (live or dead), and their location in the gastrointestinal tract (stomach, anterior intestine, and posterior intestine). Feces were removed from tanks and examined for live snails. We repeated evaluations of passage rate and snail survival to determine the effects of varying the number of snails ingested, fish size, snail size, and feeding a commercial diet to fish after snail ingestion. We plotted and modeled gut evacuation using a stochastic model for ordinal data to consider each test variable. Snail passage rates were faster in fish that were fed smaller snails. Surprisingly, fish fed snails and then administered rations of commercial fish feed retained the snails longer in their stomach than did fish that were not administered fish feeds after being fed snails. Increased retention time of snails in the stomach decreased the probability of snail survival when voided in fecal material. Snails that passed through the gastrointestinal tract within 12–24 h of ingestion were often recovered live in fecal samples. However, no live snails were recovered from the posterior intestine or fecal material collected 24 h after ingestion. Using our results we propose potential management options that could reduce the risks of introducing live snails into new locations when stocking fish from infested hatcheries.

  15. Fasting protects mice from lethal DNA damage by promoting small intestinal epithelial stem cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Tinkum, Kelsey L.; Stemler, Kristina M.; White, Lynn S.; Loza, Andrew J.; Jeter-Jones, Sabrina; Michalski, Basia M.; Kuzmicki, Catherine; Pless, Robert; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Short-term fasting protects mice from lethal doses of chemotherapy through undetermined mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that fasting preserves small intestinal (SI) architecture by maintaining SI stem cell viability and SI barrier function following exposure to high-dose etoposide. Nearly all SI stem cells were lost in fed mice, whereas fasting promoted sufficient SI stem cell survival to preserve SI integrity after etoposide treatment. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple SI stem cell populations, marked by Lgr5, Bmi1, or HopX expression, contributed to fasting-induced survival. DNA repair and DNA damage response genes were elevated in SI stem/progenitor cells of fasted etoposide-treated mice, which importantly correlated with faster resolution of DNA double-strand breaks and less apoptosis. Thus, fasting preserved SI stem cell viability as well as SI architecture and barrier function suggesting that fasting may reduce host toxicity in patients undergoing dose intensive chemotherapy. PMID:26644583

  16. Synbiotic approach restores intestinal homeostasis and prolongs survival in leukaemic mice with cachexia.

    PubMed

    Bindels, Laure B; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Claus, Sandrine P; Le Roy, Caroline I; Grangette, Corinne; Pot, Bruno; Martinez, Inés; Walter, Jens; Cani, Patrice D; Delzenne, Nathalie M

    2016-06-01

    Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome that includes muscle wasting and inflammation. As gut microbes influence host immunity and metabolism, we investigated the role of the gut microbiota in the therapeutic management of cancer and associated cachexia. A community-wide analysis of the caecal microbiome in two mouse models of cancer cachexia (acute leukaemia or subcutaneous transplantation of colon cancer cells) identified common microbial signatures, including decreased Lactobacillus spp. and increased Enterobacteriaceae and Parabacteroides goldsteinii/ASF 519. Building on this information, we administered a synbiotic containing inulin-type fructans and live Lactobacillus reuteri 100-23 to leukaemic mice. This treatment restored the Lactobacillus population and reduced the Enterobacteriaceae levels. It also reduced hepatic cancer cell proliferation, muscle wasting and morbidity, and prolonged survival. Administration of the synbiotic was associated with restoration of the expression of antimicrobial proteins controlling intestinal barrier function and gut immunity markers, but did not impact the portal metabolomics imprinting of energy demand. In summary, this study provided evidence that the development of cancer outside the gut can impact intestinal homeostasis and the gut microbial ecosystem and that a synbiotic intervention, by targeting some alterations of the gut microbiota, confers benefits to the host, prolonging survival and reducing cancer proliferation and cachexia. PMID:26613342

  17. Inhibition of intestinal epithelial apoptosis improves survival in a murine model of radiation combined injury.

    PubMed

    Jung, Enjae; Perrone, Erin E; Brahmamdan, Pavan; McDonough, Jacquelyn S; Leathersich, Ann M; Dominguez, Jessica A; Clark, Andrew T; Fox, Amy C; Dunne, W Michael; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2013-01-01

    World conditions place large populations at risk from ionizing radiation (IR) from detonation of dirty bombs or nuclear devices. In a subgroup of patients, ionizing radiation exposure would be followed by a secondary infection. The effects of radiation combined injury are potentially more lethal than either insult in isolation. The purpose of this study was to determine mechanisms of mortality and possible therapeutic targets in radiation combined injury. Mice were exposed to IR with 2.5 Gray (Gy) followed four days later by intratracheal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). While either IR or MRSA alone yielded 100% survival, animals with radiation combined injury had 53% survival (p = 0.01). Compared to IR or MRSA alone, mice with radiation combined injury had increased gut apoptosis, local and systemic bacterial burden, decreased splenic CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, B cells, NK cells, and dendritic cells, and increased BAL and systemic IL-6 and G-CSF. In contrast, radiation combined injury did not alter lymphocyte apoptosis, pulmonary injury, or intestinal proliferation compared to IR or MRSA alone. In light of the synergistic increase in gut apoptosis following radiation combined injury, transgenic mice that overexpress Bcl-2 in their intestine and wild type mice were subjected to IR followed by MRSA. Bcl-2 mice had decreased gut apoptosis and improved survival compared to WT mice (92% vs. 42%; p<0.01). These data demonstrate that radiation combined injury results in significantly higher mortality than could be predicted based upon either IR or MRSA infection alone, and that preventing gut apoptosis may be a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24204769

  18. Inhibition of Intestinal Epithelial Apoptosis Improves Survival in a Murine Model of Radiation Combined Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Enjae; Perrone, Erin E.; Brahmamdan, Pavan; McDonough, Jacquelyn S.; Leathersich, Ann M.; Dominguez, Jessica A.; Clark, Andrew T.; Fox, Amy C.; Dunne, W. Michael; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2013-01-01

    World conditions place large populations at risk from ionizing radiation (IR) from detonation of dirty bombs or nuclear devices. In a subgroup of patients, ionizing radiation exposure would be followed by a secondary infection. The effects of radiation combined injury are potentially more lethal than either insult in isolation. The purpose of this study was to determine mechanisms of mortality and possible therapeutic targets in radiation combined injury. Mice were exposed to IR with 2.5 Gray (Gy) followed four days later by intratracheal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). While either IR or MRSA alone yielded 100% survival, animals with radiation combined injury had 53% survival (p = 0.01). Compared to IR or MRSA alone, mice with radiation combined injury had increased gut apoptosis, local and systemic bacterial burden, decreased splenic CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, B cells, NK cells, and dendritic cells, and increased BAL and systemic IL-6 and G-CSF. In contrast, radiation combined injury did not alter lymphocyte apoptosis, pulmonary injury, or intestinal proliferation compared to IR or MRSA alone. In light of the synergistic increase in gut apoptosis following radiation combined injury, transgenic mice that overexpress Bcl-2 in their intestine and wild type mice were subjected to IR followed by MRSA. Bcl-2 mice had decreased gut apoptosis and improved survival compared to WT mice (92% vs. 42%; p<0.01). These data demonstrate that radiation combined injury results in significantly higher mortality than could be predicted based upon either IR or MRSA infection alone, and that preventing gut apoptosis may be a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24204769

  19. Long-term survival of intestinal allografts induced by costimulation blockade, busulfan and donor bone marrow infusion.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhong; Wang, Jun; Dong, Ying; Adams, Andrew B; Shirasugi, Nozomu; Kim, Oliver; Hart, John; Newton-West, Marvin; Pearson, Thomas C; Larsen, Christian P; Newell, Kenneth A

    2003-09-01

    Tolerance-inducing strategies that infuse donor bone marrow cells in conjunction with costimulation blockade have not been applied to intestinal transplantation. Intestines from BALB/c mice were transplanted into C57BL/6 recipients treated with anti-CD40L mAb, CTLA4-Ig, donor bone marrow, and busulfan. The majority of mice transplanted after completion of this regimen developed hematopoietic macrochimerism, although the degree of chimerism varied widely between recipients, and experienced long-term allograft survival. T cells from these mice demonstrated donor-specific hyporesponsiveness in vitro. However, T cells from chimeric mice proliferated to donor alloantigen in vivo. Furthermore, chimeric mice bearing intestinal allografts were capable of rejecting subsequently placed donor-strain skin grafts. These data suggest that although long-term allograft survival occurs in the absence of acute or chronic rejection, recipient mice are not completely unresponsive to donor alloantigens. When intestinal transplantation was performed at the time of initial bone marrow infusion (initiation of the chimerism protocol), most recipients failed to develop chimerism and promptly rejected the intestinal allograft. Although this is the most effective protocol that we have tested using this stringent model of transplantation, our observations suggest that modifications will be necessary before it can be reliably applied to the transplantation of highly immunogeneic organs like the intestine. PMID:12919088

  20. Megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS): report of a case with prolonged survival and literature review.

    PubMed

    López-Muñoz, Eunice; Hernández-Zarco, Adelina; Polanco-Ortiz, Amilcar; Villa-Morales, Judith; Mateos-Sánchez, Leovigildo

    2013-02-01

    Megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) was first described in 1976. A rare congenital autosomal recessive alteration that predominantly affects females (4:1 ratio), it is characterized by the presence of distended bladder (without distal urinary tract obstruction), microcolon, and decreased or absent intestinal peristalsis. Inconsistent and non-specific histological changes affecting the bladder and intestinal smooth muscle, and intrinsic innervations, have been reported most frequently. MMIHS usually has a fatal prognosis in the first year of life; nevertheless there are some case reports of longer survival. Here is presented the case report of a boy with a diagnosis of MMIHS who has achieved prolonged survival, followed by a review of the literature. PMID:22749573

  1. GLP-2 rapidly activates divergent intracellular signaling pathways involved in intestinal cell survival and proliferation in neonatal piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously demonstrated the dose-dependent glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-2 activation of intracellular signals associated with increased epithelial cell survival and proliferation in the neonatal intestine. Our current aim was to quantify the acute, temporal GLP-2 activation of these key intracellu...

  2. Epidermal growth factor improves survival and prevents intestinal injury in a murine model of pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Jessica A; Vithayathil, Paul J; Khailova, Ludmila; Lawrance, Christopher P; Samocha, Alexandr J; Jung, Enjae; Leathersich, Ann M; Dunne, W Michael; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2011-10-01

    Mortality from pneumonia is mediated, in part, through extrapulmonary causes. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has broad cytoprotective effects, including potent restorative properties in the injured intestine. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of EGF treatment following Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. FVB/N mice underwent intratracheal injection of either P. aeruginosa or saline and were then randomized to receive either systemic EGF or vehicle beginning immediately or 24 h after the onset of pneumonia. Systemic EGF decreased 7-day mortality from 65% to 10% when initiated immediately after the onset of pneumonia and to 27% when initiated 24 h after the onset of pneumonia. Even though injury in pneumonia is initiated in the lungs, the survival advantage conferred by EGF was not associated with improvements in pulmonary pathology. In contrast, EGF prevented intestinal injury by reversing pneumonia-induced increases in intestinal epithelial apoptosis and decreases in intestinal proliferation and villus length. Systemic cytokines and kidney and liver function were unaffected by EGF therapy, although EGF decreased pneumonia-induced splenocyte apoptosis. To determine whether the intestine was sufficient to account for extrapulmonary effects induced by EGF, a separate set of experiments was done using transgenic mice with enterocyte-specific overexpression of EGF (IFABP-EGF [intestinal fatty acid-binding protein linked to mouse EGF] mice), which were compared with wild-type mice subjected to pneumonia. IFABP-EGF mice had improved survival compared with wild-type mice following pneumonia (50% vs. 28%, respectively, P < 0.05) and were protected from pneumonia-induced intestinal injury. Thus, EGF may be a potential adjunctive therapy for pneumonia, mediated in part by its effects on the intestine. PMID:21701422

  3. Intestinal microbes influence the survival, reproduction and protein profile of Trichinella spiralis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai-yan; Zhao, Na; Zhang, Qiao-ling; Gao, Jiang-ming; Liu, Li-li; Wu, Teng-Fei; Wang, Ying; Huang, Qing-hua; Gou, Qiang; Chen, Wei; Gong, Peng-tao; Li, Jian-hua; Gao, Ying-jie; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Xi-chen

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between intestinal microbes and parasitic worms play an essential role in the development of the host immune system. However, the effects of gut microbes on Trichinella spiralis are unknown. The aim of this work was to explore microbe-induced alterations in the survival and reproduction of T. spiralis in vitro. To further identify the proteins and genes involved in the response of nematodes to microbes, quantitative proteomic analysis of T. spiralis was conducted by iTRAQ-coupled LCMS/MS technology and quantitative real-time-PCR was used to measure changes in mRNA expression. The results showed Lactobacillus acidophilus, and especially Lactobacillus bulgaricus, significantly enhanced the survival and reproductive rates of nematodes. Salmonella enterica, and especially Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC), had opposite effects. Genetic responses were activated mainly by EHEC. A total of 514 proteins were identified and quantified, and carbohydrate metabolism-related proteins existed in a higher proportion. These findings indicated that some gut bacteria are friendly or harmful to humans and in addition they may have similar beneficial or detrimental effects on parasites. This may be due to the regulation of expression of specific genes and proteins. Our studies provide a basis for developing therapies against parasitic infections from knowledge generated by studying the gut microbes of mammals. PMID:26432293

  4. Pretreatment with transforming growth factor beta-3 protects small intestinal stem cells against radiation damage in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Potten, C. S.; Booth, D.; Haley, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, with its rapid cell replacement, is sensitive to cytotoxic damage and can be a site of dose-limiting toxicity in cancer therapy. Here, we have investigated the use of one growth modulator to manipulate the cell cycle status of gastrointestinal stem cells before cytotoxic exposure to minimize damage to this normal tissue. Transforming growth factor beta-3 (TGF-beta3), a known inhibitor of cell cycle progression through G1, was used to alter intestinal crypt stem cell sensitivity before 12-16 Gy of gamma irradiation, which was used as a model cytotoxic agent. Using a crypt microcolony assay as a measure of functional competence of gastrointestinal stem cells, it was shown that the administration of TGF-beta3 over a 24-h period before irradiation increased the number of surviving crypts by four- to six-fold. To test whether changes in crypt survival are reflected in the well-being of the animal, survival time analyses were performed. After 14.5 Gy of radiation, only 35% of the animals survived within a period of about 12 days, while prior treatment with TGF-beta3 provided significant protection against this early gastrointestinal animal death, with 95% of the treated animals surviving for greater than 30 days. PMID:9166937

  5. Apoptosis of ileal crypt epithelia after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation without graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Kreft, Andreas; Russo, Alexandra; Lux, Steffi; Waiz, Lioudmila; Seidmann, Larissa; Faber, Jörg; Kirkpatrick, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Intestinal crypt cell apoptosis may occur after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation without clinically overt graft-versus-host disease. We describe this phenomenon in a case of a 12-year-old girl who had segments of the ileum resected because of a relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The diagnostic difficulties are discussed. PMID:25984309

  6. The Colonic Crypt Protects Stem Cells from Microbiota-Derived Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Kaiko, Gerard E; Ryu, Stacy H; Koues, Olivia I; Collins, Patrick L; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna; Pearce, Edward J; Pearce, Erika L; Oltz, Eugene M; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S

    2016-06-16

    In the mammalian intestine, crypts of Leiberkühn house intestinal epithelial stem/progenitor cells at their base. The mammalian intestine also harbors a diverse array of microbial metabolite compounds that potentially modulate stem/progenitor cell activity. Unbiased screening identified butyrate, a prominent bacterial metabolite, as a potent inhibitor of intestinal stem/progenitor proliferation at physiologic concentrations. During homeostasis, differentiated colonocytes metabolized butyrate likely preventing it from reaching proliferating epithelial stem/progenitor cells within the crypt. Exposure of stem/progenitor cells in vivo to butyrate through either mucosal injury or application to a naturally crypt-less host organism led to inhibition of proliferation and delayed wound repair. The mechanism of butyrate action depended on the transcription factor Foxo3. Our findings indicate that mammalian crypt architecture protects stem/progenitor cell proliferation in part through a metabolic barrier formed by differentiated colonocytes that consume butyrate and stimulate future studies on the interplay of host anatomy and microbiome metabolism. PMID:27264604

  7. Computational Models Reveal a Passive Mechanism for Cell Migration in the Crypt

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Sara-Jane; Näthke, Inke S.; Osborne, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Cell migration in the intestinal crypt is essential for the regular renewal of the epithelium, and the continued upward movement of cells is a key characteristic of healthy crypt dynamics. However, the driving force behind this migration is unknown. Possibilities include mitotic pressure, active movement driven by motility cues, or negative pressure arising from cell loss at the crypt collar. It is possible that a combination of factors together coordinate migration. Here, three different computational models are used to provide insight into the mechanisms that underpin cell movement in the crypt, by examining the consequence of eliminating cell division on cell movement. Computational simulations agree with existing experimental results, confirming that migration can continue in the absence of mitosis. Importantly, however, simulations allow us to infer mechanisms that are sufficient to generate cell movement, which is not possible through experimental observation alone. The results produced by the three models agree and suggest that cell loss due to apoptosis and extrusion at the crypt collar relieves cell compression below, allowing cells to expand and move upwards. This finding suggests that future experiments should focus on the role of apoptosis and cell extrusion in controlling cell migration in the crypt. PMID:24260407

  8. Epidermal growth factor improves survival and prevents intestinal injury in a murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Jessica A.; Vithayathil, Paul J.; Khailova, Ludmila; Lawrance, Christopher P.; Samocha, Alexandr J.; Jung, Enjae; Leathersich, Ann M.; Dunne, W. Michael; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2011-01-01

    Mortality from pneumonia is mediated, in part, through extrapulmonary causes. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has broad cytoprotective effects, including potent restorative properties in the injured intestine. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of EGF treatment following Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. FVB/N mice underwent intratracheal injection of either Pseudomonas aeruginosa or saline and were then randomized to receive either systemic EGF or vehicle beginning immediately or 24 hours after the onset of pneumonia. Systemic EGF decreased seven-day mortality from 65% to 10% when initiated immediately after the onset of pneumonia and to 27% when initiated 24 hours after the onset of pneumonia. Even though injury in pneumonia is initiated in the lungs, the survival advantage conferred by EGF was not associated with improvements in pulmonary pathology. In contrast, EGF prevented intestinal injury by reversing pneumonia-induced increases in intestinal epithelial apoptosis and decreases in intestinal proliferation and villus length. Systemic cytokines, kidney and liver function were unaffected by EGF therapy although EGF decreased pneumonia-induced splenocyte apoptosis. To determine whether the intestine was sufficient to account for extrapulmonary effects induced by EGF, a separate set of experiments were done using transgenic mice with enterocyte-specific overexpression of EGF (IFABP-EGF mice) which were compared to WT mice subjected to pneumonia. IFABP-EGF mice had improved survival compared to WT mice following pneumonia (50% vs. 28% respectively, p<0.05) and were protected from pneumonia-induced intestinal injury. Thus, EGF may be a potential adjunctive therapy for pneumonia, mediated in part by its effects on the intestine. PMID:21701422

  9. Pharmacologically blocking p53-dependent apoptosis protects intestinal stem cells and mice from radiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinwei; Wei, Liang; Cramer, Julie M; Leibowitz, Brian J; Judge, Colleen; Epperly, Michael; Greenberger, Joel; Wang, Fengchao; Li, Linheng; Stelzner, Matthias G; Dunn, James C Y; Martin, Martin G; Lagasse, Eric; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation (IR) leads to debilitating and dose-limiting gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Using three-dimensional mouse crypt culture, we demonstrated that p53 target PUMA mediates radiation-induced apoptosis via a cell-intrinsic mechanism, and identified the GSK-3 inhibitor CHIR99021 as a potent radioprotector. CHIR99021 treatment improved Lgr5+ cell survival and crypt regeneration after radiation in culture and mice. CHIR99021 treatment specifically blocked apoptosis and PUMA induction and K120 acetylation of p53 mediated by acetyl-transferase Tip60, while it had no effect on p53 stabilization, phosphorylation or p21 induction. CHIR99021 also protected human intestinal cultures from radiation by PUMA but not p21 suppression. These results demonstrate that p53 posttranslational modifications play a key role in the pathological and apoptotic response of the intestinal stem cells to radiation and can be targeted pharmacologically. PMID:25858503

  10. Pharmacologically blocking p53-dependent apoptosis protects intestinal stem cells and mice from radiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinwei; Wei, Liang; Cramer, Julie M.; Leibowitz, Brian J.; Judge, Colleen; Epperly, Michael; Greenberger, Joel; Wang, Fengchao; Li, Linheng; Stelzner, Matthias G.; Dunn, James C. Y.; Martin, Martin G.; Lagasse, Eric; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation (IR) leads to debilitating and dose-limiting gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Using three-dimensional mouse crypt culture, we demonstrated that p53 target PUMA mediates radiation-induced apoptosis via a cell-intrinsic mechanism, and identified the GSK-3 inhibitor CHIR99021 as a potent radioprotector. CHIR99021 treatment improved Lgr5+ cell survival and crypt regeneration after radiation in culture and mice. CHIR99021 treatment specifically blocked apoptosis and PUMA induction and K120 acetylation of p53 mediated by acetyl-transferase Tip60, while it had no effect on p53 stabilization, phosphorylation or p21 induction. CHIR99021 also protected human intestinal cultures from radiation by PUMA but not p21 suppression. These results demonstrate that p53 posttranslational modifications play a key role in the pathological and apoptotic response of the intestinal stem cells to radiation and can be targeted pharmacologically. PMID:25858503

  11. The Vibrio cholerae Extracellular Chitinase ChiA2 Is Important for Survival and Pathogenesis in the Host Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Moumita; Nag, Dhrubajyoti; Koley, Hemanta; Saha, Dhira Rani; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    In aquatic environments, Vibrio cholerae colonizes mainly on the chitinous surface of copepods and utilizes chitin as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. Of the two extracellular chitinases essential for chitin utilization, the expression of chiA2 is maximally up-regulated in host intestine. Recent studies indicate that several bacterial chitinases may be involved in host pathogenesis. However, the role of V. cholerae chitinases in host infection is not yet known. In this study, we provide evidence to show that ChiA2 is important for V. cholerae survival in intestine as well as in pathogenesis. We demonstrate that ChiA2 de-glycosylates mucin and releases reducing sugars like GlcNAc and its oligomers. Deglycosylation of mucin corroborated with reduced uptake of alcian blue stain by ChiA2 treated mucin. Next, we show that V. cholerae could utilize mucin as a nutrient source. In comparison to the wild type strain, ΔchiA2 mutant was 60-fold less efficient in growth in mucin supplemented minimal media and was also ∼6-fold less competent to survive when grown in the presence of mucin-secreting human intestinal HT29 epithelial cells. Similar results were also obtained when the strains were infected in mice intestine. Infection with the ΔchiA2 mutant caused ∼50-fold less fluid accumulation in infant mice as well as in rabbit ileal loop compared to the wild type strain. To see if the difference in survival of the ΔchiA2 mutant and wild type V. cholerae was due to reduced adhesion of the mutant, we monitored binding of the strains on HT29 cells. The initial binding of the wild type and mutant strain was similar. Collectively these data suggest that ChiA2 secreted by V. cholerae in the intestine hydrolyzed intestinal mucin to release GlcNAc, and the released sugar is successfully utilized by V. cholerae for growth and survival in the host intestine. PMID:25244128

  12. Loss of Slc26a9 anion transporter alters intestinal electrolyte and HCO3(-) transport and reduces survival in CFTR-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuemei; Li, Taolang; Riederer, Brigitte; Lenzen, Henrike; Ludolph, Lisa; Yeruva, Sunil; Tuo, Biguang; Soleimani, Manoocher; Seidler, Ursula

    2015-06-01

    Slc26a9 is an anion transporter that is strongly expressed in the stomach and lung. Slc26a9 variants were recently found associated with a higher incidence of meconium ileus in cystic fibrosis (CF) infants, raising the question whether Slc26a9 is expressed in the intestine and what its functional role is. Slc26a9 messenger RNA (mRNA) was found highly expressed in the mucosae of the murine and human upper gastrointestinal tract, with an abrupt decrease in expression levels beyond the duodenum. Absence of SLC26a9 expression strongly increased the intestinally related mortality in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient mice. Proximal duodenal JHCO3(-) and fluid secretion were reduced in the absence of Slc26a9 expression. In the proximal duodenum of young Slc26a9 KO mice, the glands and villi/crypts were elongated and proliferation was enhanced. This difference was lost with ageing, as were the alterations in fluid movement, whereas the reduction in JHCO3(-) remained. Laser dissection followed by qPCR suggested Slc26a9 expression to be crypt-predominant in the duodenum. In summary, deletion of Slc26a9 caused bicarbonate secretory and fluid absorptive changes in the proximal duodenal mucosa and increased the postweaning death rates in CFTR-deficient mice. Functional alterations in the duodenum were most prominent at young ages. We assume that the association of meconium ileus and Slc26a9 variants may be related to maldigestion and impaired downstream signaling caused by loss of upper GI tract digestive functions, aggravating the situation of lack of secretion and sticky mucus at the site of obstruction in CF intestine. PMID:24965066

  13. Human colonic crypts in culture: segregation of immunochemical markers in normal versus adenoma-derived

    PubMed Central

    Dame, Michael K; Jiang, Yan; Appelman, Henry D; Copley, Kelly D; McClintock, Shannon D; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Attili, Durga; Elmunzer, B Joseph; Brenner, Dean E; Varani, James; Turgeon, D Kim

    2014-01-01

    In order to advance a culture model of human colonic neoplasia, we developed methods for the isolation and in vitro maintenance of intact colonic crypts from normal human colon tissue and adenomas. Crypts were maintained in three-dimensional Matrigel culture with a simple, serum-free, low Ca2+ (0.15 mM) medium. Intact colonic crypts from normal human mucosa were viably maintained for 3–5 days with preservation of the in situ crypt-like architecture, presenting a distinct base and apex. Abnormal structures from adenoma tissue could be maintained through multiple passages (up to months), with expanding buds/tubules. Immunohistochemical markers for intestinal stem cells (Lgr5), growth (Ki67), differentiation (E-cadherin, cytokeratin 20 (CK20) and mucin 2 (MUC2)) and epithelial turnover (Bax, cleaved Caspase-3), paralleled the changes in function. The epithelial cells in normal crypts followed the physiological sequence of progression from proliferation to differentiation to dissolution in a spatially and temporally appropriate manner. Lgr5 expression was seen in a few basal cells of freshly isolated crypts, but was not detected after 1–3 days in culture. After 24 h in culture, crypts from normal colonic tissue continued to show strong Ki67 and MUC2 expression at the crypt base, with a gradual decrease over time such that by days 3–4 Ki67 was not expressed. The differentiation marker CK20 increased over the same period, eventually becoming intense throughout the whole crypt. In adenoma-derived structures, expression of markers for all stages of progression persisted for the entire time in culture. Lgr5 showed expression in a few select cells after months in culture. Ki67 and MUC2 were largely associated with the proliferative budding regions while CK20 was localized to the parent structure. This ex vivo culture model of normal and adenomatous crypts provides a readily accessible tool to help understand the growth and differentiation process in human colonic

  14. EFFECTS OF TOPICAL TREATMENT WITH EUPHORBIA TIRUCALLI LATEX ON THE SURVIVAL AND INTESTINAL ADHESIONS IN RATS WITH EXPERIMENTAL PERITONITIS

    PubMed Central

    de ARAÚJO, Lilhian Alves; MRUÉ, Fátima; NEVES, Roberpaulo Anacleto; ALVES, Maxley Martins; da SILVA-JÚNIOR, Nelson Jorge; SILVA, Marcelo Seixo de Brito; de MELO-REIS, Paulo Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of plants of the family Euphorbiaceae, particularly Euphorbia tirucalli (avelós) has been popularly widespread for treating a variety of diseases of infectious, tumoral, and inflammatory. Aim: To demonstrated antimicrobial and immunomodulatory effects of these extracts, evaluating the effect of a topical treatment with an aqueous solution of avelós latex on the survival and on intestinal adhesions in rats with experimental peritonitis. Methods: Peritonitis was induced in 24 Wistar rats, that were randomized into four groups of six as follows: (1) Control group (n=6), no treatment; (2) Antibiotic group (n=6), treatment with a single intramuscular dose of antibiotic Unasyn; (3) Saline group (n=6), the abdominal cavity was washed with 0.9% saline; and (4) E.tirucalli group (n=6), the abdominal cavity was washed with E. tirucalli at a concentration of 12 mg/ml. The animals that died were necropsied, and the time of death was recorded. The survivors were killed on postoperative day 11, and necropsy was subsequently performed for evaluation of the intestinal adhesions. Results: Significant differences were observed in the control and antibiotic groups (p<0.01) with respect to the survival hours when compared with the saline and E. tirucalli groups. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in the survival of animals in the saline andE. tirucalli groups; however, one animal died in the saline group. Necropsy of the animals in the saline and E. tirucalligroups showed strong adhesions resistant to manipulation, between the intestinal loops and abdominal wall. The remaining groups did not show any adhesions. Conclusions: Topical treatment with E. tirucalli latex stimulated an increased formation of intestinal adhesions and prevented the death of all animals with peritonitis. PMID:26734792

  15. Structural Stability of Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 Is Essential for Protective Effects Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Fumiaki; Umeda, Sachiko; Yasuda, Takeshi; Asada, Masahiro; Motomura, Kaori; Suzuki, Masashi; Zakrzewska, Malgorzata; Imamura, Toru; Imai, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Human fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF1) has radioprotective effects on the intestine, although its structural instability limits its potential for practical use. Several stable FGF1 mutants were created increasing stability in the order, wild-type FGF1, single mutants (Q40P, S47I, and H93G), Q40P/S47I, and Q40P/S47I/H93G. This study evaluated the contribution of the structural stability of FGF1 to its radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: Each FGF1 mutant was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 h before or after total body irradiation (TBI) with {gamma}-rays at 8-12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Q40P/S47I/H93G could activate all subtypes of FGF receptors in vitro much more strongly than the wild-type without endogenous or exogenous heparin. Preirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G significantly increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1 after TBI at 10 or 12 Gy, and postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G was effective in promoting crypt survival after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. In addition, crypt cell proliferation, crypt depth, and epithelial differentiation were significantly promoted by postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G. The level of stability of FGF1 mutants correlated with their mitogenic activities in vitro in the absence of heparin; however, preirradiation treatment with the mutants increased the crypt number to almost the same level as Q40P/S47I/H93G. When given 24 h after TBI at 10 Gy, all FGF1 mutants increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1, and Q40P/S47I/H93G had the strongest mitogenic effects in intestinal epithelial cells after radiation damage. Moreover, Q40P/S47I/H93G prolonged mouse survival after TBI because of the repair of intestinal damage. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the structural stability of FGF1 can contribute to the enhancement of protective effects against radiation-induced intestinal

  16. The Delayed Effects of Acute Radiation Syndrome: Evidence of Long-Term Functional Changes in the Clonogenic Cells of the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Booth, Catherine; Tudor, Gregory L; Katz, Barry P; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    Long term or residual damage post-irradiation has been described for many tissues. In hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), this is only revealed when the HSC are stressed and required to regenerate and repopulate a myeloablated host. Such an assay cannot be used to assess the recovery potential of previously irradiated intestinal stem cells (ISC) due to their incompatibility with transplantation. The best approximation to the HSC assay is the crypt microcolony assay, also based on clonogen survival. In the current study, the regenerative capacity of intestinal clonogenic cells in mice that had survived 13 Gy irradiation (with 5% bone marrow shielding to allow survival through the hematopoietic syndrome) and were then aged for 200 d was compared to previously unirradiated age-matched controls. Interestingly, at 200 d following 13 Gy, there remained a statistically significant reduction in crypts present in the various small intestinal regions (illustrating that the gastrointestinal epithelium had not fully recovered despite the 200-d interval). However, upon re-irradiation on day 196, those mice previously irradiated had improved crypt survival and regeneration compared to the age-matched controls. This was evident in all regions of the small intestine following 11-13 Gy re-exposure. Thus, there were either more clonogens per crypt within those previously irradiated and/or those that were present were more radioresistant (possibly because a subpopulation was more quiescent). This is contrary to the popular belief that previously irradiated animals may have an impaired/delayed regenerative response and be more radiosensitive. PMID:26425901

  17. Intestinal FoxO signaling is required to survive oral infection in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Fink, C; Hoffmann, J; Knop, M; Li, Y; Isermann, K; Roeder, T

    2016-07-01

    The intestinal immune system is tailored to fight pathogens effectively while tolerating the indigenous microbiota. Impairments of this homeostatic interaction may contribute to the etiology of various diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases. However, the molecular architecture underlying this complex regulatory interaction is not well understood. Here, we show that the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has a multilayered intestinal immune system that ensures strictly localized antimicrobial responses. Enterocytes, a major cell population of the intestine, produced antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in a FoxO- but not NF-κB-dependent manner. Consequently, animals impaired in FoxO-mediated signaling had a significantly lowered resistance to intestinal infections; they were unable to increase the expression of AMP genes and males showed an increased bacterial load in response to an infection. Conventional innate immune signaling converging onto NF-κB activation was operative in only a few regions of the intestine, comprising the proventriculus, copper cells, and intestinal stem cells. Taken together, our results imply that danger-mediated as well as conventional innate immune signaling constitute modules that contribute to the fruit fly's intestinal immune system. We propose that this special architecture ensures localized and efficient antimicrobial responses against invasive pathogens while preserving the microbiota. PMID:26627459

  18. Localization and Function of a 5-HT Transporter in Crypt Epithelia of the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Wade, P. R.; Chen, J.; Jaffe, B.; Kassem, I. S.; Blakely, R. D.; Gershon, M. D.

    2012-01-01

    The peristaltic reflex can be evoked in the absence of input from the CNS because the responsible neural pathways are intrinsic to the intestine. Mucosal enterochromaffin cells have been postulated to be pressure transducers, which activate the intrinsic sensory neurons that initiate the reflex by secreting 5-HT. All of the criteria necessary to establish 5-HT as this transmitter have been fulfilled previously, except that no mucosal mechanism for 5-HT inactivation was known. In the current investigation, desensitization of 5-HT receptors was demonstrated to inhibit the peristaltic reflex in the guinea pig large intestine in vitro. At low concentration (1.0 nM), the 5-HT uptake inhibitor fluoxetine potentiated the reflex, but higher concentrations blocked it, suggesting that the peristaltic reflex depends on the 5-HT transporter-mediated inactivation of 5-HT. Specific (Na+-dependent, fluoxetine-sensitive) uptake of 3H- 5-HT by intestinal crypt epithelial cells was found by radioautography. mRNA encoding the neuronal 5-HT transporter was demonstrated in the intestinal mucosa by Northern analysis and located in crypt epithelial cells as well as in myenteric neurons by in situ hybridization. cDNA encoding the 5-HT transporter was cloned from the mucosa and completely sequenced. 5-HT transporter immunoreactivity was detected in crypt epithelial cells and enteric neurons. Mucosal epithelial cells thus express a plasmalemmal 5-HT transporter identical to that of serotonergic neurons. This molecule seems to play a critical role in the peristaltic reflex. PMID:8601815

  19. Differential proteome analysis along jejunal crypt-villus axis in piglets.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xia; Yang, Huansheng; Hu, Xihai; Wang, Xiaocheng; Li, Biao; Long, Lina; Li, Tiejun; Wang, Junjun; Hou, Yongqing; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    The brush-border membrane (BBM) of enterocytes is responsible for the digestion and absorption of nutrients and ions in the small intestine. To identify the BBM proteins involved in epithelial cell maturation along the crypt-villus axis, enterocytes were sequentially isolated from the villus tip to the crypt of the jejunum from 21-day-old suckling piglets. After preparation of BBM vesicles, we detected 194 proteins in the jejunal epithelial cells by isobaric tags using relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) techniques. Of these, 56 BBM proteins were differentially expressed along the crypt-villus axis. During differentiation, the expression of proteins related to digestion and absorption of nutrients was primarily downregulated at the upper, middle villus, or crypt compared to the villus tip, while expression of proteins related to structural and enzyme regulator proteins was largely upregulated. We verified the differences in Na(+)/K(+) -transporting ATPase, galectin-3, and an intestinal-type fatty acid binding protein by western blot or immunochemical analysis. Identification of BBM-associated proteins helps enhance our understanding of digestion and absorption in piglets and other mammals, including humans. PMID:26709777

  20. The cellular prion protein PrPc is a partner of the Wnt pathway in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Besnier, Laura S.; Cardot, Philippe; Da Rocha, Barbara; Simon, Anthony; Loew, Damarys; Klein, Christophe; Riveau, Béatrice; Lacasa, Michel; Clair, Caroline; Rousset, Monique; Thenet, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    We reported previously that the cellular prion protein (PrPc) is a component of desmosomes and contributes to the intestinal barrier function. We demonstrated also the presence of PrPc in the nucleus of proliferating intestinal epithelial cells. Here we sought to decipher the function of this nuclear pool. In human intestinal cancer cells Caco-2/TC7 and SW480 and normal crypt-like HIEC-6 cells, PrPc interacts, in cytoplasm and nucleus, with γ-catenin, one of its desmosomal partners, and with β-catenin and TCF7L2, effectors of the canonical Wnt pathway. PrPc up-regulates the transcriptional activity of the β-catenin/TCF7L2 complex, whereas γ-catenin down-regulates it. Silencing of PrPc results in the modulation of several Wnt target gene expressions in human cells, with different effects depending on their Wnt signaling status, and in mouse intestinal crypt cells in vivo. PrPc also interacts with the Hippo pathway effector YAP, suggesting that it may contribute to the regulation of gene transcription beyond the β-catenin/TCF7L2 complex. Finally, we demonstrate that PrPc is required for proper formation of intestinal organoids, indicating that it contributes to proliferation and survival of intestinal progenitors. In conclusion, PrPc must be considered as a new modulator of the Wnt signaling pathway in proliferating intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:26224313

  1. Gastrointestinal cell proliferation and crypt fission are separate but complementary means of increasing tissue mass following infusion of epidermal growth factor in rats

    PubMed Central

    Berlanga-Acosta, J; Playford, R; Mandir, N; Goodlad, R

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a potent mitogen for the gastrointestinal tract and also influences the number of new crypts formed by crypt fission. The time course of these events and possible linkage between these two complementary mechanisms is however poorly understood. We therefore examined the temporal relationship of proliferation and fission in rats treated with EGF.
METHODS—Osmotic minipumps were implanted subcutaneously into male Wistar rats to infuse EGF continuously (60 µg/rat/day) for periods of 1-14 days. Proliferation and crypt branching were quantified following vincristine induced metaphase arrest and morphometric assessment of microdissected tissue.
RESULTS—In the small intestine, EGF significantly increased epithelial cell proliferation and crypt and villus area after 24 hours of EGF, although maximal effects were only reached following six days of infusion. EGF also resulted in an approximate 30% reduction in crypt fission in the small bowel. In the colon, EGF caused a twofold increase in epithelial cell proliferation one day after infusion, from 15.3 (2.3) to 29.6 (3.5) metaphases per crypt (p<0.01). Maximal effects were seen in rats receiving EGF for seven days. For all time points, colonic crypt size increased in response to EGF. The amount of branching increased following one day of infusion with EGF (from 15.3 (1.9) to 32.4 (5.5)%; p<0.001) but was significantly lower (approximately 25% of control values) following longer periods of infusion. Crypt fission did not correlate with crypt area.
CONCLUSION—EGF has profound effects on cell proliferation and also altered crypt fission, with its actions on crypt fission most pronounced in the colon where it first increased and then decreased fission. EGF can thus be a potent stimulus for crypt fission during short term infusion and may reduce the number of branched crypts present in a resting or quiescent stage. Growth factors can alter cell mass by two

  2. Comparison of clinical findings and short-term survival between horses with intestinal entrapment in the gastrosplenic ligament and horses with intestinal entrapment in the epiploic foramen.

    PubMed

    Kilcoyne, Isabelle; Dechant, Julie E; Nieto, Jorge E

    2016-09-15

    OBJECTIVE To compare clinical findings and short-term outcome for horses with intestinal entrapment in the gastrosplenic ligament (GLE) with those of horses with intestinal entrapment in the epiploic foramen (EFE). DESIGN Retrospective case-control study. ANIMALS 43 horses with GLE (cases) and 73 horses with EFE (controls). PROCEDURES Medical records of horses examined because of colic at a veterinary teaching hospital between 1992 and 2012 were reviewed. Signalment was extracted from medical records for all horses with colic (colic population), and additional information regarding colic history, clinical findings, treatments, and outcome was extracted from the records of horses in which GLE or EFE was diagnosed during surgery or necropsy. Signalment was compared between the colic population and the case and control populations. Clinical findings and short-term outcome were compared between the cases and controls. RESULTS The proportions of middle-aged horses and geldings in both the case and control groups were greater than those in the colic population. Mean heart rate and blood and peritoneal fluid lactate concentrations in horses with EFE were significantly greater than those for horses with GLE. The proportion of horses that underwent surgery and were discharged from the hospital (short-term survival rate) did not differ between the GLE (22/25 [88%]) and EFE (29/34 [85%]) groups. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Compared with the colic population, results suggested middle-aged geldings might be predisposed to GLE and EFE. The short-term survival rate was similar between the GLE and EFE groups even though horses with EFE had more severe systemic derangements than did horses with GLE. PMID:27585104

  3. Mice overexpressing CD97 in intestinal epithelial cells provide a unique model for mammalian postnatal intestinal cylindrical growth.

    PubMed

    Aust, Gabriela; Kerner, Christiane; Gonsior, Susann; Sittig, Doreen; Schneider, Hartmut; Buske, Peter; Scholz, Markus; Dietrich, Norman; Oldenburg, Sindy; Karpus, Olga N; Galle, Jörg; Amasheh, Salah; Hamann, Jörg

    2013-07-01

    Postnatal enlargement of the mammalian intestine comprises cylindrical and luminal growth, associated with crypt fission and crypt/villus hyperplasia, respectively, which subsequently predominate before and after weaning. The bipartite adhesion G protein-coupled receptor CD97 shows an expression gradient along the crypt-villus axis in the normal human intestine. We here report that transgenic mice overexpressing CD97 in intestinal epithelial cells develop an upper megaintestine. Intestinal enlargement involves an increase in length and diameter but does not affect microscopic morphology, as typical for cylindrical growth. The megaintestine is acquired after birth and before weaning, independent of the genotype of the mother, excluding altered availability of milk constituents as driving factor. CD97 overexpression does not regulate intestinal growth factors, stem cell markers, and Wnt signaling, which contribute to epithelial differentiation and renewal, nor does it affect suckling-to-weaning transition. Consistent with augmented cylindrical growth, suckling but not adult transgenic mice show enlarged crypts and thus more crypt fissions caused by a transient increase of the crypt transit-amplifying zone. Intestinal enlargement by CD97 requires its seven-span transmembrane/cytoplasmic C-terminal fragment but not the N-terminal fragment binding partner CD55. In summary, ectopic expression of CD97 in intestinal epithelial cells provides a unique model for intestinal cylindrical growth occurring in breast-fed infants. PMID:23676664

  4. A Crypt-Specific Core Microbiota Resides in the Mouse Colon

    PubMed Central

    Pédron, Thierry; Mulet, Céline; Dauga, Catherine; Frangeul, Lionel; Chervaux, Christian; Grompone, Gianfranco; Sansonetti, Philippe J.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT In an attempt to explore the microbial content of functionally critical niches of the mouse gastrointestinal tract, we targeted molecular microbial diagnostics of the crypts that contain the intestinal stem cells, which account for epithelial regeneration. As current evidence indicates, the gut microbiota affects epithelial regeneration; bacteria that are likely to primarily participate in this essential step of the gut, microbiota cross talk, have been identified. We show in this article that only the cecal and colonic crypts harbor resident microbiota in the mouse and that regardless of the line and breeding origin of these mice, this bacterial population is unexpectedly dominated by aerobic genera. Interestingly, this microbiota resembles the restricted microbiota found in the midgut of invertebrates; thus, the presence of our so-called “crypt-specific core microbiota” (CSCM) in the mouse colon potentially reflects a coevolutionary process under selective conditions that can now be addressed. We suggest that CSCM could play both a protective and a homeostatic role within the colon. This article is setting the bases for such studies, particularly by providing a bona fide—and essentially cultivable—crypt microbiota of reference. PMID:22617141

  5. Influence of Ketotifen, Cromolyn Sodium, and Compound 48/80 on the survival rates after intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zi-qing, Hei; Xiao-liang, Gan; Pin-jie, Huang; Jing, Wei; Ning, Shen; Wan-ling, Gao

    2008-01-01

    Background Mast cells were associated with intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury, the study was to observe the influence of Ketotifen, Cromolyn Sdium(CS), and Compound 48/80(CP) on the survival rates on the third day after intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats. Methods 120 healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, Sham-operated group (group S), model group (group M), group K, group C and group CP. Intestinal damage was triggered by clamping the superior mesenteric artery for 75 minutes, group K, C, and CP were treated with kotifen 1 mg·kg-1, CS 50 mg·kg-1, and CP 0.75 mg·kg-1 i.v. at 5 min before reperfusion and once daily for three days following reperfusion respectively. Survival rate in each group was recorded during the three days after reperfusion. All the surviving rats were killed for determining the concentration of serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase(AST), glutamic pyruvic transaminase(ALT), the ratio of AST compare ALT(S/L), total protein(TP), albumin(ALB), globulin(GLB), the ratio of ALB compare GLB(A/G), phosphocreatine kinase(CK), lactate dehydrogenase(LDH), urea nitrogen(BUN) and creatinine(CRE) at the 3rd day after reperfusion. And ultrastructure of IMMC, Chiu's score, lung histology, IMMC counts, the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 of the small intestine were detected at the same time. Results Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury reduced the survival rate. The concentrations of TP, ALB and level of IL-10 in intestine in group M decreased significantly while the concentrations of S/L, LDH and the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in intestine increased significantly compared with group S (P < 0.05). Treatment with Ketotifen and CS increased the survival rate compared with group M (P < 0.05), attenuated the down-regulation or up-regulation of the above index (P < 0.05). Treatment with CP decreased the survival rate on the 3rd day after reperfusion compared with group M(P < 0.05). Group K and C had better

  6. Duodenal crypt health following exposure to Cr(VI): Micronucleus scoring, γ-H2AX immunostaining, and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Chad M; Wolf, Jeffrey C; Elbekai, Reem H; Paranjpe, Madhav G; Seiter, Jennifer M; Chappell, Mark A; Tappero, Ryan V; Suh, Mina; Proctor, Deborah M; Bichteler, Anne; Haws, Laurie C; Harris, Mark A

    2015-08-01

    Lifetime exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water results in intestinal damage and an increase in duodenal tumors in B6C3F1 mice. To assess whether these tumors could be the result of a direct mutagenic or genotoxic mode of action, we conducted a GLP-compliant 7-day drinking water study to assess crypt health along the entire length of the duodenum. Mice were exposed to water (vehicle control), 1.4, 21, or 180 ppm Cr(VI) via drinking water for 7 consecutive days. Crypt enterocytes in Swiss roll sections were scored as normal, mitotic, apoptotic, karyorrhectic, or as having micronuclei. A single oral gavage of 50mg/kg cyclophosphamide served as a positive control for micronucleus induction. Exposure to 21 and 180 ppm Cr(VI) significantly increased the number of crypt enterocytes. Micronuclei and γ-H2AX immunostaining were not elevated in the crypts of Cr(VI)-treated mice. In contrast, treatment with cyclophosphamide significantly increased numbers of crypt micronuclei and qualitatively increased γ-H2AX immunostaining. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy revealed the presence of strong Cr fluorescence in duodenal villi, but negligible Cr fluorescence in the crypt compartment. Together, these data indicate that Cr(VI) does not adversely effect the crypt compartment where intestinal stem cells reside, and provide additional evidence that the mode of action for Cr(VI)-induced intestinal cancer in B6C3F1 mice involves chronic villous wounding resulting in compensatory crypt enterocyte hyperplasia. PMID:26232259

  7. Intestinal Phospholipid Remodeling Is Required for Dietary-Lipid Uptake and Survival on a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Rong, Xin; Duerr, Mark A; Hermanson, Daniel J; Hedde, Per Niklas; Wong, Jinny S; Vallim, Thomas Q de Aguiar; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Gratton, Enrico; Ford, David A; Tontonoz, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Phospholipids are important determinants of membrane biophysical properties, but the impact of membrane acyl chain composition on dietary-lipid absorption is unknown. Here we demonstrate that the LXR-responsive phospholipid-remodeling enzyme Lpcat3 modulates intestinal fatty acid and cholesterol absorption and is required for survival on a high-fat diet. Mice lacking Lpcat3 in the intestine thrive on carbohydrate-based chow but lose body weight rapidly and become moribund on a triglyceride-rich diet. Lpcat3-dependent incorporation of polyunsaturated fatty acids into phospholipids is required for the efficient transport of dietary lipids into enterocytes. Furthermore, loss of Lpcat3 amplifies the production of gut hormones, including GLP-1 and oleoylethanolamide, in response to high-fat feeding, contributing to the paradoxical cessation of food intake in the setting of starvation. These results reveal that membrane phospholipid composition is a gating factor in passive lipid absorption and implicate LXR-Lpcat3 signaling in a gut-brain feedback loop that couples absorption to food intake. PMID:26833026

  8. Compensation by the residual intestine after intestinal resection in the rat. I. Influence of amount of tissue removed.

    PubMed

    Hanson, W R; Osborne, J W; Sharp, J G

    1977-04-01

    Thirty days after resection of 10 to 80% of the midportion of the small intestine, excluding the duodenum, several cell kinetic parameters were investigated in the residual intestine. The degree of intestinal response increased in a stepwise fashion as the amount of tissue removed was increased. The response involved marked increases in: DNA synthesis per crypt expressed as disintegrations per minute of tritium (3H) reflecting (3H)thymidine incorporation, cells per crypt column, 3H-labelled cells per crypt column, cells per villus column, and thickness of all intestinal wall components. These changes occureed throughout the small intestine even at lesser resections. "Crypt profiles'' reflected changes in cell counts, but when the labeling frequency of proliferative cells was expressed as a percentage of the total crypt height, there was no change. The total number of crypts in the duodenum remained unchanged and the total number of cyrpts in the residual jejunum plus ileum decreased proportionally to the amount of tissue removed. Intestinal compensation occurred by increasing the size of the structures present in the residual intestine, not by increasing the number of structural units. PMID:838224

  9. Understanding epithelial homeostasis in the intestine

    PubMed Central

    De Mey, Jan R.; Freund, Jean-Noël

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium constitutes the barrier between the gut lumen and the rest of the body and a very actively renewing cell population. The crypt/villus and crypt/cuff units of the mouse small intestine and colon are its basic functional units. The field is confronted with competing concepts with regard to the nature of the cells that are responsible for all the day-to day cell replacement and those that act to regenerate the tissue upon injury and with two diametrically opposed models for lineage specification. The review revisits groundbreaking pioneering studies to provide non expert readers and crypt watchers with a factual analysis of the origins of the current models deduced from the latest spectacular advances. It also discusses recent progress made by addressing these issues in the crypts of the colon, which need to be better understood, since they are the preferred sites of major pathologies. PMID:24665395

  10. Neurogenic differentiation factor NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Du, Aonan; Xu, Jing; Ma, Yanchao; Cao, Han; Yang, Chao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xing, Chun-Gen; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, especially the small intestine, is particularly sensitive to radiation, and is prone to radiation-induced injury as a result. Neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) is an evolutionarily-conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor. NeuroD contains a protein transduction domain (PTD), which allows it to be exogenously delivered across the membrane of mammalian cells, whereupon its transcription activity can be unleashed. Whether NeuroD has therapeutic effects for radiation-induced injury remains unclear. In the present study, we prepared a NeuroD-EGFP recombinant protein, and explored its protective effects on the survival and intestinal damage induced by ionizing radiation. Our results showed that NeuroD-EGFP could be transduced into small intestine epithelial cells and tissues. NeuroD-EGFP administration significantly increased overall survival of mice exposed to lethal total body irradiation (TBI). This recombinant NeuroD also reduced radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury and apoptosis, and improved crypt survival. Expression profiling of NeuroD-EGFP-treated mice revealed upregulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), a known inhibitor of apoptosis in mammalian cells. In conclusion, NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury, and provides a novel therapeutic clinical option for the prevention of intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and the treatment of victims of incidental exposure. PMID:27436572

  11. Neurogenic differentiation factor NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Du, Aonan; Xu, Jing; Ma, Yanchao; Cao, Han; Yang, Chao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xing, Chun-Gen; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, especially the small intestine, is particularly sensitive to radiation, and is prone to radiation-induced injury as a result. Neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) is an evolutionarily-conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor. NeuroD contains a protein transduction domain (PTD), which allows it to be exogenously delivered across the membrane of mammalian cells, whereupon its transcription activity can be unleashed. Whether NeuroD has therapeutic effects for radiation-induced injury remains unclear. In the present study, we prepared a NeuroD-EGFP recombinant protein, and explored its protective effects on the survival and intestinal damage induced by ionizing radiation. Our results showed that NeuroD-EGFP could be transduced into small intestine epithelial cells and tissues. NeuroD-EGFP administration significantly increased overall survival of mice exposed to lethal total body irradiation (TBI). This recombinant NeuroD also reduced radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury and apoptosis, and improved crypt survival. Expression profiling of NeuroD-EGFP-treated mice revealed upregulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), a known inhibitor of apoptosis in mammalian cells. In conclusion, NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury, and provides a novel therapeutic clinical option for the prevention of intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and the treatment of victims of incidental exposure. PMID:27436572

  12. A bioassay to measure energy metabolism in mouse colonic crypts, organoids, and sorted stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yang-Yi; Davidson, Laurie A.; Callaway, Evelyn S.; Wright, Gus A.; Safe, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that targeting cancer cell energy metabolism might be an effective therapeutic approach for selective ablation of malignancies. Using a Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer, we have demonstrated that select environmental agents can alter colonic mitochondrial function by increasing respiration-induced proton leak, thereby inducing apoptosis, a marker of colon cancer risk. To further probe bioenergetics in primary intestinal cells, we developed methodology that can be modified and adapted to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic crypts, the basic functional unit of the colon, and colonic organoids, an ex vivo 3D culture of colonic crypts. Furthermore, in combination with the MoFlo Astrios High-Speed Cell Sorter, we were able to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic adult stem and daughter cells from Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-creERT2 transgenic mice. We examined the effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a full arylhydrocarbon receptor agonist, known to affect gastrointestinal function and cancer risk, on the bioenergetic profiles of intestinal epithelial cells. Mouse colonic crypts, organoids, or sorted single cells were seeded onto Matrigel-precoated Seahorse XF24 microplates for extracellular flux analysis. Temporal analyses revealed distinct energy metabolic profiles in crypts and organoids challenged with TCDD. Furthermore, sorted Lgr5+ stem cells exhibited a Warburg-like metabolic profile. This is noteworthy because perturbations in stem cell dynamics are generally believed to represent the earliest step toward colon tumorigenesis. We propose that our innovative methodology may facilitate future in vivo/ex vivo metabolic studies using environmental agents affecting colonocyte energy metabolism. PMID:25977509

  13. A bioassay to measure energy metabolism in mouse colonic crypts, organoids, and sorted stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yang-Yi; Davidson, Laurie A; Callaway, Evelyn S; Wright, Gus A; Safe, Stephen; Chapkin, Robert S

    2015-07-01

    Evidence suggests that targeting cancer cell energy metabolism might be an effective therapeutic approach for selective ablation of malignancies. Using a Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer, we have demonstrated that select environmental agents can alter colonic mitochondrial function by increasing respiration-induced proton leak, thereby inducing apoptosis, a marker of colon cancer risk. To further probe bioenergetics in primary intestinal cells, we developed methodology that can be modified and adapted to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic crypts, the basic functional unit of the colon, and colonic organoids, an ex vivo 3D culture of colonic crypts. Furthermore, in combination with the MoFlo Astrios High-Speed Cell Sorter, we were able to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic adult stem and daughter cells from Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-creER(T2) transgenic mice. We examined the effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a full arylhydrocarbon receptor agonist, known to affect gastrointestinal function and cancer risk, on the bioenergetic profiles of intestinal epithelial cells. Mouse colonic crypts, organoids, or sorted single cells were seeded onto Matrigel-precoated Seahorse XF24 microplates for extracellular flux analysis. Temporal analyses revealed distinct energy metabolic profiles in crypts and organoids challenged with TCDD. Furthermore, sorted Lgr5(+) stem cells exhibited a Warburg-like metabolic profile. This is noteworthy because perturbations in stem cell dynamics are generally believed to represent the earliest step toward colon tumorigenesis. We propose that our innovative methodology may facilitate future in vivo/ex vivo metabolic studies using environmental agents affecting colonocyte energy metabolism. PMID:25977509

  14. Intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rege, Aparna; Sudan, Debra

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal transplantation has now emerged as a lifesaving therapeutic option and standard of care for patients with irreversible intestinal failure. Improvement in survival over the years has justified expansion of the indications for intestinal transplantation beyond the original indications approved by Center for Medicare and Medicaid services. Management of patients with intestinal failure is complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach to accurately select candidates who would benefit from rehabilitation versus transplantation. Significant strides have been made in patient and graft survival with several advancements in the perioperative management through timely referral, improved patient selection, refinement in the surgical techniques and better understanding of the immunopathology of intestinal transplantation. The therapeutic efficacy of the procedure is well evident from continuous improvements in functional status, quality of life and cost-effectiveness of the procedure. This current review summarizes various aspects including current practices and evidence based recommendations of intestinal transplantation. PMID:27086894

  15. A Two-Dimensional Model of the Colonic Crypt Accounting for the Role of the Basement Membrane and Pericryptal Fibroblast Sheath

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Sara-Jane; Appleton, Paul L.; Nelson, Scott A.; Näthke, Inke S.; Gavaghan, David J.; Osborne, James M.

    2012-01-01

    The role of the basement membrane is vital in maintaining the integrity and structure of an epithelial layer, acting as both a mechanical support and forming the physical interface between epithelial cells and the surrounding connective tissue. The function of this membrane is explored here in the context of the epithelial monolayer that lines the colonic crypt, test-tube shaped invaginations that punctuate the lining of the intestine and coordinate a regular turnover of cells to replenish the epithelial layer every few days. To investigate the consequence of genetic mutations that perturb the system dynamics and can lead to colorectal cancer, it must be possible to track the emerging tissue level changes that arise in the crypt. To that end, a theoretical crypt model with a realistic, deformable geometry is required. A new discrete crypt model is presented, which focuses on the interaction between cell- and tissue-level behaviour, while incorporating key subcellular components. The model contains a novel description of the role of the surrounding tissue and musculature, based upon experimental observations of the tissue structure of the crypt, which are also reported. A two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional geometry is considered, and the shape of the crypt is allowed to evolve and deform. Simulation results reveal how the shape of the crypt may contribute mechanically to the asymmetric division events typically associated with the stem cells at the base. The model predicts that epithelial cell migration may arise due to feedback between cell loss at the crypt collar and density-dependent cell division, an hypothesis which can be investigated in a wet lab. This work forms the basis for investigation of the deformation of the crypt structure that can occur due to proliferation of cells exhibiting mutant phenotypes, experiments that would not be possible in vivo or in vitro. PMID:22654652

  16. Distribution and survival of Escherichia coli translocating from the intestine after thermal injury.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J W; Gianotti, L; Pyles, T; Carey, M A; Babcock, G F

    1991-01-01

    The present investigation was performed to study the kinetics of tissue distribution and deposition of Escherichia coli and endotoxin translocating from the intestine after thermal injury. Escherichia coli was grown in the presence of 14C glucose and both labeled bacteria and endotoxin prepared from the labeled bacteria were used as translocation probes. Escherichia coli (10(8) to 10(10) bacteria) and E. coli endotoxin (100 micrograms per animal) were gavaged into the stomach immediately before a 30% burn injury was inflicted in mice. Animals were killed 1, 4 and 24 hours after burn injury. Translocation occurred extensively within 1 hour after burn injury. Expressed as amount of radioactivity per gram of tissue, translocation was greatest in the mesenteric lymph node (MLN) followed by spleen, lung, and liver. Translocation of endotoxin was similar to translocation of intact bacteria, with the exception that less radioactivity could be found in the peritoneal cavity and more in the liver. Both intact E. coli and endotoxin translocated directly through the intact bowel wall. Killing of bacteria was greatest in the MLN and spleen, approximating 95% to more than 99% of translocating bacteria. Killing efficiency was lowest in the lungs. It is concluded that estimation of translocation by viable bacterial counts in tissues grossly underestimates the extent of translocation of bacteria and ignores the extent of translocation of endotoxin. Translocation of endotoxin may have biologic significance that is independent of and in addition to translocation of intact bacteria. PMID:2039286

  17. Post Treatment With an FGF Chimeric Growth Factor Enhances Epithelial Cell Proliferation to Improve Recovery From Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Fumiaki; Hagiwara, Akiko; Umeda, Sachiko; Asada, Masahiro; Goto, Megumi; Oki, Junko; Suzuki, Masashi; Imamura, Toru; Akashi, Makoto

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: A fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 1-FGF2 chimera (FGFC) was created previously and showed greater structural stability than FGF1. This chimera was capable of stimulating epithelial cell proliferation much more strongly than FGF1 or FGF2 even without heparin. Therefore FGFC was expected to have greater biologic activity in vivo. This study evaluated and compared the protective activity of FGFC and FGF1 against radiation-induced intestinal injuries. Methods and Materials: We administered FGFC and FGF1 intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice 24 h before or after total-body irradiation (TBI). The numbers of surviving crypts were determined 3.5 days after TBI with gamma rays at doses ranging from 8 to 12 Gy. Results: The effect of FGFC was equal to or slightly superior to FGF1 with heparin. However, FGFC was significantly more effective in promoting crypt survival than FGF1 (p < 0.01) when 10 {mu}g of each FGF was administered without heparin before irradiation. In addition, FGFC was significantly more effective at promoting crypt survival (p < 0.05) than FGF1 even when administered without heparin at 24 h after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. We found that FGFC post treatment significantly promoted 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into crypts and increased crypt depth, resulting in more epithelial differentiation. However, the number of apoptotic cells in FGFC-treated mice decreased to almost the same level as that in FGF1-treated mice. Conclusions: These findings suggest that FGFC strongly enhanced radioprotection with the induction of epithelial proliferation without exogenous heparin after irradiation and is useful in clinical applications for both the prevention and post treatment of radiation injuries.

  18. INTESTINAL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Tzakis, Andreas G.; Todo, Satoru; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation is often the only alternative form of treatment for patients dependent on total parenteral nutrition for survival. Although a limited number of intestinal transplantations have been performed, results with FK 506 immunosuppression are comparable to those for other organ transplants. The impact of successful intestinal transplantation on gastroenterology will likely be similar to the impact of kidney and liver transplantation on nephrology and hepatology. PMID:7515221

  19. Effect of probiotic-fermented milk administration on gastrointestinal survival of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 and modulation of intestinal microbial flora.

    PubMed

    Sidira, Marianthi; Galanis, Alex; Ypsilantis, Petros; Karapetsas, Athanasios; Progaki, Zoi; Simopoulos, Constantinos; Kourkoutas, Yiannis

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the survival of free and immobilized Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 on apple pieces, contained in probiotic-fermented milk, after gastrointestinal (GI) transit and to investigate the potential regulation of intestinal microbial flora in a rat model. In in vitro GI stress tolerance tests, immobilized L. casei ATCC 393 exhibited significantly higher survival rates compared to free cells. At a second stage, probiotic-fermented milk produced by either free or immobilized cells was administered orally at a single dose or daily for 9 days in Wistar rats. By 12 h after single-dose administration, both free and immobilized cells were detected by microbiological and molecular analysis at levels ≥6 logCFU/g of feces. Moreover, daily administration led to significant reduction of staphylococci, enterobacteria, coliforms and streptococci counts. In conclusion, L. casei ATCC 393 contained in fermented milk survived GI transit and modulated intestinal microbiota. PMID:21160205

  20. Improving access to intestinal stem cells as a step toward intestinal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, J W; Lau, C; Jacomino, M; Finegold, M; Henning, S J

    1994-03-01

    In previous studies exploring the intestinal epithelium as a potential site for somatic gene therapy, we concluded that the mucus lining the intestine constitutes a significant barrier to any attempts at gene transfer via the lumenal route. The mucus problem is aggravated by the fact that the epithelial stem cells, which are the logical target for gene transfer, are located deep in the intestinal crypts. The goals of the current study were to develop procedures that would improve accessibility to the intestinal stem cells and which would effect in vivo mucus removal without damaging the underlying epithelium. Initial experiments involved evaluation of the use of distension to improve accessibility to the intestinal crypts and the use of the mucolytic agents dithiothreitol (DTT) and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) versus a control solution of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) for mucus removal. Catheters were inserted in each end of 3-cm terminal ileal segments in anesthetized rats. Two milliliters of agent was instilled into the clamped segment for 2 min, removed, and repeated. Lumenal distension resulted in shortened villi with wider intervillus spacing, thereby improving crypt access. Both NAC and DTT washes removed significant mucus between the villi but failed to reach the crypt lumen. To enhance mucus release from the crypt lumen, pilocarpine was selected due to its cholinergic properties and preferential binding to muscarinic receptors on crypt goblet cells. Pilocarpine given intraperitoneally 30 min prior to the mucolytic or PBS wash resulted in significant eradication of mucus down into the crypt lumen. This effect was still evident 3-4 hr later provided the intestine remained undisturbed. PMID:8018747

  1. Protective Role of Rheum Tanguticum Polysaccharide 1 in Radiation- induced Intestinal Mucosal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin-Na; Shi, Lei; Li, Shi-Cao; Zhang, Wen-Juan; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Zhi-Pei

    2015-01-01

    The protective effects of Rheum tanguticum polysaccharide 1 (RTP1), which is extracted from the Chinese traditional medicine Rheum tanguticum, on radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury was investigated. Rat intestinal crypt epithelial cells (IEC-6 cells) and Sprague-Dawley rats were each divided into control, irradiated and RTP1-pretreated irradiated groups. After irradiation, cell survival was determined by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide). assay, and the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected by fluorescent probe method. Apoptosis was observed by acridine orange staining, and cell cycle was analysed by flow cytometry. Histological analysis of the rat intestinal mucosa was conducted by haematoxylin and eosin staining. Irradiation at 8 Gy(Gray) decreased cell survival rate to only 54%, significantly increased intracellular ROS levels and induced apoptosis. RTP1 pretreatment significantly inhibited cell death, reduced the formation of intracellular ROS and partially inhibited apoptosis. Irradiation markedly reduced the height and quantity of rat intestinal villi, but it could be antagonised by RTP1 pretreatment. RTP1 can promote the recovery of intestinal mucosa damage, possibly by inhibiting radiation-induced intestinal epithelial apoptosis and intracellular ROS production. PMID:26330871

  2. Analysis of Cell Death Induction in Intestinal Organoids In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Grabinger, Thomas; Delgado, Eugenia; Brunner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has an important function in the absorption of nutrients contained in the food. Furthermore, it also has an important barrier function, preventing luminal pathogens from entering the bloodstream. This single cell layer epithelium is quite sensitive to various cell death-promoting triggers, including drugs, irradiation, and TNF family members, leading to loss of barrier integrity, epithelial erosion, inflammation, malabsorption, and diarrhea. In order to assess the intestinal epithelium-damaging potential of treatments and substances specific test systems are required. As intestinal tumor cell lines are a poor substitute for primary intestinal epithelial cells, and in vivo experiments in mice are costly and often unethical, the use of intestinal organoids cultured from intestinal crypts provide an ideal tool to study cell death induction and mechanisms in primary intestinal epithelial cells. This protocol describes the isolation and culture of intestinal organoids from murine small intestinal crypts, and the quantitative assessment of cell death induction in these organoids. PMID:27108433

  3. Apical Na(+)-D-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) activity and protein abundance are expressed along the jejunal crypt-villus axis in the neonatal pig

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gut apical Na(+)-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) activity is high at the birth and during suckling, thus contributing substantially to neonatal glucose homeostasis. We hypothesize that neonates possess high SGLT1 maximal activity by expressing apical SGLT1 protein along the intestinal crypt-villus a...

  4. Microencapsulation of Probiotics by Calcium Alginate-gelatinized Starch with Chitosan Coating and Evaluation of Survival in Simulated Human Gastro-intestinal Condition

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi Zanjani, Mohammad Ali; Ghiassi Tarzi, Babak; Sharifan, Anousheh; Mohammadi, Nima

    2014-01-01

    Microencapsulation as one of the most modern methods has considerable effects on probiotic survival. In this study Lactobacillus casei (ATCC 39392) and Bifidobacterium bifidum (ATCC 29521) were encapsulated using calcium alginate-gelatinized starch, chitosan coating and inulin via emulsion technique, and were incubated in simulated gastric juice (along with pepsin, pH=1.5) and simulated intestinal juice (along with pancreatin and bile salts, pH = 8) for 2 hours at 37 oC. The morphology and size of microcapsules were measured by scanning electron and optical microscopy. The results indicated that the survival of microencapsulated probiotic increased significantly in simulated gastro-intestinal condition (P < 0.05). Chitosan coating played a significant role in the protection of probiotic bacteria in simulated gastro-intestinal condition and the diameter of the microcapsules increased with the addition of chitosan coating. In general, this study indicated that microencapsulation with alginate-gelatinized starch coated with chitosan could successfully and significantly protect probiotic bacteria against adverse condition of simulated human gastro-intestinal condition. PMID:25276184

  5. Microencapsulation of Probiotics by Calcium Alginate-gelatinized Starch with Chitosan Coating and Evaluation of Survival in Simulated Human Gastro-intestinal Condition.

    PubMed

    Khosravi Zanjani, Mohammad Ali; Ghiassi Tarzi, Babak; Sharifan, Anousheh; Mohammadi, Nima

    2014-01-01

    Microencapsulation as one of the most modern methods has considerable effects on probiotic survival. In this study Lactobacillus casei (ATCC 39392) and Bifidobacterium bifidum (ATCC 29521) were encapsulated using calcium alginate-gelatinized starch, chitosan coating and inulin via emulsion technique, and were incubated in simulated gastric juice (along with pepsin, pH=1.5) and simulated intestinal juice (along with pancreatin and bile salts, pH = 8) for 2 hours at 37 (o)C. The morphology and size of microcapsules were measured by scanning electron and optical microscopy. The results indicated that the survival of microencapsulated probiotic increased significantly in simulated gastro-intestinal condition (P < 0.05). Chitosan coating played a significant role in the protection of probiotic bacteria in simulated gastro-intestinal condition and the diameter of the microcapsules increased with the addition of chitosan coating. In general, this study indicated that microencapsulation with alginate-gelatinized starch coated with chitosan could successfully and significantly protect probiotic bacteria against adverse condition of simulated human gastro-intestinal condition. PMID:25276184

  6. Curcumin affects cell survival and cell volume regulation in human renal and intestinal cells

    PubMed Central

    Kössler, Sonja; Nofziger, Charity; Jakab, Martin; Dossena, Silvia; Paulmichl, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin (1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1E,6E-heptadiene-3,5-dione or diferuloyl methane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, commonly known as turmeric. This substance has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries for its anti-oxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activity. More recently curcumin has been found to possess anti-cancer properties linked to its pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions. The underlying mechanisms of these diverse effects are complex, not fully elucidated and subject of intense scientific debate. Despite increasing evidence indicating that different cation channels can be a molecular target for curcumin, very little is known about the effect of curcumin on chloride channels. Since, (i) the molecular structure of curcumin indicates that the substance could potentially interact with chloride channels, (ii) chloride channels play a role during the apoptotic process and regulation of the cell volume, and (iii) apoptosis is a well known effect of curcumin, we set out to investigate whether or not curcumin could (i) exert a modulatory effect (direct or indirect) on the swelling activated chloride current IClswell in a human cell system, therefore (ii) affect cell volume regulation and (iii) ultimately modulate cell survival. The IClswell channels, which are essential for regulating the cell volume after swelling, are also known to be activated under isotonic conditions as an early event in the apoptotic process. Here we show that long-term exposure of a human kidney cell line to extracellular 0.1–10 μM curcumin modulates IClswell in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 μM curcumin is ineffective, 0.5–5.0 μM curcumin increase, while 10 μM curcumin decrease the current), and short-term exposure to micromolar concentrations of curcumin does not affect IClswell neither if applied from the extracellular nor from the intracellular side – therefore, a direct effect of curcumin on

  7. The characterization of an intestine-like genomic signature maintained during Barrett's-associated adenocarcinogenesis reveals an NR5A2-mediated promotion of cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Shane P; Behan, Fiona M; Kirca, Murat; Zaheer, Abdul; McGarrigle, Sarah A; Reynolds, John V; Vaz, Gisela M F; Senge, Mathias O; Kelleher, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    Barrett's oesophagus (BO), an intestinal-type metaplasia (IM), typically arising in conjunction with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, is a prominent risk factor for the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). The molecular similarities between IM and normal intestinal tissues are ill-defined. Consequently, the contribution of intestine-enriched factors expressed within BO to oncogenesis is unclear. Herein, using transcriptomics we define the intestine-enriched genes expressed in meta-profiles of BO and OAC. Interestingly, 77% of the genes differentially expressed in a meta-profile of BO were similarly expressed in intestinal tissues. Furthermore, 85% of this intestine-like signature was maintained upon transition to OAC. Gene networking analysis of transcription factors within this signature revealed a network centred upon NR5A2, GATA6 and FOXA2, whose over-expression was determined in a cohort of BO and OAC patients. Simulated acid reflux was observed to induce the expression of both NR5A2 and GATA6. Using siRNA-mediated silencing and an NR5A2 antagonist we demonstrate that NR5A2-mediated cancer cell survival is facilitated through augmentation of GATA6 and anti-apoptotic factor BCL-XL levels. Abrogation of NR5A2-GATA6 expression in conjunction with BCL-XL co-silencing resulted in synergistically increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutics and photo-dynamic therapeutics. These findings characterize the intestine-like signature associated with IM which may have important consequences to adenocarcinogenesis. PMID:27586588

  8. The characterization of an intestine-like genomic signature maintained during Barrett’s-associated adenocarcinogenesis reveals an NR5A2-mediated promotion of cancer cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Shane P.; Behan, Fiona M.; Kirca, Murat; Zaheer, Abdul; McGarrigle, Sarah A.; Reynolds, John V.; Vaz, Gisela M. F.; Senge, Mathias O.; Kelleher, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    Barrett’s oesophagus (BO), an intestinal-type metaplasia (IM), typically arising in conjunction with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, is a prominent risk factor for the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). The molecular similarities between IM and normal intestinal tissues are ill-defined. Consequently, the contribution of intestine-enriched factors expressed within BO to oncogenesis is unclear. Herein, using transcriptomics we define the intestine-enriched genes expressed in meta-profiles of BO and OAC. Interestingly, 77% of the genes differentially expressed in a meta-profile of BO were similarly expressed in intestinal tissues. Furthermore, 85% of this intestine-like signature was maintained upon transition to OAC. Gene networking analysis of transcription factors within this signature revealed a network centred upon NR5A2, GATA6 and FOXA2, whose over-expression was determined in a cohort of BO and OAC patients. Simulated acid reflux was observed to induce the expression of both NR5A2 and GATA6. Using siRNA-mediated silencing and an NR5A2 antagonist we demonstrate that NR5A2-mediated cancer cell survival is facilitated through augmentation of GATA6 and anti-apoptotic factor BCL-XL levels. Abrogation of NR5A2-GATA6 expression in conjunction with BCL-XL co-silencing resulted in synergistically increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutics and photo-dynamic therapeutics. These findings characterize the intestine-like signature associated with IM which may have important consequences to adenocarcinogenesis. PMID:27586588

  9. Protective effect of genistein on radiation-induced intestinal injury in tumor bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiation therapy is the most widely used treatment for cancer, but it causes the side effect of mucositis due to intestinal damage. We examined the protective effect of genistein in tumor-bearing mice after abdominal irradiation by evaluation of apoptosis and intestinal morphological changes. Methods Mouse colon cancer CT26 cells were subcutaneously injected at the flank of BALB/c mice to generate tumors. The tumor-bearing mice were treated with abdominal radiation at 5 and 10 Gy, and with genistein at 200 mg/kg body weight per day for 1 d before radiation. The changes in intestinal histology were evaluated 12 h and 3.5 d after irradiation. To assess the effect of the combination treatment on the cancer growth, the tumor volume was determined at sacrifice before tumor overgrowth occurred. Results Genistein significantly decreased the number of apoptotic nuclei compared with that in the irradiation group 12 h after 5 Gy irradiation. Evaluation of histological changes showed that genistein ameliorated intestinal morphological changes such as decreased crypt survival, villus shortening, and increased length of the basal lamina 3.5 d after 10 Gy irradiation. Moreover, the genistein-treated group exhibited more Ki-67-positive proliferating cells in the jejunum than the irradiated control group, and crypt depths were greater in the genistein-treated group than in the irradiated control group. The mean weight of the CT26 tumors was reduced in the group treated with genistein and radiation compared with the control group. Conclusion Genistein had a protective effect on intestinal damage induced by irradiation and delayed tumor growth. These results suggest that genistein is a useful candidate for preventing radiotherapy-induced intestinal damage in cancer patients. PMID:23672582

  10. Seasonal variations of DNA synthesis in intestinal epithelial cells of hibernating animals--I. DNA synthesis in intestinal epithelial cells of ground squirrel (Citellus undulatus) during deep hibernation.

    PubMed

    Kruman, I I; Kolaeva, S G; Iljasova, E N; Zubrikhina, G N; Khachko, V N; Petrova, A S

    1986-01-01

    The conditions for obtaining crypt cells from ground squirrel small intestine were chosen which allow flow-through cytofluorometric analysis of the DNA synthesis of this tissue. DNA synthesis was found to be greatly reduced in the intestinal crypt cells of ground squirrel during deep hibernation in torpid animals, in animals during spontaneous arousals and in animals prevented from hibernation. The conclusion is made about endogenous control of the DNA synthesis in the cells of true hibernators. PMID:3943302

  11. Elp3 drives Wnt-dependent tumor initiation and regeneration in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Ladang, Aurélie; Rapino, Francesca; Heukamp, Lukas C; Tharun, Lars; Shostak, Kateryna; Hermand, Damien; Delaunay, Sylvain; Klevernic, Iva; Jiang, Zheshen; Jacques, Nicolas; Jamart, Diane; Migeot, Valérie; Florin, Alexandra; Göktuna, Serkan; Malgrange, Brigitte; Sansom, Owen J; Nguyen, Laurent; Büttner, Reinhard; Close, Pierre; Chariot, Alain

    2015-11-16

    Tumor initiation in the intestine can rapidly occur from Lgr5(+) crypt columnar stem cells. Dclk1 is a marker of differentiated Tuft cells and, when coexpressed with Lgr5, also marks intestinal cancer stem cells. Here, we show that Elp3, the catalytic subunit of the Elongator complex, is required for Wnt-driven intestinal tumor initiation and radiation-induced regeneration by maintaining a subpool of Lgr5(+)/Dclk1(+)/Sox9(+) cells. Elp3 deficiency dramatically delayed tumor appearance in Apc-mutated intestinal epithelia and greatly prolonged mice survival without affecting the normal epithelium. Specific ablation of Elp3 in Lgr5(+) cells resulted in marked reduction of polyp formation upon Apc inactivation, in part due to a decreased number of Lgr5(+)/Dclk1(+)/Sox9(+) cells. Mechanistically, Elp3 is induced by Wnt signaling and promotes Sox9 translation, which is needed to maintain the subpool of Lgr5(+)/Dclk1(+) cancer stem cells. Consequently, Elp3 or Sox9 depletion led to similar defects in Dclk1(+) cancer stem cells in ex vivo organoids. Finally, Elp3 deficiency strongly impaired radiation-induced intestinal regeneration, in part because of decreased Sox9 protein levels. Together, our data demonstrate the crucial role of Elp3 in maintaining a subpopulation of Lgr5-derived and Sox9-expressing cells needed to trigger Wnt-driven tumor initiation in the intestine. PMID:26527802

  12. Urokinase and the intestinal mucosa: evidence for a role in epithelial cell turnover

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, P; Birchall, I; Rosella, O; Albert, V; Finch, C; Barkla, D; Young, G

    1998-01-01

    Background—The functions of urokinase in intestinal epithelia are unknown. 
Aims—To determine the relation of urokinase expressed by intestinal epithelial cells to their position in the crypt-villus/surface axis and of mucosal urokinase activity to epithelial proliferative kinetics in the distal colon. 
Methods—Urokinase expression was examined immunohistochemically in human intestinal mucosa. Urokinase activity was measured colorimetrically in epithelial cells isolated sequentially from the crypt-villus axis of the rat small intestine. In separate experiments, urokinase activity and epithelial kinetics (measured stathmokinetically) were measured in homogenates of distal colonic mucosa of 14 groups of eight rats fed diets known to alter epithelial turnover. 
Results—From the crypt base, an ascending gradient of expression and activity of urokinase was associated with the epithelial cells. Median mucosal urokinase activities in each of the dietary groups of rats correlated positively with autologous median number of metaphase arrests per crypt (r=0.68; p<0.005) and per 100 crypt cells (r=0.75; p<0.001), but not with crypt column height. 
Conclusions—Localisation of an enzyme capable of leading to digestion of cell substratum in the region where cells are loosely attached to their basement membrane, and the association of its activity with indexes of cell turnover, suggest a role for urokinase in facilitating epithelial cell loss in the intestine. 

 Keywords: urokinase; intestinal epithelium; colon; epithelial proliferation PMID:9824347

  13. Technological characterization and survival of the exopolysaccharide-producing strain Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis 193 and its bile-resistant derivative 193+ in simulated gastric and intestinal juices.

    PubMed

    Burns, Patricia; Vinderola, Gabriel; Reinheimer, Jorge; Cuesta, Isabel; de Los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia

    2011-08-01

    The capacity of lactic acid bacteria to produce exopolysaccharides (EPS) conferring microorganisms a ropy phenotype could be an interesting feature from a technological point of view. Progressive adaptation to bile salts might render some lactobacilli able to overcome physiological gut barriers but could also modify functional properties of the strain, including the production of EPS. In this work some technological properties and the survival ability in simulated gastrointestinal conditions of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis 193, and Lb. delbrueckii subsp. lactis 193+, a strain with stable bile-resistant phenotype derived thereof, were characterized in milk in order to know whether the acquisition of resistance to bile could modify some characteristics of the microorganism. Both strains were able to grow and acidify milk similarly; however the production of ethanol increased at the expense of the aroma compound acetaldehyde in milk fermented by the strain 193+, with respect to milk fermented by the strain 193. Both microorganisms produced a heteropolysaccharide composed of glucose and galactose, and were able to increase the viscosity of fermented milks. In spite of the higher production yield of EPS by the bile-resistant strain 193+, it displayed a lower ability to increase viscosity than Lb. delbrueckii subsp. lactis 193. Milk increased survival in simulated gastric juice; the presence of bile improved adhesion to the intestinal cell line HT29-MTX in both strains. However, the acquisition of a stable resistance phenotype did not improve survival in simulated gastric and intestinal conditions or the adhesion to the intestinal cell line HT29-MTX. Thus, Lb. delbrueckii subsp. lactis 193 presents suitable technological properties for the manufacture of fermented dairy products; the acquisition of a stable bile-resistant phenotype modified some properties of the microorganism. This suggests that the possible use of bile-resistant derivative strains should be

  14. 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E/sub 2/ increases survival of murine intestinal stem cells when given before photon radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, W.R.; Thomas, C.

    1983-11-01

    A variety of prostaglandins (PG) protect the gastric and intestinal mucosa when given before damaging agents as absolute ethanol, acidified taurocholate, boiling water, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAI). A synthetic prostaglandin, 16,16-dimethyl PGE/sub 2/, shown to be cytoprotective at physiologic levels to the above agents was given to mice 1 h before or 15 min after /sup 137/Cs gamma(..gamma..) whole-body irradiation. The survival of intestinal stem cells measured by their ability to form in situ colonies of regenerating epithelium was increased stem cells measured by their ability to form in situ colonies of regenerating epithelium was increased when 16,16-dimethyl PGE/sub 2/ was given before but not after /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. irradiation. The maximum degree of 16,16-dimethyl PGE/sub 2/-induced radioprotection was seen when the drug was given 1 h before irradiation. No radioprotection was seen when the interval between drug and irradiation was 3 h or longer. When the time between 16,16-dimethyl PGE/sub 2/ and irradiation was kept at 1 h, the degree of radioprotection was dependent on the PG drug dose. There was a steep rise in the number of surviving cells at low doses of PG. These results imply that tumors which secrete PGE/sub 2/ may in part be protected from the lethal effects of ionizing photon radiation.

  15. Blockade of the integrin αLβ2 but not of integrins α4 and/or β7 significantly prolongs intestinal allograft survival in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sarnacki, S; Auber, F; Cretolle, C; Camby, C; Cavazzana-Calvo, M; Muller, W; Wagner, N; Brousse, N; Revillon, Y; Fischer, A; Cerf-Bensussan, N

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Small bowel transplantation remains a difficult therapeutic option endangered by a high rate of rejection and infectious complications. To improve these clinical results, it is mandatory to set up animal models to test alternative immunosuppressive regimens which may lead to immunotolerance.
AIMS—To determine the value of blockade of αLβ2 (LFA-1) and α4 and β7 integrins (α4β1, α4β7, and αEβ7) in the prevention of rejection of fetal small bowel grafts in mice and the effect of the association of calcineurin dependent drugs in anti-LFA-1 treated mice.
METHODS—Adult recipient mice engrafted with allogeneic fetal small bowel received a short course of anti-α4 and/or anti-LFA-1 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) with or without FK506 or cyclosporin A. In addition, in a set of experiment, β7−/− mice were used as recipients. Graft biopsies were performed and processed for standard histology.
RESULTS—Blockade of the pathways of the integrins α4 and β7 had a modest or no effect on intestinal graft survival. In contrast, transitory, short administration of anti-LFA-1 monoclonal antibody alone, when started before engraftment (day −1), allowed long term survival of intestinal grafts, even when associated with calcineurin dependent drugs. However, early withdrawal of FK506 reversed the immunosuppressive effect of anti-LFA-1 treatment.
CONCLUSION—These results suggest that firstly, anti-LFA-1, but not anti-α4 mAb treatment, may be useful in improving the results of intestinal transplantation, and secondly, that this treatment is not incompatible with long term administration of tacrolimus currently used in the prevention of small bowel graft rejection in humans.


Keywords: small bowel transplantation; integrins; calcineurin; tolerance; mouse PMID:10861270

  16. Isolation, Culture, and Maintenance of Mouse Intestinal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Kevin P.; Ackerman, Sarah; Dow, Lukas E; Lowe, Scott W

    2016-01-01

    In this protocol we describe our modifications to a method to isolate, culture and maintain mouse intestinal stem cells as crypt-villus forming organoids. These cells, isolated either from the small or large intestine, maintain self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potential over time. This provides investigators a tool to culture wild type or transformed intestinal epithelium, and a robust assay for stem cell tissue homeostasis in vitro.

  17. Microbial influences on the small intestinal response to radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Packey, Christopher D.; Ciorba, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Injury to the small bowel from ionizing radiation occurs commonly in patients undergoing cancer therapy and less commonly in instances of accidental radiation overexposure. Several lines of evidence now suggest that dynamic interactions between the host’s enteric microbiota and innate immune system are important in modulating the intestinal response to radiation. Here, we will review recent developments in the area of acute radiation enteropathy and examine the current state of knowledge regarding the impact of host–microbial interactions in the process. Recent findings There is promise in the development and testing of new clinical biomarkers including serum citrulline. Toll-like receptor agonists and innate immune system signaling pathways including nuclear factor-kappa B profoundly alter intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and crypt survival after radiation exposure. Germ-free conditions, probiotics and antibiotics are each identified as modifiers of disease development and course. A human study suggested that luminal microbiota composition may influence the host’s intestinal response to radiation and may change in those developing postradiation diarrhea. Summary New knowledge implies that investigations aimed at deciphering the microbiome–host interactions before and after small bowl radiation injury may eventually allow prediction of disease course and offer opportunities for the development of novel therapeutic or prophylactic strategies. PMID:20040865

  18. Chromoendoscopy with a Standard-Resolution Colonoscope for Evaluation of Rectal Aberrant Crypt Foci.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Marek; Siermontowski, Piotr; Mucha, Dariusz; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Orłowski, Marcin; Zinkiewicz, Krzysztof; Kurpiewski, Waldemar; Paśnik, Krzysztof; Kowalczyk, Iwona; Pedrycz, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of death worldwide. According to the theory by Vogelstein, colorectal carcinogenesis involves a series of successive changes in the normal colonic mucosa, starting with excessive proliferation and focal disorders of intestinal crypts, followed by adenoma and its subsequent malignant transformation. The first identifiable changes in CRC carcinogenesis are aberrant crypt foci (ACF). ACF are invisible during routine colonoscopy yet are well identifiable in chromoendoscopy using methylene blue or indigo carmine. High-resolution colonoscopes are used for assessment of ACF. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of standard-resolution colonoscopy for identification of rectal ACF. The following parameters were evaluated: duration of chromoendoscopy of a given rectal segment, type of ACF, sensitivity and specificity of endoscopy combined with histopathological evaluation. The mean duration of colonoscopy and chromoendoscopy was 26.8 min. In the study population, typical ACF were found in 73 patients (p = 0.489), hyperplastic ACF in 49 (p = 0.328), and dysplastic ACF in 16 patients (p = 0.107). Mixed ACF were observed in 11 individuals (p = 0.073). The sensitivity of the method was found to be 0.96 whereas its specificity 0.99. Identification of rectal ACF using standard-resolution colonoscopy combined with rectal mucosa staining with 0.25% methylene blue is characterised by high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26886097

  19. Chromoendoscopy with a Standard-Resolution Colonoscope for Evaluation of Rectal Aberrant Crypt Foci

    PubMed Central

    Orłowski, Marcin; Zinkiewicz, Krzysztof; Kurpiewski, Waldemar; Kowalczyk, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of death worldwide. According to the theory by Vogelstein, colorectal carcinogenesis involves a series of successive changes in the normal colonic mucosa, starting with excessive proliferation and focal disorders of intestinal crypts, followed by adenoma and its subsequent malignant transformation. The first identifiable changes in CRC carcinogenesis are aberrant crypt foci (ACF). ACF are invisible during routine colonoscopy yet are well identifiable in chromoendoscopy using methylene blue or indigo carmine. High-resolution colonoscopes are used for assessment of ACF. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of standard-resolution colonoscopy for identification of rectal ACF. The following parameters were evaluated: duration of chromoendoscopy of a given rectal segment, type of ACF, sensitivity and specificity of endoscopy combined with histopathological evaluation. The mean duration of colonoscopy and chromoendoscopy was 26.8 min. In the study population, typical ACF were found in 73 patients (p = 0.489), hyperplastic ACF in 49 (p = 0.328), and dysplastic ACF in 16 patients (p = 0.107). Mixed ACF were observed in 11 individuals (p = 0.073). The sensitivity of the method was found to be 0.96 whereas its specificity 0.99. Identification of rectal ACF using standard-resolution colonoscopy combined with rectal mucosa staining with 0.25% methylene blue is characterised by high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26886097

  20. Krüppel-Like Factor 5 Promotes Epithelial Proliferation and DNA Damage Repair in the Intestine of Irradiated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Gu, Yuan; Ma, Yan-Chao; Shang, Zeng-Fu; Wang, Chang; Liu, Fen-Ju; Cao, Jian-Ping; Wan, Hua-Jing; Zhang, Xue-Guang

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: High doses of radiation induce severe DNA damage in intestinal epithelial cells, especially crypt cells, and cause intestinal injury, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5), a zinc finger-containing transcription factor, is induced by various stress stimuli and is involved in cell proliferation and survival. The role of KLF5 in radiation-induced intestinal injury was investigated here. METHODS: Wild type mice were treated with 8 or 15 Gy total body irradiation (TBI). KLF5 content and cellular localization in the small intestines of irradiated mice were detected by Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis. Mice with intestinal-specific knockdown of KLF5 (Vil-Cre; Klf5fl/+ mice) were generated and their response to radiation was compared with controls. Morphological changes were determined by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Proliferation was examined by Ki67 immunostaining. The molecular response of the small intestine after KLF5 knockdown was investigated using microarrays. RESULTS: KLF5 expression correlated with the progression of intestinal damage. Decreased levels of KLF5 in the gut were associated with increased damage to the intestinal mucosa and reduced epithelial proliferation after TBI. Our microarray data disclosed that KLF5 knockdown down-regulated genes related to DNA damage repair pathways such as nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, non-homologous end joining and the Fanconi anemia pathway, which may suggest a novel function of KLF5. CONCLUSIONS: Our study illustrates that KLF5 may modulate DNA repair pathways to prevent intestinal injury induced by TBI. KLF5 signaling provides a novel field for identification of potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of radiation-induced intestinal damage. PMID:26681925

  1. WNT signaling controls expression of pro-apoptotic BOK and BAX in intestinal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zeilstra, Jurrit; Joosten, Sander P.J.; Wensveen, Felix M.; Dessing, Mark C.; Schuetze, Denise M.; Eldering, Eric; Spaargaren, Marcel; Pals, Steven T.

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Intestinal adenomas initiated by aberrant activation of the WNT pathway displayed an increased sensitivity to apoptosis. {yields} Expression profiling of apoptosis-related genes in Apc{sup Min/+} mice revealed the differential expression of pro-apoptotic Bok and Bax. {yields} APC-mutant adenomatous crypts in FAP patients showed strongly increased BAX immunoreactivity. {yields} Blocking of {beta}-catenin/TCF-4-mediated signaling in colon cancer cells reduced the expression of BOK and BAX. -- Abstract: In a majority of cases, colorectal cancer is initiated by aberrant activation of the WNT signaling pathway. Mutation of the genes encoding the WNT signaling components adenomatous polyposis coli or {beta}-catenin causes constitutively active {beta}-catenin/TCF-mediated transcription, driving the transformation of intestinal crypts to cancer precursor lesions, called dysplastic aberrant crypt foci. Deregulated apoptosis is a hallmark of adenomatous colon tissue. However, the contribution of WNT signaling to this process is not fully understood. We addressed this role by analyzing the rate of epithelial apoptosis in aberrant crypts and adenomas of the Apc{sup Min/+} mouse model. In comparison with normal crypts and adenomas, aberrant crypts displayed a dramatically increased rate of apoptotic cell death. Expression profiling of apoptosis-related genes along the crypt-villus axis and in Apc mutant adenomas revealed increased expression of two pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members in intestinal adenomas, Bok and Bax. Analysis of the colon of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients along the crypt-to-surface axis, and of dysplastic crypts, corroborated this expression pattern. Disruption of {beta}-catenin/TCF-4-mediated signaling in the colorectal cancer cell line Ls174T significantly decreased BOK and BAX expression, confirming WNT-dependent regulation in intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a feedback mechanism by which

  2. Epigenetics in Intestinal Epithelial Cell Renewal.

    PubMed

    Roostaee, Alireza; Benoit, Yannick D; Boudjadi, Salah; Beaulieu, Jean-François

    2016-11-01

    A controlled balance between cell proliferation and differentiation is essential to maintain normal intestinal tissue renewal and physiology. Such regulation is powered by several intracellular pathways that are translated into the establishment of specific transcription programs, which influence intestinal cell fate along the crypt-villus axis. One important check-point in this process occurs in the transit amplifying zone of the intestinal crypts where different signaling pathways and transcription factors cooperate to manage cellular proliferation and differentiation, before secretory or absorptive cell lineage terminal differentiation. However, the importance of epigenetic modifications such as histone methylation and acetylation in the regulation of these processes is still incompletely understood. There have been recent advances in identifying the impact of histone modifications and chromatin remodelers on the proliferation and differentiation of normal intestinal crypt cells. In this review we discuss recent discoveries on the role of the cellular epigenome in intestinal cell fate, development, and tissue renewal. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2361-2367, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061836

  3. DNA-based watermarks using the DNA-Crypt algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Heider, Dominik; Barnekow, Angelika

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the application of watermarks based on DNA sequences to identify the unauthorized use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) protected by patents. Predicted mutations in the genome can be corrected by the DNA-Crypt program leaving the encrypted information intact. Existing DNA cryptographic and steganographic algorithms use synthetic DNA sequences to store binary information however, although these sequences can be used for authentication, they may change the target DNA sequence when introduced into living organisms. Results The DNA-Crypt algorithm and image steganography are based on the same watermark-hiding principle, namely using the least significant base in case of DNA-Crypt and the least significant bit in case of the image steganography. It can be combined with binary encryption algorithms like AES, RSA or Blowfish. DNA-Crypt is able to correct mutations in the target DNA with several mutation correction codes such as the Hamming-code or the WDH-code. Mutations which can occur infrequently may destroy the encrypted information, however an integrated fuzzy controller decides on a set of heuristics based on three input dimensions, and recommends whether or not to use a correction code. These three input dimensions are the length of the sequence, the individual mutation rate and the stability over time, which is represented by the number of generations. In silico experiments using the Ypt7 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that the DNA watermarks produced by DNA-Crypt do not alter the translation of mRNA into protein. Conclusion The program is able to store watermarks in living organisms and can maintain the original information by correcting mutations itself. Pairwise or multiple sequence alignments show that DNA-Crypt produces few mismatches between the sequences similar to all steganographic algorithms. PMID:17535434

  4. Small intestine histomorphometry of beef cattle with divergent feed efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The provision of feed is a major cost in beef production. Therefore, the improvement of feed efficiency is warranted. The direct assessment of feed efficiency has limitations and alternatives are needed. Small intestine micro-architecture is associated with function and may be related to feed efficiency. The objective was to verify the potential histomorphological differences in the small intestine of animals with divergent feed efficiency. Methods From a population of 45 feedlot steers, 12 were selected with low-RFI (superior feed efficiency) and 12 with high-RFI (inferior feed efficiency) at the end of the finishing period. The animals were processed at 13.79 ± 1.21 months of age. Within 1.5 h of slaughter the gastrointestinal tract was collected and segments from duodenum and ileum were harvested. Tissue fragments were processed, sectioned and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Photomicroscopy images were taken under 1000x magnification. For each animal 100 intestinal crypts were imaged, in a cross section view, from each of the two intestinal segments. Images were analyzed using the software ImageJ®. The measurements taken were: crypt area, crypt perimeter, crypt lumen area, nuclei number and the cell size was indirectly calculated. Data were analyzed using general linear model and correlation procedures of SAS®. Results Efficient beef steers (low-RFI) have a greater cellularity (indicated by nuclei number) in the small intestinal crypts, both in duodenum and ileum, than less efficient beef steers (high-RFI) (P < 0.05). The mean values for the nuclei number of the low-RFI and high-RFI groups were 33.16 and 30.30 in the duodenum and 37.21 and 33.65 in the ileum, respectively. The average size of the cells did not differ between feed efficiency groups in both segments (P ≥ 0.10). A trend was observed (P ≤ 0.10) for greater crypt area and crypt perimeter in the ileum for cattle with improved feed efficiency. Conclusion

  5. Colostrum quality affects immune system establishment and intestinal development of neonatal calves.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Zou, Y; Wu, Z H; Li, S L; Cao, Z J

    2015-10-01

    The first meal of a neonatal calf after birth is crucial for survival and health. The present experiment was performed to assess the effects of colostrum quality on IgG passive transfer, immune and antioxidant status, and intestinal morphology and histology in neonatal calves. Twenty-eight Holstein neonatal male calves were used in the current study, 24 of which were assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups: those that received colostrum (GrC), transitional milk (GrT, which was obtained after the first milking on 2-3 d after calving), and bulk tank milk (GrB) only at birth. The 4 extra neonatal calves who were not fed any milk were assigned to the control group and were killed immediately after birth to be a negative control to small intestinal morphology and histology detection. Calves in GrC gained more body weight than in GrT, whereas GrB calves lost 0.4 kg compared with the birth weight. Serum total protein, IgG, and superoxide dismutase concentrations were highest in GrC, GrT was intermediate, whereas GrB was the lowest on d 2, 3, and 7. Apparent efficiency of absorption at 48 h, serum complement 3 (C3), and complement 4 (C4) on d 2, 3, and 7 in GrB was low compared with GrC and GrT. On the contrary, malondialdehyde on d 7 increased in GrB. Calves in GrC had better villus length and width, crypt depth, villus height/crypt depth (V/C) value, and mucosal thickness in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, whereas GrT calves had lower villus length and width, crypt depth, and mucosal thickness than those fed colostrum. Villi of calves in GrB were nonuniform, sparse, severely atrophied, and apically abscised, and Peyer's patches and hydroncus were detected. Overall, colostrum is the best source for calves in IgG absorption, antioxidant activities, and serum growth metabolites, and promoting intestinal development. The higher quality of colostrum calves ingested, the faster immune defense mechanism and the more healthy intestinal circumstances they established. PMID:26233454

  6. Polyphosphate kinases modulate Campylobacter jejuni outer membrane constituents and alter its capacity to invade and survive in intestinal epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pina-Mimbela, Ruby; Madrid, Jesús Arcos; Kumar, Anand; Torrelles, Jordi B; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most prevalent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Polyphosphate kinases 1 and 2 (PPK1 and PPK2) regulate several cellular processes, including the biosynthesis of the bacterial cell wall. Despite their importance, whether PPK1 and PPK2 modulate the composition of C. jejuni outer membrane constituents (OMCs) and consequently impact its interaction with host cells remains unknown. Our comparative analysis between C. jejuni wild type, Δppk1, and Δppk2 strains showed qualitative and quantitative differences in the total OMC composition among these strains. Importantly, these OMC variations observed on the C. jejuni polyphosphate kinase mutants are directly related to their capacity to invade, survive, and alter the immune response of intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Specifically, sub-fractionation of the C. jejuni OMC indicated that OMC proteins are uniquely associated with bacterial invasion, whereas C. jejuni OMC proteins, lipids, and lipoglycans are all associated with C. jejuni intracellular survival. This study provides new insights regarding the function of polyphosphate kinases and their role in C. jejuni infection. PMID:26714783

  7. Element concentrations in the intestinal mucosa of the mouse as measured by X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    von Zglinicki, T; Roomans, G M

    1989-06-01

    Subcellular ion distribution in villus, crypt, Paneth and smooth muscle cells of the mouse small intestine under resting conditions was investigated by X-ray microanalysis of ultrathin cryosections. In addition, the mass distribution was estimated by measuring the optical transmission of the compartments in transmission electron micrographs. Each cell type is characterized by a special composition in terms of the major monovalent ions Na, K, and Cl. In particular, among crypt epithelial cells, those cells containing small secretion granula (termed crypt A cells) also display cytoplasmic ion concentrations significantly different from crypt epithelial cells lacking secretion granula (crypt B cells). Monovalent ion concentrations in the cytoplasm of Paneth cells, muscle cells, and crypt epithelial cells lacking secretion granula are higher than expected from osmotic considerations. Hence, significant binding of ions to cytoplasmic polyelectrolytes is assumed in these cells. There are gradients of dry mass and K concentration from the luminal to the basal side of the cell, both in crypt and in villus cells. The terminal web in these cells is rich in Na and Cl. The elemental composition of the large, dark secretion granula in Paneth cells is similar to that of the small dark granula in crypt cells. However, the two morphologically different types of granula within the Paneth cells have a significantly different elemental composition, which might reflect maturation of secretion granula. PMID:2814397

  8. Cell invasion and survival of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli within cultured human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Fabiana; da Silva, Rita Ifuoe K; Vargas-Stampe, Thaís L Z; Cerqueira, Aloysio M F; Andrade, João R C

    2013-08-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause severe human infections and their virulence abilities are not fully understood. Cattle are a key reservoir, and the terminal rectum is the principal site of bacterial carriage. Most STEC possess a pathogenicity island termed the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE). Nonetheless, LEE-negative STEC have been associated with disease. We found that invasion of LEE-positive and LEE-negative strains was higher for human enterocytic cell lines and for undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Intracellular bacteria could be detected as early as 5 min after infection and transmission electron microscopy showed bacteria within membrane-bound vacuoles. STEC invasion depended on actin microfilaments and protein kinases. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that bacterial entry was not associated with membrane ruffling. Absence of macropinocytosis or actin rearrangement at the entry points suggests a zipper-like entry mechanism. Disruption of the tight junction by EGTA enhanced invasion of Caco-2 monolayers, and bacterial invasion mostly proceeded through the basolateral pole of enterocytes. STEC persisted within Caco-2 cells for up to 96 h without cell death and bacterial viability increased after 48 h, suggesting intracellular multiplication. The relatively harmless intracellular localization of STEC can be an efficient strategy to prevent its elimination from the bovine intestinal tract. PMID:23704791

  9. Transforming growth factor-beta mediates intestinal healing and susceptibility to injury in vitro and in vivo through epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Beck, Paul L; Rosenberg, Ian M; Xavier, Ramnik J; Koh, Theodore; Wong, Josée F; Podolsky, Daniel K

    2003-02-01

    In vitro studies suggest that transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta has potent effects on gastrointestinal mucosal integrity, wound repair, and neoplasia. However, the multiplicity of actions of this peptide on many different cell types confounds efforts to define the role of TGF-beta within the intestinal epithelium in vivo. To delineate these effects selective blockade of intestinal epithelial TGF-beta activity was undertaken through targeted expression of a dominant-negative (DN) TGF-beta RII to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Stable intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-6 lines overexpressing TGF-beta RII-DN (nucleotides -7 to 573) were established. Transgenic mice overexpressing TGF-beta RII-DN under the regulation of a modified liver fatty acid-binding promoter (LFABP-PTS4) were constructed. In vitro healing was assessed by wounding of confluent monolayers. Colitis was induced by the addition of dextran sodium sulfate (2.5 to 7.5% w/v) to their drinking water. Overexpression of TGF-beta RII-DN in intestinal epithelial cell-6 cells resulted in a marked reduction in cell migration and TGF-beta-stimulated wound healing in vitro. TGF-beta RII-DN transgenic mice did not exhibit baseline intestinal inflammation or changes in survival, body weight, epithelial cell proliferation, aberrant crypt foci, or tumor formation. TGF-beta RII-DN mice were markedly more susceptible to dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and exhibited impaired recovery after colonic injury. TGF-beta is required for intestinal mucosal healing and TGF-beta modulation of the intestinal epithelium plays a central role in determining susceptibility to injury. PMID:12547717

  10. PAR2-dependent activation of GSK3β regulates the survival of colon stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Imen; Bonnet, Delphine; Zwarycz, Bailey; d'Aldebert, Emilie; Khou, Sokchea; Mezghani-Jarraya, Raoudha; Quaranta, Muriel; Rolland, Corinne; Bonnart, Chrystelle; Mas, Emmanuel; Ferrand, Audrey; Cenac, Nicolas; Magness, Scott; Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Racaud-Sultan, Claire

    2016-08-01

    Protease-activated receptors PAR1 and PAR2 play an important role in the control of epithelial cell proliferation and migration. However, the survival of normal and tumor intestinal stem/progenitor cells promoted by proinflammatory mediators may be critical in oncogenesis. The glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) pathway is overactivated in colon cancer cells and promotes their survival and drug resistance. We thus aimed to determine PAR1 and PAR2 effects on normal and tumor intestinal stem/progenitor cells and whether they involved GSK3β. First, PAR1 and PAR2 were identified in colon stem/progenitor cells by immunofluorescence. In three-dimensional cultures of murine crypt units or single tumor Caco-2 cells, PAR2 activation decreased numbers and size of normal or cancerous spheroids, and PAR2-deficient spheroids showed increased proliferation, indicating that PAR2 represses proliferation. PAR2-stimulated normal cells were more resistant to stress (serum starvation or spheroid passaging), suggesting prosurvival effects of PAR2 Accordingly, active caspase-3 was strongly increased in PAR2-deficient normal spheroids. PAR2 but not PAR1 triggered GSK3β activation through serine-9 dephosphorylation in normal and tumor cells. The PAR2-triggered GSK3β activation implicates an arrestin/PP2A/GSK3β complex that is dependent on the Rho kinase activity. Loss of PAR2 was associated with high levels of GSK3β nonactive form, strengthening the role of PAR2 in GSK3β activation. GSK3 pharmacological inhibition impaired the survival of PAR2-stimulated spheroids and serum-starved cells. Altogether our data identify PAR2/GSK3β as a novel pathway that plays a critical role in the regulation of stem/progenitor cell survival and proliferation in normal colon crypts and colon cancer. PMID:27313176

  11. Crypt cells are involved in kin recognition in larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Biechl, Daniela; Tietje, Kristin; Gerlach, Gabriele; Wullimann, Mario F.

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish larvae imprint on visual and olfactory kin cues at day 5 and 6 postfertilization, respectively, resulting in kin recognition later in life. Exposure to non-kin cues prevents imprinting and kin recognition. Imprinting depends on MHC class II related signals and only larvae sharing MHC class II alleles can imprint on each other. Here, we analyzed which type of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) detects kin odor. The single teleost olfactory epithelium harbors ciliated OSNs carrying OR and TAAR gene family receptors (mammals: main olfactory epithelium) and microvillous OSNs with V1R and V2R gene family receptors (mammals: vomeronasal organ). Additionally, teleosts exhibit crypt cells which possess microvilli and cilia. We used the activity marker pERK (phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase) after stimulating 9 day old zebrafish larvae with either non-kin conspecific or food odor. While food odor activated both ciliated and microvillous OSNs, only the latter were activated by conspecific odor, crypt cells showed no activation to both stimuli. Then, we tested imprinted and non-imprinted larvae (full siblings) for kin odor detection. We provide the first direct evidence that crypt cells, and likely a subpopulation of microvillous OSNs, but not ciliated OSNs, play a role in detecting a kin odor related signal. PMID:27087508

  12. Crypt cells are involved in kin recognition in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Biechl, Daniela; Tietje, Kristin; Gerlach, Gabriele; Wullimann, Mario F

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish larvae imprint on visual and olfactory kin cues at day 5 and 6 postfertilization, respectively, resulting in kin recognition later in life. Exposure to non-kin cues prevents imprinting and kin recognition. Imprinting depends on MHC class II related signals and only larvae sharing MHC class II alleles can imprint on each other. Here, we analyzed which type of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) detects kin odor. The single teleost olfactory epithelium harbors ciliated OSNs carrying OR and TAAR gene family receptors (mammals: main olfactory epithelium) and microvillous OSNs with V1R and V2R gene family receptors (mammals: vomeronasal organ). Additionally, teleosts exhibit crypt cells which possess microvilli and cilia. We used the activity marker pERK (phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase) after stimulating 9 day old zebrafish larvae with either non-kin conspecific or food odor. While food odor activated both ciliated and microvillous OSNs, only the latter were activated by conspecific odor, crypt cells showed no activation to both stimuli. Then, we tested imprinted and non-imprinted larvae (full siblings) for kin odor detection. We provide the first direct evidence that crypt cells, and likely a subpopulation of microvillous OSNs, but not ciliated OSNs, play a role in detecting a kin odor related signal. PMID:27087508

  13. Bioimage analysis of Shigella infection reveals targeting of colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ellen T; Campbell-Valois, Francois-Xavier; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Nigro, Giulia; Sachse, Martin; Moya-Nilges, Maryse; Nothelfer, Katharina; Marteyn, Benoit; Shorte, Spencer L; Sansonetti, Philippe J

    2015-06-23

    Few studies within the pathogenic field have used advanced imaging and analytical tools to quantitatively measure pathogenicity in vivo. In this work, we present a novel approach for the investigation of host-pathogen processes based on medium-throughput 3D fluorescence imaging. The guinea pig model for Shigella flexneri invasion of the colonic mucosa was used to monitor the infectious process over time with GFP-expressing S. flexneri. A precise quantitative imaging protocol was devised to follow individual S. flexneri in a large tissue volume. An extensive dataset of confocal images was obtained and processed to extract specific quantitative information regarding the progression of S. flexneri infection in an unbiased and exhaustive manner. Specific parameters included the analysis of S. flexneri positions relative to the epithelial surface, S. flexneri density within the tissue, and volume of tissue destruction. In particular, at early time points, there was a clear association of S. flexneri with crypts, key morphological features of the colonic mucosa. Numerical simulations based on random bacterial entry confirmed the bias of experimentally measured S. flexneri for early crypt targeting. The application of a correlative light and electron microscopy technique adapted for thick tissue samples further confirmed the location of S. flexneri within colonocytes at the mouth of crypts. This quantitative imaging approach is a novel means to examine host-pathogen systems in a tailored and robust manner, inclusive of the infectious agent. PMID:26056271

  14. Bioimage analysis of Shigella infection reveals targeting of colonic crypts

    PubMed Central

    Arena, Ellen T.; Campbell-Valois, Francois-Xavier; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Nigro, Giulia; Sachse, Martin; Moya-Nilges, Maryse; Nothelfer, Katharina; Marteyn, Benoit; Shorte, Spencer L.; Sansonetti, Philippe J.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies within the pathogenic field have used advanced imaging and analytical tools to quantitatively measure pathogenicity in vivo. In this work, we present a novel approach for the investigation of host–pathogen processes based on medium-throughput 3D fluorescence imaging. The guinea pig model for Shigella flexneri invasion of the colonic mucosa was used to monitor the infectious process over time with GFP-expressing S. flexneri. A precise quantitative imaging protocol was devised to follow individual S. flexneri in a large tissue volume. An extensive dataset of confocal images was obtained and processed to extract specific quantitative information regarding the progression of S. flexneri infection in an unbiased and exhaustive manner. Specific parameters included the analysis of S. flexneri positions relative to the epithelial surface, S. flexneri density within the tissue, and volume of tissue destruction. In particular, at early time points, there was a clear association of S. flexneri with crypts, key morphological features of the colonic mucosa. Numerical simulations based on random bacterial entry confirmed the bias of experimentally measured S. flexneri for early crypt targeting. The application of a correlative light and electron microscopy technique adapted for thick tissue samples further confirmed the location of S. flexneri within colonocytes at the mouth of crypts. This quantitative imaging approach is a novel means to examine host–pathogen systems in a tailored and robust manner, inclusive of the infectious agent. PMID:26056271

  15. Use of the dynamic gastro-intestinal model TIM to explore the survival of the yogurt bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus and the metabolic activities induced in the simulated human gut.

    PubMed

    Uriot, Ophélie; Galia, Wessam; Awussi, Ahoefa Ablavi; Perrin, Clarisse; Denis, Sylvain; Chalancon, Sandrine; Lorson, Emilie; Poirson, Chantal; Junjua, Maira; Le Roux, Yves; Alric, Monique; Dary, Annie; Blanquet-Diot, Stéphanie; Roussel, Yvonne

    2016-02-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus, a lactic acid bacterium used to produce yogurts and cheeses is more and more considered for its potential probiotic properties. This implies that additional information should be obtained regarding its survival and metabolic activity in the human Gastro-Intestinal Tract (GIT). In this study, we screened 30 S. thermophilus strains for urease, small heat shock protein, and amino-acid decarboxylase functions which may play a role in survival in the upper part of the GIT. The survival kinetics of 4 strains was investigated using the TIM, a physiologically relevant in vitro dynamic gastric and small intestinal model. The three strains LMD9, PB18O and EBLST20 showed significantly higher survival than CNRZ21 in all digestive compartments of the TIM, which may be related to the presence of urease and heat shock protein functions. When LMD9 bacterial cells were delivered in a fermented milk formula, a significant improvement of survival in the TIM was observed compared to non-fermented milk. With the RIVET (Recombinase In Vivo Expression Technology) method applied to the LMD9 strain, a promoter located upstream of hisS, responsible for the histidyl-transfer RNA synthesis, was found to be specifically activated in the artificial stomach. The data generated on S. thermophilus survival and its adaptation capacities to the digestive tract are essential to establish a list of biomarkers useful for the selection of probiotic strains. PMID:26611166

  16. Nexrutine inhibits azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt formation in rat colon and induced apoptotic cell death in colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Alam, Shamshad; Pal, Anu; Kumar, Rahul; Mir, Snober S; Ansari, Kausar M

    2016-08-01

    Colon cancer is the third most common cause of death in the United States. Therefore, new preventive strategies are warranted for preventing colon cancer. Nexrutine (NX), an herbal extract from Phellodendron amurense, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and anti-cancer activity for various tissue specific cancers, but its chemopreventive efficacy has not been evaluated against colon cancer. Here, we explored the mechanism of chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic efficacy of NX against colon cancer. We found that dietary exposure of NX significantly reduced the number of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. In addition, significant inhibition in AOM-induced cell proliferation and reduced expression of the inflammatory markers COX-2, iNOS as well as the proliferative markers PCNA and cyclin D1 were also seen. Moreover, NX exposure significantly enhanced apoptosis in the colon of AOM treated rats. Furthermore, in in vitro studies, NX (2.5, 5, 10 μg/ml, 48 h) decreased cell survival and colony formation while inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in colon adenocarcinoma cells COLO205 and HCT-15. However, NX had minimal cytotoxic effect on IEC-6 normal rat intestinal cells, suggesting its high therapeutic index. NX treatment also modulates the level of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins along with cytochrome c release, cleavage and enhanced expression of poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase as well as the catalytic activity of caspase 3 and caspase 9 in both COLO205 and HCT-15 cells. Based on these in vivo and in vitro findings, we suggest that NX could be useful candidate agent for colon cancer chemoprevention and treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26259065

  17. Stomatal Crypts Have Small Effects on Transpiration: A Numerical Model Analysis1

    PubMed Central

    Roth-Nebelsick, Anita; Hassiotou, Foteini; Veneklaas, Erik J.

    2009-01-01

    Stomata arranged in crypts with trichomes are commonly considered to be adaptations to aridity due to the additional diffusion resistance associated with this arrangement; however, information on the effect of crypts on gas exchange, relative to stomata, is sparse. In this study, three-dimensional Finite Element models of encrypted stomata were generated using commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics software. The models were based on crypt and stomatal architectural characteristics of the species Banksia ilicifolia, examined microscopically, and variations thereof. In leaves with open or partially closed stomata, crypts reduced transpiration by less than 15% compared with nonencrypted, superficially positioned stomata. A larger effect of crypts was found only in models with unrealistically high stomatal conductances. Trichomes inside the crypt had virtually no influence on transpiration. Crypt conductance varied with stomatal conductance, boundary layer conductance, and ambient relative humidity, as these factors modified the three-dimensional diffusion patterns inside crypts. It was concluded that it is unlikely that the primary function of crypts and crypt trichomes is to reduce transpiration. PMID:19864375

  18. Only fibres promoting a stable butyrate producing colonic ecosystem decrease the rate of aberrant crypt foci in rats

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, P; Pierre, F; Patry, Y; Champ, M; Berreur, M; Pradal, G; Bornet, F; Meflah, K; Menanteau, J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Dietary fibres have been proposed as protective agents against colon cancer but results of both epidemiological and experimental studies are inconclusive.
AIMS—Hypothesising that protection against colon cancer may be restricted to butyrate producing fibres, we investigated the factors needed for long term stable butyrate production and its relation to susceptibility to colon cancer.
METHODS—A two part randomised blinded study in rats, mimicking a prospective study in humans, was performed using a low fibre control diet (CD) and three high fibre diets: starch free wheat bran (WB), type III resistant starch (RS), and short chain fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS). Using a randomised block design, 96 inbred rats were fed for two, 16, 30, or 44 days to determine the period of adaptation to the diets, fermentation profiles, and effects on the colon, including mucosal proliferation on day 44. Subsequently, 36 rats fed the same diets for 44 days were injected with azoxymethane and checked for aberrant crypt foci 30 days later.
RESULTS—After fermentation had stabilised (44 days), only RS and FOS produced large amounts of butyrate, with a trophic effect in the large intestine. No difference in mucosal proliferation between the diets was noted at this time. In the subsequent experiment one month later, fewer aberrant crypt foci were present in rats fed high butyrate producing diets (RS, p=0.022; FOS, p=0.043).
CONCLUSION—A stable butyrate producing colonic ecosystem related to selected fibres appears to be less conducive to colon carcinogenesis.


Keywords: fibre; fermentation; butyrate; colon carcinogenesis; aberrant crypt foci; rat PMID:11115823

  19. Fbxw7-associated drug resistance is reversed by induction of terminal differentiation in murine intestinal organoid culture.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Federica; Babaei-Jadidi, Roya; Sheard, Jonathan; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Nateri, Abdolrahman S

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the top three cancer-related causes of death worldwide. FBXW7 is a known tumor-suppressor gene, commonly mutated in CRC and in a variety of other epithelial tumors. Low expression of FBXW7 is also associated with poor prognosis. Loss of FBXW7 sensitizes cancer cells to certain drugs, while making them more resistant to other types of chemotherapies. However, is not fully understood how epithelial cells within normal gut and primary tumors respond to potential cancer therapeutics. We have studied genetically engineered mice in which the fbxw7 gene is conditionally knocked-out in the intestine (fbxw7(∆G)). To further investigate the mechanism of Fbxw7-action, we grew intestinal crypts from floxed-fbxw7 (fbxw7(fl/fl)) and fbxw7(ΔG) mice, in a Matrigel-based organoid (mini-gut) culture. The fbxw7(ΔG) organoids exhibited rapid budding events in the crypt region. Furthermore, to test organoids for drug response, we exposed day 3 intestinal organoids from fbxw7(fl/fl) and fbxw7(∆G) mice, to various concentrations of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for 72 hours. 5-FU triggers phenotypic differences in organoids including changing shape, survival, resistance, and death. 5-FU however, rescues the drug-resistance phenotype of fbxw7(ΔG) through the induction of terminal differentiation. Our results support the hypothesis that a differentiating therapy successfully targets FBXW7-mutated CRC cells. PMID:27110583

  20. Fbxw7-associated drug resistance is reversed by induction of terminal differentiation in murine intestinal organoid culture

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Federica; Babaei-Jadidi, Roya; Sheard, Jonathan; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Nateri, Abdolrahman S

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the top three cancer-related causes of death worldwide. FBXW7 is a known tumor-suppressor gene, commonly mutated in CRC and in a variety of other epithelial tumors. Low expression of FBXW7 is also associated with poor prognosis. Loss of FBXW7 sensitizes cancer cells to certain drugs, while making them more resistant to other types of chemotherapies. However, is not fully understood how epithelial cells within normal gut and primary tumors respond to potential cancer therapeutics. We have studied genetically engineered mice in which the fbxw7 gene is conditionally knocked-out in the intestine (fbxw7∆G). To further investigate the mechanism of Fbxw7-action, we grew intestinal crypts from floxed-fbxw7 (fbxw7fl/fl) and fbxw7ΔG mice, in a Matrigel-based organoid (mini-gut) culture. The fbxw7ΔG organoids exhibited rapid budding events in the crypt region. Furthermore, to test organoids for drug response, we exposed day 3 intestinal organoids from fbxw7fl/fl and fbxw7∆G mice, to various concentrations of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for 72 hours. 5-FU triggers phenotypic differences in organoids including changing shape, survival, resistance, and death. 5-FU however, rescues the drug-resistance phenotype of fbxw7ΔG through the induction of terminal differentiation. Our results support the hypothesis that a differentiating therapy successfully targets FBXW7-mutated CRC cells. PMID:27110583

  1. Assessment of the mode of action underlying development of rodent small intestinal tumors following oral exposure to hexavalent chromium and relevance to humans

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, Deborah M.; Suh, Mina; Haws, Laurie C.; Kirman, Christopher R.; Harris, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in drinking water causes intestinal adenomas and carcinomas in mice, but not in rats. Cr(VI) causes damage to intestinal villi and crypt hyperplasia in mice after only one week of exposure. After two years of exposure, intestinal damage and crypt hyperplasia are evident in mice (but not rats), as are intestinal tumors. Although Cr(VI) has genotoxic properties, these findings suggest that intestinal tumors in mice arise as a result of chronic mucosal injury. To better understand the mode of action (MOA) of Cr(VI) in the intestine, a 90-day drinking water study was conducted to collect histological, biochemical, toxicogenomic and pharmacokinetic data in intestinal tissues. Using MOA analyses and human relevance frameworks proposed by national and international regulatory agencies, the weight of evidence supports a cytotoxic MOA with the following key events: (a) absorption of Cr(VI) from the intestinal lumen, (b) toxicity to intestinal villi, (c) crypt regenerative hyperplasia and (d) clonal expansion of mutations within the crypt stem cells, resulting in late onset tumorigenesis. This article summarizes the data supporting each key event in the MOA, as well as data that argue against a mutagenic MOA for Cr(VI)-induced intestinal tumors. PMID:23445218

  2. The effect of intestinal anastomosis on gut growth and maturation.

    PubMed

    Stringel, G; Uauy, R; Guertin, L

    1989-10-01

    We evaluated the effect of intestinal anastomosis without resection on gut morphometry (muscle thickness, villus height, and crypt depth), growth indices (DNA, protein, and protein:DNA ratio), and disaccharidase activity (maltase, sucrase, and lactase) in the growing animal. A group of 10 weanling Sprague-Dawley rats at 21 days of age was subjected to intestinal transection and anastomosis in the upper jejunum, 10 cm distal to the ligament of Treitz. A second group of 10 similar rats was used as a control group. All rats were fed a regular diet and kept under the same conditions. They were sacrificed 2 weeks later. Body weight, intestinal weight, and intestinal length measurements were obtained. The intestine was divided into two sections: preanastomotic (section A) and postanastomotic (section B) in the surgery group and equivalent sections A and B in the control group. Specimens were subjected to morphometric evaluation and mucosal scrapings for biochemical analysis. Despite significant weight gain in the control group, there were no differences in intestinal length, intestinal weight, and mucosal weight between the two groups. Muscle thickness, villus height, and crypt depth were significantly increased in the preanastomotic segment. Protein and DNA were also higher in the preanastomotic segment, but the protein:DNA ratio was less affected. There was significantly decreased enzymatic activity in the preanastomotic segment. Intestinal anastomosis has a significant effect on gut growth and maturation in the growing animal and may have important implications in the postoperative management of newborns and infants following intestinal surgery. PMID:2809956

  3. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of extra-adrenal glucocorticoid synthesis in murine intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Atanasov, Atanas G; Leiser, Dominic; Roesselet, Corinne; Noti, Mario; Corazza, Nadia; Schoonjans, Kristina; Brunner, Thomas

    2008-12-01

    Glucocorticoids are anti-inflammatory steroids with important applications in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Endogenous glucocorticoids are mainly produced by the adrenal glands, although there is increasing evidence for extra-adrenal sources. Recent findings show that intestinal crypt cells produce glucocorticoids, which contribute to the maintenance of intestinal immune homeostasis. Intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis is critically regulated by the transcription factor liver receptor homologue-1 (LRH-1). As expression of steroidogenic enzymes and LRH-1 is restricted to the proliferating cells of the crypts, we aimed to investigate the role of the cell cycle in the regulation of LRH-1 activity and intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis. We here show that either pharmacological or molecular modulation of cell cycle progression significantly inhibited expression of steroidogenic enzymes and synthesis of glucocorticoids in intestinal epithelial cells. Synchronization of intestinal epithelial cells in the cell cycle revealed that expression of steroidogenic enzymes is preferentially induced at the G(1)/S stage. Differentiation of immature intestinal epithelial cells to mature nonproliferating cells also resulted in reduced expression of steroidogenic enzymes. This cell cycle-related effect on intestinal steroidogenesis was found to be mediated through the regulation of LRH-1 transcriptional activity. This mechanism may restrict intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis to the proliferating cells of the crypts. PMID:18711026

  4. Histogenesis of human colorectal adenomas and hyperplastic polyps: the role of cell proliferation and crypt fission

    PubMed Central

    Wong, W-M; Mandir, N; Goodlad, R A; Wong, B C Y; Garcia, S B; Lam, S-K; Wright, N A

    2002-01-01

    Background: The histogenesis of human colorectal hyperplastic polyps and colorectal adenomas is poorly understood even now. Method: Human colorectal adenomas, hyperplastic polyps, and normal colorectal mucosae (patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal carcinoma were excluded) were obtained during colonoscopy and microdissected into individual crypts. Morphology, cell proliferation characteristics, and fission indices of crypts isolated from these lesions were then studied. Results: Crypts isolated from colorectal adenomas and colorectal hyperplastic polyps were significantly larger (p<0.001) than crypts from normal colorectal mucosae. Crypt fission was an uncommon event in normal colonic mucosae but common in crypts isolated from adenomas and hyperplastic polyps (p<0.001). Analysis of the distribution of mitoses suggested an upward expansion of the proliferation compartment in adenomas to the surface of the crypt with no reversal of proliferating cell distribution, as has previously been described. Conclusions: Sporadic human colorectal adenomas and hyperplastic polyps grow by the process of crypt fission. Expansion of the proliferative compartment was demonstrated in crypts from adenomas, consistent with deregulation of cell cycle control. PMID:11788562

  5. Tracking the cell hierarchy in the human intestine using biochemical signatures derived by mid-infrared microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Michael J; Hammiche, Azzedine; Fellous, Tariq G; Nicholson, James M; Cotte, Marine; Susini, Jean; Fullwood, Nigel J; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Alison, Malcolm R; Martin, Francis L

    2009-07-01

    Markers of gastrointestinal (GI) stem cells remain elusive. We employed synchrotron Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy to derive mid-infrared (IR) spectra along the length of human GI crypts. Tissue sections (10-μm thick) were floated onto BaF2 windows and image maps were acquired of small intestine and large bowel crypts in transmission mode with an aperture of ≤10 μm×10 μm. Counting upwards in a step-size (≤10 μm) fashion from the crypt base, IR spectra were extracted from the image maps and each spectrum corresponding to a particular location was identified. Spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis plus linear discriminant analysis. Compared to putative crypt base columnar/Paneth cells, those assigned as label-retaining cells were chemically more similar to putative large bowel stem cells and, the small intestine transit-amplifying cells were closest to large bowel transit-amplifying cells; interestingly, the base of small intestine crypts was the most chemically-distinct. This study suggests that in the complex cell lineage of human GI crypts, chemical similarities as revealed by FTIR microspectroscopy between regions putatively assigned as stem cell, transit-amplifying and terminally-differentiated facilitates identification of cell function. PMID:19393589

  6. Use of collagen gel as an alternative extracellular matrix for the in vitro and in vivo growth of murine small intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Jabaji, Ziyad; Sears, Connie M; Brinkley, Garrett J; Lei, Nan Ye; Joshi, Vaidehi S; Wang, Jiafang; Lewis, Michael; Stelzner, Matthias; Martín, Martín G; Dunn, James C Y

    2013-12-01

    Methods for the in vitro culture of primary small intestinal epithelium have improved greatly in recent years. A critical barrier for the translation of this methodology to the patient's bedside is the ability to grow intestinal stem cells using a well-defined extracellular matrix. Current methods rely on the use of Matrigel(™), a proprietary basement membrane-enriched extracellular matrix gel produced in mice that is not approved for clinical use. We demonstrate for the first time the capacity to support the long-term in vitro growth of murine intestinal epithelium in monoculture, using type I collagen. We further demonstrate successful in vivo engraftment of enteroids co-cultured with intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts in collagen gel. Small intestinal crypts were isolated from 6 to 10 week old transgenic enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP+) mice and suspended within either Matrigel or collagen gel; cultures were supported using previously reported media and growth factors. After 1 week, cultures were either lysed for DNA or RNA extraction or were implanted subcutaneously in syngeneic host mice. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to determine expansion of the transgenic eGFP-DNA and to determine the mRNA gene expression profile. Immunohistochemistry was performed on in vitro cultures and recovered in vivo explants. Small intestinal crypts reliably expanded to form enteroids in either Matrigel or collagen in both mono- and co-cultures as confirmed by microscopy and eGFP-DNA qPCR quantification. Collagen-based cultures yielded a distinct morphology with smooth enteroids and epithelial monolayer growth at the gel surface; both enteroid and monolayer cells demonstrated reactivity to Cdx2, E-cadherin, CD10, Periodic Acid-Schiff, and lysozyme. Collagen-based enteroids were successfully subcultured in vitro, whereas pure monolayer epithelial sheets did not survive passaging. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction

  7. The regulatory niche of intestinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sailaja, Badi Sri; He, Xi C; Li, Linheng

    2016-09-01

    The niche constitutes a unique category of cells that support the microenvironment for the maintenance and self-renewal of stem cells. Intestinal stem cells reside at the base of the crypt, which contains adjacent epithelial cells, stromal cells and smooth muscle cells, and soluble and cell-associated growth and differentiation factors. We summarize here recent advances in our understanding of the crucial role of the niche in regulating stem cells. The stem cell niche maintains a balance among quiescence, proliferation and regeneration of intestinal stem cells after injury. Mesenchymal cells, Paneth cells, immune cells, endothelial cells and neural cells are important regulatory components that secrete niche ligands, growth factors and cytokines. Intestinal homeostasis is regulated by niche signalling pathways, specifically Wnt, bone morphogenetic protein, Notch and epidermal growth factor. These insights into the regulatory stem cell niche during homeostasis and post-injury regeneration offer the potential to accelerate development of therapies for intestine-related disorders. PMID:27060879

  8. Fluctuations of cell population in a colonic crypt.

    PubMed

    Pei, Qi-ming; Zhan, Xuan; Yang, Li-jian; Bao, Chun; Cao, Wei; Li, An-bang; Rozi, Anvar; Jia, Ya

    2014-03-01

    The number of stem cells in a colonic crypt is often very small, which leads to large intrinsic fluctuations in the cell population. Based on the model of cell population dynamics with linear feedback in a colonic crypt, we present a stochastic dynamics of the cell population [including stem cells (SCs), transit amplifying cells (TACs), and fully differentiated cells (FDCs)]. The Fano factor, covariance, and susceptibility formulas of the cell population around the steady state are derived by using the Langevin theory. In the range of physiologically reasonable parameter values, it is found that the stationary populations of TACs and FDCs exhibit an approximately threshold behavior as a function of the net growth rate of TACs, and the reproductions of TACs and FDCs can be classified into three regimens: controlled, crossover, and uncontrolled. With the increasing of the net growth rate of TACs, there is a maximum of the relative intrinsic fluctuations (i.e., the Fano factors) of TACs and FDCs in the crossover region. For a fixed differentiation rate and the net growth rate of SCs, the covariance of fluctuations between SCs and TACs has a maximum in the crossover region. However, the susceptibilities of both TACs and FDCs to the net growth rate of TACs have a minimum in the crossover region. PMID:24730882

  9. Fluctuations of cell population in a colonic crypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Qi-ming; Zhan, Xuan; Yang, Li-jian; Bao, Chun; Cao, Wei; Li, An-bang; Rozi, Anvar; Jia, Ya

    2014-03-01

    The number of stem cells in a colonic crypt is often very small, which leads to large intrinsic fluctuations in the cell population. Based on the model of cell population dynamics with linear feedback in a colonic crypt, we present a stochastic dynamics of the cell population [including stem cells (SCs), transit amplifying cells (TACs), and fully differentiated cells (FDCs)]. The Fano factor, covariance, and susceptibility formulas of the cell population around the steady state are derived by using the Langevin theory. In the range of physiologically reasonable parameter values, it is found that the stationary populations of TACs and FDCs exhibit an approximately threshold behavior as a function of the net growth rate of TACs, and the reproductions of TACs and FDCs can be classified into three regimens: controlled, crossover, and uncontrolled. With the increasing of the net growth rate of TACs, there is a maximum of the relative intrinsic fluctuations (i.e., the Fano factors) of TACs and FDCs in the crossover region. For a fixed differentiation rate and the net growth rate of SCs, the covariance of fluctuations between SCs and TACs has a maximum in the crossover region. However, the susceptibilities of both TACs and FDCs to the net growth rate of TACs have a minimum in the crossover region.

  10. Notch in the intestine: regulation of homeostasis and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Noah, Taeko K; Shroyer, Noah F

    2013-01-01

    The small and large intestines are tubular organs composed of several tissue types. The columnar epithelium that lines the inner surface of the intestines distinguishes the digestive physiology of each region of the intestine and consists of several distinct cell types that are rapidly and continually renewed by intestinal stem cells that reside near the base of the crypts of Lieberkühn. Notch signaling controls the fate of intestinal stem cells by regulating the expression of Hes genes and by repressing Atoh1. Alternate models of Notch pathway control of cell fate determination are presented. Roles for Notch signaling in development of the intestine, including mesenchymal and neural cells, are discussed. The oncogenic activities of Notch in colorectal cancer, as well as the tumor suppressive activities of Atoh1, are reviewed. Therapeutic targeting of the Notch pathway in colorectal cancers is discussed, along with potential caveats. PMID:23190077

  11. Lubiprostone ameliorates the cystic fibrosis mouse intestinal phenotype

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CFTR gene that impair the function of CFTR, a cAMP-regulated anion channel. In the small intestine loss of CFTR function creates a dehydrated, acidic luminal environment which is believed to cause an accumulation of mucus, a phenotype characteristic of CF. CF mice have small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, an altered innate immune response, and impaired intestinal transit. We investigated whether lubiprostone, which can activate the CLC2 Cl- channel, would improve the intestinal phenotype in CF mice. Methods Cftrtm1UNC (CF) and wildtype (WT) littermate mice on the C57BL/6J background were used. Lubiprostone (10 μg/kg-day) was administered by gavage for two weeks. Mucus accumulation was estimated from crypt lumen widths in periodic acid-Schiff base, Alcian blue stained sections. Luminal bacterial load was measured by qPCR for the bacterial 16S gene. Gastric emptying and small intestinal transit in fasted mice were assessed using gavaged rhodamine dextran. Gene expression was evaluated by Affymetrix Mouse430 2.0 microarray and qRT-PCR. Results Crypt width in control CF mice was 700% that of WT mice (P < 0.001). Lubiprostone did not affect WT crypt width but, unexpectedly, increased CF crypt width 22% (P = 0.001). Lubiprostone increased bacterial load in WT mice to 490% of WT control levels (P = 0.008). Conversely, lubiprostone decreased bacterial overgrowth in CF mice by 60% (P = 0.005). Lubiprostone increased gastric emptying at 20 min postgavage in both WT (P < 0.001) and CF mice (P < 0.001). Lubiprostone enhanced small intestinal transit in WT mice (P = 0.024) but not in CF mice (P = 0.377). Among other innate immune markers, expression of mast cell genes was elevated 4-to 40-fold in the CF intestine as compared to WT, and lubiprostone treatment of CF mice decreased expression to WT control levels. Conclusions These results indicate that lubiprostone has some benefits for the CF intestinal phenotype

  12. Wnt Lipidation and Modifiers in Intestinal Carcinogenesis and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaemmerer, Elke; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    The wingless (Wnt) signaling is suggested as a fundamental hierarchical pathway in regulation of proliferation and differentiation of cells. The Wnt ligands are small proteins of about 40 kDa essentially for regulation and initiation of the Wnt activity. They are secreted proteins requiring acylation for activity in the Wnt signaling cascade and for functional interactivity with transmembrane proteins. Dual lipidation is important for posttranslational activation of the overwhelming number of Wnt proteins and is probably involved in their spatial distribution. The intestinal mucosa, where Wnt signaling is essential in configuration and maintenance, is an established model to study Wnt proteins and their role in carcinogenesis and cancer. The intestinal crypt-villus/crypt-plateau axis, a cellular system with self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation, is tightly coordinated by a Wnt gradient. In the review, some attention is given to Wnt3, Wnt3A, and Wnt2B as important members of the Wnt family to address the role of lipidation and modifiers of Wnt proteins in intestinal carcinogenesis. Wnt3 is an important player in establishing the Wnt gradient in intestinal crypts and is mainly produced by Paneth cells. Wnt2B is characterized as a mitochondrial protein and shuttles between mitochondria and the nucleus. Porcupine and ACSL5, a long-chain fatty acid activating enzyme, are introduced as modifiers of Wnts and as interesting strategy to targeting Wnt-driven carcinogenesis. PMID:27438855

  13. Wnt Lipidation and Modifiers in Intestinal Carcinogenesis and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaemmerer, Elke; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    The wingless (Wnt) signaling is suggested as a fundamental hierarchical pathway in regulation of proliferation and differentiation of cells. The Wnt ligands are small proteins of about 40 kDa essentially for regulation and initiation of the Wnt activity. They are secreted proteins requiring acylation for activity in the Wnt signaling cascade and for functional interactivity with transmembrane proteins. Dual lipidation is important for posttranslational activation of the overwhelming number of Wnt proteins and is probably involved in their spatial distribution. The intestinal mucosa, where Wnt signaling is essential in configuration and maintenance, is an established model to study Wnt proteins and their role in carcinogenesis and cancer. The intestinal crypt-villus/crypt-plateau axis, a cellular system with self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation, is tightly coordinated by a Wnt gradient. In the review, some attention is given to Wnt3, Wnt3A, and Wnt2B as important members of the Wnt family to address the role of lipidation and modifiers of Wnt proteins in intestinal carcinogenesis. Wnt3 is an important player in establishing the Wnt gradient in intestinal crypts and is mainly produced by Paneth cells. Wnt2B is characterized as a mitochondrial protein and shuttles between mitochondria and the nucleus. Porcupine and ACSL5, a long-chain fatty acid activating enzyme, are introduced as modifiers of Wnts and as interesting strategy to targeting Wnt-driven carcinogenesis. PMID:27438855

  14. Intestinal leiomyoma

    MedlinePlus

    Leiomyoma - intestine ... McLaughlin P, Maher MM. The duodenum and small intestine. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ... Roline CE, Reardon RF. Disorders of the small intestine. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  15. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  16. Bt-maize (MON810) and Non-GM Soybean Meal in Diets for Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.) Juveniles – Impact on Survival, Growth Performance, Development, Digestive Function, and Transcriptional Expression of Intestinal Immune and Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jinni; Bakke, Anne Marie; Valen, Elin C.; Lein, Ingrid; Krogdahl, Åshild

    2014-01-01

    Responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) juveniles (fry) fed diets containing genetically modified maize (Bt-maize, MON810) expressing Cry1Ab protein from first-feeding were investigated during a 99-day feeding trial. Four experimental diets were made; each diet contained ∼20% maize, either Bt-maize or its near-isogenic maternal line (non-GM maize). One pair was fishmeal-based while the other pair included standard (extracted) soybean meal (SBM; 16.7% inclusion level), with the intention of investigating responses to the maize varieties in healthy fish as well as in immunologically challenged fish with SBM-induced distal intestinal inflammation, respectively. Three replicate tanks of fry (0.17±0.01 g; initial mean weight ± SEM) were fed one of the four diets and samples were taken on days 15, 36, 48 and 99. Survival, growth performance, whole body composition, digestive function, morphology of intestine, liver and skeleton, and mRNA expression of some immune and stress response parameters in the distal intestine were evaluated. After 99 days of feeding, survival was enhanced and the intended SBM-induced inflammatory response in the distal intestine of the two groups of SBM-fed fish was absent, indicating that the juvenile salmon were tolerant to SBM. Mortality, growth performance and body composition were similar in fish fed the two maize varieties. The Bt-maize fed fish, however, displayed minor but significantly decreased digestive enzyme activities of leucine aminopeptidase and maltase, as well as decreased concentration of gut bile salts, but significantly increased amylase activity at some sampling points. Histomorphological, radiographic and mRNA expression evaluations did not reveal any biologically relevant effects of Bt-maize in the gastrointestinal tract, liver or skeleton. The results suggest that the Cry1Ab protein or other compositional differences in GM Bt-maize may cause minor alterations in intestinal responses in juvenile salmon, but

  17. Bt-maize (MON810) and non-GM soybean meal in diets for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) juveniles--impact on survival, growth performance, development, digestive function, and transcriptional expression of intestinal immune and stress responses.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jinni; Bakke, Anne Marie; Valen, Elin C; Lein, Ingrid; Krogdahl, Åshild

    2014-01-01

    Responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) juveniles (fry) fed diets containing genetically modified maize (Bt-maize, MON810) expressing Cry1Ab protein from first-feeding were investigated during a 99-day feeding trial. Four experimental diets were made; each diet contained ∼20% maize, either Bt-maize or its near-isogenic maternal line (non-GM maize). One pair was fishmeal-based while the other pair included standard (extracted) soybean meal (SBM; 16.7% inclusion level), with the intention of investigating responses to the maize varieties in healthy fish as well as in immunologically challenged fish with SBM-induced distal intestinal inflammation, respectively. Three replicate tanks of fry (0.17±0.01 g; initial mean weight ± SEM) were fed one of the four diets and samples were taken on days 15, 36, 48 and 99. Survival, growth performance, whole body composition, digestive function, morphology of intestine, liver and skeleton, and mRNA expression of some immune and stress response parameters in the distal intestine were evaluated. After 99 days of feeding, survival was enhanced and the intended SBM-induced inflammatory response in the distal intestine of the two groups of SBM-fed fish was absent, indicating that the juvenile salmon were tolerant to SBM. Mortality, growth performance and body composition were similar in fish fed the two maize varieties. The Bt-maize fed fish, however, displayed minor but significantly decreased digestive enzyme activities of leucine aminopeptidase and maltase, as well as decreased concentration of gut bile salts, but significantly increased amylase activity at some sampling points. Histomorphological, radiographic and mRNA expression evaluations did not reveal any biologically relevant effects of Bt-maize in the gastrointestinal tract, liver or skeleton. The results suggest that the Cry1Ab protein or other compositional differences in GM Bt-maize may cause minor alterations in intestinal responses in juvenile salmon, but

  18. Aberrant crypt foci: detection, gene abnormalities, and clinical usefulness.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Tetsuji; Miyanishi, Koji; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Kukitsu, Takehiro; Takanashi, Kunihiro; Ishiwatari, Hirotoshi; Kogawa, Takahiro; Abe, Tomoyuki; Niitsu, Yoshiro

    2005-07-01

    Human aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were first identified as lesions consisting of large thick crypts in colonic mucosa of surgical specimens after staining with methylene blue. Previously we succeeded in identifying ACF by using magnifying endoscopy and analyzed the number, size, and dysplastic features of ACF in normal controls and patients with adenoma or cancer patients. On the basis of these analyses, we strongly suggested that ACF, particularly dysplastic ACF, are precursor lesions of the adenoma-carcinoma sequence in humans. In most sporadic ACF, K-ras mutations were positive, but APC mutations were negative irrespective of nondysplastic or dysplastic features. Conversely, in most ACF from familial adenomatous polyposis patients, APC mutations were positive but K-ras mutations were negative. These results may suggest that the molecular mechanism of sporadic colon carcinogenesis is not necessarily the same as that of familial adenomatous polyposis. It was shown that ACF acquired resistance to apoptosis induced by bile salts, whereas normal colonic epithelial cells are turning over consistently by apoptosis. This apoptosis resistance was closely associated with glutathione S-transferase P1-1 expression. One of the most important clinical applications of ACF observation with magnifying endoscopy is its use as a target lesion for chemoprevention. Because ACF are tiny lesions, they should be eradicated during a short time by administration of chemopreventive agents. In fact, we performed an open chemopreventive trial of sulindac and found that the number of ACF was reduced markedly in 2 months. We currently are proceeding with a randomized double-blind trial targeting ACF. PMID:16012995

  19. Radiation redux: reserve intestinal stem cells miss the call to duty.

    PubMed

    Shivdasani, Ramesh A

    2014-02-01

    Distinct stem cell populations in intestinal crypts mediate tissue homeostasis and responses to epithelial damage such as radiation. Now in Cell Stem Cell, Metcalfe et al. (2014) demonstrate that homeostatic, proliferative Lrg5(+) cells are necessary to regenerate the epithelium after radiation, whereas quiescent Lgr5(-) reserve stem cells are surprisingly radiosensitive. PMID:24506878

  20. Intestine-Specific Deletion of Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein Increases Mortality in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhe; Xie, Yan; Dominguez, Jessica A.; Breed, Elise R.; Yoseph, Benyam P.; Burd, Eileen M.; Farris, Alton B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mice with conditional, intestine-specific deletion of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (Mttp-IKO) exhibit a complete block in chylomicron assembly together with lipid malabsorption. Young (8–10 week) Mttp-IKO mice have improved survival when subjected to a murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced sepsis. However, 80% of deaths in sepsis occur in patients over age 65. The purpose of this study was to determine whether age impacts outcome in Mttp-IKO mice subjected to sepsis. Methods Aged (20–24 months) Mttp-IKO mice and WT mice underwent intratracheal injection with P. aeruginosa. Mice were either sacrificed 24 hours post-operatively for mechanistic studies or followed seven days for survival. Results In contrast to young septic Mttp-IKO mice, aged septic Mttp-IKO mice had a significantly higher mortality than aged septic WT mice (80% vs. 39%, p = 0.005). Aged septic Mttp-IKO mice exhibited increased gut epithelial apoptosis, increased jejunal Bax/Bcl-2 and Bax/Bcl-XL ratios yet simultaneously demonstrated increased crypt proliferation and villus length. Aged septic Mttp-IKO mice also manifested increased pulmonary myeloperoxidase levels, suggesting increased neutrophil infiltration, as well as decreased systemic TNFα compared to aged septic WT mice. Conclusions Blocking intestinal chylomicron secretion alters mortality following sepsis in an age-dependent manner. Increases in gut apoptosis and pulmonary neutrophil infiltration, and decreased systemic TNFα represent potential mechanisms for why intestine-specific Mttp deletion is beneficial in young septic mice but harmful in aged mice as each of these parameters are altered differently in young and aged septic WT and Mttp-IKO mice. PMID:25010671

  1. Alanyl-glutamine attenuates 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Araújo, C V; Lazzarotto, C R; Aquino, C C; Figueiredo, I L; Costa, T B; Alves, L A de Oliveira; Ribeiro, R A; Bertolini, L R; Lima, A A M; Brito, G A C; Oriá, R B

    2015-06-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE=gene, apoE=protein) is a known factor regulating the inflammatory response that may have regenerative effects during tissue recovery from injury. We investigated whether apoE deficiency reduces the healing effect of alanyl-glutamine (Ala-Gln) treatment, a recognized gut-trophic nutrient, during tissue recovery after 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. APOE-knockout (APOE-/-) and wild-type (APOE+/+) C57BL6J male and female mice (N=86) were given either Ala-Gln (100 mM) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) by gavage 3 days before and 5 days after a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) challenge (450 mg/kg, via intraperitoneal injection). Mouse body weight was monitored daily. The 5-FU cytotoxic effect was evaluated by leukometry. Intestinal villus height, villus/crypt ratio, and villin expression were monitored to assess recovery of the intestinal absorptive surface area. Crypt length, mitotic, apoptotic, and necrotic crypt indexes, and quantitative real-time PCR for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) intestinal mRNA transcripts were used to evaluate intestinal epithelial cell turnover. 5-FU challenge caused significant weight loss and leukopenia (P<0.001) in both mouse strains, which was not improved by Ala-Gln. Villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, and reduced villus/crypt ratio (P<0.05) were found in all 5-FU-challenged mice but not in PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus/crypt ratio, crypt length and mitotic index in all challenged mice, compared with PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus height only in APOE-/- mice. Crypt cell apoptosis and necrotic scores were increased in all mice challenged by 5-FU, compared with untreated controls. Those scores were significantly lower in Ala-Gln-treated APOE+/+ mice than in controls. Bcl-2 and IGF-1 mRNA transcripts were reduced only in the APOE-/- -challenged mice. Altogether our findings suggest APOE-independent Ala-Gln regenerative effects after 5-FU challenge. PMID:25945744

  2. Alanyl-glutamine attenuates 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, C.V.; Lazzarotto, C.R.; Aquino, C.C.; Figueiredo, I.L.; Costa, T.B.; de Oliveira Alves, L.A.; Ribeiro, R.A.; Bertolini, L.R.; Lima, A.A.M.; Brito, G.A.C.; Oriá, R.B.

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE=gene, apoE=protein) is a known factor regulating the inflammatory response that may have regenerative effects during tissue recovery from injury. We investigated whether apoE deficiency reduces the healing effect of alanyl-glutamine (Ala-Gln) treatment, a recognized gut-trophic nutrient, during tissue recovery after 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. APOE-knockout (APOE-/-) and wild-type (APOE+/+) C57BL6J male and female mice (N=86) were given either Ala-Gln (100 mM) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) by gavage 3 days before and 5 days after a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) challenge (450 mg/kg, via intraperitoneal injection). Mouse body weight was monitored daily. The 5-FU cytotoxic effect was evaluated by leukometry. Intestinal villus height, villus/crypt ratio, and villin expression were monitored to assess recovery of the intestinal absorptive surface area. Crypt length, mitotic, apoptotic, and necrotic crypt indexes, and quantitative real-time PCR for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) intestinal mRNA transcripts were used to evaluate intestinal epithelial cell turnover. 5-FU challenge caused significant weight loss and leukopenia (P<0.001) in both mouse strains, which was not improved by Ala-Gln. Villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, and reduced villus/crypt ratio (P<0.05) were found in all 5-FU-challenged mice but not in PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus/crypt ratio, crypt length and mitotic index in all challenged mice, compared with PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus height only in APOE-/- mice. Crypt cell apoptosis and necrotic scores were increased in all mice challenged by 5-FU, compared with untreated controls. Those scores were significantly lower in Ala-Gln-treated APOE+/+ mice than in controls. Bcl-2 and IGF-1 mRNA transcripts were reduced only in the APOE-/--challenged mice. Altogether our findings suggest APOE-independent Ala-Gln regenerative effects after 5-FU challenge. PMID:25945744

  3. Overlapping DNA Methylation Dynamics in Mouse Intestinal Cell Differentiation and Early Stages of Malignant Progression

    PubMed Central

    Forn, Marta; Díez-Villanueva, Anna; Merlos-Suárez, Anna; Muñoz, Mar; Lois, Sergi; Carriò, Elvira; Jordà, Mireia; Bigas, Anna; Batlle, Eduard; Peinado, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models of intestinal crypt cell differentiation and tumorigenesis have been used to characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying both processes. DNA methylation is a key epigenetic mark and plays an important role in cell identity and differentiation programs and cancer. To get insights into the dynamics of cell differentiation and malignant transformation we have compared the DNA methylation profiles along the mouse small intestine crypt and early stages of tumorigenesis. Genome-scale analysis of DNA methylation together with microarray gene expression have been applied to compare intestinal crypt stem cells (EphB2high), differentiated cells (EphB2negative), ApcMin/+ adenomas and the corresponding non-tumor adjacent tissue, together with small and large intestine samples and the colon cancer cell line CT26. Compared with late stages, small intestine crypt differentiation and early stages of tumorigenesis display few and relatively small changes in DNA methylation. Hypermethylated loci are largely shared by the two processes and affect the proximities of promoter and enhancer regions, with enrichment in genes associated with the intestinal stem cell signature and the PRC2 complex. The hypermethylation is progressive, with minute levels in differentiated cells, as compared with intestinal stem cells, and reaching full methylation in advanced stages. Hypomethylation shows different signatures in differentiation and cancer and is already present in the non-tumor tissue adjacent to the adenomas in ApcMin/+ mice, but at lower levels than advanced cancers. This study provides a reference framework to decipher the mechanisms driving mouse intestinal tumorigenesis and also the human counterpart. PMID:25933092

  4. Experiment K-6-17. Structural changes and cell turnover in the rats small intestine induced by spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. W.; Sawyer, H. R.; Smirnov, K. V.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that the generalized, whole body decrease in synthetic activity associated with microgravity conditions of space flight as evidenced by negative nitrogen balance and muscle atrophy (Nicogossian and Parker, 1982; Oganov, 1981), as well as inhibited lymphocyte proliferation (Bechler and Cogoli, 1986), would be evident in cells characterized by a rapid rate of turnover. As a model, researchers chose to study the turnover of mucosal cells lining the jejunum of the small intestine, since these cells are among the most rapidly proliferating in the body. Under normal conditions, epithelial cells that line the small intestine are continually produced in the crypts of Lieberkuhn. These cells migrate out of the crypts onto intestinal villi, are progressively pushed up the villus as new crypt cells are formed, and ultimately reach the tip of villi where they are then descquamated. In rats, the entire process, from initial proliferation in crypts to desquamation, takes approximately 2 days (Cairnie et al., 1965; Lipkin, 1973). In this study, researchers determined the mitotic index for mucosal cells lining the proximal, middle, and distal regions of the jejunum in rats from three treatment groups (synchronous control, vivarium control and flight), and measured the depth of the crypts of Lieberkuhn and the length of villi present in each of the three jejunal regions sampled.

  5. Congenital intestinal atresia.

    PubMed

    Davenport, M; Bianchi, A

    1990-09-01

    Surgery for infants with intestinal atresia has evolved along with the development of specialized neonatal surgical units. This once fatal condition now carries a better than 85% chance of survival and an excellent long-term prognosis. Recent advances in bowel preservation techniques have reduced morbidity and improved gut function in both the long and the short term. PMID:2257399

  6. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in human colonic crypt stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Robert W.; Barron, Martin J.; Borthwick, Gillian M.; Gospel, Amy; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Samuels, David C.; Taylor, Geoffrey A.; Plusa, Stefan M.; Needham, Stephanie J.; Greaves, Laura C.; Kirkwood, Thomas B.L.; Turnbull, Douglass M.

    2003-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome encodes 13 essential subunits of the respiratory chain and has remarkable genetics based on uniparental inheritance. Within human populations, the mitochondrial genome has a high rate of sequence divergence with multiple polymorphic variants and thus has played a major role in examining the evolutionary history of our species. In recent years it has also become apparent that pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations play an important role in neurological and other diseases. Patients harbor many different mtDNA mutations, some of which are mtDNA mutations, some of which are inherited, but others that seem to be sporadic. It has also been suggested that mtDNA mutations play a role in aging and cancer, but the evidence for a causative role in these conditions is less clear. The accumulated data would suggest, however, that mtDNA mutations occur on a frequent basis. In this article we describe a new phenomenon: the accumulation of mtDNA mutations in human colonic crypt stem cells that result in a significant biochemical defect in their progeny. These studies have important consequences not only for understanding of the finding of mtDNA mutations in aging tissues and tumors, but also for determining the frequency of mtDNA mutations within a cell. PMID:14597761

  7. Acrylamide-induced prenatal programming of intestine structure in guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska, E; Dobrowolski, P; Puzio, I; Prost, L; Kurlak, P; Sawczuk, P; Badzian, B; Hulas-Stasiak, M; Kostro, K

    2014-02-01

    Potential effects of prenatal administration of acrylamide (ACR) on postnatal development of the small intestine were not examined experimentally yet. The aim of this study was to establish changes of morphological parameters of the small intestine damaged by prenatal action of ACR in guinea pigs. The 3 mg/kg body weight of ACR was given in drinking water every day during the last 35 days of the pregnancy in guinea pigs. The histomorphometry of the duodenum and jejunum was determined. Immunohistochemical staining with anti cadherin antibody was performed. Maternal treatment with ACR led to the decrease of the expression of cadherin in the epithelium. Maternal ACR treatment increased the number of total, divided and inactive crypt, and the number of damaged villi in the duodenum and jejunum of newborn guinea pigs. The thickness of myenteron and submucosa, mucosa fractal dimension and the depth of crypts in the duodenum were increased by ACR. Additionally, in offspring born by mothers administered with ACR the decrease of villi epithelium thickness and active crypt number was observed. Moreover, ACR decreased goblet cells and inact villi number in the duodenum, mucosa thickness and crypts width in the jejunum. Intestine absorptive surface was affected by ACR in the jejunum as well. Results of measurements showed that maternal ACR treatment had negative influence on small intestine histomorphometry. ACR acting prenatally influenced small intestine nervous plexuses that became enlarged by 2.5 times compared with the control group. In conclusion, our results showed the negative impact of maternal ACR treatment on histological structure, integrity and innervation of small intestine wall as well as on absorptive function of small intestine mucosa. PMID:24622835

  8. Quantitative assessment of normal and potentially premalignant epithelium at different levels of human colorectal crypts.

    PubMed

    Tipoe, G L; White, F H

    1998-04-01

    The present study uses morphometric techniques to assess whether altered differentiation patterns exist in PPM which might reflect its premalignant status. Samples were obtained from resected malignant lesions of large bowels of 10 Chinese patients. Normal (N) samples were biopsied from the margins of each resected large bowel. Potentially premalignant (PPM) mucosae were obtained from within 2 cm of the margins of the malignant lesions. Tissues were processed for histological examination and using strict criteria, colorectal crypts were divided into basal (B), intermediate (I) and surface (S) segments. Interactive digitisation of sections from each group was used to generate the following morphometric parameters in each segment: nuclear profile circularity indices (NSF and NCI); nuclear numerical density (NA and NV); the degree of deviation of the major nuclear axis in relation to the epithelial-connective junction (AGDMAX); cell height (CH); the distance between nuclear apex to cell apex (DNACA); the distance between cell base to nuclear apex (DCBNA); stratification index (SI)--the ratio of DCBNA and CH; and the volume density of mucous vacuoles in the reference epithelium (VVMV,EP). In comparisons of different segments within groups, the nuclei at the S segment of N and PPM crypts were more irregular and less circular in shape than nuclei from other segments. There was a shift of nuclear profile shape (NSF and NCI) from circular to ellipsiodal between B and S segments. In comparisons of similar segments between groups, no significant nuclear shape changes were detected in nuclei of PPM crypts when compared with nuclei in similar segments of N crypts and the pattern of nuclear shape alterations resembled those of normal crypts. In comparisons of different segments within groups of N and PPM crypts, AGDMAX, DNACA, DCBNA, CH and SI parameters demonstrated that epithelial cells at the I segments have more centrally positioned nuclei with the tallest epithelial height

  9. Stroma provides an intestinal stem cell niche in the absence of epithelial Wnts.

    PubMed

    Kabiri, Zahra; Greicius, Gediminas; Madan, Babita; Biechele, Steffen; Zhong, Zhendong; Zaribafzadeh, Hamed; Edison; Aliyev, Jamal; Wu, Yonghui; Bunte, Ralph; Williams, Bart O; Rossant, Janet; Virshup, David M

    2014-06-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling supports intestinal homeostasis by regulating proliferation in the crypt. Multiple Wnts are expressed in Paneth cells as well as other intestinal epithelial and stromal cells. Ex vivo, Wnts secreted by Paneth cells can support intestinal stem cells when Wnt signaling is enhanced with supplemental R-Spondin 1 (RSPO1). However, in vivo, the source of Wnts in the stem cell niche is less clear. Genetic ablation of Porcn, an endoplasmic reticulum resident O-acyltransferase that is essential for the secretion and activity of all vertebrate Wnts, confirmed the role of intestinal epithelial Wnts in ex vivo culture. Unexpectedly, mice lacking epithelial Wnt activity (Porcn(Del)/Villin-Cre mice) had normal intestinal proliferation and differentiation, as well as successful regeneration after radiation injury, indicating that epithelial Wnts are dispensable for these processes. Consistent with a key role for stroma in the crypt niche, intestinal stromal cells endogenously expressing Wnts and Rspo3 support the growth of Porcn(Del) organoids ex vivo without RSPO1 supplementation. Conversely, increasing pharmacologic PORCN inhibition, affecting both stroma and epithelium, reduced Lgr5 intestinal stem cells, inhibited recovery from radiation injury, and at the highest dose fully blocked intestinal proliferation. We conclude that epithelial Wnts are dispensable and that stromal production of Wnts can fully support normal murine intestinal homeostasis. PMID:24821987

  10. Current understanding concerning intestinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shuang; Chang, Peng-Yu

    2016-08-21

    In mammals, the intestinal epithelium is a tissue that contains two distinct pools of stem cells: active intestinal stem cells and reserve intestinal stem cells. The former are located in the crypt basement membrane and are responsible for maintaining epithelial homeostasis under intact conditions, whereas the latter exhibit the capacity to facilitate epithelial regeneration after injury. These two pools of cells can convert into each other, maintaining their quantitative balance. In terms of the active intestinal stem cells, their development into functional epithelium is precisely controlled by the following signaling pathways: Wnt/β-catenin, Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk/MAPK, Notch and BMP/Smad. However, mutations in some of the key regulator genes associated with these signaling pathways, such as APC, Kras and Smad4, are also highly associated with gut malformations. At this point, clarifying the biological characteristics of intestinal stem cells will increase the feasibility of preventing or treating some intestinal diseases, such as colorectal cancer. Moreover, as preclinical data demonstrate the therapeutic effects of colon stem cells on murine models of experimental colitis, the prospects of stem cell-based regenerative treatments for ulcerous lesions in the gastrointestinal tract will be improved all the same. PMID:27610020

  11. Current understanding concerning intestinal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Shuang; Chang, Peng-Yu

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, the intestinal epithelium is a tissue that contains two distinct pools of stem cells: active intestinal stem cells and reserve intestinal stem cells. The former are located in the crypt basement membrane and are responsible for maintaining epithelial homeostasis under intact conditions, whereas the latter exhibit the capacity to facilitate epithelial regeneration after injury. These two pools of cells can convert into each other, maintaining their quantitative balance. In terms of the active intestinal stem cells, their development into functional epithelium is precisely controlled by the following signaling pathways: Wnt/β-catenin, Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk/MAPK, Notch and BMP/Smad. However, mutations in some of the key regulator genes associated with these signaling pathways, such as APC, Kras and Smad4, are also highly associated with gut malformations. At this point, clarifying the biological characteristics of intestinal stem cells will increase the feasibility of preventing or treating some intestinal diseases, such as colorectal cancer. Moreover, as preclinical data demonstrate the therapeutic effects of colon stem cells on murine models of experimental colitis, the prospects of stem cell-based regenerative treatments for ulcerous lesions in the gastrointestinal tract will be improved all the same. PMID:27610020

  12. Intestinal Malrotation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines don't position themselves normally during fetal development and aren't attached inside properly as a result. The exact reason this occurs is unknown. When a fetus develops in the womb, the intestines start out ...

  13. Intestinal obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the major causes of intestinal obstruction in infants and children. Causes of paralytic ileus may include: Bacteria or viruses that cause intestinal infections ( gastroenteritis ) Chemical, electrolyte, or mineral imbalances (such as decreased ...

  14. The nuclear receptor LRH-1 critically regulates extra-adrenal glucocorticoid synthesis in the intestine

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Matthias; Cima, Igor; Noti, Mario; Fuhrer, Andrea; Jakob, Sabine; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Schoonjans, Kristina; Brunner, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear receptor liver receptor homologue-1 (LRH-1, NR5A2) is a crucial transcriptional regulator of many metabolic pathways. In addition, LRH-1 is expressed in intestinal crypt cells where it regulates the epithelial cell renewal and contributes to tumorigenesis through the induction of cell cycle proteins. We have recently identified the intestinal epithelium as an important extra-adrenal source of immunoregulatory glucocorticoids. We show here that LRH-1 promotes the expression of the steroidogenic enzymes and the synthesis of corticosterone in murine intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Interestingly, LRH-1 is also essential for intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis in vivo, as LRH-1 haplo-insufficiency strongly reduces the intestinal expression of steroidogenic enzymes and glucocorticoid synthesis upon immunological stress. These results demonstrate for the first time a novel role for LRH-1 in the regulation of intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis and propose LRH-1 as an important regulator of intestinal tissue integrity and immune homeostasis. PMID:16923850

  15. The nuclear receptor LRH-1 critically regulates extra-adrenal glucocorticoid synthesis in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Matthias; Cima, Igor; Noti, Mario; Fuhrer, Andrea; Jakob, Sabine; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Schoonjans, Kristina; Brunner, Thomas

    2006-09-01

    The nuclear receptor liver receptor homologue-1 (LRH-1, NR5A2) is a crucial transcriptional regulator of many metabolic pathways. In addition, LRH-1 is expressed in intestinal crypt cells where it regulates the epithelial cell renewal and contributes to tumorigenesis through the induction of cell cycle proteins. We have recently identified the intestinal epithelium as an important extra-adrenal source of immunoregulatory glucocorticoids. We show here that LRH-1 promotes the expression of the steroidogenic enzymes and the synthesis of corticosterone in murine intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Interestingly, LRH-1 is also essential for intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis in vivo, as LRH-1 haplo-insufficiency strongly reduces the intestinal expression of steroidogenic enzymes and glucocorticoid synthesis upon immunological stress. These results demonstrate for the first time a novel role for LRH-1 in the regulation of intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis and propose LRH-1 as an important regulator of intestinal tissue integrity and immune homeostasis. PMID:16923850

  16. Intestine Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... intestine segment, most intestine transplants involve a whole organ from a deceased donor. In addition, most intestine transplants are performed in ... blood before surgery. I am looking for ... allocation About UNOS Being a living donor Calculator - CPRA Calculator - KDPI Calculator - LAS Calculator - MELD ...

  17. Epithelioid cell cultures from rat small intestine. Characterization by morphologic and immunologic criteria.

    PubMed

    Quaroni, A; Wands, J; Trelstad, R L; Isselbacher, K J

    1979-02-01

    Rat small intestinal epithelial cell lines have been established in vitro and subcultured serially for periods up to 6 mo. These cells have an epithelioid morphology, grow as monolayers of closely opposed polygonal cells, and during the logarithmic phase of growth have a population doubling time of 19--22 h. Ultrastructural studies revealed the presence of microvilli, tight junctions, an extensive Golgi complex, and the presence of extracellular amorphous material similar in appearance to isolated basement membrane. These cells exhibit a number of features characteristic of normal cells in culture; namely, a normal rat diploid karyotype, strong density inhibition of growth, lack of growth in soft agar, and a low plating efficiency when seeded at low density. They did not produce tumors when injected in syngeneic animals. Immunochemical studies were performed to determine their origin using antisera prepared against rat small intestinal crypt cell plasma membrane, brush border membrane of villus cells and isolated sucrase-isomaltase complex. Antigenic determinants specific for small intestinal epithelial (crypt and villus) cells were demonstrated on the surface of the epithelioid cells, but they lacked immunological determinants specific for differentiated villus cells. An antiserum specifically staining extracellular material surrounding the cells cultured in vitro demonstrated cross-reactivity to basement membrane in rat intestinal frozen sections. It is concluded that the cultured epithelioid cells have features of undifferentiated small intestinal crypt cells. PMID:88453

  18. Intestinal and multivisceral transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Meira, Sérgio Paiva; Guardia, Bianca Della; Evangelista, Andréia Silva; Matielo, Celso Eduardo Lourenço; Neves, Douglas Bastos; Pandullo, Fernando Luis; Felga, Guilherme Eduardo Gonçalves; Alves, Jefferson André da Silva; Curvelo, Lilian Amorim; Diaz, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Rusi, Marcela Balbo; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; de Almeida, Marcio Dias; Epstein, Marina Gabrielle; Pedroso, Pamella Tung; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Rocco, Rodrigo Andrey; de Almeida, Samira Scalso; de Rezende, Marcelo Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation has shown exceptional growth over the past 10 years. At the end of the 1990’s, intestinal transplantation moved out of the experimental realm to become a routine practice in treating patients with severe complications related to total parenteral nutrition and intestinal failure. In the last years, several centers reported an increasing improvement in survival outcomes (about 80%), during the first 12 months after surgery, but long-term survival is still a challenge. Several advances led to clinical application of transplants. Immunosuppression involved in intestinal and multivisceral transplantation was the biggest gain for this procedure in the past decade due to tacrolimus, and new inducing drugs, mono- and polyclonal anti-lymphocyte antibodies. Despite the advancement of rigid immunosuppression protocols, rejection is still very frequent in the first 12 months, and can result in long-term graft loss. The future of intestinal transplantation and multivisceral transplantation appears promising. The major challenge is early recognition of acute rejection in order to prevent graft loss, opportunistic infections associated to complications, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease and graft versus host disease; and consequently, improve results in the long run. PMID:25993080

  19. Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide Promotes Intestinal Barrier Homeostasis and Protection Against Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiujuan; Conlin, Victoria S.; Morampudi, Vijay; Ryz, Natasha R.; Nasser, Yasmin; Bhinder, Ganive; Bergstrom, Kirk S.; Yu, Hong B.; Waterhouse, Chris C. M.; Buchan, Allison M. J.; Popescu, Oana E.; Gibson, William T.; Waschek, James A.; Vallance, Bruce A.; Jacobson, Kevan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory disorder associated with changes in neuropeptide expression and function, including vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP regulates intestinal vasomotor and secretomotor function and motility; however, VIP’s role in development and maintenance of colonic epithelial barrier homeostasis is unclear. Using VIP deficient (VIPKO) mice, we investigated VIP’s role in epithelial barrier homeostasis, and susceptibility to colitis. Colonic crypt morphology and epithelial barrier homeostasis were assessed in wildtype (WT) and VIPKO mice, at baseline. Colitic responses were evaluated following dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) or dextran-sodium sulfate (DSS) exposure. Mice were also treated with exogenous VIP. At baseline, VIPKO mice exhibited distorted colonic crypts, defects in epithelial cell proliferation and migration, increased apoptosis, and altered permeability. VIPKO mice also displayed reduced goblet cell numbers, and reduced expression of secreted goblet cell factors mucin 2 and trefoil factor 3. These changes were associated with reduced expression of caudal type homeobox 2 (Cdx2), a master regulator of intestinal function and homeostasis. DNBS and DSS-induced colitis were more severe in VIPKO than WT mice. VIP treatment rescued the phenotype, protecting VIPKO mice against DSS colitis, with results comparable to WT mice. In conclusion, VIP plays a crucial role in the development and maintenance of colonic epithelial barrier integrity under physiological conditions and promotes epithelial repair and homeostasis during colitis. PMID:25932952

  20. Chloride channels in the small intestinal cell line IEC-18.

    PubMed

    Basavappa, Srisaila; Vulapalli, Sreesatya Raju; Zhang, Hui; Yule, David; Coon, Steven; Sundaram, Uma

    2005-01-01

    Small intestinal crypt cells play a critical role in modulating Cl- secretion during digestion. The types of Cl- channels mediating Cl- secretion in the small intestine was investigated using the intestinal epithelial cell line, IEC-18, which was derived from rat small intestine crypt cells. In initial radioisotope efflux studies, exposure to forskolin, ionomycin or a decrease in extracellular osmolarity significantly increased 36Cl efflux as compared to control cells. Whole cell patch clamp techniques were subsequently used to examine in more detail the swelling-, Ca2+-, and cAMP-activated Cl- conductance. Decreasing the extracellular osmolarity from 290 to 200 mOsm activated a large outwardly rectifying Cl- current that was voltage-independent and had an anion selectivity of I- > Cl-. Increasing cytosolic Ca2+ by ionomycin activated whole cell Cl- currents, which were also outwardly rectifying but were voltage-dependent. The increase in intracellular Ca2+ levels with ionomycin was confirmed with fura-2 loaded IEC-18 cells. A third type of whole cell Cl- current was observed after increases in intracellular cAMP induced by forskolin. These cAMP-activated Cl- currents have properties consistent with cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) Cl- channels, as the currents were blocked by glibenclamide or NPPB but insensitive to DIDS. In addition, the current-voltage relationship was linear and had an anion selectivity of Cl- > I-. Confocal immunofluorescence studies and Western blots with two different anti-CFTR antibodies confirmed the expression of CFTR. These results suggest that small intestinal crypt cells express multiple types of Cl- channels, which may all contribute to net Cl- secretion. PMID:15389550

  1. Intestinal stem cells and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Piscaglia, Anna Chiara

    2014-04-26

    Stem cells (SCs) are the key to tissue genesis and regeneration. Given their central role in homeostasis, dysfunctions of the SC compartment play a pivotal role in the development of cancers, degenerative disorders, chronic inflammatory pathologies and organ failure. The gastrointestinal tract is constantly exposed to harsh mechanical and chemical conditions and most of the epithelial cells are replaced every 3 to 5 d. According to the so-called Unitarian hypothesis, this renewal is driven by a common intestinal stem cell (ISC) residing within the crypt base at the origin of the crypt-to-villus hierarchical migratory pattern. Celiac disease (CD) can be defined as a chronic immune-mediated disease that is triggered and maintained by dietary proteins (gluten) in genetically predisposed individuals. Many advances have been achieved over the last years in understanding of the pathogenic interactions among genetic, immunological and environmental factors in CD, with a particular emphasis on intestinal barrier and gut microbiota. Conversely, little is known about ISC modulation and deregulation in active celiac disease and upon a gluten-free diet. Nonetheless, bone marrow-derived SC transplantation has become an option for celiac patients with complicated or refractory disease. This manuscript summarizes the "state of the art" regarding CD and ISCs, their niche and potential role in the development and treatment of the disease. PMID:24772248

  2. Intestinal stem cells and celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Piscaglia, Anna Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells (SCs) are the key to tissue genesis and regeneration. Given their central role in homeostasis, dysfunctions of the SC compartment play a pivotal role in the development of cancers, degenerative disorders, chronic inflammatory pathologies and organ failure. The gastrointestinal tract is constantly exposed to harsh mechanical and chemical conditions and most of the epithelial cells are replaced every 3 to 5 d. According to the so-called Unitarian hypothesis, this renewal is driven by a common intestinal stem cell (ISC) residing within the crypt base at the origin of the crypt-to-villus hierarchical migratory pattern. Celiac disease (CD) can be defined as a chronic immune-mediated disease that is triggered and maintained by dietary proteins (gluten) in genetically predisposed individuals. Many advances have been achieved over the last years in understanding of the pathogenic interactions among genetic, immunological and environmental factors in CD, with a particular emphasis on intestinal barrier and gut microbiota. Conversely, little is known about ISC modulation and deregulation in active celiac disease and upon a gluten-free diet. Nonetheless, bone marrow-derived SC transplantation has become an option for celiac patients with complicated or refractory disease. This manuscript summarizes the “state of the art” regarding CD and ISCs, their niche and potential role in the development and treatment of the disease. PMID:24772248

  3. Optical coherence tomography imaging of colonic crypts in a mouse model of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welge, Weston A.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2016-03-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) are abnormal epithelial lesions that precede development of colonic polyps. As the earliest morphological change in the development of colorectal cancer, ACF is a highly studied phenomenon. The most common method of imaging ACF is chromoendoscopy using methylene blue as a contrast agent. Narrow- band imaging is a contrast-agent-free modality for imaging the colonic crypts. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an attractive alternative to chromoendoscopy and narrow-band imaging because it can resolve the crypt structure at sufficiently high sampling while simultaneously providing depth-resolved data. We imaged in vivo the distal 15 mm of colon in the azoxymethane (AOM) mouse model of colorectal cancer using a commercial swept-source OCT system and a miniature endoscope designed and built in-house. We present en face images of the colonic crypts and demonstrate that different patterns in healthy and adenoma tissue can be seen. These patterns correspond to those reported in the literature. We have previously demonstrated early detection of colon adenoma using OCT by detecting minute thickening of the mucosa. By combining mucosal thickness measurement with imaging of the crypt structure, OCT can be used to correlate ACF and adenoma development in space and time. These results suggest that OCT may be a superior imaging modality for studying the connection between ACF and colorectal cancer.

  4. Glucose transport and microvillus membrane physical properties along the crypt-villus axis of the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Meddings, J B; DeSouza, D; Goel, M; Thiesen, S

    1990-01-01

    Both transport function and microvillus membrane physical properties evolve as the enterocyte matures and migrates up the crypt-villus axis. We isolated enriched fractions of villus tip, mid-villus, and crypt enterocytes from which microvillus membrane vesicles were prepared. Using this material we characterized the alterations that occur in microvillus membrane fluidity as the rabbit enterocyte matures and correlated these with kinetic studies of glucose transport. With increasing maturity the microvillus membrane becomes more rigid due to both an increase in the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio and alterations in individual phospholipid subclasses. Maximal rates of glucose transport were greatest in microvillus membrane vesicles prepared from mature cells. However, the glucose concentration producing half-maximal rates of transport (Km) was significantly lower in crypt microvillus membrane vesicles, suggesting that a distinct glucose transporter existed in crypt enterocytes. This distinction disappeared when differences between membrane lipid environments were removed. By fluidizing villus-tip microvillus membrane vesicles, in vitro, to levels seen in the crypt microvillus membrane, we observed a reduction in the Km of this transport system. These data suggest that the kinetic characteristics of the sodium-dependent glucose transporter are dependent upon its local membrane environment. Images PMID:2318967

  5. Protection by polaprezinc against radiation-induced apoptosis in rat jejunal crypt cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuu-Matsuyama, Mutsumi; Shichijo, Kazuko; Okaichi, Kumio; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Nakashima, Masahiro; Uemura, Takashi; Niino, Daisuke; Sekine, Ichiro

    2008-07-01

    Polaprezinc, an anti-ulcer drug, is a chelate compound consisting of zinc and L-carnosine. Polaprezinc has been shown to prevent gastric mucosal injury. The anti ulcer effects of polaprezinc have been ascribed to its antioxidative property. The effect of polaprezinc on ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis was studied in the jejunal epithelial crypt cells of rats. Seven-to eight week-old Wistar rats, which were treated with 100 mg/kg of polaprezinc orally 1h before irradiation or 2% carboxymethyl cellulose sodium in controls, were exposed to whole body X-ray irradiation at 2 Gy. The number of apoptotic cells per jejunum crypt was counted in haematoxylin and eosin stained sections at 0-6 h after irradiation. TUNEL positive cells and immunopositive cells for active caspase-3 per crypt were also counted. Accumulation of p53, p21(WAF1/CIP1) and Bax expression in the jejunum after irradiation were examined by Western blot analyses. Polaprezinc treatment given prior to radiation resulted in a significant reduction in numbers of apoptotic cells, TUNEL positive cells and active caspase-3 immunopositive cells in jejunal crypt cells. Polaprezinc treatment resulted in decreases of p53 accumulation, p21(WAF1/CIP1) and Bax expression after irradiation. Polaprezinc has a protective effect against ionizing radiation induced apoptosis in rat jejunal crypt cells. PMID:18413982

  6. Management of intestinal failure in inflammatory bowel disease: Small intestinal transplantation or home parenteral nutrition?

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Elizabeth; Allan, Philip; Ramu, Amrutha; Vaidya, Anil; Travis, Simon; Lal, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease and Crohn’s disease in particular, is a common cause of intestinal failure. Current therapeutic options include home parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation. For most patients, home intravenous therapy including parenteral nutrition, with a good probability of long-term survival, is the favoured choice. However, in selected patients, with specific features that may shorten survival or complicate home parenteral nutrition, intestinal transplantation presents a viable alternative. We present survival, complications, quality of life and economic considerations that currently influence individualised decision-making between home parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation. PMID:24696601

  7. Intestinal adaptation after massive intestinal resection

    PubMed Central

    Weale, A; Edwards, A; Bailey, M; Lear, P

    2005-01-01

    Patients with short bowel syndrome require long term parenteral nutrition support. However, after massive intestinal resection the intestine undergoes adaptation and nutritional autonomy may be obtained. Given that the complications of parenteral nutrition may be life threatening or result in treatment failure and the need for intestinal transplantation, a more attractive option is to wean patients off nutrition support by optimising the adaptive process. The article examines the evidence that after extensive small bowel resection adaptation occurs in humans and focuses on the factors that influence adaptation and the strategies that have been used to optimise this process. The review is based on an English language Medline search with secondary references obtained from key articles. There is evidence that adaptation occurs in humans. Adaptation is a complex process that results in response to nutrient and non-nutrient stimuli. Successful and reproducible strategies to improve adaptation remain elusive despite an abundance of experimental data. Nevertheless given the low patient survival and quality of life associated with other treatments for irreversible intestinal failure it is imperative that clinical research continues into the optimisation of the adaptation. PMID:15749794

  8. Injury-associated reacquiring of intestinal stem cell function

    PubMed Central

    Sipos, Ferenc; Műzes, Györgyi

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial layer of the intestine relies upon stem cells for maintaining homeostasis and regeneration. Two types of stem cells are currently defined in intestinal crypts: the cycling crypt base columnar cells and quiescent cells. Though several candidate markers and regulators of rapidly cycling and quiescent stem cells have been identified so far, the exact nature of quiescent cells is still questionable since investigations mainly focused on candidate markers rather than the label-retaining population itself. Recent results, however, have strengthened the argument for functional plasticity. Using a lineage tracing strategy label-retaining cells (LRCs) of the intestinal epithelium were marked, then followed by a pulse-chase analysis it was found that during homeostasis, LRCs were Lgr5-positive and were destined to become Paneth and neuroendocrine cells. Nevertheless, it was demonstrated that LRCs are capable of clonogenic growth by recall to the self-renewing pool of stem cells in case of epithelial injury. These new findings highlight on the hierarchical and spatial organization of intestinal epithelial homeostasis and the important plasticity of progenitors during tissue regeneration, moreover, provide a motivation for studying their role in disorders like colorectal cancer. PMID:25717233

  9. Impaired expression of acyl-CoA-synthetase 5 in epithelial tumors of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Gassler, Nikolaus; Schneider, Armin; Kopitz, Jürgen; Schnölzer, Martina; Obermüller, Nicholas; Kartenbeck, Jürgen; Otto, Herwart F; Autschbach, Frank

    2003-10-01

    Fatty acids are implicated in tumorigenesis, but data are limited concerning endogenous fatty acid metabolism of tumor cells in adenomas and adenocarcinomas of the small intestine. The recently cloned human acyl-CoA-synthetase 5 (ACS5) is predominantly found in the small intestine and represents a key enzyme in providing cytosolic acyl-CoA thioesters. Protein synthesis and mRNA expression of ACS5 were studied in human intestinal tissues using different methods, including a newly established monoclonal antibody. In the healthy small intestine, expression of ACS5 was restricted to the villus surface epithelium but was not detectable in enterocytes lining crypts. ACS5 protein and mRNA were progressively diminished in epithelial cells of adenomas and adenocarcinomas of the small intestine. In conclusion, altered expression of ACS5 is probably related to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence of small intestinal epithelial tumors due to an impaired acyl-CoA thioester synthesis. PMID:14608540

  10. Insights into Vibrio cholerae Intestinal Colonization from Monitoring Fluorescently Labeled Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Yves A.; Alvarez, David; Ringgaard, Simon; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Davis, Brigid M.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the agent of cholera, is a motile non-invasive pathogen that colonizes the small intestine (SI). Most of our knowledge of the processes required for V. cholerae intestinal colonization is derived from enumeration of wt and mutant V. cholerae recovered from orogastrically infected infant mice. There is limited knowledge of the distribution of V. cholerae within the SI, particularly its localization along the villous axis, or of the bacterial and host factors that account for this distribution. Here, using confocal and intravital two-photon microscopy to monitor the localization of fluorescently tagged V. cholerae strains, we uncovered unexpected and previously unrecognized features of V. cholerae intestinal colonization. Direct visualization of the pathogen within the intestine revealed that the majority of V. cholerae microcolonies attached to the intestinal epithelium arise from single cells, and that there are notable regiospecific aspects to V. cholerae localization and factors required for colonization. In the proximal SI, V. cholerae reside exclusively within the developing intestinal crypts, but they are not restricted to the crypts in the more distal SI. Unexpectedly, V. cholerae motility proved to be a regiospecific colonization factor that is critical for colonization of the proximal, but not the distal, SI. Furthermore, neither motility nor chemotaxis were required for proper V. cholerae distribution along the villous axis or in crypts, suggesting that yet undefined processes enable the pathogen to find its niches outside the intestinal lumen. Finally, our observations suggest that host mucins are a key factor limiting V. cholerae intestinal colonization, particularly in the proximal SI where there appears to be a more abundant mucus layer. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the potent capacity of direct pathogen visualization during infection to deepen our understanding of host pathogen interactions. PMID:25275396

  11. Differential response to DNA damage may explain different cancer susceptibility between small and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Hong, Mee Young; Turner, Nancy D; Carroll, Raymond J; Chapkin, Robert S; Lupton, Joanne R

    2005-07-01

    Although large intestine (LI) cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, small intestine (SI) cancer is relatively rare. Because oxidative DNA damage is one possible initiator of tumorigenesis, we investigated if the SI is protected against cancer because of a more appropriate response to oxidative DNA damage compared with the LI. Sixty rats were allocated to three treatment groups: 3% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS, a DNA-oxidizing agent) for 48 hrs, withdrawal (DSS for 48 hrs + DSS withdrawal for 48 hrs), or control (no DSS). The SI, compared with the LI, showed greater oxidative DNA damage (P < 0.001) as determined using a quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of 8-oxodeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG). The response to the DNA adducts in the SI was greater than in the LI. The increase of TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive apoptosis after DSS treatment was greater in the SI compared with the LI (P < 0.001), and there was a positive correlation (P = 0.031) between DNA damage and apoptosis in the SI. Morphologically, DSS caused an extensive loss of crypt structure shown in lower crypt height (P = 0.006) and the number of intact crypts (P = 0.0001) in the LI, but not in the SI. These data suggest that the SI may be more protected against cancer by having a more dynamic response to oxidative damage that maintains crypt morphology, whereas the response of the LI makes it more susceptible to loss of crypt architecture. These differential responses to oxidative DNA damage may contribute to the difference in cancer susceptibility between these two anatomic sites of the intestine. PMID:15985621

  12. An increase in epithelial cell apoptosis is associated with chronic intestinal nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Cliffe, Laura J; Potten, Christopher S; Booth, Catherine E; Grencis, Richard K

    2007-04-01

    It is well established that homeostasis of the intestinal epithelium becomes dysregulated during gastrointestinal helminth infection and is under immune control. An increase in both enterocyte proliferation and the subsequent generation of crypt hyperplasia are hallmarks of chronic infection with Trichuris muris, a large intestinal dwelling nematode. The effect of this parasitic infection on apoptosis induction in the large intestine and its regulation has been neglected. To address this, mice of resistant and susceptible phenotypes were infected with different doses of T. muris, and the levels of epithelial cell apoptosis were determined. It is clear that apoptosis is induced during chronic T. muris infection. This occurs mainly at the base of the cecal crypt, within the stem cell region. The level of apoptosis induced is independent of worm number, suggesting that it is not a consequence of worm-induced damage but rather a mechanism for controlling cell number within the crypt. Neutralization of both gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor alpha caused a significant reduction in the levels of apoptosis, showing that proinflammatory cytokines generated in response to chronic infection play an important role in apoptosis induction in this system. It is proposed that the generation of proinflammatory cytokines during chronic T. muris infection may play a positive role, by promoting intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, to counter infection-induced epithelial hyperplasia. PMID:17242061

  13. Stimulation of butyrate production in the large intestine of weaning piglets by dietary fructooligosaccharides and its influence on the histological variables of the large intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Iwasaki, Yoshie; Nakayama, Keizo; Ushida, Kazunari

    2003-12-01

    Fructooligosaccharides (FOS) reach the large intestine and are fermented into short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), lactate, and carbon dioxide. As the major energy source for the epithelial cells of the large intestine, n-butyrate stimulates the proliferation of cells as well as mineral and water absorption from the lumen. We examined the effect of dietary FOS supplementation on luminal SCFA production and its influence on the morphometrical variables of mucosa of the large intestine in commercially available pigs. Six weaning piglets were used. After 7 d of adaptation, three pigs were given a test diet containing FOS (10%) ad libitum for 10 d. The other three remained on the basal diet and were used as controls. At the end of the experiment, their large intestines were removed, and the cecum, gyri centripetales, gyri centrifugales, and rectum were separated. The contents of each portion were collected and measured for SCFA concentration, pH, and moisture. A micrometer was used to measure the crypt depth. The numbers of epithelial and mitotic cells in the crypt columns were also counted. The concentration of SCFA was significantly higher in piglets fed FOS than in the controls. The concentration of n-butyrate was markedly stimulated by FOS. The number of epithelial. mitotic, and mucin-containing cells was higher in piglets fed FOS than in the controls. Accordingly, the crypt depth was larger in the FOS-fed piglets. The luminal n-butyrate concentration showed a significantly positive correlation with the crypt depth and the number of epithelial, mitotic, and mucin-containing cells. PMID:14974732

  14. Intestinal Parasitoses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagardere, Bernard; Dumburgier, Elisabeth

    1994-01-01

    Intestinal parasites have become a serious public health problem in tropical countries because of the climate and the difficulty of achieving efficient hygiene. The objectives of this journal issue are to increase awareness of the individual and collective repercussions of intestinal parasites, describe the current conditions of contamination and…

  15. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason Blood in the stool A lump in the abdomen Imaging tests that create pictures of the small ... help diagnose intestinal cancer and show whether it has spread. Surgery is ...

  16. Differentiation-dependent regulation of intestinal vitamin B2 uptake: studies utilizing human-derived intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and native rat intestine

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Veedamali S.; Ghosal, Abhisek; Subramanya, Sandeep B.; Lytle, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells undergo differentiation as they move from the crypt to the villi, a process that is associated with up- and downregulation in expression of a variety of genes, including those involved in nutrient absorption. Whether the intestinal uptake process of vitamin B2 [riboflavin (RF)] also undergoes differentiation-dependent regulation and the mechanism through which this occurs are not known. We used human-derived intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and native rat intestine as models to address these issues. Caco-2 cells showed a significantly higher carrier-mediated RF uptake in post- than preconfluent cells. This upregulation was associated with a significantly higher level of protein and mRNA expression of the RF transporters hRFVT-1 and hRFVT-3 in the post- than preconfluent cells; it was also accompanied with a significantly higher rate of transcription of the respective genes (SLC52A1 and SLC52A3), as indicated by the higher level of expression of heterogeneous nuclear RNA and higher promoter activity in post- than preconfluent cells. Studies with native rat intestine also showed a significantly higher RF uptake by epithelial cells of the villus tip than epithelial cells of the crypt; this again was accompanied by a significantly higher level of expression of the rat RFVT-1 and RFVT-3 at the protein, mRNA, and heterogeneous nuclear RNA levels. These findings show, for the first time, that the intestinal RF uptake process undergoes differentiation-dependent upregulation and suggest that this is mediated (at least in part) via transcriptional mechanisms. PMID:23413253

  17. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Bioavailability Regulates Angiogenesis and Intestinal Stem and Progenitor Cell Proliferation during Postnatal Small Intestinal Development

    PubMed Central

    Holoyda, Kathleen A.; Hou, Xiaogang; Fowler, Kathryn L.; Grikscheit, Tracy C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly conserved, master regulatory molecule required for endothelial cell proliferation, organization, migration and branching morphogenesis. Podocoryne carnea and drosophila, which lack endothelial cells and a vascular system, express VEGF homologs, indicating potential roles beyond angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. The role of VEGF in the development and homeostasis of the postnatal small intestine is unknown. We hypothesized regulating VEGF bioavailability in the postnatal small intestine would exhibit effects beyond the vasculature and influence epithelial cell stem/progenitor populations. Methods VEGF mutant mice were created that overexpressed VEGF in the brush border of epithelium via the villin promotor following doxycycline treatment. To decrease VEGF bioavailability, sFlt-1 mutant mice were generated that overexpressed the soluble VEGF receptor sFlt-1 upon doxycycline administration in the intestinal epithelium. Mice were analyzed after 21 days of doxycycline administration. Results Increased VEGF expression was confirmed by RT-qPCR and ELISA in the intestine of the VEGF mutants compared to littermates. The VEGF mutant duodenum demonstrated increased angiogenesis and vascular leak as compared to littermate controls. The VEGF mutant duodenum revealed taller villi and increased Ki-67-positive cells in the transit-amplifying zone with reduced Lgr5 expression. The duodenum of sFlt-1 mutants revealed shorter villi and longer crypts with reduced proliferation in the transit-amplifying zone, reduced expression of Dll1, Bmp4 and VE-cadherin, and increased expression of Sox9 and EphB2. Conclusions Manipulating VEGF bioavailability leads to profound effects on not only the intestinal vasculature, but epithelial stem and progenitor cells in the intestinal crypt. Elucidation of the crosstalk between VEGF signaling in the vasculature, mesenchyme and epithelial stem/progenitor cell populations may direct future

  18. Expression of apical Na(+)-L-glutamine co-transport activity, B(0)-system neutral amino acid co-transporter (B(0)AT1) and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 along the jejunal crypt-villus axis in young pigs fed a liquid formula.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chengbo; Yang, Xiaojian; Lackeyram, Dale; Rideout, Todd C; Wang, Zirong; Stoll, Barbara; Yin, Yulong; Burrin, Douglas G; Fan, Ming Z

    2016-06-01

    Gut apical amino acid (AA) transport activity is high at birth and during suckling, thus being essential to maintain luminal nutrient-dependent mucosal growth through providing AA as essential metabolic fuel, substrates and nutrient stimuli for cellular growth. Because system-B(0) Na(+)-neutral AA co-transporter (B(0)AT1, encoded by the SLC6A19 gene) plays a dominant role for apical uptake of large neutral AA including L-Gln, we hypothesized that high apical Na(+)-Gln co-transport activity, and B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) in co-expression with angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) were expressed along the entire small intestinal crypt-villus axis in young animals via unique control mechanisms. Kinetics of Na(+)-Gln co-transport activity in the apical membrane vesicles, prepared from epithelial cells sequentially isolated along the jejunal crypt-villus axis from liquid formula-fed young pigs, were measured with the membrane potential being clamped to zero using thiocyanate. Apical maximal Na(+)-Gln co-transport activity was much higher (p < 0.05) in the upper villus cells than in the middle villus (by 29 %) and the crypt (by 30 %) cells, whereas Na(+)-Gln co-transport affinity was lower (p < 0.05) in the upper villus cells than in the middle villus and the crypt cells. The B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) mRNA abundance was lower (p < 0.05) in the crypt (by 40-47 %) than in the villus cells. There were no significant differences in B(0)AT1 and ACE2 protein abundances on the apical membrane among the upper villus, the middle villus and the crypt cells. Our study suggests that piglet fast growth is associated with very high intestinal apical Na(+)-neutral AA uptake activities via abundantly co-expressing B(0)AT1 and ACE2 proteins in the apical membrane and by transcribing the B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) gene in the epithelia along the entire crypt-villus axis. PMID:26984322

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of an Oceanobacillus sp. Strain Isolated from Soil in a Burial Crypt

    PubMed Central

    Arizaga, Ylenia; Bikandi, Joseba; Garaizar, Javier; Ganau, Giulia; Paglietti, Bianca; Deligios, Massimo; Rubino, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome of an Oceanobacillus sp. strain isolated from spores found in soil samples from a burial crypt of the Cathedral of Sant'Antonio Abate in Castelsardo, Italy. The data obtained indicated the closest relation of the strain with Oceanobacillus caeni. PMID:27469952

  20. Mechanisms and regulation of intestinal iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Evan H; Oates, Phillip S

    2002-01-01

    Iron absorption from the small intestine is regulated according to the body's needs, increasing in iron deficiency and decreasing in iron overload. It has been proposed that the efficiency of absorption is determined by the amount of iron acquired by developing enterocytes when they are in the crypts of Lieberkůhn and that this regulates expression of iron transporters such as DMT1 in mature enterocytes of the intestinal villi. In the crypts the cells take up iron from plasma transferrin by receptor-mediated endocytosis, a process that is influenced by the hemochromatosis protein, HFE. Hence, the availability of plasma transferrin-bound iron and the expression and function of transferrin receptors (TfR1), HFE and DMT1 should all contribute to the absorptive capacity of villus enterocytes. These aspects of the regulation and mechanism of iron absorption were investigated in genetically normal rats and mice, and in Belgrade anemic (b/b) rats and HFE knockout mice. In most experiments the function of the TfR1 was assessed by the uptake of radiolabeled transferrin-bound iron given intravenously. Absorption of non-heme iron was measured using closed in situ duodenal loops. The expression and cellular distribution of DMT1 and TfR1 were determined by in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry. The uptake of transferrin-bound iron and expression of functional TfR1 was shown to occur mainly in crypt cells and to be proportional to the plasma concentration of iron. It was not impaired by the mutation of DMT1 that occurs in b/b rats but was impaired in HFE knockout mice. Iron absorption was increased in these mice but was still influenced by the level of iron stores, as in normal mice. These results are in accordance with the proposed regulation of iron absorption and suggest that DMT1 is not the only iron transporter operating within endosomes of crypt cells. This view was supported by the failure to detect DMT1 mRNA or protein in crypt cells. Expression of DMT1 m

  1. Enhanced Gastrointestinal Expression of Cytosolic Malic Enzyme (ME1) Induces Intestinal and Liver Lipogenic Gene Expression and Intestinal Cell Proliferation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dwairi, Ahmed; Brown, Adam R.; Pabona, John Mark P.; Van, Trang H.; Hamdan, Hamdan; Mercado, Charles P.; Quick, Charles M.; Wight, Patricia A.; Simmen, Rosalia C. M.; Simmen, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine participates in lipid digestion, metabolism and transport. Cytosolic malic enzyme 1 (ME1) is an enzyme that generates NADPH used in fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. Previous work has correlated liver and adipose ME1 expression with susceptibility to obesity and diabetes; however, the contributions of intestine-expressed ME1 to these conditions are unknown. We generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing rat ME1 in the gastrointestinal epithelium under the control of the murine villin1 promoter/enhancer. Levels of intestinal ME1 protein (endogenous plus transgene) were greater in Tg than wildtype (WT) littermates. Effects of elevated intestinal ME1 on body weight, circulating insulin, select adipocytokines, blood glucose, and metabolism-related genes were examined. Male Tg mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet gained significantly more body weight than WT male littermates and had heavier livers. ME1-Tg mice had deeper intestinal and colon crypts, a greater intestinal 5-bromodeoxyuridine labeling index, and increased expression of intestinal lipogenic (Fasn, Srebf1) and cholesterol biosynthetic (Hmgcsr, Hmgcs1), genes. The livers from HF diet-fed Tg mice also exhibited an induction of cholesterol and lipogenic pathway genes and altered measures (Irs1, Irs2, Prkce) of insulin sensitivity. Results indicate that gastrointestinal ME1 via its influence on intestinal epithelial proliferation, and lipogenic and cholesterologenic genes may concomitantly impact signaling in liver to modify this tissue’s metabolic state. Our work highlights a new mouse model to address the role of intestine-expressed ME1 in whole body metabolism, hepatomegaly, and crypt cell proliferation. Intestinal ME1 may thus constitute a therapeutic target to reduce obesity-associated pathologies. PMID:25402228

  2. Cell death (apoptosis) in mouse intestine after continuous irradiation with gamma rays and with beta rays from tritiated water

    SciTech Connect

    Ijiri, K.

    1989-04-01

    Apoptosis is a pattern of cell death involving nuclear pycnosis, cytoplasmic condensation, and karyorrhexis. Apoptosis induced by continuous irradiation with gamma rays (externally given by a 137Cs source) or with beta rays (from tritiated water injected ip) was quantified in the crypts of two portions of mouse bowel, the small intestine and descending colon. The time-course change in the incidence of apoptosis after each type of radiation could be explained on the basis of the innate circadian rhythm of the cells susceptible to apoptotic death and of the excretion of tritiated water (HTO) from the body. For 6-h continuous gamma irradiation at various dose rates (0.6-480 mGy/h) and for 6 h after injection of HTO of various radioactivities (0.15-150 GBq per kg body wt), the relationships between dose and incidence of apoptosis were obtained. Survival curves were then constructed from the curves for dose vs incidence of apoptosis. For the calculation of the absorbed dose from HTO, the water content both of the mouse body and of the cells was assumed to be 70%. One megabecquerel of HTO per mouse (i.e., 40 MBq/kg body wt) gave a dose rate of 0.131 mGy/h. The mean lethal doses (D0) were calculated for gamma rays and HTO, and relative biological effectiveness values of HTO relative to gamma rays were obtained. The D0 values for continuous irradiation with gamma rays were 210 mGy for small intestine and 380 mGy for descending colon, and the respective values for HTO were 130 and 280 mGy, indicating the high radiosensitivity of target cells for apoptotic death. The relative biological effectiveness of HTO relative to 137Cs gamma rays for cell killing in both the small intestine and the descending colon in the mouse was 1.4-2.1.

  3. Generation of L-cells in mouse and human small intestine organoids

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Natalia; Reimann, Frank; Bartfeld, Sina; Farin, Henner F.; Ringnalda, Femke C.; Vries, Robert G. J.; van den Brink, Stieneke; Clevers, Hans; Gribble, Fiona M.; de Koning, Eelco J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Upon a nutrient challenge, L-cells produce glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a powerful stimulant of insulin release. Strategies to augment endogenous GLP-1 production include promoting L-cell differentiation and increasing L-cell number. Here we present a novel in vitro platform to generate functional L-cells from 3D cultures of mouse and human intestinal crypts. We show that short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) selectively increase the number of L-cells resulting in an elevation of GLP-1 release. This is accompanied by up-regulation of transcription factors, associated with the endocrine lineage of intestinal stem cell development. Thus, our platform allows us to study and modulate the development of L-cells in mouse and human crypts as a potential basis for novel therapeutic strategies in type 2 diabetes. PMID:24130334

  4. Intestinal steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bouguen, Guillaume; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Desreumaux, Pierre; Brunner, Thomas; Bertin, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    Steroids are fundamental hormones that control a wide variety of physiological processes such as metabolism, immune functions, and sexual characteristics. Historically, steroid synthesis was considered a function restricted to the adrenals and the gonads. In the past 20 years, a significant number of studies have demonstrated that steroids could also be synthesized or metabolized by other organs. According to these studies, the intestine appears to be a major source of de novo produced glucocorticoids as well as a tissue capable of producing and metabolizing sex steroids. This finding is based on the detection of steroidogenic enzyme expression as well as the presence of bioactive steroids in both the rodent and human gut. Within the intestinal mucosa, the intestinal epithelial cell layer is one of the main cellular sources of steroids. Glucocorticoid synthesis regulation in the intestinal epithelial cells is unique in that it does not involve the classical positive regulator steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) but a closely related homolog, namely the liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1). This local production of immunoregulatory glucocorticoids contributes to intestinal homeostasis and has been linked to pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel diseases. Intestinal epithelial cells also possess the ability to metabolize sex steroids, notably estrogen; this mechanism may impact colorectal cancer development. In this review, we contextualize and discuss what is known about intestinal steroidogenesis and regulation as well as the key role these functions play both in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25560486

  5. Radioprotection and Cell Cycle Arrest of Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Darinaparsin, a Tumor Radiosensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Junqiang; Doi, Hiroshi; Saar, Matthias; Santos, Jennifer; Li, Xuejun; Peehl, Donna M.; Knox, Susan J.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: It was recently reported that the organic arsenic compound darinaparsin (DPS) is a cytotoxin and radiosensitizer of tumor cells in vitro and in subcutaneous xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, it was also found that DPS protects normal intestinal crypt epithelial cells (CECs) from clonogenic death after ionizing radiation (IR). Here we tested the DPS radiosensitizing effect in a clinically relevant model of prostate cancer and explored the radioprotective effect and mechanism of DPS on CECs. Methods and Materials: The radiation modification effect of DPS was tested in a mouse model of orthotopic xenograft prostate cancer and of IR-induced acute gastrointestinal syndrome. The effect of DPS on CEC DNA damage and DNA damage responses was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: In the mouse model of IR-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, DPS treatment before IR accelerated recovery from body weight loss and increased animal survival. DPS decreased post-IR DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that the radioprotective effect was mediated by enhanced DNA damage repair. Shortly after DPS injection, significant cell cycle arrest was observed in CECs at both G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, which was accompanied by the activation of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 alpha (GADD45A). Further investigation revealed that DPS activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important inducer of DNA damage repair and cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: DPS selectively radioprotected normal intestinal CECs and sensitized prostate cancer cells in a clinically relevant model. This effect may be, at least in part, mediated by DNA damage response activation and has the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy.

  6. Protective effects of carvacrol and pomegranate against methotrexate-induced intestinal damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Türkcü, Gül; Alabalık, Ulaş; Keleş, Ayşe Nur; Bozkurt, Mehtap; İbiloğlu, İbrahim; Fırat, Uğur; Büyükbayram, Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this experimental study was to evaluate the efficacy of carvacrol (CVR) and pomegranate (PMG) against methotrexate (MTX)-induced intestinal damage using histopathological and immunohistochemical techniques. Methods: Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 195-250 g, were divided into four groups: control, MTX treatment alone, MTX plus CVR and MTX plus PMG. A single dose of CVR (73 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally to group III on the first day of the experiment, PMG (225 mg/kg/day) was administered orogastrically (with a gavage needle) once daily for 7 days and a single dose of MTX (20 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally on the second day of the experiment. Intestinal tissues were obtained on 8th day, and examined for villus damage, crypt damage, and inflammation. Ki-67 and Caspase 3 staining was used for immunohistochemical evaluation. Results: MTX treatment induced villus shortening and fusion, epithelial atrophy, crypt loss, inflammatory infiltrate in the lamina propria, and goblet cell depletion. The CVR and PMG decreased the severity of intestinal damage caused by MTX treatment. In the MTX-received group, significant inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in the lamina propria. Compared to the MTX-received group, the PMG and CVR groups showed less villus and crypt damage and less inflammation in the lamina propria. Fewer Ki-67 positive cells were observed in the crypts of the MTX-received groups compared to the control group. There were more Ki-67 positive cells in the CVR and PMG groups compared to MTX group. The MTX-received group exhibited more caspase-3 positive cells than the control group, and the number of caspase-3 positive cells were decreased in the CVR and PMG treated groups. Conclusion: This study is the first to show that PMG and CVR decrease MTX-related damage and apoptotic activity in intestinal tissue. PMID:26629037

  7. Methyl donor deficiency affects small-intestinal differentiation and barrier function in rats.

    PubMed

    Bressenot, Aude; Pooya, Shabnam; Bossenmeyer-Pourie, Carine; Gauchotte, Guillaume; Germain, Adeline; Chevaux, Jean-Baptiste; Coste, Florence; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2013-02-28

    Dietary methyl donors and their genetic determinants are associated with Crohn's disease risk. We investigated whether a methyl-deficient diet (MDD) may affect development and functions of the small intestine in rat pups from dams subjected to the MDD during gestation and lactation. At 1 month before pregnancy, adult females were fed with either a standard food or a diet without vitamin B12, folate and choline. A global wall hypotrophy was observed in the distal small bowel (MDD animals 0·30 mm v. controls 0·58 mm; P< 0·001) with increased crypt apoptosis (3·37 v. 0·4%; P< 0·001), loss of enterocyte differentiation in the villus and a reduction in intestinal alkaline phosphatase production. Cleaved caspase-3 immunostaining (MDD animals 3·37% v. controls 0·4%, P< 0·001) and the Apostain labelling index showed increased crypt apoptosis (3·5 v. 1·4%; P= 0·018). Decreased proliferation was observed in crypts of the proximal small bowel with a reduced number of minichromosome maintenance 6 (MDD animals 52·83% v. controls 83·17%; P= 0·048) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive cells (46·25 v. 59 %; P= 0·05). This lack of enterocyte differentiation in the distal small bowel was associated with an impaired expression of β-catenin and a decreased β-catenin-E-cadherin interaction. The MDD affected the intestinal barrier in the proximal small bowel by decreasing Paneth cell number after immunostaining for lysosyme (MDD animals 8·66% v. controls 21·66%) and by reducing goblet cell number and mucus production after immunostaining for mucin-2 (crypts 8·66 v. 15·33%; villus 7 v. 17%). The MDD has dual effects on the small intestine by producing dramatic effects on enterocyte differentiation and barrier function in rats. PMID:22794784

  8. Autoradiographic localization of opioid receptor types in the rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Dashwood, M.R.; Sykes, R.M.; Thompson, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    The selective mu and delta ligands (/sup 3/H)DAGO and (/sup 3/H)DPDPE have been used to investigate the distribution of specific opioid subtypes in the rat small intestine by in vitro autoradiography. There was a greater density of (/sup 3/H)DPDPE binding at regions of the villi and crypts than (/sup 3/H)DAGO binding. These results suggest that the opioid receptors located in these regions are predominantly of the delta subtype.

  9. Anti-Siglec-F antibody inhibits oral egg allergen induced intestinal eosinophilic inflammation in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dae Jin; Cho, Jae Youn; Miller, Marina; Strangman, Wendy; Zhang, Mai; Varki, Ajit; Broide, David H

    2009-01-01

    Siglec-F is a sialic acid binding immunoglobulin-superfamily receptor that is highly expressed on eosinophils. We have used a mouse model of oral egg ovalbumin (OVA)-induced eosinophilic inflammation of the gastrointestinal mucosa associated with diarrhea and weight loss to determine whether administering an anti-Siglec-F antibody would reduce levels of intestinal mucosal eosinophilic inflammation. Mice administered the anti-Siglec-F antibody had significantly lower levels of intestinal eosinophilic inflammation, and this was associated with reduced intestinal permeability changes, normalization of intestinal villous crypt height, and restoration of weight gain. The reduced numbers of intestinal eosinophils in anti-Siglec-F antibody treated mice was associated with significantly reduced numbers of bone marrow and peripheral blood eosinophils, but was not associated with significant changes in the numbers of proliferating or apoptotic jejunal eosinophils. In addition, the anti-Siglec-F Ab reduced Th2 cytokines and IgE levels. Overall, these studies demonstrate that administration of an anti-Siglec-F antibody significantly reduces levels of eosinophilic inflammation in the intestinal mucosa and that this was associated with reduced intestinal permeability changes, normalization of intestinal villous crypt height, and restoration of weight gain. PMID:19135419

  10. Complex, multi-scale small intestinal topography replicated in cellular growth substrates fabricated via chemical vapor deposition of Parylene C.

    PubMed

    Koppes, Abigail N; Kamath, Megha; Pfluger, Courtney A; Burkey, Daniel D; Dokmeci, Mehmet; Wang, Lin; Carrier, Rebecca L

    2016-01-01

    Native small intestine possesses distinct multi-scale structures (e.g., crypts, villi) not included in traditional 2D intestinal culture models for drug delivery and regenerative medicine. The known impact of structure on cell function motivates exploration of the influence of intestinal topography on the phenotype of cultured epithelial cells, but the irregular, macro- to submicron-scale features of native intestine are challenging to precisely replicate in cellular growth substrates. Herein, we utilized chemical vapor deposition of Parylene C on decellularized porcine small intestine to create polymeric intestinal replicas containing biomimetic irregular, multi-scale structures. These replicas were used as molds for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) growth substrates with macro to submicron intestinal topographical features. Resultant PDMS replicas exhibit multiscale resolution including macro- to micro-scale folds, crypt and villus structures, and submicron-scale features of the underlying basement membrane. After 10 d of human epithelial colorectal cell culture on PDMS substrates, the inclusion of biomimetic topographical features enhanced alkaline phosphatase expression 2.3-fold compared to flat controls, suggesting biomimetic topography is important in induced epithelial differentiation. This work presents a facile, inexpensive method for precisely replicating complex hierarchal features of native tissue, towards a new model for regenerative medicine and drug delivery for intestinal disorders and diseases. PMID:27550930

  11. Interleukin-22 Promotes Intestinal Stem Cell-Mediated Epithelial Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dudakov, Jarrod A.; Jenq, Robert R.; Velardi, Enrico; Young, Lauren F.; Smith, Odette M.; Lawrence, Gillian; Ivanov, Juliet A.; Fu, Ya-Yuan; Takashima, Shuichiro; Hua, Guoqiang; Martin, Maria L.; O'Rourke, Kevin P.; Lo, Yuan-Hung; Mokry, Michal; Romera-Hernandez, Monica; Cupedo, Tom; Dow, Lukas; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E.; Shroyer, Noah F.; Liu, Chen; Kolesnick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial regeneration is critical for barrier maintenance and organ function after intestinal injury. The intestinal stem cell (ISC) niche provides Wnt, Notch, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) signals supporting Lgr5+ crypt base columnar ISCs for normal epithelial maintenance1,2. However, little is known about the regulation of the ISC compartment after tissue damage. Utilizing ex vivo organoid cultures, we provide evidence that innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), potent producers of Interleukin-22 (IL-22) after intestinal injury3,4, increased the growth of murine small intestine (SI) organoids in an IL-22-dependent fashion. Recombinant IL-22 directly targeted ISCs, augmenting the growth of both murine and human intestinal organoids, increasing proliferation, and promoting ISC expansion. IL-22 induced Stat3 phosphorylation in Lgr5+ ISCs, and Stat3 was critical for both organoid formation and IL-22-mediated regeneration. Treatment with IL-22 in vivo after murine allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) enhanced recovery of ISCs, increased epithelial regeneration, and reduced intestinal pathology and mortality from graft vs. host disease (GVHD). Atoh1-deficient organoid culture demonstrated that IL-22 induced epithelial regeneration independent of the Paneth cell niche. Our findings reveal a fundamental mechanism by which the immune system is able to support intestinal epithelium, activating ISCs to promote regeneration. PMID:26649819

  12. Interleukin-22 promotes intestinal-stem-cell-mediated epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lindemans, Caroline A; Calafiore, Marco; Mertelsmann, Anna M; O'Connor, Margaret H; Dudakov, Jarrod A; Jenq, Robert R; Velardi, Enrico; Young, Lauren F; Smith, Odette M; Lawrence, Gillian; Ivanov, Juliet A; Fu, Ya-Yuan; Takashima, Shuichiro; Hua, Guoqiang; Martin, Maria L; O'Rourke, Kevin P; Lo, Yuan-Hung; Mokry, Michal; Romera-Hernandez, Monica; Cupedo, Tom; Dow, Lukas E; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E; Shroyer, Noah F; Liu, Chen; Kolesnick, Richard; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Hanash, Alan M

    2015-12-24

    Epithelial regeneration is critical for barrier maintenance and organ function after intestinal injury. The intestinal stem cell (ISC) niche provides Wnt, Notch and epidermal growth factor (EGF) signals supporting Lgr5(+) crypt base columnar ISCs for normal epithelial maintenance. However, little is known about the regulation of the ISC compartment after tissue damage. Using ex vivo organoid cultures, here we show that innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), potent producers of interleukin-22 (IL-22) after intestinal injury, increase the growth of mouse small intestine organoids in an IL-22-dependent fashion. Recombinant IL-22 directly targeted ISCs, augmenting the growth of both mouse and human intestinal organoids, increasing proliferation and promoting ISC expansion. IL-22 induced STAT3 phosphorylation in Lgr5(+) ISCs, and STAT3 was crucial for both organoid formation and IL-22-mediated regeneration. Treatment with IL-22 in vivo after mouse allogeneic bone marrow transplantation enhanced the recovery of ISCs, increased epithelial regeneration and reduced intestinal pathology and mortality from graft-versus-host disease. ATOH1-deficient organoid culture demonstrated that IL-22 induced epithelial regeneration independently of the Paneth cell niche. Our findings reveal a fundamental mechanism by which the immune system is able to support the intestinal epithelium, activating ISCs to promote regeneration. PMID:26649819

  13. Laminin α5 influences the architecture of the mouse small intestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Zhen X.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Miner, Jeffrey H.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The mammalian intestine displays two distinct patterns of mucosal organization. The small intestine contains mucosal epithelial invaginations called crypts of Lieberkühn that are continuous with evaginations into the lumen called villi. The colon also contains crypts, but its epithelial surface is lined by flat surface cuffs. The epithelial cells of both organs communicate with the underlying mesenchyme through a basement membrane that is composed of a variety of extracellular matrix proteins, including members of the laminin family. The basement membranes of the small intestine and colon contain distinct laminin subtypes; notably, the villus basement membrane is rich in laminin α5. Here we show that diminution of laminin α5 in a mouse model led to a compensatory deposition of colonic laminins that resulted in a transformation from a small intestinal to a colonic mucosal architecture. The alteration in mucosal architecture was associated with reduced levels of nuclear p27Kip1, a cell cycle regulator, and altered intestinal epithelial cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Our results suggest that laminin α5 plays a crucial role in establishing and maintaining the specific mucosal pattern of the mouse small intestine. PMID:18628307

  14. YY1 is indispensable for Lgr5+ intestinal stem cell renewal.

    PubMed

    Perekatt, Ansu O; Valdez, Michael J; Davila, Melanie; Hoffman, A; Bonder, Edward M; Gao, Nan; Verzi, Michael P

    2014-05-27

    The intestinal stem cell fuels the highest rate of tissue turnover in the body and has been implicated in intestinal disease and cancer; understanding the regulatory mechanisms controlling intestinal stem cell physiology is of great importance. Here, we provide evidence that the transcription factor YY1 is essential for intestinal stem cell renewal. We observe that YY1 loss skews normal homeostatic cell turnover, with an increase in proliferating crypt cells and a decrease in their differentiated villous progeny. Increased crypt cell numbers come at the expense of Lgr5(+) stem cells. On YY1 deletion, Lgr5(+) cells accelerate their commitment to the differentiated population, exhibit increased levels of apoptosis, and fail to maintain stem cell renewal. Loss of Yy1 in the intestine is ultimately fatal. Mechanistically, YY1 seems to play a role in stem cell energy metabolism, with mitochondrial complex I genes bound directly by YY1 and their transcript levels decreasing on YY1 loss. These unappreciated YY1 functions broaden our understanding of metabolic regulation in intestinal stem cell homeostasis. PMID:24821761

  15. 3-D intestinal scaffolds for evaluating the therapeutic potential of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Costello, Cait M; Sorna, Rachel M; Goh, Yih-Lin; Cengic, Ivana; Jain, Nina K; March, John C

    2014-07-01

    Biomimetic in vitro intestinal models are becoming useful tools for studying host-microbial interactions. In the past, these models have typically been limited to simple cultures on 2-D scaffolds or Transwell inserts, but it is widely understood that epithelial cells cultured in 3-D environments exhibit different phenotypes that are more reflective of native tissue, and that different microbial species will preferentially adhere to select locations along the intestinal villi. We used a synthetic 3-D tissue scaffold with villous features that could support the coculture of epithelial cell types with select bacterial populations. Our end goal was to establish microbial niches along the crypt-villus axis in order to mimic the natural microenvironment of the small intestine, which could potentially provide new insights into microbe-induced intestinal disorders, as well as enabling targeted probiotic therapies. We recreated the surface topography of the small intestine by fabricating a biodegradable and biocompatible villous scaffold using poly lactic-glycolic acid to enable the culture of Caco-2 with differentiation along the crypt-villus axis in a similar manner to native intestines. This was then used as a platform to mimic the adhesion and invasion profiles of both Salmonella and Pseudomonas, and assess the therapeutic potential of Lactobacillus and commensal Escherichia coli in a 3-D setting. We found that, in a 3-D environment, Lactobacillus is more successful at displacing pathogens, whereas Nissle is more effective at inhibiting pathogen adhesion. PMID:24798584

  16. Snai1 regulates cell lineage allocation and stem cell maintenance in the mouse intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Horvay, Katja; Jardé, Thierry; Casagranda, Franca; Perreau, Victoria M; Haigh, Katharina; Nefzger, Christian M; Akhtar, Reyhan; Gridley, Thomas; Berx, Geert; Haigh, Jody J; Barker, Nick; Polo, Jose M; Hime, Gary R; Abud, Helen E

    2015-01-01

    Snail family members regulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) during invasion of intestinal tumours, but their role in normal intestinal homeostasis is unknown. Studies in breast and skin epithelia indicate that Snail proteins promote an undifferentiated state. Here, we demonstrate that conditional knockout of Snai1 in the intestinal epithelium results in apoptotic loss of crypt base columnar stem cells and bias towards differentiation of secretory lineages. In vitro organoid cultures derived from Snai1 conditional knockout mice also undergo apoptosis when Snai1 is deleted. Conversely, ectopic expression of Snai1 in the intestinal epithelium in vivo results in the expansion of the crypt base columnar cell pool and a decrease in secretory enteroendocrine and Paneth cells. Following conditional deletion of Snai1, the intestinal epithelium fails to produce a proliferative response following radiation-induced damage indicating a fundamental requirement for Snai1 in epithelial regeneration. These results demonstrate that Snai1 is required for regulation of lineage choice, maintenance of CBC stem cells and regeneration of the intestinal epithelium following damage. PMID:25759216

  17. SAM pointed domain ETS factor (SPDEF) regulates terminal differentiation and maturation of intestinal goblet cells

    SciTech Connect

    Noah, Taeko K.; Kazanjian, Avedis; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Neonatology and Pulmonary Biology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH ; Shroyer, Noah F.

    2010-02-01

    Background and Aims: SPDEF (also termed PDEF or PSE) is an ETS family transcription factor that regulates gene expression in the prostate and goblet cell hyperplasia in the lung. Spdef has been reported to be expressed in the intestine. In this paper, we identify an important role for Spdef in regulating intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis and differentiation. Methods: SPDEF expression was inhibited in colon cancer cells to determine its ability to control goblet cell gene activation. The effects of transgenic expression of Spdef on intestinal differentiation and homeostasis were determined. Results: In LS174T colon cancer cells treated with Notch/{gamma}-secretase inhibitor to activate goblet cell gene expression, shRNAs that inhibited SPDEF also repressed expression of goblet cell genes AGR2, MUC2, RETLNB, and SPINK4. Transgenic expression of Spdef caused the expansion of intestinal goblet cells and corresponding reduction in Paneth, enteroendocrine, and absorptive enterocytes. Spdef inhibited proliferation of intestinal crypt cells without induction of apoptosis. Prolonged expression of the Spdef transgene caused a progressive reduction in the number of crypts that expressed Spdef, consistent with its inhibitory effects on cell proliferation. Conclusions: Spdef was sufficient to inhibit proliferation of intestinal progenitors and induce differentiation into goblet cells; SPDEF was required for activation of goblet cell associated genes in vitro. These data support a model in which Spdef promotes terminal differentiation into goblet cells of a common goblet/Paneth progenitor.

  18. Intestinal obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    Obstruction of the bowel may due to: A mechanical cause, which means something is in the way ... lung disease Use of certain medicines, especially narcotics Mechanical causes of intestinal obstruction may include: Adhesions or ...

  19. Marked changes in endogenous antioxidant expression precede vitamin A, C and E-protectable, radiation-induced reductions in small intestinal nutrient transport

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Marjolaine; Kemp, Francis W; Agrawal, Amit; Attanasio, Alicia; Neti, Prasad VSV; Howell, Roger W; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2010-01-01

    Rapidly proliferating epithelial crypt cells of the small intestine are susceptible to radiation-induced oxidative stress, yet there is a dearth of data linking this stress to expression of antioxidant enzymes and to alterations of intestinal nutrient absorption. We previously showed that 5 – 14 d after acute γ-irradiation, intestinal sugar absorption decreased without change in antioxidant enzyme expression. In the present study, we measured antioxidant mRNA and protein expression in mouse intestines taken at early times postirradiation. Observed changes in antioxidant expression are characterized by a rapid decrease within 1 h postirradiation, followed by dramatic upregulation within 4 h, and then downregulation a few days later. The cell type and location expressing the greatest changes in levels of the oxidative stress marker 4HNE and in antioxidant enzymes are, respectively, epithelial cells responsible for nutrient absorption and the crypt region comprised mainly of undifferentiated cells. Consumption of a cocktail of antioxidant vitamins A, C and E, before irradiation, prevents reductions in transport of intestinal sugars, amino acids, bile acids and peptides. Ingestion of antioxidants may blunt radiation-induced decreases in nutrient transport, perhaps by reducing acute oxidative stress in crypt cells, thereby allowing the small intestine to retain its absorptive function when those cells migrate to the villus days after the insult. PMID:20970494

  20. Lactobacillus plantarum NCU116 attenuates cyclophosphamide-induced intestinal mucosal injury, metabolism and intestinal microbiota disorders in mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun-Hua; Fan, Song-Tao; Nie, Shao-Ping; Yu, Qiang; Xiong, Tao; Gong, Deming; Xie, Ming-Yong

    2016-03-16

    Anticancer drugs at high doses often damage the intestinal mucosa and metabolism. Lactobacillus plantarum NCU116 (NCU116) isolated from pickled vegetables was orally given to cyclophosphamide-treated mice to determine its effects on intestinal mucosal injury, nutrient metabolism and colon microbiota, and investigate the mechanisms accounting for its effects. Mice treated with the bacterium were found to favorably recover intestine morphology of villus height and crypt depth, and have improved mucins expression and quantity of goblet cells, as well as intestinal metabolism by increasing the level of short-chain fatty acids and reducing the concentration of ammonia in the colon feces. In addition, NCU116-treated mice showed a higher diversity of colonic microbiota than the group without bacterium supplementation. The number of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium in the mouse colon was increased after bacterium intake, which decreased the number of potentially pathogenic bacteria, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas. These results indicated that NCU116 could be of significant advantage in reducing intestinal mucosal injury and improving the intestinal metabolism and the intestinal microbiota. PMID:26906433

  1. Plasma GLP-2 levels and intestinal markers in the juvenile pig during intestinal adaptation: effects of different diet regimens.

    PubMed

    Paris, Monique C; Fuller, Peter J; Carstensen, Bendix; Nagy, Eva; Taylor, Russell G; Sourial, Magdy; Holst, Jens J; Hartmann, Bolette; Binesm, Julie E

    2004-10-01

    Adaptation of the residual small bowel following resection is dependent on luminal and humoral factors. We aimed to establish if circulating levels of glucagon-like peptide (GLP-2) change under different dietary regimens following resection and to determine if there is a relationship between plasma GLP-2 levels and markers of intestinal adaptation. Four-week-old piglets underwent a 75% proximal small bowel resection (n = 31) or transection (n = 14). Postoperatively they received either pig chow (n = 14), nonpolymeric (elemental) infant formula (n = 7), or polymeric infant formula alone (n = 8) or supplemented either with fiber (n = 6) or with bovine colostrum protein concentrate (CPC; n = 10) for 8 weeks until sacrifice. Plasma GLP-2 levels were measured at weeks 0, 2, 4, and 8 postoperatively. In addition, end-stage parameters were studied at week 8 including weight gain, ileal villus height, crypt depth, and disaccharidase levels. Plasma GLP-2 levels were higher in resected animals compared to transected animals fed the same diet. Plasma GLP-2 levels were significantly increased in the colostrum protein isolate-supplemented animals following resection compared to all other diet groups. The increase in plasma GLP-2 (pM) was greatest in the first 2 weeks postresection (week 0, 15.5; week 2, 30.9), followed by a plateau at weeks 2 to 4 and a decrease in GLP-2 levels from week 4 to week 8. At week 8, no relationships were found between the plasma GLP-2 levels and the measurements of weight gain, villus height, lactase, sucrase, maltase, crypt depth, or villus/crypt ratio. Plasma GLP-2 levels increase in the first weeks following massive small intestinal resection. The increase in plasma GLP-2 levels was enhanced by supplementation of the diet with CPC. The changes in GLP-2 levels observed in this study may suggest that GLP-2 plays a role in the adaptive response in the intestine following resection in this preclinical model. PMID:15573929

  2. Capture and 3D culture of colonic crypts and colonoids in a microarray platform

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuli; Ahmad, Asad A.; Shah, Pavak K.; Sims, Christopher E.; Magness, Scott T.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    Crypts are the basic structural and functional units of colonic epithelium and can be isolated from the colon and cultured in vitro into multi-cell spheroids termed “colonoids”. Both crypts and colonoids are ideal building blocks for construction of an in vitro tissue model of the colon. Here we proposed and tested a microengineered platform for capture and in vitro 3D culture of colonic crypts and colonoids. An integrated platform was fabricated from polydimethylsiloxane which contained two fluidic layers separated by an array of cylindrical microwells (150-μm diameter, 150-μm depth) with perforated bottoms (30-μm opening, 10-μm depth) termed “microstrainers”. As fluid moved through the array, crypts or colonoids were retained in the microstrainers with a >90% array-filling efficiency. Matrigel as an extracellular matrix was then applied to the microstrainers to generate isolated Matrigel pockets encapsulating the crypts or colonoids. After supplying the essential growth factors, epidermal growth factor, Wnt-3A, R-spondin 2 and noggin, 63±13% of the crypts and 77±8% of the colonoids cultured in the microstrainers over a 48–72 h period formed viable 3D colonoids. Thus colonoid growth on the array was similar to that under standard culture conditions (78±5%). Additionally the colonoids displayed the same morphology and similar numbers of stem and progenitor cells as those under standard culture conditions. Immunofluorescence staining confirmed that the differentiated cell-types of the colon, goblet cells, enteroendocrine cells and absorptive enterocytes, formed on the array. To demonstrating the utility of the array in tracking the colonoid fate, quantitative fluorescence analysis was performed on the arrayed colonoids exposed to reagents such as Wnt-3A and the γ-secretase inhibitor LY-411575. The successful formation of viable, multi-cell type colonic tissue on the microengineered platform represents a first step in the building of a

  3. Effect of Polysaccharides from Acanthopanax senticosus on Intestinal Mucosal Barrier of Escherichia coli Lipopolysaccharide Challenged Mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Jie; Xu, Yunhe; Yang, Di; Yu, Ning; Bai, Zishan; Bian, Lianquan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of polysaccharide from Acanthopanax senticosus (ASPS) in preventing lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intestinal injury, 18 mice (at 5 wk of age) were assigned to three groups with 6 replicates of one mouse each. Mice were administrated by oral gavage with or without ASPS (300 mg/kg body weight) for 14 days and were injected with saline or LPS at 15 days. Intestinal samples were collected at 4 h post-challenge. The results showed that ASPS ameliorated LPS-induced deterioration of digestive ability of LPS-challenged mice, indicated by an increase in intestinal lactase activity (45%, p<0.05), and the intestinal morphology, as proved by improved villus height (20.84%, p<0.05) and villus height:crypt depth ratio (42%, p<0.05), and lower crypt depth in jejunum (15.55%, p<0.05), as well as enhanced intestinal tight junction proteins expression involving occludin-1 (71.43%, p<0.05). ASPS also prevented intestinal inflammation response, supported by decrease in intestinal inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor α (22.28%, p<0.05) and heat shock protein (HSP70) (77.42%, p<0.05). In addition, intestinal mucus layers were also improved by ASPS, as indicated by the increase in number of goblet cells (24.89%, p<0.05) and intestinal trefoil peptide (17.75%, p<0.05). Finally, ASPS facilitated mRNA expression of epidermal growth factor (100%, p<0.05) and its receptor (200%, p<0.05) gene. These results indicate that ASPS can prevent intestinal mucosal barrier injury under inflammatory conditions, which may be associated with up-regulating gene mRNA expression of epidermal growth factor and its receptor. PMID:26732337

  4. Effect of Polysaccharides from Acanthopanax senticosus on Intestinal Mucosal Barrier of Escherichia coli Lipopolysaccharide Challenged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jie; Xu, Yunhe; Yang, Di; Yu, Ning; Bai, Zishan; Bian, Lianquan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of polysaccharide from Acanthopanax senticosus (ASPS) in preventing lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intestinal injury, 18 mice (at 5 wk of age) were assigned to three groups with 6 replicates of one mouse each. Mice were administrated by oral gavage with or without ASPS (300 mg/kg body weight) for 14 days and were injected with saline or LPS at 15 days. Intestinal samples were collected at 4 h post-challenge. The results showed that ASPS ameliorated LPS-induced deterioration of digestive ability of LPS-challenged mice, indicated by an increase in intestinal lactase activity (45%, p<0.05), and the intestinal morphology, as proved by improved villus height (20.84%, p<0.05) and villus height:crypt depth ratio (42%, p<0.05), and lower crypt depth in jejunum (15.55%, p<0.05), as well as enhanced intestinal tight junction proteins expression involving occludin-1 (71.43%, p<0.05). ASPS also prevented intestinal inflammation response, supported by decrease in intestinal inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor α (22.28%, p<0.05) and heat shock protein (HSP70) (77.42%, p<0.05). In addition, intestinal mucus layers were also improved by ASPS, as indicated by the increase in number of goblet cells (24.89%, p<0.05) and intestinal trefoil peptide (17.75%, p<0.05). Finally, ASPS facilitated mRNA expression of epidermal growth factor (100%, p<0.05) and its receptor (200%, p<0.05) gene. These results indicate that ASPS can prevent intestinal mucosal barrier injury under inflammatory conditions, which may be associated with up-regulating gene mRNA expression of epidermal growth factor and its receptor. PMID:26732337

  5. Small Intestine Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease Crohn's disease Infections Intestinal cancer Intestinal obstruction Irritable bowel syndrome Ulcers, such as peptic ulcer Treatment of disorders of the small intestine depends on the cause.

  6. In vivo gene expression profiling of human intestinal epithelial cells: analysis by laser microdissection of formalin fixed tissues

    PubMed Central

    George, Michael D; Wehkamp, Jan; Kays, Robert J; Leutenegger, Christian M; Sabir, Sadiah; Grishina, Irina; Dandekar, Satya; Bevins, Charles L

    2008-01-01

    Background The small intestinal epithelium mediates vital functions of nutrient absorption and host defense. The spatial organization of the epithelial cells along the crypt-villus axis segregates them into regions of specialized function. However, the differences in transcriptional programming and the molecular machinery that governs the migration, adhesion, and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cell lineages in humans remain under-explored. To increase our understanding of these mechanisms, we have evaluated gene expression patterns of ileal epithelial cells isolated by laser capture microdissection from either the villus epithelial or crypt cell regions of healthy human small intestinal mucosa. Expression profiles in villus and crypt epithelium were determined by DNA microarray, quantitative real-time PCR, and immunohistochemistry based methods. The expression levels of selected epithelial biomarkers were also compared between gastrointestinal tissues. Results Previously established biomarkers as well as a novel and distinct set of genes believed to be linked to epithelial cell motility, adhesion, and differentiation were found to be enriched in each of the two corresponding cell populations (GEO accession: GSE10629). Additionally, high baseline expression levels of innate antimicrobials, alpha defensin 5 (HD5) and regenerating islet-derived 3 alpha (Reg3A), were detected exclusively within the small bowel crypt, most notably in the ileum in comparison to other sites along the gastrointestinal tract. Conclusion The elucidation of differential gene expression patterns between crypt and villus epithelial cell lineages in human ileal tissue provides novel insights into the molecular machinery that mediates their functions and spatial organization. Moreover, our findings establish an important framework of knowledge for future investigations of human gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:18457593

  7. Appropriate crypt formation in the uterus for embryo homing and implantation requires Wnt5a-ROR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jeeyeon; Bartos, Amanda; Park, Craig; Sun, Xiaofei; Li, Yingju; Cha, Sang-Wook; Ajima, Rieko; Ho, Hsin-Yi Henry; Yamaguchi, Terry P.; Dey, Sudhansu K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Embryo homing and implantation occur within a crypt (implantation chamber) at the antimesometrial (AM) pole along the uterus. The mechanism by which this is achieved is not known. Here we show that villi-like epithelial projections from the main uterine lumen towards the AM pole at regularly spaced intervals to form crypts for embryo implantation were disrupted in mice with uterine loss or gain of function of Wnt5a, or loss of function of both Ror1 and Ror2. This disruption of Wnt5a-ROR signaling resulted in disorderly epithelial projections, crypt formation, embryo spacing, and impaired implantation. These early disturbances under abnormal Wnt5a-ROR signaling were reflected in adverse late pregnancy events, including defective decidualization and placentation, ultimately leading to compromised pregnancy outcome. This study presents deeper insight regarding the formation of organized epithelial projections for crypt formation and embryo implantation for pregnancy success. PMID:25043182

  8. Effect of Two Macrocephala Flavored Powder supplementation on intestinal morphology and intestinal microbiota in weaning pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Gang; Qiu, Yin; He, Xiaoli; Zhao, Ling; Shi, Fei; Lv, Cheng; Jing, Bo; Li, Yinglun

    2015-01-01

    A total of 75 pigs were used to investigate effects of feeding Two Macrocephala Flavored Powder (TMFP) on small intestinal morphology, intestinal microbiota in weaning pigs. The dietary treatments were: a control diet; control diet + 3 g/kg TMFP; control diet + 0.3 g/kg colistin sulfate (ANT). The results showed that supplementation with TMFP increased (P < 0.05) villus height at duodenum, jejunum at 3 time points, increased (P < 0.05) crypt depth at duodenum, jejunum at day 14, improved villus height: crypt depth ratio (P < 0.05) in jejunum at day 21 as compared with ANT. Supplementation of TMFP and ANT had lower (P < 0.05) E. coli counts in the ileum, cecum and colon at day 7 as compared with control. Supplementation of TMFP had higher (P < 0.05) bifidobacteria counts in the ileum, cecum and colon compared with ANT, except for colon at day 21. No effect (P > 0.05) on lactobacilli in colon has been seen with supplementation of TMFP and ANT at 3 time points, while both of supplementations showed increased the number of lactobacilli in cecum at day 14 and day 21. Analysis of DGGE fingerprints indicated that a highest similarity was observed for profiles from samples taken 14 d, 21 d from TMFP. The diversity of DGGE fingerprints of TMFP was higher than those of ANT and control. The results suggest that TMFP is potential to enhancing intestinal morphology and microbiota of weaning pigs, and can be served as an effective and safe dietary additive for weaning pigs. PMID:25785165

  9. Developing a pig model for crypt fenestration-induced localized hypoplastic enamel defects in humans.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Mark F; Rodrigues, Antonia T; Byra, Chris

    2014-06-01

    Hypoplastic pits on human deciduous canine teeth are attributed to nutritionally induced thinning of the crypt wall prior to eruption, exposing ameloblasts to unspecified physical trauma through the fenestration. Traditionally known as localized hypoplasia of the primary canine (LHPC), this little-understood condition is reported in fields ranging from public health to bioarchaeology. We propose the defect be termed a ‘crypt fenestration hypoplastic enamel defect’ (CFED) to reflect that an analogous lesion is created postnatally on maxillary molars of pigs. Pigs are accepted as a suitable proxy for many studies in human biology. We compare fenestration defects and CFEDs between 50 Sick Pen pigs, who died naturally, and 20 Controls. Observations were made of the presence, number and size of fenestrations in molar crypts. CFEDs were counted on erupted deciduous last molars and permanent first molars. Signs of being underweight and cranio-dental infection at death were recorded. Sick pen pigs show significantly more fenestrations at death and CFEDs acquired before death. These conditions co-occur with infection and poor growth. The deep fibers of temporalis muscle lie adjacent to the crypt wall of maxillary molars. We propose that contraction of this muscle during suckling and chewing creates large compressive forces against fenestrated bony surfaces sufficient to have physiological consequences for physically unprotected ameloblasts. While we conclude that a pig model is appropriate to study fenestration-induced enamel defects, this naturalistic experiment leaves unresolved whether osteopenia in pigs, and by extension in human infants, is due to disease and/or malnutrition. PMID:24936607

  10. Differential distribution of protein kinases along the crypt-to-lumen regions of rat colonic epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, B; Fraser, G M; Levy, J; Sharoni, Y; Guberman, R; Krawiec, J; Lamprecht, S A

    1988-01-01

    The activity of cAMP-dependent and cAMP-independent protein kinases, a class of enzymes involved in the regulation of cell proliferation was measured in rat colonic epithelium. Sequential cell populations harvested by a stepwise scraping technique from colonic crypt regions were identified by histology and incorporation of [3H]-thymidine into DNA. cAMP-independent phosphorylation of casein, in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP, was markedly suppressed by quercetin, a bioflavonoid known to inhibit G-type casein kinase, protein kinase-C and tyrosine protein kinase. Conversely, the cyclic nucleotide regulatable form requiring histone as substrate was responsive to the action of the heat stable protein kinase inhibitor. The protein kinase species were characterised and partially purified by DEAE-cellulose chromatography. The activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase in colonic cytosols (pmol 32P/min/mg protein, means (SE)) increased from 129.4 (15.9) in superficial cell populations to 238.5 (31.4) in lower crypt cell fractions (p less than 0.01). Colonic cAMP-independent protein kinase activity increased from 87.3 (15.6) in surface cell preparations to 178.1 (30.0) in lower crypt cell populations (p less than 0.02). A comparable activity gradient was observed in membrane fractions. The activity gradient persisted when the results were expressed as a function of cellular DNA. These findings indicate that protein kinases display a defined topological segregation along the colonic crypt regions and that during migration to the lumen colonic cells attenuate enzyme signals supposedly related to tissue growth. PMID:2848753