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Sample records for intestinal enzyme acyl

  1. Impaired expression of acyl-CoA-synthetase 5 in epithelial tumors of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Gassler, Nikolaus; Schneider, Armin; Kopitz, Jürgen; Schnölzer, Martina; Obermüller, Nicholas; Kartenbeck, Jürgen; Otto, Herwart F; Autschbach, Frank

    2003-10-01

    Fatty acids are implicated in tumorigenesis, but data are limited concerning endogenous fatty acid metabolism of tumor cells in adenomas and adenocarcinomas of the small intestine. The recently cloned human acyl-CoA-synthetase 5 (ACS5) is predominantly found in the small intestine and represents a key enzyme in providing cytosolic acyl-CoA thioesters. Protein synthesis and mRNA expression of ACS5 were studied in human intestinal tissues using different methods, including a newly established monoclonal antibody. In the healthy small intestine, expression of ACS5 was restricted to the villus surface epithelium but was not detectable in enterocytes lining crypts. ACS5 protein and mRNA were progressively diminished in epithelial cells of adenomas and adenocarcinomas of the small intestine. In conclusion, altered expression of ACS5 is probably related to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence of small intestinal epithelial tumors due to an impaired acyl-CoA thioester synthesis. PMID:14608540

  2. Acylation of lysolecithin in the intestinal mucosa of rats

    PubMed Central

    Subbaiah, P. V.; Sastry, P. S.; Ganguly, J.

    1970-01-01

    1. The presence of an active acyl-CoA–lysolecithin (1-acylglycerophosphorylcholine) acyltransferase was demonstrated in rat intestinal mucosa. 2. ATP and CoA were necessary for the incorporation of free [1-14C]oleic acid into lecithin (phosphatidylcholine). 3. The reaction was about 20 times as fast with [1-14C]oleoyl-CoA as with free oleic acid, CoA and ATP. 4. With 1-acylglycerophosphorylcholine as the acceptor, both oleic acid and palmitic acid were incorporated into the β-position of lecithin; the incorporation of palmitic acid was 60% of that of oleic acid. 5. Of the various analogues of lysolecithin tested as acyl acceptors from [1-14C]oleoyl CoA, a lysolecithin with a long-chain fatty acid at the 1-position was most efficient. 6. The enzyme was mostly present in the brush-border-free particulate fraction of the intestinal mucosa. 7. Of the various tissues of rats tested for the activity, intestinal mucosa was found to be the most active, with testes, liver, kidneys and spleen following it in decreasing order. PMID:5484668

  3. Expression of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 reflects the state of villus architecture in human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Gassler, Nikolaus; Kopitz, Jürgen; Tehrani, Arman; Ottenwälder, Birgit; Schnölzer, Martina; Kartenbeck, Jürgen; Lyer, Stefan; Autschbach, Frank; Poustka, Annemarie; Otto, Herwart F; Mollenhauer, Jan

    2004-02-01

    Several disorders of the small intestine are associated with disturbances in villus architecture. Thus, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with the differentiation of villi represents an important step in the improvement of the understanding of small intestinal pathology. Screening of antibodies from a hybridoma library led to the identification of an acyl-CoA synthetase 5-specific monoclonal antibody. Protein synthesis, mRNA expression, and the enzyme activity of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 were studied by several methods in human small intestinal tissues with Crohn's disease or coeliac disease, respectively. Acyl-CoA synthetase 5 mRNA and protein levels were substantially reduced in injured small intestinal mucosa. Moreover, impaired synthesis of the acyl-CoA synthetase 5 protein was reflected by a decrease in intramucosal enzyme activity. Subtle changes of the acyl-CoA synthetase 5 pattern correlate with conversion of intestinal epithelial cells to a gastric phenotype. These results suggest that deranged acyl-CoA synthetase 5 expression, synthesis, and activity are closely related to the state of villus architecture and epithelial homeostasis in human small intestine. PMID:14743501

  4. Sonochemical enzyme-catalyzed regioselective acylation of flavonoid glycosides.

    PubMed

    Ziaullah; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2016-04-01

    This work compares a highly efficient and alternative method of sonication-assisted lipase catalyzed acylation of quercetin-3-O-glucoside and phloretin-2'-glucoside, using Candida antarctica lipase B (Novozyme 435(®)), with a range of fatty acids. In this study, sonication-assisted irradiation coupled with stirring has been found to be more efficient and economical than conventional reaction conditions. Sonication-assisted acylation accelerated the reactions and reduced the time required by 4-5 folds. PMID:26829593

  5. Enzyme-coupled assays for flip-flop of acyl-Coenzyme A in liposomes.

    PubMed

    Bavdek, Andrej; Vazquez, Hector M; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Acyl-Coenzyme A is made in the cytosol. Certain enzymes using acyl-CoA seem to operate in the lumen of the ER but no corresponding flippases for acyl-CoA or an activated acyl have been described. In order to test the ability of purified candidate flippases to operate the transport of acyl-CoA through lipid bilayers in vitro we developed three enzyme-coupled assays using large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) obtained by detergent removal. The first assay uses liposomes encapsulating a water-soluble acyl-CoA:glycerol-3-phosphate acyl transferase plus glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P). It measures formation of [(3)H]lyso-phosphatidic acid inside liposomes after [(3)H]palmitoyl-CoA has been added from outside. Two other tests use empty liposomes containing [(3)H]palmitoyl-CoA in the inner membrane leaflet, to which either soluble acyl-CoA:glycerol-3-phosphate acyl transferase plus glycerol-3-phosphate or alkaline phosphatase are added from outside. Here one can follow the appearance of [(3)H]lyso-phosphatidic acid or of dephosphorylated [(3)H]acyl-CoA, respectively, both being made outside the liposomes. Although the liposomes may retain small amounts of detergent, all these tests show that palmitoyl-CoA crosses the lipid bilayer only very slowly and that the lipid composition of liposomes barely affects the flip-flop rate. Thus, palmitoyl-CoA cannot cross the membrane spontaneously implying that in vivo some transport mechanism is required. PMID:26325346

  6. The chain-flipping mechanism of ACP (acyl carrier protein)-dependent enzymes appears universal.

    PubMed

    Cronan, John E

    2014-06-01

    ACPs (acyl carrier proteins) play essential roles in the synthesis of fatty acids, polyketides and non-ribosomal polypeptides. ACP function requires the modification of the protein by attachment of 4'-phosphopantetheine to a conserved serine residue. The phosphopantetheine thiol acts to tether the starting materials and intermediates as their thioesters. ACPs are small highly soluble proteins composed of four α-helices. The helices form a bundle that acts as a hydrophobic sleeve that sequesters the acyl chains and activated thioesters from solvent. However, in the synthesis of fatty acids and complex lipids the enzymes of the pathway must access the thioester and the proximal carbon atoms in order to perform the needed chemistry. How such access is provided without exposure of the acyl chains to solvent has been a longstanding question due to the lack of acyl-ACP-enzyme complexes, a situation generally attributed to the brevity of the interactions of acyl-ACPs with their cognate enzymes. As discussed in the present review the access question has now been answered by four recent crystal structures, each of which shows that the entire acyl chain plus the 4'-phosphopantetheine prosthetic group partitions from the ACP hydrophobic sleeve into a hydrophobic pocket or groove of the enzyme protein, a process termed chain flipping. PMID:24825445

  7. Genome-level and biochemical diversity of the acyl-activating enzyme superfamily in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In higher plants, the superfamily of carboxyl-CoA ligases and related proteins, collectively called acyl activating enzymes (AAEs), has evolved to provide enzymes for many pathways of primary and secondary metabolism and for the conjugation of hormones to amino acids. Across the superfamily there is...

  8. Acylated monogalactosyl diacylglycerol: prevalence in the plant kingdom and identification of an enzyme catalyzing galactolipid head group acylation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Anders K; Johansson, Oskar N; Fahlberg, Per; Kommuri, Murali; Töpel, Mats; Bodin, Lovisa J; Sikora, Per; Modarres, Masoomeh; Ekengren, Sophia; Nguyen, Chi T; Farmer, Edward E; Olsson, Olof; Ellerström, Mats; Andersson, Mats X

    2015-12-01

    The lipid phase of the thylakoid membrane is mainly composed of the galactolipids mono- and digalactosyl diacylglycerol (MGDG and DGDG, respectively). It has been known since the late 1960s that MGDG can be acylated with a third fatty acid to the galactose head group (acyl-MGDG) in plant leaf homogenates. In certain brassicaceous plants like Arabidopsis thaliana, the acyl-MGDG frequently incorporates oxidized fatty acids in the form of the jasmonic acid precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA). In the present study we further investigated the distribution of acylated and OPDA-containing galactolipids in the plant kingdom. While acyl-MGDG was found to be ubiquitous in green tissue of plants ranging from non-vascular plants to angiosperms, OPDA-containing galactolipids were only present in plants from a few genera. A candidate protein responsible for the acyl transfer was identified in Avena sativa (oat) leaf tissue using biochemical fractionation and proteomics. Knockout of the orthologous gene in A. thaliana resulted in an almost total elimination of the ability to form both non-oxidized and OPDA-containing acyl-MGDG. In addition, heterologous expression of the A. thaliana gene in E. coli demonstrated that the protein catalyzed acylation of MGDG. We thus demonstrate that a phylogenetically conserved enzyme is responsible for the accumulation of acyl-MGDG in A. thaliana. The activity of this enzyme in vivo is strongly enhanced by freezing damage and the hypersensitive response. PMID:26566971

  9. Enzyme:substrate hydrogen bond shortening during the acylation phase of serine protease catalysis.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Krisztián; Harmat, Veronika; Neutze, Richard; Szilágyi, László; Gráf, László; Katona, Gergely

    2006-02-21

    Atomic resolution (enzyme and the substrate changed during catalysis. The well-conserved hydrogen bonds of antiparallel beta-sheet between the enzyme and the substrate become significantly shorter in the transition from a Michaelis complex analogue (Pontastacus leptodactylus (narrow-fingered crayfish) trypsin (CFT) in complex with Schistocerca gregaria (desert locust) trypsin inhibitor (SGTI) at 1.2 A resolution) to an acyl-enzyme intermediate (N-acetyl-Asn-Pro-Ile acyl-enzyme intermediate of porcine pancreatic elastase at 0.95 A resolution) presumably synchronously with the nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon atom of the scissile peptide bond. This is interpreted as an active mechanism that utilizes the energy released from the stronger hydrogen bonds to overcome the energetic barrier of the nucleophilic attack by the hydroxyl group of the catalytic serine. In the CFT:SGTI complex this hydrogen bond shortening may be hindered by the 27I-32I disulfide bridge and Asn-15I of SGTI. The position of the catalytic histidine changes slightly as it adapts to the different nucleophilic attacker during the transition from the Michaelis complex to the acyl-enzyme state, and simultaneously its interaction with Asp-102 and Ser-214 becomes stronger. The oxyanion hole hydrogen bonds provide additional stabilization for acyl-ester bond in the acyl-enzyme than for scissile peptide bond of the Michaelis complex. Significant deviation from planarity is not observed in the reactive bonds of either the Michaelis complex or the acyl-enzyme. In the Michaelis complex the electron distribution of the carbonyl bond is distorted toward the oxygen atom compared to other peptide bonds in the structure, which indicates the polarization effect of the oxyanion hole. PMID:16475800

  10. Plant fatty acyl reductases: enzymes generating fatty alcohols for protective layers with potential for industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Owen; Domergue, Frédéric

    2012-09-01

    Primary fatty alcohols are found throughout the biological world, either in free form or in a combined state. They are common components of plant surface lipids (i.e. cutin, suberin, sporopollenin, and associated waxes) and their absence can significantly perturb these essential barriers. Fatty alcohols and/or derived compounds are also likely to have direct functions in plant biotic and abiotic interactions. An evolutionarily related set of alcohol-forming fatty acyl reductases (FARs) is present in all kingdoms of life. Plant microsomal and plastid-associated FAR enzymes have been characterized, acting on acyl-coenzymeA (acyl-CoA) or acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) substrates, respectively. FARs have distinct substrate specificities both with regard to chain length and chain saturation. Fatty alcohols and wax esters, which are a combination of fatty alcohol and fatty acid, have a variety of commercial applications. The expression of FARs with desired specificities in transgenic microbes or oilseed crops would provide a novel means of obtaining these valuable compounds. In the present review, we report on recent progress in characterizing plant FAR enzymes and in understanding the biological roles of primary fatty alcohols, as well as describe the biotechnological production and industrial uses of fatty alcohols. PMID:22794916

  11. Intestinal acyl-CoA synthetase 5: activation of long chain fatty acids and behind.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Christina; Jeon, Min Kyung; Kaemmerer, Elke; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2013-11-14

    The intestinal mucosa is characterized by a high complexity in terms of structure and functions and allows for a controlled demarcation towards the gut lumen. On the one hand it is responsible for pulping and selective absorption of alimentary substances ensuring the immunological tolerance, on the other hand it prevents the penetration of micro-organisms as well as bacterial outgrowth. The continuous regeneration of surface epithelia along the crypt-villus-axis in the small intestine is crucial to assuring these various functions. The core phenomena of intestinal epithelia regeneration comprise cell proliferation, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis. These partly contrarily oriented processes are molecularly balanced through numerous interacting signaling pathways like Wnt/β-catenin, Notch and Hedgehog, and regulated by various modifying factors. One of these modifiers is acyl-CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5). It plays a key role in de novo lipid synthesis, fatty acid degradation and membrane modifications, and regulates several intestinal processes, primarily through different variants of protein lipidation, e.g., palmitoylation. ACSL5 was shown to interact with proapoptotic molecules, and besides seems to inhibit proliferation along the crypt-villus-axis. Because of its proapoptotic and antiproliferative characteristics it could be of significant relevance for intestinal homeostasis, cellular disorder and tumor development. PMID:24259967

  12. Anatomy of a simple acyl intermediate in enzyme catalysis: combined biophysical and modeling studies on ornithine acetyl transferase.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Aman; Clifton, Ian J; Bagonis, Maria; Kershaw, Nadia J; Domene, Carmen; Claridge, Timothy D W; Wharton, Christopher W; Schofield, Christopher J

    2009-01-21

    Acyl-enzyme complexes are intermediates in reactions catalyzed by many hydrolases and related enzymes which employ nucleophilic catalysis. However, most of the reported structural data on acyl-enzyme complexes has been acquired under noncatalytic conditions. Recent IR analyses have indicated that some acyl-enzyme complexes may be more flexible than most crystallographic analyses have implied. OAT2 is a member of the N-terminal nucleophile (Ntn) hydrolase enzyme superfamily and catalyzes the reversible transfer of an acetyl group between the alpha-amino groups of ornithine and glutamate in a mechanism proposed to involve an acyl-enzyme complex. We have carried out biophysical analyses on ornithine acetyl transferase (OAT2), both in solution and in the crystalline state. Mass spectrometric studies identified Thr-181 as the residue acetylated during OAT2 catalysis; (13)C NMR analyses implied the presence of an acyl-enzyme complex in solution. Crystallization of OAT2 in the presence of N-alpha-acetyl-L-glutamate led to a structure in which Thr-181 was acetylated; the carbonyl oxygen of the acyl-enzyme complex was located in an oxyanion hole and positioned to hydrogen bond with the backbone amide NH of Gly-112 and the alcohol of Thr-111. While the crystallographic analyses revealed only one structure, IR spectroscopy demonstrated the presence of two distinct acyl-enzyme complex structures with carbonyl stretching frequencies at 1691 and 1701 cm(-1). Modeling studies implied two possible acyl-enzyme complex structures, one of which correlates with that observed in the crystal structure and with the 1691 cm(-1) IR absorption. The second acyl-enzyme complex structure, which has only a single oxyanion hole hydrogen bond, is proposed to give rise to the 1701 cm(-1) IR absorption. The two acyl-enzyme complex structures can interconvert by movement of the Thr-111 side-chain alcohol hydrogen away from the oxyanion hole to hydrogen bond with the backbone carbonyl of the acylated

  13. Regioselective enzymatic acylation of methyl shikimate. Influence of acyl chain length and solvent polarity on enzyme specificity.

    PubMed

    Armesto, Nuria; Ferrero, Miguel; Fernández, Susana; Gotor, Vicente

    2002-07-12

    Candida antarctica lipase A (CAL-A) selectively catalyzes the acylation at the secondary C-4 hydroxyl group of methyl shikimate (2), which possesses three secondary hydroxyl groups, the C-3 allylic one being chemically more reactive. The effect both of the acyl group of the acylating agents and of the solvent polarity has been studied. The selectivity of CAL-A is almost complete with acyl donors that possess short chains. However, when acyl donors have longer chains, better results are obtained by C. antarctica lipase B (CAL-B). PMID:12098318

  14. Lipopolysaccharide differentially decreases plasma acyl and desacyl ghrelin levels in rats: potential role of the circulating ghrelin acylating enzyme GOAT

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Reeve, Joseph R.; Taché, Yvette; Lambrecht, Nils W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rodents is an established model for studying innate immune responses to gram-negative bacteria and mimicking symptoms of infections including reduced food intake associated with decreased circulating total ghrelin levels. The ghrelin-acylating enzyme, ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT) involved in the formation of acyl ghrelin (AG) was recently identified. We investigated changes in circulating AG, desacyl ghrelin (DG) and GOAT induced by intraperitoneal LPS (100μg/kg) and associated changes in food intake. Plasma AG and total ghrelin were assessed by radioimmunoassay, GOAT protein by Western blot and mRNA by RT-qPCR. DG was derived from total minus AG. Plasma AG and DG were decreased at 2h, 5h and 7h (p<0.01) post injection compared to vehicle and recovered at 24h. At 2h there was a significantly greater decrease of AG (-53%) than DG (-28%) resulting in a decreased AG/DG ratio (1:5, p <0.01), which thereafter returned to pre-injection values (1:3). This altered ratio was associated with a 38% decrease in plasma GOAT protein compared to vehicle (p <0.001), whereas gastric GOAT protein was slightly increased by 10% (p<0.05). GOAT mRNA expression was unchanged. Food intake was reduced by 58% measured during the 1.5-2h period post LPS injection. Decreased plasma AG and DG preceded the rise in rectal temperature and blood glucose that peaked at 7h. These data indicate that LPS induces a long-lasting reduction of AG and DG levels that may have a bearing with the decrease in food intake. The faster drop in AG than DG within 2h is associated with reduced circulating GOAT. PMID:20599577

  15. Endophytic Actinomycetes: A Novel Source of Potential Acyl Homoserine Lactone Degrading Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Chankhamhaengdecha, Surang; Hongvijit, Suphatra; Srichaisupakit, Akkaraphol; Charnchai, Pattra; Panbangred, Watanalai

    2013-01-01

    Several Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria employ N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (HSL) quorum sensing (QS) system to control their virulence traits. Degradation of acyl-HSL signal molecules by quorum quenching enzyme (QQE) results in a loss of pathogenicity in QS-dependent organisms. The QQE activity of actinomycetes in rhizospheric soil and inside plant tissue was explored in order to obtain novel strains with high HSL-degrading activity. Among 344 rhizospheric and 132 endophytic isolates, 127 (36.9%) and 68 (51.5%) of them, respectively, possessed the QQE activity. The highest HSL-degrading activity was at 151.30 ± 3.1 nmole/h/mL from an endophytic actinomycetes isolate, LPC029. The isolate was identified as Streptomyces based on 16S  rRNA gene sequence similarity. The QQE from LPC029 revealed HSL-acylase activity that was able to cleave an amide bond of acyl-side chain in HSL substrate as determined by HPLC. LPC029 HSL-acylase showed broad substrate specificity from C6- to C12-HSL in which C10HSL is the most favorable substrate for this enzyme. In an in vitro pathogenicity assay, the partially purified HSL-acylase efficiently suppressed soft rot of potato caused by Pectobacterium carotovorum ssp. carotovorum as demonstrated. To our knowledge, this is the first report of HSL-acylase activity derived from an endophytic Streptomyces. PMID:23484156

  16. Enzymatic acylation of di- and trisaccharides with fatty acids: choosing the appropriate enzyme, support and solvent.

    PubMed

    Plou, Francisco J; Cruces, M Angeles; Ferrer, Manuel; Fuentes, Gloria; Pastor, Eitel; Bernabé, Manuel; Christensen, Morten; Comelles, Francisco; Parra, José L; Ballesteros, Antonio

    2002-06-13

    Enzymatic synthesis of fatty acid esters of di- and trisaccharides is limited by the fact that most biological catalysts are inactivated by the polar solvents (e.g. dimethylsulfoxide, dimethylformamide) where these carbohydrates are soluble. This article reviews the methodologies developed to overcome this limitation, namely those involving control over the reaction medium, the enzyme and the support. We have proposed the use of mixtures of miscible solvents (e.g. dimethylsulfoxide and 2-methyl-2-butanol) as a general strategy to acylate enzymatically hydrophilic substrates. We observed that decreasing the hydrophobicity of the medium (i.e. lowering the percentage of DMSO) the molar ratio sucrose diesters versus sucrose monoesters can be substantially enhanced. The different regioselectivity exhibited by several lipases and proteases makes feasible to synthesise different positional isomers, whose properties may vary considerably. In particular, the lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus displays a notable selectivity for only one hydroxyl group in the acylation of sucrose, maltose, leucrose and maltotriose, compared with lipase from Candida antarctica. We have examined three immobilisation methods (adsorption on polypropylene, covalent coupling to Eupergit C, and silica-granulation) for sucrose acylation catalysed by T. lanuginosus lipase. The morphology of the support affected significantly the reaction rate and/or the selectivity of the process. PMID:12142143

  17. Modulating effects of acyl-CoA synthetase 5-derived mitochondrial Wnt2B palmitoylation on intestinal Wnt activity

    PubMed Central

    Klaus, Christina; Schneider, Ursula; Hedberg, Christian; Schütz, Anke K; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Waldmann, Herbert; Gassler, Nikolaus; Kaemmerer, Elke

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5) activity in Wnt signaling in intestinal surface epithelia. METHODS: Several cell lines were used to investigate the ACSL5-dependent expression and synthesis of Wnt2B, a mitochondrially expressed protein of the Wnt signaling family. Wnt activity was functionally assessed with a luciferase reporter assay. ACSL5-related biochemical Wnt2B modifications were investigated with a modified acyl-exchange assay. The findings from the cell culture models were verified using an Apcmin/+ mouse model as well as normal and neoplastic diseased human intestinal tissues. RESULTS: In the presence of ACSL5, Wnt2B was unable to translocate into the nucleus and was enriched in mitochondria, which was paralleled by a significant decrease in Wnt activity. ACSL5-dependent S-palmitoylation of Wnt2B was identified as a molecular reason for mitochondrial Wnt2B accumulation. In cell culture systems, a strong relation of ACSL5 expression, Wnt2B palmitoylation, and degree of malignancy were found. Using normal mucosa, the association of ACSL5 and Wnt2B was seen, but in intestinal neoplasias the mechanism was only rudimentarily observed. CONCLUSION: ACSL5 mediates antiproliferative activities via Wnt2B palmitoylation with diminished Wnt activity. The molecular pathway is probably relevant for intestinal homeostasis, overwhelmed by other pathways in carcinogenesis. PMID:25356045

  18. Folylpolyglutamate synthetase: direct evidence for an acyl phosphate intermediate in the enzyme-catalyzed reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, R.; McGuire, J.J.; Shane, B.; Coward, J.K.

    1986-05-01

    The nature of the intermediate in the reaction catalyzed by folylpoly-..gamma..-glutamate synthetase (FPGS) has been investigated. Incubation of ..cap alpha..,..gamma..-(/sup 18/O)methotrexate with ATP, glutamate, and FPGS resulted in the formation of (/sup 18/O)phosphate, thus providing strong evidence for the formation of a ..gamma..-glutamyl phosphate during catalysis. The inorganic phosphate formed in the enzyme-catalyzed reaction was separated from other products and substrates by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, then converted to the trimethyl ester, and analyzed by mass spectroscopy. Stoichiometric formation of (/sup 18/O)phosphate was observed in the case of the E. coli enzyme, isolated from a transformant containing the cloned FPGS-dihydrofolate synthetase (folC) gene. In addition, /sup 31/P-NMR analysis of the phosphate isolated from the reaction using E. coli FPGS showed the expected /sup 18/O-isotopic perturbations due to both singly bonded and doubly bonded P-/sup 18/O species. Similar experiments were carried out with FPGS isolated from hog liver. In this case, the small amounts of pure enzyme available precluded use of the NMR technique. However, mass spectral analysis of the derivatized phosphate product revealed the presence of (/sup 18/O)-trimethyl phosphate, thus indicating that the reaction catalyzed by the mammalian enzyme also proceeds via an acyl phosphate intermediate.

  19. Intrinsic evolutionary constraints on protease structure, enzyme acylation, and the identity of the catalytic triad

    PubMed Central

    Buller, Andrew R.; Townsend, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    The study of proteolysis lies at the heart of our understanding of biocatalysis, enzyme evolution, and drug development. To understand the degree of natural variation in protease active sites, we systematically evaluated simple active site features from all serine, cysteine and threonine proteases of independent lineage. This convergent evolutionary analysis revealed several interrelated and previously unrecognized relationships. The reactive rotamer of the nucleophile determines which neighboring amide can be used in the local oxyanion hole. Each rotamer–oxyanion hole combination limits the location of the moiety facilitating proton transfer and, combined together, fixes the stereochemistry of catalysis. All proteases that use an acyl-enzyme mechanism naturally divide into two classes according to which face of the peptide substrate is attacked during catalysis. We show that each class is subject to unique structural constraints that have governed the convergent evolution of enzyme structure. Using this framework, we show that the γ-methyl of Thr causes an intrinsic steric clash that precludes its use as the nucleophile in the traditional catalytic triad. This constraint is released upon autoproteolysis and we propose a molecular basis for the increased enzymatic efficiency introduced by the γ-methyl of Thr. Finally, we identify several classes of natural products whose mode of action is sensitive to the division according to the face of attack identified here. This analysis of protease structure and function unifies 50 y of biocatalysis research, providing a framework for the continued study of enzyme evolution and the development of inhibitors with increased selectivity. PMID:23382230

  20. MICROBIAL SUCCESSION AND INTESTINAL ENZYME ACTIVITIES IN THE DEVELOPING RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The succession of gastrointestinal flora in the developing rat was studied, concomitant with studies of intestinal enzyme activity. Aerobes and anaerobes were identified as members of 4 major bacterial groups, i.e., Lactobacilli spp., Gram positive enterococci, Gram negative rods...

  1. Role of Intestinal Cytochrome P450 Enzymes in Diclofenac-Induced Toxicity in the Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of small intestinal (SI) cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes in the metabolic activation of diclofenac (DCF), a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and DCF-induced intestinal toxicity. DCF induces intestinal ulcers in humans and mice, but the underlying mechanisms, including the necessity for drug bioactivation in the target tissues and the sources and identities of reactive intermediates, are not fully understood. We found that the number of DCF-induced (at 50 mg/kg p.o.) intestinal ulcers was significantly smaller in an intestinal epithelium (IE)-specific P450 reductase (CPR) knockout (IE-Cpr-null) mouse model, which has little P450 activity in the IE, than in wild-type (WT) mice, determined at 14 h after DCF administration. The involvement of intestinal P450 enzymes was confirmed by large reductions (>80–90%) in the rates of in vitro formation, in SI microsomal reactions, of hydroxylated DCF metabolites and reactive intermediates, trapped as DCF-glutathione (GSH) conjugates, in the IE-Cpr-null, compared with WT mice. The SI levels of DCF-GSH conjugates (at 4 h after dosing) and DCF-protein adducts (at 14 h after dosing) were significantly lower in IE-Cpr-null than in WT mice. In additional experiments, we found that pretreatment of mice with grapefruit juice, which is known to inhibit SI P450 activity, ameliorated DCF-induced intestinal toxicity in WT mice. Our results not only strongly support the notion that SI P450 enzymes play an important role in DCF-induced intestinal toxicity, but also illustrate the possibility of preventing DCF-induced intestinal toxicity through dietary intervention. PMID:22892338

  2. Carbapenems and SHV-1 β-Lactamase Form Different Acyl-Enzyme Populations in Crystals and Solution

    PubMed Central

    Kalp, Matthew; Carey, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    The reactions between single crystals of the SHV-1 β-lactamase enzyme and the carbapenems, meropenem, imipenem and ertapenem, have been studied by Raman microscopy. Aided by quantum mechanical calculations, major populations of two acyl-enzyme species, a labile Δ2-pyrroline and a more tightly bound Δ1-pyrroline, have been identified for all three compounds. These isomers differ only in the position of the double bond about the carbapenem nucleus. This discovery is consonant with X-ray crystallographic findings that also identified two populations for meropenem bound in SHV-1: one with the acyl C=O group in the oxyanion hole and the second with the acyl group rotated 180 degrees compared to its expected position [Nukaga, M., Bethel, C. R., Thomson, J. M., Hujer, A. M., Distler, A. M., Anderson, V. E., Knox, J. R., and Bonomo, R. A. (2008) Journal of the American Chemical Society]. When crystals of the Δ1 and Δ2 containing acyl-enzymes were exposed to solutions with no carbapenem, rapid deacylation of the Δ2 species was observed by kinetic Raman experiments. However, no change in the Δ1 population was observed over 1 hour, the effective lifetime of the crystal. These observations lead to the hypothesis that the stable Δ1 species is due to the form seen by X-ray with the acyl carbonyl outside the oxyanion hole, while the Δ2 species corresponds to the form with the carbonyl inside the oxyanion hole. Soak-in and soak-out Raman experiments also demonstrated that tautomeric exchange between the Δ1 and Δ2 forms does not occur on the crystalline enzyme. When meropenem or ertapenem were reacted with SHV-1 in solution, the Raman difference spectra demonstrated that only a major population corresponding to the Δ1 acyl-enzyme could be detected. The 1003 cm-1 mode of the phenyl ring positioned on the C3 side chain of ertapenem acts as an effective internal Raman intensity standard and the ratio of its intensity to that of the 1600 cm-1 feature of Δ1 provides an

  3. Brush border intestinal enzymes after multiple daily fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Becciolini, A.; Giache, V.; Balzi, M.; Morrone, A.

    1987-03-01

    The modifications in brush border enzyme activity of the epithelial cell of the small intestine were studied after multiple daily fractionation (MDF) of 3 Gy X and 3 Gy X 2 X 2 (12 h split). Disaccharase and dipeptidase activities changed in the same way after irradiation. The results show that both total doses caused the three known phases of increase, decrease, and a return to normal. With MDF, activity at the end of irradiation was similar to or greater than that of controls and remained higher longer than a single dose of 8 Gy. However, the return to normal occurred sooner than after a single dose of 8 Gy. After 11 days, circadian oscillations of brush border enzyme activity appeared similar to those of controls in many segments of the intestine, reaching the highest activity during the night and the lowest in the afternoon.

  4. Effect of sulfite intake on intestinal enzyme activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Vieytes, M; Martinez-Sapiña, J; Taboada Montero, C; Lamas Aneiros, M

    1994-01-01

    Sulfites are usually added to food, beverages and pharmaceuticals as preservative antioxidants, bleaching agents, and dough conditioning agents. Ingestion of foods containing sulfites can cause abdominal pain, diarrhoea, seizures and death. Sulfite can react with cellular components and can cause toxicity. Changes in mucosal disaccharidases and phosphatase alkaline after sodium metabisulfite administration were investigated in the small intestine of rats. Female Wistar rats were given a diet supplemented with 0.25 or 2.5% sodium metabisulfite for 5 weeks. Sucrase, maltase, lactase and alkaline phosphatase were assayed in intestinal homogenates and in brush border membrane fractions. The intake of only 2.5% sulfite induced an increase in the specific activities of sucrase, maltase, and alkaline phosphatase compared to control levels (P < 0.05). Lactase levels were affected in a variable manner. The origin of such altered enzyme activities is still unknown. PMID:7958644

  5. Enzymatic regioselective acylation of nucleosides in biomass-derived 2-methyltetrahydrofuran: kinetic study and enzyme substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wen-Li; Li, Ning; Zong, Min-Hua

    2013-03-10

    Enzymatic regioselective acylation of pyrimidine nucleosides was mediated by immobilized lipase from Penicillium expansum in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (MeTHF), a bio-solvent derived from biomass. Despite of the moderate dissolution ability of MeTHF toward nucleosides, the initial enzymatic reaction rate was much higher in this eco-friendly solvent than in other commonly used organic solvents. This could be explained by the lower apparent activation energy of the enzymatic reaction (24.5 vs. 43.3-57.1kJ/mol) and the higher catalytic efficiency of the enzyme (Vmax/Km, 5.8 vs. 1.1-2.9h(-1)) in MeTHF. The enzymatic acylation of a group of ribonucleosides afforded the desirable 5'-esters with the conversions of 96-99% and 5'-regioselectivities of 96 to >99%. In enzymatic acylation of 2'-deoxynucleosides, however, 5'-regioselectivities showed a clear dependence on the 5-substituents present in the base moiety although the substrate conversions reached >98% within 1-3h. In the cases of 2',3'-dideoxynucleoside analogs, the reaction rate decreased markedly due to the lack of 3'-hydroxyl. PMID:23337886

  6. Small intestinal brush border enzymes in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Van Biervliet, S; Eggermont, E; Carchon, H; Veereman, G; Deboeck, K

    1999-01-01

    The study concerns the maltase, saccharase, lactase and alkaline phosphatase activity in small intestinal biopsy specimens from 61 consecutively admitted, untreated, Caucasian cystic fibrosis patients. A group of 319 age matched controls admitted during the same time period for undefined gastrointestinal or nutritional disorders acted as the controls. In order to eliminate morphological damage as a confounding factor, the enzyme activities were studied in small intestinal biopsy specimens having both normal stereomicroscopic and histological features. It was shown that neither maltase nor saccharase activity was different in the two groups, in contrast to lactase and alkaline phophatase activity, that was significantly lower in cystic fibrosis patients. The differences could not be explained by the nutritional status as judged by the body mass index. Lactase activity is known to be easily affected by numerous enteropathies. As the information on alkaline phosphatase activity is limited, the low activity is discussed in more detail. Taking into account the literature data, the low alkaline phosphatase activity is tentatively attributed either to enhanced release from the brush border or to the faulty handling of alkaline phophatase protein in the post-golgi compartments secondary to the accumulation of incorrectly glycosylated CFTR in the same cell structures. PMID:10547891

  7. Deacylation Mechanism and Kinetics of Acyl-Enzyme Complex of Class C β-Lactamase and Cephalothin.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Ravi; Nair, Nisanth N

    2016-03-17

    Understanding the molecular details of antibiotic resistance by the bacterial enzymes β-lactamases is vital for the development of novel antibiotics and inhibitors. In this spirit, the detailed mechanism of deacylation of the acyl-enzyme complex formed by cephalothin and class C β-lactamase is investigated here using hybrid quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical molecular dynamics methods. The roles of various active-site residues and substrate in the deacylation reaction are elucidated. We identify the base that activates the hydrolyzing water molecule and the residue that protonates the catalytic serine (Ser64). Conformational changes in the active sites and proton transfers that potentiate the efficiency of the deacylation reaction are presented. We have also characterized the oxyanion holes and other H-bonding interactions that stabilize the reaction intermediates. Together with the kinetic and mechanistic details of the acylation reaction, we analyze the complete mechanism and the overall kinetics of the drug hydrolysis. Finally, the apparent rate-determining step in the drug hydrolysis is scrutinized. PMID:26918257

  8. Intestinal acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 overexpression enhances postprandial triglyceridemic response and exacerbates high fat diet-induced hepatic triacylglycerol storage

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Aki; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Eustaquio, Trisha; Leary, James F.; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Buhman, Kimberly K.

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2) is important in the cellular and physiological responses to dietary fat. To determine the effect of increased intestinal DGAT2 on cellular and physiological responses to acute and chronic dietary fat challenges, we generated mice with intestine-specific overexpression of DGAT2 and compared them with intestine-specific overexpression of DGAT1 and wild-type (WT) mice. We found that when intestinal DGAT2 is present in excess, triacylglycerol (TG) secretion from enterocytes is enhanced compared to WT mice; however, TG storage within enterocytes is similar compared to WT mice. We found that when intestinal DGAT2 is present in excess, mRNA levels of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation were reduced. This result suggests that reduced fatty acid oxidation may contribute to increased TG secretion by overexpression of DGAT2 in intestine. Furthermore, this enhanced supply of TG for secretion in Dgat2Int mice may be a significant contributing factor to the elevated fasting plasma TG and exacerbated hepatic TG storage in response to a chronic HFD. These results highlight that altering fatty acid and TG metabolism within enterocytes has the capacity to alter systemic delivery of dietary fat and may serve as an effective target for preventing and treating metabolic diseases such as hepatic steatosis. PMID:23643496

  9. Characterization of a fatty acyl-CoA reductase from Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8: a bacterial enzyme catalyzing the reduction of fatty acyl-CoA to fatty alcohol.

    PubMed

    Willis, Robert M; Wahlen, Bradley D; Seefeldt, Lance C; Barney, Brett M

    2011-12-01

    Fatty alcohols are of interest as a renewable feedstock to replace petroleum compounds used as fuels, in cosmetics, and in pharmaceuticals. One biological approach to the production of fatty alcohols involves the sequential action of two bacterial enzymes: (i) reduction of a fatty acyl-CoA to the corresponding fatty aldehyde catalyzed by a fatty acyl-CoA reductase, followed by (ii) reduction of the fatty aldehyde to the corresponding fatty alcohol catalyzed by a fatty aldehyde reductase. Here, we identify, purify, and characterize a novel bacterial enzyme from Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8 that catalyzes the reduction of fatty acyl-CoA by four electrons to the corresponding fatty alcohol, eliminating the need for a separate fatty aldehyde reductase. The enzyme is shown to reduce fatty acyl-CoAs ranging from C8:0 to C20:4 to the corresponding fatty alcohols, with the highest rate found for palmitoyl-CoA (C16:0). The dependence of the rate of reduction of palmitoyl-CoA on substrate concentration was cooperative, with an apparent K(m) ~ 4 μM, V(max) ~ 200 nmol NADP(+) min(-1) (mg protein)(-1), and n ~ 3. The enzyme also reduced a range of fatty aldehydes with decanal having the highest activity. The substrate cis-11-hexadecenal was reduced in a cooperative manner with an apparent K(m) of ~50 μM, V(max) of ~8 μmol NADP(+) min(-1) (mg protein)(-1), and n ~ 2. PMID:22035211

  10. SOME EFFECTS OF AGE, SPECIES DIFFERENCE, ANTIBIOTICS AND TOXICANT EXPOSURE ON INTESTINAL ENZYME ACTIVITY AND GENOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Altered intestinal enzyme activity significantly affects the biotransformation and toxicity of many xenobiotics. his review summarizes research, supported by the Air Force Bioenvironmental Hazards Research Program, that employs a novel gas-liquid chromatographic assay to investig...

  11. Feasibility of using an isolated intestinal segment as an artificial organ for enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Shelt, D; Walton, D; Sato, P

    1982-01-01

    Guinea pigs fed an ascorbic acid-deficient diet develop scurvy because of the absence of the enzyme L-gulonolactone oxidase. In theory if this enzyme is provided and its substrate L-gulonolactone is present at adequate concentrations ascorbic acid will be synthesized and the development of scurvy prevented. Using this model we tested whether a viable segment of intestine could be used to contain the administered enzyme and act as an artificial organ for the production of ascorbic acid. A surgical procedure was developed to prepare an externalized pouch of intestine with its circulation left intact. When enzyme is inserted in this intestinal bag it is not toxic and not antigenic in some animals, whereas, enzyme injected intraperitoneally is clearly antigenic. Synthesis of ascorbic acid by this artificial organ could not, however, be detected by elevation of plasma concentrations of the vitamin. PMID:7104431

  12. Generation of in vivo activating factors in the ischemic intestine by pancreatic enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuoka, Hiroshi; Kistler, Erik B.; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.

    2000-02-01

    One of the early events in physiological shock is the generation of activators for leukocytes, endothelial cells, and other cells in the cardiovascular system. The mechanism by which these activators are produced has remained unresolved. We examine here the hypothesis that pancreatic digestive enzymes in the ischemic intestine may be involved in the generation of activators during intestinal ischemia. The lumen of the small intestine of rats was continuously perfused with saline containing a broadly acting pancreatic enzyme inhibitor (6-amidino-2-naphthyl p-guanidinobenzoate dimethanesulfate, 0.37 mM) before and during ischemia of the small intestine by splanchnic artery occlusion. This procedure inhibited activation of circulating leukocytes during occlusion and reperfusion. It also prevented the appearance of activators in portal venous and systemic artery plasma and attenuated initiating symptoms of multiple organ injury in shock. Intestinal tissue produces only low levels of activators in the absence of pancreatic enzymes, whereas in the presence of enzymes, activators are produced in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. The results indicate that pancreatic digestive enzymes in the ischemic intestine serve as an important source for cell activation and inflammation, as well as multiple organ failure.

  13. Evolutionary view of acyl-CoA diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), a key enzyme in neutral lipid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Triacylglycerides (TAGs) are a class of neutral lipids that represent the most important storage form of energy for eukaryotic cells. DGAT (acyl-CoA: diacylglycerol acyltransferase; EC 2.3.1.20) is a transmembrane enzyme that acts in the final and committed step of TAG synthesis, and it has been proposed to be the rate-limiting enzyme in plant storage lipid accumulation. In fact, two different enzymes identified in several eukaryotic species, DGAT1 and DGAT2, are the main enzymes responsible for TAG synthesis. These enzymes do not share high DNA or protein sequence similarities, and it has been suggested that they play non-redundant roles in different tissues and in some species in TAG synthesis. Despite a number of previous studies on the DGAT1 and DGAT2 genes, which have emphasized their importance as potential obesity treatment targets to increase triacylglycerol accumulation, little is known about their evolutionary timeline in eukaryotes. The goal of this study was to examine the evolutionary relationship of the DGAT1 and DGAT2 genes across eukaryotic organisms in order to infer their origin. Results We have conducted a broad survey of fully sequenced genomes, including representatives of Amoebozoa, yeasts, fungi, algae, musses, plants, vertebrate and invertebrate species, for the presence of DGAT1 and DGAT2 gene homologs. We found that the DGAT1 and DGAT2 genes are nearly ubiquitous in eukaryotes and are readily identifiable in all the major eukaryotic groups and genomes examined. Phylogenetic analyses of the DGAT1 and DGAT2 amino acid sequences revealed evolutionary partitioning of the DGAT protein family into two major DGAT1 and DGAT2 clades. Protein secondary structure and hydrophobic-transmembrane analysis also showed differences between these enzymes. The analysis also revealed that the MGAT2 and AWAT genes may have arisen from DGAT2 duplication events. Conclusions In this study, we identified several DGAT1 and DGAT2 homologs in eukaryote taxa

  14. The metabolic profile of acteoside produced by human or rat intestinal bacteria or intestinal enzyme in vitro employed UPLC-Q-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Cui, Qingling; Pan, Yingni; Xu, Xiaotong; Zhang, Wenjie; Wu, Xiao; Qu, Shouhe; Liu, Xiaoqiu

    2016-03-01

    Acteoside, the main and representative phenylethanoid glycosides of Herba Cistanches, possesses wide bioactivities but low oral bioavailability. It may serve as the prodrug and be converted into the active forms in gastrointestinal tract, which mainly occurred in intestinal tract composed of intestinal bacteria and intestinal enzyme. Intestinal bacteria, a new drug target, take a significant role on exerting pharmacological effects of drugs by oral administration. In this paper, acteoside was incubated with human or rat intestinal bacteria or rat intestinal enzyme for 36 h to seek metabolites responsible for pharmacodynamics. The samples were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Besides the parent compound, 14 metabolites were detected and identified based on their retention times and fragmentation patterns in their MS spectra including 8 degradation metabolites, 2 isomers in intestinal bacteria and intestinal enzyme samples and 4 parent metabolites only found in intestinal enzymes. The metabolic pathway of acteoside was thus proposed. Identification of these metabolites of acteoside by the intestinal bacteria or intestinal enzyme gave an insight to clarify pharmacological mechanism of traditional Chinese medicines and identify the real active molecules. PMID:26705842

  15. Hydrogen-bonding in enzyme catalysis. Fourier-transform infrared detection of ground-state electronic strain in acyl-chymotrypsins and analysis of the kinetic consequences.

    PubMed Central

    White, A J; Wharton, C W

    1990-01-01

    I.r. difference spectra are presented for 3-(indol-3-yl)acryloyl-, cinnamoyl-, 3-(5-methylthien-2-yl)acryloyl-, dehydrocinnamoyl- and dihydrocinnamoyl-chymotrypsins at low pH, where the acyl-enzymes are catalytically inactive. At least two absorption bands are seen in each case in the ester carbonyl stretching region of the spectrum. Cinnamoyl-chymotrypsin substituted at the carbonyl carbon atom with 13C was prepared. A difference spectrum in which 13C-substituted acyl-enzyme was subtracted from [12C]acyl-enzyme shows two bands in the ester carbonyl region and thus confirms the assignment of the features to the single ester carbonyl group. The frequencies of the ester carbonyl bands are interpreted in terms of differential hydrogen-bonding. In each case a lower-frequency relatively narrow band is assigned to a productive potentially reactive binding mode in which the carbonyl oxygen atom is inserted in the oxyanion hole of the enzyme active centre. The higher-frequency band, which is broader, is assigned to a non-productive binding mode in each case, where a water molecule bridges from the carbonyl oxygen atom to His-57; this mode is equivalent to the crystallographically determined structure of 3-(indol-3-yl)acryloyl-chymotrypsin, i.e. the Henderson structure. A difference spectrum of dihydrocinnamoyl-chymotrypsin taken at higher pH shows resolution of a feature centred upon 1731 cm-1, which is assigned to a non-bonded conformer in which the carbonyl oxygen atom is not hydrogen-bonded. Perturbation of the protein spectrum in the presence of acyl groups is interpreted in terms of enhanced structural rigidity. It is reported that the ester carbonyl region of the difference spectrum of cinnamoyl-subtilisin is complicated by overlap of features that arise from protein perturbation. Measurements of carbonyl absorption frequencies in a number of solvents of the methyl esters of the acyl groups used to make acyl-enzymes have permitted determination of the apparent

  16. A Bifunctional Enzyme That Has Both Monoacylglycerol Acyltransferase and Acyl Hydrolase Activities1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraj, Panneerselvam; Jashal, Charnitkaur B.; Vijayakumar, Anitha; Rani, Sapa Hima; Venkata Rao, D.K.; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2012-01-01

    Monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) catalyzes the synthesis of diacylglycerol, the precursor of triacylglycerol biosynthesis and an important signaling molecule. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of the peanut (Arachis hypogaea) MGAT gene. The soluble enzyme utilizes invariant histidine-62 and aspartate-67 residues of the acyltransferase motif for its MGAT activity. A sequence analysis revealed the presence of a hydrolase (GXSXG) motif, and enzyme assays revealed the presence of monoacylglycerol (MAG) and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) hydrolytic activities, indicating the bifunctional nature of the enzyme. The overexpression of the MGAT gene in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) caused an increase in triacylglycerol accumulation. Similar to the peanut MGAT, the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homolog (At1g52760) also exhibited both acyltransferase and hydrolase activities. Interestingly, the yeast homolog lacks the conserved HX4D motif, and it is deficient in the acyltransferase function but exhibits MAG and LPC hydrolase activities. This study demonstrates the presence of a soluble MGAT/hydrolase in plants. The predicted three-dimensional homology modeling and substrate docking suggested the presence of two separate substrate (MAG and LPC)-binding sites in a single polypeptide. Our study describes a soluble bifunctional enzyme that has both MGAT and hydrolase functions. PMID:22915575

  17. Purification and characterization of a cytoplasmic enzyme component of the Na+-activated malonate decarboxylase system of Malonomonas rubra: acetyl-S-acyl carrier protein: malonate acyl carrier protein-SH transferase.

    PubMed

    Hilbi, H; Dimroth, P

    1994-01-01

    Malonate decarboxylation by crude extracts of Malonomonas rubra was specifically activated by Na+ and less efficiently by Li+ ions. The extracts contained an enzyme catalyzing CoA transfer from malonyl-CoA to acetate, yielding acetyl-CoA and malonate. After about a 26-fold purification of the malonyl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, an almost pure enzyme was obtained, indicating that about 4% of the cellular protein consisted of the CoA transferase. This abundance of the transferase is in accord with its proposed role as an enzyme component of the malonate decarboxylase system, the key enzyme of energy metabolism in this organism. The apparent molecular weight of the polypeptide was 67,000 as revealed from SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A similar molecular weight was estimated for the native transferase by gel chromatography, indicating that the enzyme exists as a monomer. Kinetic analyses of the CoA transferase yielded the following: pH-optimum at pH 5.5, an apparent Km for malonyl-CoA of 1.9mM, for acetate of 54mM, for acetyl-CoA of 6.9mM, and for malonate of 0.5mM. Malonate or citrate inhibited the enzyme with an apparent Ki of 0.4mM and 3.0mM, respectively. The isolated CoA transferase increased the activity of malonate decarboxylase of a crude enzyme system, in which part of the endogenous CoA transferase was inactivated by borohydride, about three-fold. These results indicate that the CoA transferase functions physiologically as a component of the malonate decarboxylase system, in which it catalyzes the transfer of acyl carrier protein from acetyl acyl carrier protein and malonate to yield malonyl acyl carrier protein and acetate. Malonate is thus activated on the enzyme by exchange for the catalytically important enzymebound acetyl thioester residues noted previously. This type of substrate activation resembles the catalytic mechanism of citrate lyase and citramalate lyase. PMID:18251085

  18. Genomic analysis reveals versatile organisms for quorum quenching enzymes: acyl-homoserine lactone-acylase and -lactonase.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Vipin Chandra; Raju, Sajan C; Purohit, Hemant J

    2011-01-01

    Microbial virulence and their resistance to multiple drugs have obliged researchers to look for novel drug targets. Virulence of pathogenic microbes is regulated by signal molecules such as acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) produced during a cell density dependent phenomenon of quorum sensing (QS). In contrast, certain microbes produce AHL-lactonases and -acylases to degrade QS signals, also termed as quorum quenching. Mining sequenced genome databases has revealed organisms possessing conserved domains for AHL-lactonases and -acylases: i) Streptomyces (Actinobacteria), ii) Deinococcus (Deinococcus-Thermus), iii) Hyphomonas (α-Proteobacteria), iv) Ralstonia (β-Proteobacteria), v) Photorhabdus (γ-Proteobacteria), and certain marine gamma proteobacterium. Presence of genes for both the enzymes within an organism was observed in the following: i) Deinococcus radiodurans R1, ii) Hyphomonas neptunium ATCC 15444 and iii) Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii TTO1. These observations are supported by the presence motifs for lactonase and acylase in these strains. Phylogenetic analysis and multiple sequence alignment of the gene sequences for AHL-lactonases and -acylases have revealed consensus sequences which can be used to design primers for amplifying these genes even among mixed cultures and metagenomes. Quorum quenching can be exploited to prevent food spoilage, bacterial infections and bioremediation. PMID:21660112

  19. Genomic Analysis Reveals Versatile Organisms for Quorum Quenching Enzymes: Acyl-Homoserine Lactone-Acylase and -Lactonase

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Vipin Chandra; Raju, Sajan C; Purohit, Hemant J

    2011-01-01

    Microbial virulence and their resistance to multiple drugs have obliged researchers to look for novel drug targets. Virulence of pathogenic microbes is regulated by signal molecules such as acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) produced during a cell density dependent phenomenon of quorum sensing (QS). In contrast, certain microbes produce AHL-lactonases and -acylases to degrade QS signals, also termed as quorum quenching. Mining sequenced genome databases has revealed organisms possessing conserved domains for AHL-lactonases and –acylases: i) Streptomyces (Actinobacteria), ii) Deinococcus (Deinococcus-Thermus), iii) Hyphomonas (α-Proteobacteria), iv) Ralstonia (β-Proteobacteria), v) Photorhabdus (γ-Proteobacteria), and certain marine gamma proteobacterium. Presence of genes for both the enzymes within an organism was observed in the following: i) Deinococcus radiodurans R1, ii) Hyphomonas neptunium ATCC 15444 and iii) Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii TTO1. These observations are supported by the presence motifs for lactonase and acylase in these strains. Phylogenetic analysis and multiple sequence alignment of the gene sequences for AHL-lactonases and –acylases have revealed consensus sequences which can be used to design primers for amplifying these genes even among mixed cultures and metagenomes. Quorum quenching can be exploited to prevent food spoilage, bacterial infections and bioremediation. PMID:21660112

  20. Influence of dietary zinc and copper on digestive enzyme activity and intestinal morphology in weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Hedemann, M S; Jensen, B B; Poulsen, H D

    2006-12-01

    The current study was conducted to investigate the effects of high dietary concentrations of Zn as zinc oxide and Cu as copper sulfate on the activity of digestive enzymes in the pancreas and the intestinal mucosa, intestinal morphology, and mucin histochemistry in pigs after weaning. Thirty-two pigs were weaned at 4 wk of age. The pigs were fed standard weaning diets supplemented with Zn (100 or 2,500 ppm) and Cu (0 or 175 ppm) in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments for a 14-d period. In pancreatic tissue, the activity of amylase, carboxypeptidase A, chymotrypsin, trypsin, and lipase increased (P < 0.01) in pigs fed 2,500 ppm of Zn, whereas the activity of carboxypeptidase B and carboxylester hydrolase was unaffected. Copper had no effect on the activity of pancreatic enzymes. In small intestinal contents, the total activity of amylase and carboxypeptidase A was greater in pigs fed 100 ppm of Zn (P < 0.05), whereas feeding 2,500 ppm of Zn increased the chymotrypsin activity (P < 0.001). The remaining enzymes were unaffected by dietary Zn concentration. The villi were longer in the cranial small intestine (P < 0.001) in pigs fed 100 ppm of Zn than in pigs fed 2,500 ppm of Zn, but otherwise there were no clear effects of Zn and Cu supplementation on intestinal morphology. In the cranial small intestine, the activity of maltase (P < 0.001), sucrase (P < 0.001), and lactase was greater in pigs fed 100 ppm of Zn, even though there was a Zn x Cu interaction (P < 0.05) in lactase activity. In the middle and caudal small intestine, no clear differences between dietary treatments were observed. The activity of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase in the intestinal mucosa was not affected by dietary Zn or Cu. In pigs fed 100 ppm of Zn, the activity of aminopeptidase N was greater in the caudal small intestine, but dietary Zn or Cu had no effect on aminopeptidase N in the cranial and middle small intestine. No effect of dietary Zn or Cu supplementation was found on

  1. ANTIOXIDANT ENZYME ACTIVITY AMONG ORPHANS INFECTED WITH INTESTINAL PARASITES IN PATHUM THANI PROVINCE, THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Mahittikorn, Aongart; Prasertbun, Rapeepan; Mori, Hirotake; Popruk, Supaluk

    2014-11-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections can negatively impact growth and nutrition in children. The infections can induce oxidative stress, resulting in a variety of illnesses. We measured antioxidant enzyme levels in orphan children infected with intestinal parasites to investigate the influence of nutritional status on antioxidant enzymes. This cross sectional study was conducted at an orphanage in Thailand. Stool samples were obtained from each subject and examined for intestinal parasites. Anthropometric measurements, complete blood count and biochemical parameters, including serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels, were obtained from studied subjects. One hundred twenty-eight children were included in the study. Intestinal parasites were found on microscopic examination of the stools in 36.7% (47/128); 18% (23/128) had a mixed parasite infection. Intestinal protozoa were found in 34.4% of subjects and intestinal helminthes were found in 2.3%. The median GPx level in children infected with intestinal parasites (2.3 ng/ml) was significantly lower than in non-infected children (7.7 ng/ml) (p < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in SOD levels between the two groups. When comparing GPx levels in children with 1) pathogenic parasites, 2) non-pathogenic parasites and 3) no intestinal parasite infection, GPx levels differed significantly among three groups (2.2 ng/ml, 2.4 ng/ml and 7.7 ng/ml, respectively) (p < 0.05). When separating children by BMI and type of infection, the median SOD level in underweight children infected with pathogenic parasites (107.2 ng/ml) was significantly higher than in underweight children infected with non-pathogenic parasites (68.6 ng/ml) and without intestinal parasite infections (72.2 ng/ml). The present study identified two key findings: low GPx levels in children with intestinal parasitic infections, and the potential impact of malnutrition on some antioxidants. PMID:26466411

  2. Identification of Grass-specific Enzyme That Acylates Monolignols with p-Coumarate*

    PubMed Central

    Withers, Saunia; Lu, Fachuang; Kim, Hoon; Zhu, Yimin; Ralph, John; Wilkerson, Curtis G.

    2012-01-01

    Lignin is a major component of plant cell walls that is essential to their function. However, the strong bonds that bind the various subunits of lignin, and its cross-linking with other plant cell wall polymers, make it one of the most important factors in the recalcitrance of plant cell walls against polysaccharide utilization. Plants make lignin from a variety of monolignols including p-coumaryl, coniferyl, and sinapyl alcohols to produce the three primary lignin units: p-hydroxyphenyl, guaiacyl, and syringyl, respectively, when incorporated into the lignin polymer. In grasses, these monolignols can be enzymatically preacylated by p-coumarates prior to their incorporation into lignin, and these monolignol conjugates can also be “monomer” precursors of lignin. Although monolignol p-coumarate-derived units may comprise up to 40% of the lignin in some grass tissues, the p-coumarate moiety from such conjugates does not enter into the radical coupling (polymerization) reactions of lignification. With a greater understanding of monolignol p-coumarate conjugates, grass lignins could be engineered to contain fewer pendent p-coumarate groups and more monolignol conjugates that improve lignin cleavage. We have cloned and expressed an enzyme from rice that has p-coumarate monolignol transferase activity and determined its kinetic parameters. PMID:22267741

  3. Clarification on the decarboxylation mechanism in KasA based on the protonation state of key residues in the acyl-enzyme state.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wook; Engels, Bernd

    2013-07-11

    The β-ketoacyl ACP synthase I (KasA) is a promising drug target because it is essential for the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis , a causative agent of tuberculosis. It catalyzes a condensation reaction that comprises three steps. The resulting elongated acyl chains are subsequently needed for the cell wall construction. While the mechanism of the first step (acylation of Cys171 in the active site) is straightforward already, the second step (decarboxylation of malonyl substrate) has been controversial due to the difficulty in determining the correct protonation states of the involved residues (His311, His345, Lys340, Glu354). Available experimental data suggest three possible mechanisms which differ considerably. They are not consistent with each other because these studies could not be performed for KasA at the beginning of decarboxylation step (acyl-enzyme state of KasA). Instead, different mutants had to be used which are expected to resemble this situation. In this first computational study about this topic, we use the free energy perturbation (FEP) method to compute the relevant pKa values in the acyl-enzyme state of KasA and use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to rationalize the results. Subsequent density functional theory (DFT)-based quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) MD simulations and umbrella samplings have been used to disentangle the close relationships between the protonation states of the involved residues. By these simulations, we can address the preferred protonation states and roles of the residues involved in decarboxylation reaction, thereby suggesting the possible mechanism for the decarboxylation step. PMID:23768199

  4. [Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. Apropos of a case with demonstration of this enzyme deficiency].

    PubMed

    Collet, J P; Divry, P; Blanc, J F; Guibaud, P; David, M; Macabeo, V; Vibert, J; Hermier, M

    1984-12-01

    The medium chain acyl-CoA deshydrogenase defect: a new inherited metabolic disorder. This enzymatic defect blocks the catabolism of non esterified fatty acids during fasting. Thus, this disease is revealed by a coma due to hypoglycemia in a young child; the presence of dicarboxylic aciduria in such a situation is the main evidence for this diagnosis. Finally, the enzymatic studies performed on skin fibroblasts show a defect in medium chain acyl-CoA deshydrogenase. When a child is investigated away from a coma episode, the ketotic diet induces dicarboxylic aciduria but must be performed in an intensive care unit for its dangers. PMID:6535973

  5. Acyl-Carbon Bond Cleaving Cytochrome P450 Enzymes: CYP17A1, CYP19A1 and CYP51A1.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Muhammad; Wright, J Neville

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) enzymes in their resting state contain the heme-iron in a high-spin FeIII state. Binding of a substrate to a P450 enzyme allows transfer of the first electron, producing a Fe(II) species that reacts with oxygen to generate a low-spin iron superoxide intermediate (FeIII-O-O•) ready to accept the second electron to produce an iron peroxy anion intermediate (a, FeIII-O-O-). In classical monooxygenation reactions, the peroxy anion upon protonation fragments to form the reactive Compound I intermediate (Por•+FeIV=O), or its ferryl radical resonance form (FeIV-O•). However, when the substrate projects a carbonyl functionality, of the type b, at the active site as is the case for reactions catalyzed by CYP17A1, CYP19A1 and CYP51A1, the peroxy anion (FeIII-O-O-) is trapped, yielding a tetrahedral intermediate (c) that fragments to an acyl-carbon cleavage product (d plus an acid). Analogous acyl-carbon cleavage reactions are also catalyzed by certain hepatic P450s and CYP125A1 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A further improvisation on the theme is provided by aldehyde deformylases that convert long-chain aliphatic aldehydes to hydrocarbons. CYP17A1 is involved in the biosynthesis of corticoids as well as androgens. The flux toward these two classes of hormones seems to be regulated by cytochrome b 5, at the level of the acyl-carbon cleavage reaction. It is this regulation of CYP17A1 that provides a safety mechanism, ensuring that during corticoid biosynthesis, which requires 17α-hydroxylation by CYP17A1, androgen formation is avoided (Fig. 4.1). PMID:26002733

  6. Synergistic effects of thyroxine and dexamethasone on enzyme ontogeny in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    McDonald, M C; Henning, S J

    1992-09-01

    The synergistic effects of dexamethasone (DEX) and thyroxine (T4) on the postnatal maturation of the 13-d-old rodent small intestine has been studied. Previous studies have shown that hydrocortisone and T4 produced a synergistic response in enzyme maturation. However, T4 elevates corticosteroid-binding globulin, which reduces the clearance of hydrocortisone. Thus, the apparent synergy between T4 and hydrocortisone may have been due to increased glucocorticoid availability. DEX, which does not bind to corticosteroid-binding globulin, was given (d8-12) at 25 pmol (i.e. 0.01 micrograms)/g body wt/d as established by a dose-response study in which this dose of DEX induced one third the maximum response in sucrase activity. In this way, synergy with T4 (130 pmol/g body wt/d, i.e. 0.1 micrograms/g body wt/d, d 5-12) could still be observed. Glucoamylase, lactase, acid beta-galactosidase, alkaline phosphatase, and sucrase activities were determined in two regions of the small intestine. Overall, the results for the two hormones administered alone showed intestinal maturation to be not significantly affected in the T4 group and partially stimulated in the DEX group. When combined, DEX + T4 synergistically increased jejunal sucrase, ileal glucoamylase, and duodenal alkaline phosphatase, and lowered ileal acid beta-galactosidase. The striking exceptions to the general pattern were two brush border enzymes that normally decline during intestinal maturation, namely ileal alkaline phosphatase and jejunal and ileal lactase. For these enzymes, DEX alone did not elicit precocious maturation, and there was no evidence for a synergistic interaction of these two hormones. Serum corticosterone concentrations also were measured. When corticosterone concentrations were compared with enzyme activity, no correlation was found.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1408467

  7. Angiotensin receptors and angiotensin I-converting enzyme in rat intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, K.A.; Mendelsohn, F.A.; Levens, N.R. )

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to map the distribution of angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors and ANG I-converting enzyme (ACE) in rat intestine. ANG II binding sites were visualized by in vitro autoradiography using iodinated (Sar1, Ile8)ANG II. The distribution of ACE was mapped using an iodinated derivative of lisinopril. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were killed and the interior of the whole intestine washed with ice-cold saline. Segments of duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon were quickly frozen in a mixture of isopentane and dry ice. Twenty-micron frozen sections were thaw-mounted onto gelatin-coated slides, incubated with either ligand, and exposed to X-ray film. After exposure and subsequent development, the films were quantitated by computerized densitometry. ANG II receptors were most dense in the colon, followed by the ileum, duodenum, and jejunum. Within each segment of intestine, specific ANG II binding sites were localized exclusively to the muscularis. In contrast, ACE was present in both the mucosa and the muscularis. The colocalization of ANG II receptors and ACE may suggest a role for locally generated ANG II in the control of intestinal function. The luminal orientation of ACE in the mucosa of the small intestine may suggest that at this site ACE serves primarily to hydrolyze dietary peptides.

  8. Digestive enzyme expression and epithelial structure of small intestine in neonatal rats after 16 days spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, M.; Yamasaki, M.; Hazama, A.; Ijiri, K.; Shimizu, T.

    It is important to assure whether digestive system can develop normally in neonates during spaceflight. Because the small intestine changes its function and structure drastically around weaning known as redifferentiation. Lactase expression declines and sucrase increases in small intestine for digestion of solid food before weaning. In this paper, we compared this enzyme transition and structural development of small intestine in neonatal rats after spaceflight. To find digestive genes differentially expressed in fight rats, DNA membrane macroarray was also used. Eight-day old rats were loaded to Space Shuttle Columbia, and housed in the animal facility for 16 days in space (STS-90, Neurolab mission). Two control groups (AGC; asynchronous ground control and VIV; vivarium) against flight group (FLT) were prepared. There was no difference in structure (crypt depth) and cell differentiation of epithelium between FLT and AGC by immunohistochemical analysis. We found that the amount of sucrase mRNA compared to lactase was decreased in FLT by RT-PCR. It reflected the enzyme transition was inhibited. Increase of 5 genes (APO A-I, APO A-IV, ACE, aFABP and aminopeptidase M) and decrease of carboxypeptidase-D were detected in FLT using macroarray. We think nutrition differences (less nourishment and late weaning) during spaceflight may cause inhibition of enzyme transition at least partly. The weightlessness might contribute to the inhibition through behavioral change.

  9. Identification of an Acyl-Enzyme Intermediate in a meta-Cleavage Product Hydrolase Reveals the Versatility of the Catalytic Triad

    SciTech Connect

    Ruzzini, Antonio C.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Horsman, Geoff P.; Foster, Leonard J.; Bolin, Jeffrey T.; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2012-03-14

    Meta-cleavage product (MCP) hydrolases are members of the {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase superfamily that utilize a Ser-His-Asp triad to catalyze the hydrolysis of a C-C bond. BphD, the MCP hydrolase from the biphenyl degradation pathway, hydrolyzes 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-6-phenylhexa-2,4-dienoic acid (HOPDA) to 2-hydroxypenta-2,4-dienoic acid (HPD) and benzoate. A 1.6 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of BphD H265Q incubated with HOPDA revealed that the enzyme's catalytic serine was benzoylated. The acyl-enzyme is stabilized by hydrogen bonding from the amide backbone of 'oxyanion hole' residues, consistent with formation of a tetrahedral oxyanion during nucleophilic attack by Ser112. Chemical quench and mass spectrometry studies substantiated the formation and decay of a Ser112-benzoyl species in wild-type BphD on a time scale consistent with turnover and incorporation of a single equivalent of {sup 18}O into the benzoate produced during hydrolysis in H{sub 2}{sup 18}O. Rapid-scanning kinetic studies indicated that the catalytic histidine contributes to the rate of acylation by only an order of magnitude, but affects the rate of deacylation by over 5 orders of magnitude. The orange-colored catalytic intermediate, ES{sup red}, previously detected in the wild-type enzyme and proposed herein to be a carbanion, was not observed during hydrolysis by H265Q. In the newly proposed mechanism, the carbanion abstracts a proton from Ser112, thereby completing tautomerization and generating a serinate for nucleophilic attack on the C6-carbonyl. Finally, quantification of an observed pre-steady-state kinetic burst suggests that BphD is a half-site reactive enzyme. While the updated catalytic mechanism shares features with the serine proteases, MCP hydrolase-specific chemistry highlights the versatility of the Ser-His-Asp triad.

  10. Acylated Carrageenan Changes the Physicochemical Properties of Mixed Enzyme-Lipid Ultrathin Films and Enhances the Catalytic Properties of Sucrose Phosphorylase Nanostructured as Smart Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Jefferson M; Pavinatto, Adriana; Nobre, Thatyane M; Caseli, Luciano

    2016-06-23

    Control over the catalytic activity of enzymes is important to construct biosensors with a wide range of detectability and higher stability. For this, immobilization of enzymes on solid supports as nanostructured films is a current approach that permits easy control of the molecular architecture as well as tuning of the properties. In this article, we employed acylated carrageenan (AC) mixed with phospholipids at the air-water interface to facilitate the adsorption of the enzyme sucrose phosphorylase (SP). AC stabilized the adsorption of SP at the phospholipid monolayer, as detected by tensiometry, by which thermodynamic parameters could be inferred from the surface pressure-area isotherm. Also, infrared spectroscopy applied in situ over the monolayer showed that the AC-phospholipid system not only permitted the enzyme to be adsorbed but also helped conserve its secondary structure. The mixed monolayers were then transferred onto solid supports as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films and investigated with transfer ratio, quartz crystal microbalance, fluorescence spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The enzyme activity of the LB film was then determined, revealing that although there was an expected reduction in activity in relation to the homogeneous environment the activity could be better preserved after 1 month, revealing enhanced stability. PMID:27249064

  11. Acyl-acyl carrier protein: Lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol acyl transferase in Anabaena variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol was produced when membranes isolated from the cyanobacterium, Anabaena variabilis, and washed free of soluble endogenous constituents, were incubated with ({sup 14}C)acyl-acyl carrier protein. This enzymatic synthesis of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol localized in the membranes was not dependent on any added cofactors, such as ATP, coenzyme A, and dithiothreitol. Palmitoyl-, stearoyl-, and oleoyl-acyl carrier proteins were approximately equally active as substrates with Km of 0.37, 0.36, and 0.23 {mu}M, respectively. The ({sup 14}C)acyl group was exclusively transferred to the sn-1 hydroxyl of the glycerol backbone of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol as demonstrated by hydrolysis of all incorporated acyl groups by the lipase from Rhizopus arrhizus delamar. Using a double labelled ({sup 14}C)acyl-({sup 14}C)acyl carrier protein, this enzyme catalyzed the direct transfer of the acyl group from acyl-acyl carrier protein to an endogenous lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol to form monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. The transfer reaction mechanism was also confirmed by the increased activity with the addition of the lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol suspension. A specific galactolipid acyl hydrolase activity was released into the soluble protein fraction when the membranes of Anabaena variabilis were treated with 2% Triton X-100. The positional specificity of this acyl hydrolase was demonstrated to be similar to that of Rhizopus lipase, i.e. only the acyl group at the sn-1 position was hydrolyzed. The acyl hydrolase which was also localized in the membrane fraction of Anabaena variabilis was presumably responsible for producing endogenous lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol used by the acyltransferase.

  12. HIV-1 Alters Intestinal Expression of Drug Transporters and Metabolic Enzymes: Implications for Antiretroviral Drug Disposition.

    PubMed

    Kis, Olena; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Hoque, M Tozammel; Walmsley, Sharon L; Dandekar, Satya; Bendayan, Reina

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of HIV-1 infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the expression of intestinal drug efflux transporters, i.e., P-glycoprotein (Pgp), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and metabolic enzymes, such as cytochrome P450s (CYPs), in the human upper intestinal tract. Intestinal biopsy specimens were obtained from HIV-negative healthy volunteers, ART-naive HIV-positive (HIV(+)) subjects, and HIV(+) subjects receiving ART (10 in each group). Intestinal tissue expression of drug transporters and metabolic enzymes was examined by microarray, real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qPCR), and immunohistochemistry analyses. Microarray analysis demonstrated significantly lower expression of CYP3A4 and ABCC2/MRP2 in the HIV(+) ART-naive group than in uninfected subjects. qPCR analysis confirmed significantly lower expression of ABCC2/MRP2 in ART-naive subjects than in the control group, while CYP3A4 and ABCG2/BCRP showed a trend toward decreased expression. Protein expression of MRP2 and BCRP was also significantly lower in the HIV(+) naive group than in the control group and was partially restored to baseline levels in HIV(+) subjects receiving ART. In contrast, gene and protein expression of ABCB1/Pgp was significantly increased in HIV(+) subjects on ART relative to HIV(+) ART-naive subjects. These data demonstrate that the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters is significantly altered in therapy-naive HIV(+) subjects and in those receiving ART. Since CYP3A4, Pgp, MRPs, and BCRP metabolize or transport many antiretroviral drugs, their altered expression with HIV infection may negatively impact drug pharmacokinetics in HIV(+) subjects. This has clinical implications when using data from healthy volunteers to guide ART. PMID:26902756

  13. The hexanoyl-CoA precursor for cannabinoid biosynthesis is formed by an acyl-activating enzyme in Cannabis sativa trichomes.

    PubMed

    Stout, Jake M; Boubakir, Zakia; Ambrose, Stephen J; Purves, Randy W; Page, Jonathan E

    2012-08-01

    The psychoactive and analgesic cannabinoids (e.g. Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)) in Cannabis sativa are formed from the short-chain fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) precursor hexanoyl-CoA. Cannabinoids are synthesized in glandular trichomes present mainly on female flowers. We quantified hexanoyl-CoA using LC-MS/MS and found levels of 15.5 pmol g(-1) fresh weight in female hemp flowers with lower amounts in leaves, stems and roots. This pattern parallels the accumulation of the end-product cannabinoid, cannabidiolic acid (CBDA). To search for the acyl-activating enzyme (AAE) that synthesizes hexanoyl-CoA from hexanoate, we analyzed the transcriptome of isolated glandular trichomes. We identified 11 unigenes that encoded putative AAEs including CsAAE1, which shows high transcript abundance in glandular trichomes. In vitro assays showed that recombinant CsAAE1 activates hexanoate and other short- and medium-chained fatty acids. This activity and the trichome-specific expression of CsAAE1 suggest that it is the hexanoyl-CoA synthetase that supplies the cannabinoid pathway. CsAAE3 encodes a peroxisomal enzyme that activates a variety of fatty acid substrates including hexanoate. Although phylogenetic analysis showed that CsAAE1 groups with peroxisomal AAEs, it lacked a peroxisome targeting sequence 1 (PTS1) and localized to the cytoplasm. We suggest that CsAAE1 may have been recruited to the cannabinoid pathway through the loss of its PTS1, thereby redirecting it to the cytoplasm. To probe the origin of hexanoate, we analyzed the trichome expressed sequence tag (EST) dataset for enzymes of fatty acid metabolism. The high abundance of transcripts that encode desaturases and a lipoxygenase suggests that hexanoate may be formed through a pathway that involves the oxygenation and breakdown of unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:22353623

  14. Enhanced Gastrointestinal Expression of Cytosolic Malic Enzyme (ME1) Induces Intestinal and Liver Lipogenic Gene Expression and Intestinal Cell Proliferation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dwairi, Ahmed; Brown, Adam R.; Pabona, John Mark P.; Van, Trang H.; Hamdan, Hamdan; Mercado, Charles P.; Quick, Charles M.; Wight, Patricia A.; Simmen, Rosalia C. M.; Simmen, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine participates in lipid digestion, metabolism and transport. Cytosolic malic enzyme 1 (ME1) is an enzyme that generates NADPH used in fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. Previous work has correlated liver and adipose ME1 expression with susceptibility to obesity and diabetes; however, the contributions of intestine-expressed ME1 to these conditions are unknown. We generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing rat ME1 in the gastrointestinal epithelium under the control of the murine villin1 promoter/enhancer. Levels of intestinal ME1 protein (endogenous plus transgene) were greater in Tg than wildtype (WT) littermates. Effects of elevated intestinal ME1 on body weight, circulating insulin, select adipocytokines, blood glucose, and metabolism-related genes were examined. Male Tg mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet gained significantly more body weight than WT male littermates and had heavier livers. ME1-Tg mice had deeper intestinal and colon crypts, a greater intestinal 5-bromodeoxyuridine labeling index, and increased expression of intestinal lipogenic (Fasn, Srebf1) and cholesterol biosynthetic (Hmgcsr, Hmgcs1), genes. The livers from HF diet-fed Tg mice also exhibited an induction of cholesterol and lipogenic pathway genes and altered measures (Irs1, Irs2, Prkce) of insulin sensitivity. Results indicate that gastrointestinal ME1 via its influence on intestinal epithelial proliferation, and lipogenic and cholesterologenic genes may concomitantly impact signaling in liver to modify this tissue’s metabolic state. Our work highlights a new mouse model to address the role of intestine-expressed ME1 in whole body metabolism, hepatomegaly, and crypt cell proliferation. Intestinal ME1 may thus constitute a therapeutic target to reduce obesity-associated pathologies. PMID:25402228

  15. Effects of diabetes on development of small intestinal enzymes of infant rats.

    PubMed

    Wen, D; Henning, S J; Hazelwood, R L

    1988-01-01

    The effect of streptozotocin (SZ) on the development of small intestinal enzymes in postnatal rat pups was studied. SZ was injected ip on Day 10 and, if necessary, again on Day 12. On Days 15, 18, and 21, one pup from each group (including a vehicle-injected control (C) group) was decapitated under conditions which minimized stress. Plasma glucose, insulin (IRI), and corticosterone were measured, as were pancreatic IRI, liver glycogen, and liver membrane binding of IRI. Small intestinal segments were processed and analyzed for sucrase, lactase, maltase, and ileal acid beta-galactosidase activities. Our results indicate that plasma glucocorticoid levels remained virtually constant in both SZ and C groups, while the ontogenic profiles of sucrase and maltase in SZ rats were shifted toward an earlier appearance and a precocious maturation. Circulating levels of IRI were not reduced significantly by SZ despite the fact that pancreatic IRI was decreased 95%. Jejunal lactase, unlike data reported for diabetic rats, was not affected by SZ diabetes. Also, acid beta-galactosidase was unaltered in the SZ rat pups. It is concluded that possibly the elevated disaccharidases seen in diabetic postnatal rat pups are the direct effect of elevated blood glucose. If so, the SZ rat pup model may be a useful tool with which to study effects of glucose on intestinal enzymes in the absence of changes in plasma insulin. PMID:3124120

  16. Release of metabolic enzymes by Giardia in response to interaction with intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ringqvist, Emma; Palm, J E Daniel; Skarin, Hanna; Hehl, Adrian B; Weiland, Malin; Davids, Barbara J; Reiner, David S; Griffiths, William J; Eckmann, Lars; Gillin, Frances D; Svärd, Staffan G

    2008-06-01

    Giardia lamblia, an important cause of diarrheal disease, resides in the small intestinal lumen in close apposition to epithelial cells. Since the disease mechanisms underlying giardiasis are poorly understood, elucidating the specific interactions of the parasite with the host epithelium is likely to provide clues to understanding the pathogenesis. Here we tested the hypothesis that contact of Giardia lamblia with intestinal epithelial cells might lead to release of specific proteins. Using established co-culture models, intestinal ligated loops and a proteomics approach, we identified three G. lamblia proteins (arginine deiminase, ornithine carbamoyl transferase and enolase), previously recognized as immunodominant antigens during acute giardiasis. Release was stimulated by cell-cell interactions, since only small amounts of arginine deiminase and enolase were detected in the medium after culturing of G. lamblia alone. The secreted G. lamblia proteins were localized to the cytoplasm and the inside of the plasma membrane of trophozoites. Furthermore, in vitro studies with recombinant arginine deiminase showed that the secreted Giardia proteins can disable host innate immune factors such as nitric oxide production. These results indicate that contact of Giardia with epithelial cells triggers metabolic enzyme release, which might facilitate effective colonization of the human small intestine. PMID:18359106

  17. SIRT3 and SIRT5 Regulate the Enzyme Activity and Cardiolipin Binding of Very Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuxun; Bharathi, Sivakama S.; Rardin, Matthew J.; Uppala, Radha; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    SIRT3 and SIRT5 have been shown to regulate mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation but the molecular mechanisms behind the regulation are lacking. Here, we demonstrate that SIRT3 and SIRT5 both target human very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD), a key fatty acid oxidation enzyme. SIRT3 deacetylates and SIRT5 desuccinylates K299 which serves to stabilize the essential FAD cofactor in the active site. Further, we show that VLCAD binds strongly to cardiolipin and isolated mitochondrial membranes via a domain near the C-terminus containing lysines K482, K492, and K507. Acetylation or succinylation of these residues eliminates binding of VLCAD to cardiolipin. SIRT3 deacetylates K507 while SIRT5 desuccinylates K482, K492, and K507. Sirtuin deacylation of recombinant VLCAD rescues membrane binding. Endogenous VLCAD from SIRT3 and SIRT5 knockout mouse liver shows reduced binding to cardiolipin. Thus, SIRT3 and SIRT5 promote fatty acid oxidation by converging upon VLCAD to promote its activity and membrane localization. Regulation of cardiolipin binding by reversible lysine acylation is a novel mechanism that is predicted to extrapolate to other metabolic proteins that localize to the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:25811481

  18. SIRT3 and SIRT5 regulate the enzyme activity and cardiolipin binding of very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxun; Bharathi, Sivakama S; Rardin, Matthew J; Uppala, Radha; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W; Goetzman, Eric S

    2015-01-01

    SIRT3 and SIRT5 have been shown to regulate mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation but the molecular mechanisms behind the regulation are lacking. Here, we demonstrate that SIRT3 and SIRT5 both target human very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD), a key fatty acid oxidation enzyme. SIRT3 deacetylates and SIRT5 desuccinylates K299 which serves to stabilize the essential FAD cofactor in the active site. Further, we show that VLCAD binds strongly to cardiolipin and isolated mitochondrial membranes via a domain near the C-terminus containing lysines K482, K492, and K507. Acetylation or succinylation of these residues eliminates binding of VLCAD to cardiolipin. SIRT3 deacetylates K507 while SIRT5 desuccinylates K482, K492, and K507. Sirtuin deacylation of recombinant VLCAD rescues membrane binding. Endogenous VLCAD from SIRT3 and SIRT5 knockout mouse liver shows reduced binding to cardiolipin. Thus, SIRT3 and SIRT5 promote fatty acid oxidation by converging upon VLCAD to promote its activity and membrane localization. Regulation of cardiolipin binding by reversible lysine acylation is a novel mechanism that is predicted to extrapolate to other metabolic proteins that localize to the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:25811481

  19. Potential Biological Functions of Cytochrome P450 Reductase-dependent Enzymes in Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    D'Agostino, Jaime; Ding, Xinxin; Zhang, Peng; Jia, Kunzhi; Fang, Cheng; Zhu, Yi; Spink, David C.; Zhang, Qing-Yu

    2012-01-01

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (POR) is essential for the functioning of microsomal cytochrome P450 (P450) monooxygenases and heme oxygenases. The biological roles of the POR-dependent enzymes in the intestine have not been defined, despite the wealth of knowledge on the biochemical properties of the various oxygenases. In this study, cDNA microarray analysis revealed significant changes in gene expression in enterocytes isolated from the small intestine of intestinal epithelium-specific Por knock-out (named IE-Cpr-null) mice compared with that observed in wild-type (WT) littermates. Gene ontology analyses revealed significant changes in terms related to P450s, transporters, cholesterol biosynthesis, and, unexpectedly, antigen presentation/processing. The genomic changes were confirmed at either mRNA or protein level for selected genes, including those of the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II). Cholesterol biosynthetic activity was greatly reduced in the enterocytes of the IE-Cpr-null mice, as evidenced by the accumulation of the lanosterol metabolite, 24-dihydrolanosterol. However, no differences in either circulating or enterocyte cholesterol levels were observed between IE-Cpr-null and WT mice. Interestingly, the levels of the cholesterol precursor farnesyl pyrophosphate and its derivative geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate were also increased in the enterocytes of the IE-Cpr-null mice. Furthermore, the expression of STAT1 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 1), a downstream target of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate signaling, was enhanced. STAT1 is an activator of CIITA, the class II transactivator for MHC II expression; CIITA expression was concomitantly increased in IE-Cpr-null mice. Overall, these findings provide a novel and mechanistic link between POR-dependent enzymes and the expression of MHC II genes in the small intestine. PMID:22453923

  20. Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients. PMID:26755265

  1. Subacute effects of carbofuran on enzyme functions in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Gera, Nidhi; Kiran, Ravi; Mahmood, Akhtar

    2009-02-01

    The effect of carbofuran administration to rats has been studied on enzymes functions in rat intestine. Carbofuran was administrated 4.0 mg/kg body weight for 7 days or 2.8 mg/kg body weight for 30 days daily by Ryle's tube. Animals given carbofuran for 30 days exhibited retarded growth compared to control group. The activities of sucrase (56%), alkaline phosphatase (62%), leucine aminopeptidase (56%), and gamma-glutamyl trans peptidase (84%) were enhanced in animals given carbofuran for 7 days. Enhancement in the activities of alkaline phosphatase and leucine amino peptidase (92-96%) was also observed in animals exposed to carbofuran for 30 days, but the activities of sucrase (28%) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (49%) were reduced under these conditions. There was no change in activities of maltase, lactase, and trehalase in pesticide-treated animals for 7 or 30 days. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase was enhanced (p < 0.001) in 7 days and 30 days induced carbofuran toxicity. The activities of glucose-6-phosphatase and glutamate pyruvate transaminase were also enhanced (p < 0.001) in pesticide-treated animals for 7 days, but were reduced by 46% and 26%, respectively, after 30 days of carbofuran exposure. The activity of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase was unaltered in carbofuran toxicity. Kinetic analysis of brush border enzymes revealed a change in V(max) with no change in apparent Km. Western blot analysis of brush border sucrase, alkaline phosphatase, and leucine aminopeptidase corroborated the enzyme activity data. Intestinal histological revealed distruption of the villi, and comet assay showed disintegration of DNA in enterocytes of animals exposed to carbofuran for 30 days. These findings suggest that carbofuran toxicity may modulate digestive functions in rat intestine. PMID:19778259

  2. Enzymatic acylation of starch.

    PubMed

    Alissandratos, Apostolos; Halling, Peter J

    2012-07-01

    Starch a cheap, abundant and renewable natural material has been chemically modified for many years. The popular modification acylation has been used to adjust rheological properties as well as deliver polymers with internal plasticizers and other potential uses. However the harsh reaction conditions required to produce these esters may limit their use, especially in sensitive applications (foods, pharmaceuticals, etc.). The use of enzymes to catalyse acylation may provide a suitable alternative due to high selectivities and mild reaction conditions. Traditional hydrolase-catalysed synthesis in non-aqueous apolar media is hard due to lack of polysaccharide solubility. However, acylated starch derivatives have recently been successfully produced in other non-conventional systems: (a) surfactant-solubilised subtilisin and suspended amylose in organic media; (b) starch nanoparticles dispersed in organic medium with immobilised lipase; (c) aqueous starch gels with lipase and dispersed fatty acids. We attempt a systematic review that draws parallels between the seemingly unrelated approaches described. PMID:22138593

  3. Short-term fasting induces intra-hepatic lipid accumulation and decreases intestinal mass without reduced brush-border enzyme activity in mink (Mustela vison) small intestine.

    PubMed

    Bjornvad, C R; Elnif, J; Sangild, P T

    2004-11-01

    For many mammalian species short-term fasting is associated with intestinal atrophy and decreased digestive capacity. Under natural conditions, strictly carnivorous animals often experience prey scarcity during winter, and they may therefore be particularly well adapted to short-term food deprivation. To examine how the carnivorous gastrointestinal tract is affected by fasting, small-intestinal structure, brush-border enzyme activities and hepatic structure and function were examined in fed mink (controls) and mink that had been fasted for 1-10 days. During the first 1-2 days of fasting, intestinal mass decreased more rapidly than total body mass and villus heights were reduced 25-40%. In contrast, tissue-specific activity of the brush-border enzymes sucrase, maltase, lactase, aminopeptidase A and dipeptidylpeptidase IV increased 0.5- to 1.5-fold at this time, but returned to prefasting levels after 6 days of fasting. After 6-10 days of fasting there was a marked increase in the activity of hepatic enzymes and accumulation of intra-hepatic lipid vacuoles. Thus, mink may be a useful model for studying fasting-induced intestinal atrophy and adaptation as well as mechanisms involved in accumulation of intra-hepatic lipids following food deprivation in strictly carnivorous domestic mammals, such as cats and ferrets. PMID:15503054

  4. Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol biosynthesis by direct acyl transfer in Anabaene variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.H.; Wickrema, A.; Jaworski, J.

    1987-04-01

    The authors previously reported the direct acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) by an enzyme in the membranes of the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis. The enzyme requires acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) as substrate, but had no other additional cofactor requirements. Palmitoyl-, stearoyl- and oleoyl-ACP were all effective substrates. The A. variabilis membranes also had a hydrolase activity which metabolized the acyl-ACP to yield free fatty acid and ACP. Possible mechanisms for the acylation reaction include either acyl exchange with existing MGDG or direct acyl transfer to a lyso-MGDG, with concomitant release of free ACP. The mechanism of this reaction has been resolved using a double labelled (/sup 14/C)acyl-(/sup 14/)ACP substrate prepared with E. coli acyl-ACP synthetase. Following incubation with the enzyme, the unreacted (/sup 14/)acyl-(/sup 14/)ACP was isolated and the (/sup 14/)acyl/(/sup 14/)ACP ratio determined. Comparison of this ratio to that of the original substrate indicated no change and eliminated acyl exchange as a possible mechanism. Therefore, the direct acylation of lyso-MGDG is the proposed mechanism for this enzyme.

  5. Effects of xylitol on carbohydrate digesting enzymes activity, intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake: a multi-mode study.

    PubMed

    Chukwuma, Chika Ifeanyi; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2015-03-01

    The present study investigated the possible mechanism(s) behind the effects of xylitol on carbohydrate digesting enzymes activity, muscle glucose uptake and intestinal glucose absorption using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo experimental models. The effects of increasing concentrations of xylitol (2.5%-40% or 164.31 mM-2628.99 mM) on alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase activity in vitro and intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake were investigated under ex vivo conditions. Additionally, the effects of an oral bolus dose of xylitol (1 g per kg BW) on gastric emptying and intestinal glucose absorption and digesta transit in the different segments of the intestinal tract were investigated in normal and type 2 diabetic rats at 1 hour after dose administration, when phenol red was used as a recovery marker. Xylitol exhibited concentration-dependent inhibition of alpha amylase (IC₅₀ = 1364.04 mM) and alpha glucosidase (IC₅₀ = 1127.52 mM) activity in vitro and small intestinal glucose absorption under ex vivo condition. Xylitol also increased dose dependent muscle glucose uptake with and without insulin, although the uptake was not significantly affected by the addition of insulin. Oral single bolus dose of xylitol significantly delayed gastric emptying, inhibited intestinal glucose absorption but increased the intestinal digesta transit rate in both normal and diabetic rats compared to their respective controls. The data of this study suggest that xylitol reduces intestinal glucose absorption via inhibiting major carbohydrate digesting enzymes, slowing gastric emptying and fastening the intestinal transit rate, but increases muscle glucose uptake in normal and type 2 diabetic rats. PMID:25656339

  6. Purification and characterization of konjac glucomannan degrading enzyme from anaerobic human intestinal bacterium, Clostridium butyricum-Clostridium beijerinckii group.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, N; Matsuura, Y

    1997-10-01

    Konjac glucomannan degrading enzyme was purified to homogeneity from the culture broth of an anaerobic human intestinal bacterium, Clostridium butyricum-Clostridium beijerinckii group. The enzyme was composed of a single polypeptide chain with a molecular weight of 50,000-53,000. The enzyme was an endo-beta-mannanase that acted specifically on the polysaccharides such as konjac glucomannan and coffee mannan, producing exclusively their smaller oligosaccharides and the monosaccharides. The optimal pH of the enzyme for the hydrolysis of konjac glucomannan was around 7-8 and the enzyme was stable in rather alkaline pH range of 8-10. The enzyme reaction was activated by the addition of CaCl2 and dithiothreitol. It was suggested that the enzyme might contribute to the decomposition of konjac glucomannan in human digestive tract. PMID:9362121

  7. Acyl-lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; Debono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P; Franke, Rochus B; Graham, Ian A; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  8. Acyl-lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; Debono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P; Franke, Rochus B; Graham, Ian A; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:22303259

  9. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:22303259

  10. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  11. Expression of an antimicrobial peptide, digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters in the intestine of E. praecox-infected chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coccidiosis is a major intestinal disease of poultry, caused by several species of the protozoan Eimeria. The objective of this study was to examine changes in expression of digestive enzymes, nutrient transporters and an antimicrobial peptide following an Eimeria praecox challenge of chickens at d...

  12. Enzymes involved in L-carnitine biosynthesis are expressed by small intestinal enterocytes in mice: Implications for gut health

    PubMed Central

    Shekhawat, Prem S; Sonne, Srinivas; Carter, A Lee; Matern, Dietrich; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2013-01-01

    Background Carnitine is essential for mitochondrial β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids. Deficiency of carnitine leads to severe gut atrophy, ulceration and inflammation in animal models of carnitine deficiency. Genetic studies in large populations have linked mutations in the carnitine transporters OCTN1 and OCTN2 with Crohn’s disease (CD), while other studies at the same time have failed to show a similar association and report normal serum carnitine levels in CD patients. Methods In this report, we have studied the expression of carnitine-synthesizing enzymes in intestinal epithelial cells to determine the capability of these cells to synthesize carnitine de novo. We studied expression of five enzymes involved in carnitine biosynthesis, namely 6-N-trimethyllysine dioxygenase (TMLD), 4-trimethylaminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase (TMABADH), serine hydroxymethyltransferase 1 & 2 (SHMT1 & 2) and γ-butyrobetaine hydroxylase (BBH) by real-time PCR in mice (C3H strain). We also measured activity of γ-BBH in the intestine using an ex vivo assay and localized its expression by in situ hybridization. Results Our investigations show that mouse intestinal epithelium expresses all five enzymes required for de novo carnitine biosynthesis; the expression is localized mainly in villous surface epithelial cells throughout the intestine. The final rate-limiting enzyme γ-BBH is highly active in the small intestine; its activity was 9.7 ± 3.5 pmol/mg/min, compared to 22.7 ± 7.3 pmol/mg/min in the liver. Conclusions We conclude that mouse gut epithelium is able to synthesize carnitine de novo. This capacity to synthesize carnitine in the intestine may play an important role in gut health and can help explain lack of clinical carnitine deficiency signs in subjects with mutations with OCTN transporters. PMID:22999781

  13. Effects of dietary stachyose on growth performance, digestive enzyme activities and intestinal morphology of juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haibin; Zhang, Yanjiao; Mai, Kangsen; Ai, Qinghui; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Wenbing; Li, Yanxian; Liu, Jintao

    2015-10-01

    A 12-week feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary stachyose on the growth performance, digestive enzymes activities and intestinal structures of juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L). Five isonitrogenous (49.58% crude protein) and isolipidic (10.50% crude lipid) diets were formulated to contain 0 (Control), 0.625% (S-0.625), 1.25% (S-1.25), 2.5% (S-2.5) and 5% (S-5) stachyose, respectively. With the increase of stachyose level, the growth performance and feed utilization of turbot, such as the specific growth rate, final mean body weight, weight gain rate and feed efficiency, increased significantly ( P< 0.05) and then stabilized. The feed intake of fish fed S-5 was significantly higher ( P< 0.05) than that of fish in other groups. The activities of trypsin, intestinal caseinolytic, stomach and intestinal amylase were significantly influenced by stachyose ( P<0.05). The highest values of trypsin and intestinal caseinolytic activities were observed in group S-1.25, while the highest activity of stomach amylase and the lowest activity of intestine amylase were observed in group S-5. No lesion or damage was found on the distal intestine structures of fish from all treatments, while the height of simple folds in the distal intestine was significantly increased ( P< 0.05) when 1.25% or 2.5% stachyose was added in the diets. These results indicated that moderate level of stachyose (1.25%) improves the growth performance, feed utilization, digestive enzyme activities and the distal intestine structures of juvenile turbot.

  14. Human α/β hydrolase domain containing 10 (ABHD10) is responsible enzyme for deglucuronidation of mycophenolic acid acyl-glucuronide in liver.

    PubMed

    Iwamura, Atsushi; Fukami, Tatsuki; Higuchi, Ryota; Nakajima, Miki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2012-03-16

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA), the active metabolite of the immunosuppressant mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), is primarily metabolized by glucuronidation to a phenolic glucuronide (MPAG) and an acyl glucuronide (AcMPAG). It is known that AcMPAG, which may be an immunotoxic metabolite, is deglucuronidated in human liver. However, it has been reported that recombinant β-glucuronidase does not catalyze this reaction. AcMPAG deglucuronidation activity was detected in both human liver cytosol (HLC) and microsomes (HLM). In this study, the enzyme responsible for AcMPAG deglucuronidation was identified by purification from HLC with column chromatographic purification steps. The purified enzyme was identified as α/β hydrolase domain containing 10 (ABHD10) by amino acid sequence analysis. Recombinant ABHD10 expressed in Sf9 cells efficiently deglucuronidated AcMPAG with a K(m) value of 100.7 ± 10.2 μM, which was similar to those in HLM, HLC, and human liver homogenates (HLH). Immunoblot analysis revealed ABHD10 protein expression in both HLC and HLM. The AcMPAG deglucuronidation by recombinant ABHD10, HLC, and HLH were potently inhibited by AgNO(3), CdCl(2), CuCl(2), PMSF, bis-p-nitrophenylphosphate, and DTNB. The CL(int) value of AcMPAG formation from MPA, which was catalyzed by human UGT2B7, in HLH was increased by 1.8-fold in the presence of PMSF. Thus, human ABHD10 would affect the formation of AcMPAG, the immunotoxic metabolite. PMID:22294686

  15. Effects of non-starch polysaccharides enzymes on pancreatic and small intestinal digestive enzyme activities in piglet fed diets containing high amounts of barley

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei-Fen; Feng, Jie; Xu, Zi-Rong; Yang, Cai-Mei

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate effects of non-starch polysaccharides(NSP) enzymes on pancreatic and small intestinal digestive enzyme activities in piglet fed diets containing high amounts of barley. METHODS: Sixty crossbred piglets averaging 13.5 kg were randomly assigned to two treatment groups with three replications (pens) based on sex and mass. Each group was fed on the diet based on barley with or without added NSP enzymes (0.15%) for a 40-d period. At the end of the experiment the pigs were weighed. Three piglets of each group were chosen and slaughtered. Pancreas, digesta from the distal end of the duodenum and jejunal mucosa were collected for determination. Activities of the digestive enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin, amylase and lipase were determined in the small intestinal sections as well as in homogenates of pancreatic tissue. Maltase, sucrase, lactase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT) activities were analyzed in jejunal mucosa. RESULTS: Supplementation with NSP enzymes improved growth performance of piglets. It showed that NSP enzymes had no effect on digestive enzyme activities in pancreas, but decreased the activities of proteolytic enzyme, trypsin, amylase and lipase in duodenal contents by 57.56%, 76.08%, 69.03% and 40.22%(P < 0.05) compared with control, and increased γ-GT activities in jejunal mucosa by 118.75%(P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Supplementation with NSP enzymes in barley based diets could improve piglets’ growth performance, decrease activities of proteolytic enzyme, trypsin, amylase and lipase in duodenal contents and increase γ-GT activities in jejunal mucosa. PMID:15040032

  16. Influence of bacterial N-acyl-homoserine lactones on growth parameters, pigments, antioxidative capacities and the xenobiotic phase II detoxification enzymes in barley and yam bean.

    PubMed

    Götz-Rösch, Christine; Sieper, Tina; Fekete, Agnes; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Hartmann, Anton; Schröder, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are able to communicate with each other and sense their environment in a population density dependent mechanism known as quorum sensing (QS). N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are the QS signaling compounds of Gram-negative bacteria which are frequent colonizers of rhizospheres. While cross-kingdom signaling and AHL-dependent gene expression in plants has been confirmed, the responses of enzyme activities in the eukaryotic host upon AHLs are unknown. Since AHL are thought to be used as so-called plant boosters or strengthening agents, which might change their resistance toward radiation and/or xenobiotic stress, we have examined the plants' pigment status and their antioxidative and detoxifying capacities upon AHL treatment. Because the yield of a crop plant should not be negatively influenced, we have also checked for growth and root parameters. We investigated the influence of three different AHLs, namely N-hexanoyl- (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl- (C8-HSL), and N-decanoyl- homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) on two agricultural crop plants. The AHL-effects on Hordeum vulgare (L.) as an example of a monocotyledonous crop and on the tropical leguminous crop plant Pachyrhizus erosus (L.) were compared. While plant growth and pigment contents in both plants showed only small responses to the applied AHLs, AHL treatment triggered tissue- and compound-specific changes in the activity of important detoxification enzymes. The activity of dehydroascorbate reductase in barley shoots after C10-HSL treatment for instance increased up to 384% of control plant levels, whereas superoxide dismutase activity in barley roots was decreased down to 23% of control levels upon C6-HSL treatment. Other detoxification enzymes reacted similarly within this range, with interesting clusters of positive or negative answers toward AHL treatment. In general the changes on the enzyme level were more severe in barley than in yam bean which might be due to the different abilities of the plants to

  17. Influence of bacterial N-acyl-homoserine lactones on growth parameters, pigments, antioxidative capacities and the xenobiotic phase II detoxification enzymes in barley and yam bean

    PubMed Central

    Götz-Rösch, Christine; Sieper, Tina; Fekete, Agnes; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Hartmann, Anton; Schröder, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are able to communicate with each other and sense their environment in a population density dependent mechanism known as quorum sensing (QS). N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are the QS signaling compounds of Gram-negative bacteria which are frequent colonizers of rhizospheres. While cross-kingdom signaling and AHL-dependent gene expression in plants has been confirmed, the responses of enzyme activities in the eukaryotic host upon AHLs are unknown. Since AHL are thought to be used as so-called plant boosters or strengthening agents, which might change their resistance toward radiation and/or xenobiotic stress, we have examined the plants’ pigment status and their antioxidative and detoxifying capacities upon AHL treatment. Because the yield of a crop plant should not be negatively influenced, we have also checked for growth and root parameters. We investigated the influence of three different AHLs, namely N-hexanoyl- (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl- (C8-HSL), and N-decanoyl- homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) on two agricultural crop plants. The AHL-effects on Hordeum vulgare (L.) as an example of a monocotyledonous crop and on the tropical leguminous crop plant Pachyrhizus erosus (L.) were compared. While plant growth and pigment contents in both plants showed only small responses to the applied AHLs, AHL treatment triggered tissue- and compound-specific changes in the activity of important detoxification enzymes. The activity of dehydroascorbate reductase in barley shoots after C10-HSL treatment for instance increased up to 384% of control plant levels, whereas superoxide dismutase activity in barley roots was decreased down to 23% of control levels upon C6-HSL treatment. Other detoxification enzymes reacted similarly within this range, with interesting clusters of positive or negative answers toward AHL treatment. In general the changes on the enzyme level were more severe in barley than in yam bean which might be due to the different abilities of the plants to

  18. Intestinal triacylglycerol synthesis in fat absorption and systemic energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Nelson, David W; Yen, Mei-I

    2015-03-01

    The intestine plays a prominent role in the biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (triglyceride; TAG). Digested dietary TAG is repackaged in the intestine to form the hydrophobic core of chylomicrons, which deliver metabolic fuels, essential fatty acids, and other lipid-soluble nutrients to the peripheral tissues. By controlling the flux of dietary fat into the circulation, intestinal TAG synthesis can greatly impact systemic metabolism. Genes encoding many of the enzymes involved in TAG synthesis have been identified. Among TAG synthesis enzymes, acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 and acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT)1 are highly expressed in the intestine. Their physiological functions have been examined in the context of whole organisms using genetically engineered mice and, in the case of DGAT1, specific inhibitors. An emerging theme from recent findings is that limiting the rate of TAG synthesis in the intestine can modulate gut hormone secretion, lipid metabolism, and systemic energy balance. The underlying mechanisms and their implications for humans are yet to be explored. Pharmacological inhibition of TAG hydrolysis in the intestinal lumen has been employed to combat obesity and associated disorders with modest efficacy and unwanted side effects. The therapeutic potential of inhibiting specific enzymes involved in intestinal TAG synthesis warrants further investigation. PMID:25231105

  19. Intestinal triacylglycerol synthesis in fat absorption and systemic energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Nelson, David W.; Yen, Mei-I

    2015-01-01

    The intestine plays a prominent role in the biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (triglyceride; TAG). Digested dietary TAG is repackaged in the intestine to form the hydrophobic core of chylomicrons, which deliver metabolic fuels, essential fatty acids, and other lipid-soluble nutrients to the peripheral tissues. By controlling the flux of dietary fat into the circulation, intestinal TAG synthesis can greatly impact systemic metabolism. Genes encoding many of the enzymes involved in TAG synthesis have been identified. Among TAG synthesis enzymes, acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 and acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT)1 are highly expressed in the intestine. Their physiological functions have been examined in the context of whole organisms using genetically engineered mice and, in the case of DGAT1, specific inhibitors. An emerging theme from recent findings is that limiting the rate of TAG synthesis in the intestine can modulate gut hormone secretion, lipid metabolism, and systemic energy balance. The underlying mechanisms and their implications for humans are yet to be explored. Pharmacological inhibition of TAG hydrolysis in the intestinal lumen has been employed to combat obesity and associated disorders with modest efficacy and unwanted side effects. The therapeutic potential of inhibiting specific enzymes involved in intestinal TAG synthesis warrants further investigation. PMID:25231105

  20. Dynamic Evolution of the LPS-Detoxifying Enzyme Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase in Zebrafish and Other Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ye; Wandler, Anica M.; Postlethwait, John H.; Guillemin, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatases (Alps) are well-studied enzymes that remove phosphates from a variety of substrates. Alps function in diverse biological processes, including modulating host-bacterial interactions by dephosphorylating the Gram-negative bacterial cell wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In animals, Alps are encoded by multiple genes characterized by either ubiquitous expression (named Alpls for their liver expression, but a key to proper bone mineralization), or their tissue-specific expression, for example in the intestine (Alpi). We previously characterized a zebrafish alpi gene (renamed here alpi.1) that is regulated by Myd88-dependent innate immune signaling and that is required to prevent a host’s excessive inflammatory reactions to its resident microbiota. Here we report the characterization of two new alp genes in zebrafish, alpi.2 and alp3. To understand their origins, we investigated the phylogenetic history of Alp genes in animals. We find that vertebrate Alp genes are organized in three clades with one of these clades missing from the mammals. We present evidence that these three clades originated during the two vertebrate genome duplications. We show that alpl is ubiquitously expressed in zebrafish, as it is in mammals, whereas the other three alps are specific to the intestine. Our phylogenetic analysis reveals that in contrast to Alpl, which has been stably maintained as a single gene throughout the vertebrates, the Alpis have been lost and duplicated multiple times independently in vertebrate lineages, likely reflecting the rapid and dynamic evolution of vertebrate gut morphologies, driven by changes in bacterial associations and diet. PMID:23091474

  1. Alterations of digestive enzyme activities, intestinal morphology and microbiota in juvenile paddlefish, Polyodon spathula, fed dietary probiotics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Cheng; Ma, Mingyang; Ji, Hong; Ren, Tongjun; Mims, Steven D

    2015-02-01

    The effects of dietary supplementation of probiotics on digestive enzymes activities, intestinal morphology and microbiota in juvenile paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) were studied. A total of 400 fish were reared in two cages and fed with a basal diet (control group, CG) or diet supplemented with commercial probiotics (treatment group, TG) for 80 days. Enzymes activities analysis indicated that protease and α-amylase activities increased (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05) in TG. Light microscopy observation demonstrated the decrease of wall thickness and muscularis thickness in foregut (P < 0.01), the increase of those in hindgut (P < 0.05), the increase of folds height in foregut (P < 0.01) and midgut in TG (P < 0.05). DGGE results of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA confirmed that the richness and diversity of intestinal microbial species increased in TG. The similarity between the commercial bacteria product and intestinal microbiota of TG were higher than the microbiota from CG. The quantities of bacterium, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, present an increasing trend from foregut to hindgut both in two groups. To our knowledge, this is the first in vivo study to reveal the effect of dietary probiotics on intestinal digestive enzymes activities, morphology and microbiota in paddlefish. PMID:25403154

  2. Fasting and refeeding cause rapid changes in intestinal tissue mass and digestive enzyme capacities of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    PubMed

    Krogdahl, Ashild; Bakke-McKellep, Anne Marie

    2005-08-01

    Fasting and refeeding effects on gastrointestinal morphology and digestive enzyme activities of Atlantic salmon, held in tanks of seawater at 9 degrees C and 31 per thousand salinity, were addressed in two trials. Trial 1: Fish (mean body mass 1190 g) were fasted for 40 days and intestines sampled at day 0, 2, 4, 11, 19 and 40. Trial 2: Fish (1334 g), fasted for 50 days, were refed and sampled at day 0, 3 and 7. Mass, length, protein, and maltase, lactase, and leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) activities were analyzed for stomach (ST), pyloric caeca (PC), proximal (PI), mid (MI), and distal intestine (DI). PC contributed 50% of gastrointestinal mass and 75% of enzyme capacity. Fasting decreased mass and enzyme capacities by 20-50% within two days, and 40-75% after 40 days. In PC, specific brush border membrane (BBM) maltase activity decreased whereas BBM LAP increased during fasting. Upon refeeding, enzyme capacities were mostly regenerated after one week. The results suggest that refeeding should start slowly with about 25% of estimated feed requirement during the first 3 days, but may then be stepped up rapidly. Investigations of digestive processes of fed fish should only be performed when intestines are feed-filled to avoid bias due to effects of fasting. PMID:16046160

  3. The Physiology of Protein S-acylation

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Luke H.; Shipston, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein S-acylation, the only fully reversible posttranslational lipid modification of proteins, is emerging as a ubiquitous mechanism to control the properties and function of a diverse array of proteins and consequently physiological processes. S-acylation results from the enzymatic addition of long-chain lipids, most typically palmitate, onto intracellular cysteine residues of soluble and transmembrane proteins via a labile thioester linkage. Addition of lipid results in increases in protein hydrophobicity that can impact on protein structure, assembly, maturation, trafficking, and function. The recent explosion in global S-acylation (palmitoyl) proteomic profiling as a result of improved biochemical tools to assay S-acylation, in conjunction with the recent identification of enzymes that control protein S-acylation and de-acylation, has opened a new vista into the physiological function of S-acylation. This review introduces key features of S-acylation and tools to interrogate this process, and highlights the eclectic array of proteins regulated including membrane receptors, ion channels and transporters, enzymes and kinases, signaling adapters and chaperones, cell adhesion, and structural proteins. We highlight recent findings correlating disruption of S-acylation to pathophysiology and disease and discuss some of the major challenges and opportunities in this rapidly expanding field. PMID:25834228

  4. The influence of age on intestinal dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV/CD26), disaccharidases, and alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Detel, Dijana; Baticic, Lara; Varljen, Jadranka

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine and describe the age-related changes in intestinal brush border membrane enzyme activities that occur in C57Bl/6 mice. Specifically, jejunal, duodenal, and ileal dipeptidyl peptidase IV/CD26, disaccharidase (lactase, sucrase, and maltase), and alkaline phosphatase activities were determined. A significant correlation between analyzed intestinal brush border membrane enzyme activities and animal age was found. Our study revealed that intestinal dipeptidyl peptidase IV/CD26, lactase, sucrase, maltase, and alkaline phosphatase activities decline significantly with age (p < .05). Nevertheless, the horizontal (duodenum to ileum) enzyme activity patterns are not affected by age. PMID:18189167

  5. Changes in small intestinal morphology and digestive enzyme activity with oral administration of copper-loaded chitosan nanoparticles in rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Xin-Yan; Du, Wen-Li; Huang, Qi-Chun; Xu, Zi-Rong; Wang, Yi-Zheng

    2012-03-01

    The experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of copper-loaded chitosan nanoparticles on the small intestinal morphology and activities of digestive enzyme and mucosal disaccharase in rats. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats, with average body weight of 82 g, were randomly allotted to five groups (n = 8). All rats were received a basal diet (control) or the same basal diet added with 80 mg/kg BW CuSO(4), 80 mg/kg BW chitosan (CS-I), 80 mg/kg BW copper-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (CSN-I), 160 mg/kg BW copper-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (CSN-II), respectively. The experiment lasted 21 days. The results showed that the villus heights of the small intestinal mucosa in groups CSN-I and CSN-II were higher than those of the control, group CuSO(4) or CS-I. The crypt depth of duodenum and ileum mucosa in group CSN-I or CSN-II was depressed. Compared with the control, there were no significant effects of CuSO(4) or CS-I on the villus height and crypt depth of small intestinal mucosa. Supplementation with CSN improved the activities of trypsin, amylase and lipase in the small intestinal contents and maltase, sucrase and lactase of duodenum, jejunum, and ileum mucosa while there were no significant effects of CuSO(4) on the digestive enzyme activities of the small content compared with the control. The results indicated that intestinal morphology, activities of digestive enzyme in digesta and mucosal disaccharase were beneficially changed by treatment of copper-loaded chitosan nanoparticles. PMID:21882065

  6. Degradation of coeliac disease-inducing rye secalin by germinating cereal enzymes: diminishing toxic effects in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Stenman, S M; Lindfors, K; Venäläinen, J I; Hautala, A; Männistö, P T; Garcia-Horsman, J A; Kaukovirta-Norja, A; Auriola, S; Mauriala, T; Mäki, M; Kaukinen, K

    2010-08-01

    Currently the only treatment for coeliac disease is a lifelong gluten-free diet excluding food products containing wheat, rye and barley. There is, however, only scarce evidence as to harmful effects of rye in coeliac disease. To confirm the assumption that rye should be excluded from the coeliac patient's diet, we now sought to establish whether rye secalin activates toxic reactions in vitro in intestinal epithelial cell models as extensively as wheat gliadin. Further, we investigated the efficacy of germinating cereal enzymes from oat, wheat and barley to hydrolyse secalin into short fragments and whether secalin-induced harmful effects can be reduced by such pretreatment. In the current study, secalin elicited toxic reactions in intestinal Caco-2 epithelial cells similarly to gliadin: it induced epithelial cell layer permeability, tight junctional protein occludin and ZO-1 distortion and actin reorganization. In high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy (HPLC-MS), germinating barley enzymes provided the most efficient degradation of secalin and gliadin peptides and was thus selected for further in vitro analysis. After germinating barley enzyme pretreatment, all toxic reactions induced by secalin were ameliorated. We conclude that germinating enzymes from barley are particularly efficient in the degradation of rye secalin. In future, these enzymes might be utilized as a novel medical treatment for coeliac disease or in food processing in order to develop high-quality coeliac-safe food products. PMID:20560983

  7. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  8. Preparation of fatty-acylated derivatives of acyl carrier protein using Vibrio harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase.

    PubMed

    Shen, Z; Fice, D; Byers, D M

    1992-07-01

    A simple two-step purification of Vibrio harveyi fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) synthetase, which is useful for the quantitative preparation and analysis of fatty-acylated derivatives of ACP, is described. Acyl-ACP synthetase can be partially purified from extracts of this bioluminescent bacterium by Cibacron blue chromatography and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration and is stable for months at -20 degrees C in the presence of glycerol. Incubation of ACP from Escherichia coli with ATP and radiolabeled fatty acids (6 to 16 carbons in length) in the presence of the enzyme resulted in quantitative conversion to biologically active acylated derivatives. The enzyme reaction can be monitored by a filter disk assay to quantitate levels of ACP or by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography to detect ACP in cell extracts. With its broad fatty acid chain length specificity and optimal activity in mild nondenaturing buffers, the soluble V. harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase provides an attractive alternative to current chemical and enzymatic methods of acyl-ACP preparation and analysis. PMID:1514693

  9. Early Changes in Microbial Colonization Selectively Modulate Intestinal Enzymes, but Not Inducible Heat Shock Proteins in Young Adult Swine

    PubMed Central

    Arnal, Marie-Edith; Zhang, Jing; Messori, Stefano; Bosi, Paolo; Smidt, Hauke; Lallès, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic diseases and obesity are developing worldwide in a context of plethoric intake of high energy diets. The intestine may play a pivotal role due to diet-induced alterations in microbiota composition and increased permeability to bacterial lipopolysaccharide inducing metabolic inflammation. Early programming of metabolic disorders appearing in later life is also suspected, but data on the intestine are lacking. Therefore, we hypothesized that early disturbances in microbial colonization have short- and long-lasting consequences on selected intestinal components including key digestive enzymes and protective inducible heat shock proteins (HSP). The hypothesis was tested in swine offspring born to control mothers (n = 12) or mothers treated with the antibiotic amoxicillin around parturition (n = 11), and slaughtered serially at 14, 28 and 42 days of age to assess short-term effects. To evaluate long-term consequences, young adult offspring from the same litters were offered a normal or a fat-enriched diet for 4 weeks between 140 and 169 days of age and were then slaughtered. Amoxicillin treatment transiently modified both mother and offspring microbiota. This was associated with early but transient reduction in ileal alkaline phosphatase, HSP70 (but not HSP27) and crypt depth, suggesting a milder or delayed intestinal response to bacteria in offspring born to antibiotic-treated mothers. More importantly, we disclosed long-term consequences of this treatment on jejunal alkaline phosphatase (reduced) and jejunal and ileal dipeptidylpeptidase IV (increased and decreased, respectively) of offspring born to antibiotic-treated dams. Significant interactions between early antibiotic treatment and later diet were observed for jejunal alkaline phosphatase and sucrase. By contrast, inducible HSPs were not affected. In conclusion, our data suggest that early changes in bacterial colonization not only modulate intestinal architecture and function transiently, but

  10. Zinc oxide-montmorillonite hybrid influences diarrhea, intestinal mucosal integrity, and digestive enzyme activity in weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Hu, Caihong; Song, Juan; You, Zhaotong; Luan, Zhaoshuang; Li, Weifen

    2012-11-01

    One hundred-eighty piglets (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire), with an average initial weight of 7.4 kg weaned at 27 ± 1 days of age, were used to evaluate the effects of dietary zinc oxide-montmorillonite hybrid (ZnO-MMT) on growth performance, diarrhea, intestinal mucosal integrity, and digestive enzyme activity. All pigs were allotted to five treatments and fed with the basal diets supplemented with 0, 250, 500, and 750 mg/kg of Zn as ZnO-MMT or 2,000 mg/kg of Zn as ZnO. The results showed that supplementation with 500 or 750 mg/kg of Zn from ZnO-MMT and 2,000 mg/kg of Zn from ZnO improved average daily gain, enhanced average daily feed intake, decreased fecal scores at 4, 8, and 14 days postweaning, reduced intestinal permeability which was evident from the reduced lactulose recovery and urinary lactulose/mannitol ratio, and improved the activities of protease, amylase, lipase, trypsin, and chymotrypsin both in pancreas and small intestinal contents of pigs as compared with the control. Supplemental 250 mg/kg of Zn from ZnO-MMT also decreased fecal scores at 8 and 14 days postweaning, decreased urinary lactulose/mannitol ratio, and improved chymotrypsin activity in pancreas and small intestinal contents as well as protease activity in small intestinal contents compared with control. Moreover, the above indexes of weanling pigs fed with 500 or 750 mg/kg of Zn as ZnO-MMT did not differ from those fed with 2,000 mg/kg of Zn as ZnO. The results demonstrated that supplementation with 500 or 750 mg/kg of Zn from ZnO-MMT was as efficacious as 2,000 mg/kg of Zn from ZnO in improving growth performance, alleviating postweaning diarrhea, and enhancing intestinal mucosal integrity and the digestive enzyme activities in pancreas and small intestinal contents of pigs. The results that feeding lower concentrations of ZnO-MMT to weanling pigs maintained performance will be beneficial for the environment and for sustaining swine production. PMID:22539019

  11. Molecular & Biochemical Parasitology Release of metabolic enzymes by Giardia in response to interaction with intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ringqvist, Emma; Palm, J.E. Daniel; Skarin, Hanna; Hehl, Adrian B.; Weiland, Malin; Davids, Barbara J.; Reiner, David S.; Griffiths, William J.; Eckmann, Lars; Gillin, Frances D.; Svärd, Staffan G.

    2012-01-01

    Giardia lamblia, an important cause of diarrheal disease, resides in the small intestinal lumen in close apposition to epithelial cells. Since the disease mechanisms underlying giardiasis are poorly understood, elucidating the specific interactions of the parasite with the host epithelium is likely to provide clues to understanding the pathogenesis. Here we tested the hypothesis that contact of Giardia lamblia with intestinal epithelial cells might lead to release of specific proteins. Using established co-culture models, intestinal ligated loops and a proteomics approach, we identified three G. lamblia proteins (arginine deiminase, ornithine carbamoyl transferase and enolase), previously recognized as immunodominant antigens during acute giardiasis. Release was stimulated by cell–cell interactions, since only small amounts of argi-nine deiminase and enolase were detected in the medium after culturing of G. lamblia alone. The secreted G. lamblia proteins were localized to the cytoplasm and the inside of the plasma membrane of trophozoites. Furthermore, in vitro studies with recombinant arginine deiminase showed that the secreted Giardia proteins can disable host innate immune factors such as nitric oxide production. These results indicate that contact of Giardia with epithelial cells triggers metabolic enzyme release, which might facilitate effective colonization of the human small intestine. PMID:18359106

  12. Lipid Acyl Chain Remodeling in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Renne, Mike F.; Bao, Xue; De Smet, Cedric H.; de Kroon, Anton I. P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane lipid homeostasis is maintained by de novo synthesis, intracellular transport, remodeling, and degradation of lipid molecules. Glycerophospholipids, the most abundant structural component of eukaryotic membranes, are subject to acyl chain remodeling, which is defined as the post-synthetic process in which one or both acyl chains are exchanged. Here, we review studies addressing acyl chain remodeling of membrane glycerophospholipids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model organism that has been successfully used to investigate lipid synthesis and its regulation. Experimental evidence for the occurrence of phospholipid acyl chain exchange in cardiolipin, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylethanolamine is summarized, including methods and tools that have been used for detecting remodeling. Progress in the identification of the enzymes involved is reported, and putative functions of acyl chain remodeling in yeast are discussed. PMID:26819558

  13. Effect of standardized cranberry extract on the activity and expression of selected biotransformation enzymes in rat liver and intestine.

    PubMed

    Bártíková, Hana; Boušová, Iva; Jedličková, Pavla; Lněničková, Kateřina; Skálová, Lenka; Szotáková, Barbora

    2014-01-01

    The use of dietary supplements containing cranberry extract is a common way to prevent urinary tract infections. As consumption of these supplements containing a mixture of concentrated anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins has increased, interest in their possible interactions with drug-metabolizing enzymes has grown. In this in vivo study, rats were treated with a standardized cranberry extract (CystiCran®) obtained from Vaccinium macrocarpon in two dosage schemes (14 days, 0.5 mg of proanthocyanidins/kg/day; 1 day, 1.5 mg of proanthocyanidins/kg/day). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins contained in this extract on the activity and expression of intestinal and hepatic biotransformation enzymes: cytochrome P450 (CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B and CYP3A), carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT). Administration of cranberry extract led to moderate increases in the activities of hepatic CYP3A (by 34%), CYP1A1 (by 38%), UGT (by 40%), CBR1 (by 17%) and GST (by 13%), while activities of these enzymes in the small intestine were unchanged. No changes in the relative amounts of these proteins were found. Taken together, the interactions of cranberry extract with simultaneously administered drugs seem not to be serious. PMID:25237750

  14. Intestinal disaccharidases and some renal enzymes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats fed sapogenin extract from bitter yam (Dioscorea polygonoides).

    PubMed

    McAnuff-Harding, Marie A; Omoruyi, Felix O; Asemota, Helen N

    2006-04-25

    In this study, the effects of bitter yam sapogenin extract or commercial diosgenin on intestinal disaccharidases and some renal enzymes in diabetic rats were investigated. Diabetic male Wistar rats were fed diets supplemented with 1% sapogenin extract or commercial diosgenin for 3 weeks. Plasma glucose, intestinal disaccharidases and the activities of transaminases, acid phosphatase, glucose-6-phosphatase, ATP citrate lyase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase were assessed for the level of metabolic changes in the kidney of diabetic rats. Sapogenin extract or commercial diosgenin supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in lactase and maltase activities in all three regions of the intestine compared to the diabetic control group. However, the test diets significantly reduced intestinal sucrase activity in the proximal and mid regions. Test diets supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in the activities of the transaminases compared to the normal and diabetic control groups. The activity of glucose-6-phosphatase was significantly increased while the activities of ATP citrate lyase, pyruvate kinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were significantly reduced in the kidney of the diabetic control rats compared to the normal group. Test diets supplementation did not significantly alter glucose-6-phosphatase, ATP citrate lyase and pyruvate kinase activities compared to the diabetic control. However, there was a significant increase in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity toward the normal group. In conclusion, the consumption of bitter yam sapogenin extract or commercial diosgenin demonstrated hypoglycemic properties, which are beneficial in diabetes by reducing intestinal disaccharidases activities; however, bitter yam sapogenin extract may adversely affect the integrity of kidney membrane. PMID:16497337

  15. Histochemical distribution of digestive enzymes in the intestine of the common two-banded seabream, Diplodus vulgaris, Geoffroy St-Hilaire 1817.

    PubMed

    Tlak Gajger, I; Nejedli, S; Kozarić, Z

    2013-06-01

    The histochemical localization of non-specific esterase, alkaline and acid phosphatase as well as aminopeptidase in the intestine of the free-living common two-banded sea bream (Diplodus vulgaris) was investigated. Fish were caught near the town of Zadar (Adriatic Sea, Croatia). Samples of pyloric caeca and three parts of the intestine proper (anterior, middle and posterior) were used for the description of non-specific esterase, alkaline and acid phosphatase as well as aminopeptidase. Non-specific esterase activity was found in the cytoplasm of enterocytes in pyloric caeca and in all investigated intestinal segments. The activity was stronger in the anterior and posterior part of the intestine than in the pyloric caeca and middle segment of the intestine. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase was detected in brush border of enterocytes of all investigated intestinal segments. Enzymatic activity gradually decreased in a posterior direction. Acid phosphatase activity was observed as a fine granular reaction product in the supranuclear region of enterocytes. This activity was almost equal in pyloric caeca as well as in the anterior intestinal segment, while it was stronger in the middle and posterior intestinal segment. Aminopeptidase was present along the intestinal epithelium brush border in all investigated parts of the digestive tube. The intensity of aminopeptidase increased posteriorly. The possible role of investigated enzymes in intracellular digestion and transport is discussed. PMID:22812413

  16. Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol biosynthesis by direct acyl transfer in Anabaena variabilis. [Anabaena variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.H.; Wickrema, A.; Jaworski, J.

    1987-05-01

    The authors previously reported the direct acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) by an enzyme in the membranes of the cyanobacterium (Anabaena variabilis. The enzyme requires acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) as substrate, but had no other additional cofactor requirements. Palmitoyl-, stearoyl- and oleoyl-ACP were all effective substrates. The A. variabilis membranes also had a hydrolase activity which metabolized the acyl-ACP to yield free fatty acid and ACP. Possible mechanisms for the acylation reaction include either acyl exchange with existing MGDG or direct acyl transfer to a lyso-MGDG, with concomitant release of free ACP. The mechanism of this reaction has been resolved using a double labelled (/sup 14/C)acyl-(/sup 14/C)ACP substrate prepared with E. coli acyl-ACP synthetase. Following incubation with the enzyme, the unreacted (/sup 14/C)acyl-(/sup 14/C)ACP was isolated and the (/sup 14/C)acyl/(/sup 14/C)ACP ratio determined. Comparison of this ratio to that of the original substrate indicated no change and eliminated acyl exchange as a possible mechanism. Therefore, the direct acylation of lyso-MGDG is the proposed mechanism for this enzyme. The reaction is apparently specific for MGDG synthesis, as other glycolipids and phospholipids were not labelled during incubations.

  17. Purification of Recombinant Acyl-Coenzyme A:Cholesterol Acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) from H293 Cells and Binding Studies Between the Enzyme and Substrates Using Difference Intrinsic Fluorescence Spectroscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Catherine CY; Miyazaki, Akira; Dong, Ruhong; Kheirollah, Alireza; Yu, Chunjiang; Geng, Yong; Higgs, Henry N; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) is a membrane bound enzyme utilizing long-chain fatty acyl-coenzyme A and cholesterol to form cholesteryl esters and coenzyme A. Previously, we had expressed tagged human ACAT1 (hACAT1) in CHO cells and purified it to homogeneity; however, only a sparse amount of purified protein could be obtained. Here we report that the hACAT1 expression level in H293 cells is 18-fold higher than that in CHO cells. We have developed a milder purification procedure to purify the enzyme to homogeneity. The abundance of the purified protein enabled us to conduct difference intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy to study the binding between the enzyme and its substrates in CHAPS/phospholipid mixed micelles. The results show that oleoyl CoA binds to ACAT1 with Kd=1.9 μM, and elicits significant structural changes of the protein as manifested by the significantly positive changes in its fluorescence spectrum; stearoyl CoA elicits a similar spectrum change with much lower in magnitude. Previously, kinetic studies had shown that cholesterol is an efficient substrate and an allosteric activator of ACAT1, while its diastereomer epicholesterol is neither a substrate nor an activator. Here we show that both cholesterol and epicholesterol induce positive changes in the ACAT1 fluorescence spectrum; however, the magnitude of spectrum changes induced by cholesterol is much larger than epicholesterol. These results show that stereospecificity, governed by the 3beta-OH moiety in steroid ring A, plays an important role in the binding of cholesterol to ACAT1. PMID:20964445

  18. Discovery of acyl guanidine tryptophan hydroxylase-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Daniel R; De Lombaert, Stéphane; Aiello, Robert; Bourassa, Patricia; Barucci, Nicole; Zhang, Qing; Paralkar, Vishwas; Stein, Adam J; Valentine, Jim; Zavadoski, William

    2016-06-15

    An increasing number of diseases have been linked to a dysfunctional peripheral serotonin system. Given that tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1) is the rate limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis off serotonin, it represents an attractive target to regulate peripheral serotonin. Following up to our first disclosure, we report a new chemotype of TPH1 inhibitors where-by the more common central planar heterocycle has been replaced with an open-chain, acyl guanidine surrogate. Through our work, we found that compounds of this nature provide highly potent TPH1 inhibitors with favorable physicochemical properties that were effective in reducing murine intestinal 5-HT in vivo. Furthermore, we obtained a high resolution (1.90Å) X-ray structure crystal structure of one of these inhibitors (compound 51) that elucidated the active conformation along with revealing a dimeric form of TPH1 for the first time. PMID:27146606

  19. Effect of orally administered betel leaf (Piper betle Linn.) on digestive enzymes of pancreas and intestinal mucosa and on bile production in rats.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, M S; Platel, K; Saraswathi, G; Srinivasan, K

    1995-10-01

    The influence of two varieties of betel leaf (Piper betle Linn.) namely, the pungent Mysore and non-pungent Ambadi, was examined on digestive enzymes of pancreas and intestinal mucosa and on bile secretion in experimental rats. The betel leaves were administered orally at two doses which were either comparable to human consumption level or 5 times this. The results indicated that while these betel leaves do not influence bile secretion and composition, they have a significant stimulatory influence on pancreatic lipase activity. Besides, the Ambadi variety of betel leaf has a positive stimulatory influence on intestinal digestive enzymes, especially lipase, amylase and disaccharidases. A slight lowering in the activity of these intestinal enzymes was seen when Mysore variety of betel leaf was administered, and this variety also had a negative effect on pancreatic amylase. Further, both the betel leaf varieties have shown decreasing influence on pancreatic trypsin and chymotrypsin activities. PMID:8575807

  20. Gene expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine during fasting

    PubMed Central

    van den Bosch, Heleen M; Bünger, Meike; de Groot, Philip J; van der Meijde, Jolanda; Hooiveld, Guido JEJ; Müller, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Background Fasting has dramatic effects on small intestinal transport function. However, little is known on expression of intestinal transport and phase I/II metabolism genes during fasting and the role the fatty acid-activated transcription factor PPARα may play herein. We therefore investigated the effects of fasting on expression of these genes using Affymetrix GeneChip MOE430A arrays and quantitative RT-PCR. Results After 24 hours of fasting, expression levels of 33 of the 253 analyzed transporter and phase I/II metabolism genes were changed. Upregulated genes were involved in transport of energy-yielding molecules in processes such as glycogenolysis (G6pt1) and mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids (Cact, Mrs3/4, Fatp2, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1). Other induced genes were responsible for the inactivation of the neurotransmitter serotonin (Sert, Sult1d1, Dtd, Papst2), formation of eicosanoids (Cyp2j6, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1), or for secretion of cholesterol (Abca1 and Abcg8). Cyp3a11, typically known because of its drug metabolizing capacity, was also increased. Fasting had no pronounced effect on expression of phase II metabolic enzymes, except for glutathione S-transferases which were down-regulated. Time course studies revealed that some genes were acutely regulated, whereas expression of other genes was only affected after prolonged fasting. Finally, we identified 8 genes that were PPARα-dependently upregulated upon fasting. Conclusion We have characterized the response to fasting on expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine. Differentially expressed genes are involved in a variety of processes, which functionally can be summarized as a) increased oxidation of fat and xenobiotics, b) increased cholesterol secretion, c) increased susceptibility to electrophilic stressors, and d) reduced intestinal motility. This knowledge increases our understanding of gut physiology, and may be of relevance for e.g. pre

  1. Purification and characterization of fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase from Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed Central

    Fice, D; Shen, Z; Byers, D M

    1993-01-01

    A Vibrio harveyi enzyme which catalyzes the ATP-dependent ligation of fatty acids to acyl carrier protein (ACP) has been purified 6,000-fold to apparent homogeneity by anion-exchange, gel filtration, and ACP-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Purified acyl-ACP synthetase migrated as a single 62-kDa band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and as an 80-kDa protein by gel filtration under reducing conditions. Activity of the purified enzyme was lost within hours in the absence of glycerol and low concentrations of Triton X-100. Acyl-ACP synthetase exhibited Kms for myristic acid, ACP, and ATP of 7 microM, 18 microM, and 0.3 mM, respectively. The enzyme was specific for adenine-containing nucleotides, and AMP was the product of the reaction. No covalent acyl-enzyme intermediate was observed. Enzyme activity was stimulated up to 50% by iodoacetamide but inhibited > 80% by N-ethylmaleimide: inhibition by the latter was prevented by ATP and ACP but not myristic acid. Dithiothreitol and sulfhydryl-directed reagents also influenced enzyme size, activity, and elution pattern on anion-exchange resins. The function of acyl-ACP synthetase has not been established, but it may be related to the capacity of V. harveyi to elongate exogenous fatty acids by an ACP-dependent mechanism. Images PMID:8384617

  2. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  3. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ta-Yuan; Li, Bo-Liang; Chang, Catherine C. Y.; Urano, Yasuomi

    2009-01-01

    The enzymes acyl-coenzyme A (CoA):cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs) are membrane-bound proteins that utilize long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and cholesterol as substrates to form cholesteryl esters. In mammals, two isoenzymes, ACAT1 and ACAT2, encoded by two different genes, exist. ACATs play important roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis in various tissues. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge on ACAT-related research in two areas: 1) ACAT genes and proteins and 2) ACAT enzymes as drug targets for atherosclerosis and for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19141679

  4. Characterization of an Archaeal Medium-Chain Acyl Coenzyme A Synthetase from Methanosarcina acetivorans▿

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yu; Ingram-Smith, Cheryl; Cooper, Leroy L.; Smith, Kerry S.

    2010-01-01

    Short- and medium-chain acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) synthetases catalyze the formation of acyl-CoA from an acyl substrate, ATP, and CoA. These enzymes catalyze mechanistically similar two-step reactions that proceed through an enzyme-bound acyl-AMP intermediate. Here we describe the characterization of a member of this enzyme family from the methane-producing archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans. This enzyme, a medium-chain acyl-CoA synthetase designated MacsMa, utilizes 2-methylbutyrate as its preferred substrate for acyl-CoA synthesis but cannot utilize acetate and thus cannot catalyze the first step of acetoclastic methanogenesis in M. acetivorans. When propionate or other less favorable acyl substrates, such as butyrate, 2-methylpropionate, or 2-methylvalerate, were utilized, the acyl-CoA was not produced or was produced at reduced levels. Instead, acyl-AMP and PPi were released in the absence of CoA, whereas in the presence of CoA, the intermediate was broken down into AMP and the acyl substrate, which were released along with PPi. These results suggest that although acyl-CoA synthetases may have the ability to utilize a broad range of substrates for the acyl-adenylate-forming first step of the reaction, the intermediate may not be suitable for the thioester-forming second step. The MacsMa structure has revealed the putative acyl substrate- and CoA-binding pockets. Six residues proposed to form the acyl substrate-binding pocket, Lys256, Cys298, Gly351, Trp259, Trp237, and Trp254, were targeted for alteration. Characterization of the enzyme variants indicates that these six residues are critical in acyl substrate binding and catalysis, and even conservative alterations significantly reduced the catalytic ability of the enzyme. PMID:20851904

  5. LPS impairs phospholipid synthesis by triggering beta-transducin repeat-containing protein (beta-TrCP)-mediated polyubiquitination and degradation of the surfactant enzyme acyl-CoA:lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase I (LPCAT1).

    PubMed

    Zou, Chunbin; Butler, Phillip L; Coon, Tiffany A; Smith, Rebecca M; Hammen, Gary; Zhao, Yutong; Chen, Bill B; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2011-01-28

    Acyl-CoA:lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 (LPCAT1) is a relatively newly described and yet indispensable enzyme needed for generation of the bioactive surfactant phospholipid, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPtdCho). Here, we show that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) causes LPCAT1 degradation using the Skp1-Cullin-F-box ubiquitin E3 ligase component, β-transducin repeat-containing protein (β-TrCP), that polyubiquitinates LPCAT1, thereby targeting the enzyme for proteasomal degradation. LPCAT1 was identified as a phosphoenzyme as Ser(178) within a phosphodegron was identified as a putative molecular recognition site for glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) phosphorylation that recruits β-TrCP docking within the enzyme. β-TrCP ubiquitinates LPCAT1 at an acceptor site (Lys(221)), as substitution of Lys(221) with Arg abrogated LPCAT1 polyubiquitination. LPS profoundly reduced immunoreactive LPCAT1 levels and impaired lung surfactant mechanics, effects that were overcome by siRNA to β-TrCP and GSK-3β or LPCAT1 gene transfer, respectively. Thus, LPS appears to destabilize the LPCAT1 protein by GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation within a canonical phosphodegron for β-TrCP docking and site-specific ubiquitination. LPCAT1 is the first lipogenic substrate for β-TrCP, and the results suggest that modulation of the GSK-3β-SCFβ(TrCP) E3 ligase effector pathway might be a unique strategy to optimize dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine levels in sepsis. PMID:21068446

  6. Effect of enzyme supplementation of a rye-based diet on xylanase activity in the small intestine of broilers, on intestinal crypt cell proliferation and on nutrient digestibility and growth performance of the birds.

    PubMed

    Silva, S S P; Smithard, R R

    2002-05-01

    1. A study was undertaken to investigate the susceptibility to peptic digestion of exogenous xylanase (EC 3.2.1.8) from Trichoderma longibrachiatum, added to a rye-based diet for broiler chickens, in order to elucidate its possible site of action. 2. It was also designed to investigate the effects of the enzyme (plus exogenous protease EC 3.4-24.28) when added to a rye-containing diet (60% rye/kg diet) on crypt cell proliferation in the mucosa of the small intestine, on short chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations in the small intestine digesta and in portal blood and on nutrient digestibilities. 3. In Experiment 1, the enzymes were added at activities 10x and 30x those recommended in commercial practice, but in Experiment 2 the activities were the recommended levels. 4. A significant proportion (estimated to be 15 to 20%) of the xylanase added at the higher concentration (15,000 and 45,000 units/kg diet) remained active in the small intestine of the growing chicken. 5. The crypt cell proliferation rate in birds fed on the control diet (45 cells/2 h) was significantly higher than in birds fed on the diets supplemented with enzyme at the higher level (29 and 33 cells/ 2 h), but there was no significant effect on SCFA. In birds fed on the diet supplemented with enzyme at the commercial level there was no clear-cut effect on crypt cell proliferation but exogenous xylanase could be detected in the small intestine. Intestinal fluid viscosity was reduced and growth performance of the birds was improved by the supplementation with exogenous enzymes. 6. Part of the improvement in growth performance could be ascribed to a 25% increase in the digestibility of nitrogen and a doubling of the digestibility of fat. PMID:12047093

  7. The Effects of Boron Derivatives on Lipid Absorption from the Intestine and on Bile Lipids and Bile Acids of Sprague Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Iris H.; Reynolds, David J.; Wong, O. T.; Sood, A.; Spielvogel, B. F.

    1995-01-01

    N,N-dimethyl-n-octadecylamine borane 1 at 8 mg/kg/day, tetrakis-u-(trimethylamine boranecarboxylato)-bis(trimethyl-carboxyborane)-dicopper(II) 2 at 2.5 mg/kg/day and trimethylamine-carboxyborane 3 at 8 mg/kg/day were evaluated for their effects on bile lipids, bile acids, small intestinal absorption of cholesterol and cholic acid and liver and small intestinal enzyme activities involved in lipid metabolism. The agent administered orally elevated rat bile excretion of lipids, e.g. cholesterol and phospholipids, and compounds 2 and 3 increased the bile flow rate. These agents altered the composition of the bile acids, but there was no significant increase in lithocholic acid which is most lithogenic agent in rats. The three agents did decrease cholesterol absorption from isolated in situ intestinal duodenum loops in the presence of drug. Hepatic and small intestinal mucosa enzyme activities, e.g. ATP-dependent citrate lyase, acyl CoA cholesterol acyl transferase, cholsterol-7-α -hydroxylase, sn glycerol-3-phosphate acyl transferase, phosphatidylate phosphohydrolase, and lipoprotein lipase, were reduced. However, the boron derivatives 1 and 3 decreased hepatic HMG-CoA reductase activity, the regulatory enzyme for cholesterol synthesis, but the compounds had no effects on small intestinal mucosa HMG-CoA reductase activity. There was no evidence of hepatic cell damage afforded by the drugs based on clinical chemistry values which would induce alterations in bile acid concentrations after treatment of the rat. PMID:18472747

  8. Acyl-ACP Substrate Recognition in Burkholderia mallei BmaI1 Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Synthase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) autoinducer mediated quorum sensing regulates virulence in several pathogenic bacteria. The hallmark of an efficient quorum sensing system relies on the tight specificity in the signal generated by each bacterium. Since AHL signal specificity is derived from the acyl-chain of the acyl-ACP (ACP = acyl carrier protein) substrate, AHL synthase enzymes must recognize and react with the native acyl-ACP with high catalytic efficiency while keeping reaction rates with non-native acyl-ACPs low. The mechanism of acyl-ACP substrate recognition in these enzymes, however, remains elusive. In this study, we investigated differences in catalytic efficiencies for shorter and longer chain acyl-ACP substrates reacting with an octanoyl-homoserine lactone synthase Burkholderia mallei BmaI1. With the exception of two-carbon shorter hexanoyl-ACP, the catalytic efficiencies of butyryl-ACP, decanoyl-ACP, and octanoyl-CoA reacting with BmaI1 decreased by greater than 20-fold compared to the native octanoyl-ACP substrate. Furthermore, we also noticed kinetic cooperativity when BmaI1 reacted with non-native acyl-donor substrates. Our kinetic data suggest that non-native acyl-ACP substrates are unable to form a stable and productive BmaI1·acyl-ACP·SAM ternary complex and are thus effectively discriminated by the enzyme. These results offer insights into the molecular basis of substrate recognition for the BmaI1 enzyme. PMID:25215658

  9. Vertebrate Acyl CoA synthetase family member 4 (ACSF4-U26) is a β-alanine-activating enzyme homologous to bacterial non-ribosomal peptide synthetase.

    PubMed

    Drozak, Jakub; Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Kadziolka, Beata; Van Schaftingen, Emile

    2014-03-01

    Mammalian ACSF4-U26 (Acyl CoA synthetase family member 4), a protein of unknown function, comprises a putative adenylation domain (AMP-binding domain) similar to those of bacterial non-ribosomal peptide synthetases, a putative phosphopantetheine attachment site, and a C-terminal PQQDH (pyrroloquinoline quinone dehydrogenase)-related domain. Orthologues comprising these three domains are present in many eukaryotes including plants. Remarkably, the adenylation domain of plant ACSF4-U26 show greater identity with Ebony, the insect enzyme that ligates β-alanine to several amines, than with vertebrate or insect ACSF4-U26, and prediction of its specificity suggests that it activates β-alanine. In the presence of ATP, purified mouse recombinant ACSF4-U26 progressively formed a covalent bond with radiolabelled β-alanine. The bond was not formed in a point mutant lacking the phosphopantetheine attachment site. Competition experiments with various amino acids indicated that the reaction was almost specific for β-alanine, and a KM of ~ 5 μm was calculated for this reaction. The loaded enzyme was used to study the formation of a potential end product. Among the 20 standard amino acids, only cysteine stimulated unloading of the enzyme. This effect was mimicked by cysteamine and dithiothreitol, and was unaffected by absence of the PQQDH-related domain, suggesting that β-alanine transfer onto thiols is catalysed by the ACSF4-U26 adenylation domain, but is physiologically irrelevant. We conclude that ACSF4-U26 is a β-alanine-activating enzyme, and hypothesize that it is involved in a rare intracellular reaction, possibly an infrequent post-translational or post-transcriptional modification. PMID:24467666

  10. 3-Ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) is not similar to other condensing enzymes of fatty acid synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Tai, H; Jaworski, J G

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding spinach (Spinacia oleracea) 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (KAS III), which catalyzes the initial condensing reaction in fatty acid biosynthesis, was isolated. Based on the amino acid sequence of tryptic digests of purified spinach KAS III, degenerate polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers were designed and used to amplify a 612-bp fragment from first-strand cDNA of spinach leaf RNA. A root cDNA library was probed with the PCR fragment, and a 1920-bp clone was isolated. Its deduced amino acid sequence matched the sequences of the tryptic digests obtained from the purified KAS III. Northern analysis confirmed that it was expressed in both leaf and root. The clone contained a 1218-bp open reading frame coding for 405 amino acids. The identity of the clone was confirmed by expression in Escherichia coli BL 21 as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein. The deduced amino acid sequence was 48 and 45% identical with the putative KAS III of Porphyra umbilicalis and KAS III of E. coli, respectively. It also had a strong local homology to the plant chalcone synthases but had little homology with other KAS isoforms from plants, bacteria, or animals. PMID:8290632

  11. LIGNIN ACYLATION IN GRASSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acylation of lignin during growth and development is a commonly found among some plant species. Grasses form unique acylated lignins involving p-coumarate (pCA). In corn rind tissue, it is exclusively attached to the gamma-carbon of lignin monomers, with a strong preference (over 90%) for attachment...

  12. Oxidative acylation using thioacids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1997-01-01

    Several important prebiotic reactions, including the coupling of amino acids into polypeptides by the formation of amide linkages, involve acylation. Theae reactions present a challenge to the understanding of prebiotic synthesis. Condensation reactions relying on dehydrating agents are either inefficient in aqueous solution or require strongly acidic conditions and high temperatures. Activated amino acids such as thioester derivatives have therefore been suggested as likely substrates for prebiotic peptide synthesis. Here we propose a closely related route to amide bond formation involving oxidative acylation by thioacids. We find that phenylalanine, leucine and phenylphosphate are acylated efficiently in aqueous solution by thioacetic acid and an oxidizing agent. From a prebiotic point of view, oxidative acylation has the advantage of proceeding efficiently in solution and under mild conditions. We anticipate that oxidative acylation should prove to be a general method for activating carboxylic acids, including amino acids.

  13. High-Moisture Diet for Laboratory Rats: Complete Blood Counts, Serum Biochemical Values, and Intestinal Enzyme Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battles, August H.; Knapka, Joseph T.; Stevens, Bruce R.; Lewis, Laura; Lang, Marie T.; Gruendel, Douglas J.

    1991-01-01

    Rats were fed an irradiated high-moisture diet (KSC-25) with or without access to a water bottle. Physiologic values were compared between these two groups and a group of rats fed a purified diet. Hematologic and serum biochemical values, urine specific gravity, and intestinal enzyme activities were determined from samples collected from the three groups of rats. Sprague Dawley rats (n=32) fed the irradiated high-moisture diet with or without a water bottle were the test animals. Rats (n=16) fed an irradiated purified diet and water provided via a water bottle were the control group. The purified diet formulation, modified AIN-76A, is a commonly used purified diet for laboratory rodents. All rats remained alert and healthy throughout the study. A comparison of the physiologic values of rats in this study with reported normal values indicated that all of the rats in the study were in good health. Significant differences (P less than 0.05) of the physiologic values from each rat group are reported.

  14. Comparison of pH-dependent allostery and dissociation for phosphofructokinases from Artemia embryos and rabbit muscle: nature of the enzymes acylated with diethylpyrocarbonate.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, J F; Hand, S C

    1986-07-01

    Purified Artemia phosphofructokinase (PFK), unlike the rabbit skeletal muscle enzyme, displays allosteric kinetics at pH 8, a feature that is functionally significant since the intracellular pH of the developing brine shrimp embryo is greater than or equal to 7.9. Catalytic activity of the Artemia enzyme is severely suppressed by acidic pH even when assayed at the adenylate nucleotide concentrations existing in anaerobic embryos, which is consistent with the lack of a Pasteur effect in these organisms. For both PFK homologs, carbethoxylation reduces the sensitivity to ATP and citrate inhibition, the cooperativity as a function of fructose 6-phosphate concentration and the degree of activation in the presence ADP, AMP, and fructose 2,6-bisphosphate. Considering the role of histidine protonation in PFK allosteric control, the capacity for regulatory kinetics seen at pH 8 in the Artemia enzyme could be explained in part by upward shifts in pKa values of ionizable residues. pH-induced dissociation of tetrameric Artemia PFK into inactive subunits does not occur during catalytic inhibition at acidic pH (pH 6.5, 6 degrees C), as judged by 90 degree light scattering. This observation contrasts markedly with the dimerization and inactivation of rabbit PFK, but is shown not to be unique when compared to other selected PFK homologs. Neither the acute pH sensitivity of Artemia PFK nor the pH-induced hysteretic inactivation displayed by the rabbit enzyme are altered by carbethoxylation, suggesting that ionizable residues involved in these two processes are not the same ones involved in allosteric kinetics. PMID:2942107

  15. Dysregulated expression of arginine metabolic enzymes in human intestinal tissues of necrotizing enterocolitis and response of CaCO2 cells to bacterial components.

    PubMed

    Leung, Kam Tong; Chan, Kathy Yuen Yee; Ma, Terence Ping Yuen; Yu, Jasmine Wai Sum; Tong, Joanna Hung Man; Tam, Yuk Him; Cheung, Hon Ming; To, Ka Fai; Lam, Hugh Simon; Lee, Kim Hung; Li, Karen; Ng, Pak Cheung

    2016-03-01

    The small intestine is the exclusive site of arginine synthesis in neonates. Low levels of circulating arginine have been associated with the occurrence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) but the mechanism of arginine dysregulation has not been fully elucidated. We aimed to investigate (i) expressional changes of arginine synthesizing and catabolic enzymes in human intestinal tissues of NEC, spontaneous intestinal perforation (SIP) and noninflammatory surgical conditions (Surg-CTL) and to investigate the (ii) mechanisms of arginine dysregulation and enterocyte proliferation upon stimulation by bacterial components, arginine depletion, ARG1 overexpression and nitric oxide (NO) supplementation. Our results showed that expressions of arginine synthesizing enzymes ALDH18A1, ASL, ASS1, CPS1, GLS, OAT and PRODH were significantly decreased in NEC compared with Surg-CTL or SIP tissues. Catabolic enzyme ARG1 was increased (>100-fold) in NEC tissues and histologically demonstrated to be expressed by infiltrating neutrophils. No change in arginine metabolic enzymes was observed between SIP and Surg-CTL tissues. In CaCO2 cells, arginine metabolic enzymes were differentially dysregulated by lipopolysaccharide or lipoteichoic acid. Depletion of arginine reduced cell proliferation and this phenomenon could be partially rescued by NO. Overexpression of ARG1 also reduced enterocyte proliferation. We provided the first expressional profile of arginine metabolic enzymes at the tissue level of NEC. Our findings suggested that arginine homeostasis was severely disturbed and could be triggered by inflammatory responses of enterocytes and infiltrating neutrophils as well as bacterial components. Such reactions could reduce arginine and NO, resulting in mucosal damage. The benefit of arginine supplementation for NEC prophylaxis merits further clinical evaluation. PMID:26895666

  16. Precocious alteration of digestive enzyme activities in small intestine and pancreas by chronic oral administration of protease inhibitor in suckling rats.

    PubMed

    Harada, E; Syuto, B

    1991-01-01

    1. The role of endogenous CCK in the development of digestive enzyme activities in small intestine and pancreas was investigated in suckling rats. Synthetic protease inhibitor (camostat 100 micrograms/g bwt) was orally administered twice daily for 5 days from 11 days of age. 2. Pancreatic hypertrophy and hyperplasia, and alteration of pancreatic enzyme composition, especially decreases in amylase activity and increases in trypsin and chymotrypsin activities were produced by camostat treatment. These changes were completely suppressed by simultaneous administration of the potent CCK receptor antagonist L-364,718 (1 microgram/g bwt). 3. With camostat treatment, intestinal lactase activity decreased to 41%, while maltase and sucrase activities increased 3 and 2.5 times respectively. These changes in enzyme activities were not affected by the application of L-364,718. 4. The mucosal disaccharidase and pancreatic enzyme activities could not be modified by chronic subcutaneous injection of camostat. The precocious induction of maltase and sucrase activities by camostat treatment was also observed in the adrenalectomized pups. 5. These results indicate that pancreatic growth accompanied by alteration of digestive enzyme composition in the suckling rats is regulated by endogenous CCK, but the precocious induction of disaccharidase activities is not mediated by endogenous CCK released by camostat treatment. PMID:1685962

  17. Short-term effect of dietary yeast nucleotide supplementation on total and diurnal variation of small intestinal enzyme activities in piglets.

    PubMed

    Sauer, N; Eklund, M; Hoerner, S; Bauer, E; Jezierny, D; Mosenthin, R

    2012-12-01

    A study was carried out to investigate, whether short-term supplementation of dietary yeast nucleotides affects total and diurnal variation of enzyme activities in the small intestine of weaned piglets. Twelve barrows, weaned at 18 d of age (5 kg initial BW), were fitted with a simple T-cannula at the distal ileum. Twice daily (0730 and 1930 h), 6 piglets each received a cereal-soybean (Glycine max) meal-based diet with or without supplementation of 1 g/kg of a yeast nucleotide product in 2 consecutive periods. In each period, digesta samples were collected 6 times at given intervals during 24 h digesta collection. Dietary supplementation with yeast nucleotides did not affect (P > 0.05) total enzyme activities for α-amylase, leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), maltase, and lactase in ileal digesta. Therefore, data of both treatments were pooled to determine diurnal variations in enzyme activities. For α-amylase, a diurnal variation in enzyme activity could be observed (P < 0.05). Variations in diurnal activities of LAP, maltase, and lactase were not observed (P > 0.05). In conclusion, yeast nucleotides do not affect total small intestinal enzyme activities. Independent of diet composition, α-amylase activities may vary over time, with peak flow at 6 h postprandially. PMID:23365322

  18. Lysine fatty acylation promotes lysosomal targeting of TNF-α

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Lin, Hening

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a proinflammation cytokine secreted by various cells. Understanding its secretive pathway is important to understand the biological functions of TNF-α and diseases associated with TNF-α. TNF-α is one of the first proteins known be modified by lysine fatty acylation (e.g. myristoylation). We previously demonstrated that SIRT6, a member of the mammalian sirtuin family of enzymes, can remove the fatty acyl modification on TNF-α and promote its secretion. However, the mechanistic details about how lysine fatty acylation regulates TNF-α secretion have been unknown. Here we present experimental data supporting that lysine fatty acylation promotes lysosomal targeting of TNF-α. The result is an important first step toward understanding the biological functions of lysine fatty acylation. PMID:27079798

  19. Extrusion decreases the negative effects of kidney bean on enzyme and transport activities of the rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Marzo, F; Milagro, F I; Urdaneta, E; Barrenetxe, J; Ibañez, F C

    2011-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of raw and extruded kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Pinto) consumption on the gut physiology of young growing rats. The intestinal enzyme activity (sucrase, maltase, Na(+) /K(+) ATPase, aminopeptidase N, dipeptidylpeptidase IV, alkaline phosphatase) and the uptake of sugar (d-galactose) and amino acids (l-leucine) were measured in brush border membrane vesicles. Five groups of growing male Wistar rats were fed ad libitum for 15 days on five different 10% protein diets: one containing casein as the main source of protein (Control, C), and four containing raw (RKB1, RKB6) or extruded kidney bean (EKB1, EKB6) at 1% and 6% of total protein content respectively. Extrusion treatment significantly reduced the content of bioactive factors (phytates, tannins) and abolished lectins, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and α-amylase inhibitory activities. Rats fed raw beans (especially RKB6) showed lower growth rate and food intake as compared to those fed extruded legumes, probably due to the high levels of lectins and other anti-nutritive factors in the raw beans. Gut enzymatic activities and uptake of d-galactose and l-leucine were lower in RKB6 and RKB1-fed animals, although they significantly improved in the groups fed extruded beans. Enzymatic activity and uptake in EKB1 were similar to those of casein-fed rats, whereas the uptake and growth rate of EKB6 were different to the control. This is attributable to the higher non-thermolabile biofactor content in the EKB6 diet, especially phytates and tannins, than in EKB1. This article shows the dose-dependent toxicological effects of bioactive factors contained in kidney beans on gut function. The extrusion process reduced their adverse impact on gut physiology and growth rate. PMID:21114542

  20. Phylogenetic and experimental characterization of an acyl-ACP thioesterase family reveals significant diversity in enzymatic specificity and activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (acyl-ACP TEs) catalyze the hydrolysis of the thioester bond that links the acyl chain to the sulfhydryl group of the phosphopantetheine prosthetic group of ACP. This reaction terminates acyl chain elongation of fatty acid biosynthesis, and in plant seeds it is the biochemical determinant of the fatty acid compositions of storage lipids. Results To explore acyl-ACP TE diversity and to identify novel acyl ACP-TEs, 31 acyl-ACP TEs from wide-ranging phylogenetic sources were characterized to ascertain their in vivo activities and substrate specificities. These acyl-ACP TEs were chosen by two different approaches: 1) 24 TEs were selected from public databases on the basis of phylogenetic analysis and fatty acid profile knowledge of their source organisms; and 2) seven TEs were molecularly cloned from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis), coconut (Cocos nucifera) and Cuphea viscosissima, organisms that produce medium-chain and short-chain fatty acids in their seeds. The in vivo substrate specificities of the acyl-ACP TEs were determined in E. coli. Based on their specificities, these enzymes were clustered into three classes: 1) Class I acyl-ACP TEs act primarily on 14- and 16-carbon acyl-ACP substrates; 2) Class II acyl-ACP TEs have broad substrate specificities, with major activities toward 8- and 14-carbon acyl-ACP substrates; and 3) Class III acyl-ACP TEs act predominantly on 8-carbon acyl-ACPs. Several novel acyl-ACP TEs act on short-chain and unsaturated acyl-ACP or 3-ketoacyl-ACP substrates, indicating the diversity of enzymatic specificity in this enzyme family. Conclusion These acyl-ACP TEs can potentially be used to diversify the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway to produce novel fatty acids. PMID:21831316

  1. Mapping the intestinal alpha-glucogenic enzyme specificities of starch digesting maltase-glucoamylase and sucrase-isomaltase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of intestinal alpha-glucosidases and pancreatic alpha-amylases is an approach to controlling blood glucose and serum insulin levels in individuals with Type II diabetes. The two human intestinal glucosidases are maltase-glucoamylase and sucrase-isomaltase. Each incorporates two family 31 ...

  2. A method for the determination of the hepatic enzyme activity catalyzing bile acid acyl glucuronide formation by high-performance liquid chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Ikegawa, S; Oohashi, J; Murao, N; Goto, J

    2000-05-01

    A method for the determination of the activity of hepatic glucuronyltransferase catalyzing formation of bile acid 24-glucuronides using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) has been developed. Bile acid 24-glucuronides were simultaneously separated on a semimicrobore column, Capcell Pak C18UG120, using 20 mM ammonium phosphate (pH 6.0)-acetonitrile (27:10 and 16:10) as the mobile phase in the stepwise gradient elution mode. A 1 M potassium hydroxide solution for the hydrolysis of the 24-glucuronides, which liberates the corresponding bile acids and glucuronic acid, was mixed with the mobile phase in a post-column mode, and the resulting eluant was heated at 90 degrees C, the 24-glucuronides being monitored using a pulsed amperometric detector; the limit of detection was 10 ng. The proposed method was applied to the determination of the hepatic enzyme activity catalyzing bile acid 24-glucuronide formation and the result exhibited the efficient 24-glucuronide formation of the monohydroxylated bile acid, lithocholic acid. PMID:10850616

  3. Short-term oral exposure to aluminium decreases glutathione intestinal levels and changes enzyme activities involved in its metabolism.

    PubMed

    Orihuela, Daniel; Meichtry, Verónica; Pregi, Nicolás; Pizarro, Manuel

    2005-09-01

    To study the effects of aluminium (Al) on glutathione (GSH) metabolism in the small intestine, adult male Wistar rats were orally treated with AlCl3.6H2O at doses of 30, 60, 120 and 200 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day, during seven days. Controls received deionized water. At doses above 120 mg/kg b.w., Al produced both a significant reduction of GSH content and an increase of oxidized/reduced glutathione ratio (P < 0.05). The index of oxidative stress of the intestine mucosa in terms of lipid peroxidation evaluated by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances was significantly increased (52%) at higher Al dose used. The duodenal expression of the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 in brush border membranes, determined by Western blot technique, was increased 2.7-fold in rats treated with 200mg AlCl3/kg b.w (P < 0.01). Intestine activities of both GSH-synthase (from 60 mg/kg b.w.) and GSSG-reductase (from 120 mg/kg b.w.) were significantly reduced (26% and 31%, respectively) while glutathione-S-transferase showed to be slightly modified in the Al-treated groups. Conversely, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity was significantly increased (P < 0.05) due to the Al treatment. Al reduced in vitro mucosa-to-lumen GSH efflux (P < 0.05). A positive linear correlation between the intestine GSH depletion and reduction of in situ 45Ca intestinal absorption, both produced by Al, was found (r = 0.923, P = 0.038). Taking as a whole, these results show that Al would alter GSH metabolism in small intestine by decreasing its turnover, leading to an unbalance of redox state in the epithelial cells, thus contributing to deteriorate GSH-dependent absorptive functions. PMID:16084594

  4. Effect of Intestinal Flora on Protein Expression of Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters in the Liver and Kidney of Germ-Free and Antibiotics-Treated Mice.

    PubMed

    Kuno, Takuya; Hirayama-Kurogi, Mio; Ito, Shingo; Ohtsuki, Sumio

    2016-08-01

    Dysbiosis (alteration of intestinal flora) is associated with various host physiologies, including diseases. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of dysbiosis on protein expression levels in mouse liver and kidney by quantitative proteomic analysis, focusing in particular on drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in order to investigate the potential impact of dysbiosis on drug pharmacokinetics. Germ-free (GF) mice and antibiotics-treated mice were used as dysbiosis models. Expression levels of 825 and 357 proteins were significantly changed in the liver and kidney, respectively, of GF mice (vs specific-pathogen-free mice), while 306 and 178 proteins, respectively, were changed in antibiotics-treated mice (vs vehicle controls). Among them, 52 and 16 drug-metabolizing enzyme and transporter proteins were significantly changed in the liver and kidney, respectively, of GF mice, while 25 and 8, respectively were changed in antibiotics-treated mice. Expression of mitochondrial proteins was also changed in the liver and kidney of both model mice. In GF mice, Oatp1a1 was decreased in both the liver and kidney, while Sult1a1 and two Cyp enzymes were increased and Gstp1, four Cyp enzymes, three Ces enzymes, Bcrp1, and Oct1 were decreased in the liver. In antibiotics-treated mice, Cyp51a1 was increased and three Cyp enzymes, Bcrp1, and Bsep were decreased in the liver. Notably, the expression of Cyp2b10 and Cyp3a11 was greatly decreased in the liver of both models. Cyp2b activity in the liver microsomal fraction was also decreased. Our results indicate that dysbiosis changes the protein expression of multiple drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in the liver and kidney and may alter pharmacokinetics in the host. PMID:27376980

  5. Acetate kinase Activity and Kinetic Properties of the Enzyme in Desulfovibrio piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9 Intestinal Bacterial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kushkevych, Ivan V

    2014-01-01

    Activity of acetate kinase in cell-free extracts and individual fractions and the kinetic properties of the enzyme obtained from the Desulfovibrio piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9 intestinal bacterial strains were presented at the first time. The highest activity of the enzyme was measured in the cell-free extracts (1.52 ± 0.163 and 0.46 ± 0.044 U × mg-1 protein for D. piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9, respectively) compared to other fractions. The specific activity of acetate kinase in the extracts of both bacterial strains was determined at different temperature and pH. Analysis of the kinetic properties of the purified acetate kinase was carried out. The acetate kinase activity, initial (instantaneous) reaction rate (V0) and maximum rate of the acetate kinase reaction (Vmax) in D. piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9 intestinal bacterial strains were defined. Michaelis constants (KmAcetyl phosphate and KmADP) of the enzyme reaction (2.54 ± 0.26 and 2.39 ± 0.24 mM for D. piger Vib-7 as well as 2.68 ± 0.25 and 2.47 ± 0.27 mM for Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9, respectively) were calculated. The described results of acetate kinase, an important enzyme in the process of organic compounds oxidation and dissimilatory sulfate reduction would be perspective and useful for clarification of the etiological role of these bacteria in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases in humans and animals. PMID:25598851

  6. The effect of continued feeding of physiological amounts of lactose on the level of intestinal lactase and other disaccharidase enzyme activities in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tadesse, K

    1990-03-01

    Intestinal lactase activity in mammals is high at birth but begins to decline around weaning and reaches very low levels in adult life. The triggering mechanism for this decline is not clear. Because of the association of the decline with weaning, lack of lactose in the diet has been implicated. In 110 growing rats, the effect of continued supplementation of the diet after weaning with physiological amounts of either cows' milk or a 5% lactose solution on intestinal lactase and other disaccharidase enzyme activities was investigated. In both control and test animals, the specific lactase activity decreased from a peak value of 115 +/- 4 mumol min-1 g-1 protein before weaning to about 10% at maturity. There was no significant difference in the level or the pattern of decline between the groups. Sucrase, maltase and trehalase showed the normal maturational changes without being affected by the test diets. The finding suggests that diet, particularly the presence or absence of physiological amounts of lactose, has no appreciable effect on the age related spontaneous decline of intestinal lactase activity or on the pattern of development of the other disaccharidases. PMID:2111152

  7. Acyl-acyl carrier protein as a source of fatty acids for bacterial bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, D.M.; Meighen, E.A.

    1985-09-01

    Pulse-chase experiments with (/sup 3/H)tetradecanoic acid and ATP showed that the bioluminescence-related 32-kDa acyltransferase from Vibrio harveyi can specifically catalyze the deacylation of a /sup 3/H-labeled 18-kDa protein observed in extracts of this bacterium. The 18-kDa protein has been partially purified and its physical and chemical properties strongly indicate that it is fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP). Both this V. harveyi (/sup 3/H)acylprotein and (/sup 3/H)palmitoyl-ACP from Escherichia coli were substrates in vitro for either the V. harveyi 32-kDa acyltransferase or the analogous enzyme (34K) from Photobacterium phosphoreum. TLC analysis indicated that the hexane-soluble product of the reaction is fatty acid. No significant cleavage of either E. coli or V. harveyi tetradecanoyl-ACP was observed in extracts of these bacteria unless the 32-kDa or 34K acyltransferase was present. Since these enzymes are believed to be responsible for the supply of fatty acids for reduction to form the aldehyde substrate of luciferase, the above results suggest that long-chain acyl-ACP is the source of fatty acids for bioluminescence.

  8. Intestinal steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bouguen, Guillaume; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Desreumaux, Pierre; Brunner, Thomas; Bertin, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    Steroids are fundamental hormones that control a wide variety of physiological processes such as metabolism, immune functions, and sexual characteristics. Historically, steroid synthesis was considered a function restricted to the adrenals and the gonads. In the past 20 years, a significant number of studies have demonstrated that steroids could also be synthesized or metabolized by other organs. According to these studies, the intestine appears to be a major source of de novo produced glucocorticoids as well as a tissue capable of producing and metabolizing sex steroids. This finding is based on the detection of steroidogenic enzyme expression as well as the presence of bioactive steroids in both the rodent and human gut. Within the intestinal mucosa, the intestinal epithelial cell layer is one of the main cellular sources of steroids. Glucocorticoid synthesis regulation in the intestinal epithelial cells is unique in that it does not involve the classical positive regulator steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) but a closely related homolog, namely the liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1). This local production of immunoregulatory glucocorticoids contributes to intestinal homeostasis and has been linked to pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel diseases. Intestinal epithelial cells also possess the ability to metabolize sex steroids, notably estrogen; this mechanism may impact colorectal cancer development. In this review, we contextualize and discuss what is known about intestinal steroidogenesis and regulation as well as the key role these functions play both in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25560486

  9. Butylated hydroxyanisole induces distinct expression patterns of Nrf2 and detoxification enzymes in the liver and small intestine of C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lin; Chen, Yeru; Wu, Deqi; Shou, Jiafeng; Wang, Shengcun; Ye, Jie; Tang, Xiuwen; Wang, Xiu Jun

    2015-11-01

    Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) is widely used as an antioxidant and preservative in food, food packaging and medicines. Its chemopreventive properties are attributing to its ability to activate the transcription factor NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which directs central genetic programs of detoxification and protection against oxidative stress. This study was to investigate the histological changes of Nrf2 and its regulated phase II enzymes Nqo1, AKR1B8, and Ho-1 in wild-type (WT) and Nrf2(-/-) mice induced by BHA. The mice were given a 200mg/kg oral dose of BHA daily for three days. Immunohistochemistry revealed that, in the liver from WT mice, BHA increased Nqo1 staining in hepatocytes, predominately in the pericentral region. In contrast, the induction of AKR1B8 appeared mostly in hepatocytes in the periportal region. The basal and inducible Ho-1 was located almost exclusively in Kupffer cells. In the small intestine from WT mice, the inducible expression patterns of Nqo1 and AKR1B8 were nearly identical to that of Nrf2, with more intense staining in the villus than that the crypt. Conversely, Keap1 was more highly expressed in the crypt, where the proliferative cells reside. Our study demonstrates that BHA elicited differential expression patterns of phase II-detoxifying enzymes in the liver and small intestine from WT but not Nrf2(-/-) mice, demonstrating a cell type specific response to BHA in vivo. PMID:26291391

  10. Expression of digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters in the small intestine of Eimeria acervulina-infected chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coccidiosis is a major disease of poultry caused by the intestinal protozoa Eimeria. Eimeria acervulina mainly infects the duodenum, causing lesions in epithelial tissue. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of E. acervulina infection on the expression of 18 nutrient transport...

  11. Effects of Dietary Supplementation with the Combination of Zeolite and Attapulgite on Growth Performance, Nutrient Digestibility, Secretion of Digestive Enzymes and Intestinal Health in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, P.; Tan, Y. Q.; Zhang, L.; Zhou, Y. M.; Gao, F.; Zhou, G. H.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of basal diets supplemented with a clay product consisting of zeolite and attapulgite (ZA) at 1:1 ratio on growth performance, digestibility of feed nutrients, activities of digestive enzymes in small intestine and intestinal health in broiler chickens. In experiment 1, 112 one-day-old male chickens were randomly divided into 2 groups with 8 replicates of 7 chickens each. In experiment 2, 84 one-day-old male chickens were randomly allocated into 2 groups consisting 6 replicates of 7 chickens each. The experimental diets both consisted of a maize-soybean basal control diet supplemented with 0% or 2% ZA. The diets were fed from 1 to 42 days of age. The results showed that ZA supplementation could increase body weight gain (BWG) and feed intake (FI), but had no significant effect on feed conversion ratio. The apparent digestibility values of crude protein and gross energy were significantly increased (p<0.05) by ZA from 14 to 16 d and 35 to 37 d. Dietary ZA treatment significantly increased (p<0.05) the activities of amylase, lipase and trypsin in jejunal digesta and the activities of maltase and sucrase in jejunal mucosa on days 21 and 42. The ZA supplementation also significantly increased (p<0.05) the catalase activity, reduced (p<0.05) the malondialdehyde concentration in the jejunal mucosa. In addition, a decrease of serum diamine oxidase activity and an increase (p<0.05) in concentration of secretory immunoglobulin A in jejunal mucosa were observed in birds treated with ZA on 21 and 42 days. It is concluded that ZA supplementation (2%) could partially improve the growth performance by increasing BWG and FI. This improvement was achieved through increasing the secretion of digestive enzymes, enhancing the digestibilites of nutrients, promoting intestinal health of broiler chickens. PMID:25178375

  12. Effect of zinc-bearing zeolite clinoptilolite on growth performance, nutrient retention, digestive enzyme activities, and intestinal function of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhigang; Wen, Chao; Li, Ping; Wang, Tian; Zhou, Yanmin

    2014-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of zinc-bearing zeolite clinoptilolite (Zn-ZCP) on performance, growth performance, nutrient retention, digestive enzyme activities, and intestinal function in broiler chickens. A total of 180 1-day-old Arbor Acres chickens were randomly divided into three groups with six replicates of ten birds for a 21-day feeding period. Birds were fed a basal corn-soybean meal diet (29.1 mg of Zn per kilogram of diet) without supplemental zinc (control) or the same diet supplemented with 80 mg/kg zinc from ZnSO4 or Zn-ZCP. Zn-ZCP and ZnSO4 treatments had lower feed: gain ratio than that of control group (P < 0.05). Addition of Zn-ZCP increased (P < 0.05) the apparent retention of organic matter and ether extract during 14-17 days, and increased (P < 0.05) pancreatic lipase activity at 14 and 21 days as well as amylase activity at 21 days. Addition of Zn-ZCP increased the villus heights and villus height to crypt depth ratio at the duodenal (P < 0.05) and jejunal (P < 0.05) of broilers at 14 days. Broilers fed the diet supplemented with 80 mg/kg Zn from Zn-ZCP had higher villus heights and villus height to crypt depth ratio of duodenum (P < 0.05) and jejunum (P < 0.05) than those fed with control diet on day 21. Zn-ZCP treatment increased (P < 0.05) IgG and sIgA concentrations in jejunum at 21 days. The results indicated that Zn-ZCP supplementation which might have modified the release of Zn further down in the intestinal tract with the controlled-release characteristic, modulated digestive enzyme activities and intestinal structure and function, increased nutrient retention, and improved feed efficiency. PMID:24515449

  13. Plant Acyl-CoA:Lysophosphatidylcholine Acyltransferases (LPCATs) Have Different Specificities in Their Forward and Reverse Reactions*

    PubMed Central

    Lager, Ida; Yilmaz, Jenny Lindberg; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Jasieniecka, Katarzyna; Kazachkov, Michael; Wang, Peng; Zou, Jitao; Weselake, Randall; Smith, Mark A.; Bayon, Shen; Dyer, John M.; Shockey, Jay M.; Heinz, Ernst; Green, Allan; Banas, Antoni; Stymne, Sten

    2013-01-01

    Acyl-CoA:lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT) enzymes have central roles in acyl editing of phosphatidylcholine (PC). Plant LPCAT genes were expressed in yeast and characterized biochemically in microsomal preparations of the cells. Specificities for different acyl-CoAs were similar for seven LPCATs from five different species, including species accumulating hydroxylated acyl groups in their seed oil, with a preference for C18-unsaturated acyl-CoA and low activity with palmitoyl-CoA and ricinoleoyl (12-hydroxyoctadec-9-enoyl)-CoA. We showed that Arabidopsis LPCAT1 and LPCAT2 enzymes catalyzed the acylation and de-acylation of both sn positions of PC, with a preference for the sn-2 position. When acyl specificities of the Arabidopsis LPCATs were measured in the reverse reaction, sn-2-bound oleoyl, linoleoyl, and linolenoyl groups from PC were transferred to acyl-CoA to a similar extent. However, a ricinoleoyl group at the sn-2-position of PC was removed 4–6-fold faster than an oleoyl group in the reverse reaction, despite poor utilization in the forward reaction. The data presented, taken together with earlier published reports on in vivo lipid metabolism, support the hypothesis that plant LPCAT enzymes play an important role in regulating the acyl-CoA composition in plant cells by transferring polyunsaturated and hydroxy fatty acids produced on PC directly to the acyl-CoA pool for further metabolism or catabolism. PMID:24189065

  14. Applying Data Mining to Classify Age by Intestinal Microbiota in 92 Healthy Men Using a Combination of Several Restriction Enzymes for T-RFLP Experiments

    PubMed Central

    KOBAYASHI, Toshio; OSAKI, Takako; OIKAWA, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the intestinal microbiota was measured following consumption of identical meals for 3 days in 92 Japanese men, and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) was used to analyze their feces. The obtained operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and the subjects’ ages were classified by using Data mining (DM) software that compared these data with continuous data and for 5 partitions for age divided at 5 years intervals between the ages of 30 and 50. The DM provided Decision trees in which the selected OTUs were closely related to the ages of the subjects. DM was also used to compare the OTUs from the T-RFLP data with seven restriction enzymes (two enzymes of 516f-BslI and 516f-HaeIII, two enzymes of 27f-MspI and 27f-AluI, three enzymes of 35f-HhaI, 35f-MspI and 35f-AluI) and their various combinations. The OTUs delivered from the five enzyme-digested partitions were analyzed to classify their age clusters. For use in future DM processing, we discussed the enzymes that were effective for accurate classification. We selected two OTUs (HA624 and HA995) that were useful for classifying the subject’s ages. Depending on the 16S rRNA sequences of the OTUs, Ruminicoccus obeum clones 1-4 were present in 18 of 36 bacterial candidates in the older age group-related OTU (HA624). On the other hand, Ruminicoccus obeum clones 1-33 were present in 65 of 269 candidates in the younger age group-related OUT (HA995). PMID:25003020

  15. Possible Role of Different Yeast and Plant Lysophospholipid:Acyl-CoA Acyltransferases (LPLATs) in Acyl Remodelling of Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Jasieniecka-Gazarkiewicz, Katarzyna; Demski, Kamil; Lager, Ida; Stymne, Sten; Banaś, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Recent results have suggested that plant lysophosphatidylcholine:acyl-coenzyme A acyltransferases (LPCATs) can operate in reverse in vivo and thereby catalyse an acyl exchange between the acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) pool and the phosphatidylcholine. We have investigated the abilities of Arabidopsis AtLPCAT2, Arabidopsis lysophosphatidylethanolamine acyltransferase (LPEAT2), S. cerevisiae lysophospholipid acyltransferase (Ale1) and S. cerevisiae lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (SLC1) to acylate lysoPtdCho, lysoPtdEtn and lysoPtdOH and act reversibly on the products of the acylation; the PtdCho, PtdEtn and PtdOH. The tested LPLATs were expressed in an S. cervisiae ale1 strain and enzyme activities were assessed in assays using microsomal preparations of the different transformants. The results show that, despite high activity towards lysoPtdCho, lysoPtdEtn and lysoPtdOH by the ALE1, its capacities to operate reversibly on the products of the acylation were very low. Slc1 readily acylated lysoPtdOH, lysoPtdCho and lysoPtdEtn but showed no reversibility towards PtdCho, very little reversibility towards PtdEtn and very high reversibility towards PtdOH. LPEAT2 showed the highest levels of reversibility towards PtdCho and PtdEtn of all LPLATs tested but low ability to operate reversibly on PtdOH. AtLPCAT2 showed good reversible activity towards PtdCho and PtdEtn and very low reversibility towards PtdOH. Thus, it appears that some of the LPLATs have developed properties that, to a much higher degree than other LPLATs, promote the reverse reaction during the same assay conditions and with the same phospholipid. The results also show that the capacity of reversibility can be specific for a particular phospholipid, albeit the lysophospholipid derivatives of other phospholipids serve as good acyl acceptors for the forward reaction of the enzyme. PMID:26643989

  16. Effect of dietary lysine on growth, intestinal enzymes activities and antioxidant status of sub-adult grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Yin; Tang, Ling; Hu, Kai; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Chen, Gang-Fu; Li, Shu-Hong; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Feng, Lin; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-06-01

    The dietary lysine requirement of sub-adult grass carp (460 ± 1.5 g) was assessed by feeding diets supplemented with grade levels of lysine (6.6, 8.5, 10.8, 12.9, 15.0 and 16.7 g kg(-1) diet) for 56 days. The test diets (28% CP) contained fish meal, casein and gelatin as sources of intact protein, supplemented with crystalline amino acids. Weight gain (WG), feed intake and feed efficiency were significantly improved with increasing levels of lysine up to 12.9 g kg(-1) diet and thereafter declined (P < 0.05). Quadratic regression analysis of WG at 95% maximum response indicated lysine requirement was 10.9 g kg(-1) diet. Activities of trypsin, chymotrypsin, lipase, Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and alkaline phosphatase in intestine, creatine kinase activity in proximal and mid-intestine responded similar to WG (P < 0.05). In addition, lipid and protein oxidation decreased with increasing levels of lysine up to certain values and increased thereafter (P < 0.05); the anti-hydroxyl radical capacity, dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities and glutathione content were increased with increasing dietary lysine levels up to certain values in the detected tissues, except for hepatopancreatic GST. Requirement estimated on the basis of malondialdehyde content in intestine and hepatopancreas was 10.6 and 9.53 g lysine kg(-1) diet, respectively. PMID:24174167

  17. Interplay between the chalcone cardamonin and selenium in the biosynthesis of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzymes in intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    De Spirt, Silke; Eckers, Anna; Wehrend, Carina; Micoogullari, Mustafa; Sies, Helmut; Stahl, Wilhelm; Steinbrenner, Holger

    2016-02-01

    Selenoenzymes and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated phase II enzymes comprise key components of the cellular redox and antioxidant systems, which show multiple interrelations. Deficiency of the micronutrient selenium (Se) and impaired biosynthesis of selenoproteins have been reported to result in induction of Nrf2 target genes. Conversely, transcription of the selenoenzymes glutathione peroxidase 2 (GPx2) and thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) is up-regulated upon Nrf2 activation. Here, we have studied the interplay between Se and the secondary plant metabolite cardamonin, an Nrf2-activating chalcone, in the regulation of Nrf2-controlled antioxidant enzymes. Se-deficient and Se-repleted (sodium selenite-supplemented) human intestinal Caco-2 cells were exposed to cardamonin. Uptake of cardamonin by the Caco-2 cells was independent of their Se status. Cardamonin strongly induced gene expression of GPx2 and TrxR1. However, cardamonin treatment did not result in elevated GPx or TrxR activity and protein levels, possibly relating to a concomitant down-regulation of O-phosphoseryl-tRNA(Sec) kinase (PSTK), an enzyme involved in translation of selenoprotein mRNAs. On the other hand, induction of the Nrf2-regulated enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) by cardamonin was diminished in Se-replete compared to Se-deficient cells. Our findings suggest that cardamonin interferes with the biosynthesis of Nrf2-regulated selenoenzymes, in contrast to the Nrf2-activating isothiocyanate compound sulforaphane, which has been shown earlier to synergize with Se-mediated cytoprotection. Conversely, the cellular Se status apparently affects the cardamonin-mediated induction of non-selenoprotein antioxidant enzymes such as HO-1. PMID:26698667

  18. The 2.1Å Crystal Structure of an Acyl-CoA Synthetase from Methanosarcina acetivorans reveals an alternate acyl binding pocket for small branched acyl substrates†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Manish B.; Ingram-Smith, Cheryl; Cooper, Leroy L.; Qu, Jun; Meng, Yu; Smith, Kerry S.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    The acyl-AMP forming family of adenylating enzymes catalyze two-step reactions to activate a carboxylate with the chemical energy derived from ATP hydrolysis. X-ray crystal structures have been determined for multiple members of this family and, together with biochemical studies, provide insights into the active site and catalytic mechanisms used by these enzymes. These studies have shown that the enzymes use a domain rotation of 140° to reconfigure a single active site to catalyze the two partial reactions. We present here the crystal structure of a new medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase from Methanosarcina acetivorans. The binding pocket for the three substrates is analyzed, with many conserved residues present in the AMP binding pocket. The CoA binding pocket is compared to the pockets of both acetyl-CoA synthetase and 4-chlorobenzoate:CoA ligase. Most interestingly, the acyl binding pocket of the new structure is compared with other acyl- and aryl-CoA synthetases. A comparison of the acyl-binding pocket of the acyl-CoA synthetase from M. acetivorans with other structures identifies a shallow pocket that is used to bind the medium chain carboxylates. These insights emphasize the high sequence and structural diversity among this family in the area of the acyl binding pocket. PMID:19544569

  19. Influence of dietary inclusion of Bacillus licheniformis on laying performance, egg quality, antioxidant enzyme activities, and intestinal barrier function of laying hens.

    PubMed

    Lei, K; Li, Y L; Yu, D Y; Rajput, I R; Li, W F

    2013-09-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary inclusion of Bacillus licheniformis on laying performance, egg quality, antioxidant enzyme activities, and intestinal barrier function of laying hens. Hy-Line Variety W-36 hens (n = 540; 28 wk of age) were randomized into 6 groups, each group with 6 replications (n = 15). The control group received the basal diet formulated with maize and soybean meal. The treatment groups received the same basal diets supplemented with 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.06, and 0.09% Bacillus licheniformis powder (2 × 10(10) cfu/g) for an 8-wk trial. The results showed that dietary supplementation with 0.01 and 0.03% B. licheniformis significantly increased egg production and egg mass. However, no significant differences were observed in egg weight, feed consumption, and feed conversion efficiency among the 6 groups. Supplementation with different levels of B. licheniformis was found to be effective in improvement of egg quality by increasing egg shell thickness and strength. Compared with control, d-lactate content, diamine oxidase activity, and adrenocorticotropic hormone level in serum decreased significantly, and the level of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone increased significantly in plasma of all the experimental groups. Dietary supplementation with B. licheniformis increased the intestinal villus height and reduced the crypt depth. In conclusion, dietary inclusion of B. licheniformis could improve laying performance and egg quality significantly in a dose-dependent manner by decreasing the stress response, upregulating the growth hormone, and improving intestinal health. PMID:23960122

  20. Intestinal α-glucosidase and some pancreatic enzymes inhibitory effect of hydroalcholic extract of Moringa stenopetala leaves

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Moringa stenopetala has been used in traditional health systems to treat diabetes mellitus. One of the successful methods to prevent of the onset of diabetes is to control postprandial hyperglycemia by the inhibition of α-glucosidase and pancreatic α-amylase activities, resulting in the aggressive delay of the carbohydrate digestion of absorbable monosaccharides. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of the extract of the leaves of Moringa stenopetala on α-glucosidase, pancreatic α-amylase, pancreatic lipase, and pancreatic cholesterol esterase activities, and, therefore find out the relevance of the plant in controlling blood sugar and lipid levels. Methods The dried leaves of Moringa stenopetala were extracted with hydroalcoholic solvent and dried using rotary vapor under reduced pressure. The dried extracts were determined for the total phenolic compounds, flavonoid content and condensed tannins content by using Folin-Ciocateu’s reagent, AlCl3 and vanillin assay, respectively. The dried extract of plant-based food was further quantified with respect to intestinal α-glucosidase (maltase and sucrase) inhibition and pancreatic α-amylase inhibition by glucose oxidase method and dinitrosalicylic (DNS) reagent, respectively. Results The phytochemical analysis indicated that flavonoid, total phenolic, and condensed tannin contents in the extract were 71.73 ± 2.48 mg quercetin equivalent/g of crude extract, 79.81 ± 2.85 mg of gallic acid equivalent/g of crude extract, 8.82 ± 0.77 mg catechin equivalent/g of crude extract, respectively. The extract inhibited intestinal sucrase more than intestinal maltase with IC50 value of 1.47 ± 0.19 mg/ml. It also slightly inhibited pancreatic α-amylase, pancreatic lipase and pancreatic cholesterol esterase. Conclusion The result demonstrated the beneficial biochemical effects of Moringa stenopetala by inhibiting intestinal α-glucosidase, pancreatic cholesterol esterase

  1. Comparison among Different Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata) Farming Systems: Activity of Intestinal and Hepatic Enzymes and 13C-NMR Analysis of Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Coco, Laura Del; Papadia, Paride; Pascali, Sandra A. De; Bressani, Giorgia; Storelli, Carlo; Zonno, Vincenzo; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo

    2009-01-01

    In order to evaluate differences in general health and nutritional values of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata), the effects of semi-intensive, land-based tanks and sea-cages intensive rearing systems were investigated, and results compared with captured wild fish. The physiological state was determined by measuring the activity of three different intestinal digestive enzymes: alkaline phosphatase (ALP), leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and maltase; and the activity of the hepatic ALP. Also, the hepatic content in protein, cholesterol, and lipid were assessed. 13C-NMR analysis for qualitative and quantitative characterization of the lipid fraction extracted from fish muscles for semi-intensive and land based tanks intensive systems was performed. The lipid fraction composition showed small but significant differences in the monounsaturated/saturated fatty acid ratio, with the semi-intensive characterized by higher monounsaturated and lower saturated fatty acid content with respect to land based tanks intensive rearing system. PMID:22253985

  2. Calcium-myristoyl Tug is a new mechanism for intramolecular tuning of calcium sensitivity and target enzyme interaction for guanylyl cyclase-activating protein 1: dynamic connection between N-fatty acyl group and EF-hand controls calcium sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Peshenko, Igor V; Olshevskaya, Elena V; Lim, Sunghyuk; Ames, James B; Dizhoor, Alexander M

    2012-04-20

    Guanylyl cyclase-activating protein 1 (GCAP1), a myristoylated Ca(2+) sensor in vision, regulates retinal guanylyl cyclase (RetGC). We show that protein-myristoyl group interactions control Ca(2+) sensitivity, apparent affinity for RetGC, and maximal level of cyclase activation. Mutating residues near the myristoyl moiety affected the affinity of Ca(2+) binding to EF-hand 4. Inserting Phe residues in the cavity around the myristoyl group increased both the affinity of GCAP1 for RetGC and maximal activation of the cyclase. NMR spectra show that the myristoyl group in the L80F/L176F/V180F mutant remained sequestered inside GCAP1 in both Ca(2+)-bound and Mg(2+)-bound states. This mutant displayed much higher affinity for the cyclase but reduced Ca(2+) sensitivity of the cyclase regulation. The L176F substitution improved affinity of myristoylated and non-acylated GCAP1 for the cyclase but simultaneously reduced the affinity of Ca(2+) binding to EF-hand 4 and Ca(2+) sensitivity of the cyclase regulation by acylated GCAP1. The replacement of amino acids near both ends of the myristoyl moiety (Leu(80) and Val(180)) minimally affected regulatory properties of GCAP1. N-Lauryl- and N-myristoyl-GCAP1 activated RetGC in a similar fashion. Thus, protein interactions with the central region of the fatty acyl chain optimize GCAP1 binding to RetGC and maximize activation of the cyclase. We propose a dynamic connection (or "tug") between the fatty acyl group and EF-hand 4 via the C-terminal helix that attenuates the efficiency of RetGC activation in exchange for optimal Ca(2+) sensitivity. PMID:22383530

  3. Atorvastatin induces bile acid-synthetic enzyme Cyp7a1 by suppressing FXR signaling in both liver and intestine in mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Cui, Julia Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2014-01-01

    Statins are effective cholesterol-lowering drugs to treat CVDs. Bile acids (BAs), the end products of cholesterol metabolism in the liver, are important nutrient and energy regulators. The present study aims to investigate how statins affect BA homeostasis in the enterohepatic circulation. Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with atorvastatin (100 mg/kg/day po) for 1 week, followed by BA profiling by ultra-performance LC-MS/MS. Atorvastatin decreased BA pool size, mainly due to less BA in the intestine. Surprisingly, atorvastatin did not alter total BAs in the serum or liver. Atorvastatin increased the ratio of 12α-OH/non12α-OH BAs. Atorvastatin increased the mRNAs of the BA-synthetic enzymes cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1) (over 10-fold) and cytochrome P450 27a1, the BA uptake transporters Na+/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and organic anion transporting polypeptide 1b2, and the efflux transporter multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 in the liver. Noticeably, atorvastatin suppressed the expression of BA nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) target genes, namely small heterodimer partner (liver) and fibroblast growth factor 15 (ileum). Furthermore, atorvastatin increased the mRNAs of the organic cation uptake transporter 1 and cholesterol efflux transporters Abcg5 and Abcg8 in the liver. The increased expression of BA-synthetic enzymes and BA transporters appear to be a compensatory response to maintain BA homeostasis after atorvastatin treatment. The Cyp7a1 induction by atorvastatin appears to be due to suppressed FXR signaling in both the liver and intestine. PMID:25278499

  4. Sucrase-isomaltase deficiency in humans. Different mutations disrupt intracellular transport, processing, and function of an intestinal brush border enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Naim, H Y; Roth, J; Sterchi, E E; Lentze, M; Milla, P; Schmitz, J; Hauri, H P

    1988-01-01

    Eight cases of congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency were studied at the subcellular and protein level with monoclonal antibodies against sucrase-isomaltase. At least three phenotypes were revealed: one in which sucrase-isomaltase protein accumulated intracellularly probably in the endoplasmic reticulum, as a membrane-associated high-mannose precursor, one in which the intracellular transport of the enzyme was apparently blocked in the Golgi apparatus, and one in which catalytically altered enzyme was transported to the cell surface. All patients expressed electrophoretically normal or near normal high-mannose sucrase-isomaltase. The results suggest that different, probably small, mutations in the sucrase-isomaltase gene lead to the synthesis of transport-incompetent or functionally altered enzyme which results in congenital sucrose intolerance. Images PMID:3403721

  5. Fibrates downregulate apolipoprotein C-III expression independent of induction of peroxisomal acyl coenzyme A oxidase. A potential mechanism for the hypolipidemic action of fibrates.

    PubMed Central

    Staels, B; Vu-Dac, N; Kosykh, V A; Saladin, R; Fruchart, J C; Dallongeville, J; Auwerx, J

    1995-01-01

    Epidemiological and transgenic animal studies have implicated apo C-III as a major determinant of plasma triglyceride metabolism. Since fibrates are very efficient in lowering triglycerides, it was investigated whether fibrates regulate apo C-III gene expression. Different fibrates lowered rat liver apo C-III mRNA levels up to 90% in a dose- and time-dependent manner, whereas intestinal apo C-III mRNA remained constant. This decrease in liver apo C-III mRNA was rapid (1 d) and reversible, since it was restored to control levels within 1 wk after cessation of treatment. In addition, fenofibrate treatment abolished the developmental rise of hepatic apo C-III mRNA observed during the suckling-weaning period. Administration of fibrates to rats induced liver and intestinal expression of the acyl CoA oxidase gene, the rate-limiting enzyme for peroxisomal beta-oxidation of fatty acids. In primary cultures of rat and human hepatocytes, fenofibric acid lowered apo C-III mRNA in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This reduction in apo C-III mRNA levels was accompanied by a decreased secretion of apo C-III in the culture medium of human hepatocytes. In rat hepatocytes fenofibric acid induced acyl CoA oxidase gene expression, whereas acyl CoA oxidase mRNA remained unchanged in human hepatocytes. Nuclear run-on and transient transfection experiments of a reporter construct driven by the human apo C-III gene promoter indicated that fibrates downregulate apo C-III gene expression at the transcriptional level. In conclusion, these studies demonstrate that fibrates decrease rat and human liver apo C-III gene expression. In humans the mechanisms appears to be independent of the induction of peroxisomal enzymes. This downregulation of liver apo C-III gene expression by fibrates may contribute to the hypotriglyceridemic action of these drugs. Images PMID:7860752

  6. The ɛ-Amino Group of Protein Lysine Residues Is Highly Susceptible to Nonenzymatic Acylation by Several Physiological Acyl-CoA Thioesters.

    PubMed

    Simic, Zeljko; Weiwad, Matthias; Schierhorn, Angelika; Steegborn, Clemens; Schutkowski, Mike

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial enzymes implicated in the pathophysiology of diabetes, cancer, and metabolic syndrome are highly regulated by acetylation. However, mitochondrial acetyltransferases have not been identified. Here, we show that acetylation and also other acylations are spontaneous processes that depend on pH value, acyl-CoA concentration and the chemical nature of the acyl residue. In the case of a peptide derived from carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1, the rates of succinylation and glutarylation were up to 150 times than for acetylation. These results were confirmed by using the protein substrate cyclophilin A (CypA). Deacylation experiments revealed that SIRT3 exhibits deacetylase activity but is not able to remove any of the succinyl groups from CypA, whereas SIRT5 is an effective protein desuccinylase. Thus, the acylation landscape on lysine residues might largely depend on the enzymatic activity of specific sirtuins, and the availability and reactivity of acyl-CoA compounds. PMID:26382620

  7. Brush border enzyme activities in the small intestine after long-term gliadin feeding in animal models of human coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Kozáková, H; Stĕpánková, R; Kolínská, J; Farré, M A; Funda, D P; Tucková, L; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, H

    1998-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a human, genetically linked, disorder which develops in gluten-sensitive persons. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prolonged feeding of gliadin, a major fraction of gluten, on enzyme activities of enterocyte brush border membrane enzymes in rats, mice and pigs. Brush-border membranes were isolated from mucosal scrapings of the small intestine of 21-d-old rat pups hand-fed with formula milk diet, two-month-old nu/nu and +/+ BALB/c mice and two-month-old piglets fed three times a week starting at birth with high doses of gliadin. Activities of lactase, sucrase and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) were determined. Individual animal models differed in their response to gliadin feeding. In comparison with albumin fed controls the activities of DPP IV and lactase were decreased in rat pups, nu/nu BALB/c mice and piglets. DPP IV activity was mostly affected in the ileum of rats and piglets fed with gliadin starting at birth. On the other hand, lactase and sucrase activities of nu/nu BALB/c mice and piglets decreased to the largest extent in jejunum. PMID:9821309

  8. Effects of ciprofibrate and 2-[5-(4-chlorophenyl)pentyl]oxirane-2-carboxylate (POCA) on the distribution of carnitine and CoA and their acyl-esters and on enzyme activities in rats. Relation between hepatic carnitine concentration and carnitine acetyltransferase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bhuiyan, A K; Bartlett, K; Sherratt, H S; Agius, L

    1988-01-01

    The effects of feeding the peroxisome proliferators ciprofibrate (a hypolipidaemic analogue of clofibrate) or POCA (2-[5-(4-chlorophenyl)pentyl]oxirane-2-carboxylate) (an inhibitor of CPT I) to rats for 5 days on the distribution of carnitine and acylcarnitine esters between liver, plasma and muscle and on hepatic CoA concentrations (free and acylated) and activities of carnitine acetyltransferase and acyl-CoA hydrolases were determined. Ciprofibrate and POCA increased hepatic [total CoA] by 2 and 2.5 times respectively, and [total carnitine] by 4.4 and 1.9 times respectively, but decreased plasma [carnitine] by 36-46%. POCA had no effect on either urinary excretion of acylcarnitine esters or [acylcarnitine] in skeletal muscle. By contrast, ciprofibrate decreased [acylcarnitine] and [total carnitine] in muscle. In liver, ciprofibrate increased the [carnitine]/[CoA] ratio and caused a larger increase in [acylcarnitine] (7-fold) than in [carnitine] (4-fold), thereby increasing the [short-chain acylcarnitine]/[carnitine] ratio. POCA did not affect the [carnitine]/[CoA] and the [short-chain acylcarnitine]/[carnitine] ratios, but it decreased the [long-chain acylcarnitine]/[carnitine] ratio. Ciprofibrate and POCA increased the activities of acyl-CoA hydrolases, and carnitine acetyltransferase activity was increased 28-fold and 6-fold by ciprofibrate and POCA respectively. In cultures of hepatocytes, ciprofibrate caused similar changes in enzyme activity to those observed in vivo, although [carnitine] decreased with time. The results suggest that: (1) the reactions catalysed by the short-chain carnitine acyltransferases, but not by the carnitine palmitoyltransferases, are near equilibrium in liver both before and after modification of metabolism by administration of ciprofibrate or POCA; (2) the increase in hepatic [carnitine] after ciprofibrate or POCA feeding can be explained by redistribution of carnitine between tissues; (3) the activity of carnitine

  9. New players in the fatty acyl ethanolamide metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Iffat Ara Sonia; Tsuboi, Kazuhito; Uyama, Toru; Ueda, Natsuo

    2014-08-01

    Fatty acyl ethanolamides represent a class of endogenous bioactive lipid molecules and are generally referred to as N-acylethanolamines (NAEs). NAEs include palmitoylethanolamide (anti-inflammatory and analgesic substance), oleoylethanolamide (anorexic substance), and anandamide (endocannabinoid). The endogenous levels of NAEs are mainly regulated by enzymes responsible for their biosynthesis and degradation. In mammalian tissues, the major biosynthetic pathway starts from glycerophospholipids and is composed of two enzyme reactions. The first step is N-acylation of ethanolamine phospholipids catalyzed by Ca(2+)-dependent N-acyltransferase and the second step is the release of NAEs from N-acylated ethanolamine phospholipids by N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE)-hydrolyzing phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD). As for the degradation of NAEs, fatty acid amide hydrolase plays the central role. However, recent studies strongly suggest the involvement of other enzymes in the NAE metabolism. These enzymes include members of the HRAS-like suppressor family (also called phospholipase A/acyltransferase family), which were originally discovered as tumor suppressors but can function as Ca(2+)-independent NAPE-forming N-acyltransferases; multiple enzymes involved in the NAPE-PLD-independent multi-step pathways to generate NAE from NAPE, which came to light by the analysis of NAPE-PLD-deficient mice; and a lysosomal NAE-hydrolyzing acid amidase as a second NAE hydrolase. These newly recognized enzymes may become the targets for the development of new therapeutic drugs. Here, we focus on recent enzymological findings in this area. PMID:24747663

  10. Utilization of peptide carrier system to improve intestinal absorption: targeting prolidase as a prodrug-converting enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, J. P.; Hu, M.; Subramanian, P.; Mosberg, H. I.; Amidon, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of targeting prolidase as a peptide prodrug-converting enzyme has been examined. The enzymatic hydrolysis by prolidase of substrates for the peptide transporter L-alpha-methyldopa-pro and several dipeptide analogues without an N-terminal alpha-amino group (phenylpropionylproline, phenylacetylproline, N-benzoylproline, and N-acetylproline) was investigated. The Michaelis-Menten parameters Km and Vmax for L-alpha-methyldopa-pro are 0.09 +/- 0.02 mM and 3.98 +/- 0.25 mumol/min/mg protein, respectively. However, no hydrolysis of the dipeptide analogues without an N-terminal alpha-amino group is observed, suggesting that an N-terminal alpha-amino group is required for prolidase activity. These results demonstrate that prolidase may serve as a prodrug-converting enzyme for the dipeptide-type prodrugs, utilizing the peptide carrier for transport of prodrugs into the mucosal cells and prolidase, a cytosolic enzyme, to release the drug. However, a free alpha-amino group appears to be necessary for prolidase hydrolysis.

  11. Diverse Activities of Histone Acylations Connect Metabolism to Chromatin Function.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Arnob; Abmayr, Susan M; Workman, Jerry L

    2016-08-18

    Modifications of histones play important roles in balancing transcriptional output. The discovery of acyl marks, besides histone acetylation, has added to the functional diversity of histone modifications. Since all modifications use metabolic intermediates as substrates for chromatin-modifying enzymes, the prevalent landscape of histone modifications in any cell type is a snapshot of its metabolic status. Here, we review some of the current findings of how differential use of histone acylations regulates gene expression as response to metabolic changes and differentiation programs. PMID:27540855

  12. Quantum chemical study of penicillin: Reactions after acylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Feng, Dacheng; Zhu, Feng

    The density functional theory methods were used on the model molecules of penicillin to determine the possible reactions after their acylation on ?-lactamase, and the results were compared with sulbactam we have studied. The results show that, the acylated-enzyme tetrahedral intermediate can evolves with opening of ?-lactam ring as well as the thiazole ring; the thiazole ring-open products may be formed via ?-lactam ring-open product or from tetrahedral intermediate directly. Those products, in imine or enamine form, can tautomerize via hydrogen migration. In virtue of the water-assisted, their energy barriers are obviously reduced.

  13. Wnt Lipidation and Modifiers in Intestinal Carcinogenesis and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaemmerer, Elke; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    The wingless (Wnt) signaling is suggested as a fundamental hierarchical pathway in regulation of proliferation and differentiation of cells. The Wnt ligands are small proteins of about 40 kDa essentially for regulation and initiation of the Wnt activity. They are secreted proteins requiring acylation for activity in the Wnt signaling cascade and for functional interactivity with transmembrane proteins. Dual lipidation is important for posttranslational activation of the overwhelming number of Wnt proteins and is probably involved in their spatial distribution. The intestinal mucosa, where Wnt signaling is essential in configuration and maintenance, is an established model to study Wnt proteins and their role in carcinogenesis and cancer. The intestinal crypt-villus/crypt-plateau axis, a cellular system with self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation, is tightly coordinated by a Wnt gradient. In the review, some attention is given to Wnt3, Wnt3A, and Wnt2B as important members of the Wnt family to address the role of lipidation and modifiers of Wnt proteins in intestinal carcinogenesis. Wnt3 is an important player in establishing the Wnt gradient in intestinal crypts and is mainly produced by Paneth cells. Wnt2B is characterized as a mitochondrial protein and shuttles between mitochondria and the nucleus. Porcupine and ACSL5, a long-chain fatty acid activating enzyme, are introduced as modifiers of Wnts and as interesting strategy to targeting Wnt-driven carcinogenesis. PMID:27438855

  14. Wnt Lipidation and Modifiers in Intestinal Carcinogenesis and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaemmerer, Elke; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    The wingless (Wnt) signaling is suggested as a fundamental hierarchical pathway in regulation of proliferation and differentiation of cells. The Wnt ligands are small proteins of about 40 kDa essentially for regulation and initiation of the Wnt activity. They are secreted proteins requiring acylation for activity in the Wnt signaling cascade and for functional interactivity with transmembrane proteins. Dual lipidation is important for posttranslational activation of the overwhelming number of Wnt proteins and is probably involved in their spatial distribution. The intestinal mucosa, where Wnt signaling is essential in configuration and maintenance, is an established model to study Wnt proteins and their role in carcinogenesis and cancer. The intestinal crypt-villus/crypt-plateau axis, a cellular system with self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation, is tightly coordinated by a Wnt gradient. In the review, some attention is given to Wnt3, Wnt3A, and Wnt2B as important members of the Wnt family to address the role of lipidation and modifiers of Wnt proteins in intestinal carcinogenesis. Wnt3 is an important player in establishing the Wnt gradient in intestinal crypts and is mainly produced by Paneth cells. Wnt2B is characterized as a mitochondrial protein and shuttles between mitochondria and the nucleus. Porcupine and ACSL5, a long-chain fatty acid activating enzyme, are introduced as modifiers of Wnts and as interesting strategy to targeting Wnt-driven carcinogenesis. PMID:27438855

  15. The intestinal lymph fistula model--a novel approach to study ghrelin secretion.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jenny; Tschöp, Matthias H; Aulinger, Benedikt A; Davis, Harold W; Yang, Qing; Liu, Jianhua; Gaylinn, Bruce D; Thorner, Michael O; D'Alessio, David; Tso, Patrick

    2010-03-01

    The orexigenic hormone ghrelin is secreted from the stomach and has been implicated in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis. We hypothesized that ghrelin, like other gastrointestinal (GI) hormones, is present in intestinal lymph, and sampling this compartment would provide advantages for studying ghrelin secretion in rodents. Blood and lymph were sampled from catheters in the jugular vein and mesenteric lymph duct before and after intraduodenal (ID) administration of isocaloric Ensure, dextrin, or Liposyn meals or an equal volume of saline in conscious Sprague-Dawley rats. Total ghrelin levels were measured using an established radioimmunoassay. Acyl and des-acyl ghrelin were measured using two-site ELISA. Fasting ghrelin levels in lymph were significantly higher than in plasma (means +/- SE: 3,307.9 +/- 272.9 vs. 2,127.1 +/- 115.0 pg/ml, P = 0.004). Postingestive acyl and des-acyl ghrelin levels were also significantly higher, whereas the ratio of acyl:des-acyl ghrelin was similar in lymph and plasma (0.91 +/- 0.28 vs. 1.20 +/- 0.36, P = 0.76). The principle enzymes responsible for deacylation of ghrelin were lower in lymph than in plasma. Following ID Ensure, maximum ghrelin suppression occurred at 2 h in lymph compared with at 1 h in plasma. The return of suppressed ghrelin levels to baseline was also delayed in lymph. Similarly, dextrin also induced significant suppression of ghrelin (two-way ANOVA: P = 0.02), whereas Liposyn did not (P = 0.32). On the basis of these findings, it appears that intestinal lymph, which includes drainage from the interstitium of the GI mucosa, is enriched in ghrelin. Despite reduced deacylating activity in lymph, there is not a disproportionate amount of acyl ghrelin in this pool. The postprandial dynamics of ghrelin are slower in lymph than plasma, but the magnitude of change is greater. Assessing ghrelin levels in the lymph may be advantageous for studying its secretion and concentrations in the gastric mucosa. PMID

  16. Acylation of Ferrocene: A Greener Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwhistell, Kurt R.; Nguyen, Andy; Ramos, Eric J.; Kobelja, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The acylation of ferrocene is a common reaction used in organic laboratories to demonstrate Friedel-Crafts acylation and the purification of compounds using column chromatography. This article describes an acylation of ferrocene experiment that is more eco-friendly than the conventional acylation experiment. The traditional experiment was modified…

  17. The mechanism of acyl specific phospholipid remodeling by tafazzin

    PubMed Central

    Schlame, Michael; Acehan, Devrim; Berno, Bob; Xu, Yang; Valvo, Salvatore; Ren, Mindong; Stokes, David L.; Epand, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiolipin is a mitochondrial phospholipid with a characteristic acyl chain composition that depends on the function of tafazzin, a phospholipid-lysophospholipid transacylase, although the enzyme itself lacks acyl specificity. We incubated isolated tafazzin with various mixtures of phospholipids and lysophospholipids, characterized the lipid phase by 31P-NMR, and measured newly formed molecular species by mass spectrometry. Significant transacylation was observed only in non-bilayer lipid aggregates and the substrate specificity was highly sensitive to the lipid phase. In particular, tetralinoleoyl-cardiolipin, a prototype molecular species, formed only under conditions that favor the inverted hexagonal phase. In isolated mitochondria, <1 percent of lipids participated in transacylations, suggesting that the action of tafazzin is limited to privileged lipid domains. We propose that tafazzin reacts with non-bilayer type lipid domains that occur in curved or hemifused membrane zones, and that acyl specificity is driven by the packing properties of these domains. PMID:22941046

  18. Regioselective self-acylating cyclodextrins in organic solvent

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eunae; Yun, Deokgyu; Jeong, Daham; Im, Jieun; Kim, Hyunki; Dindulkar, Someshwar D.; Choi, Youngjin; Jung, Seunho

    2016-01-01

    Amphiphilic cyclodextrins have been synthesized with self-acylating reaction using vinyl esters in dimethylformamide. In the present study no base, catalyst, or enzyme was used, and the structural analyses using thin layer chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry show that the cyclodextrin is substituted preferentially by one acyl moiety at the C2 position of the glucose unit, suggesting that cyclodextrin functions as a regioselective catalytic carbohydrate in organic solvent. In the self-acylation, the most acidic OH group at the 2-position and the inclusion complexing ability of cyclodextrin were considered to be significant. The substrate preference was also observed in favor of the long-chain acyl group, which could be attributed to the inclusion ability of cyclodextrin cavity. Furthermore, using the model amphiphilic building block, 2-O-mono-lauryl β-cyclodextrin, the self-organized supramolecular architecture with nano-vesicular morphology in water was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The cavity-type nano-assembled vesicle and the novel synthetic methods for the preparation of mono-acylated cyclodextrin should be of great interest with regard to drug/gene delivery systems, functional surfactants, and carbohydrate derivatization methods. PMID:27020946

  19. Regioselective self-acylating cyclodextrins in organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunae; Yun, Deokgyu; Jeong, Daham; Im, Jieun; Kim, Hyunki; Dindulkar, Someshwar D; Choi, Youngjin; Jung, Seunho

    2016-01-01

    Amphiphilic cyclodextrins have been synthesized with self-acylating reaction using vinyl esters in dimethylformamide. In the present study no base, catalyst, or enzyme was used, and the structural analyses using thin layer chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry show that the cyclodextrin is substituted preferentially by one acyl moiety at the C2 position of the glucose unit, suggesting that cyclodextrin functions as a regioselective catalytic carbohydrate in organic solvent. In the self-acylation, the most acidic OH group at the 2-position and the inclusion complexing ability of cyclodextrin were considered to be significant. The substrate preference was also observed in favor of the long-chain acyl group, which could be attributed to the inclusion ability of cyclodextrin cavity. Furthermore, using the model amphiphilic building block, 2-O-mono-lauryl β-cyclodextrin, the self-organized supramolecular architecture with nano-vesicular morphology in water was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The cavity-type nano-assembled vesicle and the novel synthetic methods for the preparation of mono-acylated cyclodextrin should be of great interest with regard to drug/gene delivery systems, functional surfactants, and carbohydrate derivatization methods. PMID:27020946

  20. Regioselective self-acylating cyclodextrins in organic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Eunae; Yun, Deokgyu; Jeong, Daham; Im, Jieun; Kim, Hyunki; Dindulkar, Someshwar D.; Choi, Youngjin; Jung, Seunho

    2016-03-01

    Amphiphilic cyclodextrins have been synthesized with self-acylating reaction using vinyl esters in dimethylformamide. In the present study no base, catalyst, or enzyme was used, and the structural analyses using thin layer chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry show that the cyclodextrin is substituted preferentially by one acyl moiety at the C2 position of the glucose unit, suggesting that cyclodextrin functions as a regioselective catalytic carbohydrate in organic solvent. In the self-acylation, the most acidic OH group at the 2-position and the inclusion complexing ability of cyclodextrin were considered to be significant. The substrate preference was also observed in favor of the long-chain acyl group, which could be attributed to the inclusion ability of cyclodextrin cavity. Furthermore, using the model amphiphilic building block, 2-O-mono-lauryl β-cyclodextrin, the self-organized supramolecular architecture with nano-vesicular morphology in water was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The cavity-type nano-assembled vesicle and the novel synthetic methods for the preparation of mono-acylated cyclodextrin should be of great interest with regard to drug/gene delivery systems, functional surfactants, and carbohydrate derivatization methods.

  1. Plant acyl-CoA:lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferases (LPCATs) have different specificities in their forward and reverse reactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acyl-CoA:lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT) enzymes have central roles inacyl editing of phosphatidylcholine (PC). Plant LPCAT genes were expressed in yeast and characterized biochemically in microsomal preparations of the cells. Specificities for different acyl-CoAs were similar for se...

  2. Cardiolipin molecular species with shorter acyl chains accumulate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants lacking the acyl coenzyme A-binding protein Acb1p: new insights into acyl chain remodeling of cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Rijken, Pieter J; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Akbari, Hana; Brouwers, Jos F; Koorengevel, Martijn C; de Kruijff, Ben; Frentzen, Margrit; Vaz, Frédéric M; de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2009-10-01

    The function of the mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) is thought to depend on its acyl chain composition. The present study aims at a better understanding of the way the CL species profile is established in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using depletion of the acyl-CoA-binding protein Acb1p as a tool to modulate the cellular acyl chain content. Despite the presence of an intact CL remodeling system, acyl chains shorter than 16 carbon atoms (C16) were found to accumulate in CL in cells lacking Acb1p. Further experiments revealed that Taz1p, a key CL remodeling enzyme, was not responsible for the shortening of CL in the absence of Acb1p. This left de novo CL synthesis as the only possible source of acyl chains shorter than C16 in CL. Experiments in which the substrate specificity of the yeast cardiolipin synthase Crd1p and the acyl chain composition of individual short CL species were investigated, indicated that both CL precursors (i.e. phosphatidylglycerol and CDP-diacylglycerol) contribute to comparable extents to the shorter acyl chains in CL in acb1 mutants. Based on the findings, we conclude that the fatty acid composition of mature CL in yeast is governed by the substrate specificity of the CL-specific lipase Cld1p and the fatty acid composition of the Taz1p substrates. PMID:19656950

  3. Changes in expression of an antimicrobial peptide, digestive enzymes, and nutrient transporters in the intestine of E. praecox-infected chickens.

    PubMed

    Yin, H; Sumners, L H; Dalloul, R A; Miska, K B; Fetterer, R H; Jenkins, M C; Zhu, Q; Wong, E A

    2015-07-01

    Coccidiosis is a major intestinal disease of poultry, caused by several species of the protozoan Eimeria. The objective of this study was to examine changes in expression of digestive enzymes, nutrient transporters, and an antimicrobial peptide following an Eimeria praecox challenge of chickens at days 3 and 6 post-infection. Gene expression was determined by real-time PCR and analyzed by one-way ANOVA. In the duodenum, the primary site of E. praecox infection, a number of genes were downregulated at both d3 and d6 post-infection. These genes included liver expressed antimicrobial peptide 2 (LEAP2), the cationic (CAT1), anionic (EAAT3), and L-type (LAT1) amino acid transporters, the peptide transporter PepT1 and the zinc transporter ZnT1. Other transporters were downregulated either at d3 or d6. At both d3 and d6, there was downregulation of B(o)AT and CAT1 in the jejunum and downregulation of LEAP2 and LAT1 in the ileum. LEAP2, EAAT3, and ZnT1 have been found to be downregulated following challenge with other Eimeria species, suggesting a common cellular response to Eimeria. PMID:26015586

  4. Effects of Metabolites Produced from (-)-Epigallocatechin Gallate by Rat Intestinal Bacteria on Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Activity and Blood Pressure in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Takagaki, Akiko; Nanjo, Fumio

    2015-09-23

    Inhibitory activity of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) was examined with (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) metabolites produced by intestinal bacteria, together with tea catechins. All of the metabolites showed ACE inhibitory activities and the order of IC50 was hydroxyphenyl valeric acids > 5-(3,4,5-trihydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone (1) > trihydroxyphenyl 4-hydroxyvaleric acid ≫ dihydroxyphenyl 4-hydroxyvaleric acid ≫ 5-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone (2). Among the catechins, galloylated catechins exhibited stronger ACE inhibitory activity than nongalloylated catechins. Furthermore, the effects of a single oral intake of metabolites 1 and 2 on systolic blood pressure (SBP) were examined with spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Significant decreases in SBP were observed between 2 h after oral administration of 1 (150 mg/kg in SHR) and the control group (p = 0.002) and between 4 h after administration of 2 (200 mg/kg in SHR) and the control group (p = 0.044). These results suggest that the two metabolites have hypotensive effects in vivo. PMID:26323573

  5. Short-term effect of dietary yeast nucleotide supplementation on small intestinal enzyme activities, bacterial populations and metabolites and ileal nutrient digestibilities in newly weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Sauer, N; Eklund, M; Roth, S; Rink, F; Jezierny, D; Bauer, E; Mosenthin, R

    2012-08-01

    In previous studies, dietary nucleotides have been shown to improve performance in single-stomached animals by promoting the renewal of small intestine epithelial cells and by influencing the activity and composition of the microbial community in the digestive tract. The present experiment was carried out with 12 barrows weaned at the age of 18 days and fitted with a simple T-cannula at the distal ileum. To determine short-term effects of dietary yeast nucleotides, the piglets received a grain-soybean meal-based basal diet with or without supplementation of 1 g/kg of a dried yeast product containing free nucleotides. Dietary supplementation with yeast did not affect bacterial numbers in the ileum as well as ileal concentrations of individual short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), total SCFA and total lactic acid (p > 0.05). Moreover, there was no effect of supplemental yeast nucleotides on ileal α-amylase, leucine amino peptidase, maltase and lactase activities (p > 0.05), as well as on ileal dry matter, crude protein and crude fibre digestibilities (p > 0.05). In conclusion, short-term supplementation with dietary yeast nucleotides did not affect microbial metabolite concentrations, bacterial numbers and enzyme activities in the ileal digesta as well as ileal nutrient digestibilities of newly weaned pigs. PMID:21797935

  6. Normal pancreatic and intestinal enzymes in hypophagic growth-retarded rats that received dorsomedial hypothalamic lesions shortly after weaning.

    PubMed

    Bernardis, L L; Lee, P C; Brooks, S; Lebenthal, E

    1984-08-01

    Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats received bilateral electrolytic lesions in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei (DMNL rats). Sham-operated rats served as controls. After being fed lab chow for two postoperative weeks, the animals were divided into four groups. One group of DMNL rats and controls received a high-caloric diet (high-fat diet, chocolate chip cookies, 32% sucrose solution, potato chips and marshmallows), whereas another group of DMNL rats and controls continued to receive lab chow. The experiment was terminated on the 185th postoperative day. In accordance with previous findings, DMNL rats, irrespective of diet, were lighter and shorter than controls. In addition, DMNL rats fed junk food were lighter than DMNL rats fed lab chow, and junk-fed controls weighed as much as chow-fed controls. Both DMNL rats and controls fed junk food were also shorter and showed higher carcass fat than their chow-fed counterparts. Also, DMNL rats fed junk food had less carcass fat than junk-fed sham-operated controls, whereas in accordance with previous findings, there was no difference between chow-fed DMNL rats and chow-fed sham-operated controls. Irrespective of diet, DMNL rats ate less calories than their respective sham-operated controls. Both absolute and percent pancreas weight and protein/pancreas were unaffected in DMNL rats but were reduced in both junk-fed groups in comparison with their chow-fed counterparts. Both concentrations and contents of pancreatic trypsinogen, amylase and lipase were unaffected in DMNL rats but total activities of all three enzymes were dramatically reduced in the junk-fed compared with the chow-fed DMNL rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6483936

  7. Efficient free fatty acid production in Escherichia coli using plant acyl-ACP thioesterases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujun; Li, Mai; Agrawal, Arpita; San, Ka-Yiu

    2011-11-01

    Microbial biosynthesis of fatty acid-like chemicals from renewable carbon sources has attracted significant attention in recent years. Free fatty acids can be used as precursors for the production of fuels or chemicals. Free fatty acids can be produced by introducing an acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase gene into Escherichia coli. The presence of the acyl-ACP thioesterase will break the fatty acid elongation cycle and release free fatty acid. Depending on their sequence similarity and substrate specificity, class FatA thioesterase is active on unsaturated acyl-ACPs and class FatB prefers saturated acyl group. Different acyl-ACP thioesterases have different degrees of chain length specificity. Although some of these enzymes have been characterized from a number of sources, information on their ability to produce free fatty acid in microbial cells has not been extensively examined until recently. In this study, we examined the effect of the overexpression of acyl-ACP thioesterase genes from Diploknema butyracea, Gossypium hirsutum, Ricinus communis and Jatropha curcas on free fatty acid production. In particular, we are interested in studying the effect of different acyl-ACP thioesterase on the quantities and compositions of free fatty acid produced by an E. coli strain ML103 carrying these constructs. It is shown that the accumulation of free fatty acid depends on the acyl-ACP thioesterase used. The strain carrying the acyl-ACP thioesterase gene from D. butyracea produced approximately 0.2g/L of free fatty acid while the strains carrying the acyl-ACP thioesterase genes from R. communis and J. curcas produced the most free fatty acid at a high level of more than 2.0 g/L at 48 h. These two strains accumulated three major straight chain free fatty acids, C14, C16:1 and C16 at levels about 40%, 35% and 20%, respectively. PMID:22001432

  8. The in vivo infusion of hydrogen peroxide induces oxidative stress and differentially affects the activities of small intestinal carbohydrate digestive enzymes in the neonatal pig.

    PubMed

    Lackeyram, D; Mine, Y; Widowski, T; Archbold, T; Fan, M Z

    2012-12-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is characterized by persistent and relapsing fatigue that involves oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. We tested the hypothesis that a decrease in key carbohydrate-digesting enzyme activity in the gut is one of the major biological mechanisms of developing CFS in liquid formula-fed neonatal pigs with in vivo infusion of H(2)O(2). Piglets at 7 to 10 d of age were fitted with an intraperitoneal catheter, allowed a 3-d post surgical recovery, and infused with either H(2)O(2) at 5 mmol/kg BW (PER; n = 8) or the same volume of saline (CON; n = 8) in six 20-ml doses daily for a period of 10 d. During this period, animal behavior was monitored, blood samples collected, and jejunal enzyme activity kinetic experiments for lactase, sucrase, maltase, and maltase-glucoamylase were conducted. Plasma concentration of reduced glutathione remained similar (P > 0.05) to the pre-infusion level over the study duration in the CON group whereas this was 65% lower (P < 0.05) than the pre-infusion level in the PER group. Piglets experiencing oxidative stress had an overall lower (P < 0.05) physical mobility and the maximal jejunal specific activities [μmol/(mg protein · min)] for lactase (PER, 6.54 ± 0.68 vs. CON, 12.65 ± 0.69) and maltase (PER, 57.39 ± 1.02 vs. CON, 75.60 ± 1.04), respectively. However, differences were not observed (P > 0.05) in the maximal specific activities [μmol/(mg protein · min)] of sucrase (PER, 10.50 ± 1.37 vs. CON, 12.40 ± 1.55) and maltase-glucoamylase (PER, 0.71 ± 0.08 vs. CON, 0.70 ± 0.07) between the 2 groups. In conclusion, infusion of a suitable dose of H(2)O(2) induced CFS in the neonatal pigs. Oxidative stress in vivo differentially affected the maximal activities of important small intestinal carbohydrate-digesting enzymes in neonatal pigs fed a dairy milk-based liquid formula. PMID:23365398

  9. Fatty acylation of proteins: The long and the short of it.

    PubMed

    Resh, Marilyn D

    2016-07-01

    Long, short and medium chain fatty acids are covalently attached to hundreds of proteins. Each fatty acid confers distinct biochemical properties, enabling fatty acylation to regulate intracellular trafficking, subcellular localization, protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions. Myristate and palmitate represent the most common fatty acid modifying groups. New insights into how fatty acylation reactions are catalyzed, and how fatty acylation regulates protein structure and function continue to emerge. Myristate is typically linked to an N-terminal glycine, but recent studies reveal that lysines can also be myristoylated. Enzymes that remove N-terminal myristoyl-glycine or myristate from lysines have now been identified. DHHC proteins catalyze S-palmitoylation, but the mechanisms that regulate substrate recognition by individual DHHC family members remain to be determined. New studies continue to reveal thioesterases that remove palmitate from S-acylated proteins. Another area of rapid expansion is fatty acylation of the secreted proteins hedgehog, Wnt and Ghrelin, by Hhat, Porcupine and GOAT, respectively. Understanding how these membrane bound O-acyl transferases recognize their protein and fatty acyl CoA substrates is an active area of investigation, and is punctuated by the finding that these enzymes are potential drug targets in human diseases. PMID:27233110

  10. Cardiolipin Molecular Species with Shorter Acyl Chains Accumulate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mutants Lacking the Acyl Coenzyme A-binding Protein Acb1p

    PubMed Central

    Rijken, Pieter J.; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Akbari, Hana; Brouwers, Jos F.; Koorengevel, Martijn C.; de Kruijff, Ben; Frentzen, Margrit; Vaz, Frédéric M.; de Kroon, Anton I. P. M.

    2009-01-01

    The function of the mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) is thought to depend on its acyl chain composition. The present study aims at a better understanding of the way the CL species profile is established in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using depletion of the acyl-CoA-binding protein Acb1p as a tool to modulate the cellular acyl chain content. Despite the presence of an intact CL remodeling system, acyl chains shorter than 16 carbon atoms (C16) were found to accumulate in CL in cells lacking Acb1p. Further experiments revealed that Taz1p, a key CL remodeling enzyme, was not responsible for the shortening of CL in the absence of Acb1p. This left de novo CL synthesis as the only possible source of acyl chains shorter than C16 in CL. Experiments in which the substrate specificity of the yeast cardiolipin synthase Crd1p and the acyl chain composition of individual short CL species were investigated, indicated that both CL precursors (i.e. phosphatidylglycerol and CDP-diacylglycerol) contribute to comparable extents to the shorter acyl chains in CL in acb1 mutants. Based on the findings, we conclude that the fatty acid composition of mature CL in yeast is governed by the substrate specificity of the CL-specific lipase Cld1p and the fatty acid composition of the Taz1p substrates. PMID:19656950

  11. Effect of carbon chain length in acyl coenzyme A on the efficiency of enzymatic transformation of okadaic acid to 7-O-acyl okadaic acid.

    PubMed

    Furumochi, Sachie; Onoda, Tatsuya; Cho, Yuko; Fuwa, Haruhiko; Sasaki, Makoto; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Konoki, Keiichi

    2016-07-01

    Okadaic acid (OA), a product of dinoflagellate Prorocentrum spp., is transformed into 7-O-acyl OA in various bivalve species. The structural transformation proceeds enzymatically in vitro in the presence of the microsomal fraction from the digestive gland of bivalves. We have been using LC-MS/MS to identify OA-transforming enzymes by detecting 7-O-acyl OA, also known as dinophysistoxin 3 (DTX3). However, an alternative assay for DTX3 is required because the OA-transforming enzyme is a membrane protein, and surfactants for solubilizing membrane proteins decrease the sensitivity of LC-MS/MS. The present study examined saturated fatty acyl CoAs with a carbon chain length of 10 (decanoyl), 12 (dodecanoyl), 14 (tetradecanoyl), 16 (hexadecanoyl) and 18 (octadecanoyl) as the substrate for the in vitro acylation reaction. Saturated fatty acyl CoAs with a carbon chain length of 14, 16 and 18 exhibited higher yields than those with a carbon chain length of 10 or 12. Acyl CoAs with carbon chain lengths from 14 to 18 and containing either a diene unit, an alkyne unit, or an azide unit in the carbon chain were synthesized and shown to provide the corresponding DTX3 with a yield comparable to that of hexadecanoyl CoA. The three functional units can be conjugated with fluorescent reagents and are applicable to the development of a novel assay for DTX3. PMID:27231127

  12. Specificity of acyl-homoserine lactone synthases examined by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gould, Ty A; Herman, Jake; Krank, Jessica; Murphy, Robert C; Churchill, Mair E A

    2006-01-01

    Many gram-negative bacteria produce a specific set of N-acyl-L-homoserine-lactone (AHL) signaling molecules for the purpose of quorum sensing, which is a means of regulating coordinated gene expression in a cell-density-dependent manner. AHLs are produced from acylated acyl-carrier protein (acyl-ACP) and S-adenosyl-L-methionine by the AHL synthase enzyme. The appearance of specific AHLs is due in large part to the intrinsic specificity of the enzyme for subsets of acyl-ACP substrates. Structural studies of the Pantoea stewartii enzyme EsaI and AHL-sensitive bioassays revealed that threonine 140 in the acyl chain binding pocket directs the enzyme toward production of 3-oxo-homoserine lactones. Mass spectrometry was used to examine the range of AHL molecular species produced by AHL synthases under a variety of conditions. An AHL selective normal-phase chromatographic purification with addition of a deuterated AHL internal standard was followed by reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in order to obtain estimates of the relative amounts of different AHLs from biological samples. The AHLs produced by wild-type and engineered EsaI and LasI AHL synthases show that intrinsic specificity and different cellular conditions influence the production of AHLs. The threonine at position 140 in EsaI is important for the preference for 3-oxo-acyl-ACPs, but the role of the equivalent threonine in LasI is less clear. In addition, LasI expressed in Escherichia coli produces a high proportion of unusual AHLs with acyl chains consisting of an odd number of carbons. Furthermore, these studies offer additional methods that will be useful for surveying and quantitating AHLs from different sources. PMID:16385066

  13. Metabolic Glycoengineering with N-Acyl Side Chain Modified Mannosamines.

    PubMed

    Wratil, Paul R; Horstkorte, Rüdiger; Reutter, Werner

    2016-08-01

    In metabolic glycoengineering (MGE), cells or animals are treated with unnatural derivatives of monosaccharides. After entering the cytosol, these sugar analogues are metabolized and subsequently expressed on newly synthesized glycoconjugates. The feasibility of MGE was first discovered for sialylated glycans, by using N-acyl-modified mannosamines as precursor molecules for unnatural sialic acids. Prerequisite is the promiscuity of the enzymes of the Roseman-Warren biosynthetic pathway. These enzymes were shown to tolerate specific modifications of the N-acyl side chain of mannosamine analogues, for example, elongation by one or more methylene groups (aliphatic modifications) or by insertion of reactive groups (bioorthogonal modifications). Unnatural sialic acids are incorporated into glycoconjugates of cells and organs. MGE has intriguing biological consequences for treated cells (aliphatic MGE) and offers the opportunity to visualize the topography and dynamics of sialylated glycans in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo (bioorthogonal MGE). PMID:27435524

  14. The hog intestinal mucosa acylase I: subcellular localization, isolation, kinetic studies and biological function.

    PubMed

    Giardina, T; Biagini, A; Dalle Ore, F; Ferre, E; Reynier, M; Puigserver, A

    1997-05-01

    The soluble acylase I (N-acylamino acid amidohydrolase, EC 3.5.1.14) from hog intestinal mucosa was 11,000-fold purified for the first time using a new four-step procedure involving an immunoaffinity chromatography. The resulting protein, which had an isoelectric point of 5.2 and a M(r) of 90,000 was composed of two apparently identical N-acylated polypeptide chains. Its amino acid composition was comparable to that of hog kidney acylase I. The enzyme had a pH optimum at 8.0 and required Zn2+ or Co2+. The optimal temperature for the acylase reaction was 40 degrees C and the activation energy of thermodenaturation was estimated at 260 kJ mol-1. The enzyme was strongly inhibited when preincubated with chelating agents, by diethyl pyrocarbonate under histidine-modifying conditions as well as by sulfhydryl compounds. The reaction of the purified enzyme with the synthetic substrate furylacryloyl-L-methionine was partly characterized as follows: Km = 0.22 +/- 0.03 mM, kcat = 128.0 +/- 17.8 s-1 and kcat/Km = 5.8 +/- 1.6 x 10(5) M-1 s-1. The L-stereoisomer of methionine competitively inhibited the enzyme reaction with a Ki of 3.4 +/- 0.2 mM. It is suggested that acylase I might not only be involved in the catabolism of intracellular N-acylated protein but also be responsible for the biological utilization of N-acylated food proteins. PMID:9258435

  15. Measurement of Long-Chain Fatty Acyl-CoA Synthetase Activity.

    PubMed

    Füllekrug, Joachim; Poppelreuther, Margarete

    2016-01-01

    Long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetases (ACS) are a family of essential enzymes of lipid metabolism, activating fatty acids by thioesterification with coenzyme A. Fatty acyl-CoA molecules are then readily utilized for the biosynthesis of storage and membrane lipids, or for the generation of energy by ß-oxidation. Acyl-CoAs also function as transcriptional activators, allosteric inhibitors, or precursors for inflammatory mediators. Recent work suggests that ACS enzymes may drive cellular fatty acid uptake by metabolic trapping, and may also regulate the channeling of fatty acids towards specific metabolic pathways. The implication of ACS enzymes in widespread lipid associated diseases like type 2 diabetes has rekindled interest in this protein family. Here, we describe in detail how to measure long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetase activity by a straightforward radiometric assay. Cell lysates are incubated with ATP, coenzyme A, Mg(2+), and radiolabeled fatty acid bound to BSA. Differential phase partitioning of fatty acids and acyl-CoAs is exploited to quantify the amount of generated acyl-CoA by scintillation counting. The high sensitivity of this assay also allows the analysis of small samples like patient biopsies. PMID:26552674

  16. Metabolic and Tissue-Specific Regulation of Acyl-CoA Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jessica M.; Bowman, Caitlyn E.; Wolfgang, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Acyl-CoA formation initiates cellular fatty acid metabolism. Acyl-CoAs are generated by the ligation of a fatty acid to Coenzyme A mediated by a large family of acyl-CoA synthetases (ACS). Conversely, acyl-CoAs can be hydrolyzed by a family of acyl-CoA thioesterases (ACOT). Here, we have determined the transcriptional regulation of all ACS and ACOT enzymes across tissues and in response to metabolic perturbations. We find patterns of coordinated regulation within and between these gene families as well as distinct regulation occurring in a tissue- and physiologically-dependent manner. Due to observed changes in long-chain ACOT mRNA and protein abundance in liver and adipose tissue, we determined the consequence of increasing cytosolic long-chain thioesterase activity on fatty acid metabolism in these tissues by generating transgenic mice overexpressing a hyperactive mutant of Acot7 in the liver or adipose tissue. Doubling cytosolic acyl-CoA thioesterase activity failed to protect mice from diet-induced obesity, fatty liver or insulin resistance, however, overexpression of Acot7 in adipocytes rendered mice cold intolerant. Together, these data suggest distinct modes of regulation of the ACS and ACOT enzymes and that these enzymes act in a coordinated fashion to control fatty acid metabolism in a tissue-dependent manner. PMID:25760036

  17. Fatty acyl-CoA reductases of birds

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Birds clean and lubricate their feathers with waxes that are produced in the uropygial gland, a holocrine gland located on their back above the tail. The type and the composition of the secreted wax esters are dependent on the bird species, for instance the wax ester secretion of goose contains branched-chain fatty acids and unbranched fatty alcohols, whereas that of barn owl contains fatty acids and alcohols both of which are branched. Alcohol-forming fatty acyl-CoA reductases (FAR) catalyze the reduction of activated acyl groups to fatty alcohols that can be esterified with acyl-CoA thioesters forming wax esters. Results cDNA sequences encoding fatty acyl-CoA reductases were cloned from the uropygial glands of barn owl (Tyto alba), domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) and domestic goose (Anser anser domesticus). Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that they encode membrane associated enzymes which catalyze a NADPH dependent reduction of acyl-CoA thioesters to fatty alcohols. By feeding studies of transgenic yeast cultures and in vitro enzyme assays with membrane fractions of transgenic yeast cells two groups of isozymes with different properties were identified, termed FAR1 and FAR2. The FAR1 group mainly synthesized 1-hexadecanol and accepted substrates in the range between 14 and 18 carbon atoms, whereas the FAR2 group preferred stearoyl-CoA and accepted substrates between 16 and 20 carbon atoms. Expression studies with tissues of domestic chicken indicated that FAR transcripts were not restricted to the uropygial gland. Conclusion The data of our study suggest that the identified and characterized avian FAR isozymes, FAR1 and FAR2, can be involved in wax ester biosynthesis and in other pathways like ether lipid synthesis. PMID:22151413

  18. Slow onset inhibition of bacterial beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases by thiolactomycin.

    PubMed

    Machutta, Carl A; Bommineni, Gopal R; Luckner, Sylvia R; Kapilashrami, Kanishk; Ruzsicska, Bela; Simmerling, Carlos; Kisker, Caroline; Tonge, Peter J

    2010-02-26

    Thiolactomycin (TLM), a natural product thiolactone antibiotic produced by species of Nocardia and Streptomyces, is an inhibitor of the beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase (KAS) enzymes in the bacterial fatty acid synthase pathway. Using enzyme kinetics and direct binding studies, TLM has been shown to bind preferentially to the acyl-enzyme intermediates of the KASI and KASII enzymes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli. These studies, which utilized acyl-enzyme mimics in which the active site cysteine was replaced by a glutamine, also revealed that TLM is a slow onset inhibitor of the KASI enzymes KasA and ecFabB but not of the KASII enzymes KasB and ecFabF. The differential affinity of TLM for the acyl-KAS enzymes is proposed to result from structural change involving the movement of helices alpha5 and alpha6 that prepare the enzyme to bind malonyl-AcpM or TLM and that is initiated by formation of hydrogen bonds between the acyl-enzyme thioester and the oxyanion hole. The finding that TLM is a slow onset inhibitor of ecFabB supports the proposal that the long residence time of TLM on the ecFabB homologues in Serratia marcescens and Klebsiella pneumonia is an important factor for the in vivo antibacterial activity of TLM against these two organisms despite the fact that the in vitro MIC values are only 100-200 microg/ml. The mechanistic data on the interaction of TLM with KasA will provide an important foundation for the rational development of high affinity KasA inhibitors based on the thiolactone skeleton. PMID:20018879

  19. Insight into Coenzyme A cofactor binding and the mechanism of acyl-transfer in an acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase from Clostridium phytofermentans

    PubMed Central

    Tuck, Laura R.; Altenbach, Kirsten; Ang, Thiau Fu; Crawshaw, Adam D.; Campopiano, Dominic J.; Clarke, David J.; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The breakdown of fucose and rhamnose released from plant cell walls by the cellulolytic soil bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans produces toxic aldehyde intermediates. To enable growth on these carbon sources, the pathway for the breakdown of fucose and rhamnose is encapsulated within a bacterial microcompartment (BMC). These proteinaceous organelles sequester the toxic aldehyde intermediates and allow the efficient action of acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes to produce an acyl-CoA that is ultimately used in substrate-level phosphorylation to produce ATP. Here we analyse the kinetics of the aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme from the fucose/rhamnose utilisation BMC with different short-chain fatty aldehydes and show that it has activity against substrates with up to six carbon atoms, with optimal activity against propionaldehyde. We have also determined the X-ray crystal structure of this enzyme in complex with CoA and show that the adenine nucleotide of this cofactor is bound in a distinct pocket to the same group in NAD+. This work is the first report of the structure of CoA bound to an aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme and our crystallographic model provides important insight into the differences within the active site that distinguish the acylating from non-acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes. PMID:26899032

  20. Insight into Coenzyme A cofactor binding and the mechanism of acyl-transfer in an acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase from Clostridium phytofermentans.

    PubMed

    Tuck, Laura R; Altenbach, Kirsten; Ang, Thiau Fu; Crawshaw, Adam D; Campopiano, Dominic J; Clarke, David J; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The breakdown of fucose and rhamnose released from plant cell walls by the cellulolytic soil bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans produces toxic aldehyde intermediates. To enable growth on these carbon sources, the pathway for the breakdown of fucose and rhamnose is encapsulated within a bacterial microcompartment (BMC). These proteinaceous organelles sequester the toxic aldehyde intermediates and allow the efficient action of acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes to produce an acyl-CoA that is ultimately used in substrate-level phosphorylation to produce ATP. Here we analyse the kinetics of the aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme from the fucose/rhamnose utilisation BMC with different short-chain fatty aldehydes and show that it has activity against substrates with up to six carbon atoms, with optimal activity against propionaldehyde. We have also determined the X-ray crystal structure of this enzyme in complex with CoA and show that the adenine nucleotide of this cofactor is bound in a distinct pocket to the same group in NAD(+). This work is the first report of the structure of CoA bound to an aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme and our crystallographic model provides important insight into the differences within the active site that distinguish the acylating from non-acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes. PMID:26899032

  1. Palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase and the evolutionary origin of plant acyl-ACP thioesterases.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A; Davies, H M; Voelker, T A

    1995-01-01

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases play an essential role in chain termination during de novo fatty acid synthesis and in the channeling of carbon flux between the two lipid biosynthesis pathways in plants. We have discovered that there are two distinct but related thioesterase gene classes in higher plants, termed FatA and FatB, whose evolutionary divergence appears to be ancient. FatA encodes the already described 18:1-ACP thioesterase. In contrast, FatB representatives encode thioesterases preferring acyl-ACPs having saturated acyl groups. We unexpectedly obtained a 16:0-ACP thioesterase cDNA from Cuphea hookeriana seed, which accumulate predominantly 8:0 and 10:0. The 16:0 thioesterase transcripts were found in non-seed tissues, and expression in transgenic Brassica napus led to the production of a 16:0-rich oil. We present evidence that this type of FatB gene is ancient and ubiquitous in plants and that specialized plant medium-chain thioesterases have evolved independently from such enzymes several times during angiosperm evolution. Also, the ubiquitous 18:1-ACP thioesterase appears to be a derivative of a 16:0 thioesterase. PMID:7734968

  2. Acyl-ACP thioesterases from macadamia (Macadamia tetraphylla) nuts: cloning, characterization and their impact on oil composition.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, Antonio J; Sánchez-García, Alicia; Salas, Joaquín J; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms by which macadamia nuts accumulate the unusual palmitoleic and asclepic acyl moieties, which constitute up to 20% of the fatty acids in some varieties, are still unknown. Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases (EC 3.1.2.14) are intraplastidial enzymes that terminate the synthesis of fatty acids in plants and that facilitate the export of the acyl moieties to the endoplasmic reticulum where they can be used in the production of glycerolipids. Here, we have investigated the possible role of acyl-ACP thioesterase activity in the composition of macadamia kernel oil. Accordingly, two acyl-ACP thioesterases were cloned from developing macadamia kernels, one of the FatA type and the other of the FatB type. These enzymes were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant thioesterases were purified, characterized kinetically and assayed with a variety of substrates, demonstrating the high specificity of macadamia FatA towards 16:1-ACP. Acyl-ACP thioesterase activity was also characterized in crude extracts from two different varieties of macadamia, Cate and Beaumont, which accumulate different amounts of n-7 fatty acids. The impact of acyl-ACP thioesterase activities on the oil composition of these kernels is discussed in the light of these results. PMID:21071236

  3. Acetic anhydride: an intermediate analogue in the acyl-exchange reaction of citramalate lyase.

    PubMed

    Buckel, W

    1976-04-15

    1. Reactivation of deacetyl citramalate lyase by acetic anhydride proceeds through an enzyme-anhydride complex prior to actual acetylation. The reaction is inhibited by citramalate which is competitive with acetic anhydride. 2. A corresponding complex is an intermediate in the carboxymethylation of deacetyl enzyme by iodoacetate. However, the inhibition of this reaction by S-citramalate appears to be non-competitive with iodoacetate. 3. The results lead to the conclusion that acetic anhydride can be regarded as a structural analogue of citramalic acetic anhydride, the proposed intermediate in the acyl exchange reaction on citramalate lyase. 4. The formation of 6-citryl thiolester from the 1-thiolester via the cyclic citric anhydride provides a chemicla model for enzymic acyl exchange. 5. The data suggest that anhydrides are of general importance in acyl exchange reactions of thiolesters. PMID:1278157

  4. RNA SHAPE chemistry with aromatic acylating reagents.

    PubMed

    Nodin, Laura; Noël, Olivier; Chaminade, Françoise; Maskri, Ouerdia; Barbier, Vincent; David, Olivier; Fossé, Philippe; Xie, Juan

    2015-02-01

    As chemical methods for RNA secondary structure determination, SHAPE chemistry (selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) has been developed to specifically target flexible nucleotides (often unpaired nucleotides) independently to their purine or pyrimidine nature. In order to improve the specificity of acylating reagents towards unpaired nucleotides, we have explored the reactivity of symmetric anhydrides, acyl fluorides, active esters like succinimidyl ester and cyanomethyl esters for 2'-O-acylation reaction. Among the tested compounds, only the acyl fluoride 4 showed a low reactivity (compared to NMIA). However, this study is the first to show that nucleophilic catalysts like DMAP greatly improved the selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation by symmetric anhydrides, acyl fluorides and succinimidyl ester, with the 2-fluorobenzoic anhydride 5 being the most reactive. PMID:25557357

  5. DHHC Protein S-Acyltransferases Use Similar Ping-Pong Kinetic Mechanisms but Display Different Acyl-CoA Specificities*

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Benjamin C.; Linder, Maurine E.

    2012-01-01

    DHHC proteins catalyze the reversible S-acylation of proteins at cysteine residues, a modification important for regulating protein localization, stability, and activity. However, little is known about the kinetic mechanism of DHHC proteins. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), fluorescent peptide-based assay for protein S-acylation activity was developed to characterize mammalian DHHC2 and DHHC3. Time courses and substrate saturation curves allowed the determination of Vmax and Km values for both the peptide N-myristoylated-GCG and palmitoyl-coenzyme A. DHHC proteins acylate themselves upon incubation with palmitoyl-CoA, which is hypothesized to reflect a transient acyl enzyme transfer intermediate. Single turnover assays with DHHC2 and DHHC3 demonstrated that a radiolabeled acyl group on the enzyme transferred to the protein substrate, consistent with a two-step ping-pong mechanism. Enzyme autoacylation and acyltransfer to substrate displayed the same acyl-CoA specificities, further supporting a two-step mechanism. Interestingly, DHHC2 efficiently transferred acyl chains 14 carbons and longer, whereas DHHC3 activity was greatly reduced by acyl-CoAs with chain lengths longer than 16 carbons. The rate and extent of autoacylation of DHHC3, as well as the rate of acyl chain transfer to protein substrate, were reduced with stearoyl-CoA when compared with palmitoyl-CoA. This is the first observation of lipid substrate specificity among DHHC proteins and may account for the differential S-acylation of proteins observed in cells. PMID:22247542

  6. Deterioration of white croaker (Pennahia argentata) meat thermally-induced gel products caused by proteolytic enzymes in the contaminated intestine and kidney.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Nobuhiko; Wan, Jianrong; Watabe, Shugo

    2016-05-15

    Thermally-induced gels were made from white croaker (Pennahia argentata) meat in the presence of its organ extracts by pre-heating at 40 and 65°C for 20 min and subsequent heating at 85°C for 20 min. The breaking strength of the gels decreased with increasing concentrations of the intestinal extracts accompanying decomposition of myosin heavy chains. However, no significant changes in the gel strength occurred when the kidney extract was added. The proteolytic activity in the intestinal extracts examined in the meat homogenate had a maximum at 60°C and pH 8.90. These results suggest that the intestinal rather than kidney proteolytic activities are responsible for gel softening known as a modori phenomenon. Thus, the removal of intestinal tracts is essential to maintain a high quality of surimi-based products. PMID:26775990

  7. Intestinal leiomyoma

    MedlinePlus

    Leiomyoma - intestine ... McLaughlin P, Maher MM. The duodenum and small intestine. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ... Roline CE, Reardon RF. Disorders of the small intestine. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  8. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  9. Remote control of regioselectivity in acyl-acyl carrier protein-desaturases

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Jodie E.; Whittle, Edward; Moche, Martin; Lengqvist, Johan; Lindqvist, Ylva; Shanklin, John

    2011-01-01

    Regiospecific desaturation of long-chain saturated fatty acids has been described as approaching the limits of the discriminatory power of enzymes because the substrate entirely lacks distinguishing features close to the site of dehydrogenation. To identify the elusive mechanism underlying regioselectivity, we have determined two crystal structures of the archetypal Δ9 desaturase from castor in complex with acyl carrier protein (ACP), which show the bound ACP ideally situated to position C9 and C10 of the acyl chain adjacent to the diiron active site for Δ9 desaturation. Analysis of the structures and modeling of the complex between the highly homologous ivy Δ4 desaturase and ACP, identified a residue located at the entrance to the binding cavity, Asp280 in the castor desaturase (Lys275 in the ivy desaturase), which is strictly conserved within Δ9 and Δ4 enzymes but differs between them. We hypothesized that interaction between Lys275 and the phosphate of the pantetheine, seen in the ivy model, is key to positioning C4 and C5 adjacent to the diiron center for Δ4 desaturation. Mutating castor Asp280 to Lys resulted in a major shift from Δ9 to Δ4 desaturation. Thus, interaction between desaturase side-chain 280 and phospho-serine 38 of ACP, approximately 27 Å from the site of double-bond formation, predisposes ACP binding that favors either Δ9 or Δ4 desaturation via repulsion (acidic side chain) or attraction (positively charged side chain), respectively. Understanding the mechanism underlying remote control of regioselectivity provides the foundation for reengineering desaturase enzymes to create designer chemical feedstocks that would provide alternatives to those currently obtained from petrochemicals. PMID:21930947

  10. Remote control of regioselectivity in acyl-acyl carrier protein-desaturases.

    PubMed

    Guy, Jodie E; Whittle, Edward; Moche, Martin; Lengqvist, Johan; Lindqvist, Ylva; Shanklin, John

    2011-10-01

    Regiospecific desaturation of long-chain saturated fatty acids has been described as approaching the limits of the discriminatory power of enzymes because the substrate entirely lacks distinguishing features close to the site of dehydrogenation. To identify the elusive mechanism underlying regioselectivity, we have determined two crystal structures of the archetypal Δ9 desaturase from castor in complex with acyl carrier protein (ACP), which show the bound ACP ideally situated to position C9 and C10 of the acyl chain adjacent to the diiron active site for Δ9 desaturation. Analysis of the structures and modeling of the complex between the highly homologous ivy Δ4 desaturase and ACP, identified a residue located at the entrance to the binding cavity, Asp280 in the castor desaturase (Lys275 in the ivy desaturase), which is strictly conserved within Δ9 and Δ4 enzymes but differs between them. We hypothesized that interaction between Lys275 and the phosphate of the pantetheine, seen in the ivy model, is key to positioning C4 and C5 adjacent to the diiron center for Δ4 desaturation. Mutating castor Asp280 to Lys resulted in a major shift from Δ9 to Δ4 desaturation. Thus, interaction between desaturase side-chain 280 and phospho-serine 38 of ACP, approximately 27 Å from the site of double-bond formation, predisposes ACP binding that favors either Δ9 or Δ4 desaturation via repulsion (acidic side chain) or attraction (positively charged side chain), respectively. Understanding the mechanism underlying remote control of regioselectivity provides the foundation for reengineering desaturase enzymes to create designer chemical feedstocks that would provide alternatives to those currently obtained from petrochemicals. PMID:21930947

  11. Evolution of the acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP)

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Mark; Rose, Timothy M.; Færgeman, Nils J.; Knudsen, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is a 10 kDa protein that binds C12–C22 acyl-CoA esters with high affinity. In vitro and in vivo experiments suggest that it is involved in multiple cellular tasks including modulation of fatty acid biosynthesis, enzyme regulation, regulation of the intracellular acyl-CoA pool size, donation of acyl-CoA esters for β-oxidation, vesicular trafficking, complex lipid synthesis and gene regulation. In the present study, we delineate the evolutionary history of ACBP to get a complete picture of its evolution and distribution among species. ACBP homologues were identified in all four eukaryotic kingdoms, Animalia, Plantae, Fungi and Protista, and eleven eubacterial species. ACBP homologues were not detected in any other known bacterial species, or in archaea. Nearly all of the ACBP-containing bacteria are pathogenic to plants or animals, suggesting that an ACBP gene could have been acquired from a eukaryotic host by horizontal gene transfer. Many bacterial, fungal and higher eukaryotic species only harbour a single ACBP homologue. However, a number of species, ranging from protozoa to vertebrates, have evolved two to six lineage-specific paralogues through gene duplication and/or retrotransposition events. The ACBP protein is highly conserved across phylums, and the majority of ACBP genes are subjected to strong purifying selection. Experimental evidence indicates that the function of ACBP has been conserved from yeast to humans and that the multiple lineage-specific paralogues have evolved altered functions. The appearance of ACBP very early on in evolution points towards a fundamental role of ACBP in acyl-CoA metabolism, including ceramide synthesis and in signalling. PMID:16018771

  12. Efficient mono-acylation of fructose by lipase-catalyzed esterification in ionic liquid co-solvents.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Ji, Fangling; Wang, Jingyun; Jiang, Bo; Li, Yachen; Bao, Yongming

    2015-10-30

    Fructose monoesters are eco-friendly nonionic surfactants in various applications. Selective preparation of mono-acylated fructose is challenging due to the multiple hydroxyl sites available for acylation both chemically and enzymatically. Ionic liquids (ILs) have profound impacts not only on the reaction media but also on the catalytic properties of enzymes in the acylation process. In this study, utilizing an IL co-solvent system, selective synthesis of mono-acylated fructose with lauric acid catalyzed by immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) was investigated. The imidazolium-based ILs selected as co-solvents with 2-methyl-2-butanol (2M2B) markedly improved the ratios of monolauroyl fructose in the presence of 60% [BMIM][TfO] (v/v) and 20% [BMIM][BF4] (v/v), in which the mono-acylated fructose was 85% and 78% respectively. Based on a Ping-Pong Bi-Bi model, a kinetic equation was fitted, by which the kinetic parameters revealed that the affinity between fructose and acyl-enzyme intermediate was enhanced. The inhibition effect of fructose on free enzyme was weakened in the presence of IL co-solvents. The conformation of CALB binding substrates also changed in the co-solvent system as demonstrated by Fourier transform infrared spectra. These results demonstrated that the variation of CALB kinetic characteristics was a crucial factor for the selectivity of mono-acylation in ILs/2M2B co-solvents. PMID:26343327

  13. Measurement of tissue acyl-CoAs using flow-injection tandem mass spectrometry: acyl-CoA profiles in short-chain fatty acid oxidation defects

    PubMed Central

    Palladino, Andrew A.; Chen, Jie; Kallish, Staci; Stanley, Charles A.; Bennett, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The primary accumulating metabolites in fatty acid oxidation defects are intramitochondrial acyl-CoAs. Typically, secondary metabolites such as acylcarnitines, acylglycines and dicarboxylic acids are measured to study these disorders. Methods have not been adapted for tissue acyl-CoA measurement in defects with primarily acyl-CoA accumulation. Our objective was to develop a method to measure fatty acyl-CoA species that are present in tissues of mice with fatty acid oxidation defects using flow-injection tandem mass spectrometry. Following the addition of internal standards of [13C2] acetyl-CoA, [13C8] octanoyl-CoA, and [C17] heptadecanoic CoA, acyl-CoA’s are extracted from tissue samples and are injected directly into the mass spectrometer. Data is acquired using a 506.9 neutral loss scan and multiple reaction-monitoring (MRM). This method can identify all long, medium and short-chain acyl-CoA species in wild type mouse liver including predicted 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA species. We validated the method using liver of the short-chain-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) knock-out mice. As expected, there is a significant increase in [C4] butyryl-CoA species in the SCAD −/− mouse liver compared to wild type. We then tested the assay in liver from the short-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCHAD) deficient mice to determine the profile of acyl-CoA accumulation in this less predictable model. There was more modest accumulation of medium chain species including 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA’s consistent with the known chain-length specificity of the SCHAD enzyme. PMID:23117082

  14. Morphological and metabolic changes in transgenic wheat with altered glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase or acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase activities.

    PubMed

    Edlin, D A; Kille, P; Wilkinson, M D; Jones, H D; Harwood, J L

    2000-12-01

    We have transformed varieties of wheat with a Pisum sativum glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase gene, and also with an Arabidopsis thaliana acyl-ACP thioesterase gene. Morphological (growth, organelle development) and metabolic changes (fatty acid labelling of chloroplast and non-chloroplast lipids) have been observed in transgenics with altered gene expression for either enzyme. PMID:11171169

  15. Modified acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, Edgar B.; Shanklin, John; Lindgvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter

    1998-01-06

    Disclosed is a methods for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity.

  16. Modified Acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, Edgar B.; Shanklin, John; Lindqvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter

    1999-03-30

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity.

  17. Acyl CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5) ablation in mice increases energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity and delays fat absorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The family of acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes (ACSL) activates fatty acids within cells to generate long chain fatty acyl CoA (FACoA). The differing metabolic fates of FACoAs such as incorporation into neutral lipids, phospholipids, and oxidation pathways are differentially regulated by the ...

  18. Trapping of the Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase–Acyl Carrier Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Tallorin, Lorillee; Finzel, Kara; Nguyen, Quynh G.; Beld, Joris; La Clair, James J.; Burkart, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    An ideal target for metabolic engineering, fatty acid biosynthesis remains poorly understood on a molecular level. These carrier protein-dependent pathways require fundamental protein–protein interactions to guide reactivity and processivity, and their control has become one of the major hurdles in successfully adapting these biological machines. Our laboratory has developed methods to prepare acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) loaded with substrate mimetics and cross-linkers to visualize and trap interactions with partner enzymes, and we continue to expand the tools for studying these pathways. We now describe application of the slow-onset, tight-binding inhibitor triclosan to explore the interactions between the type II fatty acid ACP from Escherichia coli, AcpP, and its corresponding enoyl-ACP reductase, FabI. We show that the AcpP–triclosan complex demonstrates nM binding, inhibits in vitro activity, and can be used to isolate FabI in complex proteomes. PMID:26938266

  19. Ligand binding to the ACBD6 protein regulates the acyl-CoA transferase reactions in membranes.

    PubMed

    Soupene, Eric; Kuypers, Frans A

    2015-10-01

    The binding determinants of the human acyl-CoA binding domain-containing protein (ACBD) 6 and its function in lipid renewal of membranes were investigated. ACBD6 binds acyl-CoAs of a chain length of 6 to 20 carbons. The stoichiometry of the association could not be fitted to a 1-to-1 model. Saturation of ACBD6 by C16:0-CoA required higher concentration than less abundant acyl-CoAs. In contrast to ACBD1 and ACBD3, ligand binding did not result in the dimerization of ACBD6. The presence of fatty acids affected the binding of C18:1-CoA to ACBD6, dependent on the length, the degree of unsaturation, and the stereoisomeric conformation of their aliphatic chain. ACBD1 and ACBD6 negatively affected the formation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine in the red blood cell membrane. The acylation rate of lysophosphatidylcholine into PC catalyzed by the red cell lysophosphatidylcholine-acyltransferase 1 protein was limited by the transfer of the acyl-CoA substrate from ACBD6 to the acyltransferase enzyme. These findings provide evidence that the binding properties of ACBD6 are adapted to prevent its constant saturation by the very abundant C16:0-CoA and protect membrane systems from the detergent nature of free acyl-CoAs by controlling their release to acyl-CoA-utilizing enzymes. PMID:26290611

  20. Mutation of the Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Core LPS Biosynthesis Enzyme RfaD Confers Hypersusceptibility to Host Intestinal Innate Immunity In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Cheng-Ju; Chen, Jenn-Wei; Chiu, Hao-Chieh; Teng, Ching-Hao; Hsu, Tai-I; Lu, Pei-Jung; Syu, Wan-Jr; Wang, Sin-Tian; Chou, Ting-Chen; Chen, Chang-Shi

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is an important foodborne pathogen causing severe diseases in humans worldwide. Currently, there is no specific treatment available for EHEC infection and the use of conventional antibiotics is contraindicated. Therefore, identification of potential therapeutic targets and development of effective measures to control and treat EHEC infection are needed. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are surface glycolipids found on the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, including EHEC, and LPS biosynthesis has long been considered as potential anti-bacterial target. Here, we demonstrated that the EHEC rfaD gene that functions in the biosynthesis of the LPS inner core is required for the intestinal colonization and pathogenesis of EHEC in vivo. Disruption of the EHEC rfaD confers attenuated toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans and less bacterial colonization in the intestine of C. elegans and mouse. Moreover, rfaD is also involved in the control of susceptibility of EHEC to antimicrobial peptides and host intestinal immunity. It is worth noting that rfaD mutation did not interfere with the growth kinetics when compared to the wild-type EHEC cells. Taken together, we demonstrated that mutations of the EHEC rfaD confer hypersusceptibility to host intestinal innate immunity in vivo, and suggested that targeting the RfaD or the core LPS synthesis pathway may provide alternative therapeutic regimens for EHEC infection. PMID:27570746

  1. Mutation of the Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Core LPS Biosynthesis Enzyme RfaD Confers Hypersusceptibility to Host Intestinal Innate Immunity In vivo.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Cheng-Ju; Chen, Jenn-Wei; Chiu, Hao-Chieh; Teng, Ching-Hao; Hsu, Tai-I; Lu, Pei-Jung; Syu, Wan-Jr; Wang, Sin-Tian; Chou, Ting-Chen; Chen, Chang-Shi

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is an important foodborne pathogen causing severe diseases in humans worldwide. Currently, there is no specific treatment available for EHEC infection and the use of conventional antibiotics is contraindicated. Therefore, identification of potential therapeutic targets and development of effective measures to control and treat EHEC infection are needed. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are surface glycolipids found on the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, including EHEC, and LPS biosynthesis has long been considered as potential anti-bacterial target. Here, we demonstrated that the EHEC rfaD gene that functions in the biosynthesis of the LPS inner core is required for the intestinal colonization and pathogenesis of EHEC in vivo. Disruption of the EHEC rfaD confers attenuated toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans and less bacterial colonization in the intestine of C. elegans and mouse. Moreover, rfaD is also involved in the control of susceptibility of EHEC to antimicrobial peptides and host intestinal immunity. It is worth noting that rfaD mutation did not interfere with the growth kinetics when compared to the wild-type EHEC cells. Taken together, we demonstrated that mutations of the EHEC rfaD confer hypersusceptibility to host intestinal innate immunity in vivo, and suggested that targeting the RfaD or the core LPS synthesis pathway may provide alternative therapeutic regimens for EHEC infection. PMID:27570746

  2. Retrobiosynthetic Approach Delineates the Biosynthetic Pathway and the Structure of the Acyl Chain of Mycobacterial Glycopeptidolipids*

    PubMed Central

    Vats, Archana; Singh, Anil Kumar; Mukherjee, Raju; Chopra, Tarun; Ravindran, Madhu Sudhan; Mohanty, Debasisa; Chatterji, Dipankar; Reyrat, Jean-Marc; Gokhale, Rajesh S.

    2012-01-01

    Glycopeptidolipids (GPLs) are dominant cell surface molecules present in several non-tuberculous and opportunistic mycobacterial species. GPLs from Mycobacterium smegmatis are composed of a lipopeptide core unit consisting of a modified C26-C34 fatty acyl chain that is linked to a tetrapeptide (Phe-Thr-Ala-alaninol). The hydroxyl groups of threonine and terminal alaninol are further modified by glycosylations. Although chemical structures have been reported for 16 GPLs from diverse mycobacteria, there is still ambiguity in identifying the exact position of the hydroxyl group on the fatty acyl chain. Moreover, the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of the fatty acyl component are unknown. In this study we show that a bimodular polyketide synthase in conjunction with a fatty acyl-AMP ligase dictates the synthesis of fatty acyl chain of GPL. Based on genetic, biochemical, and structural investigations, we determine that the hydroxyl group is present at the C-5 position of the fatty acyl component. Our retrobiosynthetic approach has provided a means to understand the biosynthesis of GPLs and also resolve the long-standing debate on the accurate structure of mycobacterial GPLs. PMID:22798073

  3. Metabolism of acyl-lipids in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Beisson, Fred; Riekhof, Wayne

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae are emerging platforms for production of a suite of compounds targeting several markets, including food, nutraceuticals, green chemicals, and biofuels. Many of these products, such as biodiesel or polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), derive from lipid metabolism. A general picture of lipid metabolism in microalgae has been deduced from well characterized pathways of fungi and land plants, but recent advances in molecular and genetic analyses of microalgae have uncovered unique features, pointing out the necessity to study lipid metabolism in microalgae themselves. In the past 10 years, in addition to its traditional role as a model for photosynthetic and flagellar motility processes, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has emerged as a model organism to study lipid metabolism in green microalgae. Here, after summarizing data on total fatty acid composition, distribution of acyl-lipid classes, and major acyl-lipid molecular species found in C. reinhardtii, we review the current knowledge on the known or putative steps for fatty acid synthesis, glycerolipid desaturation and assembly, membrane lipid turnover, and oil remobilization. A list of characterized or putative enzymes for the major steps of acyl-lipid metabolism in C. reinhardtii is included, and subcellular localizations and phenotypes of associated mutants are discussed. Biogenesis and composition of Chlamydomonas lipid droplets and the potential importance of lipolytic processes in increasing cellular oil content are also highlighted. PMID:25660108

  4. Modified Acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Lindqvist, Y.; Schneider, G.

    1999-03-30

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity. 2 figs.

  5. Modified acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Lindgvist, Y.; Schneider, G.

    1998-01-06

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity. 1 fig.

  6. LuxR homolog-independent gene regulation by acyl-homoserine lactones in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chugani, Sudha; Greenberg, Everett Peter

    2010-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum control of gene expression involves three LuxR-type signal receptors LasR, RhlR, and QscR that respond to the LasI- and RhlI-generated acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) signals 3OC12-HSL and C4-HSL. We found that a LasR-RhlR-QscR triple mutant responds to acyl-HSLs by regulating at least 37 genes. LuxR homolog-independent activation of the representative genes antA and catB also occurs in the wild type. Expression of antA was influenced the most by C10-HSL and to a lesser extent by other acyl-HSLs, including the P. aeruginosa 3OC12-HSL and C4-HSL signals. The ant and cat operons encode enzymes for the degradation of anthranilate to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Our results indicate that LuxR homolog-independent acyl-HSL control of the ant and cat operons occurs via regulation of antR, which codes for the transcriptional activator of the ant operon. Although P. aeruginosa has multiple pathways for anthranilate synthesis, one pathway-the kynurenine pathway for tryptophan degradation-is required for acyl-HSL activation of the ant operon. The kynurenine pathway is also the critical source of anthranilate for energy metabolism via the antABC gene products, as well as the source of anthranilate for synthesis of the P. aeruginosa quinolone signal. Our discovery of LuxR homolog-independent responses to acyl-HSLs provides insight into acyl-HSL signaling. PMID:20498077

  7. Evidence that peroxisomal acyl-CoA synthetase is located at the cytoplasmic side of the peroxisomal membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Mannaerts, G P; Van Veldhoven, P; Van Broekhoven, A; Vandebroek, G; Debeer, L J

    1982-01-01

    1. Subfractionation by isopycnic density-gradient centrifugation in self-generating Percoll gradients of peroxisome-rich fractions prepared by differential centrifugation confirmed the presence of acyl-CoA synthetase in peroxisomes. Peroxisomes did not contain nicotinamide or adenine nucleotides other than CoA. 2. The gradient fractions most enriched in peroxisomes were pooled and the peroxisomes sedimented by centrifugation, resulting in a 50-fold-purified peroxisomal preparation as revealed by marker enzyme analysis. 3. Palmitate oxidation by intact purified peroxisomes was CoA-dependent, whereas palmitoyl-CoA oxidation was not, demonstrating that the peroxisomal CoA was available for the thiolase reaction, located in the peroxisomal matrix, but not for acyl-CoA synthetase. This suggests that the latter enzyme is located at the cytoplasmic side of the peroxisomal membrane. 4. Additional evidence for this location of peroxisomal acyl-CoA synthetase was as follows. Mechanical disruption of purified peroxisomes resulted in the release of catalase from the broken organelles, but not of acyl-CoA synthetase, indicating that the enzyme was membrane-bound. Acyl-CoA synthetase was not latent, despite the fact that at least one of its substrates appears to have a limited membrane permeability, as evidenced by the presence of CoA in purified peroxisomes. Finally, Pronase, a proteinase that does not penetrate the peroxisomal membrane, almost completely inactivated the acyl-CoA synthetase of intact peroxisomes. PMID:7115321

  8. Novel role of a triglyceride-synthesizing enzyme: DGAT1 at the crossroad between triglyceride and cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Vinay; Leopold, Christina; Bauer, Raimund; Patankar, Jay V.; Iqbal, Jahangir; Obrowsky, Sascha; Boverhof, Renze; Doktorova, Marcela; Scheicher, Bernhard; Goeritzer, Madeleine; Kolb, Dagmar; Turnbull, Andrew V.; Zimmer, Andreas; Hoefler, Gerald; Hussain, M. Mahmood; Groen, Albert K.; Kratky, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    Acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) is a key enzyme in triacylglycerol (TG) biosynthesis. Here we show that genetic deficiency and pharmacological inhibition of DGAT1 in mice alters cholesterol metabolism. Cholesterol absorption, as assessed by acute cholesterol uptake, was significantly decreased in the small intestine and liver upon DGAT1 deficiency/inhibition. Ablation of DGAT1 in the intestine (I-DGAT1−/−) alone is sufficient to cause these effects. Consequences of I-DGAT1 deficiency phenocopy findings in whole-body DGAT1−/− and DGAT1 inhibitor-treated mice. We show that deficiency/inhibition of DGAT1 affects cholesterol metabolism via reduced chylomicron size and increased trans-intestinal cholesterol excretion. These effects are independent of cholesterol uptake at the apical surface of enterocytes but mediated through altered dietary fatty acid metabolism. Our findings provide insight into a novel role of DGAT1 and identify a pathway by which intestinal DGAT1 deficiency affects whole-body cholesterol homeostasis in mice. Targeting intestinal DGAT1 may represent a novel approach for treating hypercholesterolemia. PMID:27344248

  9. Novel role of a triglyceride-synthesizing enzyme: DGAT1 at the crossroad between triglyceride and cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, Vinay; Leopold, Christina; Bauer, Raimund; Patankar, Jay V; Iqbal, Jahangir; Obrowsky, Sascha; Boverhof, Renze; Doktorova, Marcela; Scheicher, Bernhard; Goeritzer, Madeleine; Kolb, Dagmar; Turnbull, Andrew V; Zimmer, Andreas; Hoefler, Gerald; Hussain, M Mahmood; Groen, Albert K; Kratky, Dagmar

    2016-09-01

    Acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) is a key enzyme in triacylglycerol (TG) biosynthesis. Here we show that genetic deficiency and pharmacological inhibition of DGAT1 in mice alters cholesterol metabolism. Cholesterol absorption, as assessed by acute cholesterol uptake, was significantly decreased in the small intestine and liver upon DGAT1 deficiency/inhibition. Ablation of DGAT1 in the intestine (I-DGAT1(-/-)) alone is sufficient to cause these effects. Consequences of I-DGAT1 deficiency phenocopy findings in whole-body DGAT1(-/-) and DGAT1 inhibitor-treated mice. We show that deficiency/inhibition of DGAT1 affects cholesterol metabolism via reduced chylomicron size and increased trans-intestinal cholesterol excretion. These effects are independent of cholesterol uptake at the apical surface of enterocytes but mediated through altered dietary fatty acid metabolism. Our findings provide insight into a novel role of DGAT1 and identify a pathway by which intestinal DGAT1 deficiency affects whole-body cholesterol homeostasis in mice. Targeting intestinal DGAT1 may represent a novel approach for treating hypercholesterolemia. PMID:27344248

  10. Glycosyltransferases from Oat (Avena) Implicated in the Acylation of Avenacins*

    PubMed Central

    Owatworakit, Amorn; Townsend, Belinda; Louveau, Thomas; Jenner, Helen; Rejzek, Martin; Hughes, Richard K.; Saalbach, Gerhard; Qi, Xiaoquan; Bakht, Saleha; Roy, Abhijeet Deb; Mugford, Sam T.; Goss, Rebecca J. M.; Field, Robert A.; Osbourn, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Plants produce a huge array of specialized metabolites that have important functions in defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. Many of these compounds are glycosylated by family 1 glycosyltransferases (GTs). Oats (Avena spp.) make root-derived antimicrobial triterpenes (avenacins) that provide protection against soil-borne diseases. The ability to synthesize avenacins has evolved since the divergence of oats from other cereals and grasses. The major avenacin, A-1, is acylated with N-methylanthranilic acid. Previously, we have cloned and characterized three genes for avenacin synthesis (for the triterpene synthase SAD1, a triterpene-modifying cytochrome P450 SAD2, and the serine carboxypeptidase-like acyl transferase SAD7), which form part of a biosynthetic gene cluster. Here, we identify a fourth member of this gene cluster encoding a GT belonging to clade L of family 1 (UGT74H5), and show that this enzyme is an N-methylanthranilic acid O-glucosyltransferase implicated in the synthesis of avenacin A-1. Two other closely related family 1 GTs (UGT74H6 and UGT74H7) are also expressed in oat roots. One of these (UGT74H6) is able to glucosylate both N-methylanthranilic acid and benzoic acid, whereas the function of the other (UGT74H7) remains unknown. Our investigations indicate that UGT74H5 is likely to be key for the generation of the activated acyl donor used by SAD7 in the synthesis of the major avenacin, A-1, whereas UGT74H6 may contribute to the synthesis of other forms of avenacin that are acylated with benzoic acid. PMID:23258535

  11. Glycosyltransferases from oat (Avena) implicated in the acylation of avenacins.

    PubMed

    Owatworakit, Amorn; Townsend, Belinda; Louveau, Thomas; Jenner, Helen; Rejzek, Martin; Hughes, Richard K; Saalbach, Gerhard; Qi, Xiaoquan; Bakht, Saleha; Roy, Abhijeet Deb; Mugford, Sam T; Goss, Rebecca J M; Field, Robert A; Osbourn, Anne

    2013-02-01

    Plants produce a huge array of specialized metabolites that have important functions in defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. Many of these compounds are glycosylated by family 1 glycosyltransferases (GTs). Oats (Avena spp.) make root-derived antimicrobial triterpenes (avenacins) that provide protection against soil-borne diseases. The ability to synthesize avenacins has evolved since the divergence of oats from other cereals and grasses. The major avenacin, A-1, is acylated with N-methylanthranilic acid. Previously, we have cloned and characterized three genes for avenacin synthesis (for the triterpene synthase SAD1, a triterpene-modifying cytochrome P450 SAD2, and the serine carboxypeptidase-like acyl transferase SAD7), which form part of a biosynthetic gene cluster. Here, we identify a fourth member of this gene cluster encoding a GT belonging to clade L of family 1 (UGT74H5), and show that this enzyme is an N-methylanthranilic acid O-glucosyltransferase implicated in the synthesis of avenacin A-1. Two other closely related family 1 GTs (UGT74H6 and UGT74H7) are also expressed in oat roots. One of these (UGT74H6) is able to glucosylate both N-methylanthranilic acid and benzoic acid, whereas the function of the other (UGT74H7) remains unknown. Our investigations indicate that UGT74H5 is likely to be key for the generation of the activated acyl donor used by SAD7 in the synthesis of the major avenacin, A-1, whereas UGT74H6 may contribute to the synthesis of other forms of avenacin that are acylated with benzoic acid. PMID:23258535

  12. Acylation Type Determines Ghrelin's Effects on Energy Homeostasis in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, Kristy M.; Chaudhary, Nilika; Müller, Timo D.; Kirchner, Henriette; Habegger, Kirk M.; Ottaway, Nickki; Smiley, David L.; DiMarchi, Richard; Hofmann, Susanna M.; Woods, Stephen C.; Sivertsen, Bjørn; Holst, Birgitte; Pfluger, Paul T.; Perez-Tilve, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Ghrelin is a gastrointestinal polypeptide that acts through the ghrelin receptor (GHSR) to promote food intake and increase adiposity. Activation of GHSR requires the presence of a fatty-acid (FA) side chain on amino acid residue serine 3 of the ghrelin molecule. However, little is known about the role that the type of FA used for acylation plays in the biological action of ghrelin. We therefore evaluated a series of differentially acylated peptides to determine whether alterations in length or stability of the FA side chain have an impact on the ability of ghrelin to activate GHSR in vitro or to differentially alter food intake, body weight, and body composition in vivo. Fatty acids principally available in the diet (such as palmitate C16) and therefore representing potential substrates for the ghrelin-activating enzyme ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) were used for dose-, time-, and administration/route-dependent effects of ghrelin on food intake, body weight, and body composition in rats and mice. Our data demonstrate that altering the length of the FA side chain of ghrelin results in the differential activation of GHSR. Additionally, we found that acylation of ghrelin with a long-chain FA (C16) delays the acute central stimulation of food intake. Lastly, we found that, depending on acylation length, systemic and central chronic actions of ghrelin on adiposity can be enhanced or reduced. Together our data suggest that modification of the FA side-chain length can be a novel approach to modulate the efficacy of pharmacologically administered ghrelin. PMID:22865372

  13. Nitroalkane oxidase, a carbanion-forming flavoprotein homologous to acyl-CoA dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F; Orville, Allen M; Nagpal, Akanksha; Valley, Michael P

    2005-01-01

    While several flavoproteins will oxidize nitroalkanes in addition to their physiological substrates, nitroalkane oxidase (NAO) is the only one which does not require the anionic nitroalkane. This, in addition to the induction of NAO by nitroethane seen in Fusarium oxysporum, suggests that oxidation of a nitroaliphatic species is the physiological role of the enzyme. Mechanistic studies of the reaction with nitroethane as substrate have established many of the details of the enzymatic reaction. The enzyme is unique in being the only flavoprotein to date for which a carbanion is definitively established as an intermediate in catalysis. Recent structural analyses show that NAO is homologous to the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA oxidase families of enzymes. In NAO, the glutamate which acts as the active site base in the latter enzymes is replaced by an aspartate. PMID:15581574

  14. Biogenesis of ER subdomains containing DGAT2, an enzyme involved in industrial oil biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferases (DGATs) are enzymes that catalyze the committed step in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis by transferring a fatty acyl group from the acyl-CoA pool to the sn-3 position of diacylglycerol. The substrate specificity and overall activity of these enzymes play a key role...

  15. Intestinal Malrotation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines don't position themselves normally during fetal development and aren't attached inside properly as a result. The exact reason this occurs is unknown. When a fetus develops in the womb, the intestines start out ...

  16. Intestinal obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the major causes of intestinal obstruction in infants and children. Causes of paralytic ileus may include: Bacteria or viruses that cause intestinal infections ( gastroenteritis ) Chemical, electrolyte, or mineral imbalances (such as decreased ...

  17. Stability-increasing effects of anthocyanin glycosyl acylation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chang-Ling; Yu, Yu-Qi; Chen, Zhong-Jian; Wen, Guo-Song; Wei, Fu-Gang; Zheng, Quan; Wang, Chong-De; Xiao, Xing-Lei

    2017-01-01

    This review comprehensively summarizes the existing knowledge regarding the chemical implications of anthocyanin glycosyl acylation, the effects of acylation on the stability of acylated anthocyanins and the corresponding mechanisms. Anthocyanin glycosyl acylation commonly refers to the phenomenon in which the hydroxyl groups of anthocyanin glycosyls are esterified by aliphatic or aromatic acids, which is synthetically represented by the acylation sites as well as the types and numbers of acyl groups. Generally, glycosyl acylation increases the in vitro and in vivo chemical stability of acylated anthocyanins, and the mechanisms primarily involve physicochemical, stereochemical, photochemical, biochemical or environmental aspects under specific conditions. Additionally, the acylation sites as well as the types and numbers of acyl groups influence the stability of acylated anthocyanins to different degrees. This review could provide insight into the optimization of the stability of anthocyanins as well as the application of suitable anthocyanins in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. PMID:27507456

  18. Intestine Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... intestine segment, most intestine transplants involve a whole organ from a deceased donor. In addition, most intestine transplants are performed in ... blood before surgery. I am looking for ... allocation About UNOS Being a living donor Calculator - CPRA Calculator - KDPI Calculator - LAS Calculator - MELD ...

  19. Macrocyclic prolinyl acyl guanidines as inhibitors of β-secretase (BACE).

    PubMed

    Boy, Kenneth M; Guernon, Jason M; Wu, Yong-Jin; Zhang, Yunhui; Shi, Joe; Zhai, Weixu; Zhu, Shirong; Gerritz, Samuel W; Toyn, Jeremy H; Meredith, Jere E; Barten, Donna M; Burton, Catherine R; Albright, Charles F; Good, Andrew C; Grace, James E; Lentz, Kimberley A; Olson, Richard E; Macor, John E; Thompson, Lorin A

    2015-11-15

    The synthesis, evaluation, and structure-activity relationships of a class of acyl guanidines which inhibit the BACE-1 enzyme are presented. The prolinyl acyl guanidine chemotype (7c), unlike compounds of the parent isothiazole chemotype (1), yielded compounds with good agreement between their enzymatic and cellular potency as well as a reduced susceptibility to P-gp efflux. Further improvements in potency and P-gp ratio were realized via a macrocyclization strategy. The in vivo profile in wild-type mice and P-gp effects for the macrocyclic analog 21c is presented. PMID:26497283

  20. Alkylation and acylation of cyclotriphosphazenes.

    PubMed

    Benson, Mark A; Zacchini, Stefano; Boomishankar, Ramamoorthy; Chan, Yuri; Steiner, Alexander

    2007-08-20

    Phosphazenes (RNH)6P3N3 (R = n-propyl, isobutyl, isopropyl, cyclohexyl, tert-butyl, benzyl) are readily alkylated at ring N sites by alkyl halides forming N-alkyl phosphazenium cations. Alkylation of two ring N sites occurred after prolonged heating in the presence of methyl iodide or immediately at room temperature with methyl triflate yielding N,N'-dimethyl phosphazenium dications. Geminal dichloro derivatives Cl2(RNH)4P3N3 are methylated by methyl iodide at the ring N site adjacent to both P centers carrying four RNH groups. X-ray crystal structures showed that the alkylation of ring N sites leads to substantial elongation of the associated P-N bonds. Both N-alkyl and N,N'-dialkyl phosphazenium salts form complex supramolecular networks in the solid state via NH...X interactions. Systems carrying less-bulky RNH groups show additional NH...N bonds between N-alkyl phosphazenium ions. N-Alkyl phosphazenium halides form complexes with silver ions upon treatment with silver nitrate. Depending on the steric demand of RNH substituents, either one or both of the vacant ring N sites engage in coordination to silver ions. Treatment of (RNH)6P3N3 (R = isopropyl) with acetyl chloride and benzoyl chloride, respectively, yielded N-acyl phosphazenium ions. X-ray crystal structures revealed that elongation of P-N bonds adjacent to the acylated ring N site is more pronounced than it is in the case of N-alkylated species. Salts containing N-alkyl phosphazenium ions are stable toward water and other mild nucleophiles, while N,N'-dialkyl and N-acyl phosphazenium salts are readily hydrolyzed. The reaction of (RNH)6P3N3 with bromoacetic acid led to N-alkylation at one ring N site in addition to formation of an amide via condensation of an adjacent RNH substituent with the carboxylic acid group. The resulting bromide salt contains mono cations of composition (RNH)5P3N3CH2CONR in which a CH2-C(O) unit is embedded between a ring N and an exocyclic N site of the phosphazene. PMID

  1. Long chain acyl-CoA synthetases and other acyl activating enzymes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proper synthesis and breakdown of molecules containing carboxylic acids is a vital part of metabolism in all living organisms. Given the relatively inert chemical nature of many carboxylic acids, activation is a necessary step prior to use in the various anabolic and catabolic pathways that utilize...

  2. Friedel-Crafts Acylation with Amides

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Erum K.; DeSchepper, Daniel J.; Nilsson Lill, Sten O.; Klumpp, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    Friedel-Crafts acylation has been known since the 1870s and it is an important organic synthetic reaction leading to aromatic ketone products. Friedel-Crafts acylation is usually done with carboxylic acid chlorides or anhydrides while amides are generally not useful substrates in these reactions. Despite being the least reactive carboxylic acid derivative, we have found a series of amides capable of providing aromatic ketones in good yields (55–96%, 17 examples). We propose a mechanism involving diminished C-N resonance through superelectrophilic activation and subsequent cleavage to acyl cations. PMID:22690740

  3. Changes in plasma and hepatic lipids, small intestinal histology and pancreatic enzyme activity due to aging and dietary fiber in rats.

    PubMed

    Schneeman, B O; Richter, D

    1993-07-01

    Rats were fed either a control diet or a control diet supplemented with wheat bran, psyllium husk or oat bran to increase intake of fiber. Groups of rats were killed after 3.5, 10, 15, or 18.5 mo of consuming the diets. Plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were significantly higher in 18.5-mo-old than younger animals. Fiber supplementation did not prevent the age-related increase in lipids. Cecal weight, including contents, was higher in the psyllium husk and oat bran groups than control, and smooth muscle thickness in the ileum of psyllium husk and oat bran animals was greater than control. The score for torn villi in the small intestine was lower than expected in the wheat bran group. Amylase activity in the pancreas declined significantly with age in all groups. In aging animals fiber supplementation may enhance ileal compensation for decreases in proximal intestinal function but does not prevent age-related changes in the gut or in lipid concentrations. PMID:7686573

  4. An orphan esterase ABHD10 modulates probenecid acyl glucuronidation in human liver.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yusuke; Fukami, Tatsuki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Miki

    2014-12-01

    Probenecid, a widely used uricosuric agent, is mainly metabolized to probenecid acyl glucuronide (PRAG), which is considered a causal substance of severe allergic or anaphylactoid reactions. PRAG can be hydrolyzed (deglucuronidated) to probenecid. The purpose of this study was to identify enzymes responsible for probenecid acyl glucuronidation and PRAG deglucuronidation in human livers and to examine the effect of deglucuronidation in PRAG formation. In human liver homogenates (HLHs), the intrinsic clearance (CLint) of PRAG deglucuronidation was much greater (497-fold) than that of probenecid acyl glucuronidation. Evaluation of PRAG formation by recombinant UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms and an inhibition study using HLHs as an enzyme source demonstrated that multiple UGT isoforms, including UGT1A1, UGT1A9, and UGT2B7, catalyzed probenecid acyl glucuronidation. We found that recombinant α/β hydrolase domain containing 10 (ABHD10) substantially catalyzed PRAG deglucuronidation activity, whereas carboxylesterases did not. Similar inhibitory patterns by chemicals between HLHs and recombinant ABHD10 supported the major contribution of ABHD10 to PRAG deglucuronidation in human liver. Interestingly, it was demonstrated that the CLint value of probenecid acyl glucuronidation in HLHs was increased by 1.7-fold in the presence of phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, which potently inhibited ABHD10 activity. In conclusion, we found that PRAG deglucuronidation catalyzed by ABHD10 suppressively regulates PRAG formation via multiple UGT enzymes in human liver. The balance of activities by these enzymes is important for the formation of PRAG, which may be associated with the adverse reactions observed after probenecid administration. PMID:25217485

  5. A liver-specific defect of Acyl-CoA degradation produces hyperammonemia, hypoglycemia and a distinct hepatic Acyl-CoA pattern.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Nicolas; Wu, Jiang Wei; Wang, Shu Pei; Allard, Pierre; Mamer, Orval A; Sweetman, Lawrence; Moser, Ann B; Kratz, Lisa; Alvarez, Fernando; Robitaille, Yves; Lépine, François; Mitchell, Grant A

    2013-01-01

    Most conditions detected by expanded newborn screening result from deficiency of one of the enzymes that degrade acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) esters in mitochondria. The role of acyl-CoAs in the pathophysiology of these disorders is poorly understood, in part because CoA esters are intracellular and samples are not generally available from human patients. We created a mouse model of one such condition, deficiency of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (HL), in liver (HLLKO mice). HL catalyses a reaction of ketone body synthesis and of leucine degradation. Chronic HL deficiency and acute crises each produced distinct abnormal liver acyl-CoA patterns, which would not be predictable from levels of urine organic acids and plasma acylcarnitines. In HLLKO hepatocytes, ketogenesis was undetectable. Carboxylation of [2-(14)C] pyruvate diminished following incubation of HLLKO hepatocytes with the leucine metabolite 2-ketoisocaproate (KIC). HLLKO mice also had suppression of the normal hyperglycemic response to a systemic pyruvate load, a measure of gluconeogenesis. Hyperammonemia and hypoglycemia, cardinal features of many inborn errors of acyl-CoA metabolism, occurred spontaneously in some HLLKO mice and were inducible by administering KIC. KIC loading also increased levels of several leucine-related acyl-CoAs and reduced acetyl-CoA levels. Ultrastructurally, hepatocyte mitochondria of KIC-treated HLLKO mice show marked swelling. KIC-induced hyperammonemia improved following administration of carglumate (N-carbamyl-L-glutamic acid), which substitutes for the product of an acetyl-CoA-dependent reaction essential for urea cycle function, demonstrating an acyl-CoA-related mechanism for this complication. PMID:23861731

  6. A Liver-Specific Defect of Acyl-CoA Degradation Produces Hyperammonemia, Hypoglycemia and a Distinct Hepatic Acyl-CoA Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Nicolas; Wu, Jiang Wei; Wang, Shu Pei; Allard, Pierre; Mamer, Orval A.; Sweetman, Lawrence; Moser, Ann B.; Kratz, Lisa; Alvarez, Fernando; Robitaille, Yves; Lépine, François; Mitchell, Grant A.

    2013-01-01

    Most conditions detected by expanded newborn screening result from deficiency of one of the enzymes that degrade acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) esters in mitochondria. The role of acyl-CoAs in the pathophysiology of these disorders is poorly understood, in part because CoA esters are intracellular and samples are not generally available from human patients. We created a mouse model of one such condition, deficiency of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (HL), in liver (HLLKO mice). HL catalyses a reaction of ketone body synthesis and of leucine degradation. Chronic HL deficiency and acute crises each produced distinct abnormal liver acyl-CoA patterns, which would not be predictable from levels of urine organic acids and plasma acylcarnitines. In HLLKO hepatocytes, ketogenesis was undetectable. Carboxylation of [2-14C] pyruvate diminished following incubation of HLLKO hepatocytes with the leucine metabolite 2-ketoisocaproate (KIC). HLLKO mice also had suppression of the normal hyperglycemic response to a systemic pyruvate load, a measure of gluconeogenesis. Hyperammonemia and hypoglycemia, cardinal features of many inborn errors of acyl-CoA metabolism, occurred spontaneously in some HLLKO mice and were inducible by administering KIC. KIC loading also increased levels of several leucine-related acyl-CoAs and reduced acetyl-CoA levels. Ultrastructurally, hepatocyte mitochondria of KIC-treated HLLKO mice show marked swelling. KIC-induced hyperammonemia improved following administration of carglumate (N-carbamyl-L-glutamic acid), which substitutes for the product of an acetyl-CoA-dependent reaction essential for urea cycle function, demonstrating an acyl-CoA-related mechanism for this complication. PMID:23861731

  7. Protease-catalyzed peptide synthesis using inverse substrates: the influence of reaction conditions on the trypsin acyl transfer efficiency.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, V; Jakubke, H D; Zapevalova, N P; Mitin, Y V

    1991-06-01

    Benzyloxycarbonyl-L-alanine p-guanidinophenyl ester behaves as a trypsin "inverse substrate," i.e., a cationic center is included in the leaving group instead of being in the acyl moiety. Using this substrate as an acyl donor, trypsin catalyzes the synthesis of peptide bonds that cannot be split by this enzyme. An optimal acyl transfer efficiency was achieved between pH 8 and 9 at 30 degrees C.The addition of as much as 50% cosolvent was shown to be of minor influence on the acyl transfer efficiency, whereas the reaction velocity decreases by more than one order of magnitude. The efficiency of H-Leu-NH(2) and H-Val-NH(2) in deacylation is almost the same for "inverse" and normal type substrates. PMID:18600704

  8. Kinetics of acyl transfer reactions in organic media catalysed by Candida antarctica lipase B.

    PubMed

    Martinelle, M; Hult, K

    1995-09-01

    The acyl transfer reactions catalysed by Candida antartica lipase B in organic media followed a bi-bi ping-pong mechanism, with competitive substrate inhibition by the alcohols used as acyl acceptors. The effect of organic solvents on Vm and Km was investigated. The Vm values in acetonitrile was 40-50% of those in heptane. High Km values in acetonitrile compared to those in heptane could partly be explained by an increased solvation of the substrates in acetonitrile. Substrate solvation caused a 10-fold change in substrate specificity, defined as (Vm/Km)ethyl octanoate/(Vm/Km)octanoic acid, going from heptane to acetonitrile. Deacylation was the rate determining step for the acyl transfer in heptane with vinyl- and ethyl octanoate as acyl donors and (R)-2-octanol as acyl acceptor. With 1-octanol, a rate determining deacylation step in heptane was indicated using the same acyl donors. Using 1-octanol as acceptor in heptane, S-ethyl thiooctanoate had a 25- to 30-fold lower Vm/Km value and vinyl octanoate a 4-fold higher Vm/Km value than that for ethyl octanoate. The difference showed to be a Km effect for vinyl octanoate and mainly a Km effect for S-ethyl thiooctanoate. The Vm values of the esterification of octanoic acid with different alcohols was 10-30-times lower than those for the corresponding transesterification of ethyl octanoate. The low activity could be explained by a low pH around the enzyme caused by the acid or a withdrawing of active enzyme by nonproductive binding by the acid. PMID:7669809

  9. Biosynthesis of lipid a precursors: cloning, expression and partial purification of E. coli UDP-GlcNAc acyl transferase; identification of UDP-3-O-acyl-GlcNAc as its enzymatic product

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.S.; Crowell, D.N.; Schlafmann, S.E.; Raetz, C.R.H.

    1986-05-01

    The initial steps in the biosynthesis of E. coli lipid A disaccharides have been shown to proceed by two acylations of UDP-GlcNAc to form UDP-2,3-diacyl-GlcN (UDP-DAG). In vitro synthesis of UDP-DAG appears to involve a previously undescribed, monoacylated form of UDP-GlcNAc. The authors now show (1) definitive evidence that this metabolite has the structure UDP-3-O-acyl-GlcNAc, and (2) that a gene encoding or controlling this acylating enzyme is located on a 2.4 Kb fragment mapping between dnaE and cds on the E. coli chromosome. Insertion of this fragment into an expression vector directs overproduction of an enzyme catalyzing monoacylation of UDP-GlcNAc by acyl-acyl carrier protein. The activity was partially purified from an overproducing strain by chromatography of the soluble fraction of a cell extract on DEAE cellulose in the presence of 1% octyl glucoside. Peak fractions were 2200x purified relative to wild type with an 80% yield. The product generated by this enzyme was isolated from a preparative scale incubation and structurally identified by /sup 1/H-NMR.

  10. Intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rege, Aparna; Sudan, Debra

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal transplantation has now emerged as a lifesaving therapeutic option and standard of care for patients with irreversible intestinal failure. Improvement in survival over the years has justified expansion of the indications for intestinal transplantation beyond the original indications approved by Center for Medicare and Medicaid services. Management of patients with intestinal failure is complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach to accurately select candidates who would benefit from rehabilitation versus transplantation. Significant strides have been made in patient and graft survival with several advancements in the perioperative management through timely referral, improved patient selection, refinement in the surgical techniques and better understanding of the immunopathology of intestinal transplantation. The therapeutic efficacy of the procedure is well evident from continuous improvements in functional status, quality of life and cost-effectiveness of the procedure. This current review summarizes various aspects including current practices and evidence based recommendations of intestinal transplantation. PMID:27086894

  11. INTESTINAL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Tzakis, Andreas G.; Todo, Satoru; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation is often the only alternative form of treatment for patients dependent on total parenteral nutrition for survival. Although a limited number of intestinal transplantations have been performed, results with FK 506 immunosuppression are comparable to those for other organ transplants. The impact of successful intestinal transplantation on gastroenterology will likely be similar to the impact of kidney and liver transplantation on nephrology and hepatology. PMID:7515221

  12. Characterization of the acyl substrate binding pocket of acetyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Ingram-Smith, Cheryl; Woods, Barrett I; Smith, Kerry S

    2006-09-26

    AMP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase [ACS; acetate:CoA ligase (AMP-forming), EC 6.2.1.1] catalyzes the activation of acetate to acetyl-CoA in a two-step reaction. This enzyme is a member of the adenylate-forming enzyme superfamily that includes firefly luciferase, nonribosomal peptide synthetases, and acyl- and aryl-CoA synthetases/ligases. Although the structures of several superfamily members demonstrate that these enzymes have a similar fold and domain structure, the low sequence conservation and diversity of the substrates utilized have limited the utility of these structures in understanding substrate binding in more distantly related enzymes in this superfamily. The crystal structures of the Salmonella enterica ACS and Saccharomyces cerevisiae ACS1 have allowed a directed approach to investigating substrate binding and catalysis in ACS. In the S. enterica ACS structure, the propyl group of adenosine 5'-propylphosphate, which mimics the acyl-adenylate intermediate, lies in a hydrophobic pocket. Modeling of the Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus Z245 ACS (MT-ACS1) on the S. cerevisiae ACS structure showed similar active site architecture, and alignment of the amino acid sequences of proven ACSs indicates that the four residues that compose the putative acetate binding pocket are well conserved. These four residues, Ile312, Thr313, Val388, and Trp416 of MT-ACS1, were targeted for alteration, and our results support that they do indeed form the acetate binding pocket and that alterations at these positions significantly alter the enzyme's affinity for acetate as well as the range of acyl substrates that can be utilized. In particular, Trp416 appears to be the primary determinant for acyl chain length that can be accommodated in the binding site. PMID:16981708

  13. Acyl-homoserine-lactone autoinducer (AHL) in the gastrointestinal tract of feedlot cattle and correlation to season, E. coli 0157:H7 prevalence and diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acyl-homoserine-lactone autoinducer (AHL) produced by non-enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) species in cattle appears to be required for EHEC colonization of the gastro¬intestinal tract (GIT). The objectives of the current research were to examine the effect of season, diet, EHEC shedding, and locat...

  14. Aberrant protein acylation is a common observation in inborn errors of acyl-CoA metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pougovkina, Olga; Te Brinke, Heleen; Wanders, Ronald J A; Houten, Sander M; de Boer, Vincent C J

    2014-09-01

    Inherited disorders of acyl-CoA metabolism, such as defects in amino acid metabolism and fatty acid oxidation can present with severe clinical symptoms either neonatally or later in life, but the pathophysiological mechanisms are often incompletely understood. We now report the discovery of a novel biochemical mechanism that could contribute to the pathophysiology of these disorders. We identified increased protein lysine butyrylation in short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficient mice as a result of the accumulation of butyryl-CoA. Similarly, in SCAD deficient fibroblasts, lysine butyrylation was increased. Furthermore, malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD) deficient patient cells had increased levels of malonylated lysines and propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) deficient patient cells had increased propionylation of lysines. Since lysine acylation can greatly impact protein function, aberrant lysine acylation in inherited disorders associated with acyl-CoA accumulation may well play a role in their disease pathophysiology. PMID:24531926

  15. Microbial Tailoring of Acyl Peptidic Siderophores

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Marine bacteria produce an abundance of suites of acylated siderophores characterized by a unique, species-dependent headgroup that binds iron(III) and one of a series of fatty acid appendages. Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 produces a suite of seven acylated marinobactins, with fatty acids ranging from saturated and unsaturated C12–C18 fatty acids. In the present study, we report that in the late log phase of growth, the fatty acids are hydrolyzed by an amide hydrolase producing the peptidic marinobactin headgroup. Halomonas aquamarina str. DS40M3, another marine bacterium isolated originally from the same sample of open ocean water as Marinobacter sp. DS40M6, produces the acyl aquachelins, also as a suite composed of a peptidic headgroup distinct from that of the marinobactins. In contrast to the acyl marinobactins, hydrolysis of the suite of acyl aquachelins is not detected, even when H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 is grown into the stationary phase. The Marinobacter cell-free extract containing the acyl amide hydrolase is active toward exogenous acyl-peptidic siderophores (e.g., aquachelin C, loihichelin C, as well as octanoyl homoserine lactone used in quorum sensing). Further, when H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 is cultured together with Marinobacter sp. DS40M6, the fatty acids of both suites of siderophores are hydrolyzed, and the aquachelin headgroup is also produced. The present study demonstrates that coculturing bacteria leads to metabolically tailored metabolites compared to growth in a single pure culture, which is interesting given the importance of siderophore-mediated iron acquisition for bacterial growth and that Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 and H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 were isolated from the same sample of seawater. PMID:24735218

  16. Microbial tailoring of acyl peptidic siderophores.

    PubMed

    Gauglitz, Julia M; Iinishi, Akira; Ito, Yusai; Butler, Alison

    2014-04-29

    Marine bacteria produce an abundance of suites of acylated siderophores characterized by a unique, species-dependent headgroup that binds iron(III) and one of a series of fatty acid appendages. Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 produces a suite of seven acylated marinobactins, with fatty acids ranging from saturated and unsaturated C12-C18 fatty acids. In the present study, we report that in the late log phase of growth, the fatty acids are hydrolyzed by an amide hydrolase producing the peptidic marinobactin headgroup. Halomonas aquamarina str. DS40M3, another marine bacterium isolated originally from the same sample of open ocean water as Marinobacter sp. DS40M6, produces the acyl aquachelins, also as a suite composed of a peptidic headgroup distinct from that of the marinobactins. In contrast to the acyl marinobactins, hydrolysis of the suite of acyl aquachelins is not detected, even when H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 is grown into the stationary phase. The Marinobacter cell-free extract containing the acyl amide hydrolase is active toward exogenous acyl-peptidic siderophores (e.g., aquachelin C, loihichelin C, as well as octanoyl homoserine lactone used in quorum sensing). Further, when H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 is cultured together with Marinobacter sp. DS40M6, the fatty acids of both suites of siderophores are hydrolyzed, and the aquachelin headgroup is also produced. The present study demonstrates that coculturing bacteria leads to metabolically tailored metabolites compared to growth in a single pure culture, which is interesting given the importance of siderophore-mediated iron acquisition for bacterial growth and that Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 and H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 were isolated from the same sample of seawater. PMID:24735218

  17. Intestinal Parasitoses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagardere, Bernard; Dumburgier, Elisabeth

    1994-01-01

    Intestinal parasites have become a serious public health problem in tropical countries because of the climate and the difficulty of achieving efficient hygiene. The objectives of this journal issue are to increase awareness of the individual and collective repercussions of intestinal parasites, describe the current conditions of contamination and…

  18. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason Blood in the stool A lump in the abdomen Imaging tests that create pictures of the small ... help diagnose intestinal cancer and show whether it has spread. Surgery is ...

  19. Remodeling of host phosphatidylcholine by Chlamydia acyltransferase is regulated by acyl-CoA binding protein ACBD6 associated with lipid droplets

    PubMed Central

    Soupene, Eric; Wang, Derek; Kuypers, Frans A

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis invades cells as an infectious elementary body (EB). The EB is internalized into a vacuole that is hidden from the host defense mechanism, and is modified to sustain the development of the replicative reticulate body (RB). Inside this parasitophorous compartment, called the inclusion, the pathogen survives supported by an active exchange of nutrients and proteins with the host cell. We show that host lipids are scavenged and modified into bacterial-specific lipids by the action of a shared human-bacterial acylation mechanism. The bacterial acylating enzymes for the essential lipids 1-acyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate and 1-acyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine were identified as CT453 and CT775, respectively. Bacterial CT775 was found to be associated with lipid droplets (LDs). During the development of C. trachomatis, the human acyl-CoA carrier hACBD6 was recruited to cytosolic LDs and translocated into the inclusion. hACBD6 protein modulated the activity of CT775 in an acyl-CoA dependent fashion and sustained the activity of the bacterial acyltransferase by buffering the concentration of acyl-CoAs. We propose that disruption of the binding activity of the acyl-CoA carrier might represent a new drug-target to prevent growth of C. trachomatis. PMID:25604091

  20. Duodenal brush-border mucosal glucose transport and enzyme activities in aging man and effect of bacterial contamination of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wallis, J L; Lipski, P S; Mathers, J C; James, O F; Hirst, B H

    1993-03-01

    Duodenal biopsies were collected from 38 subjects (24 female and 14 male) ranging in age from 55 to 91 years. Evidence of bacterial contamination of the small bowel (BCSB) was sought at the same time by bacterial culture of duodenal aspirates and by hydrogen and [14C]glycocholic acid breath tests; subjects were considered to be positive for BCSB if any one of the three tests was abnormal. Biopsies were analyzed for six brush-border membrane enzyme activities: maltase, sucrase, lactase, alkaline phosphatase, leucine aminopeptidase, and alpha-glucosidase. Analysis of covariance with age as the covariate indicated no significant effect of age on the specific activities of these enzymes. Mucosal Na(+)-dependent glucose transport was quantified in brush-border membrane vesicles prepared from the biopsies. In all groups, glucose transport at 20-30 sec was greater (ranging from mean values of 2.45 to 3.66 times) than at 45 min, consistent with Na(+)-coupled glucose transport, and no significant effect of age was observed. BCSB had no significant effect on specific activities of any of the duodenal mucosal hydrolases but was associated with reduced (P = 0.05) brush-border glucose transport. None of the variables studied was significantly affected by the gender of subjects. In conclusion, these biochemical data do not support the contention that reduced capacity for carbohydrate absorption in the elderly is explained by reductions in duodenal brush-border mucosal disaccharidase activities or glucose transport. PMID:8444069

  1. Structural Basis for Substrate Specificity in Adenosylcobalamin-dependent Isobutyryl-CoA Mutase and Related Acyl-CoA Mutases.

    PubMed

    Jost, Marco; Born, David A; Cracan, Valentin; Banerjee, Ruma; Drennan, Catherine L

    2015-11-01

    Acyl-CoA mutases are a growing class of adenosylcobalamin-dependent radical enzymes that perform challenging carbon skeleton rearrangements in primary and secondary metabolism. Members of this class of enzymes must precisely control substrate positioning to prevent oxidative interception of radical intermediates during catalysis. Our understanding of substrate specificity and catalysis in acyl-CoA mutases, however, is incomplete. Here, we present crystal structures of IcmF, a natural fusion protein variant of isobutyryl-CoA mutase, in complex with the adenosylcobalamin cofactor and four different acyl-CoA substrates. These structures demonstrate how the active site is designed to accommodate the aliphatic acyl chains of each substrate. The structures suggest that a conformational change of the 5'-deoxyadenosyl group from C2'-endo to C3'-endo could contribute to initiation of catalysis. Furthermore, detailed bioinformatic analyses guided by our structural findings identify critical determinants of acyl-CoA mutase substrate specificity and predict new acyl-CoA mutase-catalyzed reactions. These results expand our understanding of the substrate specificity and the catalytic scope of acyl-CoA mutases and could benefit engineering efforts for biotechnological applications ranging from production of biofuels and commercial products to hydrocarbon remediation. PMID:26318610

  2. Biochemical analysis of the substrate specificity of the beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase domain of module 2 of the erythromycin polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiaquan; Kinoshita, Kenji; Khosla, Chaitan; Cane, David E

    2004-12-28

    The beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase (KS) domain of the modular 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase (DEBS) catalyzes the fundamental chain building reaction of polyketide biosynthesis. The KS-catalyzed reaction involves two discrete steps consisting of formation of an acyl-enzyme intermediate generated from the incoming acylthioester substrate and an active site cysteine residue, and the conversion of this intermediate to the beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein product by a decarboxylative condensation with a paired methylmalonyl-SACP. We have determined the rate constants for the individual biochemical steps by a combination of protein acylation and transthioesterification experiments. The first-order rate constant (k(2)) for formation of the acyl-enzyme intermediate from [1-(14)C]-(2S,3R)-2-methyl-3-hydroxypentanoyl-SNAC (2) and recombinant DEBS module 2 is 5.8 +/- 2.6 min(-)(1), with a dissociation constant (K(S)) of 3.5 +/- 2.8 mM. The acyl-enzyme adduct was formed at a near-stoichiometric ratio of approximately 0.8:1. Transthioesterification between unlabeled diketide-SNAC 2 and N-[1-(14)C-acetyl]cysteamine gave a k(exch) of 0.15 +/- 0.06 min(-)(1), with a K(m) for HSNAC of 5.7 +/- 4.9 mM and a K(m) for 2 of 5.3 +/- 0.9 mM. Under the conditions that were used, k(exch) was equal to k(-)(2), the first-order rate constant for reversal of the acyl-enzyme-forming reaction. Since the rate of the decarboxylative condensation is much greater that the rate of reversion to the starting material (k(3) > k(-)(2)), formation of the acyl-enzyme adduct is effectively irreversible, thereby establishing that the observed value of the specificity constant (k(cat)/K(m)) is solely a reflection of the intrinsic substrate specificity of the KS-catalyzed acyl-enzyme-forming reaction. These findings were also extended to a panel of diketide- and triketide-SNAC analogues, revealing that some substrate analogues that are not converted to product by DEBS module 2 form dead

  3. Phasic study of intestinal homeostasis disruption in experimental intestinal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiang-Yang; Zou, Chang-Lin; Zhou, Zhen-Li; Shan, Tao; Li, Dong-Hua; Cui, Nai-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the phasic alteration of intestinal homeostasis in an experimental model of intestinal obstruction. METHODS: A rabbit model of intestinal obstruction was established by transforming parts of an infusion set into an in vivo pulled-type locking clamp and creating a uniform controllable loop obstruction in the mesenteric non-avascular zone 8 cm from the distal end of the ileum. The phasic alteration of intestinal homeostasis was studied after intestinal obstruction. The changes in goblet cells, intraepithelial lymphocytes, lamina propria lymphocytes, and intestinal epithelium were quantified from periodic acid-Schiff-stained sections. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity and serum citrulline levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Claudin 1 mRNA expression was examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Intestinal microorganisms, wet/dry weight ratios, pH values, and endotoxin levels were determined at multiple points after intestinal obstruction. Furthermore, the number and ratio of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were determined by flow cytometry, and secretory IgA levels were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: A suitable controllable rabbit model of intestinal obstruction was established. Intestinal obstruction induced goblet cell damage and reduced cell number. Further indicators of epithelial cell damage were observed as reduced serum citrulline levels and claudin 1 gene expression, and a transient increase in ODC activity. In addition, the wet/dry weight ratio and pH of the intestinal lumen were also dramatically altered. The ratio of Bacillus bifidus and enterobacteria was reversed following intestinal obstruction. The number and area of Peyer’s patches first increased then sharply decreased after the intestinal obstruction, along with an alteration in the ratio of CD4/CD8+ T cells, driven by an increase in CD3+ and CD8+ T cells and a decrease in CD4+ T cells. The number of

  4. Cloning, characterization, and expression analysis of acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP)-thioesterase B from seeds of Chinese Spicehush (Lindera communis).

    PubMed

    Dong, Shubin; Huang, Jiacong; Li, Yannan; Zhang, Jing; Lin, Shanzhi; Zhang, Zhixiang

    2014-05-25

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases (TE EC 3.1.2.14) are fatty acid biosynthesis key enzymes that determine fatty acid carbon chain length in most plant tissues. A full-length cDNA corresponding to one of the fatty acyl-ACP thioesterase (Fat) genes, designated LcFatB, was isolated from developing Lindera communis seeds using PCR and RACE with degenerate primers based on conserved sequences of multiple TE gene sequences obtained from GenBank. The 1788 bp cDNA had an open reading frame (ORF) of 1260 bp encoding a protein of 419 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 61-73% identity to proteins in the FatB class of plant thioesterases. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that LcFatB was expressed in all tissues of L. communis, with the highest expression in the developing seeds 75days after flowering. Recombinant pET-MLcFatB was constructed using the pET-30 a vector and transformed into Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)△FadE, a strain that deleted the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (FadE). SDS-PAGE analysis of proteins isolated from pET-MLcFatB E. coli cells after induction with IPTG revealed a protein band at ~40.5kDa, corresponding to the predicted size of LcFatB mature protein. The decanoic acid and lauric acid contents of the pET-MLcFatB transformant were increased significantly. These findings suggest that an LcFatB gene from a non-traditional oil-seed tree could be used to function as a saturated acyl-ACP thioesterase and could potentially be used to modify the fatty acid composition of seed oil from L. communis or other species through transgenic approaches. PMID:24631366

  5. Transgenic rice seed expressing flavonoid biosynthetic genes accumulate glycosylated and/or acylated flavonoids in protein bodies.

    PubMed

    Ogo, Yuko; Mori, Tetsuya; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Saito, Kazuki; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Plant-specialized (or secondary) metabolites represent an important source of high-value chemicals. In order to generate a new production platform for these metabolites, an attempt was made to produce flavonoids in rice seeds. Metabolome analysis of these transgenic rice seeds using liquid chromatography-photodiode array-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was performed. A total of 4392 peaks were detected in both transgenic and non-transgenic rice, 20-40% of which were only detected in transgenic rice. Among these, 82 flavonoids, including 37 flavonols, 11 isoflavones, and 34 flavones, were chemically assigned. Most of the flavonols and isoflavones were O-glycosylated, while many flavones were O-glycosylated and/or C-glycosylated. Several flavonoids were acylated with malonyl, feruloyl, acetyl, and coumaroyl groups. These glycosylated/acylated flavonoids are thought to have been biosynthesized by endogenous rice enzymes using newly synthesized flavonoids whose biosynthesis was catalysed by exogenous enzymes. The subcellular localization of the flavonoids differed depending on the class of aglycone and the glycosylation/acylation pattern. Therefore, flavonoids with the intended aglycones were efficiently produced in rice seeds via the exogenous enzymes introduced, while the flavonoids were variously glycosylated/acylated by endogenous enzymes. The results suggest that rice seeds are useful not only as a production platform for plant-specialized metabolites such as flavonoids but also as a tool for expanding the diversity of flavonoid structures, providing novel, physiologically active substances. PMID:26438413

  6. Transgenic rice seed expressing flavonoid biosynthetic genes accumulate glycosylated and/or acylated flavonoids in protein bodies

    PubMed Central

    Ogo, Yuko; Mori, Tetsuya; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Saito, Kazuki; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Plant-specialized (or secondary) metabolites represent an important source of high-value chemicals. In order to generate a new production platform for these metabolites, an attempt was made to produce flavonoids in rice seeds. Metabolome analysis of these transgenic rice seeds using liquid chromatography-photodiode array-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was performed. A total of 4392 peaks were detected in both transgenic and non-transgenic rice, 20–40% of which were only detected in transgenic rice. Among these, 82 flavonoids, including 37 flavonols, 11 isoflavones, and 34 flavones, were chemically assigned. Most of the flavonols and isoflavones were O-glycosylated, while many flavones were O-glycosylated and/or C-glycosylated. Several flavonoids were acylated with malonyl, feruloyl, acetyl, and coumaroyl groups. These glycosylated/acylated flavonoids are thought to have been biosynthesized by endogenous rice enzymes using newly synthesized flavonoids whose biosynthesis was catalysed by exogenous enzymes. The subcellular localization of the flavonoids differed depending on the class of aglycone and the glycosylation/acylation pattern. Therefore, flavonoids with the intended aglycones were efficiently produced in rice seeds via the exogenous enzymes introduced, while the flavonoids were variously glycosylated/acylated by endogenous enzymes. The results suggest that rice seeds are useful not only as a production platform for plant-specialized metabolites such as flavonoids but also as a tool for expanding the diversity of flavonoid structures, providing novel, physiologically active substances. PMID:26438413

  7. Ricinus communis contains and acyl-CoA synthetase that preferentially activates ricinoleate to its CoA thioester

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of our effort to identify enzymes that are critical for producing large amounts of ricinoleate in castor oil, we have isolated three cDNAs encoding acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) in the castor plant. Analysis of the cDNA sequences reveals that two of them, designated RcACS 2 and RcACS 4, contain...

  8. Characterization of soluble acyl-ACP desaturases from Camelina sativa, Macadamia tetraphylla and Dolichandra unguis-cati.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Manuel Fernando Rodríguez; Sánchez-García, Alicia; Salas, Joaquín J; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2015-04-15

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturases (EC 1.14.19.2) are soluble enzymes that catalyse the insertion of a double bond into saturated fatty acid bound in saturated acyl chains bound to ACP in higher plants, producing cis-monounsaturated fatty acids. Three types of soluble acyl-ACP desaturases have been described: Δ(9)-acyl-ACP, Δ(6)-acyl-ACP and Δ(4)-acyl-ACP desaturases, which differ in the substrate specificity and the position in which the double bond is introduced. In the present work, Camelina sativa (CsSAD), Macadamia tetraphylla (MtSAD) and Dolichandra unguis-cati (DuSAD) desaturases were cloned, sequenced and characterized. Single copies of CsSAD, MtSAD and DuSAD with three, one and two different alleles, respectively, were found. The corresponding mature proteins were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli for biochemical characterization in protein extracts. The recombinant CsSAD enzyme showed 300-fold higher specificity towards 18:0-ACP than 16:0-ACP. Similar profile exhibited MtSAD although the differences in the specificity were lower, around 170-fold higher for 18:0-ACP than 16:0-ACP. Furthermore, DuSAD presented a profile showing preference towards 16:0-ACP against 18:0-ACP, around twice more, being so a Δ(9) palmitoyl-ACP desaturase. Also, we reported the expression profile of CsSAD, which showed the highest levels of expression in expanding tissues that typically are very active in lipid biosynthesis such as developing seed endosperm. Moreover, the possibility to express a new desaturase in C. sativa (oilseed crop that store high levels of oil and is easy to transform) to create a new line rich in short monounsaturated fatty acid is discussed. PMID:25765361

  9. Isolation of Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase inhibitor from Persicaria vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Song, Hye Young; Rho, Mun-Chual; Lee, Seung Woong; Kwon, Oh Eok; Chang, Young-Duck; Lee, Hyun Sun; Kim, Young-Kook

    2002-09-01

    In the course of our search for Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitors from natural sources, a new type of ACAT inhibitor was isolated from the methanol extract of Persicaria vulgaris. On the basis of spectral evidence, the structure of the active compound was identified as pheophorbide A. Pheophorbide A inhibited ACAT activity with an IC 50 value of 1.1 microg/ml in an enzyme assay using rat liver microsomes with a dose dependent fashion. PMID:12357403

  10. Sticky swinging arm dynamics: studies of an acyl carrier protein domain from the mycolactone polyketide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Steven; Tkachenko, Olga; Thomas, Ben; Bassuni, Mona; Hong, Hui; Nietlispach, Daniel; Broadhurst, William

    2016-01-01

    Type I modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) produce polyketide natural products by passing a growing acyl substrate chain between a series of enzyme domains housed within a gigantic multifunctional polypeptide assembly. Throughout each round of chain extension and modification reactions, the substrate stays covalently linked to an acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain. In the present study we report on the solution structure and dynamics of an ACP domain excised from MLSA2, module 9 of the PKS system that constructs the macrolactone ring of the toxin mycolactone, cause of the tropical disease Buruli ulcer. After modification of apo ACP with 4′-phosphopantetheine (Ppant) to create the holo form, 15N nuclear spin relaxation and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) experiments suggest that the prosthetic group swings freely. The minimal chemical shift perturbations displayed by Ppant-attached C3 and C4 acyl chains imply that these substrate-mimics remain exposed to solvent at the end of a flexible Ppant arm. By contrast, hexanoyl and octanoyl chains yield much larger chemical shift perturbations, indicating that they interact with the surface of the domain. The solution structure of octanoyl-ACP shows the Ppant arm bending to allow the acyl chain to nestle into a nonpolar pocket, whereas the prosthetic group itself remains largely solvent exposed. Although the highly reduced octanoyl group is not a natural substrate for the ACP from MLSA2, similar presentation modes would permit partner enzyme domains to recognize an acyl group while it is bound to the surface of its carrier protein, allowing simultaneous interactions with both the substrate and the ACP. PMID:26920023

  11. Degradation of endogenous bacterial cell wall polymers by the muralytic enzyme mutanolysin prevents hepatobiliary injury in genetically susceptible rats with experimental intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    PubMed Central

    Lichtman, S N; Okoruwa, E E; Keku, J; Schwab, J H; Sartor, R B

    1992-01-01

    Jejunal self-filling blind loops with subsequent small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SBBO) induce hepatobiliary injury in genetically susceptible Lewis rats. Lesions consist of portal tract inflammation, bile duct proliferation, and destruction. To determine the pathogenesis of SBBO-induced hepatobiliary injury, we treated Lewis rats with SBBO by using several agents with different mechanisms of activity. Buffer treatment, ursodeoxycholic acid, prednisone, methotrexate, and cyclosporin A failed to prevent SBBO-induced injury as demonstrated by increased plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and elevated histology scores. However, hepatic injury was prevented by mutanolysin, a muralytic enzyme whose only known activity is to split the beta 1-4 N-acetylmuramyl-N-acetylglucosamine linkage of peptidoglycan-polysaccharide (PG-PS), a bacterial cell wall polymer with potent inflammatory and immunoregulatory properties. Mutanolysin therapy started on the day blind loops were surgically created and continued for 8 wk significantly diminished AST (101 +/- 37 U/liter) and liver histology scores (2.2 +/- 2.7) compared to buffer-treated rats (228 +/- 146 U/liter, P < 0.05, 8.2 +/- 1.9, P < 0.001 respectively). Mutanolysin treatment started during the early phase of hepatic injury, 16-21 d after surgery, decreased AST in 7 of 11 rats from 142 +/- 80 to 103 +/- 24 U/liter contrasted to increased AST in 9 of 11 buffer-treated rats from 108 +/- 52 to 247 +/- 142 U/liter, P < 0.05. Mutanolysin did not change total bacterial numbers within the loop, eliminate Bacteroides sp., have in vitro antibiotic effects, or diminish mucosal PG-PS transport. However, mutanolysin treatment prevented elevation of plasma anti-PG antibodies and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) levels which occurred in buffer treated rats with SBBO and decreased TNF alpha production in isolated Kupffer cells stimulated in vitro with PG-PS. Based on the preventive and therapeutic activity of this highly specific

  12. Acyl silicates and acyl aluminates as activated intermediates in peptide formation on clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. H.; Kennedy, R. M.; Macklin, J.

    1984-01-01

    Glycine reacts with heating on dried clays and other minerals to give peptides in much better yield than in the absence of mineral. This reaction was proposed to occur by way of an activated intermediate such as an acyl silicate or acyl aluminate analogous to acyl phosphates involved in several biochemical reactions including peptide bond synthesis. The proposed mechanism has been confirmed by trapping the intermediate, as well as by direct spectroscopic observation of a related intermediate. The reaction of amino acids on periodically dried mineral surfaces represents a widespead, geologically realistic setting for prebiotic peptide formation via in situ activation.

  13. Intestinal obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    Obstruction of the bowel may due to: A mechanical cause, which means something is in the way ... lung disease Use of certain medicines, especially narcotics Mechanical causes of intestinal obstruction may include: Adhesions or ...

  14. Mechanisms involved in the intestinal absorption of dietary vitamin A and provitamin A carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Earl H

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin A is an essential nutrient for humans and is converted to the visual chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, and to the hormone, retinoic acid. Vitamin A in animal-derived foods is found as long chain acyl esters of retinol and these are digested to free fatty acids and retinol before uptake by the intestinal mucosal cell. The retinol is then reesterified to retinyl esters for incorporation into chlylomicrons and absorbed via the lymphatics or effluxed into the portal circulation facilitated by the lipid transporter, ABCA1. Provitamin A carotenoids such as β-carotene are found in plant-derived foods. These and other carotenoids are transported into the mucosal cell by scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). Provitamin A carotenoids are partly converted to retinol by oxygenase and reductase enzymes and the retinol so produced is available for absorption via the two pathways described above. The efficiency of vitamin A and carotenoid intestinal absorption is determined by the regulation of a number of proteins involved in the process. Polymorphisms in genes for these proteins lead to individual variability in the metabolism and transport of vitamin A and carotenoids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Retinoid and Lipid Metabolism. PMID:21718801

  15. Identification of N-Acyl Phosphatidylserine Molecules in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ziqiang; Li, Shengrong; Smith, Dale C.; Shaw, Walter A.; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2008-01-01

    While profiling the lipidome of the mouse brain by mass spectrometry, we discovered a novel family of N-acyl phosphatidylserine (N-acyl-PS) molecules. These N-acyl-PS species were enriched by DEAE-cellulose column chromatography, and they were then characterized by accurate mass measurements, tandem mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and comparison to an authentic standard. Mouse brain N-acyl-PS molecules are heterogeneous and constitute about 0.1 % of the total lipid. In addition to various ester-linked fatty acyl chains on their glycerol backbones, the complexity of the N-acyl-PS series is further increased by the presence of diverse amide-linked N-acyl chains, which include saturated, mono-unsaturated and poly-unsaturated species. N-acyl-PS molecular species were also detected in the lipids of pig brain, mouse RAW264.7 macrophage tumor cells and yeast, but not E. coli. N-acyl-PSs may be biosynthetic precursors of N-acyl serine molecules, such as the recently reported signaling lipid N-arachidonoyl serine from bovine brain. We suggest that a phospholipase D might cleave N-acyl-PS to generate N-acyl serine, in analogy to the biosynthesis of the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anadamide) from N-arachidonoyl phosphatidylethanolamine. PMID:18031065

  16. Structure of YciA from Haemophilus influenzae (HI0827), a Hexameric Broad Specificity Acyl-Coenzyme A Thioesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, Mark A.; Zhuang, Zhihao; Song, Feng; Howard, Andrew; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Herzberg, Osnat

    2008-04-02

    The crystal structure of HI0827 from Haemophilus influenzae Rd KW20, initially annotated 'hypothetical protein' in sequence databases, exhibits an acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioesterase 'hot dog' fold with a trimer of dimers oligomeric association, a novel assembly for this enzyme family. In studies described in the preceding paper [Zhuang, Z., Song, F., Zhao, H., Li, L., Cao, J., Eisenstein, E., Herzberg, O., and Dunaway-Mariano, D. (2008) Biochemistry 47, 2789-2796], HI0827 is shown to be an acyl-CoA thioesterase that acts on a wide range of acyl-CoA compounds. Two substrate binding sites are located across the dimer interface. The binding sites are occupied by two CoA molecules, one with full occupancy and the second only partially occupied. The CoA molecules, acquired from HI0827-expressing Escherichia coli cells, remained tightly bound to the enzyme through the protein purification steps. The difference in CoA occupancies indicates a different substrate affinity for each of the binding sites, which in turn implies that the enzyme might be subject to allosteric regulation. Mutagenesis studies have shown that the replacement of the putative catalytic carboxylate Asp44 with an alanine residue abolishes activity. The impact of this mutation is seen in the crystal structure of D44A HI0827. Whereas the overall fold and assembly of the mutant protein are the same as those of the wild-type enzyme, the CoA ligands are absent. The dimer interface is perturbed, and the channel that accommodates the thioester acyl chain is more open and wider than that observed in the wild-type enzyme. A model of intact substrate bound to wild-type HI0827 provides a structural rationale for the broad substrate range.

  17. Small Intestine Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease Crohn's disease Infections Intestinal cancer Intestinal obstruction Irritable bowel syndrome Ulcers, such as peptic ulcer Treatment of disorders of the small intestine depends on the cause.

  18. High acyl gellan as an emulsion stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Joice Aline Pires; da Cunha, Rosiane Lopes

    2016-03-30

    High acyl gellan (0.01-0.2% w/w) was used as stabilizer in oil in water emulsions containing 30% (w/w) of sunflower oil and prepared under different process conditions. Stable emulsions to phase separation could be obtained using high acyl gellan (HA) content above 0.05% (w/w), while low acyl gellan (LA) prepared at the same conditions could not stabilize emulsions. Emulsions properties depended on the process used to mix the oil and gellan dispersion since high pressure homogenization favored stabilization while very high energy density applied by ultrasound led to systems destabilization. Emulsions prepared using high pressure homogenization showed zeta potential values ranging from -50 up to -59 mV, suggesting that electrostatic repulsion could be contributing to the systems stability. Rheological properties of continuous phase were also responsible for emulsions stabilization, since HA gellan dispersions showed high viscosity and gel-like behavior. The high viscosity of the continuous phase could be associated to the presence of high acyl gellan microgels/aggregates. Disentanglement of these aggregates performed by ultrasound strongly decreased the viscosity and consequently affected the emulsions behavior, reducing the stability to phase separation. PMID:26794954

  19. Novel Strategies for Upstream and Downstream Processing of Tannin Acyl Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Durán, Luis V.; Valdivia-Urdiales, Blanca; Contreras-Esquivel, Juan C.; Rodríguez-Herrera, Raúl; Aguilar, Cristóbal N.

    2011-01-01

    Tannin acyl hydrolase also referred as tannase is an enzyme with important applications in several science and technology fields. Due to its hydrolytic and synthetic properties, tannase could be used to reduce the negative effects of tannins in beverages, food, feed, and tannery effluents, for the production of gallic acid from tannin-rich materials, the elucidation of tannin structure, and the synthesis of gallic acid esters in nonaqueous media. However, industrial applications of tannase are still very limited due to its high production cost. Thus, there is a growing interest in the production, recovery, and purification of this enzyme. Recently, there have been published a number of papers on the improvement of upstream and downstream processing of the enzyme. These papers dealt with the search for new tannase producing microorganisms, the application of novel fermentation systems, optimization of culture conditions, the production of the enzyme by recombinant microorganism, and the design of efficient protocols for tannase recovery and purification. The present work reviews the state of the art of basic and biotechnological aspects of tannin acyl hydrolase, focusing on the recent advances in the upstream and downstream processing of the enzyme. PMID:21941633

  20. Kinetic and Structural Basis for Acyl-Group Selectivity and NAD(+) Dependence in Sirtuin-Catalyzed Deacylation.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Jessica L; Dittenhafer-Reed, Kristin E; Kudo, Norio; Thelen, Julie N; Ito, Akihiro; Yoshida, Minoru; Denu, John M

    2015-05-19

    Acylation of lysine is an important protein modification regulating diverse biological processes. It was recently demonstrated that members of the human Sirtuin family are capable of catalyzing long chain deacylation, in addition to the well-known NAD(+)-dependent deacetylation activity [Feldman, J. L., Baeza, J., and Denu, J. M. (2013) J. Biol. Chem. 288, 31350-31356]. Here we provide a detailed kinetic and structural analysis that describes the interdependence of NAD(+)-binding and acyl-group selectivity for a diverse series of human Sirtuins, SIRT1-SIRT3 and SIRT6. Steady-state and rapid-quench kinetic analyses indicated that differences in NAD(+) saturation and susceptibility to nicotinamide inhibition reflect unique kinetic behavior displayed by each Sirtuin and depend on acyl substrate chain length. Though the rate of nucleophilic attack of the 2'-hydroxyl on the C1'-O-alkylimidate intermediate varies with acyl substrate chain length, this step remains rate-determining for SIRT2 and SIRT3; however, for SIRT6, this step is no longer rate-limiting for long chain substrates. Cocrystallization of SIRT2 with myristoylated peptide and NAD(+) yielded a co-complex structure with reaction product 2'-O-myristoyl-ADP-ribose, revealing a latent hydrophobic cavity to accommodate the long chain acyl group, and suggesting a general mechanism for long chain deacylation. Comparing two separately determined co-complex structures containing either a myristoylated peptide or 2'-O-myristoyl-ADP-ribose indicates there are conformational changes at the myristoyl-ribose linkage with minimal structural differences in the enzyme active site. During the deacylation reaction, the fatty acyl group is held in a relatively fixed position. We describe a kinetic and structural model to explain how various Sirtuins display unique acyl substrate preferences and how different reaction kinetics influence NAD(+) dependence. The biological implications are discussed. PMID:25897714

  1. Dimerization and activation of porcine pancreatic phospholipase A2 via substrate level acylation of lysine 56.

    PubMed

    Tomasselli, A G; Hui, J; Fisher, J; Zürcher-Neely, H; Reardon, I M; Oriaku, E; Kézdy, F J; Heinrikson, R L

    1989-06-15

    The porcine pancreatic phospholipase A2-catalyzed hydrolysis of the water-soluble chromogenic substrate 4-nitro-3-octanoyloxybenzoate shows an initial latency phase similar to the one observed in the hydrolysis of aggregated phospholipids by the same enzyme. We report here that during the latency phase the enzyme undergoes a slow, autocatalytic, substrate-level acylation whereby in a few of the catalytic events the scissile octanoyl group of the substrate, normally transferred to water, is transferred to the epsilon-amino group of lysine 56. The N epsilon 56-octanoylphospholipase shows a strong tendency to dimerize in solution and thus may be separated from the monomeric native enzyme by gel filtration. Octanoylation of Lys-56 activates the enzyme some 180-fold toward 4-nitro-3-octanoyloxybenzoate and more than 100-fold toward monolayers of 1,2-didecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. Acylation also attends the enzymatic hydrolysis of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine with the incorporation of 1 eq of palmitate. Kinetic analysis of the early phase of reaction with 4-nitro-3-octanoyloxybenzoate shows that in this initial step the rate of activation is first order with respect to enzyme and substrate. A much more rapid, autocatalytic activation occurs in the later phases of the reaction where the activation of the enzyme is catalyzed by the activated enzyme itself. These findings with porcine pancreatic phospholipase A2, together with those relative to a snake venom enzyme monomer (Cho, W., Tomasselli, A. G., Heinrikson, R. L., and Kézdy, F. J. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 11237-11241), strongly support the proposal that interfacial activation of monomeric phospholipases is due to substrate-level autoacylation resulting in fully potentiated dimeric enzymes. PMID:2498336

  2. Structural and Functional Studies of Fatty Acyl Adenylate Ligases from E. coli and L. pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Z Zhang; R Zhou; J Sauder; P Tonge; S Burley; S Swaminathan

    2011-12-31

    Fatty acyl-AMP ligase (FAAL) is a new member of a family of adenylate-forming enzymes that were recently discovered in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are similar in sequence to fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs). However, while FACLs perform a two-step catalytic reaction, AMP ligation followed by CoA ligation using ATP and CoA as cofactors, FAALs produce only the acyl adenylate and are unable to perform the second step. We report X-ray crystal structures of full-length FAAL from Escherichia coli (EcFAAL) and FAAL from Legionella pneumophila (LpFAAL) bound to acyl adenylate, determined at resolution limits of 3.0 and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. The structures share a larger N-terminal domain and a smaller C-terminal domain, which together resemble the previously determined structures of FAAL and FACL proteins. Our two structures occur in quite different conformations. EcFAAL adopts the adenylate-forming conformation typical of FACLs, whereas LpFAAL exhibits a unique intermediate conformation. Both EcFAAL and LpFAAL have insertion motifs that distinguish them from the FACLs. Structures of EcFAAL and LpFAAL reveal detailed interactions between this insertion motif and the interdomain hinge region and with the C-terminal domain. We suggest that the insertion motifs support sufficient interdomain motions to allow substrate binding and product release during acyl adenylate formation, but they preclude CoA binding, thereby preventing CoA ligation.

  3. Structural and Functional Studies of Fatty Acyl Adenylate Ligases from E. coli and L. pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhou, R.; Sauder, J. M.; Tonge, P. J.; Burley, S. K.

    2011-02-18

    Fatty acyl-AMP ligase (FAAL) is a new member of a family of adenylate-forming enzymes that were recently discovered in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are similar in sequence to fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs). However, while FACLs perform a two-step catalytic reaction, AMP ligation followed by CoA ligation using ATP and CoA as cofactors, FAALs produce only the acyl adenylate and are unable to perform the second step. We report X-ray crystal structures of full-length FAAL from Escherichia coli (EcFAAL) and FAAL from Legionella pneumophila (LpFAAL) bound to acyl adenylate, determined at resolution limits of 3.0 and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. The structures share a larger N-terminal domain and a smaller C-terminal domain, which together resemble the previously determined structures of FAAL and FACL proteins. Our two structures occur in quite different conformations. EcFAAL adopts the adenylate-forming conformation typical of FACLs, whereas LpFAAL exhibits a unique intermediate conformation. Both EcFAAL and LpFAAL have insertion motifs that distinguish them from the FACLs. Structures of EcFAAL and LpFAAL reveal detailed interactions between this insertion motif and the interdomain hinge region and with the C-terminal domain. We suggest that the insertion motifs support sufficient interdomain motions to allow substrate binding and product release during acyl adenylate formation, but they preclude CoA binding, thereby preventing CoA ligation.

  4. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol O-acyltransferase is not identical to liver microsomal carboxylesterase.

    PubMed

    Diczfalusy, M A; Björkhem, I; Einarsson, K; Alexson, S E

    1996-04-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A (CoA):cholesterol O-acyltransferase (ACAT) is responsible for esterification of cholesterol in the cell. The enzyme has never been purified, but two cDNA sequences coding for this enzyme were recently reported. One of the sequences was identical to human liver carboxylesterase. We have used inhibitors to elucidate the relation between microsomal carboxylesterase, acyl-CoA hydrolase (ACH), and ACAT activities in rat liver. Low concentrations of serine esterase inhibitors strongly inhibited carboxylesterase and acyl-CoA hydrolase activities but stimulated ACAT activity. At higher concentrations, ACAT activity was also inhibited. A sulfhydryl-modifying agent was found to be a potent inhibitor of ACAT without affecting carboxylesterase activity. Similarly, two specific ACAT inhibitors, DL-melinamide and PD 138142-15, inhibited ACAT activity but did not affect carboxylesterase or ACH activities. Our data thus exclude ACAT as a liver microsomal carboxylesterase. The complex inhibition patterns observed with serine esterase inhibitors indicate that carboxylesterases and ACHs may interfere with ACAT activity by competing for the substrate. It is obvious that final identification of ACAT requires demonstration of an active homogenous protein. PMID:8624784

  5. Enzymatic Acylation of Anthocyanin Isolated from Black Rice with Methyl Aromatic Acid Ester as Donor: Stability of the Acylated Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zheng; Li, Chunyang; Zhang, Lixia; Liu, Qin; Ou, Shiyi; Zeng, Xiaoxiong

    2016-02-10

    The enzymatic acylation of anthocyanin from black rice with aromatic acid methyl esters as acyl donors and Candida antarctica lipase B was carried out under reduced pressure. The highest conversion of 91% was obtained with benzoic acid methyl ester as acyl donor; cyanidin 3-(6″-benzoyl)-glucoside, cyanidin 3-(6″-salicyloyl)-glucoside, and cyanidin 3-(6″-cinnamoyl)-glucoside were successfully synthesized. This is the first report on the enzymatic acylation of anthocyanin from black rice with methyl aromatic esters as acyl donors and lipase as biocatalyst. Furthermore, the acylation with aromatic carboxylic acids enhanced both the thermostability and light resistivity of anthocyanin. In particular, cyanidin 3-(6″-cinnamoyl)-glucoside was the most stable among the three acylated anthocyanins synthesized. PMID:26766135

  6. Fatty acid transport by vectorial acylation in mammals: roles played by different isoforms of rat long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Tong, Fumin; Black, Paul N; Coleman, Rosalind A; DiRusso, Concetta C

    2006-03-01

    Mammals express multiple isoforms of acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL1 and ACSL3-6) in various tissues. These enzymes are essential for fatty acid metabolism providing activated intermediates for complex lipid synthesis, protein modification, and beta-oxidation. Yeast in contrast express four major ACSLs, which have well-defined functions. Two, Faa1p and Faa4p, are specifically required for fatty acid transport by vectorial acylation. Four ACSLs from the rat were expressed in a yeast faa1delta faa4delta strain and their roles in fatty acid transport and trafficking characterized. All four restored ACS activity yet varied in substrate preference. ACSL1, 4, and 6 were able to rescue fatty acid transport activity and triglyceride synthesis. ACSL5, however, was unable to facilitate fatty acid transport despite conferring robust oleoyl-CoA synthetase activity. This is the first study evaluating the role of the mammalian ACSLs in fatty acid transport and supports a role for ACSL1, 4, and 6 in transport by vectorial acylation. PMID:16466685

  7. Two Clades of Type-1 Brassica napus Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase Exhibit Differences in Acyl-CoA Preference.

    PubMed

    Greer, Michael S; Pan, Xue; Weselake, Randall J

    2016-06-01

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) catalyzes the acyl-CoA-dependent acylation of sn-1, 2-diacylglycerol to produce triacylglycerol, which is the main component of the seed oil of Brassica oilseed species. Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequences encoded by four transcriptionally active DGAT1 genes from Brassica napus suggests that the gene forms diverged over time into two clades (I and II), with representative members in each genome (A and C). The majority of the amino acid sequence differences in these forms of DGAT1, however, reside outside of motifs suggested to be involved in catalysis. Despite this, the clade II enzymes displayed a significantly enhanced preference for linoleoyl-CoA when assessed using in-vitro enzyme assays with yeast microsomes containing recombinant enzyme forms. These findings contribute to our understanding of triacylglycerol biosynthesis in B. napus, and may advance our ability to engineer DGAT1s with desired substrate selectivity properties. PMID:27138895

  8. Acquired causes of intestinal malabsorption.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, F

    2016-04-01

    This review focuses on the acquired causes, diagnosis, and treatment of intestinal malabsorption. Intestinal absorption is a complex process that depends on many variables, including the digestion of nutrients within the intestinal lumen, the absorptive surface of the small intestine, the membrane transport systems, and the epithelial absorptive enzymes. Acquired causes of malabsorption are classified by focussing on the three phases of digestion and absorption: 1) luminal/digestive phase, 2) mucosal/absorptive phase, and 3) transport phase. Most acquired diseases affect the luminal/digestive phase. These include short bowel syndrome, extensive small bowel inflammation, motility disorders, and deficiencies of digestive enzymes or bile salts. Diagnosis depends on symptoms, physical examination, and blood and stool tests. There is no gold standard for the diagnosis of malabsorption. Further testing should be based on the specific clinical context and the suspected underlying disease. Therapy is directed at nutritional support by enteral or parenteral feeding and screening for and supplementation of deficiencies in vitamins and minerals. Early enteral feeding is important for intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome. Medicinal treatment options for diarrhoea in malabsorption include loperamide, codeine, cholestyramine, or antibiotics. PMID:27086886

  9. Identification of a Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Acyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase from the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana1

    PubMed Central

    Tonon, Thierry; Qing, Renwei; Harvey, David; Li, Yi; Larson, Tony Robert; Graham, Ian Alexander

    2005-01-01

    The draft genome of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was searched for DNA sequences showing homology with long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetases (LACSs), since the corresponding enzyme may play a key role in the accumulation of health-beneficial polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in triacylglycerol. Among the candidate genes identified, an open reading frame named TplacsA was found to be full length and constitutively expressed during cell cultivation. The predicted amino acid sequence of the corresponding protein, TpLACSA, exhibited typical features of acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) synthetases involved in the activation of long-chain fatty acids. Feeding experiments carried out in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) transformed with the algal gene showed that TpLACSA was able to activate a number of PUFAs, including eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Determination of acyl-CoA synthetase activities by direct measurement of acyl-CoAs produced in the presence of different PUFA substrates showed that TpLACSA was most active toward DHA. Heterologous expression also revealed that TplacsA transformants were able to incorporate more DHA in triacylglycerols than the control yeast. PMID:15821149

  10. Purification of Pseudomonas putida acyl coenzyme A ligase active with a range of aliphatic and aromatic substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Valverde, M; Reglero, A; Martinez-Blanco, H; Luengo, J M

    1993-01-01

    Acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) ligase (acyl-CoA synthetase [ACoAS]) from Pseudomonas putida U was purified to homogeneity (252-fold) after this bacterium was grown in a chemically defined medium containing octanoic acid as the sole carbon source. The enzyme, which has a mass of 67 kDa, showed maximal activity at 40 degrees C in 10 mM K2PO4H-NaPO4H2 buffer (pH 7.0) containing 20% (wt/vol) glycerol. Under these conditions, ACoAS showed hyperbolic behavior against acetate, CoA, and ATP; the Kms calculated for these substrates were 4.0, 0.7, and 5.2 mM, respectively. Acyl-CoA ligase recognizes several aliphatic molecules (acetic, propionic, butyric, valeric, hexanoic, heptanoic, and octanoic acids) as substrates, as well as some aromatic compounds (phenylacetic and phenoxyacetic acids). The broad substrate specificity of ACoAS from P. putida was confirmed by coupling it with acyl-CoA:6-aminopenicillanic acid acyltransferase from Penicillium chrysogenum to study the formation of several penicillins. Images PMID:8476289

  11. Modification of the substrate specificity of an acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase by protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Yuan, L; Voelker, T A; Hawkins, D J

    1995-11-01

    The plant acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases (TEs) are of biochemical interest because of their roles in fatty acid synthesis and their utilities in the bioengineering of plant seed oils. When the FatB1 cDNA encoding a 12:0-ACP TE (Uc FatB1) from California bay, Umbellularia californica (Uc) was expressed in Escherichia coli and in developing oilseeds of the plants Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus, large amounts of laurate (12:0) and small amounts of myristate (14:0) were accumulated. We have isolated a TE cDNA from camphor (Cinnamomum camphorum) (Cc) seeds that shares 92% amino acid identity with Uc FatB1. This TE, Cc FatB1, mainly hydrolyzes 14:0-ACP as shown by E. coli expression. We have investigated the roles of the N- and C-terminal regions in determining substrate specificity by constructing two chimeric enzymes, in which the N-terminal portion of one protein is fused to the C-terminal portion of the other. Our results show that the C-terminal two-thirds of the protein is critical for the specificity. By site-directed mutagenesis, we have replaced several amino acids in Uc FatB1 by using the Cc FatB1 sequence as a guide. A double mutant, which changes Met-197 to an Arg and Arg-199 to a His (M197R/R199H), turns Uc FatB1 into a 12:0/14:0 TE with equal preference for both substrates. Another mutation, T231K, by itself does not effect the specificity. However, when it is combined with the double mutant to generate a triple mutant (M197R/R199H/T231K), Uc FatB1 is converted to a 14:0-ACP TE. Expression of the double-mutant cDNA in E. coli K27, a strain deficient in fatty acid degradation, results in accumulation of similar amounts of 12:0 and 14:0. Meanwhile the E. coli expressing the triple-mutant cDNA produces predominantly 14:0 with very small amounts of 12:0. Kinetic studies indicate that both wild-type Uc FatB1 and the triple mutant have similar values of Km,app with respect to 14:0-ACP. Inhibitory studies also show that 12:0-ACP is a good

  12. ROLE OF THE INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA IN THE ACTIVATION OF THE PROMUTAGEN 2,6-DINITROTOLUENE TO MUTAGENIC URINE METABOLITES AND COMPARISON OF GI ENZYME ACTIVITIES IN GERM-FREE AND CONVENTIONALIZED MALE FISCHER 344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    After male germfree and conventionalized Fischer 344 rats were administered p.o 75 mg/kg DNT, intestinal nitroreductase, B-glucuronidase, and azo reductase activities were lower in the cecum and large intestine of germfree animals. owever, there was no significant difference in t...

  13. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... the small intestine (duodenum) may be caused by cancer of the pancreas, scarring from an ulcer, or Crohn disease . Rarely, a gallstone, a mass of undigested food, or a collection of parasitic worms may block ... commonly caused by cancer, diverticulitis , or a hard lump of stool (fecal ...

  14. Efficient regioselective acylation of quercetin using Rhizopus oryzae lipase and its potential as antioxidant.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Jahan, Firdaus; Mahajan, Richi V; Saxena, Rajendra Kumar

    2016-10-01

    The present investigation describes the regioselective enzymatic acylation of quercetin with ferulic acid using Rhizopus oryzae lipase. Optimization of reaction parameters resulted in 93.2% yield of the ester synthesized using 750IU of lipase in cyclo-octane at a temperature of 45°C. The reaction was successfully carried out upto 25g scale. The ester synthesized was analyzed by (1)H Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The ester synthesized (quercetin ferulate) showed higher antiradical activity as compared to ascorbic acid using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical method. These results on enzyme-catalyzed acylation of quercetin might be used to prepare and scale-up other flavonoids derivatives. PMID:27372535

  15. Ab initio study on the transition state of acylation step of trypsin catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kubodera, H; Nakagawa, S; Umeyama, H

    1990-03-01

    The transition state of acylation step of trypsin catalysis was determined by molecular orbital calculations. The calculations were carried out at the RHF-LCAO-SCF approximation level with double zeta basis set (plus polarization functions). The role of His57 residue in the acylation step of the catalytic reaction of trypsin was analysed from a quantum mechanical point of view. The influences of surrounding residues, such as oxyanion hole and Asp102-, and the electrostatic effect of the other regions of the enzyme were also studied. His57 was proved to capture the proton from Ser195 side chain terminus with its lone pair and to transfer it to substrate with electrostatic assistance of Asp102- and oxyanion hole. PMID:2165153

  16. A Thiolate Anion Buried within the Hydrocarbon Ruler Perturbs PagP Lipid Acyl Chain Selection†

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. Adil; Moktar, Joel; Mott, Patrick J.; Bishop, Russell E.

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli outer membrane phospholipid:lipid A palmitoyltransferase PagP exhibits remarkable selectivity because its binding pocket for lipid acyl chains excludes those differing in length from palmitate by a solitary methylene unit. This narrow detergent-binding hydrophobic pocket buried within the eight-strand antiparallel β-barrel is known as the hydrocarbon ruler. Gly88 lines the acyl chain binding pocket floor, and its substitution can raise the floor to correspondingly shorten the selected acyl chain. An aromatic exciton interaction between Tyr26 and Trp66 provides an intrinsic spectroscopic probe located immediately adjacent to Gly88. The Gly88Cys PagP enzyme was engineered to function as a dedicated myristoyltransferase, but the mutant enzyme instead selected both myristoyl and pentadecanoyl groups, was devoid of the exciton, and displayed a 21 °C reduction in thermal stability. We now demonstrate that the structural perturbation results from a buried thiolate anion attributed to suppression of the Cys sulfhydryl group pKa from 9.4 in aqueous solvent to 7.5 in the hydrocarbon ruler microenvironment. The Cys thiol is sandwiched at the interface between a nonpolar and a polar β-barrel interior milieu, suggesting that local electrostatics near the otherwise hydrophobic hydrocarbon ruler pocket serve to perturb the thiol pKa. Neutralization of the Cys thiolate anion by protonation restores wild-type exciton and thermal stability signatures to Gly88Cys PagP, which then functions as a dedicated myristoyltransferase at pH 7. Gly88Cys PagP assembled in bacterial membranes recapitulates lipid A myristoylation in vivo. Hydrocarbon ruler–exciton coupling in PagP thus reveals a thiol–thiolate ionization mechanism for modulating lipid acyl chain selection. PMID:20175558

  17. Decarboxylation of malonyl-(acyl carrier protein) by 3-oxoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthases in plant fatty acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Winter, E; Brummel, M; Schuch, R; Spener, F

    1997-01-01

    In order to identify regulatory steps in fatty acid biosynthesis, the influence of intermediate 3-oxoacyl-(acyl carrier proteins) (3-oxoacyl-ACPs) and end-product acyl-ACPs of the fatty acid synthase reaction on the condensation reaction was investigated in vitro, using total fatty acid synthase preparations and purified 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthases (KASs; EC 2.3.1.41) from Cuphea lanceolata seeds. KAS I and II in the fatty acid synthase preparations were assayed for the elongation of octanoyl- and hexadecanoyl-ACP respectively, and the accumulation of the corresponding condensation product 3-oxoacyl-ACP was studied by modulating the content of the reducing equivalentS NADH and NADPH. Complete omission of reducing equivalents resulted with either KAS in the abnormal synthesis of acetyl-ACP from malonyl-ACP by a decarboxylation reaction. Supplementation with NADPH or NADH, separately or in combination with recombinant 3-oxoacyl-ACP reductase (EC 1.1.1.100), led to a decrease in the amount of acetyl-ACP and a simultaneous increase in elongation products. This demonstrates that the accumulation of 3-oxoacyl-ACP inhibits the condensation reaction on the one hand, and induces the decarboxylation of malonyl-ACP on the other. By carrying out similar experiments with purified enzymes, this decarboxylation was attributed to the action of KAS. Our data point to a regulatory mechanism for the degradation of malonyl-ACP in plants which is activated by the accumulation of the fatty acid synthase intermediate 3-oxoacyl-ACP. PMID:9020860

  18. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) protein regulates long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase by deacetylating conserved lysines near the active site.

    PubMed

    Bharathi, Sivakama S; Zhang, Yuxun; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Uppala, Radha; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Schreiber, Emanuel; Uechi, Guy; Beck, Megan E; Rardin, Matthew J; Vockley, Jerry; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W; Hirschey, Matthew D; Goetzman, Eric S

    2013-11-22

    Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) is a key mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation enzyme. We previously demonstrated increased LCAD lysine acetylation in SIRT3 knockout mice concomitant with reduced LCAD activity and reduced fatty acid oxidation. To study the effects of acetylation on LCAD and determine sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) target sites, we chemically acetylated recombinant LCAD. Acetylation impeded substrate binding and reduced catalytic efficiency. Deacetylation with recombinant SIRT3 partially restored activity. Residues Lys-318 and Lys-322 were identified as SIRT3-targeted lysines. Arginine substitutions at Lys-318 and Lys-322 prevented the acetylation-induced activity loss. Lys-318 and Lys-322 flank residues Arg-317 and Phe-320, which are conserved among all acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and coordinate the enzyme-bound FAD cofactor in the active site. We propose that acetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 causes a conformational change which reduces hydride transfer from substrate to FAD. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9, two related enzymes with lysines at positions equivalent to Lys-318/Lys-322, were also efficiently deacetylated by SIRT3 following chemical acetylation. These results suggest that acetylation/deacetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 is a mode of regulating fatty acid oxidation. The same mechanism may regulate other acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. PMID:24121500

  19. Expression of Vibrio harveyi Acyl-ACP Synthetase Allows Efficient Entry of Exogenous Fatty Acids into the Escherichia coli Fatty Acid and Lipid A Synthetic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanfang; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M.; Campbell, John W.; Chan, Chi Ho; Cronan, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Although the Escherichia coli fatty acid synthesis (FAS) pathway is the best studied type II fatty acid synthesis system, a major experimental limitation has been the inability to feed intermediates into the pathway in vivo because exogenously-supplied free fatty acids are not efficiently converted to the acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesters required by the pathway. We report that expression of Vibrio harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase (AasS), a soluble cytosolic enzyme that ligates free fatty acids to ACP to form acyl-ACPs, allows exogenous fatty acids to enter the E. coli fatty acid synthesis pathway. The free fatty acids are incorporated intact and can be elongated or directly incorporated into complex lipids by acyltransferases specific for acyl-ACPs. Moreover, expression of AasS strains and supplementation with the appropriate fatty acid restored growth to E. coli mutant strains that lack essential fatty acid synthesis enzymes. Thus, this strategy provides a new tool for circumventing the loss of enzymes essential for FAS function. PMID:20028080

  20. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) Protein Regulates Long-chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase by Deacetylating Conserved Lysines Near the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Bharathi, Sivakama S.; Zhang, Yuxun; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Uppala, Radha; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Schreiber, Emanuel; Uechi, Guy; Beck, Megan E.; Rardin, Matthew J.; Vockley, Jerry; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W.; Hirschey, Matthew D.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2013-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) is a key mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation enzyme. We previously demonstrated increased LCAD lysine acetylation in SIRT3 knockout mice concomitant with reduced LCAD activity and reduced fatty acid oxidation. To study the effects of acetylation on LCAD and determine sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) target sites, we chemically acetylated recombinant LCAD. Acetylation impeded substrate binding and reduced catalytic efficiency. Deacetylation with recombinant SIRT3 partially restored activity. Residues Lys-318 and Lys-322 were identified as SIRT3-targeted lysines. Arginine substitutions at Lys-318 and Lys-322 prevented the acetylation-induced activity loss. Lys-318 and Lys-322 flank residues Arg-317 and Phe-320, which are conserved among all acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and coordinate the enzyme-bound FAD cofactor in the active site. We propose that acetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 causes a conformational change which reduces hydride transfer from substrate to FAD. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9, two related enzymes with lysines at positions equivalent to Lys-318/Lys-322, were also efficiently deacetylated by SIRT3 following chemical acetylation. These results suggest that acetylation/deacetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 is a mode of regulating fatty acid oxidation. The same mechanism may regulate other acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. PMID:24121500

  1. The mechanism of intestinal absorption of phosphatidylcholine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Sampath; Subbaiah, Papasani V.; Ganguly, Jagannath

    1974-01-01

    1. The mechanism of absorption of phosphatidylcholine was studied in rats by injecting into the intestine phosphatidylcholine specifically labelled either in the fatty acid or in the glycerol moiety or with 32P, when considerable amounts of 1-acyl-lysophosphatidylcholine were found in the intestinal lumen. 2-([14C]Acyl)phosphatidylcholine gave markedly more radioactive unesterified fatty acids in the lumen, compared with the 1-([14C]acyl) derivative. Some of the radioactivity from either the fatty acid or the glycerol moiety of the injected phosphatidylcholine appeared in the mucosal triacylglycerols. 2. Injection of 32P-labelled phosphatidylcholine or 32P-labelled lysophosphatidylcholine led to the appearance of radioactive glycerylphosphorylcholine, glycerophosphate and Pi in the mucosa. 3. Rat mucosa was found to contain a highly active glycerylphosphorylcholine diesterase. 4. It was concluded that the dietary phosphatidylcholine is hydrolysed in the intestinal lumen by the pancreatic phospholipase A to 1-acylglycerylphosphorylcholine, which on entering the mucosal cell is partly reacylated to phosphatidylcholine, and the rest is further hydrolysed to glycerylphosphorylcholine, glycerophosphate, glycerol and Pi. The fatty acids and glycerophosphate are then reassembled to give triacylglycerols via the Kennedy (1961) pathway. PMID:4374941

  2. Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, and the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Hieu Sy; Roth, Mary R.; Tamura, Pamela; Samarakoon, Thilani; Shiva, Sunitha; Honey, Samuel; Lowe, Kaleb; Schmelz, Eric A.; Williams, Todd D.; Welti, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Formation of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols has been shown to be induced by leaf homogenization, mechanical wounding, avirulent bacterial infection, and thawing after snap-freezing. Here, lipidomic analysis using mass spectrometry showed that galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols, formed in wheat (Triticum aestivum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves upon wounding, have acyl-galactose profiles that differ from those of wounded Arabidopsis thaliana, indicating that different plant species accumulate different acyl-galactose components in response to the same stress. Additionally, the composition of the acyl-galactose component of Arabidopsis acMGDG depends on the stress treatment. After sub-lethal freezing treatment, acMGDG contained mainly non-oxidized fatty acids esterified to galactose, whereas mostly oxidized fatty acids accumulated on galactose after wounding or bacterial infection. Compositional data are consistent with acMGDG being formed in vivo by transacylation with fatty acids from digalactosyldiacylglycerols. Oxophytodienoic acid, an oxidized fatty acid, was more concentrated on the galactosyl ring of acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols than in galactolipids in general. Also, oxidized fatty acid-containing acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols increased cumulatively when wounded Arabidopsis leaves were wounded again. These findings suggest that, in Arabidopsis, the pool of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols may serve to sequester oxidized fatty acids during stress responses. PMID:24286212

  3. Acyl Silicates and Acyl Aluminates as Activated Intermediates in Peptide Formation on Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, David H.; Kennedy, Robert M.; Macklin, John

    1984-12-01

    Glycine reacts with heating on dried clays and other minerals to give peptides in much better yield than in the absence of mineral. This reaction was proposed to occur by way of an activated intermediate such as an acyl silicate or acyl aluminate (i.e., the anhydride of a carboxylic acid with Si-OH or Al-OH), analogous to acyl phosphates involved in several biochemical reactions including peptide bond synthesis. We confirmed the proposed mechanism by trapping the intermediate, as well as by direct spectroscopic observation of a related intermediate. The reaction of amino acids on periodically dried mineral surfaces represents a widespread, geologically realistic setting for prebiotic peptide formation via in situ activation.

  4. Exploring the Mechanism of β-Lactam Ring Protonation in the Class A β-lactamase Acylation Mechanism Using Neutron and X-ray Crystallography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Weiss, Kevin L.; Cooper, Jonathan B.; Erskine, Peter T.; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Ostermann, Andreas; Schrader, Tobias E.; Ginell, Stephan L.; Coates, Leighton

    2015-12-02

    The catalytic mechanism of class A beta-lactamases is often debated due in part to the large number of amino acids that interact with bound beta-lactam substrates. The role and function of the conserved residue Lys 73 in the catalytic mechanism of class A type beta-lactamase enzymes is still not well understood after decades of scientific research. To better elucidate the functions of this vital residue, we used both neutron and high-resolution X-ray diffraction to examine both the structures of the ligand free protein and the acyl-enzyme complex of perdeuterated E166A Toho-1 beta-lactamase with the antibiotic cefotaxime. The E166A mutant lacksmore » a critical glutamate residue that has a key role in the deacylation step of the catalytic mechanism, allowing the acyl-enzyme adduct to be captured for study. In our ligand free structures, Lys 73 is present in a single conformation, however in all of our acyl-enzyme structures, Lys 73 is present in two different conformations, in which one conformer is closer to Ser 70 while the other conformer is positioned closer to Ser 130, which supports the existence of a possible pathway by which proton transfer from Lys 73 to Ser 130 can occur. This and further clarifications of the role of Lys 73 in the acylation mechanism may facilitate the design of inhibitors that capitalize on the enzymes native machinery.« less

  5. Exploring the Mechanism of β-Lactam Ring Protonation in the Class A β-lactamase Acylation Mechanism Using Neutron and X-ray Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Weiss, Kevin L.; Cooper, Jonathan B.; Erskine, Peter T.; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Ostermann, Andreas; Schrader, Tobias E.; Ginell, Stephan L.; Coates, Leighton

    2015-12-02

    The catalytic mechanism of class A beta-lactamases is often debated due in part to the large number of amino acids that interact with bound beta-lactam substrates. The role and function of the conserved residue Lys 73 in the catalytic mechanism of class A type beta-lactamase enzymes is still not well understood after decades of scientific research. To better elucidate the functions of this vital residue, we used both neutron and high-resolution X-ray diffraction to examine both the structures of the ligand free protein and the acyl-enzyme complex of perdeuterated E166A Toho-1 beta-lactamase with the antibiotic cefotaxime. The E166A mutant lacks a critical glutamate residue that has a key role in the deacylation step of the catalytic mechanism, allowing the acyl-enzyme adduct to be captured for study. In our ligand free structures, Lys 73 is present in a single conformation, however in all of our acyl-enzyme structures, Lys 73 is present in two different conformations, in which one conformer is closer to Ser 70 while the other conformer is positioned closer to Ser 130, which supports the existence of a possible pathway by which proton transfer from Lys 73 to Ser 130 can occur. This and further clarifications of the role of Lys 73 in the acylation mechanism may facilitate the design of inhibitors that capitalize on the enzymes native machinery.

  6. Exploring the Mechanism of β-Lactam Ring Protonation in the Class A β-lactamase Acylation Mechanism Using Neutron and X-ray Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Weiss, Kevin L; Cooper, Jonathan B; Erskine, Peter T; Tomanicek, Stephen J; Ostermann, Andreas; Schrader, Tobias E; Ginell, Stephan L; Coates, Leighton

    2016-01-14

    The catalytic mechanism of class A β-lactamases is often debated due in part to the large number of amino acids that interact with bound β-lactam substrates. The role and function of the conserved residue Lys 73 in the catalytic mechanism of class A type β-lactamase enzymes is still not well understood after decades of scientific research. To better elucidate the functions of this vital residue, we used both neutron and high-resolution X-ray diffraction to examine both the structures of the ligand free protein and the acyl-enzyme complex of perdeuterated E166A Toho-1 β-lactamase with the antibiotic cefotaxime. The E166A mutant lacks a critical glutamate residue that has a key role in the deacylation step of the catalytic mechanism, allowing the acyl-enzyme adduct to be captured for study. In our ligand free structures, Lys 73 is present in a single conformation, however in all of our acyl-enzyme structures, Lys 73 is present in two different conformations, in which one conformer is closer to Ser 70 while the other conformer is positioned closer to Ser 130, which supports the existence of a possible pathway by which proton transfer from Lys 73 to Ser 130 can occur. This and further clarifications of the role of Lys 73 in the acylation mechanism may facilitate the design of inhibitors that capitalize on the enzyme's native machinery. PMID:26630115

  7. Intestinal Phospholipid Remodeling Is Required for Dietary-Lipid Uptake and Survival on a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Rong, Xin; Duerr, Mark A; Hermanson, Daniel J; Hedde, Per Niklas; Wong, Jinny S; Vallim, Thomas Q de Aguiar; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Gratton, Enrico; Ford, David A; Tontonoz, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Phospholipids are important determinants of membrane biophysical properties, but the impact of membrane acyl chain composition on dietary-lipid absorption is unknown. Here we demonstrate that the LXR-responsive phospholipid-remodeling enzyme Lpcat3 modulates intestinal fatty acid and cholesterol absorption and is required for survival on a high-fat diet. Mice lacking Lpcat3 in the intestine thrive on carbohydrate-based chow but lose body weight rapidly and become moribund on a triglyceride-rich diet. Lpcat3-dependent incorporation of polyunsaturated fatty acids into phospholipids is required for the efficient transport of dietary lipids into enterocytes. Furthermore, loss of Lpcat3 amplifies the production of gut hormones, including GLP-1 and oleoylethanolamide, in response to high-fat feeding, contributing to the paradoxical cessation of food intake in the setting of starvation. These results reveal that membrane phospholipid composition is a gating factor in passive lipid absorption and implicate LXR-Lpcat3 signaling in a gut-brain feedback loop that couples absorption to food intake. PMID:26833026

  8. [Intestinal endometriosis].

    PubMed

    González Rodríguez, C I; Cires, M; Jiménez, F J; Rubio, T

    2008-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic, benign gynaecological disorder that is frequent in women of a child-bearing age. It is estimated that there is some degree of endometriosis in as many as 15% of pre-menopausal women, associated with a history of infertility, caesarean antecedents, dysmenorrhoea and abnormality in uterine bleeding. It is believed to be due to the rise of menstrual contents through the Fallopian tubes (retrograde menstruation). In the intestinal affectation, the colon is the segment most frequently affected, above all at the rectosigmoidal level. The clinical features are unspecific, with abdominal pain the most frequent and/or pelvic pain of a cholic type that coincides with, or is exacerbated by, menstruation. Differential diagnosis includes intestinal inflammatory disease, diverticulitis, ischemic colitis and neoplastic processes, with the definitive diagnosis being anatomopathological. With respect to treatment, this will depend on the clinical features and the age of the patient, as well as her wishes with regard to pregnancy. PMID:18953367

  9. INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Warren H.

    1950-01-01

    Despite improvements in knowledge of the pathologic physiology of intestinal obstruction, the introduction of gastrointestinal decompression, and more effective antibiotics, obstruction remains a serious disease with a high mortality rate. Although the diagnosis is often obscure, it can usually be made with a fair degree of accuracy by the history alone; pain is fairly constant and characteristically is of a cramping type simulated by very few other lesions. Distention is present in low lesions but absent in high lesions; on the contrary, vomiting is minimal in low lesions but prominent in high lesions. Visible peristaltic waves are almost pathognomonic of intestinal obstruction. Increased peristaltic sounds, as noted by auscultation, are extremely helpful in diagnosis; they are absent in paralytic ileus. Although intestinal obstruction is a surgical lesion, it must be remembered that in the type produced by adhesions the obstruction can be relieved by gastrointestinal decompression in 80 to 90 per cent of cases. Operation is usually indicated a short time after relief because of the probability of recurrence. In practically all other types of obstruction decompression is indicated only while the patient is being prepared for operation. Obviously any type of strangulation demands early operation. Strangulation can usually be diagnosed, particularly if it develops while the patient is under observation. Increase in pain, muscle spasm and pulse rate are important indications of development of strangulation. Dehydration and electrolytic imbalance are produced almost universally in high obstruction. Usually, it is unwise to wait until these two deficiencies are corrected before operation is undertaken, but correction must be well under way at the time of operation. Resections should be avoided in the presence of intestinal obstruction, but obviously will be necessary in strangulation. Operative technique must be expert and carried out with minimal trauma. Postoperative

  10. Intestinal spirochaetosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, F. D.; Kraszewski, A.; Gordon, J.; Howie, J. G. R.; McSeveney, D.; Harland, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    An abnormal condition of the large intestine is described in which the surface epithelium is infested by short spirochaetes. Diagnosis can be made by light microscopy. A review of 14 cases diagnosed by rectal biopsy and 62 cases involving the appendix shows no consistent symptom complex. The possible significance is discussed. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 1 PMID:5548558

  11. Acyl-ACP thioesterases from Camelina sativa: cloning, enzymatic characterization and implication in seed oil fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Manuel Fernando; Salas, Joaquín J; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2014-11-01

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases are intraplastidial enzymes that terminate de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in the plastids of higher plants by hydrolyzing the thioester bond between ACP and the fatty acid synthesized. Free fatty acids are then esterified with coenzyme A prior to being incorporated into the glycerolipids synthesized through the eukaryotic pathway. Acyl-ACP thioesterases belong to the TE14 family of thioester-active enzymes and can be classified as FatAs and FatBs, which differ in their amino acid sequence and substrate specificity. Here, the FatA and FatB thioesterases from Camelina sativa seeds, a crop of interest in plant biotechnology, were cloned, sequenced and characterized. The mature proteins encoded by these genes were characterized biochemically after they were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. C. sativa contained three different alleles of both the FatA and FatB genes. These genes were expressed most strongly in expanding tissues in which lipids are very actively synthesized, such as developing seed endosperm. The CsFatA enzyme displayed high catalytic efficiency on oleoyl-ACP and CsFatB acted efficiently on palmitoyl-ACP. The contribution of these two enzymes to the synthesis of C. sativa oil was discussed in the light of these results. PMID:25212866

  12. Comparative studies of Acyl-CoA dehydrogenases for monomethyl branched chain substrates in amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojun; Wu, Long; Deng, Guisheng; Chen, Gong; Li, Nan; Chu, Xiusheng; Li, Ding

    2013-04-01

    Short/branched chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SBCAD), isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IVD), and isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IBD) are involved in metabolism of isoleucine, leucine, and valine, respectively. These three enzymes all belong to acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACD) family, and catalyze the dehydrogenation of monomethyl branched-chain fatty acid (mmBCFA) thioester derivatives. In the present work, the catalytic properties of rat SBCAD, IVD, and IBD, including their substrate specificity, isomerase activity, and enzyme inhibition, were comparatively studied. Our results indicated that SBCAD has its catalytic properties relatively similar to those of straight-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases in terms of their isomerase activity and enzyme inhibition, while IVD and IBD are different. IVD has relatively broader substrate specificity than those of the other two enzymes in accommodating various substrate analogs. The present study increased our understanding for the metabolism of monomethyl branched-chain fatty acids (mmBCFAs) and branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), which should also be useful for selective control of a particular reaction through the design of specific inhibitors. PMID:23474214

  13. Evolution of acyl-ACP-thioesterases and β-ketoacyl-ACP-synthases revealed by protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Beld, Joris; Blatti, Jillian L.; Behnke, Craig; Mendez, Michael; Burkart, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The fatty acid synthase (FAS) is a conserved primary metabolic enzyme complex capable of tolerating cross-species engineering of domains for the development of modified and overproduced fatty acids. In eukaryotes, acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (TEs) off-load mature cargo from the acyl carrier protein (ACP), and plants have developed TEs for short/medium-chain fatty acids. We showed that engineering plant TEs into the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii does not result in the predicted shift in fatty acid profile. Since fatty acid biosynthesis relies on substrate recognition and protein-protein interactions between the ACP and its partner enzymes, we hypothesized that plant TEs and algal ACP do not functionally interact. Phylogenetic analysis revealed major evolutionary differences between FAS enzymes, including TEs and ketoacyl synthases (KSs), in which the former is present only in some species, whereas the latter is present in all, and has a common ancestor. In line with these results, TEs appeared to be selective towards their ACP partners whereas KSs showed promiscuous behavior across bacterial, plant and algal species. Based on phylogenetic analyses, in silico docking, in vitro mechanistic crosslinking and in vivo algal engineering, we propose that phylogeny can predict effective interactions between ACPs and partner enzymes. PMID:25110394

  14. Construction of Global Acyl Lipid Metabolic Map by Comparative Genomics and Subcellular Localization Analysis in the Red Alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Natsumi; Moriyama, Takashi; Toyoshima, Masakazu; Sato, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Pathways of lipid metabolism have been established in land plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, but the information on exact pathways is still under study in microalgae. In contrast with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which is currently studied extensively, the pathway information in red algae is still in the state in which enzymes and pathways are estimated by analogy with the knowledge in plants. Here we attempt to construct the entire acyl lipid metabolic pathways in a model red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, as an initial basis for future genetic and biochemical studies, by exploiting comparative genomics and localization analysis. First, the data of whole genome clustering by Gclust were used to identify 121 acyl lipid-related enzymes. Then, the localization of 113 of these enzymes was analyzed by GFP-based techniques. We found that most of the predictions on the subcellular localization by existing tools gave erroneous results, probably because these tools had been tuned for plants or green algae. The experimental data in the present study as well as the data reported before in our laboratory will constitute a good training set for tuning these tools. The lipid metabolic map thus constructed show that the lipid metabolic pathways in the red alga are essentially similar to those in A. thaliana, except that the number of enzymes catalyzing individual reactions is quite limited. The absence of fatty acid desaturation to produce oleic and linoleic acids within the plastid, however, highlights the central importance of desaturation and acyl editing in the endoplasmic reticulum, for the synthesis of plastid lipids as well as other cellular lipids. Additionally, some notable characteristics of lipid metabolism in C. merolae were found. For example, phosphatidylcholine is synthesized by the methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine as in yeasts. It is possible that a single 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase is involved in the condensation reactions of fatty acid

  15. Construction of Global Acyl Lipid Metabolic Map by Comparative Genomics and Subcellular Localization Analysis in the Red Alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    PubMed

    Mori, Natsumi; Moriyama, Takashi; Toyoshima, Masakazu; Sato, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Pathways of lipid metabolism have been established in land plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, but the information on exact pathways is still under study in microalgae. In contrast with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which is currently studied extensively, the pathway information in red algae is still in the state in which enzymes and pathways are estimated by analogy with the knowledge in plants. Here we attempt to construct the entire acyl lipid metabolic pathways in a model red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, as an initial basis for future genetic and biochemical studies, by exploiting comparative genomics and localization analysis. First, the data of whole genome clustering by Gclust were used to identify 121 acyl lipid-related enzymes. Then, the localization of 113 of these enzymes was analyzed by GFP-based techniques. We found that most of the predictions on the subcellular localization by existing tools gave erroneous results, probably because these tools had been tuned for plants or green algae. The experimental data in the present study as well as the data reported before in our laboratory will constitute a good training set for tuning these tools. The lipid metabolic map thus constructed show that the lipid metabolic pathways in the red alga are essentially similar to those in A. thaliana, except that the number of enzymes catalyzing individual reactions is quite limited. The absence of fatty acid desaturation to produce oleic and linoleic acids within the plastid, however, highlights the central importance of desaturation and acyl editing in the endoplasmic reticulum, for the synthesis of plastid lipids as well as other cellular lipids. Additionally, some notable characteristics of lipid metabolism in C. merolae were found. For example, phosphatidylcholine is synthesized by the methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine as in yeasts. It is possible that a single 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase is involved in the condensation reactions of fatty acid

  16. Small intestinal ischemia and infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine; Atherosclerosis - small intestine; Hardening of the arteries - small intestine ... Embolus: Blood clots can block one of the arteries supplying the intestine. People who have had a ...

  17. Release of angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor peptides during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of Parmigiano Reggiano PDO cheese and their absorption through an in vitro model of intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Basiricò, L; Catalani, E; Morera, P; Cattaneo, S; Stuknytė, M; Bernabucci, U; De Noni, I; Nardone, A

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence of 8 bovine casein-derived peptides (VPP, IPP, RYLGY, RYLG, AYFYPEL, AYFYPE, LHLPLP, and HLPLP) reported as angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitors (ACE-I) was investigated in the 3-kDa ultrafiltered water-soluble extract (WSE) of Parmigiano Reggiano (PR) cheese samples by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry via an electrospray ionization source. Only VPP, IPP, LHLPLP, and HLPLP were revealed in the WSE, and their total amount was in the range of 8.46 to 21.55 mg/kg of cheese. Following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion, the same ACE-I peptides along with the newly formed AYFYPEL and AYFYPE were found in the 3 kDa WSE of PR digestates. Digestates presented high amounts (1,880-3,053 mg/kg) of LHLPLP, whereas the remaining peptides accounted for 69.24 to 82.82 mg/kg. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values decreased from 7.92 ± 2.08 in undigested cheese to 3.20 ± 1.69 after in vitro gastrointestinal digestion. The 3-kDa WSE of digested cheeses were used to study the transport of the 8 ACE-I peptides across the monolayers of the Caco-2 cell culture grown on a semipermeable membrane of the transwells. After 1h of incubation, 649.20 ± 148.85 mg/kg of LHLPLP remained in the apical compartment, whereas VPP, IPP, AYFYPEL, AYFYPE, and HLPLP accounted in total for less than 36.78 mg/kg. On average, 0.6% of LHLPLP initially present in the digestates added to the apical compartment were transported intact to the basolateral chamber after the same incubation time. Higher transport rate (2.9%) was ascertained for the peptide HLPLP. No other intact ACE-I peptides were revealed in the basolateral compartment. For the first time, these results demonstrated that the ACE-I peptides HLPLP and LHLPLP present in the in vitro digestates of PR cheese are partially absorbed through an in vitro model of human intestinal epithelium. PMID:26364103

  18. Two Predicted Transmembrane Domains Exclude Very Long Chain Fatty acyl-CoAs from the Active Site of Mouse Wax Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Kawelke, Steffen; Feussner, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Wax esters are used as coatings or storage lipids in all kingdoms of life. They are synthesized from a fatty alcohol and an acyl-CoA by wax synthases. In order to get insights into the structure-function relationships of a wax synthase from Mus musculus, a domain swap experiment between the mouse acyl-CoA:wax alcohol acyltransferase (AWAT2) and the homologous mouse acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2) was performed. This showed that the substrate specificity of AWAT2 is partially determined by two predicted transmembrane domains near the amino terminus of AWAT2. Upon exchange of the two domains for the respective part of DGAT2, the resulting chimeric enzyme was capable of incorporating up to 20% of very long acyl chains in the wax esters upon expression in S. cerevisiae strain H1246. The amount of very long acyl chains in wax esters synthesized by wild type AWAT2 was negligible. The effect was narrowed down to a single amino acid position within one of the predicted membrane domains, the AWAT2 N36R variant. Taken together, we provide first evidence that two predicted transmembrane domains in AWAT2 are involved in determining its acyl chain length specificity. PMID:26714272

  19. Environmental contaminants and intestinal function

    PubMed Central

    Banwell, John G.

    1979-01-01

    The environmental contaminants which have their major effects on the small intestine may be classified into five major categories: (1) bacterial, viral, and parasitic agents, (2) food and plant substances, (3) environmental and industrial products, (4) pharmaceutical agents, and (5) toxic agents whose metabolic effects are dependent on interreaction with intestinal bacterial flora, other physical agents (detergents), human intestinal enzyme deficiency states, and the nutritional state of the host. Bacterial, viral, and parasitic agents are the most important of all such agents, being responsible for significant mortality and morbidity in association with diarrheal diseases of adults and children. Several plant substances ingested as foods have unique effects on the small bowel as well as from contaminants such as fungi on poorly preserved grains and cereals. Environmental and industrial products, in spite of their widespread prevalence in industrial societies as contaminants, are less important unless unexpectedly intense exposure occurs to the intestinal tract. Pharmaceutical agents of several types interreact with the small bowel mucosa causing impairment of transport processes for fluid and electrolytes, amino acid, lipid and sugars as well as vitamins. These interreactions may be dependent on bacterial metabolic activity, association with detergents, mucosal enzyme deficiency state (disaccharidases), and the state of nutrition of the subject. PMID:540611

  20. Ion channel regulation by protein S-acylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Protein S-acylation, the reversible covalent fatty-acid modification of cysteine residues, has emerged as a dynamic posttranslational modification (PTM) that controls the diversity, life cycle, and physiological function of numerous ligand- and voltage-gated ion channels. S-acylation is enzymatically mediated by a diverse family of acyltransferases (zDHHCs) and is reversed by acylthioesterases. However, for most ion channels, the dynamics and subcellular localization at which S-acylation and deacylation cycles occur are not known. S-acylation can control the two fundamental determinants of ion channel function: (1) the number of channels resident in a membrane and (2) the activity of the channel at the membrane. It controls the former by regulating channel trafficking and the latter by controlling channel kinetics and modulation by other PTMs. Ion channel function may be modulated by S-acylation of both pore-forming and regulatory subunits as well as through control of adapter, signaling, and scaffolding proteins in ion channel complexes. Importantly, cross-talk of S-acylation with other PTMs of both cysteine residues by themselves and neighboring sites of phosphorylation is an emerging concept in the control of ion channel physiology. In this review, I discuss the fundamentals of protein S-acylation and the tools available to investigate ion channel S-acylation. The mechanisms and role of S-acylation in controlling diverse stages of the ion channel life cycle and its effect on ion channel function are highlighted. Finally, I discuss future goals and challenges for the field to understand both the mechanistic basis for S-acylation control of ion channels and the functional consequence and implications for understanding the physiological function of ion channel S-acylation in health and disease. PMID:24821965

  1. Secondary Acylation of Klebsiella pneumoniae Lipopolysaccharide Contributes to Sensitivity to Antibacterial Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Abigail; Tull, Dedreia; Jenney, Adam W.; Farn, Jacinta L.; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Bishop, Russell E.; McPhee, Joseph B.; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Pearse, Martin J.; Wijburg, Odilia L. C.; Jackson, David C.; McConville, Malcolm J.; Strugnell, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of nosocomial Gram-negative sepsis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is considered to be a major virulence determinant of this encapsulated bacterium and most mutations to the lipid A anchor of LPS are conditionally lethal to the bacterium. We studied the role of LPS acylation in K. pneumoniae disease pathogenesis by using a mutation of lpxM (msbB/waaN), which encodes the enzyme responsible for late secondary acylation of immature lipid A molecules. A K. pneumoniae B5055 (K2:O1) lpxM mutant was found to be attenuated for growth in the lungs in a mouse pneumonia model leading to reduced lethality of the bacterium. B5055ΔlpxM exhibited similar sensitivity to phagocytosis or complement-mediated lysis than B5055, unlike the non-encapsulated mutant B5055nm. In vitro, B5055ΔlpxM showed increased permeability of the outer membrane and an increased susceptibility to certain antibacterial peptides suggesting that in vivo attenuation may be due in part to sensitivity to antibacterial peptides present in the lungs of BALB/c mice. These data support the view that lipopolysaccharide acylation plays a important role in providing Gram-negative bacteria some resistance to structural and innate defenses and especially the antibacterial properties of detergents (e.g. bile) and cationic defensins. PMID:17371870

  2. Role of acyl carrier protein isoforms in plant lipid metabolism: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Previous research from my lab has revealed that several higher plant species have multiple isoforms of acyl carrier protein (ACP) and therefore this trait appears highly conserved among higher plants. This level of conservation suggests that the existence of ACP isoforms is not merely the results of neutral gene duplications. We have developed techniques to examine a wider range of species. Acyl carrier proteins can be labelled very specifically and to high specific activity using H-palmitate and the E. coli enzyme acyl-ACP synthetase. Isoforms were then resolved by western blotting and native PAGE of H-palmitate labelled ACP's. Multiple isoforms of ACP were observed the leaf tissue of the monocots Avena sativa and Hordeum vulgare and dicots including Arabidopsis thallina, Cuphea wrightii, and Brassica napus. Lower vascular plants including the cycad, Dioon edule, Ginkgo biloba, the gymnosperm Pinus, the fern Anernia phyllitidis and Psilotum nudum, the most primitive known extant vascular plant, were also found to have multiple ACP isoforms as were the nonvascular liverwort, Marchantia and moss, Polytrichum. Therefore, the development of ACP isoforms occurred early in evolution. However, the uniellular alge Chlamydomonas and Dunaliella and the photosynthetic cyanobacteria Synechocystis and Agmnellum have only a single elecrophotetic form of ACP. Thus, multiple forms of ACP do not occur in all photosynthetic organisms but may be associated with multicellular plants.

  3. Expression and distribution of acyl-CoA thioesterases in the white adipose tissue of rats.

    PubMed

    Ohtomo, Takayuki; Hoshino, Atsuko; Yajima, Masako; Tsuchiya, Akiharu; Momose, Atsushi; Tanonaka, Kouichi; Toyoda, Hiroo; Kato, Tetsuta; Yamada, Junji

    2013-08-01

    Acyl-CoA thioesterases (Acots) are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of fatty acyl-CoAs to free fatty acids and coenzyme A, and have the potential to regulate the intracellular levels of these molecules. In this study, we show that a cytosolic isoform, Acot1, is expressed and distributed in immature adipocytes located in the perivascular region of the white adipose tissue (WAT) of rats. Immunoblot analyses detected Acot1 in all of the WATs examined, while immunohistochemistry revealed positively stained layered structures surrounding the adventitia of blood vessels in the subcutaneous WAT. When the subcutaneous WAT was digested with collagenase and centrifuged, Acot1 was recovered in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF), and not in the large mature adipocytes. In the SVF, undigested cells attached to short tubular fragments of blood vessels showed positive immunostaining, as well as a proportion of the dispersed cells. These fibroblast-like cells contained fine particulate lipid droplets, stained by oil-red O dye, in their cytoplasm, or expressed fatty acid-binding protein 4, an adipocyte marker. After induction of adipocyte differentiation following a 15-day preculture without insulin, the dedifferentiated cells showed increased Acot1 expression with a diffuse distribution throughout the cytosol. These findings suggest that Acot1 expression is transiently upregulated at an early stage of adipocyte maturation, possibly to maintain cytosolic acyl-CoAs below a certain level until the cells acquire their full capability for fat storage. PMID:23385637

  4. Poly specific trans-acyltransferase machinery revealed via engineered acyl-CoA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Koryakina, Irina; McArthur, John; Randall, Shan; Draelos, Matthew M; Musiol, Ewa M; Muddiman, David C; Weber, Tilmann; Williams, Gavin J

    2013-01-18

    Polyketide synthases construct polyketides with diverse structures and biological activities via the condensation of extender units and acyl thioesters. Although a growing body of evidence suggests that polyketide synthases might be tolerant to non-natural extender units, in vitro and in vivo studies aimed at probing and utilizing polyketide synthase specificity are severely limited to only a small number of extender units, owing to the lack of synthetic routes to a broad variety of acyl-CoA extender units. Here, we report the construction of promiscuous malonyl-CoA synthetase variants that can be used to synthesize a broad range of malonyl-CoA extender units substituted at the C2-position, several of which contain handles for chemoselective ligation and are not found in natural biosynthetic systems. We highlighted utility of these enzymes by probing the acyl-CoA specificity of several trans-acyltransferases, leading to the unprecedented discovery of poly specificity toward non-natural extender units, several of which are not found in naturally occurring biosynthetic pathways. These results reveal that polyketide biosynthetic machinery might be more tolerant to non-natural substrates than previously established, and that mutant synthetases are valuable tools for probing the specificity of biosynthetic machinery. Our data suggest new synthetic biology strategies for harnessing this promiscuity and enabling the regioselective modification of polyketides. PMID:23083014

  5. Cloning of a palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase from oil palm.

    PubMed

    Othman, A; Lazarus, C; Fraser, T; Stobart, K

    2000-12-01

    A palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase cDNA clone was isolated from an oil palm cDNA library. The cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein and a crude bacterial extract was assayed for acyl-CoA-hydrolysing activity. The recombinant enzyme was able to hydrolyse medium- and long-chain acyl-CoAs. Northern-blot analysis showed a high level of gene expression in leaf, flower and 15-, 17- and 18-week mesocarp tissues. Low-level gene expression was detected in germinated seedlings and 8- and 12-week mesocarp tissues, but no transcript was detected in any kernel tissues. Southern-blot analysis indicated the presence of a single gene and we have also isolated a genomic clone using the cDNA as a probe. Two genomic fragments were subcloned and a 7 kb contiguous stretch of the oil palm genome was sequenced. Comparison of this sequence with the cDNA sequence identified a putative 93 amino acid transit peptide, most of which is missing from the cDNA. The coding region of the gene consisted of seven exons and six introns. PMID:11171146

  6. An oleate 12-hydroxylase from Ricinus communis L. is a fatty acyl desaturase homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Van De Loo, F.J.; Broun, P.; Turner, S.; Somerville, C.

    1995-07-18

    Recent spectroscopic evidence implicating a binuclear iron site at the reaction center of fatty acyl desaturases suggested to us that certain fatty acyl hydroxylases may share significant amino acid sequence similarity with desaturases. To test this theory, we prepared a cDNA library from developing endosperm of the castor-oil plant (Ricinus communis L.) and obtained partial nucleotide sequences for 468 anonymous clones that were not expressed at high levels in leaves, a tissue deficient in 12-hydroxyoleic acid. This resulted in the identification of several cDNA clones encoding a polypeptide of 387 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 44,407 and with {approx}67% sequence homology to microsomal oleate desaturase from Arabidopsis. Expression of a full-length clone under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter in transgenic tobacco resulted in the accumulation of low levels of 12-hydroxyoleic acid in seeds, indicating that the clone encodes the castor oleate hydroxylase. These results suggest that fatty acyl desaturases and hydroxylases share similar reaction mechanisms and provide an example of enzyme evolution. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Purification and biochemical characterization of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases KasA and KasB.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, M L; Agnihotri, G; Volker, C; Kallender, H; Brennan, P J; Lonsdale, J T

    2001-12-14

    Mycolic acids are vital components of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall, and enzymes involved in their formation represent attractive targets for the discovery of novel anti-tuberculosis agents. Biosynthesis of the fatty acyl chains of mycolic acids involves two fatty acid synthetic systems, the multifunctional polypeptide fatty acid synthase I (FASI), which performs de novo fatty acid synthesis, and the dissociated FASII system, which consists of monofunctional enzymes, and acyl carrier protein (ACP) and elongates FASI products to long chain mycolic acid precursors. In this study, we present the initial characterization of purified KasA and KasB, two beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase (KAS) enzymes of the M. tuberculosis FASII system. KasA and KasB were expressed in E. coli and purified by affinity chromatography. Both enzymes showed activity typical of bacterial KASs, condensing an acyl-ACP with malonyl-ACP. Consistent with the proposed role of FASII in mycolic acid synthesis, analysis of various acyl-ACP substrates indicated KasA and KasB had higher specificity for long chain acyl-ACPs containing at least 16 carbons. Activity of KasA and KasB increased with use of M. tuberculosis AcpM, suggesting that structural differences between AcpM and E. coli ACP may affect their recognition by the enzymes. Both enzymes were sensitive to KAS inhibitors cerulenin and thiolactomycin. These results represent important steps in characterizing KasA and KasB as targets for antimycobacterial drug discovery. PMID:11600501

  8. Crystal structure of human mitochondrial acyl-CoA thioesterase (ACOT2)

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel, Corey R.; Tweel, Benjamin; Tong, Liang

    2009-08-13

    Acyl-CoA thioesterases (ACOTs) catalyze the hydrolysis of CoA esters to free CoA and carboxylic acids and have important functions in lipid metabolism and other cellular processes. Type I ACOTs are found only in animals and contain an {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase domain, through currently no structural information is available on any of these enzymes. We report here the crystal structure at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution of human mitochondrial ACOT2, a type I enzyme. The structure contains two domains, N and C domains. The C domain has the {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase fold, with the catalytic triad Ser294-His422-Asp388. The N domain contains a seven-stranded {beta}-sandwich, which has some distant structural homologs in other proteins. The active site is located in a large pocket at the interface between the two domains. The structural information has significant relevance for other type I ACOTs and related enzymes.

  9. The role of Δ6-desaturase acyl-carrier specificity in the efficient synthesis of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Sayanova, Olga; Ruiz-Lopez, Noemi; Haslam, Richard P; Napier, Johnathan A

    2012-02-01

    The role of acyl-CoA-dependent Δ6-desaturation in the heterologous synthesis of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids was systematically evaluated in transgenic yeast and Arabidopsis thaliana. The acyl-CoA Δ6-desaturase from the picoalga Ostreococcus tauri and orthologous activities from mouse (Mus musculus) and salmon (Salmo salar) were shown to generate substantial levels of Δ6-desaturated acyl-CoAs, in contrast to the phospholipid-dependent Δ6-desaturases from higher plants that failed to modify this metabolic pool. Transgenic plants expressing the acyl-CoA Δ6-desaturases from either O. tauri or salmon, in conjunction with the two additional activities required for the synthesis of C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids, contained higher levels of eicosapentaenoic acid compared with plants expressing the borage phospholipid-dependent Δ6-desaturase. The use of acyl-CoA-dependent Δ6-desaturases almost completely abolished the accumulation of unwanted biosynthetic intermediates such as γ-linolenic acid in total seed lipids. Expression of acyl-CoA Δ6-desaturases resulted in increased distribution of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in the polar lipids of transgenic plants, reflecting the larger substrate pool available for acylation by enzymes of the Kennedy pathway. Expression of the O. tauriΔ6-desaturase in transgenic Camelina sativa plants also resulted in the accumulation of high levels of Δ6-desaturated fatty acids. This study provides evidence for the efficacy of using acyl-CoA-dependent Δ6-desaturases in the efficient metabolic engineering of transgenic plants with high value traits such as the synthesis of omega-3 LC-PUFAs. PMID:21902798

  10. Interactions of the acyl chain with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae acyl carrier protein.

    PubMed

    Perez, Daniel R; Leibundgut, Marc; Wider, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) domains are critical integral components of multifunctional type I fatty acid synthases (FAS I) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), where they shuttle the growing adducts of the synthesis between the catalytic domains. In contrast to ACP of mammalian FAS I, PKSs, and the dissociated fatty acid synthase type II systems (FAS II) of bacteria, fungal FAS I ACP consists of two subdomains, one comprising the canonical ACP fold observed in all FAS systems and the other representing an extra structural subdomain. While ACPs of dissociated FAS II are able to sequester the reaction intermediates during substrate shuttling, such a transport mechanism has not been observed in ACP domains of multifunctional FAS I and PKS systems. For a better understanding of the interaction between the canonical subdomain of fungal ACP with the growing acyl chain and the role of the structural subdomain, we determined the structure of the isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae acyl carrier protein (ScACP) domain by NMR spectroscopy and investigated the interactions between ScACP and covalently attached substrate acyl chains of varying length by monitoring chemical shift perturbations. The interactions were mapped to the hydrophobic core of the canonical subdomain, while no perturbations were detected in the structural subdomain. A population analysis revealed that only approximately 15% of covalently attached decanoyl chains are sequestered by the ACP core, comparable to the mammalian FAS I and multifunctional PKS systems, which do not sequester their substrates. Finally, denaturation experiments show that both ScACP subdomains unfold cooperatively and that the weak interaction of the acyl chain with the hydrophobic core does not significantly affect the ACP stability. PMID:25774789

  11. Cyclic AMP-dependent Protein Lysine Acylation in Mycobacteria Regulates Fatty Acid and Propionate Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Nambi, Subhalaxmi; Gupta, Kallol; Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Ramakrishnan, Parvathy; Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Siddiqui, Nida; Thomas, Ann Terene; Visweswariah, Sandhya S.

    2013-01-01

    Acetylation of lysine residues is a posttranslational modification that is used by both eukaryotes and prokaryotes to regulate a variety of biological processes. Here we identify multiple substrates for the cAMP-dependent protein lysine acetyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (KATmt). We demonstrate that a catalytically important lysine residue in a number of FadD (fatty acyl CoA synthetase) enzymes is acetylated by KATmt in a cAMP-dependent manner and that acetylation inhibits the activity of FadD enzymes. A sirtuin-like enzyme can deacetylate multiple FadDs, thus completing the regulatory cycle. Using a strain deleted for the KATmt ortholog in Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), we show for the first time that acetylation is dependent on intracellular cAMP levels. KATmt can utilize propionyl CoA as a substrate and, therefore, plays a critical role in alleviating propionyl CoA toxicity in mycobacteria by inactivating acyl CoA synthetase (ACS). The precision by which mycobacteria can regulate the metabolism of fatty acids in a cAMP-dependent manner appears to be unparalleled in other biological organisms and is ideally suited to adapt to the complex environment that pathogenic mycobacteria experience in the host. PMID:23553634

  12. Chlorsulfuron modifies biosynthesis of acyl Acid substituents of sucrose esters secreted by tobacco trichomes.

    PubMed

    Kandra, L; Wagner, G J

    1990-11-01

    Sucrose esters and duvatrienediol diterpenes are principal constituents formed in and secreted outside head cells of trichomes occurring on surfaces of Nicotiana tabacum. Using trichome-bearing epidermal peels prepared from midveins of N. tabacum cv T.I. 1068 leaves, we found that chlorsulfuron reduced and modified radiolabeling of sucrose ester acyl acids derived from branched-chain amino acid metabolism. The herbicide did not effect formation and exudation of diterpenes which are products of isoprenoid metabolism. Treatment with 1.0 micromolar chlorsulfuron affected 8.5- and 6.3-fold reductions in radiolabeling of methylvaleryl and methylbutyryl groups of sucrose esters, respectively, and concomitant increases of 9- and 9.8-fold in radiolabeling of straight chain valeryl and butyryl groups, respectively. These results and others indicate that inhibition of acetolactate synthase causes an accumulation of 2-oxo-butyric acid that is utilized by enzymes common to Leu biosynthesis to form 2-oxo-valeric acid. Coenzyme A (CoA) activation of this keto acid gives rise to butyryl CoA, which is utilized to form butyryl containing sucrose esters. Alternatively, reutilization of 2-oxo-valeric acid by the same enzymes followed by CoA activation leads to valeryl containing sucrose esters. We propose that in trichome secretory cells synthase, isomerase and dehydrogenase enzymes which catalyze Leu synthesis/degredation in most tissues, convert iso-branched, anteiso-branched and straight-chain keto acids in the formation of sucrose ester acyl groups. PMID:16667871

  13. Chlorsulfuron Modifies Biosynthesis of Acyl Acid Substituents of Sucrose Esters Secreted by Tobacco Trichomes

    PubMed Central

    Kandra, Lili; Wagner, George J.

    1990-01-01

    Sucrose esters and duvatrienediol diterpenes are principal constituents formed in and secreted outside head cells of trichomes occurring on surfaces of Nicotiana tabacum. Using trichome-bearing epidermal peels prepared from midveins of N. tabacum cv T.I. 1068 leaves, we found that chlorsulfuron reduced and modified radiolabeling of sucrose ester acyl acids derived from branched-chain amino acid metabolism. The herbicide did not effect formation and exudation of diterpenes which are products of isoprenoid metabolism. Treatment with 1.0 micromolar chlorsulfuron affected 8.5- and 6.3-fold reductions in radiolabeling of methylvaleryl and methylbutyryl groups of sucrose esters, respectively, and concomitant increases of 9- and 9.8-fold in radiolabeling of straight chain valeryl and butyryl groups, respectively. These results and others indicate that inhibition of acetolactate synthase causes an accumulation of 2-oxo-butyric acid that is utilized by enzymes common to Leu biosynthesis to form 2-oxo-valeric acid. Coenzyme A (CoA) activation of this keto acid gives rise to butyryl CoA, which is utilized to form butyryl containing sucrose esters. Alternatively, reutilization of 2-oxo-valeric acid by the same enzymes followed by CoA activation leads to valeryl containing sucrose esters. We propose that in trichome secretory cells synthase, isomerase and dehydrogenase enzymes which catalyze Leu synthesis/degredation in most tissues, convert iso-branched, anteiso-branched and straight-chain keto acids in the formation of sucrose ester acyl groups. PMID:16667871

  14. Large intestine (colon) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The large intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of water from the indigestible ... the ileum (small intestine) passes material into the large intestine at the cecum. Material passes through the ...

  15. Probing the Mechanism of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis [beta]-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase III mtFabH: Factors Influencing Catalysis and Substrate Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Alistair K.; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Kremer, Laurent; Lindenberg, Sandra; Dover, Lynn G.; Sacchettini, James C.; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2010-11-30

    Mycolic acids are the dominant feature of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall. These {alpha}-alkyl, {beta}-hydroxy fatty acids are formed by the condensation of two fatty acids, a long meromycolic acid and a shorter C{sub 24}-C{sub 26} fatty acid. The component fatty acids are produced via a combination of type I and II fatty acid synthases (FAS) with FAS-I products being elongated by FAS-II toward meromycolic acids. The {beta}-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase III encoded by mtfabH (mtFabH) links FAS-I and FAS-II, catalyzing the condensation of FAS-I-derived acyl-CoAs with malonyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP). The acyl-CoA chain length specificity of mtFabH was assessed in vitro; the enzyme extended longer, physiologically relevant acyl-CoA primers when paired with AcpM, its natural partner, than with Escherichia coli ACP. The ability of the enzyme to use E. coli ACP suggests that a similar mode of binding is likely with both ACPs, yet it is clear that unique factors inherent to AcpM modulate the substrate specificity of mtFabH. Mutation of proposed key mtFabH residues was used to define their catalytic roles. Substitution of supposed acyl-CoA binding residues reduced transacylation, with double substitutions totally abrogating activity. Mutation of Arg{sup 46} revealed its more critical role in malonyl-AcpM decarboxylation than in the acyl-CoA binding role. Interestingly, this effect was suppressed intragenically by Arg{sup 161} {yields} Ala substitution. Our structural studies suggested that His{sup 258}, previously implicated in malonyl-ACP decarboxylation, also acts as an anchor point for a network of water molecules that we propose promotes deprotonation and transacylation of Cys{sup 122}.

  16. Biochemical characterization and substrate specificity of jojoba fatty acyl-CoA reductase and jojoba wax synthase.

    PubMed

    Miklaszewska, Magdalena; Banaś, Antoni

    2016-08-01

    Wax esters are used in industry for production of lubricants, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. The only natural source of wax esters is jojoba oil. A much wider variety of industrial wax esters-containing oils can be generated through genetic engineering. Biotechnological production of tailor-made wax esters requires, however, a detailed substrate specificity of fatty acyl-CoA reductases (FAR) and wax synthases (WS), the two enzymes involved in wax esters synthesis. In this study we have successfully characterized the substrate specificity of jojoba FAR and jojoba WS. The genes encoding both enzymes were expressed heterologously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the activity of tested enzymes was confirmed by in vivo studies and in vitro assays using microsomal preparations from transgenic yeast. Jojoba FAR exhibited the highest in vitro activity toward 18:0-CoA followed by 20:1-CoA and 22:1-CoA. The activity toward other 11 tested acyl-CoAs was low or undetectable as with 18:2-CoA and 18:3-CoA. In assays characterizing jojoba WS combinations of 17 fatty alcohols with 14 acyl-CoAs were tested. The enzyme displayed the highest activity toward 14:0-CoA and 16:0-CoA in combination with C16-C20 alcohols as well as toward C18 acyl-CoAs in combination with C12-C16 alcohols. 20:1-CoA was efficiently utilized in combination with most of the tested alcohols. PMID:27297992

  17. Understanding Acyl Chain and Glycerolipid Metabolism in Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlrogge, John B.

    2013-11-05

    Progress is reported in these areas: acyl-editing in initial eukaryotic lipid assembly in soybean seeds; identification and characterization of two Arabidopsis thaliana lysophosphatidyl acyltransferases with preference for lysophosphatidylethanolamine; and characterization and subcellular distribution of lysolipid acyl transferase activity of pea leaves.

  18. Characterization of the "Escherichia Coli" Acyl Carrier Protein Phosphodiesterase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a small essential protein that functions as a carrier of the acyl intermediates of fatty acid synthesis. ACP requires the posttranslational attachment of a 4'phosphopantetheine functional group, derived from CoA, in order to perform its metabolic function. A Mn[superscript 2+] dependent enzymatic activity that removes…

  19. Intestinal capillariasis.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, J H

    1992-01-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt, and Taiwan, but most infections occur in the Philippines and Thailand. As established experimentally, the life cycle involves freshwater fish as intermediate hosts and fish-eating birds as definitive hosts. Embryonated eggs from feces fed to fish hatch and grow as larvae in the fish intestines. Infective larvae fed to monkeys, Mongolian gerbils, and fish-eating birds develop into adults. Larvae become adults in 10 to 11 days, and the first-generation females produce larvae. These larvae develop into males and egg-producing female worms. Eggs pass with the feces, reach water, embryonate, and infect fish. Autoinfection is part of the life cycle and leads to hyperinfection. Humans acquire the infection by eating small freshwater fish raw. The parasite multiplies, and symptoms of diarrhea, borborygmus, abdominal pain, and edema develop. Chronic infections lead to malabsorption and hence to protein and electrolyte loss, and death results from irreversible effects of the infection. Treatment consists of electrolyte replacement and administration of an antidiarrheal agent and mebendazole or albendazole. Capillariasis philippinensis is considered a zoonotic disease of migratory fish-eating birds. The eggs are disseminated along flyways and infect the fish, and when fish are eaten raw, the disease develops. Images PMID:1576584

  20. Acyl peptidic siderophores: structures, biosyntheses and post-assembly modifications.

    PubMed

    Kem, Michelle P; Butler, Alison

    2015-06-01

    Acyl peptidic siderophores are produced by a variety of bacteria and possess unique amphiphilic properties. Amphiphilic siderophores are generally produced in a suite where the iron(III)-binding headgroup remains constant while the fatty acid appendage varies by length and functionality. Acyl peptidic siderophores are commonly synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases; however, the method of peptide acylation during biosynthesis can vary between siderophores. Following biosynthesis, acyl siderophores can be further modified enzymatically to produce a more hydrophilic compound, which retains its ferric chelating abilities as demonstrated by pyoverdine from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the marinobactins from certain Marinobacter species. Siderophore hydrophobicity can also be altered through photolysis of the ferric complex of certain β-hydroxyaspartic acid-containing acyl peptidic siderophores. PMID:25677460

  1. Vertebrate fatty acyl desaturase with Δ4 activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanyou; Monroig, Oscar; Zhang, Liang; Wang, Shuqi; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Dick, James R.; You, Cuihong; Tocher, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    Biosynthesis of the highly biologically active long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, arachidonic (ARA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids, in vertebrates requires the introduction of up to three double bonds catalyzed by fatty acyl desaturases (Fad). Synthesis of ARA is achieved by Δ6 desaturation of 18∶2n - 6 to produce 18∶3n - 6 that is elongated to 20∶3n - 6 followed by Δ5 desaturation. Synthesis of EPA from 18∶3n - 3 requires the same enzymes and pathway as for ARA, but DHA synthesis reportedly requires two further elongations, a second Δ6 desaturation and a peroxisomal chain shortening step. This paper describes cDNAs, fad1 and fad2, isolated from the herbivorous, marine teleost fish (Siganus canaliculatus) with high similarity to mammalian Fad proteins. Functional characterization of the cDNAs by heterologous expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that Fad1 was a bifunctional Δ6/Δ5 Fad. Previously, functional dual specificity in vertebrates had been demonstrated for a zebrafish Danio rerio Fad and baboon Fad, so the present report suggests bifunctionality may be more widespread in vertebrates. However, Fad2 conferred on the yeast the ability to convert 22∶5n - 3 to DHA indicating that this S. canaliculatus gene encoded an enzyme having Δ4 Fad activity. This is a unique report of a Fad with Δ4 activity in any vertebrate species and indicates that there are two possible mechanisms for DHA biosynthesis, a direct route involving elongation of EPA to 22∶5n - 3 followed by Δ4 desaturation, as well as the more complicated pathway as described above. PMID:20826444

  2. 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide-3'-phosphodiesterase in the central nervous system is fatty-acylated by thioester linkage.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, H C; Sprinkle, T J; Agrawal, D

    1990-07-15

    2',3'-Cyclic nucleotide-3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP1 and CNP2 with Mr of 46,000 and 48,000, respectively) is the major enzyme of central nervous system myelin. It is associated with oligodendroglial plasma membrane and uncompacted myelin (myelin-like fraction), which are in contact with glial cytoplasm. Proteins of the myelin-like fraction were labeled with [3H]palmitic acid in brain slices from 17-day-old rats and immunoprecipitated with anti-CNP antiserum. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitated material revealed intense acylation of CNP1 and CNP2, and radioactivity was released by hydroxylamine. Palmitic acid was covalently bound to CNP because radioactivity was not removed by extraction of immunoprecipitated CNP with organic solvent or by boiling in sodium dodecyl sulfate and dithiothreitol. However, treatment of immunoprecipitated CNP with (a) hydroxylamine-released palmitohydroxamate and palmitic acid, (b) sodium borohydride-released hexadecanol, and (c) methanolic-KOH-released methyl palmitate. Synthesis, acylation, or transport of CNP was not affected by monensin or colchicine. However, acylation of CNP was inhibited 24-32% by cycloheximide. These results provide conclusive evidence that CNP1 and CNP2 are fatty acid acylated with palmitate through a thioester linkage and is posttranslationally modified sometime after synthesis. PMID:2164018

  3. Crystallization of the C-terminal domain of the mouse brain cytosolic long-chain acyl-CoA thioesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Serek, Robert; Forwood, Jade K.; Hume, David A.; Martin, Jennifer L.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2006-02-01

    The C-terminal domain of the mouse long-chain acyl-CoA thioesterase has been expressed in bacteria and crystallized by vapour diffusion. The crystals diffract to 2.4 Å resolution. The mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA thioesterase, the enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of acyl-CoAs to free fatty acids, contains two fused 4HBT (4-hydroxybenzoyl-CoA thioesterase) motifs. The C-terminal domain of the mouse long-chain acyl-CoA thioesterase (Acot7) has been expressed in bacteria and crystallized. The crystals were obtained by vapour diffusion using PEG 2000 MME as precipitant at pH 7.0 and 290 K. The crystals have the symmetry of space group R32 (unit-cell parameters a = b = 136.83, c = 99.82 Å, γ = 120°). Two molecules are expected in the asymmetric unit. The crystals diffract to 2.4 Å resolution using the laboratory X-ray source and are suitable for crystal structure determination.

  4. The fruit ripening-related gene FaAAT2 encodes an acyl transferase involved in strawberry aroma biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cumplido-Laso, Guadalupe; Medina-Puche, Laura; Moyano, Enriqueta; Hoffmann, Thomas; Sinz, Quirin; Ring, Ludwig; Studart-Wittkowski, Claudia; Caballero, José Luis; Schwab, Wilfried; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Blanco-Portales, Rosario

    2012-06-01

    Short-chain esters contribute to the blend of volatiles that define the strawberry aroma. The last step in their biosynthesis involves an alcohol acyltransferase that catalyses the esterification of an acyl moiety of acyl-CoA with an alcohol. This study identified a novel strawberry alcohol acyltransferase gene (FaAAT2) whose expression pattern during fruit receptacle growth and ripening is in accordance with the production of esters throughout strawberry fruit ripening. The full-length FaAAT2 cDNA was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and its activity was analysed with acyl-CoA and alcohol substrates. The semi-purified FaAAT2 enzyme had activity with C1-C8 straight-chain alcohols and aromatic alcohols in the presence of acetyl-CoA. Cinnamyl alcohol was the most efficient acyl acceptor. When FaAAT2 expression was transiently downregulated in the fruit receptacle by agroinfiltration, the volatile ester production was significantly reduced in strawberry fruit. The results suggest that FaAAT2 plays a significant role in the production of esters that contribute to the final strawberry fruit flavour. PMID:22563120

  5. Acyl CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5) ablation in mice increases energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity and delays fat absorption

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Thomas A.; O'Keeffe, Kayleigh R.; D'Aquila, Theresa; Yan, Qing Wu; Griffin, John D.; Killion, Elizabeth A.; Salter, Deanna M.; Mashek, Douglas G.; Buhman, Kimberly K.; Greenberg, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The family of acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes (ACSL) activates fatty acids within cells to generate long chain fatty acyl CoA (FACoA). The differing metabolic fates of FACoAs such as incorporation into neutral lipids, phospholipids, and oxidation pathways are differentially regulated by the ACSL isoforms. In vitro studies have suggested a role for ACSL5 in triglyceride synthesis; however, we have limited understanding of the in vivo actions of this ACSL isoform. Methods To elucidate the in vivo actions of ACSL5 we generated a line of mice in which ACSL5 expression was ablated in all tissues (ACSL5−/−). Results Ablation of ACSL5 reduced ACSL activity by ∼80% in jejunal mucosa, ∼50% in liver, and ∼37% in brown adipose tissue lysates. Body composition studies revealed that ACSL5−/−, as compared to control ACSL5loxP/loxP, mice had significantly reduced fat mass and adipose fat pad weights. Indirect calorimetry studies demonstrated that ACSL5−/− had increased metabolic rates, and in the dark phase, increased respiratory quotient. In ACSL5−/− mice, fasting glucose and serum triglyceride were reduced; and insulin sensitivity was improved during an insulin tolerance test. Both hepatic mRNA (∼16-fold) and serum levels of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) (∼13-fold) were increased in ACSL5−/− as compared to ACSL5loxP/loxP. Consistent with increased FGF21 serum levels, uncoupling protein-1 gene (Ucp1) and PPAR-gamma coactivator 1-alpha gene (Pgc1α) transcript levels were increased in gonadal adipose tissue. To further evaluate ACSL5 function in intestine, mice were gavaged with an olive oil bolus; and the rate of triglyceride appearance in serum was found to be delayed in ACSL5−/− mice as compared to control mice. Conclusions In summary, ACSL5−/− mice have increased hepatic and serum FGF21 levels, reduced adiposity, improved insulin sensitivity, increased energy expenditure and delayed triglyceride absorption. These studies

  6. Friedel-Craft acylation of ar-himachalene: synthesis of acyl-ar-himachalene and a new acyl-hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Hossini, Issam; Harrad, Mohamed Anoir; Ait Ali, Mustapha; El Firdoussi, Larbi; Karim, Abdallah; Valerga, Pedro; Puerta, M Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Friedel-Craft acylation at 100 °C of 2,5,9,9-tetramethyl-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5H-benzocycloheptene [ar-himachalene], a sesquiterpenic hydrocarbon obtained by catalytic dehydrogenation of α-, β- and γ-himachalenes, produces a mixture of two compounds: (3,5,5,9-tetramethyl-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5H-benzocyclohepten-2-yl)-ethanone (2, in 69% yield), with a conserved reactant backbone, and 3, with a different skeleton, in 21% yield. The crystal structure of 3 reveals it to be 1-(8-ethyl-8-hydroperoxy-3,5,5-trimethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-yl)-ethanone. In this compound O-H…O bonds form dimers. These hydrogen-bonds, in conjunction with weaker C-H…O interactions, form a more extended supramolecular arrangement in the crystal. PMID:21760570

  7. Enzyme markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... or defects passed down through families (inherited) can affect how enzymes work. Some enzymes are affected by several genes. Test results are usually reported as a percentage of normal enzyme activity.

  8. Characterization of Novel Acyl Coenzyme A Dehydrogenases Involved in Bacterial Steroid Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ruprecht, Amanda; Maddox, Jaymie; Stirling, Alexander J.; Visaggio, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) dehydrogenases (ACADs) FadE34 and CasC, encoded by the cholesterol and cholate gene clusters of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, respectively, were successfully purified. Both enzymes differ from previously characterized ACADs in that they contain two fused acyl-CoA dehydrogenase domains in a single polypeptide. Site-specific mutagenesis showed that only the C-terminal ACAD domain contains the catalytic glutamate base required for enzyme activity, while the N-terminal ACAD domain contains an arginine required for ionic interactions with the pyrophosphate of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor. Therefore, the two ACAD domains must associate to form a single active site. FadE34 and CasC were not active toward the 3-carbon side chain steroid metabolite 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchol-4-en-22-oyl-CoA (4BNC-CoA) but were active toward steroid CoA esters containing 5-carbon side chains. CasC has similar specificity constants for cholyl-CoA, deoxycholyl-CoA, and 3β-hydroxy-5-cholen-24-oyl-CoA, while FadE34 has a preference for the last compound, which has a ring structure similar to that of cholesterol metabolites. Knockout of the casC gene in R. jostii RHA1 resulted in a reduced growth on cholate as a sole carbon source and accumulation of a 5-carbon side chain cholate metabolite. FadE34 and CasC represent unique members of ACADs with primary structures and substrate specificities that are distinct from those of previously characterized ACADs. IMPORTANCE We report here the identification and characterization of acyl-CoA dehydrogenases (ACADs) involved in the metabolism of 5-carbon side chains of cholesterol and cholate. The two homologous enzymes FadE34 and CasC, from M. tuberculosis and Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, respectively, contain two ACAD domains per polypeptide, and we show that these two domains interact to form a single active site. FadE34 and CasC are therefore representatives of a new class of

  9. Palladium-Catalyzed Environmentally Benign Acylation.

    PubMed

    Suchand, Basuli; Satyanarayana, Gedu

    2016-08-01

    Recent trends in research have gained an orientation toward developing efficient strategies using innocuous reagents. The earlier reported transition-metal-catalyzed carbonylations involved either toxic carbon monoxide (CO) gas as carbonylating agent or functional-group-assisted ortho sp(2) C-H activation (i.e., ortho acylation) or carbonylation by activation of the carbonyl group (i.e., via the formation of enamines). Contradicting these methods, here we describe an environmentally benign process, [Pd]-catalyzed direct carbonylation starting from simple and commercially available iodo arenes and aldehydes, for the synthesis of a wide variety of ketones. Moreover, this method comprises direct coupling of iodoarenes with aldehydes without activation of the carbonyl and also without directing group assistance. Significantly, the strategy was successfully applied to the synthesis n-butylphthalide and pitofenone. PMID:27377566

  10. Evidence for a complex of three beta-oxidation enzymes in Escherichia coli: induction and localization.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, W J; Frerman, F E

    1977-01-01

    The enzymes for beta-oxidation of fatty acids in inducible and constitutive strains of Escherichia coli were assayed in soluble and membrane fractions of disrupted cells by using fatty acid and acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) substrates containing either 4 or 16 carbon atoms in the acyl moieties. Cell fractionation was monitored, using succinic dehydrogenase as a membrane marker and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase as a soluble marker. Acyl-CoA synthetase activity was detected exclusively in the membrane fraction, whereas acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, enoyl-CoA hydratase, and 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase activities that utilized both C4 and C16 acyl-CoA substrates were isolated from the soluble fraction. 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, enoyl-CoA hydratase, and 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase activities assayed with both C4 and C16 acyl-CoA substrates co-chromatographed on gel filtration and ion-exchange columns and cosedimented in glycerol gradients. The data show that these three enzyme activities of the fad regulon can be isolated as a multienzyme complex. This complex dissociates in very dilute preparations; however, in those preparations where the three activities are separated, the fractionated species retain activity with both C4 and C16 acyl-CoA substrates. PMID:334745

  11. Identification of a Mycoloyl Transferase Selectively Involved in O-Acylation of Polypeptides in Corynebacteriales

    PubMed Central

    Huc, Emilie; de Sousa-D'Auria, Célia; de la Sierra-Gallay, Inès Li; Salmeron, Christophe; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Bayan, Nicolas; Houssin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    We have previously described the posttranslational modification of pore-forming small proteins of Corynebacterium by mycolic acid, a very-long-chain α-alkyl and β-hydroxy fatty acid. Using a combination of chemical analyses and mass spectrometry, we identified the mycoloyl transferase (Myt) that catalyzes the transfer of the fatty acid residue to yield O-acylated polypeptides. Inactivation of corynomycoloyl transferase C (cg0413 [Corynebacterium glutamicum mytC {CgmytC}]), one of the six Cgmyt genes of C. glutamicum, specifically abolished the O-modification of the pore-forming proteins PorA and PorH, which is critical for their biological activity. Expectedly, complementation of the cg0413 mutant with either the wild-type gene or its orthologues from Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Rhodococcus, but not Nocardia, fully restored the O-acylation of the porins. Consistently, the three-dimensional structure of CgMytC showed the presence of a unique loop that is absent from enzymes that transfer mycoloyl residues onto both trehalose and the cell wall arabinogalactan. These data suggest the implication of this structure in the enzyme specificity for protein instead of carbohydrate. PMID:23852866

  12. Direct Acylation of Carrier Proteins with Functionalized β-Lactones

    PubMed Central

    Amoroso, Jon W.; Borketey, Lawrence S.; Prasad, Gitanjeli

    2014-01-01

    As the key component of many biosynthetic assemblies, acyl-carrier proteins offer a robust entry point for introduction of small molecule probes and pathway intermediates. Current labeling strategies primarily rely on modifications to the phosphopantetheine cofactor or its biosynthetic precursors followed by attachment to the apo form of a given carrier protein. As a greatly simplified alternative, direct and selective acylation of holo-acyl-carrier proteins using readily accessible β-lactones as electrophilic partners for the phosphopantetheine-thiol has been demonstrated. PMID:20433156

  13. Role of acyl carrier protein isoforms in plant lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Although acyl carrier protein (ACP) is the best studied protein in plant fatty acid biosynthesis, the in vivo forms of ACPs and their steady state pools have not been examined previously in either seed or leaf. Information about the relative pool sizes of free ACP and its acyl-ACP intermediates is essential for understanding regulation of de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in plants. In this study we utilized antibodies directed against spinach ACP as a sensitive assay to analyze the acyl groups while they were still covalently attached to ACPs. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Specificities of the Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein (ACP) Thioesterase and Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase for Octadecenoyl-ACP Isomers (Identification of a Petroselinoyl-ACP Thioesterase in Umbelliferae).

    PubMed Central

    Dormann, P.; Frentzen, M.; Ohlrogge, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to address the question: How specific for double bond position and conformation are plant enzymes that act on oleoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP)? Octadecenoyl-ACPs with cis double bonds at positions [delta]6, [delta]7, [delta]8, [delta]9, [delta]10, [delta]11, or [delta]12 and elaidyl (18:1[delta]9trans)-ACP were synthesized and used to characterize the substrate specificity of the acyl-ACP thioesterase and acyl-ACP:sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase. The two enzymes were found to be specific for the [delta]9 position of the double bond. The thioesterase was highly specific for the [delta]9 cis conformation, but the transferase was almost equally active with the cis and the trans isomer of 18:1[delta]9-ACP. In plants such as the Umbelliferae species coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) that accumulate petroselinic acid (18:1[delta]6cis) in their seed triacylglycerols, a high petroselinoyl-ACP thioesterase activity was found in addition to the oleoyl-ACP thioesterase. The two activities could be separated by anion-exchange chromatography, indicating that the petroselinoyl-ACP thioesterase is represented by a distinct polypeptide. PMID:12232130

  15. Actinobacterial Acyl Coenzyme A Synthetases Involved in Steroid Side-Chain Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Casabon, Israël; Swain, Kendra; Crowe, Adam M.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial steroid catabolism is an important component of the global carbon cycle and has applications in drug synthesis. Pathways for this catabolism involve multiple acyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetases, which activate alkanoate substituents for β-oxidation. The functions of these synthetases are poorly understood. We enzymatically characterized four distinct acyl-CoA synthetases from the cholate catabolic pathway of Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and the cholesterol catabolic pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Phylogenetic analysis of 70 acyl-CoA synthetases predicted to be involved in steroid metabolism revealed that the characterized synthetases each represent an orthologous class with a distinct function in steroid side-chain degradation. The synthetases were specific for the length of alkanoate substituent. FadD19 from M. tuberculosis H37Rv (FadD19Mtb) transformed 3-oxo-4-cholesten-26-oate (kcat/Km = 0.33 × 105 ± 0.03 × 105 M−1 s−1) and represents orthologs that activate the C8 side chain of cholesterol. Both CasGRHA1 and FadD17Mtb are steroid-24-oyl-CoA synthetases. CasG and its orthologs activate the C5 side chain of cholate, while FadD17 and its orthologs appear to activate the C5 side chain of one or more cholesterol metabolites. CasIRHA1 is a steroid-22-oyl-CoA synthetase, representing orthologs that activate metabolites with a C3 side chain, which accumulate during cholate catabolism. CasI had similar apparent specificities for substrates with intact or extensively degraded steroid nuclei, exemplified by 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchol-4-en-22-oate and 1β(2′-propanoate)-3aα-H-4α(3″-propanoate)-7aβ-methylhexahydro-5-indanone (kcat/Km = 2.4 × 105 ± 0.1 × 105 M−1 s−1 and 3.2 × 105 ± 0.3 × 105 M−1 s−1, respectively). Acyl-CoA synthetase classes involved in cholate catabolism were found in both Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. Overall, this study provides insight into the physiological roles of acyl-CoA synthetases in steroid catabolism and

  16. The Wax Ester Synthase/Acyl Coenzyme A:Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase from Acinetobacter sp. Strain ADP1: Characterization of a Novel Type of Acyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Stöveken, Tim; Kalscheuer, Rainer; Malkus, Ursula; Reichelt, Rudolf; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    The wax ester synthase/acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA):diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT) catalyzes the final steps in triacylglycerol (TAG) and wax ester (WE) biosynthesis in the gram-negative bacterium Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1. It constitutes a novel class of acyltransferases which is fundamentally different from acyltransferases involved in TAG and WE synthesis in eukaryotes. The enzyme was purified by a three-step purification protocol to apparent homogeneity from the soluble fraction of recombinant Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3)pLysS (pET23a::atfA). Purified WS/DGAT revealed a remarkably low substrate specificity, accepting a broad range of various substances as alternative acceptor molecules. Besides having DGAT and WS activity, the enzyme possesses acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) activity. The sn-1 and sn-3 positions of acylglycerols are accepted with higher specificity than the sn-2 position. Linear alcohols ranging from ethanol to triacontanol are efficiently acylated by the enzyme, which exhibits highest specificities towards medium-chain-length alcohols. The acylation of cyclic and aromatic alcohols, such as cyclohexanol or phenylethanol, further underlines the unspecific character of this enzyme. The broad range of possible substrates may lead to biotechnological production of interesting wax ester derivatives. Determination of the native molecular weight revealed organization as a homodimer. The large number of WS/DGAT-homologous genes identified in pathogenic mycobacteria and their possible importance for the pathogenesis and latency of these bacteria makes the purified WS/DGAT from Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1 a valuable model for studying this group of proteins in pathogenic mycobacteria. PMID:15687201

  17. Anti-Tumor Effects of Novel 5-O-Acyl Plumbagins Based on the Inhibition of Mammalian DNA Replicative Polymerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Moe; Kuriyama, Isoko; Maruo, Sayako; Kuramochi, Kouji; Tsubaki, Kazunori; Yoshida, Hiromi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    We previously found that vitamin K3 (menadione, 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) inhibits the activity of human mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (pol γ). In this study, we focused on plumbagin (5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), and chemically synthesized novel plumbagins conjugated with C2:0 to C22:6 fatty acids (5-O-acyl plumbagins). These chemically modified plumbagins enhanced mammalian pol inhibition and their cytotoxic activity. Plumbagin conjugated with chains consisting of more than C18-unsaturated fatty acids strongly inhibited the activities of calf pol α and human pol γ. Plumbagin conjugated with oleic acid (C18:1-acyl plumbagin) showed the strongest suppression of human colon carcinoma (HCT116) cell proliferation among the ten synthesized 5-O-acyl plumbagins. The inhibitory activity on pol α, a DNA replicative pol, by these compounds showed high correlation with their cancer cell proliferation suppressive activity. C18:1-Acyl plumbagin selectively inhibited the activities of mammalian pol species, but did not influence the activities of other pols and DNA metabolic enzymes tested. This compound inhibited the proliferation of various human cancer cell lines, and was the cytotoxic inhibitor showing strongest inhibition towards HT-29 colon cancer cells (LD50 = 2.9 µM) among the nine cell lines tested. In an in vivo anti-tumor assay conducted on nude mice bearing solid tumors of HT-29 cells, C18:1-acyl plumbagin was shown to be a promising tumor suppressor. These data indicate that novel 5-O-acyl plumbagins act as anti-cancer agents based on mammalian DNA replicative pol α inhibition. Moreover, the results suggest that acylation of plumbagin is an effective chemical modification to improve the anti-cancer activity of vitamin K3 derivatives, such as plumbagin. PMID:24520419

  18. Regulation of intestinal ontogeny by intraluminal nutrients.

    PubMed

    Castillo, R O; Feng, J J; Stevenson, D K; Kerner, J A; Kwong, L K

    1990-02-01

    Major events in gastrointestinal ontogeny occur in the infant rat in association with weaning, resulting in striking alterations in small intestinal structure and function. Although the dietary changes attendant to weaning are not essential for the initiation of these events, dietary nutrients have been shown to participate in the maturation of some intestinal parameters. In order to define more precisely the role of intraluminal nutrients in the regulation of small intestinal ontogeny, a longitudinal study was conducted using a unique animal model in which intraluminal nutrients were excluded from the intact maturing intestine in vivo throughout the entire weaning period without major compromise in nutritional status. The absence of intraluminal nutrients over the weaning period resulted in diminished lengthening and accretion of mucosal mass, suggesting a slower rate of intestinal growth. Lower mucosal DNA, protein, and mitotic indices in intestines of animals receiving no intraluminal nutrients suggested that the lack of intraluminal nutrients resulted in the blunting of the striking increases in cellular proliferation normally exhibited by the developing intestinal mucosa at this time. Maturation of intestinal lactase-phlorizin hydrolase and maltase-glucoamylase was not affected by the absence of intraluminal nutrients. Although the appearance of sucrase-isomaltase was not altered by the absence of intraluminal nutrients, activity levels rose to only 50% of control levels. These data suggest that during this period of rapid intestinal maturation, intestinal growth is more dependent upon intraluminal nutrients than are the characteristic enzymic alterations normally expressed during this period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2303970

  19. Site-specific analysis of protein S-acylation by resin-assisted capture[S

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Michael T.; Hess, Douglas T.; Thompson, J. Will; Hultman, Rainbo; Moseley, M. Arthur; Stamler, Jonathan S.; Casey, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Protein S-acylation is a major posttranslational modification whereby a cysteine thiol is converted to a thioester. A prototype is S-palmitoylation (fatty acylation), in which a protein undergoes acylation with a hydrophobic 16 carbon lipid chain. Although this modification is a well-recognized determinant of protein function and localization, current techniques to study cellular S-acylation are cumbersome and/or technically demanding. We recently described a simple and robust methodology to rapidly identify S-nitrosylation sites in proteins via resin-assisted capture (RAC) and provided an initial description of the applicability of the technique to S-acylated proteins (acyl-RAC). Here we expand on the acyl-RAC assay, coupled with mass spectrometry-based proteomics, to characterize both previously reported and novel sites of endogenous S-acylation. Acyl-RAC should therefore find general applicability in studies of both global and individual protein S-acylation in mammalian cells. PMID:21044946

  20. Intestinal cytochromes P450 regulating the intestinal microbiota and its probiotic profile

    PubMed Central

    Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia Elefterios Venizelos

    2012-01-01

    Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) enzymes metabolize a large variety of xenobiotic substances. In this vein, a plethora of studies were conducted to investigate their role, as cytochromes are located in both liver and intestinal tissues. The P450 profile of the human intestine has not been fully characterized. Human intestine serves primarily as an absorptive organ for nutrients, although it has also the ability to metabolize drugs. CYPs are responsible for the majority of phase I drug metabolism reactions. CYP3A represents the major intestinal CYP (80%) followed by CYP2C9. CYP1A is expressed at high level in the duodenum, together with less abundant levels of CYP2C8-10 and CYP2D6. Cytochromes present a genetic polymorphism intra- or interindividual and intra- or interethnic. Changes in the pharmacokinetic profile of the drug are associated with increased toxicity due to reduced metabolism, altered efficacy of the drug, increased production of toxic metabolites, and adverse drug interaction. The high metabolic capacity of the intestinal flora is due to its enormous pool of enzymes, which catalyzes reactions in phase I and phase II drug metabolism. Compromised intestinal barrier conditions, when rupture of the intestinal integrity occurs, could increase passive paracellular absorption. It is clear that high microbial intestinal charge following intestinal disturbances, ageing, environment, or food-associated ailments leads to the microbial metabolism of a drug before absorption. The effect of certain bacteria having a benefic action on the intestinal ecosystem has been largely discussed during the past few years by many authors. The aim of the probiotic approach is to repair the deficiencies in the gut flora and establish a protective effect. There is a tentative multifactorial association of the CYP (P450) cytochrome role in the different diseases states, environmental toxic effects or chemical exposures and nutritional status. PMID:23990816

  1. Pseudo-enzymatic S-acylation of a myristoylated yes protein tyrosine kinase peptide in vitro may reflect non-enzymatic S-acylation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Bañó, M C; Jackson, C S; Magee, A I

    1998-01-01

    Covalent attachment of a variety of lipid groups to proteins is now recognized as a major group of post-translational modifications. S-acylation of proteins at cysteine residues is the only modification considered dynamic and thus has the potential for regulating protein function and/or localization. The activities that catalyse reversible S-acylation have not been well characterized and it is not clear whether both the acylation and the deacylation steps are regulated, since in principle it would be sufficient to control only one of them. Both apparently enzymatic and non-enzymatic S-acylation of proteins have previously been reported. Here we show that a synthetic myristoylated c-Yes protein tyrosine kinase undecapeptide undergoes spontaneous S-acylation in vitro when using a long chain acyl-CoA as acyl donor in the absence of any protein. The S-acylation was dependent on myristoylation of the substrate, the length of the incubation period, temperature and substrate concentration. When COS cell fractions were added to the S-acylation reaction no additional peptide:S-acyltransferase activity was detected. These results are consistent with the possibility that membrane-associated proteins may undergo S-acylation in vivo by non-enzymatic transfer of acyl groups from acyl-CoA. In this case, the S-acylation-deacylation process could be controlled by a regulated depalmitoylation mechanism. PMID:9480882

  2. Fatty acyl donor selectivity in membrane bound O-acyltransferases and communal cell fate decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Tuladhar, Rubina; Lum, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    The post-translational modification of proteins with lipid moieties confers spatial and temporal control of protein function by restricting their subcellular distribution or movement in the extracellular milieu. Yet, little is known about the significance of lipid selectivity to the activity of proteins targeted for such modifications. Membrane bound O-acyl transferases (MBOATs) are a superfamily of multipass enzymes that transfer fatty acids on to lipid or protein substrates. Three MBOATs constitute a subfamily with secreted signalling molecules for substrates, the Wnt, Hedgehog (Hh) and Ghrelin proteins. Given their important roles in adult tissue homoeostasis, all three molecules and their respective associated acyltransferases provide a framework for interrogating the role of extracellular acylation events in cell-to-cell communication. Here, we discuss how the preference for a fatty acyl donor in the Wnt acyltransferase porcupine (Porcn) and possibly in other protein lipidation enzymes may provide a means for coupling metabolic health at the single cell level to communal cell fate decision-making in complex multicellular organisms. PMID:25849923

  3. Fatty acyl donor selectivity in membrane bound O-acyltransferases and communal cell fate decision-making.

    PubMed

    Tuladhar, Rubina; Lum, Lawrence

    2015-04-01

    The post-translational modification of proteins with lipid moieties confers spatial and temporal control of protein function by restricting their subcellular distribution or movement in the extracellular milieu. Yet, little is known about the significance of lipid selectivity to the activity of proteins targeted for such modifications. Membrane bound O-acyl transferases (MBOATs) are a superfamily of multipass enzymes that transfer fatty acids on to lipid or protein substrates. Three MBOATs constitute a subfamily with secreted signalling molecules for substrates, the Wnt, Hedgehog (Hh) and Ghrelin proteins. Given their important roles in adult tissue homoeostasis, all three molecules and their respective associated acyltransferases provide a framework for interrogating the role of extracellular acylation events in cell-to-cell communication. Here, we discuss how the preference for a fatty acyl donor in the Wnt acyltransferase porcupine (Porcn) and possibly in other protein lipidation enzymes may provide a means for coupling metabolic health at the single cell level to communal cell fate decision-making in complex multicellular organisms. PMID:25849923

  4. Purification and characterisation of acyl-CoA: glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) tissues.

    PubMed

    Manaf, A M; Harwood, J L

    2000-01-01

    Glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT, EC 2.3.15) catalyses the first step of the Kennedy pathway for acyl lipid formation. This enzyme was studied using high-speed particulate fractions from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) tissue cultures and mesocarp acetone powders. The fractions were incubated with [(14)C]glycerol 3-phosphate and incorporation of radioactivity into Kennedy pathway intermediates studied. Optimal conditions were broadly similar between the two preparations but those from fruit mesocarp clearly contained more active enzymes for the subsequent stages of the Kennedy pathway - as exemplified by the appreciable accumulation of radioactivity in triacylglycerol. Experiments with different acyl-CoA substrates showed that the GPAT in both high-speed particulate preparations had a significant preference for palmitate. Glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase was solubilised from both preparations with optimal solubilisation being achieved at 0.5% (w/v) CHAPS concentrations. Solubilised GPATs were purified further using DE52 ion-exchange chromatography and Sephadex G-100 molecular exclusion chromatography. Purifications of up to about 70-fold were achieved. The purified GPATs showed a strong preference for palmitoyl-CoA compared to other acyl-CoA donors, in keeping with the importance of palmitate in palm oil. PMID:10664139

  5. Quorum quenching enzymes.

    PubMed

    Fetzner, Susanne

    2015-05-10

    Bacteria use cell-to-cell communication systems based on chemical signal molecules to coordinate their behavior within the population. These quorum sensing systems are potential targets for antivirulence therapies, because many bacterial pathogens control the expression of virulence factors via quorum sensing networks. Since biofilm maturation is also usually influenced by quorum sensing, quenching these systems may contribute to combat biofouling. One possibility to interfere with quorum sensing is signal inactivation by enzymatic degradation or modification. Such quorum quenching enzymes are wide-spread in the bacterial world and have also been found in eukaryotes. Lactonases and acylases that hydrolyze N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signaling molecules have been investigated most intensively, however, different oxidoreductases active toward AHLs or 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolone signals as well as other signal-converting enzymes have been described. Several approaches have been assessed which aim at alleviating virulence, or biofilm formation, by reducing the signal concentration in the bacterial environment. These involve the application or stimulation of signal-degrading bacteria as biocontrol agents in the protection of crop plants against soft-rot disease, the use of signal-degrading bacteria as probiotics in aquaculture, and the immobilization or entrapment of quorum quenching enzymes or bacteria to control biofouling in membrane bioreactors. While most approaches to use quorum quenching as antivirulence strategy are still in the research phase, the growing number of organisms and enzymes known to interfere with quorum sensing opens up new perspectives for the development of innovative antibacterial strategies. PMID:25220028

  6. Structural characterization of acyl-CoA oxidases reveals a direct link between pheromone biosynthesis and metabolic state in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxing; Li, Kunhua; Jones, Rachel A; Bruner, Steven D; Butcher, Rebecca A

    2016-09-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans secretes ascarosides as pheromones to communicate with other worms and to coordinate the development and behavior of the population. Peroxisomal β-oxidation cycles shorten the side chains of ascaroside precursors to produce the short-chain ascaroside pheromones. Acyl-CoA oxidases, which catalyze the first step in these β-oxidation cycles, have different side chain-length specificities and enable C. elegans to regulate the production of specific ascaroside pheromones. Here, we determine the crystal structure of the acyl-CoA oxidase 1 (ACOX-1) homodimer and the ACOX-2 homodimer bound to its substrate. Our results provide a molecular basis for the substrate specificities of the acyl-CoA oxidases and reveal why some of these enzymes have a very broad substrate range, whereas others are quite specific. Our results also enable predictions to be made for the roles of uncharacterized acyl-CoA oxidases in C. elegans and in other nematode species. Remarkably, we show that most of the C. elegans acyl-CoA oxidases that participate in ascaroside biosynthesis contain a conserved ATP-binding pocket that lies at the dimer interface, and we identify key residues in this binding pocket. ATP binding induces a structural change that is associated with tighter binding of the FAD cofactor. Mutations that disrupt ATP binding reduce FAD binding and reduce enzyme activity. Thus, ATP may serve as a regulator of acyl-CoA oxidase activity, thereby directly linking ascaroside biosynthesis to ATP concentration and metabolic state. PMID:27551084

  7. Comparison of metabolic fluxes of cis-5-enoyl-CoA and saturated acyl-CoA through the beta-oxidation pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Tserng, K Y; Chen, L S; Jin, S J

    1995-01-01

    The metabolic fluxes of cis-5-enoyl-CoAs through the beta-oxidation cycle were studied in solubilized rat liver mitochondrial samples and compared with saturated acyl-CoAs of equal chain length. These studies were accomplished using either spectrophotometric assay of enzyme activities and/or the analysis of metabolites and precursors using a gas chromatographic method after conversion of CoA esters into their free acids. Cis-5-enoyl-CoAs were dehydrogenated by acyl-CoA oxidase or acyl-CoA dehydrogenases at significantly lower rates (10-44%) than saturated acyl-CoAs. However, enoyl-CoA hydratase hydrated trans-2-cis-5-enoyl-CoA at a faster rate (at least 1.5-fold) than trans-2-enoyl-CoA. The combined activities of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase and 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase for 3-hydroxy-cis-5-enoyl-CoAs derived from cis-5-enoyl-CoAs were less than 40% of the activity for the corresponding 3-hydroxyacyl-CoAs prepared from saturated acyl-CoAs. Rat liver mitochondrial beta-oxidation enzymes were capable of metabolizing cis-5-enoyl-CoA via one cycle of beta-oxidation to cis-3-enoyl-CoA with two less carbons. However, the overall rates of one cycle of beta-oxidation, as determined with stable-isotope-labelled tracer, was only 15-25%, for cis-5-enoyl-CoA, of that for saturated acyl-CoA. In the presence of NADPH, the metabolism of cis-5-enoyl-CoAs was switched to the reduction pathway.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7717980

  8. Phospholipid profiling identifies acyl chain elongation as a ubiquitous trait and potential target for the treatment of lung squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marien, Eyra; Meister, Michael; Muley, Thomas; del Pulgar, Teresa Gomez; Derua, Rita; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Van de Plas, Raf; Vanderhoydonc, Frank; Machiels, Jelle; Binda, Maria Mercedes; Dehairs, Jonas; Willette-Brown, Jami; Hu, Yinling; Dienemann, Hendrik; Thomas, Michael; Schnabel, Philipp A.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Lacal, Juan Carlos; Waelkens, Etienne; Swinnen, Johannes V.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death. Beyond first line treatment, few therapeutic options are available, particularly for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Here, we have explored the phospholipidomes of 30 human SCCs and found that they almost invariably (in 96.7% of cases) contain phospholipids with longer acyl chains compared to matched normal tissues. This trait was confirmed using in situ 2D-imaging MS on tissue sections and by phospholipidomics of tumor and normal lung tissue of the L-IkkαKA/KA mouse model of lung SCC. In both human and mouse, the increase in acyl chain length in cancer tissue was accompanied by significant changes in the expression of acyl chain elongases (ELOVLs). Functional screening of differentially expressed ELOVLs by selective gene knockdown in SCC cell lines followed by phospholipidomics revealed ELOVL6 as the main elongation enzyme responsible for acyl chain elongation in cancer cells. Interestingly, inhibition of ELOVL6 drastically reduced colony formation of multiple SCC cell lines in vitro and significantly attenuated their growth as xenografts in vivo in mouse models. These findings identify acyl chain elongation as one of the most common traits of lung SCC discovered so far and pinpoint ELOVL6 as a novel potential target for cancer intervention. PMID:26862848

  9. Effect of a mutagenized acyl-ACP thioesterase FATA allele from sunflower with improved activity in tobacco leaves and Arabidopsis seeds.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, Antonio Javier; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Vaistij, Fabián E; Salas, Joaquin J; Larson, Tony R; Garcés, Rafael; Graham, Ian A; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2014-03-01

    The substrate specificity of the acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases significantly determines the type of fatty acids that are exported from plastids. Thus, designing acyl-ACP thioesterases with different substrate specificities or kinetic properties would be of interest for plant lipid biotechnology to produce oils enriched in specialty fatty acids. In the present work, the FatA thioesterase from Helianthus annuus was used to test the impact of changes in the amino acids present in the binding pocket on substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency. Amongst all the mutated enzymes studied, Q215W was especially interesting as it had higher specificity towards saturated acyl-ACP substrates and higher catalytic efficiency compared to wild-type H. annuus FatA. Null, wild type and high-efficiency alleles were transiently expressed in tobacco leaves to check their effect on lipid biosynthesis. Expression of active FatA thioesterases altered the composition of leaf triacylglycerols but did not alter total lipid content. However, the expression of the wild type and the high-efficiency alleles in Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic seeds resulted in a strong reduction in oil content and an increase in total saturated fatty acid content. The role and influence of acyl-ACP thioesterases in plant metabolism and their possible applications in lipid biotechnology are discussed. PMID:24327259

  10. Characterization of two members among the five ADP-forming acyl coenzyme A (Acyl-CoA) synthetases reveals the presence of a 2-(Imidazol-4-yl)acetyl-CoA synthetase in Thermococcus kodakarensis.

    PubMed

    Awano, Tomotsugu; Wilming, Anja; Tomita, Hiroya; Yokooji, Yuusuke; Fukui, Toshiaki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2014-01-01

    The genome of Thermococcus kodakarensis, along with those of most Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species, harbors five paralogous genes encoding putative α subunits of nucleoside diphosphate (NDP)-forming acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) synthetases. The substrate specificities of the protein products for three of these paralogs have been clarified through studies on the individual enzymes from Pyrococcus furiosus and T. kodakarensis. Here we have examined the biochemical properties of the remaining two acyl-CoA synthetase proteins from T. kodakarensis. The TK0944 and TK2127 genes encoding the two α subunits were each coexpressed with the β subunit-encoding TK0943 gene. In both cases, soluble proteins with an α2β2 structure were obtained and their activities toward various acids in the ADP-forming reaction were examined. The purified TK0944/TK0943 protein (ACS IIITk) accommodated a broad range of acids that corresponded to those generated in the oxidative metabolism of Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, Met, Phe, and Cys. In contrast, the TK2127/TK0943 protein exhibited relevant levels of activity only toward 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetate, a metabolite of His degradation, and was thus designated 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetyl-CoA synthetase (ICSTk), a novel enzyme. Kinetic analyses were performed on both proteins with their respective substrates. In T. kodakarensis, we found that the addition of histidine to the medium led to increases in intracellular ADP-forming 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetyl-CoA synthetase activity, and 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetate was detected in the culture medium, suggesting that ICSTk participates in histidine catabolism. The results presented here, together with those of previous studies, have clarified the substrate specificities of all five known NDP-forming acyl-CoA synthetase proteins in the Thermococcales. PMID:24163338

  11. Structural characterization and comparison of three acyl-carrier-protein synthases from pathogenic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Halavaty, Andrei S.; Kim, Youngchang; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Winsor, James; Zhou, Min; Onopriyenko, Olena; Skarina, Tatiana; Papazisi, Leka; Kwon, Keehwan; Peterson, Scott N.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Savchenko, Alexei; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2012-10-01

    The structural characterization of acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) from three different pathogenic microorganisms is reported. One interesting finding of the present work is a crystal artifact related to the activity of the enzyme, which fortuitously represents an opportunity for a strategy to design a potential inhibitor of a pathogenic AcpS. Some bacterial type II fatty-acid synthesis (FAS II) enzymes have been shown to be important candidates for drug discovery. The scientific and medical quest for new FAS II protein targets continues to stimulate research in this field. One of the possible additional candidates is the acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) enzyme. Its holo form post-translationally modifies the apo form of an acyl carrier protein (ACP), which assures the constant delivery of thioester intermediates to the discrete enzymes of FAS II. At the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID), AcpSs from Staphylococcus aureus (AcpS{sub SA}), Vibrio cholerae (AcpS{sub VC}) and Bacillus anthracis (AcpS{sub BA}) have been structurally characterized in their apo, holo and product-bound forms, respectively. The structure of AcpS{sub BA} is emphasized because of the two 3′, 5′-adenosine diphosphate (3′, 5′-ADP) product molecules that are found in each of the three coenzyme A (CoA) binding sites of the trimeric protein. One 3′, 5′-ADP is bound as the 3′, 5′-ADP part of CoA in the known structures of the CoA–AcpS and 3′, 5′-ADP–AcpS binary complexes. The position of the second 3′, 5′-ADP has never been described before. It is in close proximity to the first 3′, 5′-ADP and the ACP-binding site. The coordination of two ADPs in AcpS{sub BA} may possibly be exploited for the design of AcpS inhibitors that can block binding of both CoA and ACP.

  12. Protein Crystal Malic Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Malic Enzyme is a target protein for drug design because it is a key protein in the life cycle of intestinal parasites. After 2 years of effort on Earth, investigators were unable to produce any crystals that were of high enough quality and for this reason the structure of this important protein could not be determined. Crystals obtained from one STS-50 were of superior quality allowing the structure to be determined. This is just one example why access to space is so vital for these studies. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  13. "One-Pot" Approach to 8-Acylated 2-Quinolinones via Palladium-Catalyzed Regioselective Acylation of Quinoline N-Oxides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaopei; Cui, Xiuling; Wu, Yangjie

    2016-05-20

    A "one-pot" facile and efficient protocol for 8-acylated 2-quinolinones has been developed through palladium-catalyzed acylation of quinoline N-oxides, which proceeds with high selectivity at the C8-position. The desired products were isolated in up to 95% yield and good functional group tolerance. A palladacycle was isolated from the catalytic process and proposed as a key intermediate. PMID:27153298

  14. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003508.htm Vasoactive intestinal peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a test that measures the amount ...

  15. Structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    SciTech Connect

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin Ukita, Yoko; Miyano, Masashi; Kunishima, Naoki

    2008-05-01

    The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from T. thermophilus HB8 has been determined at 2.0 Å resolution and compared with the structures of β-keto-ACP synthases from other sources. The β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthases (β-keto-ACP synthases; KAS) catalyse the addition of two-carbon units to the growing acyl chain during the elongation phase of fatty-acid synthesis. As key regulators of bacterial fatty-acid synthesis, they are promising targets for the development of new antibacterial agents. The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtKAS II) has been solved by molecular replacement and refined at 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.07, b = 185.57, c = 62.52 Å, and contains one homodimer in the asymmetric unit. The subunits adopt the well known α-β-α-β-α thiolase fold that is common to ACP synthases. The structural and sequence similarities of TtKAS II to KAS I and KAS II enzymes of known structure from other sources support the hypothesis of comparable enzymatic activity. The dimeric state of TtKAS II is important to create each fatty-acid-binding pocket. Closer examination of KAS structures reveals that compared with other KAS structures in the apo form, the active site of TtKAS II is more accessible because of the ‘open’ conformation of the Phe396 side chain.

  16. Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Owen; Cornelius, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Conveys an appreciation of enzyme kinetic analysis by using a practical and intuitive approach. Discusses enzyme assays, kinetic models and rate laws, the kinetic constants (V, velocity, and Km, Michaels constant), evaluation of V and Km from experimental data, and enzyme inhibition. (CW)

  17. Regioselective Acylation of Diols and Triols: The Cyanide Effect.

    PubMed

    Peng, Peng; Linseis, Michael; Winter, Rainer F; Schmidt, Richard R

    2016-05-11

    Central topics of carbohydrate chemistry embrace structural modifications of carbohydrates and oligosaccharide synthesis. Both require regioselectively protected building blocks that are mainly available via indirect multistep procedures. Hence, direct protection methods targeting a specific hydroxy group are demanded. Dual hydrogen bonding will eventually differentiate between differently positioned hydroxy groups. As cyanide is capable of various kinds of hydrogen bonding and as it is a quite strong sterically nondemanding base, regioselective O-acylations should be possible at low temperatures even at sterically congested positions, thus permitting formation and also isolation of the kinetic product. Indeed, 1,2-cis-diols, having an equatorial and an axial hydroxy group, benzoyl cyanide or acetyl cyanide as an acylating agent, and DMAP as a catalyst yield at -78 °C the thermodynamically unfavorable axial O-acylation product; acyl migration is not observed under these conditions. This phenomenon was substantiated with 3,4-O-unproteced galacto- and fucopyranosides and 2,3-O-unprotected mannopyranosides. Even for 3,4,6-O-unprotected galactopyranosides as triols, axial 4-O-acylation is appreciably faster than O-acylation of the primary 6-hydroxy group. The importance of hydrogen bonding for this unusual regioselectivity could be confirmed by NMR studies and DFT calculations, which indicate favorable hydrogen bonding of cyanide to the most acidic axial hydroxy group supported by hydrogen bonding of the equatorial hydroxy group to the axial oxygen. Thus, the "cyanide effect" is due to dual hydrogen bonding of the axial hydroxy group which enhances the nucleophilicity of the respective oxygen atom, permitting an even faster reaction for diols than for mono-ols. In contrast, fluoride as a counterion favors dual hydrogen bonding to both hydroxy groups leading to equatorial O-acylation. PMID:27104625

  18. Purification and properties of acyl/alkyl dihydroxyacetone-phosphate reductase from guinea pig liver peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Datta, S C; Ghosh, M K; Hajra, A K

    1990-05-15

    The peroxisomal acyl/alkyl dihydroxyacetone-phosphate reductase (EC 1.1.1.101) was solubilized and purified 5500-fold from guinea pig liver. The enzyme could be solubilized by detergents only at high ionic strengths in presence of the cosubstrate NADPH. Peroxisomes, isolated from liver by a Nycodenz step density gradient centrifugation, were first treated with 0.2% Triton X-100 to remove the soluble and a large fraction of the membrane-bound proteins. The enzyme was solubilized from the resulting residue by 0.05% Triton X-100, 1 M KCl, 0.3 mM NADPH, and 2 mM dithiothreitol in Tris-HCl buffer (10 mM) at pH 7.5. The enzyme was further purified after precipitating it by dialyzing out the KCl and then resolubilized with 0.8% octyl glucoside in 1 M KCl (plus NADPH and dithiothreitol). The second solubilized enzyme was purified to homogeneity (370-fold from peroxisomes) by gel filtration in a Sepharose CL-6B column followed by affinity chromatography on an NADPH-agarose gel matrix. NADPH-agarose was prepared by reacting periodate-oxidized NADP+ to adipic acid dihydrazide-agarose and then reducing the immobilized NADP+ with NaBH4. On sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the purified enzyme showed a single homogeneous band with an apparent molecular weight of 60,000. The molecular weight of the native enzyme was estimated to be 75,000 by size exclusion chromatography. Amino acid analysis of the purified protein showed that hydrophobic amino acid comprised 27% of the molecule. The Km value of the purified enzyme for hexadecyldihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) was 21 microM, and the Vmax value in the presence of 0.07 mM NADPH was 67 mumol/min/mg. The turnover number (Kcat), after correcting for the isotope effect of the cosubstrate NADP3H, was calculated to be 6,000 mol/min/mol of enzyme, assuming the enzyme has a molecular weight of 60,000. The purified enzyme also used palmitoyldihydroxyactone phosphate as a substrate (Km = 15.4 microM, and Vmax = 75

  19. X-Ray Crystal Structure of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis β-Ketoacyl Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase II (mtKasB)

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Sudharsan; Wang, Lei; Brown, Alistair K.; Dover, Lynn G.; Kremer, Laurent; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Mycolic acids are long chain α-alkyl branched, β-hydroxy fatty acids that represent a characteristic component of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall. Through their covalent attachment to peptidoglycan via an arabinogalactan polysaccharide, they provide the basis for an essential outer envelope membrane. Mycobacteria possess two fatty acid synthases (FAS); FAS-I carries out de novo synthesis of fatty acids while FAS-II is considered to elongate medium chain length fatty acyl primers to provide long chain (C56) precursors of mycolic acids. Here we report the crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis β-ketoacyl acyl carrier protein synthase (ACP) II mtKasB, a mycobacterial elongation condensing enzyme involved in FAS-II. This enzyme, along with the M. tuberculosis β-ketoacyl ACP synthase I mtKasA, catalyzes the Claisen-type condensation reaction responsible for fatty acyl elongation in FAS-II and are potential targets for development of novel anti-tubercular drugs. The crystal structure refined to 2.4 Å resolution revealed that, like other KAS-II enzymes, mtKasB adopts a thiolase fold but contains unique structural features in the capping region that may be crucial to its preference for longer fatty acyl chains than its counterparts from other bacteria. Modeling of mtKasA using the mtKasB structure as a template predicts the overall structures to be almost identical, but a larger entrance to the active site tunnel is envisaged that might contribute to the greater sensitivity of mtKasA to the inhibitor thiolactomycin (TLM). Modeling of TLM binding in mtKasB shows that the drug fits the active site poorly and results of enzyme inhibition assays using TLM analogues are wholly consistent with our structural observations. Consequently, the structure described here further highlights the potential of TLM as an anti-tubercular lead compound and will aid further exploration of the TLM scaffold towards the design of novel compounds which inhibit

  20. Acyl Carrier Protein Synthases from Gram-Negative, Gram-Positive, and Atypical Bacterial Species: Biochemical and Structural Properties and Physiological Implications

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Kelly A.; Peery, Robert B.; Zhao, Genshi

    2006-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase (AcpS) catalyzes the transfer of the 4′-phosphopantetheine moiety from coenzyme A (CoA) onto a serine residue of apo-ACP, resulting in the conversion of apo-ACP to the functional holo-ACP. The holo form of bacterial ACP plays an essential role in mediating the transfer of acyl fatty acid intermediates during the biosynthesis of fatty acids and phospholipids. AcpS is therefore an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we have purified and characterized the AcpS enzymes from Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae, which exemplify gram-negative, gram-positive, and atypical bacteria, respectively. Our gel filtration column chromatography and cross-linking studies demonstrate that the AcpS enzyme from M. pneumoniae, like E. coli enzyme, exhibits a homodimeric structure, but the enzyme from S. pneumoniae exhibits a trimeric structure. Our biochemical studies show that the AcpS enzymes from M. pneumoniae and S. pneumoniae can utilize both short- and long-chain acyl CoA derivatives but prefer long-chain CoA derivatives as substrates. On the other hand, the AcpS enzyme from E. coli can utilize short-chain CoA derivatives but not the long-chain CoA derivatives tested. Finally, our biochemical studies show that M. pneumoniae AcpS is kinetically a very sluggish enzyme compared with those from E. coli and S. pneumoniae. Together, the results of these studies show that the AcpS enzymes from different bacterial species exhibit different native structures and substrate specificities with regard to the utilization of CoA and its derivatives. These findings suggest that AcpS from different microorganisms plays a different role in cellular physiology. PMID:16788183

  1. Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, but the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Head group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a plant lipid modification occurring during bacterial infection. Little is known about the range of stresses that induce this lipid modification, the molecular species induced, and the function of the modification. Lipidomic analysis using trip...

  2. Recognition of acyl carrier proteins by ketoreductases in assembly line polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Matthew P; Cane, David E; Khosla, Chaitan

    2016-07-01

    Ketoreductases (KRs) are the most widespread tailoring domains found in individual modules of assembly line polyketide synthases (PKSs), and are responsible for controlling the configurations of both the α-methyl and β-hydroxyl stereogenic centers in the growing polyketide chain. Because they recognize substrates that are covalently bound to acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) within the same PKS module, we sought to quantify the extent to which protein-protein recognition contributes to the turnover of these oxidoreductive enzymes using stand-alone domains from the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase (DEBS). Reduced 2-methyl-3-hydroxyacyl-ACP substrates derived from two enantiomeric acyl chains and four distinct ACP domains were synthesized and presented to four distinct KR domains. Two KRs, from DEBS modules 2 and 5, displayed little preference for oxidation of substrates tethered to their cognate ACP domains over those attached to the other ACP domains tested. In contrast, the KR from DEBS module 1 showed an ~10-50-fold preference for substrate attached to its native ACP domain, whereas the KR from DEBS module 6 actually displayed an ~10-fold preference for the ACP from DEBS module 5. Our findings suggest that recognition of the ACP by a KR domain is unlikely to affect the rate of native assembly line polyketide biosynthesis. In some cases, however, unfavorable KR-ACP interactions may suppress the rate of substrate processing when KR domains are swapped to construct hybrid PKS modules. PMID:27118242

  3. Protein S-ACYL Transferase10 is critical for development and salt tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang-Zi; Li, Sha; Feng, Qiang-Nan; Zhang, Yu-Ling; Zhao, Xinying; Zeng, Yong-lun; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Liwen; Zhang, Yan

    2013-03-01

    Protein S-acylation, commonly known as palmitoylation, is a reversible posttranslational modification that catalyzes the addition of a saturated lipid group, often palmitate, to the sulfhydryl group of a Cys. Palmitoylation regulates enzyme activity, protein stability, subcellular localization, and intracellular sorting. Many plant proteins are palmitoylated. However, little is known about protein S-acyl transferases (PATs), which catalyze palmitoylation. Here, we report that the tonoplast-localized PAT10 is critical for development and salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. PAT10 loss of function resulted in pleiotropic growth defects, including smaller leaves, dwarfism, and sterility. In addition, pat10 mutants are hypersensitive to salt stresses. We further show that PAT10 regulates the tonoplast localization of several calcineurin B-like proteins (CBLs), including CBL2, CBL3, and CBL6, whose membrane association also depends on palmitoylation. Introducing a C192S mutation within the highly conserved catalytic motif of PAT10 failed to complement pat10 mutants, indicating that PAT10 functions through protein palmitoylation. We propose that PAT10-mediated palmitoylation is critical for vacuolar function by regulating membrane association or the activities of tonoplast proteins. PMID:23482856

  4. beta-Lactamase-catalyzed hydrolysis of acyclic depsipeptides and acyl transfer to specific amino acid acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, R F; Govardhan, C P

    1984-01-01

    beta-Lactamases from all three classes, A, B, and C, catalyze the hydrolysis of specific acyclic depsipeptide (PhCH2CONHCR1R2CO2CHR3CO2H) analogs of acyl-D-alanyl-D-alanine peptides. The depsipeptides investigated, which are chemically as reactive toward nucleophiles as penicillins, are in general poor substrates, although differences between the classes of beta-lactamases have been observed: the order of effectiveness seems to be C greater than B greater than A. Certain class A and C beta-lactamases also catalyze phenylacetylglycyl transfer between phenylacetylglycyl depsipeptides and specific amino acid acceptors, a type of reaction hitherto identified more closely with D-alanyl-D-alanine transpeptidases than with beta-lactamases. Preliminary indications of an acyl-enzyme intermediate in these reactions have been obtained. These results support the suggestion [Tipper, D.J. and Strominger, J.L. (1965) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 54, 1133-1141] that beta-lactamases are evolutionary descendants of bacterial cell wall D-alanyl-D-alanine transpeptidases. PMID:6424114

  5. Structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    PubMed Central

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Ukita, Yoko; Miyano, Masashi; Kunishima, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    The β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthases (β-keto-ACP synthases; KAS) catalyse the addition of two-carbon units to the growing acyl chain during the elongation phase of fatty-acid synthesis. As key regulators of bacterial fatty-acid synthesis, they are promising targets for the development of new antibacterial agents. The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtKAS II) has been solved by molecular replacement and refined at 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.07, b = 185.57, c = 62.52 Å, and contains one homodimer in the asymmetric unit. The subunits adopt the well known α-β-α-β-α thiolase fold that is common to ACP synthases. The structural and sequence similarities of TtKAS II to KAS I and KAS II enzymes of known structure from other sources support the hypothesis of comparable enzymatic activity. The dimeric state of TtKAS II is important to create each fatty-acid-binding pocket. Closer examination of KAS structures reveals that compared with other KAS structures in the apo form, the active site of TtKAS II is more accessible because of the ‘open’ conformation of the Phe396 side chain. PMID:18453702

  6. Structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    PubMed

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Ukita, Yoko; Miyano, Masashi; Kunishima, Naoki

    2008-05-01

    The beta-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthases (beta-keto-ACP synthases; KAS) catalyse the addition of two-carbon units to the growing acyl chain during the elongation phase of fatty-acid synthesis. As key regulators of bacterial fatty-acid synthesis, they are promising targets for the development of new antibacterial agents. The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtKAS II) has been solved by molecular replacement and refined at 2.0 A resolution. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group P2(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.07, b = 185.57, c = 62.52 A, and contains one homodimer in the asymmetric unit. The subunits adopt the well known alpha-beta-alpha-beta-alpha thiolase fold that is common to ACP synthases. The structural and sequence similarities of TtKAS II to KAS I and KAS II enzymes of known structure from other sources support the hypothesis of comparable enzymatic activity. The dimeric state of TtKAS II is important to create each fatty-acid-binding pocket. Closer examination of KAS structures reveals that compared with other KAS structures in the apo form, the active site of TtKAS II is more accessible because of the ;open' conformation of the Phe396 side chain. PMID:18453702

  7. Vertebrate Intestinal Endoderm Development

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Jason R.; Lauf, Ryan; Shroyer, Noah F.

    2010-01-01

    The endoderm gives rise to the lining of the esophagus, stomach and intestines, as well as associated organs. To generate a functional intestine, a series of highly orchestrated developmental processes must occur. In this review, we attempt to cover major events during intestinal development from gastrulation to birth, including endoderm formation, gut tube growth and patterning, intestinal morphogenesis, epithelial reorganization, villus emergence as well as proliferation and cytodifferentiation. Our discussion includes morphological and anatomical changes during intestinal development as well as molecular mechanisms regulating these processes. PMID:21246663

  8. Two fatty acyl reductases involved in moth pheromone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Antony, Binu; Ding, Bao-Jian; Moto, Ken'Ichi; Aldosari, Saleh A; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acyl reductases (FARs) constitute an evolutionarily conserved gene family found in all kingdoms of life. Members of the FAR gene family play diverse roles, including seed oil synthesis, insect pheromone biosynthesis, and mammalian wax biosynthesis. In insects, FAR genes dedicated to sex pheromone biosynthesis (pheromone-gland-specific fatty acyl reductase, pgFAR) form a unique clade that exhibits substantial modifications in gene structure and possesses unique specificity and selectivity for fatty acyl substrates. Highly selective and semi-selective 'single pgFARs' produce single and multicomponent pheromone signals in bombycid, pyralid, yponomeutid and noctuid moths. An intriguing question is how a 'single reductase' can direct the synthesis of several fatty alcohols of various chain lengths and isomeric forms. Here, we report two active pgFARs in the pheromone gland of Spodoptera, namely a semi-selective, C14:acyl-specific pgFAR and a highly selective, C16:acyl-specific pgFAR, and demonstrate that these pgFARs play a pivotal role in the formation of species-specific signals, a finding that is strongly supported by functional gene expression data. The study envisages a new area of research for disclosing evolutionary changes associated with C14- and C16-specific FARs in moth pheromone biosynthesis. PMID:27427355

  9. Two fatty acyl reductases involved in moth pheromone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Binu; Ding, Bao-Jian; Moto, Ken’Ichi; Aldosari, Saleh A.; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S.

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acyl reductases (FARs) constitute an evolutionarily conserved gene family found in all kingdoms of life. Members of the FAR gene family play diverse roles, including seed oil synthesis, insect pheromone biosynthesis, and mammalian wax biosynthesis. In insects, FAR genes dedicated to sex pheromone biosynthesis (pheromone-gland-specific fatty acyl reductase, pgFAR) form a unique clade that exhibits substantial modifications in gene structure and possesses unique specificity and selectivity for fatty acyl substrates. Highly selective and semi-selective ‘single pgFARs’ produce single and multicomponent pheromone signals in bombycid, pyralid, yponomeutid and noctuid moths. An intriguing question is how a ‘single reductase’ can direct the synthesis of several fatty alcohols of various chain lengths and isomeric forms. Here, we report two active pgFARs in the pheromone gland of Spodoptera, namely a semi-selective, C14:acyl-specific pgFAR and a highly selective, C16:acyl-specific pgFAR, and demonstrate that these pgFARs play a pivotal role in the formation of species-specific signals, a finding that is strongly supported by functional gene expression data. The study envisages a new area of research for disclosing evolutionary changes associated with C14- and C16-specific FARs in moth pheromone biosynthesis. PMID:27427355

  10. Acylated flavonol glycosides from the forage legume, Onobrychis viciifolia (sainfoin).

    PubMed

    Veitch, Nigel C; Regos, Ionela; Kite, Geoffrey C; Treutter, Dieter

    2011-04-01

    Ten acylated flavonol glycosides were isolated from aqueous acetone extracts of the aerial parts of the forage legume, Onobrychis viciifolia, and their structures determined using spectroscopic methods. Among these were eight previously unreported examples which comprised either feruloylated or sinapoylated derivatives of 3-O-di- and 3-O-triglycosides of kaempferol (3,5,7,4'-tetrahydroxyflavone) or quercetin (3,5,7,3',4'-pentahydroxyflavone). The diglycosides were acylated at the primary Glc residue of O-α-Rhap(1→6)-β-Glcp (rutinose), whereas the triglycosides were acylated at the terminal Rha residues of the branched trisaccharides, O-α-Rhap(1→2)[α-Rhap(1→6)]-β-Galp or O-α-Rhap(1→2)[α-Rhap(1→6)]-β-Glcp. Identification of the primary 3-O-linked hexose residues as either Gal or Glc was carried out by negative ion electrospray and serial MS, and cryoprobe NMR spectroscopy. Analysis of UV and MS spectra of the acylated flavonol glycosides provided additional diagnostic features relevant to direct characterisation of these compounds in hyphenated analyses. Quantitative analysis of the acylated flavonol glycosides present in different aerial parts of sainfoin revealed that the highest concentrations were in mature leaflets. PMID:21292287

  11. Intestinal Disaccharidase Activity in Patients with Autism: Effect of Age, Gender, and Intestinal Inflammation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kushak, Rafail I.; Lauwers, Gregory Y.; Winter, Harland S.; Buie, Timothy M.

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal disaccharidase activities were measured in 199 individuals with autism to determine the frequency of enzyme deficiency. All patients had duodenal biopsies that were evaluated morphologically and assayed for lactase, sucrase, and maltase activity. Frequency of lactase deficiency was 58% in autistic children less than or equal to 5 years…

  12. Establishment of Intestinal Bacteriology

    PubMed Central

    MITSUOKA, Tomotari

    2014-01-01

    Research on intestinal bacteria began around the end of the 19th century. During the last 5 decades of the 20th century, research on the intestinal microbiota made rapid progress. At first, in my work, I first developed a method of comprehensive analysis of the intestinal microbiota, and then I established classification and identification methods for intestinal anaerobes. Using these methods I discovered a number of ecological rules governing the intestinal microbiota and the role of the intestinl microbiota in health and disease. Moreover, using germfree animals, it was proven that the intestinal microbiota has a role in carcinogenesis and aging in the host. Thus, a new interdisciplinary field, “intestinal bacteriology” was established. PMID:25032084

  13. Potential O-acyl-substituted (-)-Epicatechin gallate prodrugs as inhibitors of DMBA/TPA-induced squamous cell carcinoma of skin in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Sandeep; Manon, Benu; Vir Singh, Tej; Dev Sharma, Pritam; Sharma, Manu

    2011-04-01

    (-)-Epicatechin-3-gallate (1) is one of the principal catechins of green tea and exhibits cancer-preventive activities in various animal models. However, this compound is unstable in neutral or alkaline medium and, therefore, has a poor bioavailability. To improve its stability, O-acyl derivatives of 1 were prepared by isolating the partially purified tea catechin fraction from green tea extract and treating it with a variety of acylating agents. The resulting derivatives, compounds 2-6, were screened for their antitumor potential against 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced squamous cell carcinogenesis of skin in mice. The results showed that the antitumor activity decreased with the increase in size of the chain length of the acyl groups, i.e., from compound 2, derivative with an Ac group, to compound 6, possessing a valeryl group. Moreover, the C(4) derivative with a branched acyl chain, 5, had a lower activity than the linear C(4) derivative 4. This reduction in the inhibitory activity may be due to the steric hindrance by the two Me groups. Moreover, significant increases in the protein levels analyzed by ELISA of c-Jun, p65, and p53 were observed in the skin of DMBA/TPA treated mice, whereas mice treated with 2 and DMBA/TPA had a similar expression of these transcription factors than the control mice. The prodrug potential of the O-acyl derivatives 2-6 showed that they were adequately stable to be absorbed intact from the intestine, more stable at gastric pH, and suitable for oral administration. PMID:21480506

  14. A continuous fluorescent enzyme assay for early steps of lipid A biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Ronald J.; Dotson, Garry D.

    2012-01-01

    UDP-N-acetylglucosamine acyltransferase (LpxA) and UDP-3-O-(R-3-hydroxyacyl)-glucosamine acyltransferase (LpxD) catalyze the first and third steps of Lipid A biosynthesis, respectively. Both enzymes have been found to be essential for survival among Gram-negative bacteria which synthesize lipopolysaccharide, and are viable targets for antimicrobial development. Catalytically, both acyltransferases catalyze an acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) dependent transfer of a fatty acyl moiety to a UDP-glucosamine core ring. Herein, we exploit the single free-thiol unveiled on holo-ACP after transfer of the fatty acyl group to the glucosamine ring using the thiol specific labeling reagent, ThioGlo. The assay is continuously monitored as a change in fluorescence at λex = 379 nm and λem = 513 nm using a microtiter plate reader. This assay marks the first continuous and non-radioactive assay for either acyltransferase. PMID:22381368

  15. Enzyme Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Alderson, Rosanna G.; Ferrari, Luna De; Mavridis, Lazaros; McDonagh, James L.; Mitchell, John B. O.; Nath, Neetika

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, sequencing, structural biology and bioinformatics have completely revolutionised biomolecular science, with millions of sequences and tens of thousands of three dimensional structures becoming available. The bioinformatics of enzymes is well served by, mostly free, online databases. BRENDA describes the chemistry, substrate specificity, kinetics, preparation and biological sources of enzymes, while KEGG is valuable for understanding enzymes and metabolic pathways. EzCatDB, SFLD and MACiE are key repositories for data on the chemical mechanisms by which enzymes operate. At the current rate of genome sequencing and manual annotation, human curation will never finish the functional annotation of the ever-expanding list of known enzymes. Hence there is an increasing need for automated annotation, though it is not yet widespread for enzyme data. In contrast, functional ontologies such as the Gene Ontology already profit from automation. Despite our growing understanding of enzyme structure and dynamics, we are only beginning to be able to design novel enzymes. One can now begin to trace the functional evolution of enzymes using phylogenetics. The ability of enzymes to perform secondary functions, albeit relatively inefficiently, gives clues as to how enzyme function evolves. Substrate promiscuity in enzymes is one example of imperfect specificity in protein-ligand interactions. Similarly, most drugs bind to more than one protein target. This may sometimes result in helpful polypharmacology as a drug modulates plural targets, but also often leads to adverse side-effects. Many cheminformatics approaches can be used to model the interactions between druglike molecules and proteins in silico. We can even use quantum chemical techniques like DFT and QM/MM to compute the structural and energetic course of enzyme catalysed chemical reaction mechanisms, including a full description of bond making and breaking. PMID:23116471

  16. A shotgun lipidomics study of a putative lysophosphatidic acid acyl transferase (PlsC) in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Basconcillo, Libia Saborido; Zaheer, Rahat; Finan, Turlough M; McCarry, Brian E

    2009-09-15

    A shotgun lipidomics approach was used to study the knockout mutant of a putative lysophosphatidic acyl acid transferase (PlsC) in order to delineate the function of this enzyme in Sinorhizobium meliloti. In plsC knockout mutant lipids that contained 16:0 and 16:1 fatty acids and their biosynthetically related cyclopropane fatty acid (cis-9,10-methylene hexadecanoic acid) decreased up to 93%. Tandem mass spectrometry experiments in the presence of added Li(+) showed that the putative PlsC (SMc00714) functioned as a lysophosphatidic acid acyl transferase specific for the transfer of C16 fatty acids to the sn-2 position of lipids. The levels of lipids containing C18 fatty acids were unaffected in plsC mutant, suggesting the presence of one or more fatty acyl transferases in the genome of S. meliloti with selectivity towards C18 fatty acids. Two non-phosphorus containing lipid classes, sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol and 1,2-diacylglyceryl-trimethylhomoserine lipids, showed similar decreases in C16 fatty acid content as phospholipids in plsC knockout mutant; these non-phosphorus containing lipids share a common biosynthetic origin with phospholipids, most likely involving phosphatidic acid. Ornithine lipids containing C16 fatty acids also showed decreased levels in PlsC knockout mutant, suggesting that PlsC is also involved in their biosynthesis. PMID:19525157

  17. The halo-substituent effect on Pseudomonas cepacia lipase-mediated regioselective acylation of nucleosides: A comparative investigation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Yu; Bi, Yan-Hong; Yang, Rong-Ling; Duan, Zhang-Qun; Nie, Ling-Hong; Li, Xiang-Qian; Zong, Min-Hua; Wu, Jie

    2015-10-20

    In this work, comparative experiments were explored to investigate the substrate specificity of Pseudomonas cepacia lipase in regioselective acylation of nucleosides carrying various substituents (such as the H, F, Cl, Br, I) at 2'- and 5-positions. Experimental data indicated that the catalytic performance of the enzyme depended very much on the halo-substituents in nucleosides. The increased bulk of 2'-substituents in ribose moiety of the nucleoside might contribute to the improved 3'-regioselectivity (90-98%, nucleosides a-d) in enzymatic decanoylation, while the enhancement of regioselectivity (93-99%) in 3'-O-acylated nucleosides e-h could be attributable to the increasing hydrophobicity of the halogen atoms at 5-positions. With regard to the chain-length selectivity, P. cepacia lipase displayed the highest 3'-regioselectivity toward the longer chain (C14) as compared to shorter (C6 and C10) ones. The position, orientation and property of the substituent, specific structure of the lipase's active site, and acyl structure could account for the diverse results. PMID:26325198

  18. Acylation of Biomolecules in Prokaryotes: a Widespread Strategy for the Control of Biological Function and Metabolic Stress.

    PubMed

    Hentchel, Kristy L; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C

    2015-09-01

    Acylation of biomolecules (e.g., proteins and small molecules) is a process that occurs in cells of all domains of life and has emerged as a critical mechanism for the control of many aspects of cellular physiology, including chromatin maintenance, transcriptional regulation, primary metabolism, cell structure, and likely other cellular processes. Although this review focuses on the use of acetyl moieties to modify a protein or small molecule, it is clear that cells can use many weak organic acids (e.g., short-, medium-, and long-chain mono- and dicarboxylic aliphatics and aromatics) to modify a large suite of targets. Acetylation of biomolecules has been studied for decades within the context of histone-dependent regulation of gene expression and antibiotic resistance. It was not until the early 2000s that the connection between metabolism, physiology, and protein acetylation was reported. This was the first instance of a metabolic enzyme (acetyl coenzyme A [acetyl-CoA] synthetase) whose activity was controlled by acetylation via a regulatory system responsive to physiological cues. The above-mentioned system was comprised of an acyltransferase and a partner deacylase. Given the reversibility of the acylation process, this system is also referred to as reversible lysine acylation (RLA). A wealth of information has been obtained since the discovery of RLA in prokaryotes, and we are just beginning to visualize the extent of the impact that this regulatory system has on cell function. PMID:26179745

  19. The nuclear receptor LRH-1 critically regulates extra-adrenal glucocorticoid synthesis in the intestine

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Matthias; Cima, Igor; Noti, Mario; Fuhrer, Andrea; Jakob, Sabine; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Schoonjans, Kristina; Brunner, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear receptor liver receptor homologue-1 (LRH-1, NR5A2) is a crucial transcriptional regulator of many metabolic pathways. In addition, LRH-1 is expressed in intestinal crypt cells where it regulates the epithelial cell renewal and contributes to tumorigenesis through the induction of cell cycle proteins. We have recently identified the intestinal epithelium as an important extra-adrenal source of immunoregulatory glucocorticoids. We show here that LRH-1 promotes the expression of the steroidogenic enzymes and the synthesis of corticosterone in murine intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Interestingly, LRH-1 is also essential for intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis in vivo, as LRH-1 haplo-insufficiency strongly reduces the intestinal expression of steroidogenic enzymes and glucocorticoid synthesis upon immunological stress. These results demonstrate for the first time a novel role for LRH-1 in the regulation of intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis and propose LRH-1 as an important regulator of intestinal tissue integrity and immune homeostasis. PMID:16923850

  20. The nuclear receptor LRH-1 critically regulates extra-adrenal glucocorticoid synthesis in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Matthias; Cima, Igor; Noti, Mario; Fuhrer, Andrea; Jakob, Sabine; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Schoonjans, Kristina; Brunner, Thomas

    2006-09-01

    The nuclear receptor liver receptor homologue-1 (LRH-1, NR5A2) is a crucial transcriptional regulator of many metabolic pathways. In addition, LRH-1 is expressed in intestinal crypt cells where it regulates the epithelial cell renewal and contributes to tumorigenesis through the induction of cell cycle proteins. We have recently identified the intestinal epithelium as an important extra-adrenal source of immunoregulatory glucocorticoids. We show here that LRH-1 promotes the expression of the steroidogenic enzymes and the synthesis of corticosterone in murine intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Interestingly, LRH-1 is also essential for intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis in vivo, as LRH-1 haplo-insufficiency strongly reduces the intestinal expression of steroidogenic enzymes and glucocorticoid synthesis upon immunological stress. These results demonstrate for the first time a novel role for LRH-1 in the regulation of intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis and propose LRH-1 as an important regulator of intestinal tissue integrity and immune homeostasis. PMID:16923850

  1. Dietary acylated starch improves performance and gut health in necrotic enteritis challenged broilers.

    PubMed

    M'Sadeq, Shawkat A; Wu, Shu-Biao; Swick, Robert A; Choct, Mingan

    2015-10-01

    Resistant starch has been reported to act as a protective agent against pathogenic organisms in the gut and to encourage the proliferation of beneficial organisms. This study examined the efficacy of acetylated high amylose maize starch (SA) and butyralated high-amylose maize starch (SB) in reducing the severity of necrotic enteritis (NE) in broilers under experimental challenge. A total of 720 one-day-old male Ross 308 chicks were assigned to 48 floor pens with a 2 × 4 factorial arrangement of treatments. Factors were a) challenge: no or yes; and b) feed additive: control, antibiotics (AB), SA, or SB. Birds were challenged with Eimeria and C. perfringens according to a previously reported protocol. On d 24 and 35, challenged birds had lower (P < 0.001) livability (LV), weight gain (WG), and feed intake (FI) compared to unchallenged birds. Challenged birds fed SA and SB had higher FI and WG at d 24 and 35 (P < 0.05) compared to birds fed the control diet, while being significantly lower than those fed AB. Unchallenged birds fed SA or SB had higher FI at d 24 and 35 compared to those fed the control diet (P < 0.05). Birds fed SB had increased (P < 0.001) jejunal villus height/crypt depth (VH:CD) ratios at d 15, increased ileal (P < 0.001) and caecal (P < 0.001) butyrate levels at d 15 and 24, and decreased (P < 0.01) caecal pH at d 15. Birds fed SA had increased (P < 0.001) ileal acetate content at d 24 and decreased (P < 0.01) caecal pH at d 15. These results demonstrated that dietary acylated starch improved WG in birds challenged with necrotic enteritis. Depending on the acid used, starch acylation also offers a degree of specificity in short chain fatty acid (SCFA) delivery to the lower intestinal tract which improves gut health. PMID:26287000

  2. Acylated sucroses and acylated quinic acids analogs from the flower buds of Prunus mume and their inhibitory effect on melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Seikou; Fujimoto, Katsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Nakashima, Souichi; Ohta, Tomoe; Ogawa, Keiko; Matsuda, Hisashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki

    2013-08-01

    The methanolic extract from the flower buds of Prunus mume, cultivated in Zhejiang Province, China, showed an inhibitory effect on melanogenesis in theophylline-stimulated B16 melanoma 4A5 cells. From the methanolic extract, five acylated sucroses, mumeoses A-E, and three acylated quinic acid analogs, 5-O-(E)-p-coumaroylquinic acid ethyl ester, and mumeic acid-A and its methyl ester, were isolated together with 13 known compounds. The chemical structures of the compounds were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence. Inhibitory effects of the isolated compounds on melanogenesis in theophylline-stimulated B16 melanoma 4A5 cells were also investigated. Acylated quinic acid analogs substantially inhibited melanogenesis. In particular, 5-O-(E)-feruloylquinic acid methyl ester exhibited a potent inhibitory effect [inhibition (%): 21.5±1.0 (P<0.01) at 0.1 μM]. Moreover, its biological effect was much stronger than that of the reference compound, arbutin [inhibition (%): 10.6±0.6 (P<0.01) at 10 μM]. Interestingly, the obtained acylated quinic acid analogs displaying melanogenesis inhibitory activity showed no cytotoxicity [cell viability >97% at 10 μM]. It is concluded that acylated quinic acid analogs are promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of skin disorders. PMID:23693120

  3. Asymmetric Allylboration of Acyl Imines Catalyzed by Chiral Diols

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Sha; Moquist, Philip N.; Schaus, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    Chiral BINOL-derived diols catalyze the enantioselective asymmetric allylboration of acyl imines. The reaction requires 15 mol% of (S)-3,3′-Ph2-BINOL as the catalyst and allyldiisopropoxyborane as the nucleophile. The reaction products are obtained in good yields (75 – 94%) and high enantiomeric ratios (95:5 – 99.5:0.5) for aromatic and aliphatic imines. High diastereoselectivities (dr > 98:2) and enantioselectivities (er > 98:2) are obtained in the reactions of acyl imines with crotyldiisopropoxyboranes. This asymmetric transformation is directly applied to the synthesis of maraviroc, the selective CCR5 antagonist with potent activity against HIV-1 infection. Mechanistic investigations of the allylboration reaction including IR, NMR, and mass spectrometry study indicate that acyclic boronates are activated by chiral diols via exchange of one of the boronate alkoxy groups with activation of the acyl imine via hydrogen bonding. PMID:18020334

  4. Influence of the degree of unsaturation of the acyl side chain upon the interaction of analogues of 1-arachidonoylglycerol with monoacylglycerol lipase and fatty acid amide hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Vandevoorde, Severine; Saha, Bijali; Mahadevan, Anu; Razdan, Raj K.; Pertwee, Roger G.; Martin, Billy R.; Fowler, Christopher J. . E-mail: cf@pharm.umu.se

    2005-11-11

    Little is known as to the structural requirements of the acyl side chain for interaction of acylglycerols with monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), the enzyme chiefly responsible for the metabolism of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the brain. In the present study, a series of twelve analogues of 1-AG (the more stable regioisomer of 2-AG) were investigated with respect to their ability to inhibit the metabolism of 2-oleoylglycerol by cytosolic and membrane-bound MAGL. In addition, the ability of the compounds to inhibit the hydrolysis of anandamide by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) was investigated. For cytosolic MAGL, compounds with 20 carbon atoms in the acyl chain and 2-5 unsaturated bonds inhibited the hydrolysis of 2-oleoylglycerol with similar potencies (IC{sub 50} values in the range 5.1-8.2 {mu}M), whereas the two compounds with a single unsaturated bond were less potent (IC{sub 50} values 19 and 21 {mu}M). The fully saturated analogue 1-monoarachidin did not inhibit the enzyme, whereas the lower side chain analogues 1-monopalmitin and 1-monomyristin inhibited the enzyme with IC{sub 50} values of 12 and 32 {mu}M, respectively. The 22-carbon chain analogue of 1-AG was also potent (IC{sub 50} value 4.5 {mu}M). Introduction of an {alpha}-methyl group for the C20:4, C20:3, and C22:4 compounds did not affect potency in a consistent manner. For the FAAH and the membrane-bound MAGL, there was no obvious relationship between the degree of unsaturation of the acyl side chain and the ability to inhibit the enzymes. It is concluded that increasing the number of unsaturated bonds on the acyl side chain of 1-AG from 1 to 5 has little effect on the affinity of acylglycerols for cytosolic MAGL.

  5. Pyripyropenes, novel inhibitors of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase produced by Aspergillus fumigatus. I. Production, isolation, and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Tomoda, H; Kim, Y K; Nishida, H; Masuma, R; Omura, S

    1994-02-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus FO-1289, a soil isolate, was found to produce a series of novel inhibitors of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT). Four active compounds, named pyripyropenes A, B, C and D, were isolated from the fermentation broth of the producing strain by solvent extraction, silica gel column chromatography, ODS column chromatography and preparative HPLC. Pyripyropenes A, B, C and D show very potent ACAT inhibitory activity in an enzyme assay system using rat liver microsomes with IC50 values of 58, 117, 53 and 268 nM, respectively. PMID:8150709

  6. Differential acylation in vitro with tetradecanoyl coenzyme A and tetradecanoic acid (+ATP) of three polypeptides shown to have induced synthesis in Photobacterium phosphoreum

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, L.; Rodriguez, A.; Meighen, E.

    1984-02-01

    Acylation of extracts of Photobacterium phosphoreum at different stages of growth with (/sup 3/H)tetradecanoic acid (+ATP) has shown that two polypeptides found in the fatty acid reductase complex, the fatty acid activating enzyme (50K) and the 34K polypeptide, were specifically labeled during induction of the luminescent system. An alternate method for in vitro acylation of polypeptides in the luminescence system was developed using tetradecanoyl-CoA. Both the 34K polypeptide and, to a lesser extent, the acyl-CoA reductase component (58K) in the complex, were acylated with (/sup 3/H)tetradecanoyl-CoA. In contrast, the fatty acid activating enzyme (50K) was not labeled. Labeling of both the 34K and 58K polypeptides with (/sup 3/H)tetradecanoyl-CoA as well as the acyl-CoA reductase activity in extracts paralleled the induction of luciferase during growth. Differential labeling of P. phosphoreum cells with (/sup 35/S)methionine before luminescence induction and with (/sup 3/H)methionine after the onset of luminescence followed by purification of luciferase and the polypeptides in the fatty acid reductase complex demonstrated that the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of luciferase and the 34K, 50K and 58K polypeptides of the complex had /sup 3/H//sup 35/S ratios at least 7-fold higher than the constitutive proteins. These results give evidence that the synthesis of the component polypeptides of the fatty acid reductase are induced during the development of bioluminescence and may be under the same control as luciferase. The experiments also showed that P. phosphoreum may have the highest content of luciferase of any luminescent bacterium, constituting approximately 20% of the total soluble protein in extracts.

  7. Chemical and Biochemical Transfer of Acyl Groups: A New Look at an Old Mechanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Kenneth T.; Williams, Andrew

    1976-01-01

    Examines recent studies of the elimination-addition mechanism of acyl group transfer, in which an acid function moves from one acceptor to another. Presents diagnostic evidence for this mechanism and discusses acyl group transfers in metabolism. (MLH)

  8. Direct N-acylation of lactams, oxazolidinones, and imidazolidinones with aldehydes by Shvo's catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Hong, Soon Hyeok

    2012-09-01

    Direct N-acylation of lactams, oxazolidinones, and imidazolidinones was achieved with aldehydes by Shvo's catalyst without using any other stoichiometric reagent. The N-acylations with α,β-unsaturated aldehydes were achieved with excellent yields. PMID:22913512

  9. Synthesis, crystal structure, and in vitro and in silico molecular docking of novel acyl thiourea derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haribabu, Jebiti; Subhashree, Govindarajulu Rangabashyam; Saranya, Sivaraj; Gomathi, Kannayiram; Karvembu, Ramasamy; Gayathri, Dasararaju

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, a series of six biologically active substituted acyl thiourea compounds (1-6) has been synthesized from cyclohexanecarbonyl isothiocyanate and various primary amines (2-methyl aniline, aniline, 4-methoxy aniline, 4-ethoxy aniline, benzyl amine and 2-methoxy aniline). The synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, UV-Visible, FT-IR, 1H & 13C NMR and mass spectroscopic techniques. Three dimensional molecular structure of two compounds (1 and 5) was determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography. All the synthesized compounds show good anti-oxidant and anti-haemolytic activities. In silico molecular docking studies were performed to screen against DprE1 and HSP90 enzymes targeting tuberculosis and cancer respectively.

  10. Four Trypanosoma brucei fatty acyl-CoA synthetases: fatty acid specificity of the recombinant proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, D W; Englund, P T

    2001-01-01

    As part of our investigation of fatty acid metabolism in Trypanosoma brucei, we have expressed four acyl-CoA synthetase (TbACS) genes in Esherichia coli. The recombinant proteins, with His-tags on their C-termini, were purified to near homogeneity using nickel-chelate affinity chromatography. Although these enzymes are highly homologous, they have distinct specificities for fatty acid chain length. TbACS1 prefers saturated fatty acids in the range C(11:0) to C(14:0) and TbACS2 prefers shorter fatty acids, mainly C(10:0). TbACS3 and 4, which have 95% sequence identity, have similar specificities, favouring fatty acids between C(14:0) and C(17:0). In addition, TbACS1, 3 and 4 function well with a variety of unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:11535136

  11. Inhibition of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase InhA by arylamides

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Alian, Akram; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2007-01-01

    InhA, the enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the key enzymes involved in the type II fatty acid biosynthesis pathway of M. tuberculosis. We report here the discovery, through high-throughput screening, of a series of arylamides as a novel class of potent InhA inhibitors. These direct InhA inhibitors require no mycobacterial enzymatic activation and thus circumvent the resistance mechanism to antitubercular prodrugs such as INH and ETA that is most commonly observed in drug-resistant clinical isolates. The crystal structure of InhA complexed with one representative inhibitor reveals the binding mode of the inhibitor within the InhA active site. Further optimization through a microtiter synthesis strategy followed by in situ activity screening led to the discovery of a potent InhA inhibitor with in vitro IC50 = 90 nM, representing a 34-fold potency improvement over the lead compound. PMID:17723305

  12. N-Acyl Dehydrotyrosines, Tyrosinase Inhibitors from the Marine Bacterium Thalassotalea sp. PP2-459.

    PubMed

    Deering, Robert W; Chen, Jianwei; Sun, Jiadong; Ma, Hang; Dubert, Javier; Barja, Juan L; Seeram, Navindra P; Wang, Hong; Rowley, David C

    2016-02-26

    Thalassotalic acids A-C and thalassotalamides A and B are new N-acyl dehydrotyrosine derivatives produced by Thalassotalea sp. PP2-459, a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from a marine bivalve aquaculture facility. The structures were elucidated via a combination of spectroscopic analyses emphasizing two-dimensional NMR and high-resolution mass spectrometric data. Thalassotalic acid A (1) displays in vitro inhibition of the enzyme tyrosinase with an IC50 value (130 μM) that compares favorably to the commercially used control compounds kojic acid (46 μM) and arbutin (100 μM). These are the first natural products reported from a bacterium belonging to the genus Thalassotalea. PMID:26824128

  13. Purification and characterization of variants of acyl-CoA-binding protein in the bovine liver.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, M S; Højrup, P; Rasmussen, J T; Knudsen, J

    1992-01-01

    Four differently modified forms of acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) were identified in ACBP purified from bovine liver. The majority of the purified ACBP was focused at pH 5.9 in isoelectric focusing and could be shown to be N-acetylated ACBP without any further modifications. Two minor peaks were focused at pH 5.25 and 4.85 respectively. Mass spectrometry and sequence determination showed that the pI 5.25 form was acetylated at Lys18 and that the pI 4.85 form was malonylated in the same position. Furthermore, it could be shown that non-enzymic glycosylation occurred during purification. The acetylated and malonylated variants of ACBP were only found in adult cattle. Images Fig. 5. PMID:1622397

  14. Giardia fatty acyl-CoA synthetases as potential drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fengguang; Ortega-Pierres, Guadalupe; Argüello-García, Raúl; Zhang, Haili; Zhu, Guan

    2015-01-01

    Giardiasis caused by Giardia intestinalis (syn. G. lamblia, G. duodenalis) is one of the leading causes of diarrheal parasitic diseases worldwide. Although limited drugs to treat giardiasis are available, there are concerns regarding toxicity in some patients and the emerging drug resistance. By data-mining genome sequences, we observed that G. intestinalis is incapable of synthesizing fatty acids (FA) de novo. However, this parasite has five long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetases (GiACS1 to GiACS5) to activate FA scavenged from the host. ACS is an essential enzyme because FA need to be activated to form acyl-CoA thioesters before they can enter subsequent metabolism. In the present study, we performed experiments to explore whether some GiACS enzymes could serve as drug targets in Giardia. Based on the high-throughput datasets and protein modeling analyses, we initially studied the GiACS1 and GiACS2, because genes encoding these two enzymes were found to be more consistently expressed in varied parasite life cycle stages and when interacting with host cells based on previously reported transcriptome data. These two proteins were cloned and expressed as recombinant proteins. Biochemical analysis revealed that both had apparent substrate preference toward palmitic acid (C16:0) and myristic acid (C14:0), and allosteric or Michaelis–Menten kinetics on palmitic acid or ATP. The ACS inhibitor triacsin C inhibited the activity of both enzymes (IC50 = 1.56 μM, Ki = 0.18 μM for GiACS1, and IC50 = 2.28 μM, Ki = 0.23 μM for GiACS2, respectively) and the growth of G. intestinalis in vitro (IC50 = 0.8 μM). As expected from giardial evolutionary characteristics, both GiACSs displayed differences in overall folding structure as compared with their human counterparts. These observations support the notion that some of the GiACS enzymes may be explored as drug targets in this parasite. PMID:26257723

  15. Enzyme Action in the Regulation of Plant Hormone Responses*

    PubMed Central

    Westfall, Corey S.; Muehler, Ashley M.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Plants synthesize a chemically diverse range of hormones that regulate growth, development, and responses to environmental stresses. The major classes of plant hormones are specialized metabolites with exquisitely tailored perception and signaling systems, but equally important are the enzymes that control the dose and exposure to the bioactive forms of these molecules. Here, we review new insights into the role of enzyme families, including the SABATH methyltransferases, the methylesterases, the GH3 acyl acid-amido synthetases, and the hormone peptidyl hydrolases, in controlling the biosynthesis and modifications of plant hormones and how these enzymes contribute to the network of chemical signals responsible for plant growth, development, and environmental adaptation. PMID:23709222

  16. Acyl-ACP thioesterases from castor (Ricinus communis L.): an enzymatic system appropriate for high rates of oil synthesis and accumulation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-García, Alicia; Moreno-Pérez, Antonio J; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M; Salas, Joaquín J; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2010-06-01

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases are enzymes that terminate the intraplastidial fatty acid synthesis in plants by hydrolyzing the acyl-ACP intermediates and releasing free fatty acids to be incorporated into glycerolipids. These enzymes are classified in two families, FatA and FatB, which differ in amino acid sequence and substrate specificity. In the present work, both FatA and FatB thioesterases were cloned, sequenced and characterized from castor (Ricinus communis) seeds, a crop of high interest in oleochemistry. Single copies of FatA and FatB were found in castor resulting to be closely related with those of Jatropha curcas. The corresponding mature proteins were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli for biochemical characterization after purification, resulting in high catalytic efficiency of RcFatA on oleoyl-ACP and palmitoleoyl-ACP and high efficiencies of RcFatB for oleoyl-ACP and palmitoyl-ACP. The expression profile of these genes displayed the highest levels in expanding tissues that typically are very active in lipid biosynthesis such as developing seed endosperm and young expanding leaves. The contribution of these two enzymes to the synthesis of castor oil is discussed. PMID:20382402

  17. Novel approach in LC-MS/MS using MRM to generate a full profile of acyl-CoAs: discovery of acyl-dephospho-CoAs[S

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingling; Zhang, Shenghui; Berthiaume, Jessica M.; Simons, Brigitte; Zhang, Guo-Fang

    2014-01-01

    A metabolomic approach to selectively profile all acyl-CoAs was developed using a programmed multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method in LC-MS/MS and was employed in the analysis of various rat organs. The programmed MRM method possessed 300 mass ion transitions with the mass difference of 507 between precursor ion (Q1) and product ion (Q3), and the precursor ion started from m/z 768 and progressively increased one mass unit at each step. Acyl-dephospho-CoAs resulting from the dephosphorylation of acyl-CoAs were identified by accurate MS and fragmentation. Acyl-dephospho-CoAs were also quantitatively scanned by the MRM method with the mass difference of 427 between Q1 and Q3 mass ions. Acyl-CoAs and dephospho-CoAs were assayed with limits of detection ranging from 2 to 133 nM. The accuracy of the method was demonstrated by assaying a range of concentrations of spiked acyl-CoAs with the results of 80–114%. The distribution of acyl-CoAs reflects the metabolic status of each organ. The physiological role of dephosphorylation of acyl-CoAs remains to be further characterized. The methodology described herein provides a novel strategy in metabolomic studies to quantitatively and qualitatively profile all potential acyl-CoAs and acyl-dephospho-CoAs. PMID:24367045

  18. Novel B(12)-dependent acyl-CoA mutases and their biotechnological potential.

    PubMed

    Cracan, Valentin; Banerjee, Ruma

    2012-08-01

    The recent spate of discoveries of novel acyl-CoA mutases has engendered a growing appreciation for the diversity of 5'-deoxyadenosylcobalamin-dependent rearrangement reactions. The prototype of the reaction catalyzed by these enzymes is the 1,2 interchange of a hydrogen atom with a thioester group leading to a change in the degree of carbon skeleton branching. These enzymes are predicted to share common architectural elements: a Rossman fold and a triose phosphate isomerase (TIM)-barrel domain for binding cofactor and substrate, respectively. Within this family, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM) is the best studied and is the only member found in organisms ranging from bacteria to man. MCM interconverts (2R)-methylmalonyl-CoA and succinyl-CoA. The more recently discovered family members include isobutyryl-CoA mutase (ICM), which interconverts isobutyryl-CoA and n-butyryl-CoA; ethylmalonyl-CoA mutase, which interconverts (2R)-ethylmalonyl-CoA and (2S)-methylsuccinyl-CoA; and 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA mutase, which interconverts 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA and (3S)-hydroxybutyryl-CoA. A variant in which the two subunits of ICM are fused to a G-protein chaperone, IcmF, has been described recently. In addition to its ICM activity, IcmF also catalyzes the interconversion of isovaleryl-CoA and pivalyl-CoA. This review focuses on the involvement of acyl-CoA mutases in central carbon and secondary bacterial metabolism and on their biotechnological potential for applications ranging from bioremediation to stereospecific synthesis of C2-C5 carboxylic acids and alcohols, and for production of potential commodity and specialty chemicals. PMID:22803641

  19. Novel B12-dependent Acyl-CoA Mutases and their Biotechnological Potential†

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Cracan; Banerjee, Ruma

    2012-01-01

    The recent spate of discoveries of novel acyl-CoA mutases has engendered a growing appreciation for the diversity of 5′-deoxyadenosylcobalamin-dependent rearrangement reactions. The prototype of the reaction catalyzed by these enzymes is the 1,2 interchange of a hydrogen atom with a thioester group leading to a change in the degree of carbon skeleton branching. These enzymes are predicted to share common architectural elements: a Rossman fold and a TIM barrel domain for binding cofactor and substrate, respectively. Within this family, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM) is the best studied and is the only member found in organisms ranging from bacteria to man. MCM interconverts (2R)-methylmalonyl-CoA and succinyl-CoA. The more recently discovered family members include isobutyryl-CoA mutase (ICM), which interconverts isobutyryl-CoA and n-butyryl-CoA; ethylmalonyl-CoA mutase, which interconverts (2R)-ethylmalonyl-CoA and (2S)-methylsuccinyl-CoA, and 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA mutase, which interconverts 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA and (3S)-hydroxybutyryl-CoA. A variant in which the two subunits of ICM are fused to a G-protein chaperone, IcmF, has been described recently. In addition to its ICM activity, IcmF also catalyzes the interconversion of isovaleryl-CoA and pivalyl-CoA. This review focuses on the involvement of acyl-CoA mutases in central carbon and secondary bacterial metabolism and on their biotechnological potential for applications ranging from bioremediation to stereospecific synthesis of C2-C5 carboxylic acids and alcohols, and for production of potential commodity and specialty chemicals. PMID:22803641

  20. Characterization of a Serine Hydrolase Targeted by Acyl-protein Thioesterase Inhibitors in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Louise E.; Rusch, Marion; Adibekian, Alexander; Bullen, Hayley E.; Graindorge, Arnault; Freymond, Céline; Rottmann, Matthias; Braun-Breton, Catherine; Baumeister, Stefan; Porfetye, Arthur T.; Vetter, Ingrid R.; Hedberg, Christian; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, cysteine palmitoylation is an important reversible modification that impacts protein targeting, folding, stability, and interactions with partners. Evidence suggests that protein palmitoylation contributes to key biological processes in Apicomplexa with the recent palmitome of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum reporting over 400 substrates that are modified with palmitate by a broad range of protein S-acyl transferases. Dynamic palmitoylation cycles require the action of an acyl-protein thioesterase (APT) that cleaves palmitate from substrates and conveys reversibility to this posttranslational modification. In this work, we identified candidates for APT activity in Toxoplasma gondii. Treatment of parasites with low micromolar concentrations of β-lactone- or triazole urea-based inhibitors that target human APT1 showed varied detrimental effects at multiple steps of the parasite lytic cycle. The use of an activity-based probe in combination with these inhibitors revealed the existence of several serine hydrolases that are targeted by APT1 inhibitors. The active serine hydrolase, TgASH1, identified as the homologue closest to human APT1 and APT2, was characterized further. Biochemical analysis of TgASH1 indicated that this enzyme cleaves substrates with a specificity similar to APTs, and homology modeling points toward an APT-like enzyme. TgASH1 is dispensable for parasite survival, which indicates that the severe effects observed with the β-lactone inhibitors are caused by the inhibition of non-TgASH1 targets. Other ASH candidates for APT activity were functionally characterized, and one of them was found to be resistant to gene disruption due to the potential essential nature of the protein. PMID:23913689

  1. Chlamydia trachomatis Scavenges Host Fatty Acids for Phospholipid Synthesis via an Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jiangwei; Dodson, V Joshua; Frank, Matthew W; Rock, Charles O

    2015-09-01

    The obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis has a reduced genome but relies on de novo fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis to produce its membrane phospholipids. Lipidomic analyses showed that 8% of the phospholipid molecular species synthesized by C. trachomatis contained oleic acid, an abundant host fatty acid that cannot be made by the bacterium. Mass tracing experiments showed that isotopically labeled palmitic, myristic, and lauric acids added to the medium were incorporated into C. trachomatis-derived phospholipid molecular species. HeLa cells did not elongate lauric acid, but infected HeLa cell cultures elongated laurate to myristate and palmitate. The elongated fatty acids were incorporated exclusively into C. trachomatis-produced phospholipid molecular species. C. trachomatis has adjacent genes encoding the separate domains of the bifunctional acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthetase/2-acylglycerolphosphoethanolamine acyltransferase gene (aas) of Escherichia coli. The CT775 gene encodes an acyltransferase (LpaT) that selectively transfers fatty acids from acyl-ACP to the 1-position of 2-acyl-glycerophospholipids. The CT776 gene encodes an acyl-ACP synthetase (AasC) with a substrate preference for palmitic compared with oleic acid in vitro. Exogenous fatty acids were elongated and incorporated into phospholipids by Escherichia coli-expressing AasC, illustrating its function as an acyl-ACP synthetase in vivo. These data point to an AasC-dependent pathway in C. trachomatis that selectively scavenges host saturated fatty acids to be used for the de novo synthesis of its membrane constituents. PMID:26195634

  2. Enzymes, Industrial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enzymes serve key roles in numerous biotechnology processes and products that are commonly encountered in the forms of food and beverages, cleaning supplies, clothing, paper products, transportation fuels, pharmaceuticals, and monitoring devices. Enzymes can display regio- and stereo-specificity, p...

  3. Understanding Enzymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnott, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the way enzymes operate through reaction energetics, and explains that most of the catalytic power of enzymes lies in the strong noncovalent forces responsible for initial binding of substrate, which are only manifested at the transition state of the reaction. (Author/GA)

  4. Soil Enzymes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The functionality and resilience of natural and managed ecosystems mainly rely on the metabolic abilities of microbial communities, the main source of enzymes in soils. Enzyme mediated reactions are critical in the decomposition of organic matter, cycling of nutrients, and in the breakdown of herbic...

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the Thermophile Thermus filiformis ATCC 43280, Producer of Carotenoid-(Di)glucoside-Branched Fatty Acid (Di)esters and Source of Hyperthermostable Enzymes of Biotechnological Interest

    PubMed Central

    Mandelli, Fernanda; Oliveira Ramires, Brenda; Couger, Matthew Brian; Paixão, Douglas A. A.; Camilo, Cesar M.; Polikarpov, Igor; Prade, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Thermus filiformis strain ATCC 43280, a thermophile bacterium capable of producing glycosylated carotenoids acylated with branched fatty acids and enzymes of biotechnological potential. PMID:25977443

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Thermophile Thermus filiformis ATCC 43280, Producer of Carotenoid-(Di)glucoside-Branched Fatty Acid (Di)esters and Source of Hyperthermostable Enzymes of Biotechnological Interest.

    PubMed

    Mandelli, Fernanda; Oliveira Ramires, Brenda; Couger, Matthew Brian; Paixão, Douglas A A; Camilo, Cesar M; Polikarpov, Igor; Prade, Rolf; Riaño-Pachón, Diego M; Squina, Fabio M

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Thermus filiformis strain ATCC 43280, a thermophile bacterium capable of producing glycosylated carotenoids acylated with branched fatty acids and enzymes of biotechnological potential. PMID:25977443

  7. Synthesis and antihyperglycemic activity of novel N-acyl-2-arylethylamines and N-acyl-3-coumarylamines.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Atma P; Kumar, Shailesh; Varshney, Vandana; Singh, Amar B; Srivastava, Arvind K; Sahu, Devi P

    2008-04-01

    A series of novel N-acyl-2-arylethylamines and N-acyl-3-coumarylamines were synthesized and evaluated for their antihyperglycemic activity. Compounds 3g and 6d exhibited lowering of postprandial plasma glucose by 30.7%, 23.3% in SLM and 25.6%, 25.4% in STZ models respectively which is significant compared to metformin and glybenclamide. Other compounds exhibited moderate to good activity ranging from 19.5% to 32.8% in SLM and 3.26% to 25.4% in STZ models. PMID:18353644

  8. A Conserved Glutamate Controls the Commitment to Acyl-adenylate Formation in Asparagine Synthetase†

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Megan E.; Gutierrez, Jemy A.; Raushel, Frank M.; Richards, Nigel G. J.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitor docking studies have implicated a conserved glutamate residue (Glu-348) as a general base in the synthetase active site of the enzyme asparagine synthetase B from Escherichia coli (AS-B). We now report steady-state kinetic, isotope transfer and positional isotope exchange experiments for a series of site-directed AS-B mutants in which Glu-348 is substituted by conservative amino acid replacements. We find that formation of the β-aspartyl-AMP intermediate, and therefore the eventual production of asparagine, is dependent on the presence of a carboxylate side chain at this position in the synthetase active site. In addition, Glu-348 may also play a role in mediating the conformational changes needed to (i) coordinate, albeit weakly, the glutaminase and synthetase activities of the enzyme, and (ii) establish the structural integrity of the intramolecular tunnel along which ammonia is translocated. The importance of Glu-348 in mediating acyl-adenylate formation contrasts with the functional role of the cognate residues in β-lactam synthetase (BLS) and carbapenam synthetase (CPS) (Tyr-348 and Tyr-345, respectively), which both likely evolved from asparagine synthetase. Given the similarity of the chemistry catalyzed by AS-B, BLS and CPS, our work highlights the difficulty of predicting the functional outcome of single site mutations on enzymes that catalyze almost identical chemical transformations. PMID:20853825

  9. Dihydrofolate synthetase and folylpolyglutamate synthetase: direct evidence for intervention of acyl phosphate intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, R.V.; Shane, B.; McGuire, J.J.; Coward, J.K.

    1988-12-13

    The transfer of /sup 17/O and/or /sup 18/O from (COOH-/sup 17/O or -/sup 18/O) enriched substrates to inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/) has been demonstrated for two enzyme-catalyzed reactions involved in folate biosynthesis and glutamylation. COOH-/sup 18/O-labeled folate, methotrexate, and dihydropteroate, in addition to (/sup 17/O)-glutamate, were synthesized and used as substrates for folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS) isolated from Escherichia coli, hog liver, and rat liver and for dihydrofolate synthetase (DHFS) isolated from E. coli. P/sub i/ was purified from the reaction mixtures and converted to trimethyl phosphate (TMP), which was then analyzed for /sup 17/O and /sup 18/O enrichment by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and/or mass spectroscopy. In the reactions catalyzed by the E. coli enzymes, both NMR and quantitative mass spectral analyses established that transfer of the oxygen isotope from the substrate /sup 18/O-enriched carboxyl group to P/sub i/ occurred, thereby providing strong evidence for an acyl phosphate intermediate in both the FPGS- and DHFS-catalyzed reactions. Similar oxygen-transfer experiments were carried out by use of two mammalian enzymes. The small amounts of P/sub i/ obtained from reactions catalyzed by these less abundant FPGS proteins precluded the use of NMR techniques. However, mass spectral analysis of the TMP derived from the mammalian FPGS-catalyzed reactions showed clearly that /sup 18/O transfer had occurred.

  10. Insights into Medium-chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Structure by Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Bonito, Cátia A; Leandro, Paula; Ventura, Fátima V; Guedes, Rita C

    2016-08-01

    The medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the first step of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation (mFAO) pathway. Its deficiency is the most common genetic disorder of mFAO. Many of the MCAD disease-causing variants, including the most common p.K304E variant, show loss of function due to protein misfolding. Herein, we used molecular dynamics simulations to provide insights into the structural stability and dynamic behavior of MCAD wild-type (MCADwt) and validate a structure that would allow reliable new studies on its variants. Our results revealed that in both proteins the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) has an important structural role on the tetramer stability and also in maintaining the volume of the enzyme catalytic pockets. We confirmed that the presence of substrate changes the dynamics of the catalytic pockets and increases FAD affinity. A comparison between the porcine MCADwt (pMCADwt) and human MCADwt (hMCADwt) structures revealed that both proteins are essentially similar and that the reversion of the double mutant E376G/T255E of hMCAD enzyme does not affect the structure of the protein neither its behavior in simulation. Our validated hMCADwt structure is crucial for complementing and accelerating the experimental studies aiming for the discovery and development of potential stabilizers of MCAD variants as candidates for the treatment of MCAD deficiency (MCADD). PMID:26992026

  11. Acylation of keratinocyte transglutaminase by palmitic and myristic acids in the membrane anchorage region

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, R.; Rice, R.H.

    1989-01-05

    The membrane-bound form of keratinocyte transglutaminase was found to be labeled by addition of (/sup 3/H) acetic, (/sup 3/H)myristic, or (/sup 3/H)palmitic acids to the culture medium of human epidermal cells. Acid methanolysis and high performance liquid chromatography analysis of palmitate-labeled transglutaminase yielded only methyl palmitate. In contrast, analysis of the myristate-labeled protein yielded approximately 40% methyl myristate and 60% methyl palmitate. Incorporation of neither label was significantly affected by cycloheximide inhibition of protein synthesis. The importance of the fatty acid moiety for membrane anchorage was demonstrated in three ways. First, the enzyme was solubilized from the particulate fraction of cell extracts by treatment with neutral 1 M hydroxylamine, which was sufficient to release the fatty acid label. Second, solubilization of active enzyme from the particulate fraction upon mild trypsin treatment resulted in a reduction in size by approximately 10 kDa and removal of the fatty acid radiolabels. Third, the small fraction of soluble transglutaminase in cell extracts was found almost completely to lack fatty acid labeling. Keratinocyte transglutaminase translated from poly(A+) RNA in a reticulocyte cell-free system was indistinguishable in size from the native enzyme, suggesting anchorage requires only minor post-translational processing. Thus, the data are highly compatible with membrane anchorage by means of fatty acid acylation within 10 kDa of the NH/sub 2/ or COOH terminus.

  12. Mouse very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Heinzer, Ann K; Kemp, Stephan; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Watkins, Paul A; Smith, Kirby D

    2002-08-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA). This accumulation has been attributed to decreased VLCFA beta-oxidation and peroxisomal very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (VLCS) activity. The X-ALD gene, ABCD1, encodes a peroxisomal membrane ATP binding cassette transporter, ALDP, that is hypothesized to affect VLCS activity in peroxisomes by direct interaction with the VLCS enzyme. Recently, a VLCS gene that encodes a protein with significant sequence identity to known rat and human peroxisomal VLCS protein has been identified in mice. We find that the mouse VLCS gene (Vlcs) encodes an enzyme (Vlcs) with VLCS activity that localizes to peroxisomes and is expressed in X-ALD target tissues. We show that the expression of Vlcs in the peroxisomes of X-ALD mouse fibroblasts improves VLCFA beta-oxidation in these cells, implying a role for this enzyme in the biochemical abnormality of X-ALD. X-ALD mice, which accumulate VLCFA in tissues, show no change in the expression of Vlcs, the subcellular localization of Vlcs, or general peroxisomal VLCS activity. These observations imply that ALDP is not necessary for the proper expression or localization of Vlcs protein, and the control of VLCFA levels does not depend on the direct interaction of Vlcs and ALDP. PMID:12048192

  13. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in children

    PubMed Central

    Isa, Hasan M.; Al-Arayedh, Ghadeer G.; Mohamed, Afaf M.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia (IL) is a rare disease characterized by dilatation of intestinal lymphatics. It can be classified as primary or secondary according to the underlying etiology. The clinical presentations of IL are pitting edema, chylous ascites, pleural effusion, acute appendicitis, diarrhea, lymphocytopenia, malabsorption, and intestinal obstruction. The diagnosis is made by intestinal endoscopy and biopsies. Dietary modification is the mainstay in the management of IL with a variable response. Here we report 2 patients with IL in Bahrain who showed positive response to dietary modification. PMID:26837404

  14. Tacrolimus-Induced Intestinal Angioedema: Diagnosis by Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zvidi, I.; Gal, E.; Rachamimov, R.; Niv, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Small intestinal angioedema has been reported with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors therapy, but not in implanted patients treated with tacrolimus. We present a kidney transplanted patient, hospitalized with severe diarrhea, diagnosed with tacrolimus-induced intestinal angioedema with abdominal computerized tomography and capsule endoscopy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first described case of tacrolimus-induced small bowel angioedema diagnosed with capsule endoscopy. PMID:20376210

  15. The enzyme complex citramalate lyase from Clostridium tetanomorphum.

    PubMed

    Buckel, W; Bobi, A

    1976-04-15

    1. The enzyme citramalate from Clostridium tetanomorphum is not stable in crude extracts. However, the inactive enzyme can be reactivated by incubation with dithioerythritol followed by acetylation with acetic anhydride. Reactivation was also obtained with acetate, ATP, MgCl2 and acetate : SH-enzyme ligases (AMP) from C. tetanomorphum or Klebsiella aerogenes. 2. Incubation of the inactive enzyme with iodoacetate resulted in rapid loss of enzymic activity as determined by reactivation with acetic anhydride whereas the active enzyme was stable in the presence of iodoacetate. Using ido[2-(14)C]acetate the sites of carboxymethylation and acetylation where identified as cysteamine residues of the enzyme. The results demonstrate that the active enzyme contains acetyl thiolester residues which play the central role in the catalytic mechanism. 3. Citramalate lyase was purified by a procedure almost identical to that already described for citrate lyase from K. aerogenes. The molecular weight of citramalate lyase is equal to that of citrate lyase (Mr = 5.2--5.8 X 10(5)) as estimated by gel chromatography and sucrose gradient centrifugation. Polyacrylamide gel elctrophoresis of citramalate lyase in sodium dodecylsulfate yielded three polypeptide chains (Mr: alpha 5.3--5.6 X 10(4); beta 3.3--3.6 X 10(4); gamma 1.0--1.2 X 10(4)) in probably equal molar amounts. These data lead to a hexameric structure (alpha,beta,gamma)6 of the complete enzyme. 4. Pantothenate (5 mol/mol of enzyme) and the essential cysteamine residues were exclusively present in the gamma-chain, the acyl carrier protein of citramalate lyase. The acyl exchange and cleavage functions, probably catalysed by the alpha and beta-subunits, were measured with acyl-CoA derivatives which were able to substitute for the natural acyl carrier. 5. The results demonstrate that citramalate lyase is an enzyme complex with structure and functions closely resembling those of citrate lyase. Although the similarity between

  16. Alcohol and the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Persson, J

    1991-01-01

    Several alterations of the small-intestinal morphology and function have been documented after alcohol ingestion. There are morphologic changes macroscopically and microscopically after acute alcohol administration in the proximal part of the small intestine, which are quickly reversible. There are no macroscopic changes and, in most patients, very discrete light microscopic changes in the small intestine after chronic alcohol ingestion. The ultrastructural changes are, however, profound, as seen by both transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The permeability is probably increased, permitting entrance of possible noxious agents, which may explain some of the extraintestinal tissue damage observed in chronic alcoholism. The transit is increased, at least after acute alcohol administration, perhaps contributing to the diarrhea commonly seen after heavy drinking. Several of the enzymes located in the brush border are affected; lactase activity can be depressed and perhaps result in a transient milk intolerance in predisposed individuals. The activity of GGT is increased and may partly account for the GGT elevation in serum after heavy drinking. Other enzymes, such as Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, can be inhibited and result in a decreased absorption of substances that require active, energy-dependent transport mechanisms. The secretion of water and electrolytes may be increased (an effect on cAMP?). The absorption of several nutrients, vitamins, and other elements is disturbed. The bacterial flora is increased and changed, which may give rise to symptoms and also increase the production of acetaldehyde by bacterial metabolism of ethanol. Acetaldehyde is more toxic than ethanol, and an increased concentration of acetaldehyde can possibly accentuate the damage to the liver and other organs. The bacterial overgrowth can possibly cause endotoxinemia. Although studies on alcohol-related intestinal alterations have been relatively sparse, the acute and chronic effects of

  17. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of extra-adrenal glucocorticoid synthesis in murine intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Atanasov, Atanas G; Leiser, Dominic; Roesselet, Corinne; Noti, Mario; Corazza, Nadia; Schoonjans, Kristina; Brunner, Thomas

    2008-12-01

    Glucocorticoids are anti-inflammatory steroids with important applications in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Endogenous glucocorticoids are mainly produced by the adrenal glands, although there is increasing evidence for extra-adrenal sources. Recent findings show that intestinal crypt cells produce glucocorticoids, which contribute to the maintenance of intestinal immune homeostasis. Intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis is critically regulated by the transcription factor liver receptor homologue-1 (LRH-1). As expression of steroidogenic enzymes and LRH-1 is restricted to the proliferating cells of the crypts, we aimed to investigate the role of the cell cycle in the regulation of LRH-1 activity and intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis. We here show that either pharmacological or molecular modulation of cell cycle progression significantly inhibited expression of steroidogenic enzymes and synthesis of glucocorticoids in intestinal epithelial cells. Synchronization of intestinal epithelial cells in the cell cycle revealed that expression of steroidogenic enzymes is preferentially induced at the G(1)/S stage. Differentiation of immature intestinal epithelial cells to mature nonproliferating cells also resulted in reduced expression of steroidogenic enzymes. This cell cycle-related effect on intestinal steroidogenesis was found to be mediated through the regulation of LRH-1 transcriptional activity. This mechanism may restrict intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis to the proliferating cells of the crypts. PMID:18711026

  18. Mechanistic studies of malonic acid-mediated in situ acylation.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Koushik; Naoum, Johnny N; Roy, Tapta Kanchan; Gilon, Chaim; Gerber, R Benny; Friedler, Assaf

    2015-09-01

    We have previously introduced an easy to perform, cost-effective and highly efficient acetylation technique for solid phase synthesis (SPPS). Malonic acid is used as a precursor and the reaction proceeds via a reactive ketene that acetylates the target amine. Here we present a detailed mechanistic study of the malonic acid-mediated acylation. The influence of reaction conditions, peptide sequence and reagents was systematically studied. Our results show that the methodology can be successfully applied to different types of peptides and nonpeptidic molecules irrespective of their structure, sequence, or conformation. Using alkyl, phenyl, and benzyl malonic acid, we synthesized various acyl peptides with almost quantitative yields. The ketenes obtained from the different malonic acid derived precursors were characterized by in situ (1) H-NMR. The reaction proceeded in short reaction times and resulted in excellent yields when using uronium-based coupling agents, DIPEA as a base, DMF/DMSO/NMP as solvents, Rink amide/Wang/Merrifield resins, temperature of 20°C, pH 8-12 and 5 min preactivation at inert atmosphere. The reaction was unaffected by Lewis acids, transition metal ions, surfactants, or salt. DFT studies support the kinetically favorable concerted mechanism for CO2 and ketene formation that leads to the thermodynamically stable acylated products. We conclude that the malonic acid-mediated acylation is a general method applicable to various target molecules. PMID:25846609

  19. Acyl migration kinetics of vegetable oil 1,2-diacylglycerols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The acyl migration kinetics of long-chain 1,2-diacylglycerol (1,2-DAG) to form 1,3-diacylglycerol (1,3-DAG) over the temperature range of 25 to 80 degrees Celsius were examined using proton NMR spectroscopy. The 1,2-DAG mole fraction of 0.32 at equilibrium was found to be insensitive to temperature...

  20. A new acylated isoflavone glucoside from Pterocarpus santalinus.

    PubMed

    Krishnaveni, K S; Srinivasa Rao, J V

    2000-09-01

    Phytochemical investigation on the constituents of heartwood of Pterocarpus santalinus resulted in the isolation of a new acylated isoflavone glucoside. The structure of the new compound was elucidated on the basis of spectral studies as 4',5-dihydroxy-7-O-methyl isoflavone 3'-O-D-(3''-E-cinnamoyl)glucoside. PMID:10993243

  1. Novel triterpenoid acyl esters and alkaloids from Anoectochilus roxburghii.

    PubMed

    Han, Mei-Hua; Yang, Xiu-Wei; Jin, Yan-Ping

    2008-01-01

    Two novel sorghumol acyl esters, sorghumol 3-O-Z-p-coumarate and sorghumol 3-O-E-p-coumarate, and a novel alkaloid, anoectochine, were isolated from the whole plants of Anoectochilus roxburghii along with one known triterpenoid, sorghumol. Their structures were established by their detailed spectral studies, including two-dimensional NMR ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC and HMBC). PMID:18435530

  2. Lubricity characteristics of seed oils modified by acylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemically modified seed oils via acylation of epoxidized and polyhydroxylated derivatives were investigated for their potential as candidates for lubrication. The native oil was preliminarily epoxidized and ring-opened in a one-pot reaction using formic acid-H2O2 followed by aqueous HCl treatment t...

  3. Preservation of polyunsaturated fatty acyl glycerides via intramolecular antioxidant coupling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferulic acid and its esters are known to be effective antioxidants. Feruloyl di-gamma-linolenoylglycerol was assessed for its ability to serve as an antioxidant for preventing the oxidation of its gamma-linolenoyl polyunsaturated fatty acyl groups in model membrane phospholipid vesicles. The molec...

  4. Acyl-CoA-Binding Proteins (ACBPs) in Plant Development.

    PubMed

    Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) play a pivotal role in fatty acid metabolism because they can transport medium- and long-chain acyl-CoA esters. In eukaryotic cells, ACBPs are involved in intracellular trafficking of acyl-CoA esters and formation of a cytosolic acyl-CoA pool. In addition to these ubiquitous functions, more specific non-redundant roles of plant ACBP subclasses are implicated by the existence of multigene families with variable molecular masses, ligand specificities, functional domains (e.g. protein-protein interaction domains), subcellular locations and gene expression patterns. In this chapter, recent progress in the characterization of ACBPs from the model dicot plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, and the model monocot, Oryza sativa, and their emerging roles in plant growth and development are discussed. The functional significance of respective members of the plant ACBP families in various developmental and physiological processes such as seed development and germination, stem cuticle formation, pollen development, leaf senescence, peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation and phloem-mediated lipid transport is highlighted. PMID:27023243

  5. Intestinal Absorption and Metabolism of Epimedium Flavonoids in Osteoporosis Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Ma, Yi Hua; Zhou, Zhong; Chen, Yan; Wang, Ying; Gao, Xia

    2015-10-01

    Herba Epimdii is a traditional Chinese medicine used to treat osteoporosis. Its main pharmacological ingredients are flavonoids. In previous studies conducted in healthy animals, we showed that epimedium flavonoids could be hydrolyzed into secondary glycosides or aglycon by intestinal flora or enzymes, thereby enhancing their absorption and antiosteoporosis activity. To study the medicine in the pathologic state, epimedium flavonoids were incubated with intestinal mucosa and feces in vitro and intestinal perfusion in situ to explore the differences in absorption and metabolism between sham and osteoporosis rats. For osteoporosis rats, the hydrolysis rates of icariin, epimedin A, epimedin B, and epimedin C incubated with intestinal flora for 1 hour were reduced by 0.19, 0.26, 0.19, and 0.14, respectively, compared with that in sham rats. Hydrolysis rates were reduced by 0.21, 0.24, 0.08, and 0.31 for icariin, epimedin A, epimedin B, and epimedin C incubated with duodenal enzymes for 1 hour and by 0.13, 0.09, 0.07, and 0.47 for icariin, epimedin A, epimedin B, and epimedin C incubated with jejunum enzymes, respectively, compared with the sham group. In addition, the apparent permeability coefficient and elimination percentage of the four epimedium flavonoids in the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon decreased by 29%-44%, 32%-50%, 40%-56%, and 27%-53% compared with that in sham rats, respectively. The main metabolites of the four epimedium flavonoids were the same for the two groups after intestinal perfusion, or flora and enzyme incubation. In conclusion, the amount and activity of intestinal flora and enzymes changed in ovariectomized rats, which affected the intestinal absorption and hydrolysis of epimedium flavonoids whose structures contain 7-glucose. PMID:26135008

  6. Fluorescently labelled bovine acyl-CoA-binding protein acting as an acyl-CoA sensor: interaction with CoA and acyl-CoA esters and its use in measuring free acyl-CoA esters and non-esterified fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Wadum, Majken C T; Villadsen, Jens K; Feddersen, Søren; Møller, Rikke S; Neergaard, Thomas B F; Kragelund, Birthe B; Højrup, Peter; Faergeman, Nils J; Knudsen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA esters are key metabolites in lipid synthesis and beta-oxidation but, at the same time, are important regulators of intermediate metabolism, insulin secretion, vesicular trafficking and gene expression. Key tools in studying the regulatory functions of acyl-CoA esters are reliable methods for the determination of free acyl-CoA concentrations. No such method is presently available. In the present study, we describe the synthesis of two acyl-CoA sensors for measuring free acyl-CoA concentrations using acyl-CoA-binding protein as a scaffold. Met24 and Ala53 of bovine acyl-CoA-binding protein were replaced by cysteine residues, which were covalently modified with 6-bromoacetyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene to make the two fluorescent acyl-CoA indicators (FACIs) FACI-24 and FACI-53. FACI-24 and FACI-53 showed fluorescence emission maximum at 510 and 525 nm respectively, in the absence of ligand (excitation 387 nm). Titration of FACI-24 and FACI-53 with hexadecanoyl-CoA and dodecanoyl-CoA increased the fluorescence yield 5.5-and 4.7-fold at 460 and 495 nm respectively. FACI-24 exhibited a high, and similar increase in, fluorescence yield at 460 nm upon binding of C14-C20 saturated and unsaturated acyl-CoA esters. Both indicators bind long-chain (>C14) acyl-CoA esters with high specificity and affinity (K(d)=0.6-1.7 nM). FACI-53 showed a high fluorescence yield for C8-C12 acyl chains. It is shown that FACI-24 acts as a sensitive acyl-CoA sensor for measuring the concentration of free acyl-CoA, acyl-CoA synthetase activity and the concentrations of free fatty acids after conversion of the fatty acid into their respective acyl-CoA esters. PMID:12071849

  7. The enzymes of bacterial census and censorship.

    PubMed

    Fast, Walter; Tipton, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    N-Acyl-L-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are a major class of quorum-sensing signals used by Gram-negative bacteria to regulate gene expression in a population-dependent manner, thereby enabling group behavior. Enzymes capable of generating and catabolizing AHL signals are of significant interest for the study of microbial ecology and quorum-sensing pathways, for understanding the systems that bacteria have evolved to interact with small-molecule signals, and for their possible use in therapeutic and industrial applications. The recent structural and functional studies reviewed here provide a detailed insight into the chemistry and enzymology of bacterial communication. PMID:22099187

  8. Separation and quantification of 2-acyl-1-lysophospholipids and 1-acyl-2-lysophospholipids in biological samples by LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Okudaira, Michiyo; Inoue, Asuka; Shuto, Akira; Nakanaga, Keita; Kano, Kuniyuki; Makide, Kumiko; Saigusa, Daisuke; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Aoki, Junken

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids (LysoGPs) serve as lipid mediators and precursors for synthesis of diacyl phospholipids (GPs). LysoGPs detected in cells have various acyl chains attached at either the sn-1 or sn-2 position of the glycerol backbone. In general, acyl chains at the sn-2 position of 2-acyl-1-LysoGPs readily move to the sn-1 position, generating 1-acyl-2-lyso isomers by a nonenzymatic reaction called intra-molecular acyl migration, which has hampered the detection of 2-acyl-1-LysoGPs in biological samples. In this study, we developed a simple and versatile method to separate and quantify 2-acyl-1- and 1-acyl-2-LysoGPs. The main point of the method was to extract LysoGPs at pH 4 and 4°C, conditions that were found to completely eliminate the intra-molecular acyl migration. Under the present conditions, the relative amounts of 2-acyl-1-LysoGPs and 1-acyl-2-LysoGPs did not change at least for 1 week. Further, in LysoGPs extracted from cells and tissues under the present conditions, most of the saturated fatty acids (16:0 and 18:0) were found in the sn-1 position of LysoGPs, while most of the PUFAs (18:2, 20:4, 22:6) were found in the sn-2 position. Thus the method can be used to elucidate the in vivo role of 2-acyl-1-LysoGPs. PMID:25114169

  9. Thermodynamically based solvent design for enzymatic saccharide acylation with hydroxycinnamic acids in non-conventional media.

    PubMed

    Zeuner, Birgitte; Kontogeorgis, Georgios M; Riisager, Anders; Meyer, Anne S

    2012-02-15

    Enzyme-catalyzed synthesis has been widely studied with lipases (EC 3.1.1.3), but feruloyl esterases (FAEs; EC 3.1.1.73) may provide advantages such as higher substrate affinity and regioselectivity in the synthesis of hydroxycinnamate saccharide esters. These compounds are interesting because of their amphiphilicity and antioxidative potential. Synthetic reactions using mono- or disaccharides as one of the substrates may moreover direct new routes for biomass upgrading in the biorefinery. The paper reviews the available data for enzymatic hydroxycinnamate saccharide ester synthesis in organic solvent systems as well as other enzymatic hydroxycinnamate acylations in ionic liquid systems. The choice of solvent system is highly decisive for enzyme stability, selectivity, and reaction yields in these synthesis reactions. To increase the understanding of the reaction environment and to facilitate solvent screening as a crucial part of the reaction design, the review explores the use of activity coefficient models for describing these systems and - more importantly - the use of group contribution model UNIFAC and quantum chemistry based COSMO-RS for thermodynamic predictions and preliminary solvent screening. Surfactant-free microemulsions of a hydrocarbon, a polar alcohol, and water are interesting solvent systems because they accommodate different substrate and product solubilities and maintain enzyme stability. Ionic liquids may provide advantages as solvents in terms of increased substrate and product solubility, higher reactivity and selectivity, as well as tunable physicochemical properties, but their design should be carefully considered in relation to enzyme stability. The treatise shows that thermodynamic modeling tools for solvent design provide a new toolbox to design enzyme-catalyzed synthetic reactions from biomass sources. PMID:22154740

  10. Enhanced Enzymatic Preparation of Biodiesel Using Ricinoleic Acid as Acyl Donor: Optimization Using Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Sun, Shangde

    2016-09-01

    Castor oil methyl ester is a kind of biodiesel from castor oil. However, in those previous methods for biodiesel preparation using castor oil as feedstock, glycerol was the main by-product, which had a strong blocking effect on the immobilized enzyme activity and affected the mass transfer of reaction system. For avoiding the negative effect of glycerol on the enzymatic esterification, biodiesel was prepared using ricinoleic acid (RA) as acyl donor. Enzyme screening was also studied, and the effects of reaction temperature, molar ratio of ricinoleic acid and methanol, enzyme load, and reaction time, on the preparation of castor methyl ester were also evaluated. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize the interaction effect of reaction variables (reaction temperature (30-70°C), enzyme load (2-7%; relative to the weight of total substrates), molar ratio of methanol to ricinoleic acid (2:1-10:1), and reaction time (0.5-2.5 h)) on the acid value (AV) and the degree of esterification (DE). Validation of the RSM model was verified by the good agreement between the experimental and the predicted values of AV and DE. The optimum preparation conditions were as follows: reaction temperature, 48.2°C; enzyme load, 5.8%; molar ratio of methanol to ricinoleic acid, 5.56:1; reaction time, 2.36 h. Under these conditions, the AV and DE of the esterification reaction are 10.36±1.05 mgKOH/g and 94.03±0.60%, respectively. The relationship between initial reaction rate and temperature was also established, and the activation energy (Ea) of the enzymatic esterification is 33.87 KJ/mol. PMID:27477073

  11. Bacterial Acyl-CoA Mutase Specifically Catalyzes Coenzyme B12-dependent Isomerization of 2-Hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA and (S)-3-Hydroxybutyryl-CoA*

    PubMed Central

    Yaneva, Nadya; Schuster, Judith; Schäfer, Franziska; Lede, Vera; Przybylski, Denise; Paproth, Torsten; Harms, Hauke; Müller, Roland H.; Rohwerder, Thore

    2012-01-01

    Coenzyme B12-dependent acyl-CoA mutases are radical enzymes catalyzing reversible carbon skeleton rearrangements in carboxylic acids. Here, we describe 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA mutase (HCM) found in the bacterium Aquincola tertiaricarbonis as a novel member of the mutase family. HCM specifically catalyzes the interconversion of 2-hydroxyisobutyryl- and (S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA. Like isobutyryl-CoA mutase, HCM consists of a large substrate- and a small B12-binding subunit, HcmA and HcmB, respectively. However, it is thus far the only acyl-CoA mutase showing substrate specificity for hydroxylated carboxylic acids. Complete loss of 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid degradation capacity in hcmA and hcmB knock-out mutants established the central role of HCM in A. tertiaricarbonis for degrading substrates bearing a tert-butyl moiety, such as the fuel oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and its metabolites. Sequence analysis revealed several HCM-like enzymes in other bacterial strains not related to MTBE degradation, indicating that HCM may also be involved in other pathways. In all strains, hcmA and hcmB are associated with genes encoding for a putative acyl-CoA synthetase and a MeaB-like chaperone. Activity and substrate specificity of wild-type enzyme and active site mutants HcmA I90V, I90F, and I90Y clearly demonstrated that HCM belongs to a new subfamily of B12-dependent acyl-CoA mutases. PMID:22433853

  12. Bacterial acyl-CoA mutase specifically catalyzes coenzyme B12-dependent isomerization of 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA and (S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA.

    PubMed

    Yaneva, Nadya; Schuster, Judith; Schäfer, Franziska; Lede, Vera; Przybylski, Denise; Paproth, Torsten; Harms, Hauke; Müller, Roland H; Rohwerder, Thore

    2012-05-01

    Coenzyme B(12)-dependent acyl-CoA mutases are radical enzymes catalyzing reversible carbon skeleton rearrangements in carboxylic acids. Here, we describe 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA mutase (HCM) found in the bacterium Aquincola tertiaricarbonis as a novel member of the mutase family. HCM specifically catalyzes the interconversion of 2-hydroxyisobutyryl- and (S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA. Like isobutyryl-CoA mutase, HCM consists of a large substrate- and a small B(12)-binding subunit, HcmA and HcmB, respectively. However, it is thus far the only acyl-CoA mutase showing substrate specificity for hydroxylated carboxylic acids. Complete loss of 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid degradation capacity in hcmA and hcmB knock-out mutants established the central role of HCM in A. tertiaricarbonis for degrading substrates bearing a tert-butyl moiety, such as the fuel oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and its metabolites. Sequence analysis revealed several HCM-like enzymes in other bacterial strains not related to MTBE degradation, indicating that HCM may also be involved in other pathways. In all strains, hcmA and hcmB are associated with genes encoding for a putative acyl-CoA synthetase and a MeaB-like chaperone. Activity and substrate specificity of wild-type enzyme and active site mutants HcmA I90V, I90F, and I90Y clearly demonstrated that HCM belongs to a new subfamily of B(12)-dependent acyl-CoA mutases. PMID:22433853

  13. Acylation of N-p-Toluenesulfonylpyrrole Under Friedel-Crafts Conditions. Evidence for Organoaluminum Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, John W.; Smith, Valerie J.; Padgett, Lea W.

    2008-01-01

    The Friedel-Crafts acylation of N-p-toluenesulfonylpyrrole under Friedel-Crafts conditions has been reinvestigated. Evidence is presented in support of the hypothesis that when AlCl3 is used as the Lewis acid, acylation proceeds via reaction of an organoaluminum intermediate with the acyl halide. This leads to the production of the 3-acyl derivative as the major product. With weaker Lewis acids (EtAlCl2, Et2AlCl) or less than one equivalent of AlCl3 the relative amount of 2-acyl product is increased. A mechanistic rationalization is presented to explain these data. PMID:19247425

  14. Clarification of the Mechanism of Acylation Reaction and Origin of Substrate Specificity of the Serine-Carboxyl Peptidase Sedolisin through QM/MM Free Energy Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Qin; Yao, Jianzhuang; Wiodawer, Alexander; Guo, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy simulations are applied for understanding the mechanism of the acylation reaction catalyzed by sedolisin, a representative serine-carboxyl peptidase, leading to the acyl-enzyme (AE) and first product from the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. One of the interesting questions to be addressed in this work is the origin of the substrate specificity of sedolisin that shows a relatively high activity on the substrates with Glu at P1 site. It is shown that the bond making and breaking events of the acylation reaction involving a peptide substrate (LLE*FL) seem to be accompanied by local conformational changes, proton transfers as well as the formation of alternative hydrogen bonds. The results of the simulations indicate that the conformational change of Glu at P1 site and its formation of a low barrier hydrogen bond with Asp-170 (along with the transient proton transfer) during the acylation reaction might play a role in the relatively high specificity for the substrate with Glu at P1 site. The role of some key residues in the catalysis is confirmed through free energy simulations. Glu-80 is found to act as a general base to accept a proton from Ser-287 during the nucleophilic attack and then as a general acid to protonate the leaving group (N H of P1 -Phe) during the cleavage of the scissile peptide bond. Another acidic residue, Asp-170, acts as a general acid catalyst to protonate the carbonyl of P1-Glu during the formation of the tetrahedral intermediate and as a general base for the formation of the acyl-enzyme. The energetic results from the free energy simulations support the importance of proton transfer from Asp-170 to the carbonyl of P1-Glu in the stabilization of the tetrahedral intermediate and the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond between the carboxyl group of P1-Glu and Asp-170 in the lowering of the free energy barrier for the cleavage of the peptide bond. Detailed analyses of the proton transfers

  15. Effect of Cheonggukjang supplementation upon hepatic acyl-CoA synthase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, acyl-CoA oxidase and uncoupling protein 2 mRNA levels in C57BL/6J mice fed with high fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Ju-Ryoun; Shin, Dong-Hwa; Kwon, Dae Young

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of Cheonggukjang on mRNA levels of hepatic acyl-CoA synthase (ACS), carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-I), acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), and on serum lipid profiles in C57BL/6J mice. Thirty male C57BL/6J mice were divided into three groups; normal diet (ND), high fat diet (HD) and high fat diet with 40% Cheonggukjang (HDC). Energy intake was significantly higher in the HDC group than in the ND and HD groups. The HDC group normalized in weight gain, epididymal and back fat (g/100 g) accumulation which are increased by high fat diet. Serum concentrations of triglyceride and total cholesterol in the HDC were significantly lower than those in the HD group. These results were confirmed by hepatic mRNA expression of enzymes and protein (ACS, CPT-1, ACO, UCP2) which is related with lipid metabolism by RT-PCR. Hepatic CPT-I, ACO and UCP2 mRNA expression was increased by Cheonggukjang supplementation. We demonstrated that Cheonggukjang supplement leads to increased mRNA expressions of enzymes and protein involved in fatty acid oxidation in liver, reduced accumulation of body fat and improvement of serum lipids in high fat diet fed mice. PMID:18850232

  16. [The biliary intestinal obstruction].

    PubMed

    Demetrashvili, Z M; Asatiani, G A; Nemsadze, G Sh; Kenchadze, G Z

    2012-01-01

    The successful experience of treatment of 3 patients with biliary intestinal obstruction is depicted. The most informative means of diagnostics was the multispiral computed tomography. Authors state, that the volume of the operation should include only the liquidation of the intestinal obstruction. The simultaneous biliodigestive fistulae closure should be performed only in rare situations. PMID:22678540

  17. Reprogramming acyl carrier protein interactions of an acyl-CoA promiscuous trans-acyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhixia; Musiol, Ewa M; Weber, Tilmann; Williams, Gavin J

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Protein interactions between acyl carrier proteins (ACP’s) and trans-acting acyltransferase domains (trans-AT’s) are critical for regioselective extender unit installation by many polyketide synthases. Yet, little is known regarding the specificity of these interactions, particularly for trans-AT’s with unusual extender unit specificities. Currently, the best-studied trans-AT with non-malonyl specificity is KirCII from kirromycin biosynthesis. Here, we developed a new assay to probe ACP interactions based on leveraging the extender unit promiscuity of KirCII. The assay allows us to identify residues on the ACP surface that contribute to specific recognition by KirCII. This information proved sufficient to modify a non-cognate ACP from a different biosynthetic system to be a substrate for KirCII. The findings form a foundation for further understanding the specificity of trans-AT:ACP protein interactions, and for engineering modular polyketide synthases to produce analogues. PMID:24726832

  18. Chlamydia trachomatis growth and development requires the activity of host Long-chain Acyl-CoA Synthetases (ACSLs)

    PubMed Central

    Recuero-Checa, Maria A.; Sharma, Manu; Lau, Constance; Watkins, Paul A.; Gaydos, Charlotte A.; Dean, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The obligate-intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) has undergone considerable genome reduction with consequent dependence on host biosynthetic pathways, metabolites and enzymes. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs) are key host-cell enzymes that convert fatty acids (FA) into acyl-CoA for use in metabolic pathways. Here, we show that the complete host ACSL family [ACSL1 and ACSL3–6] translocates into the Ct membrane-bound vacuole, termed inclusion, and remains associated with membranes of metabolically active forms of Ct throughout development. We discovered that three different pharmacologic inhibitors of ACSL activity independently impede Ct growth in a dose-dependent fashion. Using an FA competition assay, host ACSLs were found to activate Ct branched-chain FAs, suggesting that one function of the ACSLs is to activate Ct FAs and host FAs (recruited from the cytoplasm) within the inclusion. Because the ACSL inhibitors can deplete lipid droplets (LD), we used a cell line where LD synthesis was switched off to evaluate whether LD deficiency affects Ct growth. In these cells, we found no effect on growth or on translocation of ACSLs into the inclusion. Our findings support an essential role for ACSL activation of host-cell and bacterial FAs within the inclusion to promote Ct growth and development, independent of LDs. PMID:26988341

  19. Structural basis for selective recognition of acyl chains by the membrane-associated acyltransferase PatA

    PubMed Central

    Albesa-Jové, David; Svetlíková, Zuzana; Tersa, Montse; Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Carreras-González, Ana; Bonnet, Pascal; Arrasate, Pedro; Eguskiza, Ander; Angala, Shiva K.; Cifuente, Javier O.; Korduláková, Jana; Jackson, Mary; Mikušová, Katarína; Guerin, Marcelo E.

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of phospholipids and glycolipids are critical pathways for virtually all cell membranes. PatA is an essential membrane associated acyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of mycobacterial phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs). The enzyme transfers a palmitoyl moiety from palmitoyl–CoA to the 6-position of the mannose ring linked to 2-position of inositol in PIM1/PIM2. We report here the crystal structures of PatA from Mycobacterium smegmatis in the presence of its naturally occurring acyl donor palmitate and a nonhydrolyzable palmitoyl–CoA analog. The structures reveal an α/β architecture, with the acyl chain deeply buried into a hydrophobic pocket that runs perpendicular to a long groove where the active site is located. Enzyme catalysis is mediated by an unprecedented charge relay system, which markedly diverges from the canonical HX4D motif. Our studies establish the mechanistic basis of substrate/membrane recognition and catalysis for an important family of acyltransferases, providing exciting possibilities for inhibitor design. PMID:26965057

  20. Synthesis and characterisation of 5-acyl-6,7-dihydrothieno[3,2-c]pyridine inhibitors of Hedgehog acyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Lanyon-Hogg, Thomas; Masumoto, Naoko; Bodakh, George; Konitsiotis, Antonio D.; Thinon, Emmanuelle; Rodgers, Ursula R.; Owens, Raymond J.; Magee, Anthony I.; Tate, Edward W.

    2016-01-01

    In this data article we describe synthetic and characterisation data for four members of the 5-acyl-6,7-dihydrothieno[3,2-c]pyridine (termed “RU-SKI”) class of inhibitors of Hedgehog acyltransferase, including associated NMR spectra for final compounds. RU-SKI compounds were selected for synthesis based on their published high potencies against the enzyme target. RU-SKI 41 (9a), RU-SKI 43 (9b), RU-SKI 101 (9c), and RU-SKI 201 (9d) were profiled for activity in the related article “Click chemistry armed enzyme linked immunosorbent assay to measure palmitoylation by Hedgehog acyltransferase” (Lanyon-Hogg et al., 2015) [1]. 1H NMR spectral data indicate different amide conformational ratios between the RU-SKI inhibitors, as has been observed in other 5-acyl-6,7-dihydrothieno[3,2-c]pyridines. The synthetic and characterisation data supplied in the current article provide validated access to the class of RU-SKI inhibitors. PMID:27077078

  1. Structural basis for selective recognition of acyl chains by the membrane-associated acyltransferase PatA.

    PubMed

    Albesa-Jové, David; Svetlíková, Zuzana; Tersa, Montse; Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Carreras-González, Ana; Bonnet, Pascal; Arrasate, Pedro; Eguskiza, Ander; Angala, Shiva K; Cifuente, Javier O; Korduláková, Jana; Jackson, Mary; Mikušová, Katarína; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of phospholipids and glycolipids are critical pathways for virtually all cell membranes. PatA is an essential membrane associated acyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of mycobacterial phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs). The enzyme transfers a palmitoyl moiety from palmitoyl-CoA to the 6-position of the mannose ring linked to 2-position of inositol in PIM1/PIM2. We report here the crystal structures of PatA from Mycobacterium smegmatis in the presence of its naturally occurring acyl donor palmitate and a nonhydrolyzable palmitoyl-CoA analog. The structures reveal an α/β architecture, with the acyl chain deeply buried into a hydrophobic pocket that runs perpendicular to a long groove where the active site is located. Enzyme catalysis is mediated by an unprecedented charge relay system, which markedly diverges from the canonical HX4D motif. Our studies establish the mechanistic basis of substrate/membrane recognition and catalysis for an important family of acyltransferases, providing exciting possibilities for inhibitor design. PMID:26965057

  2. Synthesis and characterisation of 5-acyl-6,7-dihydrothieno[3,2-c]pyridine inhibitors of Hedgehog acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Lanyon-Hogg, Thomas; Masumoto, Naoko; Bodakh, George; Konitsiotis, Antonio D; Thinon, Emmanuelle; Rodgers, Ursula R; Owens, Raymond J; Magee, Anthony I; Tate, Edward W

    2016-06-01

    In this data article we describe synthetic and characterisation data for four members of the 5-acyl-6,7-dihydrothieno[3,2-c]pyridine (termed "RU-SKI") class of inhibitors of Hedgehog acyltransferase, including associated NMR spectra for final compounds. RU-SKI compounds were selected for synthesis based on their published high potencies against the enzyme target. RU-SKI 41 (9a), RU-SKI 43 (9b), RU-SKI 101 (9c), and RU-SKI 201 (9d) were profiled for activity in the related article "Click chemistry armed enzyme linked immunosorbent assay to measure palmitoylation by Hedgehog acyltransferase" (Lanyon-Hogg et al., 2015) [1]. (1)H NMR spectral data indicate different amide conformational ratios between the RU-SKI inhibitors, as has been observed in other 5-acyl-6,7-dihydrothieno[3,2-c]pyridines. The synthetic and characterisation data supplied in the current article provide validated access to the class of RU-SKI inhibitors. PMID:27077078

  3. Production of a Brassica napus low-molecular mass acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein in Arabidopsis alters the acyl-coenzyme A pool and acyl composition of oil in seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-molecular mass (10 kD) cytosolic acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein (ACBP) has a substantial influence over fatty acid (FA) composition in oilseeds, possibly via an effect on the partitioning of acyl groups between elongation and desaturation pathways. Previously, we demonstrated that the expressio...

  4. Dynamics of the Heat Stress Response of Ceramides with Different Fatty-Acyl Chain Lengths in Baker's Yeast.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Wei; Fonseca, Luis L; Hannun, Yusuf A; Voit, Eberhard O

    2015-08-01

    The article demonstrates that computational modeling has the capacity to convert metabolic snapshots, taken sequentially over time, into a description of cellular, dynamic strategies. The specific application is a detailed analysis of a set of actions with which Saccharomyces cerevisiae responds to heat stress. Using time dependent metabolic concentration data, we use a combination of mathematical modeling, reverse engineering, and optimization to infer dynamic changes in enzyme activities within the sphingolipid pathway. The details of the sphingolipid responses to heat stress are important, because they guide some of the longer-term alterations in gene expression, with which the cells adapt to the increased temperature. The analysis indicates that all enzyme activities in the system are affected and that the shapes of the time trends in activities depend on the fatty-acyl CoA chain lengths of the different ceramide species in the system. PMID:26241868

  5. Topology of 1-Acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate Acyltransferases SLC1 and ALE1 and Related Membrane-bound O-Acyltransferases (MBOATs) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Pagac, Martin; de la Mora, Hector Vazquez; Duperrex, Cécile; Roubaty, Carole; Vionnet, Christine; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    In yeast, phosphatidic acid, the biosynthetic precursor for all glycerophospholipids and triacylglycerols, is made de novo by the 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferases Ale1p and Slc1p. Ale1p belongs to the membrane-bound O-acyltransferase (MBOAT) family, which contains many enzymes acylating lipids but also others that acylate secretory proteins residing in the lumen of the ER. A histidine present in a very short loop between two predicted transmembrane domains is the only residue that is conserved throughout the MBOAT gene family. The yeast MBOAT proteins of known function comprise Ale1p, the ergosterol acyltransferases Are1p and Are2p, and Gup1p, the last of which acylates lysophosphatidylinositol moieties of GPI anchors on ER lumenal GPI proteins. C-terminal topology reporters added to truncated versions of Gup1p yield a topology predicting a lumenal location of its uniquely conserved histidine 447 residue. The same approach shows that Ale1p and Are2p also have the uniquely conserved histidine residing in the ER lumen. Because these data raised the possibility that phosphatidic acid could be made in the lumen of the ER, we further investigated the topology of the second yeast 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, Slc1p. The location of C-terminal topology reporters, microsomal assays probing the protease sensitivity of inserted tags, and the accessibility of natural or artificially inserted cysteines to membrane-impermeant alkylating agents all indicate that the most conserved motif containing the presumed active site histidine of Slc1p is oriented toward the ER lumen, whereas other conserved motifs are cytosolic. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:21849510

  6. Structural Characterisation of the Beta-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthases, FabF and FabH, of Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Nanson, Jeffrey D.; Himiari, Zainab; Swarbrick, Crystall M. D.; Forwood, Jade K.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic, pneumonic, and septicaemic plague, remains a major public health threat, with outbreaks of disease occurring in China, Madagascar, and Peru in the last five years. The existence of multidrug resistant Y. pestis and the potential of this bacterium as a bioterrorism agent illustrates the need for new antimicrobials. The β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases, FabB, FabF, and FabH, catalyse the elongation of fatty acids as part of the type II fatty acid biosynthesis (FASII) system, to synthesise components of lipoproteins, phospholipids, and lipopolysaccharides essential for bacterial growth and survival. As such, these enzymes are promising targets for the development of novel therapeutic agents. We have determined the crystal structures of the Y. pestis β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases FabF and FabH, and compared these with the unpublished, deposited structure of Y. pestis FabB. Comparison of FabB, FabF, and FabH provides insights into the substrate specificities of these enzymes, and investigation of possible interactions with known β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase inhibitors suggests FabB, FabF and FabH may be targeted simultaneously to prevent synthesis of the fatty acids necessary for growth and survival. PMID:26469877

  7. Structural Characterisation of the Beta-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthases, FabF and FabH, of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Nanson, Jeffrey D; Himiari, Zainab; Swarbrick, Crystall M D; Forwood, Jade K

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic, pneumonic, and septicaemic plague, remains a major public health threat, with outbreaks of disease occurring in China, Madagascar, and Peru in the last five years. The existence of multidrug resistant Y. pestis and the potential of this bacterium as a bioterrorism agent illustrates the need for new antimicrobials. The β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases, FabB, FabF, and FabH, catalyse the elongation of fatty acids as part of the type II fatty acid biosynthesis (FASII) system, to synthesise components of lipoproteins, phospholipids, and lipopolysaccharides essential for bacterial growth and survival. As such, these enzymes are promising targets for the development of novel therapeutic agents. We have determined the crystal structures of the Y. pestis β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases FabF and FabH, and compared these with the unpublished, deposited structure of Y. pestis FabB. Comparison of FabB, FabF, and FabH provides insights into the substrate specificities of these enzymes, and investigation of possible interactions with known β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase inhibitors suggests FabB, FabF and FabH may be targeted simultaneously to prevent synthesis of the fatty acids necessary for growth and survival. PMID:26469877

  8. Intestinal adaptation after massive intestinal resection

    PubMed Central

    Weale, A; Edwards, A; Bailey, M; Lear, P

    2005-01-01

    Patients with short bowel syndrome require long term parenteral nutrition support. However, after massive intestinal resection the intestine undergoes adaptation and nutritional autonomy may be obtained. Given that the complications of parenteral nutrition may be life threatening or result in treatment failure and the need for intestinal transplantation, a more attractive option is to wean patients off nutrition support by optimising the adaptive process. The article examines the evidence that after extensive small bowel resection adaptation occurs in humans and focuses on the factors that influence adaptation and the strategies that have been used to optimise this process. The review is based on an English language Medline search with secondary references obtained from key articles. There is evidence that adaptation occurs in humans. Adaptation is a complex process that results in response to nutrient and non-nutrient stimuli. Successful and reproducible strategies to improve adaptation remain elusive despite an abundance of experimental data. Nevertheless given the low patient survival and quality of life associated with other treatments for irreversible intestinal failure it is imperative that clinical research continues into the optimisation of the adaptation. PMID:15749794

  9. Characterization of N-Acyl Phosphatidylethanolamine-Specific Phospholipase-D Isoforms in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Neale; Lone, Museer A.; Kaul, Tiffany K.; Reis Rodrigues, Pedro; Ogungbe, Ifedayo Victor; Gill, Matthew S.

    2014-01-01

    N-acylethanolamines are an important class of lipid signaling molecules found in many species, including the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) where they are involved in development and adult lifespan. In mammals, the relative activity of the biosynthetic enzyme N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase-D and the hydrolytic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase determine N-acylethanolamine levels. C. elegans has two N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase-D orthologs, nape-1 and nape-2, that are likely to have arisen from a gene duplication event. Here, we find that recombinant C. elegans NAPE-1 and NAPE-2 are capable of generating N-acylethanolamines in vitro, confirming their functional conservation. In vivo, they exhibit overlapping expression in the pharynx and the nervous system, but are also expressed discretely in these and other tissues, suggesting divergent roles. Indeed, nape-1 over-expression results in delayed growth and shortened lifespan only at 25°C, while nape-2 over-expression results in significant larval arrest and increased adult lifespan at 15°C. Interestingly, deletion of the N-acylethanolamine degradation enzyme faah-1 exacerbates nape-1 over-expression phenotypes, but suppresses the larval arrest phenotype of nape-2 over-expression, suggesting that faah-1 is coupled to nape-2, but not nape-1, in a negative feedback loop. We also find that over-expression of either nape-1 or nape-2 significantly enhances recovery from the dauer larval stage in the insulin signaling mutant daf-2(e1368), but only nape-1 over-expression reduces daf-2 adult lifespan, consistent with increased levels of the N-acylethanolamine eicosapentaenoyl ethanolamine. These results provide evidence that N-acylethanolamine biosynthetic enzymes in C. elegans have conserved function and suggest a temperature-dependent, functional divergence between the two isoforms. PMID:25423491

  10. Intestinal disaccharidase activity following pancreatic duct occlusion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hauer-Jensen, M; Christensen, K; Wilson, H D; Schedl, H P

    1987-01-01

    The influence of pancreatic secretions on growth and brush-border enzyme activity, throughout the entire small intestine, was examined in the rat. Pancreatic secretions were excluded from the gut lumen by stapling the pancreatic ducts, without interruption of bile flow. The entire small intestine was studied as four segments; the duodenum and three distal segments of equal length. Weight of intestine and mucosa, and mucosal sucrase, isomaltase, lactase, and alkaline phosphatase activity were measured 10-15 days following pancreatic duct occlusion, or sham-operation. The duodenum of pancreatic duct-occluded animals exhibited significant hypertrophy. In general, specific and total disaccharidase activities were greater in duct-occluded animals than in controls throughout the intestine. The increase was more pronounced in distal than in proximal segments. The sucrase/isomaltase ratio was significantly greater in pancreatic duct-occluded animals than in controls in the two distal segments. Alkaline phosphatase activity was not affected by pancreatic duct occlusion. The greater relative increase of disaccharidase activities and sucrase/isomaltase activity ratios in the distal segments of duct-occluded animals, indicates a more important regulatory role of pancreatic enzymes in the distal small intestine. It is concluded that regulation of intestinal brush-border enzyme activity by pancreatic secretion is selective for enzyme and site as follows: disaccharidases, but not alkaline phosphatase, are regulated; the sucrase subunit of the sucrase/isomaltase complex is most sensitive to regulation, while lactase is least sensitive; and the regulatory effect on disaccharidases is greater in distal than in proximal intestine. PMID:3114740

  11. Intestinal colonization resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, Trevor D; Walker, Alan W

    2013-01-01

    Dense, complex microbial communities, collectively termed the microbiota, occupy a diverse array of niches along the length of the mammalian intestinal tract. During health and in the absence of antibiotic exposure the microbiota can effectively inhibit colonization and overgrowth by invading microbes such as pathogens. This phenomenon is called ‘colonization resistance’ and is associated with a stable and diverse microbiota in tandem with a controlled lack of inflammation, and involves specific interactions between the mucosal immune system and the microbiota. Here we overview the microbial ecology of the healthy mammalian intestinal tract and highlight the microbe–microbe and microbe–host interactions that promote colonization resistance. Emerging themes highlight immunological (T helper type 17/regulatory T-cell balance), microbiota (diverse and abundant) and metabolic (short-chain fatty acid) signatures of intestinal health and colonization resistance. Intestinal pathogens use specific virulence factors or exploit antibiotic use to subvert colonization resistance for their own benefit by triggering inflammation to disrupt the harmony of the intestinal ecosystem. A holistic view that incorporates immunological and microbiological facets of the intestinal ecosystem should facilitate the development of immunomodulatory and microbe-modulatory therapies that promote intestinal homeostasis and colonization resistance. PMID:23240815

  12. Evidence for involvement of medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase in the metabolism of phenylbutyrate

    PubMed Central

    Kormanik, Kaitlyn; Kang, Heejung; Cuebas, Dean; Vockley, Jerry; Mohsen, Al-Walid

    2012-01-01

    Sodium phenylbutyrate is used for treating urea cycle disorders, providing an alternative for ammonia excretion. Following conversion to its CoA ester, phenylbutyryl-CoA is postulated to undergo one round of β-oxidation to phenylacetyl-CoA, the active metabolite. Molecular modeling suggests that medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD; EC 1.3.99.3), a key enzyme in straight chain fatty acid β-oxidation, could utilize phenylbutyryl-CoA as substrate. Moreover, phenylpropionyl-CoA has been shown to be a substrate for MCAD and its intermediates accumulate in patients with MCAD deficiency. We have examined the involvement of MCAD and other acyl-CoA dehydrogenases (ACADs) in the metabolism of phenylbutyryl-CoA. Anaerobic titration of purified recombinant human MCAD with phenylbutyryl-CoA caused changes in the MCAD spectrum that are similar to those induced by octanoyl-CoA, its bona fide substrate, and unique to the development of the charge transfer ternary complex. The calculated apparent dissociation constant (KD app) for these substrates was 2.16 μM and 0.12 μM, respectively. The MCAD reductive and oxidative half reactions were monitored using the electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) fluorescence reduction assay. The catalytic efficiency and the Km for phenylbutyryl-CoA were 0.2 mM−1· sec−1 and 5.3 μM compared to 4.0 mM−1· sec−1 and 2.8 μM for octanoyl-CoA. Extracts of wild type and MCAD-deficient lymphoblast cells were tested for the ability to reduce ETF using phenylbutyryl-CoA as substrate. While ETF reduction activity was detected in extracts of wild type cells, it was undetectable in extracts of cells deficient in MCAD. The results are consistent with MCAD playing a key role in phenylbutyrate metabolism. PMID:23141465

  13. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gfroerer, Stefan; Rolle, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric intestinal motility disorders affect many children and thus not only impose a significant impact on pediatric health care in general but also on the quality of life of the affected patient. Furthermore, some of these conditions might also have implications for adulthood. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders frequently present as chronic constipation in toddler age children. Most of these conditions are functional, meaning that constipation does not have an organic etiology, but in 5% of the cases, an underlying, clearly organic disorder can be identified. Patients with organic causes for intestinal motility disorders usually present in early infancy or even right after birth. The most striking clinical feature of children with severe intestinal motility disorders is the delayed passage of meconium in the newborn period. This sign is highly indicative of the presence of Hirschsprung disease (HD), which is the most frequent congenital disorder of intestinal motility. HD is a rare but important congenital disease and the most significant entity of pediatric intestinal motility disorders. The etiology and pathogenesis of HD have been extensively studied over the last several decades. A defect in neural crest derived cell migration has been proven as an underlying cause of HD, leading to an aganglionic distal end of the gut. Numerous basic science and clinical research related studies have been conducted to better diagnose and treat HD. Resection of the aganglionic bowel remains the gold standard for treatment of HD. Most recent studies show, at least experimentally, the possibility of a stem cell based therapy for HD. This editorial also includes rare causes of pediatric intestinal motility disorders such as hypoganglionosis, dysganglionosis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and ganglioneuromatosis in multiple endocrine metaplasia. Underlying organic pathologies are rare in pediatric intestinal motility disorders but must be recognized as early as

  14. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Gfroerer, Stefan; Rolle, Udo

    2015-09-01

    Pediatric intestinal motility disorders affect many children and thus not only impose a significant impact on pediatric health care in general but also on the quality of life of the affected patient. Furthermore, some of these conditions might also have implications for adulthood. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders frequently present as chronic constipation in toddler age children. Most of these conditions are functional, meaning that constipation does not have an organic etiology, but in 5% of the cases, an underlying, clearly organic disorder can be identified. Patients with organic causes for intestinal motility disorders usually present in early infancy or even right after birth. The most striking clinical feature of children with severe intestinal motility disorders is the delayed passage of meconium in the newborn period. This sign is highly indicative of the presence of Hirschsprung disease (HD), which is the most frequent congenital disorder of intestinal motility. HD is a rare but important congenital disease and the most significant entity of pediatric intestinal motility disorders. The etiology and pathogenesis of HD have been extensively studied over the last several decades. A defect in neural crest derived cell migration has been proven as an underlying cause of HD, leading to an aganglionic distal end of the gut. Numerous basic science and clinical research related studies have been conducted to better diagnose and treat HD. Resection of the aganglionic bowel remains the gold standard for treatment of HD. Most recent studies show, at least experimentally, the possibility of a stem cell based therapy for HD. This editorial also includes rare causes of pediatric intestinal motility disorders such as hypoganglionosis, dysganglionosis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and ganglioneuromatosis in multiple endocrine metaplasia. Underlying organic pathologies are rare in pediatric intestinal motility disorders but must be recognized as early as

  15. Age-related increases in F344 rat intestine microsomal quercetin glucuronidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to establish the extent age modifies intestinal quercetin glucuronidation capacity. Pooled microsomal fractions of three equidistant small intestine (SI) segments from 4, 12, 18, and 28 mo male F344 rats (n=8/group) were employed to model the enzyme kinetics of UDP-gl...

  16. A multisubstrate assay for lipases/esterases: assessing acyl chain length selectivity by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Divakar, K; Gautam, Pennathur

    2014-03-01

    Lipases and esterases are hydrolytic enzymes and are known to hydrolyze esters with unique substrate specificity and acyl chain length selectivity. We have developed a simple competitive multiple substrate assay for determination of acyl chain length selectivity of lipases/esterases using RP-HPLC with UV detection. A method for separation and quantification of 4-nitrophenyl fatty acid esters (C4-C18) was developed and validated. The chain length selectivity of five lipases and two esterases was determined in a multisubstrate reaction system containing equimolar concentrations of 4-nitrophenyl esters (C4-C18). This assay is simple, reproducible, and a useful tool for determining chain length selectivity of lipases/esterases. PMID:24316114

  17. Effects of short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase on cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhenhua; Huang, Qiuju; Shu, Zhaohui; Liu, Peiqing; Chen, Shaorui; Pan, Xuediao; Zang, Linquan; Zhou, Sigui

    2016-07-01

    Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD), a key enzyme of fatty acid β-oxidation, plays an important role in cardiac hypertrophy. However, its effect on the cardiomyocyte apoptosis remains unknown. We aimed to determine the role of SCAD in tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP)-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. The mRNA and protein expression of SCAD were significantly down-regulated in the cardiomyocyte apoptosis model. Inhibition of SCAD with siRNA-1186 significantly decreased SCAD expression, enzyme activity and ATP content, but obviously increased the content of free fatty acids. Meanwhile, SCAD siRNA treatment triggered the same apoptosis as cardiomyocytes treated with tBHP, such as the increase in cell apoptotic rate, the activation of caspase3 and the decrease in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, which showed that SCAD may play an important role in primary cardiomyocyte apoptosis. The changes of phosphonate AMP-activated protein kinase α (p-AMPKα) and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) in cardiomyocyte apoptosis were consistent with that of SCAD. Furthermore, PPARα activator fenofibrate and AMPKα activator AICAR treatment significantly increased the expression of SCAD and inhibited cardiomyocyte apoptosis. In conclusion, for the first time our findings directly demonstrated that SCAD may be as a new target to prevent cardiomyocyte apoptosis through the AMPK/PPARα/SCAD signal pathways. PMID:26989860

  18. A Pathogenic Fungi Diphenyl Ether Phytotoxin Targets Plant Enoyl (Acyl Carrier Protein) Reductase[W

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Franck E.; Ferreira, Daneel; Wang, Yan-Hong; Khan, Ikhlas A.; McInroy, John A.; Pan, Zhiqiang

    2008-01-01

    Cyperin is a natural diphenyl ether phytotoxin produced by several fungal plant pathogens. At high concentrations, this metabolite inhibits protoporphyrinogen oxidase, a key enzyme in porphyrin synthesis. However, unlike its herbicide structural analogs, the mode of action of cyperin is not light dependent, causing loss of membrane integrity in the dark. We report that this natural diphenyl ether inhibits Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) enoyl (acyl carrier protein) reductase (ENR). This enzyme is also sensitive to triclosan, a synthetic antimicrobial diphenyl ether. Whereas cyperin was much less potent than triclosan on this target site, their ability to cause light-independent disruption of membrane integrity and inhibition of ENR is similar at their respective phytotoxic concentrations. The sequence of ENR is highly conserved within higher plants and a homology model of Arabidopsis ENR was derived from the crystal structure of the protein from Brassica napus. Cyperin mimicked the binding of triclosan in the binding pocket of ENR. Both molecules were stabilized by the π-π stacking interaction between one of their phenyl rings and the nicotinamide ring of the NAD+. Furthermore, the side chain of tyrosine is involved in hydrogen bonding with a phenolic hydroxy group of cyperin. Therefore, cyperin may contribute to the virulence of the pathogens by inhibiting ENR and destabilizing the membrane integrity of the cells surrounding the point of infection. PMID:18467464

  19. Hybrid Potential Simulation of the Acylation of Enterococcus faecium l,d-Transpeptidase by Carbapenems.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Nicholus; Field, Martin J; Simorre, Jean-Pierre; Arthur, Michel; Bougault, Catherine M

    2016-06-01

    The l,d-transpeptidases, Ldts, catalyze peptidoglycan cross-linking in β-lactam-resistant mutant strains of several bacteria, including Enterococcus faecium and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although unrelated to the essential d,d-transpeptidases, which are inactivated by the β-lactam antibiotics, they are nevertheless inhibited by the carbapenem antibiotics, making them potentially useful targets in the treatment of some important diseases. In this work, we have investigated the acylation mechanism of the Ldt from E. faecium by the carbapenem, ertapenem, using computational techniques. We have employed molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with QC/MM hybrid potential calculations to map out possible reaction paths. We have focused on determining the following: (i) the protonation state of the nucleophilic cysteine of the enzyme when it attacks; (ii) whether nucleophilic attack and β-lactam ring-opening are concerted or stepwise, the latter occurring via an oxyanion intermediate; and (iii) the identities of the proton acceptors at the beginning and end of the reaction. Overall, we note that there is considerable plasticity in the mechanisms, owing to the significant flexibility of the enzyme, but find that the preferred pathways are ones in which nucleophilic attack of cysteine thiolate is concerted with β-lactam ring-opening. PMID:27196382

  20. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition by N-acyl-pro-pyrrolidine-type molecules.

    PubMed

    Kánai, Károly; Arányi, Péter; Böcskei, Zsolt; Ferenczy, György; Harmat, Veronika; Simon, Kálmán; Bátori, Sándor; Náray-Szabo, Gábor; Hermecz, István

    2008-12-11

    Three novel, N-acyl-pro-pyrrolidine-type, inhibitors of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) with nanomolar activities were synthesized and their binding analyzed to the host enzyme in the light of X-ray diffraction and molecular modeling studies. We were interested in the alteration in the binding affinity at the S3 site as a function of the properties of the N-terminal group of the inhibitors. Our studies revealed that, for inhibitors with flat aromatic terminal groups, the optimal length of the linker chain is three C-C bonds, but this increases to four C-C bonds if there is a bulky group in the terminal position. Molecular dynamics calculations indicate that this is due to the better fit into the binding pocket. A 4-fold enhancement of the inhibitor activity upon replacement of the 4-CH2 group of the proline ring by CF2 is a consequence of a weak hydrogen bond formed between the fluorine atom and the hydroxy group of Tyr473 of the host enzyme. There is notably good agreement between the calculated and experimental free energies of binding; the average error in the IC50 values is around 1 order of magnitude. PMID:19006380

  1. The effects of down-regulating expression of Arabidopsis thaliana membrane-associated acyl-CoA binding protein 2 on acyl-lipid composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple classes of acyl-CoA binding proteins are encoded by plant genomes, including a plant-unique class of predicted integral membrane-proteins. Transcript analysis revealed that both of the integral membrane-acyl-CoA binding proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana, ACBP1 and ACBP2, are expressed in al...

  2. 40 CFR 180.1207 - N-acyl sarcosines and sodium N-acyl sarcosinates; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false N-acyl sarcosines and sodium N-acyl sarcosinates; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1207 Section 180.1207 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD...

  3. New acylated anthocyanins from purple yam and their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Chiemi; Hosoya, Takahiro; Agawa, Sayuri; Sugiyama, Yasumasa; Kozone, Ikuko; Shin-Ya, Kazuo; Terahara, Norihiko; Kumazawa, Shigenori

    2015-01-01

    Purple yam (Dioscorea alata L.), which is widely distributed in tropical and subtropical regions, is characterized by its color and viscosity. Previous studies have shown that purple yams contain a variety of acylated anthocyanins that exhibit higher levels of antioxidant activity than the corresponding nonacylated compounds. In this study, the pigments found in purple yams from the Philippines (D. alata) were isolated and evaluated in terms of antioxidant activity. Four new acylated anthocyanins, alanins (1-4) were isolated from the MeOH extracts of purple yam, which were subsequently determined to be cyanidin (1, 2, and 4) and peonidin (3) type compounds, along with four known anthocyanins (5-8). The structures of 1-4 were determined by spectroscopic methods, including NMR and MS analyses. The antioxidant activities of anthocyanins 1-8 were investigated using oxygen radical absorbing capacity and ferric reducing antioxidant power assays. PMID:25848974

  4. Site-Selective Acylations with Tailor-Made Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Huber, Florian; Kirsch, Stefan F

    2016-04-18

    The acylation of alcohols catalyzed by N,N-dimethylamino pyridine (DMAP) is, despite its widespread use, sometimes confronted with substrate-specific problems: For example, target compounds with multiple hydroxy groups may show insufficient selectivity for one hydroxyl, and the resulting product mixtures are hardly separable. Here we describe a concept that aims at tailor-made catalysts for the site-specific acylation. To this end, we introduce a catalyst library where each entry is constructed by connecting a variable and readily tuned peptide scaffold with a catalytically active unit based on DMAP. For selected examples, we demonstrate how library screening leads to the identification of optimized catalysts, and the substrates of interest can be converted with a markedly enhanced site-selectivity compared with only DMAP. Furthermore, substrate-optimized catalysts of this type can be used to selectively convert "their" substrate in the presence of structurally similar compounds, an important requisite for reactions with mixtures of substances. PMID:26970553

  5. Mutations in p53 change phosphatidylinositol acyl chain composition

    PubMed Central

    Naguib, Adam; Bencze, Gyula; Engle, Dannielle; Chio, Iok I. C.; Herzka, Tali; Watrud, Kaitlin; Bencze, Szilvia; Tuveson, David A.; Pappin, Darryl J; Trotman, Lloyd C.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) second messengers relay extracellular growth cues through the phosphorylation status of the inositol sugar, a signal transduction system that is deregulated in cancer. In stark contrast to PIP inositol head group phosphorylation, changes in phosphatidylinositol (PI) lipid acyl chains in cancer have remained ill-defined. Here, we apply a mass spectrometry-based method capable of unbiased high-throughput identification and quantification of cellular PI acyl chain composition. Using this approach we find that PI lipid chains represent a cell-specific fingerprint and are unperturbed by serum-mediated signaling in contrast to the inositol head group. We find that mutation of Trp53 results in PIs containing reduced-length fatty acid moieties. Our results suggest that the anchoring tails of lipid second messengers form an additional layer of PIP signaling in cancer that operates independently of PTEN/PI3-Kinase activity, but is instead linked somehow to p53. PMID:25543136

  6. A novel fatty Acyl-CoA Synthetase is required for pollen development and sporopollenin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    de Azevedo Souza, Clarice; Kim, Sung Soo; Koch, Stefanie; Kienow, Lucie; Schneider, Katja; McKim, Sarah M; Haughn, George W; Kombrink, Erich; Douglas, Carl J

    2009-02-01

    Acyl-CoA Synthetase (ACOS) genes are related to 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL) but have distinct functions. The Arabidopsis thaliana ACOS5 protein is in clade A of Arabidopsis ACOS proteins, the clade most closely related to 4CL proteins. This clade contains putative nonperoxisomal ACOS enzymes conserved in several angiosperm lineages and in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Although its function is unknown, ACOS5 is preferentially expressed in the flowers of all angiosperms examined. Here, we show that an acos5 mutant produced no pollen in mature anthers and no seeds by self-fertilization and was severely compromised in pollen wall formation apparently lacking sporopollenin or exine. The phenotype was first evident at stage 8 of anther development and correlated with maximum ACOS5 mRNA accumulation in tapetal cells at stages 7 to 8. Green fluorescent protein-ACOS5 fusions showed that ACOS5 is located in the cytoplasm. Recombinant ACOS5 enzyme was active against oleic acid, allowing kinetic constants for ACOS5 substrates to be established. Substrate competition assays indicated broad in vitro preference of the enzyme for medium-chain fatty acids. We propose that ACOS5 encodes an enzyme that participates in a conserved and ancient biochemical pathway required for sporopollenin monomer biosynthesis that may also include the Arabidopsis CYP703A2 and MS2 enzymes. PMID:19218397

  7. Characterization of oryza sativa acyl activating enzyme3 (OsAAE3)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxalate, the smallest of the dicarboxylic acids, is produced in many plants. This acid has been shown to play an important role in both plant physiology and defense, specifically in regards to metal detoxification, calcium regulation, sucking and chewing insect deterrence, and the production of calc...

  8. Acyl Chain Length of Phosphatidylserine Is Correlated with Plant Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xuejun; Li, Weiqi

    2014-01-01

    Plant lifespan is affected by factors with genetic and environmental bases. The laws governing these two factors and how they affect plant lifespan are unclear. Here we show that the acyl chain length (ACL) of phosphatidylserine (PS) is correlated with plant lifespan. Among the detected eight head-group classes of membrane lipids with lipidomics based on triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry, the ACL of PS showed high diversity, in contrast to the ACLs of the other seven classes, which were highly conserved over all stages of development in all plant species and organs and under all conditions that we studied. Further investigation found that acyl chains of PS lengthened during development, senescence, and under environmental stresses and that increasing length was accelerated by promoted- senescence. The acyl chains of PS were limited to a certain carbon number and ceased to increase in length when plants were close to death. These findings suggest that the ACL of PS can count plant lifespan and could be a molecular scale ruler for measuring plant development and senescence. PMID:25058060

  9. Gastrointestinal uptake of nasunin, acylated anthocyanin in eggplant.

    PubMed

    Ichiyanagi, Takashi; Terahara, Norihiko; Rahman, M Mamunur; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2006-07-26

    We previously showed that nasunin, acylated anthocyanins in eggplant peel, comprises two isomers, cis-nasunin and trans-nasunin. In this study, gastrointestinal absorption of cis- and trans-nasunins was studied in rats. Orally administered nasunins were quickly absorbed in their original acylated forms and maximally appeared in blood plasma after 15 min. When the maximum plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration curve were normalized by orally administered dose (micromoles per kilogram), there was no significant difference in the uptake efficiency between two isomers and both exhibited a plasma level almost identical to that of delphinidin 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside. However, metabolites such as 4'-O-methyl analogues and extended glucuronides which were observed for delphinidin 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside and cyanidin 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside metabolisms were not detected in urine or blood plasma. Moreover, deacylated and glycolytic products of nasunins such as delphinidin 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside or delphinidin (aglycone) were also not detected in blood plasma even after oral administration for 8 h. These results indicated that nasunins were absorbed in their original acylated forms and exhibit a bioavailability almost identical to that of nonacylated anthocyanins. PMID:16848510

  10. Naphthalene Derivatives Induce Acyl Chain Interdigitation in Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Md Arif; Raghunathan, V A

    2016-01-14

    The interdigitated phase of the lipid bilayer results when acyl chains from opposing monolayers fully interpenetrate such that the terminal methyl groups of the respective lipid chains are located at the interfacial region on the opposite sides of the bilayer. Usually, chain interdigitation is not encountered in a symmetric chain phosphatidylcholine (PC) membrane but can be induced under certain special conditions. In this article, we elucidate the contribution of small amphiphatic molecules in altering the physical properties of a symmetric chain PC bilayer membrane, which results in acyl chain interdigitation. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we have carried out a systematic investigation of the physical interactions of three naphthalene derivatives containing hydroxyl groups: β-naphthol, 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene, and 2,7-dihydroxynaphthalene, with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers. On the basis of the diffraction patterns, we have determined the temperature-composition phase diagrams of these binary mixtures. The present study not only enables us to gain insight into the role played by small molecules in altering the packing arrangement of the acyl chains of the constituting PC lipids of the bilayer but also brings to light some important features that have not yet been reported hitherto. One such feature is the stabilization of the enigmatic asymmetric ripple phase over a wide temperature and concentration range. The results presented here strongly point toward a clear correlation between chain interdigitation and the stability of the ripple phase. PMID:26687052

  11. Acylation of 1,3-butadiene with acetylfluorosulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrishova, T.N.; Shastin, A.V.; Balenkova, E.S.; Novikov, N.A.

    1987-11-20

    1-Acetylbutadiene (I) is widely used in diene syntheses, and is also a valuable starting material for the preparation of otherwise difficulty accessible 1-substituted butadienes, which are then used in the synthesis of natural products. At the present time, however, there is no convenient one-step method for the preparation of acetylbutadiene (I). Acylation of butadiene (II) in the presence of Lewis acids is accompanied by extensive polymerization, and the maximum yield of acylated product in these reactions is only 10%. The authors have now successfully carried out the acylation of butadiene (II) with acetyfluorosulfonate. Workup of the reaction mixture with triethylamine gave acetylbutadiene (I) in 33% yield. The E-configuration of compound (I) was established based on the values of the spin-spin coupling constants for interaction of the olefinic protons, /sup 3/J(H/sup a/-H/sup b/) 15.4 Hz, which was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The presence of a characteristic absorption band at 965 cm/sup -1/ in the IR spectrum also confirms the E-configuration of compound (I).

  12. Serum lipids and acyl group composition of alcoholic patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, G Y; Rush, A; Chin, P C; Gorka, C; Lahiri, S; Wood, W G

    1988-01-01

    The lipid content and acyl group composition of serum from a group of alcoholic patients at a VA Medical Center were compared to control subjects sampled either from University of Missouri personnel or from subjects who were undergoing a preemployment physical examination at the same VA Medical Center. Plasma of alcoholic patients indicated an elevated triacylglycerol level (24-35%) as compared to both control groups. In addition, the acyl groups of triacylglycerols of alcoholic patients showed a markedly lower proportion of 18:2 and a higher proportion of 18:0 and 18:1 as compared to the control groups. The level of phosphatidylcholines in the plasma of alcoholic patients was not different from controls. However, acyl group composition of phosphatidylcholines from alcoholics indicated a lower proportion of 22:6 (n-3) as compared to controls. Although the cholesteryl ester level in serum was higher in alcoholics than in controls, the difference did not reach a level of significance. There was a similar decrease in 18:2 and an increase in 18:0 in cholesteryl esters of alcoholics as compared to controls. Results indicate that alcoholics in the United States show a similar change in certain serum lipids as reported for the Swedish alcoholics. This study also shows the complexities involved in selecting appropriate control groups to be compared with alcoholic patients. PMID:3395462

  13. Food Enzymes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBroom, Rachel; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.

    2007-01-01

    Many students view biology and chemistry as two unrelated, separate sciences; how these courses are generally taught in high schools may do little to change that impression. The study of enzymes provide a great opportunity for both biology and chemistry teachers to share with students the interdisciplinary nature of science. This article describes…

  14. Zinc Enzymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertini, I.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the role of zinc in various enzymes concerned with hydration, hydrolysis, and redox reactions. The binding of zinc to protein residues, properties of noncatalytic zinc(II) and catalytic zinc, and the reactions catalyzed by zinc are among the topics considered. (JN)

  15. Human and mouse tissue-engineered small intestine both demonstrate digestive and absorptive function.

    PubMed

    Grant, Christa N; Mojica, Salvador Garcia; Sala, Frederic G; Hill, J Ryan; Levin, Daniel E; Speer, Allison L; Barthel, Erik R; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Zachos, Nicholas C; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2015-04-15

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a devastating condition in which insufficient small intestinal surface area results in malnutrition and dependence on intravenous parenteral nutrition. There is an increasing incidence of SBS, particularly in premature babies and newborns with congenital intestinal anomalies. Tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) offers a therapeutic alternative to the current standard treatment, intestinal transplantation, and has the potential to solve its biggest challenges, namely donor shortage and life-long immunosuppression. We have previously demonstrated that TESI can be generated from mouse and human small intestine and histologically replicates key components of native intestine. We hypothesized that TESI also recapitulates native small intestine function. Organoid units were generated from mouse or human donor intestine and implanted into genetically identical or immunodeficient host mice. After 4 wk, TESI was harvested and either fixed and paraffin embedded or immediately subjected to assays to illustrate function. We demonstrated that both mouse and human tissue-engineered small intestine grew into an appropriately polarized sphere of intact epithelium facing a lumen, contiguous with supporting mesenchyme, muscle, and stem/progenitor cells. The epithelium demonstrated major ultrastructural components, including tight junctions and microvilli, transporters, and functional brush-border and digestive enzymes. This study demonstrates that tissue-engineered small intestine possesses a well-differentiated epithelium with intact ion transporters/channels, functional brush-border enzymes, and similar ultrastructural components to native tissue, including progenitor cells, whether derived from mouse or human cells. PMID:25573173

  16. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome). Special diets often do not work. However, vitamin B12 and other vitamin supplements should be used for ... JM, Blackshaw LA. Small intestinal motor and sensory function and dysfunction. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt ...

  17. Intestinal obstruction repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... organs in the body Formation of scar tissue ( adhesions ) Heart attack or stroke Infection, including the lungs, ... Saunders; 2010:chap 119. Read More Abdomen - swollen Adhesion Colostomy Cyst Intestinal obstruction Intussusception - children Large bowel ...

  18. Intestinal mucosal adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Drozdowski, Laurie; Thomson, Alan BR

    2006-01-01

    Intestinal failure is a condition characterized by malnutrition and/or dehydration as a result of the inadequate digestion and absorption of nutrients. The most common cause of intestinal failure is short bowel syndrome, which occurs when the functional gut mass is reduced below the level necessary for adequate nutrient and water absorption. This condition may be congenital, or may be acquired as a result of a massive resection of the small bowel. Following resection, the intestine is capable of adaptation in response to enteral nutrients as well as other trophic stimuli. Identifying factors that may enhance the process of intestinal adaptation is an exciting area of research with important potential clinical applications. PMID:16937429

  19. Clinical studies of intestinal folate conjugases.

    PubMed

    Halsted, C H; Beer, W H; Chandler, C J; Ross, K; Wolfe, B M; Bailey, L; Cerda, J J

    1986-03-01

    Clinical differences between the two human intestinal mucosal folate conjugases were assessed by measurement of their activities in normal individuals and in patients with chronic diarrhea of differing causes. Intracellular folate conjugase (ICFC) was 15-fold more active than brush border folate conjugase (BBFC) in jejunal mucosa from seven obese patients undergoing elective gastric bypass surgery. The activity of ICFC was similar among normal volunteers and patients with diarrhea of unknown origin (DUO), gluten-sensitive enteropathy (GSE), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and the short bowel syndrome (IBD-SBS). By contrast, BBFC, sucrase, and lactase were decreased significantly in GSE, and BBFC was increased in IBD-SBS. The activity of BBFC correlated with lactase and with sucrase in the normal subjects and in patients with DUO, whereas no correlations were found with the activity of ICFC in any group. Our clinical studies confirm that ICFC and BBFC are different enzymes. ICFC is not affected by intestinal disease, whereas the activity of jejunal BBFC, like that of other brush border enzymes, is decreased by mucosal injury and is also capable of adapting to distal small intestinal disease or surgical resection. PMID:3081671

  20. Claudins in intestines

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhe; Ding, Lei; Lu, Qun; Chen, Yan-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Intestines are organs that not only digest food and absorb nutrients, but also provide a defense barrier against pathogens and noxious agents ingested. Tight junctions (TJs) are the most apical component of the junctional complex, providing one form of cell-cell adhesion in enterocytes and playing a critical role in regulating paracellular barrier permeability. Alteration of TJs leads to a number of pathophysiological diseases causing malabsorption of nutrition and intestinal structure disruption, which may even contribute to systemic organ failure. Claudins are the major structural and functional components of TJs with at least 24 members in mammals. Claudins have distinct charge-selectivity, either by tightening the paracellular pathway or functioning as paracellular channels, regulating ions and small molecules passing through the paracellular pathway. In this review, we have discussed the functions of claudin family members, their distribution and localization in the intestinal tract of mammals, their alterations in intestine-related diseases and chemicals/agents that regulate the expression and localization of claudins as well as the intestinal permeability, which provide a therapeutic view for treating intestinal diseases. PMID:24478939

  1. Plant Microsomal Phospholipid Acyl Hydrolases Have Selectivities for Uncommon Fatty Acids.

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, U.; Banas, A.; Stymne, S.

    1995-01-01

    Developing endosperms and embryos accumulating triacylglycerols rich in caproyl (decanoyl) groups (i.e. developing embryos of Cuphea procumbens and Ulmus glabra) had microsomal acyl hydrolases with high selectivities toward phosphatidylcholine with this acyl group. Similarly, membranes from Euphorbia lagascae and Ricinus communis endosperms, which accumulate triacylglycerols with vernoleate (12-epoxy-octadeca-9-enoate) and ricinoleate (12-hydroxy-octadeca-9-enoate), respectively, had acyl hydrolases that selectively removed their respective oxygenated acyl group from the phospholipids. The activities toward phospholipid substrates with epoxy, hydroxy, and medium-chain acyl groups varied greatly between microsomal preparations from different plant species. Epoxidated and hydroxylated acyl groups in sn-1 and sn-2 positions of phosphatidylcholine and in sn-1-lysophosphatidylcholine were hydrolyzed to a similar extent, whereas the hydrolysis of caproyl groups was highly dependent on the positional localization. PMID:12228415

  2. Characterization of new glycolipid biosurfactants, tri-acylated mannosylerythritol lipids, produced by Pseudozyma yeasts.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Tokuma; Morita, Tomotake; Konishi, Masaaki; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2007-07-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are glycolipid biosurfactants produced by Pseudozyma yeasts. They show not only the excellent interfacial properties but also versatile biochemical actions. In the course of MEL production from soybean oil by P. antarctica and P. rugulosa, some new extracellular glycolipids (more hydrophobic than the previously reported di-acylated MELs) were found in the culture medium. The most hydrophobic one was identified as 1-O-alka(e)noyl-4-O-[(4',6'-di-O-acetyl-2',3'-di-O-alka(e)noyl)-beta-D-mannopyranosyl]-D-erythritol, namely tri-acylated MEL. Others were tri-acylated MELs bearing only one acetyl group. The tri-acylated MEL could be prepared by the lipase-catalyzed esterification of a di-acylated MEL with oleic acid implying that the new glycolipids are synthesized from di-acylated MELs in the culture medium containing the residual fatty acids. PMID:17417694

  3. Pro-oxidant environment of the colon compared to the small intestine may contribute to greater cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Lisa M; Henderson, Cara E; Hong, Mee Young; Barhoumi, Rola; Burghardt, Robert C; Carroll, Raymond J; Turner, Nancy D; Chapkin, Robert S; Lupton, Joanne R

    2004-05-28

    The colon and small intestine have inherent differences (e.g. redox status) that may explain the variation in cancer occurrence at these two sites. This study examined basal and induced (oxidative challenge) reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, antioxidant enzyme activity and oxidative DNA damage. Basal ROS and antioxidant enzyme activities in the colon were greater than in the small intestine. During oxidative stress, 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) DNA adducts in the colon exceeded levels in the small intestine concomitant with increased ROS. Thus the colon responds to oxidative stress less effectively than the small intestine, possibly contributing to increased cancer incidence at this site. PMID:15142673

  4. Glucitol-specific enzymes of the phosphotransferase system in Escherichia coli. Nucleotide sequence of the gut operon.

    PubMed

    Yamada, M; Saier, M H

    1987-04-25

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the glucitol (gut) operon in Escherichia coli has been determined. The glucitol-specific Enzyme II and Enzyme III of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system as well as glucitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase which are encoded by the gutA, gutB, and gutD genes of the gut operon, respectively, are predicted to consist of 506 (Mr = 54,018), 123 (Mr = 13,306), and 259 (Mr = 27,866) amino acyl residues, respectively. The hydropathic profile of the Enzyme IIgut revealed 7 or 8 long hydrophobic segments which may traverse the cell membrane as alpha-helices as well as 2 or 4 short strongly hydrophobic stretches which may traverse the membrane as beta-structure. The number of amino acyl residues in the sum of the molecular weights of the glucitol Enzyme II-III pair are nearly the same as those of the mannitol Enzyme II. The ratio of hydrophobic to hydrophilic amino acyl residues and the numbers of the hydrophobic segments are also nearly the same for both transport systems. However, no significant homology was found in the nucleotide or amino acyl sequences of the two systems. Glucitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was found to exhibit sequence homology with ribitol dehydrogenase. A repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence was found in the 3'-flanking region of the gutD gene, suggesting the presence of a gene downstream from the gutD gene. PMID:3553176

  5. Tight binding inhibitors of N-acyl amino sugar and N-acyl amino acid deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chengfu; Hall, Richard; Cummings, Jennifer; Raushel, Frank M

    2006-04-01

    Very potent inhibitors were synthesized for the enzymatic deacetylation of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-6-phosphate (NagA) and N-acetyl-d-glutamate (DGD). The methyl phosphonamidate derivative of d-glucosamine-6-phosphate bound to N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-6-phosphate deacetylase with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 34 +/- 5 nM at pH 7.5 and an association rate constant of 6.1 x 103 M-1 s-1. The inhibition constant is 4000-fold lower than the Michaelis constant for the substrate N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-6-phosphate. N-Acetyl-d-glutamate deacetylase was inhibited by the methyl phosphonamidate derivative of d-glutamate with an inhibition constant of 460 +/- 70 pM at pH 7.6. The inhibitor bound to the enzyme 500 000-fold tighter than the Michaelis constant for N-formyl-d-glutamate. These compounds mimic the putative tetrahedral intermediate formed upon nucleophilic attack of an activated water molecule on the amide bond of the target substrate. These inhibitors should prove useful in the elucidation of the enzyme-substrate interactions for enzymes within the amidohydrolase superfamily. PMID:16568996

  6. [Intestinal obstruction during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Stukan, Maciej; Kruszewski Wiesław, Janusz; Dudziak, Mirosław; Kopiejć, Arkadiusz; Preis, Krzysztof

    2013-02-01

    This is a review of literature concerning intestinal obstruction in pregnant women. Approximately 50-90% and 30% of pregnant women, respectively suffer from nausea and vomiting, mostly during the first trimester. There is also increased risk of constipation. During the perioperative period, the administration of tocolytics should be considered only in women showing symptoms of a threatening premature delivery. Intensive hydration should be ordered to sustain uterine blood flow. The incidence of intestinal obstruction during pregnancy is estimated at 1:1500-1:66431 pregnancies and is diagnosed in II and III trimester in most cases. However, it can also occur in the I trimester (6%) or puerperium. Symptoms of intestinal obstruction in pregnancy include: abdominal pains (98%), vomiting (82%), constipation (30%). Abdominal tenderness on palpation is found in 71% and abnormal peristalsis in 55% of cases. The most common imaging examination in the diagnosis of intestinal obstruction is the abdominal X-ray. However ionizing radiation may have a harmful effect on the fetus, especially during the first trimester. X-ray is positive for intestinal obstruction in 82% of pregnant women. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging are considered safe and applicable during pregnancy. Intestinal obstruction in pregnant women is mostly caused by: adhesions (54.6%), intestinal torsion (25%), colorectal carcinoma (3.7%), hernia (1.4%), appendicitis (0.5%) and others (10%). Adhesive obstruction occurs more frequently in advanced pregnancy (6% - I trimester 28% - II trimester; 45% - III trimester 21% - puerperium). Treatment should begin with conservative procedures. Surgical treatment may be necessary in cases where the pain turns from recurrent into continuous, with tachycardia, pyrexia and a positive Blumberg sign. If symptoms of fetal anoxia are observed, a C-section should be carried out before surgical intervention. The extent of surgical intervention depends on the

  7. The intestine is a blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Patricia; Lamarca, Morgan; Kravets, Victoria; Hu, David

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, digestive disease affects 60 to 70 million people and costs over 140 billion annually. Despite the significance of the gastrointestinal tract to human health, the physics of digestion remains poorly understood. In this study, we ask a simple question: what sets the frequency of intestinal contractions? We measure the frequency of intestinal contractions in rats, as a function of distance down the intestine. We find that intestines Contract radially ten times faster than longitudinally. This motion promotes mixing and, in turn, absorption of food products by the intestinal wall. We calculate viscous dissipation in the intestinal fluid to rationalize the relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and the viscosity of the intestinal contents. Our findings may help to understand the evolution of the intestine as an ideal mixer.

  8. The intestine is a blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Patricia; Lamarca, Morgan; Hu, David

    2015-11-01

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, digestive disease affects 60 to 70 million people and costs over 140 billion annually. Despite the significance of the gastrointestinal tract to human health, the physics of digestion remains poorly understood. In this study, we ask a simple question: what sets the frequency of intestinal contractions? We measure the frequency of intestinal contractions in rats, as a function of distance down the intestine. We find that intestines contract radially ten times faster than longitudinally. This motion promotes mixing and, in turn, absorption of food products by the intestinal wall. We calculate viscous dissipation in the intestinal fluid to rationalize the relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and the viscosity of the intestinal contents. Our findings may help to understand the evolution of the intestine as an ideal mixer.

  9. Construction of efficient and effective transformation vectors for palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase gene silencing in oil palm

    PubMed Central

    Bhore, Subhash Janardhan; Shah, Farida Habib

    2011-01-01

    Palm oil obtained from E. guineensis Jacq. Tenera is known to have about 44% of palmitic acid (C16:0). Palmitoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Thioesterase (PATE) is one of the key enzymes involved in plastidial fatty acid biosynthesis; and it determines the level of the C16:0 assimilation in oilseeds. This enzyme's activity in oil palm is responsible for high (> 44 % in E. guineensis Jacq. Tenera and 25 % in E. oleifera) content of C16:0 in its oil. By post-transcriptional PATE gene silencing, C16:0 content can be minimized for nutritional value improvement of the palm oil. The objective of this study was the construction of novel transformation vectors for PATE gene silencing. Six different transformation vectors targeted against PATE gene were constructed using 619 bp long PATE gene (5' region) fragment (from GenBank AF507115). In one set of three transformation vectors, PATE gene fragment was fused with CaMV 35S promoter in antisense, intron-spliced inverted repeat (ISIR), and inverted repeat (IR) orientations to generate antisense mRNA and hair-pin RNAs (hpRNA). In another set of three transformation vectors with same design, CaMV 35S was replaced with Oil palm mesocarp tissue-specific promoter (MSP). The expression cassette of antisense, ISIR, and IR of PATE gene fragments were constructed in primary cloning vector, pHANNIBAL or its derivative/s. Finally, all 6 expression cassettes were sub-cloned into pCAMBIA 1301 which contains the Hygromycinr and the GUS reporter genes for transformant selection and transformation detection respectively. The results of the RE analyses of the constructs and sequence analyses of PATE and MSP shows and confirms the orientation, size and locations of all the components from constructs. We hypothesize that 4 (pISIRPATE-PC, pIRPATE-PC, pMISIRPATE-PC and pMIRPATE-PC) out of 6 transformation vectors constructed in this study will be efficient and effective in palmitoyl-ACP thioesterase gene silencing in oil palm. Abbreviations anti

  10. Kinetic characterization of the inhibition of acyl coenzyme A: steroid acyltransferases by tributyltin in the eastern mud snail (Ilyanassa obsoleta).

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Robin M; LeBlanc, Gerald A

    2006-06-30

    Exposure to tributyltin (TBT) has been causally associated with the global occurrence of a pseudohermaphroditic condition called