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Sample records for intracellular chloride level

  1. Chloride Channels of Intracellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, John C.; Kahl, Christina R.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins implicated as intracellular chloride channels include the intracellular ClC proteins, the bestrophins, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the CLICs, and the recently described Golgi pH regulator. This paper examines current hypotheses regarding roles of intracellular chloride channels and reviews the evidence supporting a role in intracellular chloride transport for each of these proteins. PMID:20100480

  2. Endocannabinoid signaling enhances visual responses through modulation of intracellular chloride levels in retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Miraucourt, Loïs S; Tsui, Jennifer; Gobert, Delphine; Desjardins, Jean-François; Schohl, Anne; Sild, Mari; Spratt, Perry; Castonguay, Annie; De Koninck, Yves; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas; Wiseman, Paul W; Ruthazer, Edward S

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) are widely expressed in the vertebrate retina, but the role of endocannabinoids in vision is not fully understood. Here, we identified a novel mechanism underlying a CB1R-mediated increase in retinal ganglion cell (RGC) intrinsic excitability acting through AMPK-dependent inhibition of NKCC1 activity. Clomeleon imaging and patch clamp recordings revealed that inhibition of NKCC1 downstream of CB1R activation reduces intracellular Cl− levels in RGCs, hyperpolarizing the resting membrane potential. We confirmed that such hyperpolarization enhances RGC action potential firing in response to subsequent depolarization, consistent with the increased intrinsic excitability of RGCs observed with CB1R activation. Using a dot avoidance assay in freely swimming Xenopus tadpoles, we demonstrate that CB1R activation markedly improves visual contrast sensitivity under low-light conditions. These results highlight a role for endocannabinoids in vision and present a novel mechanism for cannabinoid modulation of neuronal activity through Cl− regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15932.001 PMID:27501334

  3. Acute effects of mercuric chloride on intracellular GSH levels and mercury distribution in the fish Oreochromic aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.; Min, S.Y.; Keong, W.M.

    1988-02-01

    In recent years there has been much interest in the effects of trace metals on intracellular levels of reduced glutathione (GSH). Most of the research has been performed on rats. As GSH is ubiquitous in living organisms it is of interest to establish a relationship between mercury intoxication and intracellular GSH levels in fish; especially as fish living in rivers and coastal areas are often expose to mercury as an aquatic pollutant. The role of GSH in fish trace metal toxicity has not been thoroughly investigated. The distribution of total glutathione (oxidized + reduced) in selected black sea bass organs seems to follow the established pattern for mammalian organs. Thus, it would appear that teleostian and mammalian glutathione metabolism may have many similarities. There are few reports concerning the effects of mercury during the first few hours of exposure. The aim of this investigation is to establish any changes in organ GSH and mercury levels following just 2 h exposure to mercuric chloride (HgCl/sub 2/).

  4. Twenty years of fluorescence imaging of intracellular chloride

    PubMed Central

    Arosio, Daniele; Ratto, Gian Michele

    2014-01-01

    Chloride homeostasis has a pivotal role in controlling neuronal excitability in the adult brain and during development. The intracellular concentration of chloride is regulated by the dynamic equilibrium between passive fluxes through membrane conductances and the active transport mediated by importers and exporters. In cortical neurons, chloride fluxes are coupled to network activity by the opening of the ionotropic GABAA receptors that provides a direct link between the activity of interneurons and chloride fluxes. These molecular mechanisms are not evenly distributed and regulated over the neuron surface and this fact can lead to a compartmentalized control of the intracellular concentration of chloride. The inhibitory drive provided by the activity of the GABAA receptors depends on the direction and strength of the associated currents, which are ultimately dictated by the gradient of chloride, the main charge carrier flowing through the GABAA channel. Thus, the intracellular distribution of chloride determines the local strength of ionotropic inhibition and influences the interaction between converging excitation and inhibition. The importance of chloride regulation is also underlined by its involvement in several brain pathologies, including epilepsy and disorders of the autistic spectra. The full comprehension of the physiological meaning of GABAergic activity on neurons requires the measurement of the spatiotemporal dynamics of chloride fluxes across the membrane. Nowadays, there are several available tools for the task, and both synthetic and genetically encoded indicators have been successfully used for chloride imaging. Here, we will review the available sensors analyzing their properties and outlining desirable future developments. PMID:25221475

  5. Synchronous Bioimaging of Intracellular pH and Chloride Based on LSS Fluorescent Protein.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Jose M; Idilli, Aurora I; Mariotti, Letizia; Losi, Gabriele; Arslanbaeva, Lyaysan R; Sato, Sebastian Sulis; Artoni, Pietro; Szczurkowska, Joanna; Cancedda, Laura; Ratto, Gian Michele; Carmignoto, Giorgio; Arosio, Daniele

    2016-06-17

    Ion homeostasis regulates critical physiological processes in the living cell. Intracellular chloride concentration not only contributes in setting the membrane potential of quiescent cells but it also plays a role in modulating the dynamic voltage changes during network activity. Dynamic chloride imaging demands new tools, allowing faster acquisition rates and correct accounting of concomitant pH changes. Joining a long-Stokes-shift red-fluorescent protein to a GFP variant with high sensitivity to pH and chloride, we obtained LSSmClopHensor, a genetically encoded fluorescent biosensor optimized for the simultaneous chloride and pH imaging and requiring only two excitation wavelengths (458 and 488 nm). LSSmClopHensor allowed us to monitor the dynamic changes of intracellular pH and chloride concentration during seizure like discharges in neocortical brain slices. Only cells with tightly controlled resting potential revealed a narrow distribution of chloride concentration peaking at about 5 and 8 mM, in neocortical neurons and SK-N-SH cells, respectively. We thus showed that LSSmClopHensor represents a new versatile tool for studying the dynamics of chloride and proton concentration in living systems. PMID:27031242

  6. Flickery block of single CFTR chloride channels by intracellular anions and osmolytes.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, P; Hanrahan, J W

    1996-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a phosphorylation- and nucleotide-dependent chloride channel. Single CFTR currents recorded on cell show slight outward rectification, which has previously been suggested to be due to an asymmetrical chloride ion gradient or to a specific interaction between permeant intracellular anions and the channel. Using a single-channel recording from Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing CFTR, we have found that both the sparingly permeant anion glutamate and the impermeant anion gluconate cause a rapid, voltage-dependent block of CFTR channels when applied to the intracellular, but not the extracellular, face of excised patches. Both the affinity and the voltage dependence of block were affected by the extracellular chloride concentration in a manner consistent with chloride ions being able to repel these blocking ions from the pore. These results are discussed in terms of previous models of CFTR current outward rectification, and it is suggested that this rectification may result from a combination of asymmetrical chloride concentrations and voltage-dependent block of the channel by large cytoplasmic anions. In addition, we find that CFTR conductance is decreased by high concentrations of intracellular sucrose, sorbitol, and urea in a manner consistent with a rapid block of the channel by these molecules. PMID:8770004

  7. Transgenic mouse lines for non-invasive ratiometric monitoring of intracellular chloride

    PubMed Central

    Batti, Laura; Mukhtarov, Marat; Audero, Enrica; Ivanov, Anton; Paolicelli, Rosa Chiara; Zurborg, Sandra; Gross, Cornelius; Bregestovski, Piotr; Heppenstall, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride is the most abundant physiological anion and participates in a variety of cellular processes including trans-epithelial transport, cell volume regulation, and regulation of electrical excitability. The development of tools to monitor intracellular chloride concentration ([Cli]) is therefore important for the evaluation of cellular function in normal and pathological conditions. Recently, several Cl-sensitive genetically encoded probes have been described which allow for non-invasive monitoring of [Cli]. Here we describe two mouse lines expressing a CFP-YFP-based Cl probe called Cl-Sensor. First, we generated transgenic mice expressing Cl-Sensor under the control of the mouse Thy1 mini promoter. Cl-Sensor exhibited good expression from postnatal day two (P2) in neurons of the hippocampus and cortex, and its level increased strongly during development. Using simultaneous whole-cell monitoring of ionic currents and Cl-dependent fluorescence, we determined that the apparent EC50 for Cli was 46 mM, indicating that this line is appropriate for measuring neuronal [Cli] in postnatal mice. We also describe a transgenic mouse reporter line for Cre-dependent conditional expression of Cl-Sensor, which was targeted to the Rosa26 locus and by incorporating a strong exogenous promoter induced robust expression upon Cre-mediated recombination. We demonstrate high levels of tissue-specific expression in two different Cre-driver lines targeting cells of the myeloid lineage and peripheral sensory neurons. Using these mice the apparent EC50 for Cli was estimated to be 61 and 54 mM in macrophages and DRG, respectively. Our data suggest that these mouse lines will be useful models for ratiometric monitoring of Cli in specific cell types in vivo. PMID:23734096

  8. A role for intracellular zinc in glioma alteration of neuronal chloride equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Di Angelantonio, S; Murana, E; Cocco, S; Scala, F; Bertollini, C; Molinari, M G; Lauro, C; Bregestovski, P; Limatola, C; Ragozzino, D

    2014-01-01

    Glioma patients commonly suffer from epileptic seizures. However, the mechanisms of glioma-associated epilepsy are far to be completely understood. Using glioma-neurons co-cultures, we found that tumor cells are able to deeply influence neuronal chloride homeostasis, by depolarizing the reversal potential of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-evoked currents (EGABA). EGABA depolarizing shift is due to zinc-dependent reduction of neuronal KCC2 activity and requires glutamate release from glioma cells. Consistently, intracellular zinc loading rapidly depolarizes EGABA in mouse hippocampal neurons, through the Src/Trk pathway and this effect is promptly reverted upon zinc chelation. This study provides a possible molecular mechanism linking glioma invasion to excitation/inhibition imbalance and epileptic seizures, through the zinc–mediated disruption of neuronal chloride homeostasis. PMID:25356870

  9. The role of chloride-bicarbonate exchange in the regulation of intracellular chloride in guinea-pig vas deferens.

    PubMed Central

    Aickin, C C; Brading, A F

    1984-01-01

    The Cl-depleted smooth muscle cells of guinea-pig vas deferens rapidly restore their intracellular Cl activity ( aiCl ) to a level 5 times higher than that predicted by a passive distribution when Cl- ions are readmitted to the extracellular solution. Cl reaccumulation, measured using Cl-sensitive micro-electrodes and the uptake of 36Cl, was slowed about 3-fold by the nominal absence of CO2 and HCO3 and about 10-fold by the presence of the anion exchange inhibitor DIDS (4-4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid). However, the usual level of intracellular Cl was eventually attained and neither condition reduced intracellular Cl in normal tissues. The loss of intracellular Cl that occurs when Cl- ions are removed from the extracellular solution was slowed about 3-fold by the nominal absence of CO2 and HCO3 and was accelerated by their readdition. DIDS slowed the fall in aiCl about 10-fold and reduced 36Cl efflux. Intracellular pH (pHi), measured using pH-sensitive micro-electrodes, increased by a mean of 0.73 units when Cl was removed from the superfusing solution in the presence of CO2 and HCO3, and rapidly decreased when Cl was readmitted. These changes are equivalent to an intracellular accumulation and loss of HCO3- ions respectively. The net transmembrane movement of HCO3- ions which would have caused these changes in pHi was calculated using the measured intracellular buffering power ( Aickin , 1984). 25% fewer HCO3- ions than Cl- ions were accumulated and lost and the HCO3 movement was completed 2-3 times faster than the simultaneous Cl movement under the same conditions. The changes in pHi induced by alteration of extracellular Cl were reduced by the nominal absence of CO2 and HCO3 and abolished by the presence of DIDS. The acidification recorded on readmission of Cl in the nominal absence of CO2 and HCO3 was compatible with a metabolic production of about 0.1% CO2. We conclude that Cl-HCO3 exchange plays a major role in the regulation of

  10. Elevated expression of chloride intracellular channel 1 is correlated with poor prognosis in human gliomas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chloride intracellular channel 1 (CLIC1) is expressed ubiquitously in human tissues and is involved in the regulation of cell cycle, cell proliferation and differentiation. Recent studies have shown that CLIC1 is highly expressed in several human malignant tumors. However, its roles in human gliomas are still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinicopathological significance and prognostic value of CLIC1 expression in human gliomas. Methods CLIC1 expression in human gliomas and nonneoplastic brain tissues was measured by real-time quantitative RT-PCR assay and immunohistochemistry. Its association with clinicopathological factors or prognosis in patients with gliomas was statistically analyzed. Results The expression of CLIC1 at both mRNA and protein levels was significantly increased in high-grade (Grade III~IV) glioma tissues compared with that in low-grade (Grade I~II) and nonneoplastic brain tissues, and was up-regulated with ascending tumor World Health Organization (WHO) grades. The elevated expression of CLIC1 protein was also significantly correlated with low Karnofsky performance score (KPS) (P=0.008). Moreover, both univariate and multivariate analysis shown that high CLIC1 expression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in patients with gliomas (P<0.001 and P=0.01, respectively). In particular, the elevated CLIC1 expression also correlated with shorter overall survival in different glioma subgroups stratified according to the WHO grading. Conclusions Our data provide the first evidence that CLIC1 expression might play an important role in the regulation of aggressiveness in human gliomas. The elevated expression of CLIC1 might represent a valuable prognostic marker for this disease. PMID:22578365

  11. Members of the Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel Protein Family Demonstrate Glutaredoxin-Like Enzymatic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Al Khamici, Heba; Brown, Louise J.; Hossain, Khondker R.; Hudson, Amanda L.; Sinclair-Burton, Alxcia A.; Ng, Jane Phui Mun; Daniel, Elizabeth L.; Hare, Joanna E.; Cornell, Bruce A.; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Davey, Mary W.; Valenzuela, Stella M.

    2015-01-01

    The Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel (CLIC) family consists of six evolutionarily conserved proteins in humans. Members of this family are unusual, existing as both monomeric soluble proteins and as integral membrane proteins where they function as chloride selective ion channels, however no function has previously been assigned to their soluble form. Structural studies have shown that in the soluble form, CLIC proteins adopt a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fold, however, they have an active site with a conserved glutaredoxin monothiol motif, similar to the omega class GSTs. We demonstrate that CLIC proteins have glutaredoxin-like glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase enzymatic activity. CLICs 1, 2 and 4 demonstrate typical glutaredoxin-like activity using 2-hydroxyethyl disulfide as a substrate. Mutagenesis experiments identify cysteine 24 as the catalytic cysteine residue in CLIC1, which is consistent with its structure. CLIC1 was shown to reduce sodium selenite and dehydroascorbate in a glutathione-dependent manner. Previous electrophysiological studies have shown that the drugs IAA-94 and A9C specifically block CLIC channel activity. These same compounds inhibit CLIC1 oxidoreductase activity. This work for the first time assigns a functional activity to the soluble form of the CLIC proteins. Our results demonstrate that the soluble form of the CLIC proteins has an enzymatic activity that is distinct from the channel activity of their integral membrane form. This CLIC enzymatic activity may be important for protecting the intracellular environment against oxidation. It is also likely that this enzymatic activity regulates the CLIC ion channel function. PMID:25581026

  12. Intracellular chloride channel protein CLIC1 regulates macrophage function through modulation of phagosomal acidification

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lele; Salao, Kanin; Li, Hui; Rybicka, Joanna M.; Yates, Robin M.; Luo, Xu Wei; Shi, Xin Xin; Kuffner, Tamara; Tsai, Vicky Wang-Wei; Husaini, Yasmin; Wu, Liyun; Brown, David A.; Grewal, Thomas; Brown, Louise J.; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Breit, Samuel N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Intracellular chloride channel protein 1 (CLIC1) is a 241 amino acid protein of the glutathione S transferase fold family with redox- and pH-dependent membrane association and chloride ion channel activity. Whilst CLIC proteins are evolutionarily conserved in Metazoa, indicating an important role, little is known about their biology. CLIC1 was first cloned on the basis of increased expression in activated macrophages. We therefore examined its subcellular localisation in murine peritoneal macrophages by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. In resting cells, CLIC1 is observed in punctate cytoplasmic structures that do not colocalise with markers for endosomes or secretory vesicles. However, when these macrophages phagocytose serum-opsonised zymosan, CLIC1 translocates onto the phagosomal membrane. Macrophages from CLIC1−/− mice display a defect in phagosome acidification as determined by imaging live cells phagocytosing zymosan tagged with the pH-sensitive fluorophore Oregon Green. This altered phagosomal acidification was not accompanied by a detectable impairment in phagosomal-lysosomal fusion. However, consistent with a defect in acidification, CLIC1−/− macrophages also displayed impaired phagosomal proteolytic capacity and reduced reactive oxygen species production. Further, CLIC1−/− mice were protected from development of serum transfer induced K/BxN arthritis. These data all point to an important role for CLIC1 in regulating macrophage function through its ion channel activity and suggest it is a suitable target for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:22956539

  13. Control of intracellular chloride concentration and GABA response polarity in rat retinal ON bipolar cells

    PubMed Central

    Billups, Daniela; Attwell, David

    2002-01-01

    GABAergic modulation of retinal bipolar cells plays a crucial role in early visual processing. It helps to form centre-surround receptive fields which filter the visual signal spatially at the bipolar cell dendrites in the outer retina, and it produces temporal filtering at the bipolar cell synaptic terminals in the inner retina. The observed chloride transporter distribution in ON bipolar cells has been predicted to produce an intracellular chloride concentration, [Cl−]i, that is significantly higher in the dendrites than in the synaptic terminals. This would allow dendritic GABA-gated Cl− channels to generate the depolarization needed for forming the lateral inhibitory surround of the cell's receptive field, while synaptic terminal GABA-gated Cl− channels generate the hyperpolarization needed for temporal shaping of the light response. In contrast to this idea, we show here that in ON bipolar cells [Cl−]i is only slightly higher in the dendrites than in the synaptic terminals, and that GABA-gated channels in the dendrites may generate a hyperpolarization rather than a depolarization. We also show that [Cl−]i is controlled by movement of Cl− through ion channels in addition to transporters, that changes of [K+]o alter [Cl−]i and that voltage-dependent equilibration of [Cl−]i in bipolar cells will produce a time-dependent adaptation of GABAergic modulation with a time constant of 8 s after illumination-evoked changes of membrane potential. Time-dependent adaptation of [Cl−]i to voltage changes in retinal bipolar cells may add a previously unsuspected layer of temporal processing to signals as they pass through the retina. PMID:12433959

  14. Intracellular proliferation of Legionella pneumophila in Hartmannella vermiformis in aquatic biofilms grown on plasticized polyvinyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, Melanie W; Wullings, Bart A; Akkermans, Antoon D L; Beumer, Rijkelt R; van der Kooij, Dick

    2004-11-01

    The need for protozoa for the proliferation of Legionella pneumophila in aquatic habitats is still not fully understood and is even questioned by some investigators. This study shows the in vivo growth of L. pneumophila in protozoa in aquatic biofilms developing at high concentrations on plasticized polyvinyl chloride in a batch system with autoclaved tap water. The inoculum, a mixed microbial community including indigenous L. pneumophila originating from a tap water system, was added in an unfiltered as well as filtered (cellulose nitrate, 3.0-microm pore size) state. Both the attached and suspended biomasses were examined for their total amounts of ATP, for culturable L. pneumophila, and for their concentrations of protozoa. L. pneumophila grew to high numbers (6.3 log CFU/cm2) only in flasks with an unfiltered inoculum. Filtration obviously removed the growth-supporting factor, but it did not affect biofilm formation, as determined by measuring ATP. Cultivation, direct counting, and 18S ribosomal DNA-targeted PCR with subsequent sequencing revealed the presence of Hartmannella vermiformis in all flasks in which L. pneumophila multiplied and also when cycloheximide had been added. Fluorescent in situ hybridization clearly demonstrated the intracellular growth of L. pneumophila in trophozoites of H. vermiformis, with 25.9% +/- 10.5% of the trophozoites containing L. pneumophila on day 10 and >90% containing L. pneumophila on day 14. Calculations confirmed that intracellular growth was most likely the only way for L. pneumophila to proliferate within the biofilm. Higher biofilm concentrations, measured as amounts of ATP, gave higher L. pneumophila concentrations, and therefore the growth of L. pneumophila within engineered water systems can be limited by controlling biofilm formation. PMID:15528550

  15. Lipid vesicles loading aluminum phthalocyanine chloride: Formulation properties and disaggregation upon intracellular delivery.

    PubMed

    Calori, Italo Rodrigo; Tedesco, Antonio Claudio

    2016-07-01

    Aluminum phthalocyanine chloride (AlClPc) is a second-generation photodynamic therapy (PDT) photosensitizer characterized for its high hydrophobicity and self-aggregation tendency in aqueous media, which hamper its potential application. Aiming at AlClPc solubilization we proposed here the use of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) at different proportions to form mixed lipid vesicles (LVs) as a drug delivery system. LVs were prepared by ethanol injection method and formed nano-sized vesicles (about 100nm) with suitable polydispersity index, negative zeta potential, and stable in aqueous medium for at least 50days. AlClPc strongly interacts with LV (high binding constant values), especially due to aluminum-phosphate specific interactions, which gives a surface localization to AlClPc molecules as demonstrated by fluorescence quenching data. Anisotropy, static and time-resolved fluorescence measurements corroborated with these results and demonstrated that AlClPc self-aggregation occurred even in the liposomes. However, formulation uptake by oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) the AlClPc was distributed in cellular organelles and suffered a disaggregation process demonstrated by fluorescence life-time imaging microscopy. This amazing behavior is new and increases the scientific knowledge about the intracellular mechanism of action of PDT photosensitizers. In addition, these results open a new perspective to the potential use of AlClPc-LV formulations for photodynamic treatment. PMID:27130963

  16. Interaction of Human Chloride Intracellular Channel Protein 1 (CLIC1) with Lipid Bilayers: A Fluorescence Study.

    PubMed

    Hare, Joanna E; Goodchild, Sophia C; Breit, Samuel N; Curmi, Paul M G; Brown, Louise J

    2016-07-12

    Chloride intracellular channel protein 1 (CLIC1) is very unusual as it adopts a soluble glutathione S-transferase-like canonical fold but can also autoinsert into lipid bilayers to form an ion channel. The conversion between these forms involves a large, but reversible, structural rearrangement of the CLIC1 module. The only identified environmental triggers controlling the metamorphic transition of CLIC1 are pH and oxidation. Until now, there have been no high-resolution structural data available for the CLIC1 integral membrane state, and consequently, a limited understanding of how CLIC1 unfolds and refolds across the bilayer to form a membrane protein with ion channel activity exists. Here we show that fluorescence spectroscopy can be used to establish the interaction and position of CLIC1 in a lipid bilayer. Our method employs a fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) approach between CLIC1 and a dansyl-labeled lipid analogue to probe the CLIC1-lipid interface. Under oxidizing conditions, a strong FRET signal between the single tryptophan residue of CLIC1 (Trp35) and the dansyl-lipid analogue was detected. When considering the proportion of CLIC1 interacting with the lipid bilayer, as estimated by fluorescence quenching experiments, the FRET distance between Trp35 and the dansyl moiety on the membrane surface was determined to be ∼15 Å. This FRET-detected interaction provides direct structural evidence that CLIC1 associates with membranes. The results presented support the current model of an oxidation-driven interaction of CLIC1 with lipid bilayers and also propose a membrane anchoring role for Trp35. PMID:27299171

  17. Knocking down of the KCC2 in rat hippocampal neurons increases intracellular chloride concentration and compromises neuronal survival

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Christophe; Gubkina, Olena; Schaefer, Michael; Becq, Hélène; Ludwig, Anastasia; Mukhtarov, Marat; Chudotvorova, Ilona; Corby, Severine; Salyha, Yuriy; Salozhin, Sergey; Bregestovski, Piotr; Medina, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Abstract KCC2 is a neuron-specific potassium–chloride co-transporter controlling intracellular chloride homeostasis in mature and developing neurons. It is implicated in the regulation of neuronal migration, dendrites outgrowth and formation of the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic connections. The function of KCC2 is suppressed under several pathological conditions including neuronal trauma, different types of epilepsies, axotomy of motoneurons, neuronal inflammations and ischaemic insults. However, it remains unclear how down-regulation of the KCC2 contributes to neuronal survival during and after toxic stress. Here we show that in primary hippocampal neuronal cultures the suppression of the KCC2 function using two different shRNAs, dominant-negative KCC2 mutant C568A or DIOA inhibitor, increased the intracellular chloride concentration [Cl−]i and enhanced the toxicity induced by lipofectamine-dependent oxidative stress or activation of the NMDA receptors. The rescuing of the KCC2 activity using over-expression of the active form of the KCC2, but not its non-active mutant Y1087D, effectively restored [Cl−]i and enhanced neuronal resistance to excitotoxicity. The reparative effects of KCC2 were mimicked by over-expression of the KCC3, a homologue transporter. These data suggest an important role of KCC2-dependent potassium/chloride homeostasis under neurototoxic conditions and reveal a novel role of endogenous KCC2 as a neuroprotective molecule. PMID:21486764

  18. The Effect of WNK4 on the Na+–Cl− Cotransporter Is Modulated by Intracellular Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Bazúa-Valenti, Silvana; Chávez-Canales, María; Rojas-Vega, Lorena; González-Rodríguez, Xochiquetzal; Vázquez, Norma; Rodríguez-Gama, Alejandro; Argaiz, Eduardo R.; Melo, Zesergio; Plata, Consuelo; Ellison, David H.; García-Valdés, Jesús; Hadchouel, Juliette

    2015-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the phenotype of familial hyperkalemic hypertension is mainly a consequence of increased activity of the renal Na+–Cl− cotransporter (NCC) because of altered regulation by with no–lysine–kinase 1 (WNK1) or WNK4. The effect of WNK4 on NCC, however, has been controversial because both inhibition and activation have been reported. It has been recently shown that the long isoform of WNK1 (L-WNK1) is a chloride-sensitive kinase activated by a low Cl- concentration. Therefore, we hypothesized that WNK4 effects on NCC could be modulated by intracellular chloride concentration ([Cl-]i), and we tested this hypothesis in oocytes injected with NCC cRNA with or without WNK4 cRNA. At baseline in oocytes, [Cl-]i was near 50 mM, autophosphorylation of WNK4 was undetectable, and NCC activity was either decreased or unaffected by WNK4. A reduction of [Cl-]i, either by low chloride hypotonic stress or coinjection of oocytes with the solute carrier family 26 (anion exchanger)-member 9 (SLC26A9) cRNA, promoted WNK4 autophosphorylation and increased NCC-dependent Na+ transport in a WNK4-dependent manner. Substitution of the leucine with phenylalanine at residue 322 of WNK4, homologous to the chloride-binding pocket in L-WNK1, converted WNK4 into a constitutively autophosphorylated kinase that activated NCC, even without chloride depletion. Elimination of the catalytic activity (D321A or D321K-K186D) or the autophosphorylation site (S335A) in mutant WNK4-L322F abrogated the positive effect on NCC. These observations suggest that WNK4 can exert differential effects on NCC, depending on the intracellular chloride concentration. PMID:25542968

  19. Intracellular GTP level determines cell's fate toward differentiation and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Meshkini, Azadeh; Yazdanparast, Razieh Nouri, Kazem

    2011-06-15

    Since the adequate supply of guanine nucleotides is vital for cellular activities, limitation of their syntheses would certainly result in modulation of cellular fate toward differentiation and apoptosis. The aim of this study was to set a correlation between the intracellular level of GTP and the induction of relevant signaling pathways involved in the cell's fate toward life or death. In that regard, we measured the GTP level among human leukemia K562 cells exposed to mycophenolic acid (MPA) or 3-hydrogenkwadaphnin (3-HK) as two potent inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors. Our results supported the maturation of the cells when the intracellular GTP level was reduced by almost 30-40%. Under these conditions, 3-HK and/or MPA caused up-regulation of PKC{alpha} and PI3K/AKT pathways. Furthermore, co-treatment of cells with hypoxanthine plus 3-HK or MPA, which caused a reduction of about 60% in the intracellular GTP levels, led to apoptosis and activation of mitochondrial pathways through inverse regulation of Bcl-2/Bax expression and activation of caspase-3. Moreover, our results demonstrated that attenuation of GTP by almost 60% augmented the intracellular ROS and nuclear localization of p21 and subsequently led to cell death. These results suggest that two different threshold levels of GTP are needed for induction of differentiation and/or ROS-associated apoptosis. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted

  20. Intracellular calcium levels as screening tool for nanoparticle toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Meindl, Claudia; Kueznik, Tatjana; Bösch, Martina; Roblegg, Eva; Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2015-01-01

    The use of engineered nano-sized materials led to revolutionary developments in many industrial applications and in the medical field. These materials, however, also may cause cytotoxicity. In addition to size, surface properties and shape were identified as relevant parameters for cell damage. Cell damage may occur as disruption of membrane integrity, induction of apoptosis and by organelle damage. Generation of oxidative stress may serve as an indicator for cytotoxicity. Effects occurring upon short contact of particles with cells, for instance in the systemic blood circulation, could be identified according to increases of intracellular [Ca2+] levels, which are caused by variety of toxic stimuli. Negatively charged, neutral and positively charged polystyrene particles of different sizes were used to study the role of size and surface properties on viability, membrane disruption, apoptosis, lysosome function, intracellular [Ca2+] levels and generation of oxidative stress. Silica particles served to test this hypothesis. Twenty nm polystyrene particles as well as 12 nm and 40 nm silica particles caused membrane damage and apoptosis with no preference of the surface charge. Only 20 nm plain and amine functionalized polystyrene particles cause oxidative stress and only the plain particles lysosomal damage. A potential role of surface charge was identified for 200 nm polystyrene particles, where only the amidine particles caused lysosomal damage. Increases in intracellular [Ca2+] levels and cytotoxicity after 24 h was often linked but determination of intracellular [Ca2+] levels could serve to characterize further the type of membrane damage. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Applied Toxicology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Nano-sized materials may cause cytotoxicity. Negatively charged, neutral and positively charged polystyrene particles of different sizes and silica nanoparticles were used to study the role of size and surface properties on viability, membrane

  1. Chloride channels in cancer: Focus on chloride intracellular channel 1 and 4 (CLIC1 AND CLIC4) proteins in tumor development and as novel therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Peretti, Marta; Angelini, Marina; Savalli, Nicoletta; Florio, Tullio; Yuspa, Stuart H; Mazzanti, Michele

    2015-10-01

    In recent decades, growing scientific evidence supports the role of ion channels in the development of different cancers. Both potassium selective pores and chloride permeabilities are considered the most active channels during tumorigenesis. High rate of proliferation, active migration, and invasiveness into non-neoplastic tissues are specific properties of neoplastic transformation. All these actions require partial or total involvement of chloride channel activity. In this context, this class of membrane proteins could represent valuable therapeutic targets for the treatment of resistant tumors. However, this encouraging premise has not so far produced any valid new channel-targeted antitumoral molecule for cancer treatment. Problematic for drug design targeting ion channels is their vital role in normal cells for essential physiological functions. By targeting these membrane proteins involved in pathological conditions, it is inevitable to cause relevant side effects in healthy organs. In light of this, a new protein family, the chloride intracellular channels (CLICs), could be a promising class of therapeutic targets for its intrinsic individualities: CLIC1 and CLIC4, in particular, not only are overexpressed in specific tumor types or their corresponding stroma but also change localization and function from hydrophilic cytosolic to integral transmembrane proteins as active ionic channels or signal transducers during cell cycle progression in certain cases. These changes in intracellular localization, tissue compartments, and channel function, uniquely associated with malignant transformation, may offer a unique target for cancer therapy, likely able to spare normal cells. This article is part of a special issue itled "Membrane Channels and Transporters in Cancers." PMID:25546839

  2. Cadmium-induced cell killing in Sacharomyces cerevisiae involves increases in intracellular NO levels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lihua; Chen, Yanfei; Gao, Huixian; Yin, Jingjing; Huang, Liqun

    2016-03-01

    Cadmium is a widespread environmental pollutant and poses some potential risks to human health. However, the signaling events controlling cadmium toxicity are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the effect of cadmium chloride on cell viability and the intracellular nitric oxide (NO) level in yeast cells. The results showed that exposure of yeast cells to cadmium (0-100 μM) could induce cell killing with significantly increased intracellular NO levels. Morphological analysis of the nuclei with 4('),6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining and DNA strand breaks analysis showed that cadmium at 50 μM can induce cell apoptosis in yeast cells. Treatment of yeast cells with cadmium (50 μM) and the nitric oxide scavenger c-PTIO [2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-teramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide; 0.2 mM] showed that c-PTIO attenuated the cadmium-induced cell killing. Our findings indicated that cadmium-induced yeast cell killing is mediated by a directly increased intracellular NO level. PMID:26872495

  3. Control of intracellular heme levels: Heme transporters and Heme oxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Anwar A.; Quigley, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Heme serves as a co-factor in proteins involved in fundamental biological processes including oxidative metabolism, oxygen storage and transport, signal transduction and drug metabolism. In addition, heme is important for systemic iron homeostasis in mammals. Heme has important regulatory roles in cell biology, yet excessive levels of intracellular heme are toxic; thus, mechanisms have evolved to control the acquisition, synthesis, catabolism and expulsion of cellular heme. Recently, a number of transporters of heme and heme synthesis intermediates have been described. Here we review aspects of heme metabolism and discuss our current understanding of heme transporters, with emphasis on the function of the cell-surface heme exporter, FLVCR. Knockdown of Flvcr in mice leads to both defective erythropoiesis and disturbed systemic iron homeostasis, underscoring the critical role of heme transporters in mammalian physiology. PMID:21238504

  4. Intracellular calcium levels can regulate Importin-dependent nuclear import

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Ly-Huynh, Jennifer D.; Jans, David A.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • High intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import. • The effect of Ca{sup 2+} on nuclear import does not relate to changes in the nuclear pore. • High intracellular calcium can result in mislocalisation of Impβ1, Ran and RCC1. - Abstract: We previously showed that increased intracellular calcium can modulate Importin (Imp)β1-dependent nuclear import of SRY-related chromatin remodeling proteins. Here we extend this work to show for the first time that high intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import generally. The basis of this relates to the mislocalisation of the transport factors Impβ1 and Ran, which show significantly higher nuclear localization in contrast to various other factors, and RCC1, which shows altered subnuclear localisation. The results here establish for the first time that intracellular calcium modulates conventional nuclear import through direct effects on the nuclear transport machinery.

  5. Modulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels by Scorpaenidae venoms.

    PubMed

    Church, Jarrod E; Moldrich, Randal X; Beart, Philip M; Hodgson, Wayne C

    2003-05-01

    The crude venoms of the soldierfish (Gymnapistes marmoratus), the lionfish (Pterois volitans) and the stonefish (Synanceia trachynis) display pronounced neuromuscular activity. Since [Ca(2+)](i) is a key regulator in many aspects of neuromuscular function we sought to determine its involvement in the neuromuscular actions of the venoms. In the chick biventer cervicis muscle, all three venoms produced a sustained contraction (approx 20-30% of 1mM acetylcholine). Blockade of nicotinic receptors with tubocurarine (10 micro M) failed to attenuate the contractile response to either G. marmoratus venom or P. volitans venom, but produced slight inhibition of the response to S. trachynis venom. All three venoms produced a rise in intracellular Ca(2+) (approx. 200-300% of basal) in cultured murine cortical neurons. The Ca(2+)-channel blockers omega-conotoxin MVIIC, omega-conotoxin GVIA, omega-agatoxin IVa and nifedipine (each at 1 micro M) potentiated the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in response to G. marmoratus venom and P. volitans venom, while attenuating the response to S. trachynis venom. Removal of extracellular Ca(2+), replacement of Ca(2+) with La(3+) (0.5mM), or addition of stonefish antivenom (3units/ml) inhibited both the venom-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in cultured neurones and contraction in chick biventer cervicis muscle. Venom-induced increases in [Ca(2+)](i) correlated with an increased cell death of cultured neurones as measured using propidium iodide (1 micro g/ml). Morphological analysis revealed cellular swelling and neurite loss consistent with necrosis. These data indicate that the effects of all three venoms are due in part to an increase in intracellular Ca(2+), possibly via the formation of pores in the cellular membrane which, under certain conditions, can lead to necrosis. PMID:12727272

  6. On-site monitoring of vinyl chloride at part per trillion levels in air

    SciTech Connect

    Linenberg, A.

    1995-12-31

    The need to measure vinyl chloride at part per trillion levels and below in the atmosphere presents a challenge for those involved with environmental monitoring. Sentex has previously reported measuring vinyl chloride in the air at 1.0 part per billion levels and above. A portable gas chromatograph equipped with a special preconcentrator was used for on-site monitoring of vinyl chloride at sub-parts per billion levels. The test was performed at a landfill adjacent to a residential area. A lap-top computer controlled the gas chromatograph`s functions including sampling, preconcentration, chromatographic parameters, and data storage. Concentrations down to .02 ppb (20 ppt) were successfully detected.

  7. Chloride flux in phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun

    2016-09-01

    Phagocytes, such as neutrophils and macrophages, engulf microbes into phagosomes and launch chemical attacks to kill and degrade them. Such a critical innate immune function necessitates ion participation. Chloride, the most abundant anion in the human body, is an indispensable constituent of the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2 O2 -halide system that produces the potent microbicide hypochlorous acid (HOCl). It also serves as a balancing ion to set membrane potentials, optimize cytosolic and phagosomal pH, and regulate phagosomal enzymatic activities. Deficient supply of this anion to or defective attainment of this anion by phagocytes is linked to innate immune defects. However, how phagocytes acquire chloride from their residing environment especially when they are deployed to epithelium-lined lumens, and how chloride is intracellularly transported to phagosomes remain largely unknown. This review article will provide an overview of chloride protein carriers, potential mechanisms for phagocytic chloride preservation and acquisition, intracellular chloride supply to phagosomes for oxidant production, and methods to measure chloride levels in phagocytes and their phagosomes. PMID:27558337

  8. Ammonium Chloride Ingestion Attenuates Exercise-Induced mRNA Levels in Human Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mündel, Toby; Pilegaard, Henriette; Hawke, Emma; Leikis, Murray; Lopez-Villalobos, Nicolas; Oliveira, Rodrigo S. F.; Bishop, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Minimizing the decrease in intracellular pH during high-intensity exercise training promotes greater improvements in mitochondrial respiration. This raises the intriguing hypothesis that pH may affect the exercise-induced transcription of genes that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. Eight males performed 10x2-min cycle intervals at 80% V˙O2peak intensity on two occasions separated by ~2 weeks. Participants ingested either ammonium chloride (ACID) or calcium carbonate (PLA) the day before and on the day of the exercise trial in a randomized, counterbalanced order, using a crossover design. Biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis muscle before and after exercise. The mRNA level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor co-activator 1α (PGC-1α), citrate synthase, cytochome c and FOXO1 was elevated at rest following ACID (P<0.05). During the PLA condition, the mRNA content of mitochondrial- and glucose-regulating proteins was elevated immediately following exercise (P<0.05). In the early phase (0–2 h) of post-exercise recovery during ACID, PGC-1α, citrate synthase, cytochome C, FOXO1, GLUT4, and HKII mRNA levels were not different from resting levels (P>0.05); the difference in PGC-1α mRNA content 2 h post-exercise between ACID and PLA was not significant (P = 0.08). Thus, metabolic acidosis abolished the early post-exercise increase of PGC-1α mRNA and the mRNA of downstream mitochondrial and glucose-regulating proteins. These findings indicate that metabolic acidosis may affect mitochondrial biogenesis, with divergent responses in resting and post-exercise skeletal muscle. PMID:26656911

  9. Altered intracellular pH regulation in cells with high levels of P-glycoprotein expression.

    PubMed

    Young, Gregory; Reuss, Luis; Altenberg, Guillermo A

    2011-01-01

    P-glycoprotein is an ATP-binding-cassette transporter that pumps many structurally unrelated drugs out of cells through an ATP-dependent mechanism. As a result, multidrug-resistant cells that overexpress P-glycoprotein have reduced intracellular steady-state levels of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents. In addition, increased cytosolic pH has been a frequent finding in multidrug-resistant cells that express P-glycoprotein, and it has been proposed that this consequence of P-glycoprotein expression may contribute to the lower intracellular levels of chemotherapeutic agents. In these studies, we measured intracellular pH and the rate of acid extrusion in response to an acid load in two cells with very different levels of P-glycoprotein expression: V79 parental cells and LZ-8 multidrug resistant cells. Compared to the wild-type V79 cells, LZ-8 cells have a lower intracellular pH and a slower recovery of intracellular pH after an acid load. The data also show that LZ-8 cells have reduced ability to extrude acid, probably due to a decrease in Na(+)/H(+) exchanger activity. The alterations in intracellular pH and acid extrusion in LZ-8 cells are reversed by 24-h exposure to the multidrug-resistance modulator verapamil. The lower intracellular pH in LZ-8 indicates that intracellular alkalinization is not necessary for multidrug resistance. The reversal by verapamil of the decreased acid-extrusion suggests that P-glycoprotein can affect other membrane transport mechanism. PMID:22003434

  10. Elevation of intracellular Zn2+ level by nanomolar concentrations of triclocarban in rat thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Morita, Junpei; Teramachi, Aoi; Sanagawa, Yosuke; Toyson, Saramaiti; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Oyama, Yasuo

    2012-12-17

    It was recently reported that nanomolar concentrations of triclocarban, an antimicrobial agent, were detected in human blood after the use of soap containing triclocarban. Due to the widespread use of triclocarban in adult and infant personal care products, the report prompted us to study its cytotoxicity. The cytotoxicity of triclocarban was examined in rat thymocytes by using a cytometric technique with propidium iodide for examining cell lethality, FluoZin-3-AM for monitoring the intracellular Zn(2+) level, and 5-chloromethylfluorescencein diacetate for estimating the cellular content of non-protein thiol. The incubation with triclocarban at nanomolar concentrations (50-500nM) for 1h did not affect cell lethality but significantly elevated the intracellular Zn(2+) level. The elevation of the intracellular Zn(2+) level by triclocarban was not significantly dependent on external Zn(2+) level. There was a negative correlation (r=-0.9225) between the effect on the intracellular Zn(2+) level and that on the cellular content of non-protein thiol. These results suggest that nanomolar concentrations of triclocarban decrease the cellular content of non-protein thiol, leading to intracellular Zn(2+) release. Since zinc plays physiological roles in mammalian cells, the percutaneous absorption of triclocarban from soap may, therefore, affect some cellular functions. PMID:23099084

  11. Modification of bursting in a Helix neuron by drugs influencing intracellular regulation of calcium level.

    PubMed

    Salánki, J; Budai, D; Véró, M

    1983-01-01

    The effect of ruthenium red, caffein and EGTA (ethyleneglycol tetraacetic acid) influencing intracellular Ca2+ level as well as that of pH-lowering was investigated on identified RPal neuron of Helix pomatia characterized by bimodal pacemaker (bursting) activity. Drugs were applied both extracellularly and intracellularly. Intracellular injection was performed from micropipettes by pressure. It was found that intracellular injection of ruthenium red, caffein, EGTA and pH-lowering caused immediate short hyperpolarization and suspension of bursting. The effect of caffein and lowering of pH was biphasic, hyperpolarization was followed by an increase of spiking. Following EGTA injection the amplitudes of interburst hyperpolarizing waves decreased, and prolongation of spikes occurred. Extracellular application of ruthenium red caused slight depolarization, while caffein produced mainly effects that were similar to those of the intracellular injection. Adding EGTA into the bath resulted in cessation of bursting, and later on also spike generation was blocked. All these effects could be eliminated by washing. It is concluded that Ca-influx during spiking cannot be considered as a single factor in maintaining bursting activity, nevertheless, intracellular binding and liberation of Ca depending on the cell metabolism should also be taken into consideration as a possible mechanism of burst regulation. PMID:6198869

  12. 5,5'-Dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) modification of cysteine improves the crystal quality of human chloride intracellular channel protein 2

    SciTech Connect

    Mi Wei; Li Lanfen; Su Xiaodong

    2008-04-18

    Structural studies of human chloride intracellular channel protein 2 (CLIC2) had been hampered by the problem of generating suitable crystals primarily due to the protein containing exposed cysteines. Several chemical reagents were used to react with the cysteines on CLIC2 in order to modify the redox state of the protein. We have obtained high quality crystals that diffracted to better than 2.5 A at a home X-ray source by treating the protein with 5,5'-dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB). After solving the crystal structure of CLIC2, we found that the DTNB had reacted with the Cys{sup 114}, and made CLIC2 in a homogenous oxidized state. This study demonstrated that the DTNB modification drastically improved the crystallization of CLIC2, and it implied that this method may be useful for other proteins containing exposed cysteines in general.

  13. Fecundity of Cryptosporidium parvum is Correlated with Intracellular Levels of the Viral Symbiont CPV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in the virulence and fecundity of Cryptosporidium parvum isolates have been observed by several researchers studying cryptosporidiosis. The purpose of the present study was to determine if there was a correlation between intracellular levels of the viral symbiont CPV in C. parvum and fe...

  14. Positive Charges at the Intracellular Mouth of the Pore Regulate Anion Conduction in the CFTR Chloride Channel

    PubMed Central

    Aubin, Chantal N. St.; Linsdell, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Many different ion channel pores are thought to have charged amino acid residues clustered around their entrances. The so-called surface charges contributed by these residues can play important roles in attracting oppositely charged ions from the bulk solution on one side of the membrane, increasing effective local counterion concentration and favoring rapid ion movement through the channel. Here we use site-directed mutagenesis to identify arginine residues contributing important surface charges in the intracellular mouth of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel pore. While wild-type CFTR was associated with a linear current–voltage relationship with symmetrical solutions, strong outward rectification was observed after mutagenesis of two arginine residues (R303 and R352) located near the intracellular ends of the fifth and sixth transmembrane regions. Current rectification was dependent on the charge present at these positions, consistent with an electrostatic effect. Furthermore, mutagenesis-induced rectification was more pronounced at lower Cl− concentrations, suggesting that these mutants had a reduced ability to concentrate Cl− ions near the inner pore mouth. R303 and R352 mutants exhibited reduced single channel conductance, especially at negative membrane potentials, that was dependent on the charge of the amino acid residue present at these positions. However, the very low conductance of both R303E and R352E-CFTR could be greatly increased by elevating intracellular Cl− concentration. Modification of an introduced cysteine residue at position 303 by charged methanethiosulfonate reagents reproduced charge-dependent effects on current rectification. Mutagenesis of arginine residues in the second and tenth transmembrane regions also altered channel permeation properties, however these effects were not consistent with changes in channel surface charges. These results suggest that positively charged arginine

  15. Positive charges at the intracellular mouth of the pore regulate anion conduction in the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Aubin, Chantal N St; Linsdell, Paul

    2006-11-01

    Many different ion channel pores are thought to have charged amino acid residues clustered around their entrances. The so-called surface charges contributed by these residues can play important roles in attracting oppositely charged ions from the bulk solution on one side of the membrane, increasing effective local counterion concentration and favoring rapid ion movement through the channel. Here we use site-directed mutagenesis to identify arginine residues contributing important surface charges in the intracellular mouth of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel pore. While wild-type CFTR was associated with a linear current-voltage relationship with symmetrical solutions, strong outward rectification was observed after mutagenesis of two arginine residues (R303 and R352) located near the intracellular ends of the fifth and sixth transmembrane regions. Current rectification was dependent on the charge present at these positions, consistent with an electrostatic effect. Furthermore, mutagenesis-induced rectification was more pronounced at lower Cl(-) concentrations, suggesting that these mutants had a reduced ability to concentrate Cl(-) ions near the inner pore mouth. R303 and R352 mutants exhibited reduced single channel conductance, especially at negative membrane potentials, that was dependent on the charge of the amino acid residue present at these positions. However, the very low conductance of both R303E and R352E-CFTR could be greatly increased by elevating intracellular Cl(-) concentration. Modification of an introduced cysteine residue at position 303 by charged methanethiosulfonate reagents reproduced charge-dependent effects on current rectification. Mutagenesis of arginine residues in the second and tenth transmembrane regions also altered channel permeation properties, however these effects were not consistent with changes in channel surface charges. These results suggest that positively charged arginine residues

  16. Extracellular zinc stimulates a calcium-activated chloride conductance through mobilisation of intracellular calcium in renal inner medullary collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Linley, J E; Simmons, N L; Gray, M A

    2007-01-01

    We have used the perforated patch clamp and fura-2 fluorescence techniques to study the effect of extracellular Zn(2+) on whole-cell Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents (I (CLCA)) in mouse inner medullary collecting duct cells (mIMCD-3). I (CLCA) was spontaneously active in 74% of cells under basal conditions and displayed time and voltage-independent kinetics and an outwardly rectifying current/voltage relationship (I/V). Addition of zinc chloride (10-400 microM) to the bathing solution resulted in a dose-dependent increase in I (CLCA) with little change in Cl(-) selectivity or biophysical characteristics, whereas gadolinium chloride (30 microM) and lanthanum chloride (100 microM) had no significant effect on the whole-cell current. Using fura-2-loaded mIMCD-3 cells, extracellular Zn(2+) (400 microM) stimulated an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) to an elevated plateau. The Zn(2+)-stimulated [Ca(2+)](i) increase was inhibited by thapsigargin (200 nM), the IP(3) receptor antagonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (10 microM) and removal of bath Ca(2+). Pre-exposure to Zn(2+) (400 microM) markedly attenuated the ATP (100 microM)-stimulated [Ca(2+)](i) increase. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that extracellular Zn(2+) stimulates an increase in [Ca(2+)](i) by a release of calcium from thapsigargin/IP(3) sensitive stores. A possible physiological role for a divalent metal ion receptor, distinct from the extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor, in IMCD cells is discussed. PMID:17021797

  17. Biochemical manipulation of intracellular glutathione levels influences cytotoxicity to isolated human lymphocytes by sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, C.L.; Innace, J.K.; Hovatter, R.C.; Meier, H.L.; Smith, W.J.

    1993-12-31

    Glutathione (GSH) is the major nonprotein thiol that can protect cells from damage due to electrophilic alkylating agents by forming conjugates with the agent. Sulfur mustard (HD) is an electrophilic alkylating agent that has potent mutagenic, carcinogenic, cytotoxic, and vesicant properties. Compounds that elevate or reduce intracellular levels of GSH may produce changes in cytotoxicity induced by sulfur mustard. Pretreatment of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) for 72 hr with 1 mM buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), which reduces intracellular GSH content to approximately 26% of control, appears to sensitize these in vitro cells to the cytotoxic effects of 10 AM HD but not to higher HD concentrations. Pretreatment of PBL for 48 hr with 10 mM N-acetyl cysteine (NA C), which elevates intracellular glutathione levels to 122% of control, appears to partially protect these in vitro cells from the cytotoxic effects of 10 LAIHD but not to higher HD concentrations. Augmentation of intracellular levels of glutathione may provide partial protection against cytotoxicity of sulfur mustard.

  18. Licochalcone A induces T24 bladder cancer cell apoptosis by increasing intracellular calcium levels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinhui; Jiang, Jiangtao; Yang, Xinyan; Han, Jichun; Zheng, Qiusheng

    2016-07-01

    Licochalcone A (LCA) has been reported to significantly inhibit cell proliferation, increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and induce apoptosis of T24 human bladder cancer cells via mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-triggered signaling pathways. Based on these findings, the present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms by which LCA induces apoptosis of T24 cells. Cultured T24 cells were treated with LCA, and cell viability was measured using the sulforhodamine B assay. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry with Annexin V/propidium iodide staining, and by fluorescent microscopy with Hoechst 33258 staining. The levels of intracellular free calcium ions were determined using Fluo-3 AM dye marker. Intracellular ROS levels were assessed using the 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate probe assay. The mitochondrial membrane potential was measured using 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethyl benzimidazole carbocyanine iodide. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of B‑cell lymphoma (Bcl)‑extra large, Bcl‑2‑associated X protein, Bcl‑2‑interacting mediator of cell death, apoptotic protease activating factor‑1 (Apaf‑1), calpain 2, cysteinyl aspartate specific proteinase (caspase)‑3, caspase‑4 and caspase‑9 were determined using reverse transcription semiquantitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses. Treatment with LCA inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis of T24 cells, and increased intracellular Ca2+ levels and ROS production. Furthermore, LCA induced mitochondrial dysfunction, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and increased the mRNA expression levels of Apaf‑1, caspase‑9 and caspase‑3. Exposure of T24 cells to LCA also triggered calpain 2 and caspase‑4 activation, resulting in apoptosis. These findings indicated that LCA increased intracellular Ca2+ levels, which may be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, the ER stress pathway may be

  19. Intracellular metabolite levels shape sulfur isotope fractionation during microbial sulfate respiration

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Boswell A.; Halevy, Itay

    2014-01-01

    We present a quantitative model for sulfur isotope fractionation accompanying bacterial and archaeal dissimilatory sulfate respiration. By incorporating independently available biochemical data, the model can reproduce a large number of recent experimental fractionation measurements with only three free parameters: (i) the sulfur isotope selectivity of sulfate uptake into the cytoplasm, (ii) the ratio of reduced to oxidized electron carriers supporting the respiration pathway, and (iii) the ratio of in vitro to in vivo levels of respiratory enzyme activity. Fractionation is influenced by all steps in the dissimilatory pathway, which means that environmental sulfate and sulfide levels control sulfur isotope fractionation through the proximate influence of intracellular metabolites. Although sulfur isotope fractionation is a phenotypic trait that appears to be strain specific, we show that it converges on near-thermodynamic behavior, even at micromolar sulfate levels, as long as intracellular sulfate reduction rates are low enough (<<1 fmol H2S⋅cell−1⋅d−1). PMID:25362045

  20. Overview on how oncogenic Kras promotes pancreatic carcinogenesis by inducing low intracellular ROS levels.

    PubMed

    Kong, Bo; Qia, Chengjia; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Michalski, Christoph W

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a devastating disease without clearly known disease causes. Recent epidemiological and animal studies suggest that the supplementation of dietary antioxidants (e.g., vitamins C and E) decreases cancer risk, implying that increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. However, oncogenic Kras mutations (e.g., Kras(G12D)), which are present in more than 90% of PDAC, have been proven to foster low intracellular ROS levels. Here, oncogenic Kras activates expression of a series of anti-oxidant genes via Nrf2 (nuclear factor, erythroid derived 2, like 2) and also mediates an unusual metabolic pathway of glutamine to generate NADPH. This can then be used as the reducing power for ROS detoxification, leading collectively to low ROS levels in pancreatic pre-neoplastic cells and in cancer cells. In adult stem cells and cancer stem cells, low ROS levels have been associated with the formation of a proliferation-permissive intracellular environment and with perseverance of self-renewal capacities. Therefore, it is conceivable that low intracellular ROS levels may contribute significantly to oncogenic Kras-mediated PDAC formation. PMID:24062691

  1. Effect of potassium depletion of Hep 2 cells on intracellular pH and on chloride uptake by anion antiport

    SciTech Connect

    Madshus, I.H.; Tonnessen, T.I.; Olsnes, S.; Sandvig, K.

    1987-04-01

    The effect of K+ depletion of Hep 2 cells on ion fluxes, internal pH, cell volume, and membrane potential was studied. The cells were depleted of K+ by incubation in K+-free buffer with or without a preceding exposure to hypotonic medium. Efflux of K+ in cells not exposed to hypotonic medium was inhibited by furosemide or by incubation in Na+-free medium, indicating that in this case at least part of the K+ efflux occurs by Na+/K+/Cl- cotransport. After exposure to hypotonic medium, K+ efflux was not inhibited by furosemide, whereas it was partly inhibited by 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-stilbene-disulfonic acid (DIDS). Exposure to hypotonic medium induced acidification of the cytosol, apparently because of efflux of protons from intracellular acidic vesicles. When isotonicity was restored, a rebound alkalinization of the cytosol was induced, because of activation of the Na+/H+ antiporter. While hypotonic shock and a subsequent incubation in K+-free buffer rapidly depolarized the cells, depolarization occurred much more slowly when the K+ depletion was carried out by incubation in K+-free buffer alone. The cell volume was reduced in both cases. K+ depletion by either method strongly reduced the ability of the cells to accumulate /sup 36/Cl- by anion antiport, and K+-depleted cells were unable to increase the rate of /sup 36/Cl- uptake in response to alkalinization of the cytosol.

  2. Intracellular ATP levels are a pivotal determinant of chemoresistance in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yunfei; Tozzi, Federico; Chen, Jinyu; Fan, Fan; Xia, Ling; Wang, Jinrong; Gao, Guang; Zhang, Aijun; Xia, Xuefeng; Brasher, Heather; Widger, William; Ellis, Lee M; Weihua, Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Altered metabolism in cancer cells is suspected to contribute to chemoresistance, but the precise mechanisms are unclear. Here, we show that intracellular ATP levels are a core determinant in the development of acquired cross-drug resistance of human colon cancer cells that harbor different genetic backgrounds. Drug-resistant cells were characterized by defective mitochondrial ATP production, elevated aerobic glycolysis, higher absolute levels of intracellular ATP, and enhanced HIF-1α-mediated signaling. Interestingly, direct delivery of ATP into cross-chemoresistant cells destabilized HIF-1α and inhibited glycolysis. Thus, drug-resistant cells exhibit a greater "ATP debt" defined as the extra amount of ATP needed to maintain homeostasis of survival pathways under genotoxic stress. Direct delivery of ATP was sufficient to render drug-sensitive cells drug resistant. Conversely, depleting ATP by cell treatment with an inhibitor of glycolysis, 3-bromopyruvate, was sufficient to sensitize cells cross-resistant to multiple chemotherapeutic drugs. In revealing that intracellular ATP levels are a core determinant of chemoresistance in colon cancer cells, our findings may offer a foundation for new improvements to colon cancer treatment. PMID:22084398

  3. Intracellular ATP Levels are a Pivotal Determinant of Chemoresistance in Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yunfei; Tozzi, Federico; Chen, Jinyu; Fan, Fan; Xia, Ling; Wang, Jinrong; Gao, Guang; Zhang, Aijun; Xia, Xuefeng; Brasher, Heather; Widger, William; Ellis, Lee M; Weihua, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Altered metabolism in cancer cells is suspected to contribute to chemoresistance but the precise mechanisms are unclear. Here we show that intracellular ATP levels are a core determinant in the development of acquired cross-drug resistance of human colon cancer cells that harbor different genetic backgrounds. Drug-resistant cells were characterized by defective mitochondrial ATP production, elevated aerobic glycolysis, higher absolute levels of intracellular ATP and enhanced HIF-1α-mediated signaling. Interestingly, direct delivery of ATP into cross-chemoresistant cells destabilized HIF-1α and inhibited glycolysis. Thus, drug-resistant cells exhibit a greater “ATP debt” defined as the extra amount of ATP needed to maintain homeostasis of survival pathways under genotoxic stress. Direct delivery of ATP was sufficient to render drug-sensitive cells drug resistant. Conversely, depleting ATP by cell treatment with an inhibitor of glycolysis, 3-bromopyruvate, was sufficient to sensitize cells cross-resistant to multiple chemotherapeutic drugs. In revealing intracellular ATP levels are a core determinant of chemoresistance in colon cancer cells, our findings may offer a foundation for new improvements to colon cancer treatment. PMID:22084398

  4. Regulation of conductance by the number of fixed positive charges in the intracellular vestibule of the CFTR chloride channel pore

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing-Jun; Li, Man-Song; Qi, Jiansong

    2010-01-01

    Rapid chloride permeation through the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel is dependent on the presence of fixed positive charges in the permeation pathway. Here, we use site-directed mutagenesis and patch clamp recording to show that the functional role played by one such positive charge (K95) in the inner vestibule of the pore can be “transplanted” to a residue in a different transmembrane (TM) region (S1141). Thus, the mutant channel K95S/S1141K showed Cl− conductance and open-channel blocker interactions similar to those of wild-type CFTR, thereby “rescuing” the effects of the charge-neutralizing K95S mutation. Furthermore, the function of K95C/S1141C, but not K95C or S1141C, was inhibited by the oxidizing agent copper(II)-o-phenanthroline, and this inhibition was reversed by the reducing agent dithiothreitol, suggesting disulfide bond formation between these two introduced cysteine side chains. These results suggest that the amino acid side chains of K95 (in TM1) and S1141 (in TM12) are functionally interchangeable and located closely together in the inner vestibule of the pore. This allowed us to investigate the functional effects of increasing the number of fixed positive charges in this vestibule from one (in wild type) to two (in the S1141K mutant). The S1141K mutant had similar Cl− conductance as wild type, but increased susceptibility to channel block by cytoplasmic anions including adenosine triphosphate, pyrophosphate, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid, and Pt(NO2)42− in inside-out membrane patches. Furthermore, in cell-attached patch recordings, apparent voltage-dependent channel block by cytosolic anions was strengthened by the S1141K mutation. Thus, the Cl− channel function of CFTR is maximal with a single fixed positive charge in this part of the inner vestibule of the pore, and increasing the number of such charges to two causes a net decrease in overall Cl− transport through a

  5. Regulation of conductance by the number of fixed positive charges in the intracellular vestibule of the CFTR chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing-Jun; Li, Man-Song; Qi, Jiansong; Linsdell, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Rapid chloride permeation through the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is dependent on the presence of fixed positive charges in the permeation pathway. Here, we use site-directed mutagenesis and patch clamp recording to show that the functional role played by one such positive charge (K95) in the inner vestibule of the pore can be "transplanted" to a residue in a different transmembrane (TM) region (S1141). Thus, the mutant channel K95S/S1141K showed Cl(-) conductance and open-channel blocker interactions similar to those of wild-type CFTR, thereby "rescuing" the effects of the charge-neutralizing K95S mutation. Furthermore, the function of K95C/S1141C, but not K95C or S1141C, was inhibited by the oxidizing agent copper(II)-o-phenanthroline, and this inhibition was reversed by the reducing agent dithiothreitol, suggesting disulfide bond formation between these two introduced cysteine side chains. These results suggest that the amino acid side chains of K95 (in TM1) and S1141 (in TM12) are functionally interchangeable and located closely together in the inner vestibule of the pore. This allowed us to investigate the functional effects of increasing the number of fixed positive charges in this vestibule from one (in wild type) to two (in the S1141K mutant). The S1141K mutant had similar Cl(-) conductance as wild type, but increased susceptibility to channel block by cytoplasmic anions including adenosine triphosphate, pyrophosphate, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid, and Pt(NO(2))(4)(2-) in inside-out membrane patches. Furthermore, in cell-attached patch recordings, apparent voltage-dependent channel block by cytosolic anions was strengthened by the S1141K mutation. Thus, the Cl(-) channel function of CFTR is maximal with a single fixed positive charge in this part of the inner vestibule of the pore, and increasing the number of such charges to two causes a net decrease in overall Cl(-) transport through a

  6. Association of Thymidylate Synthase Gene Polymorphisms with Stavudine Triphosphate Intracellular Levels and Lipodystrophy▿

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, Pere; Cabeza, M. Carmen; Pruvost, Alain; Torres, Ferran; Salazar, Juliana; del Mar Gutierrez, M.; Mateo, M. Gracia; Fontanet, Angels; Fernandez, Irene; Domingo, Joan C.; Villarroya, Francesc; Vidal, Francesc; Baiget, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    The antiviral activity and toxicity of stavudine (d4T) depend on its triphosphate metabolite, stavudine triphosphate (d4T-TP). Therefore, modifications in intracellular levels of d4T-TP may change the toxicity profile of stavudine. d4T-TP intracellular levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were determined with a prominence liquid chromatograph connected to a triple-quadruple mass spectrometer. Polymorphisms in the thymidylate synthase (TS), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), reduced folate carrier 1 (RFC1; SLC19A1), and cyclin D1 (CCND1) genes were determined by direct sequencing using an ABI Prism 3100 genetic analyzer or Fluidigm's Biomark system. The Mann-Whitney test, rank analysis of variance (with Bonferroni's adjusted post hoc comparisons), and logistic regression were used for the inferential analyses. Thirty-three stavudine-treated patients were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. d4T-TP intracellular levels were 11.50 fmol/106 cells (interquartile range [IQR] = 8.12 to 13.87 fmol/106 cells) in patients with a high-expression TS genotype (2/3G, 3C/3G, and 3G/3G), whereas in those with a low-expression TS genotype (2/2, 2/3C, and 3C/3C), they were 21.40 fmol/106 cells (IQR = 18.90 to 27.0 fmol/106 cells) (P < 0.0001). Polymorphisms in the MTHFR, DHFR, RFC1, and CCND1 genes did not influence the intracellular concentration of d4T-TP. d4T-TP levels were independently associated with the TS genotype (low versus high expression; odds ratio [OR] = 86.22; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.48 to nonestimable; P = 0.0023). The low-expression TS genotype was associated with the development of HIV/highly active antiretroviral therapy-associated lypodystrophy syndrome (HALS) (OR = 14.0; 95% CI = 2.09 to 108.0; P = 0.0032). Our preliminary data show that polymorphisms in the thymidylate synthase gene are strongly associated with d4T-TP intracellular levels and with development of HALS. PMID:21282454

  7. Association of thymidylate synthase gene polymorphisms with stavudine triphosphate intracellular levels and lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Pere; Cabeza, M Carmen; Pruvost, Alain; Torres, Ferran; Salazar, Juliana; del Mar Gutierrez, M; Mateo, M Gracia; Fontanet, Angels; Fernandez, Irene; Domingo, Joan C; Villarroya, Francesc; Vidal, Francesc; Baiget, Montserrat

    2011-04-01

    The antiviral activity and toxicity of stavudine (d4T) depend on its triphosphate metabolite, stavudine triphosphate (d4T-TP). Therefore, modifications in intracellular levels of d4T-TP may change the toxicity profile of stavudine. d4T-TP intracellular levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were determined with a prominence liquid chromatograph connected to a triple-quadruple mass spectrometer. Polymorphisms in the thymidylate synthase (TS), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), reduced folate carrier 1 (RFC1; SLC19A1), and cyclin D1 (CCND1) genes were determined by direct sequencing using an ABI Prism 3100 genetic analyzer or Fluidigm's Biomark system. The Mann-Whitney test, rank analysis of variance (with Bonferroni's adjusted post hoc comparisons), and logistic regression were used for the inferential analyses. Thirty-three stavudine-treated patients were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. d4T-TP intracellular levels were 11.50 fmol/10(6) cells (interquartile range [IQR] = 8.12 to 13.87 fmol/10(6) cells) in patients with a high-expression TS genotype (2/3G, 3C/3G, and 3G/3G), whereas in those with a low-expression TS genotype (2/2, 2/3C, and 3C/3C), they were 21.40 fmol/10(6) cells (IQR = 18.90 to 27.0 fmol/10(6) cells) (P < 0.0001). Polymorphisms in the MTHFR, DHFR, RFC1, and CCND1 genes did not influence the intracellular concentration of d4T-TP. d4T-TP levels were independently associated with the TS genotype (low versus high expression; odds ratio [OR] = 86.22; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.48 to nonestimable; P = 0.0023). The low-expression TS genotype was associated with the development of HIV/highly active antiretroviral therapy-associated lypodystrophy syndrome (HALS) (OR = 14.0; 95% CI = 2.09 to 108.0; P = 0.0032). Our preliminary data show that polymorphisms in the thymidylate synthase gene are strongly associated with d4T-TP intracellular levels and with development of HALS. PMID:21282454

  8. Analysis of intracellular reducing levels in human hepatocytes on three-dimensional focusing microchip.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunxiu; Cai, Longfei

    2014-02-01

    A novel three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing microfluidic device integrated with high-throughput cell sampling and detection of intracellular contents is presented. It has a pivotal role in maintaining the reducing environment in cells. Intracellular reducing species such as vitamin C and glutathione in normal and tumor cells were labeled by a newly synthesized 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-1-oxyl-based fluorescent probe. Hepatocytes are adherent cells, which are prone to attaching to the channel surface. To avoid the attachment of cells on the channel surface, a single channel microchip with three sheath-flow channels located on both sides of and below the sampling channel was developed. Hydrostatic pressure generated by emptying the sample waste reservoir was used as driving force of fluid on the microchip. Owing to the difference between the liquid levels of the reservoirs, the labeled cells were three-dimensional hydrodynamically focused and transported from the sample reservoir to the sample waste reservoir. Hydrostatic pressure takes advantage of its ease of generation on a microfluidic chip without any external pressure pump, which drives three sheath-flow streams to constrain a sample flow stream into a narrow stream to avoid blockage of the sampling channel by adhered cells. The intracellular reducing levels of HepG2 cells and L02 cells were detected by home-built laser-induced fluorescence detector. The analysis throughput achieved in this microfluidic system was about 59-68 cells/min. PMID:23297173

  9. Chloride intracellular channel protein CLIC4 (p64H1) binds directly to brain dynamin I in a complex containing actin, tubulin and 14-3-3 isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    Suginta, W; Karoulias, N; Aitken, A; Ashley, R H

    2001-01-01

    Mammalian chloride intracellular channel (CLIC) (p64-related) proteins are widely expressed, with an unusual dual localization as both soluble and integral membrane proteins. The molecular basis for their cellular localization and ion channel activity remains unclear. To help in addressing these problems, we identified novel rat brain CLIC4 (p64H1) binding partners by affinity chromatography, mass spectrometric analysis and microsequencing. Brain CLIC4 binds dynamin I, alpha-tubulin, beta-actin, creatine kinase and two 14-3-3 isoforms; the interactions are confirmed in vivo by immunoprecipitation. Gel overlay and reverse pull-down assays indicate that the binding of CLIC4 to dynamin I and 14-3-3zeta is direct. In HEK-293 cells, biochemical and immunofluorescence analyses show partial co-localization of recombinant CLIC4 with caveolin and with functional caveolae, which is consistent with a dynamin-associated role for CLIC4 in caveolar endocytosis. We speculate that brain CLIC4 might be involved in the dynamics of neuronal plasma membrane microdomains (micropatches) containing caveolin-like proteins and might also have other cellular roles related to membrane trafficking. Our results provide the basis for new hypotheses concerning novel ways in which CLIC proteins might be associated with cell membrane remodelling, the control of cell shape, and anion channel activity. PMID:11563969

  10. Hyperosmolar sodium chloride is toxic to cultured neurons and causes reduction of glucose metabolism and ATP levels, an increase in glutamate uptake, and a reduction in cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed

    Morland, Cecilie; Pettersen, Mi Nguyen; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2016-05-01

    Elevation of serum sodium, hypernatremia, which may occur during dehydration or treatment with sodium chloride, may cause brain dysfunction and damage, but toxic mechanisms are poorly understood. We found that exposure to excess NaCl, 10-100mmol/L, for 20h caused cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells (neurons). Toxicity was due to Na(+), since substituting excess Na(+) with choline reduced cell death to control levels, whereas gluconate instead of excess Cl(-) did not. Prior to cell death from hyperosmolar NaCl, glucose consumption and lactate formation were reduced, and intracellular aspartate levels were elevated, consistent with reduced glycolysis or glucose uptake. Concomitantly, the level of ATP became reduced. Pyruvate, 10mmol/L, reduced NaCl-induced cell death. The extracellular levels of glutamate, taurine, and GABA were concentration-dependently reduced by excess NaCl; high-affinity glutamate uptake increased. High extracellular [Na(+)] caused reduction in intracellular free [Ca(2+)], but a similar effect was seen with mannitol, which was not neurotoxic. We suggest that inhibition of glucose metabolism with ensuing loss of ATP is a neurotoxic mechanism of hyperosmolar sodium, whereas increased uptake of extracellular neuroactive amino acids and reduced intracellular [Ca(2+)] may, if they occur in vivo, contribute to the cerebral dysfunction and delirium described in hypernatremia. PMID:26994581

  11. Hyperoside regulates the level of thymic stromal lymphopoietin through intracellular calcium signalling.

    PubMed

    Han, Na-Ra; Go, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2014-07-01

    Hyperoside (HYP) is the principle active component of Crataegus pinnatifida. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of allergic reactions. Here, we investigated how HYP regulates the levels of TSLP in a human mast cell line, HMC-1 cells. We analyzed the levels of TSLP by treatment with HYP in phorbol myristate acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated HMC-1 cells with ELISA and a polymerase chain reaction analysis. We also analyzed the pathway that HYP regulates TSLP by measuring the level of fluorescent intracellular calcium and using a Western blot analysis. HYP decreased the level of intracellular calcium in stimulated HMC-1 cells. It also significantly decreased the production and mRNA expression of TSLP in stimulated HMC-1 cells. It significantly decreased the levels of receptor-interacting protein 2 and active caspase-1 in stimulated HMC-1 cells. HYP significantly decreased the translocation of NF-κB into the nucleus and degradation of IκBα in the cytoplasm in stimulated HMC-1 cells. Furthermore, it significantly decreased the production and mRNA expression of interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 in stimulated HMC-1 cells. Taken together, our findings establish HYP as a potential agent for the treatment of allergic reactions. PMID:24338918

  12. Regulation of cAMP Intracellular Levels in Human Platelets Stimulated by 2-Arachidonoylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Signorello, Maria Grazia; Leoncini, Giuliana

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrated that in human platelets the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) decreased dose- and time-dependently cAMP intracellular levels. No effect on cAMP decrease induced by 2-AG was observed in the presence of the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 as well in platelets pretreated with the thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist, SQ29548 or with aspirin, inhibitor of arachidonic acid metabolism through the cyclooxygenase pathway. An almost complete recovering of cAMP level was measured in platelets pretreated with the specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3A, milrinone. In platelets pretreated with LY294002 or MK2206, inhibitors of PI3K/AKT pathway, and with U73122, inhibitor of phospholipase C pathway, only a partial prevention was shown. cAMP intracellular level depends on synthesis by adenylate cyclase and hydrolysis by PDEs. In 2-AG-stimulated platelets adenylate cyclase activity seems to be unchanged. In contrast PDEs appear to be involved. In particular PDE3A was specifically activated, as milrinone reversed cAMP reduction by 2-AG. 2-AG enhanced PDE3A activity through its phosphorylation. The PI3K/AKT pathway and PKC participate to this PDE3A phosphorylation/activation mechanism as it was greatly inhibited by platelet pretreatment with LY294002, MK2206, U73122, or the PKC specific inhibitor GF109203X. Taken together these data suggest that 2-AG potentiates its power of platelet agonist reducing cAMP intracellular level. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1240-1249, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26460717

  13. Effect of altitude on brain intracellular pH and inorganic phosphate levels

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xian-Feng; Carlson, Paul J.; Kim, Tae-Suk; Sung, Young-Hoon; Hellem, Tracy L.; Fiedler, Kristen K.; Kim, Seong-Eun; Glaeser, Breanna; Wang, Kristina; Zuo, Chun S.; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Renshaw, Perry F.; Kondo, Douglas G.

    2015-01-01

    Normal brain activity is associated with task-related pH changes. Although central nervous system syndromes associated with significant acidosis and alkalosis are well understood, the effects of less dramatic and chronic changes in brain pH are uncertain. One environmental factor known to alter brain pH is the extreme, acute change in altitude encountered by mountaineers. However, the effect of long-term exposure to moderate altitude has not been studied. The aim of this two-site study was to measure brain intracellular pH and phosphate-bearing metabolite levels at two altitudes in healthy volunteers, using phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). Increased brain pH and reduced inorganic phosphate (Pi) levels were found in healthy subjects who were long-term residents of Salt Lake City, UT (4720 ft/1438 m), compared with residents of Belmont, MA (20 ft/6 m). Brain intracellular pH at the altitude of 4720 ft was more alkaline than that observed near sea level. In addition, the ratio of inorganic phosphate to total phosphate signal also shifted toward lower values in the Salt Lake City region compared with the Belmont area. These results suggest that long-term residence at moderate altitude is associated with brain chemical changes. PMID:24768210

  14. High Chloride Doping Levels Stabilize the Perovskite Phase of Cesium Lead Iodide.

    PubMed

    Dastidar, Subham; Egger, David A; Tan, Liang Z; Cromer, Samuel B; Dillon, Andrew D; Liu, Shi; Kronik, Leeor; Rappe, Andrew M; Fafarman, Aaron T

    2016-06-01

    Cesium lead iodide possesses an excellent combination of band gap and absorption coefficient for photovoltaic applications in its perovskite phase. However, this is not its equilibrium structure under ambient conditions. In air, at ambient temperature it rapidly transforms to a nonfunctional, so-called yellow phase. Here we show that chloride doping, particularly at levels near the solubility limit for chloride in a cesium lead iodide host, provides a new approach to stabilizing the functional perovskite phase. In order to achieve high doping levels, we first co-deposit colloidal nanocrystals of pure cesium lead chloride and cesium lead iodide, thereby ensuring nanometer-scale mixing even at compositions that potentially exceed the bulk miscibility of the two phases. The resulting nanocrystal solid is subsequently fused into a polycrystalline thin film by chemically induced, room-temperature sintering. Spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction indicate that the chloride is further dispersed during sintering and a polycrystalline mixed phase is formed. Using density functional theory (DFT) methods in conjunction with nudged elastic band techniques, low-energy pathways for interstitial chlorine diffusion into a majority-iodide lattice were identified, consistent with the facile diffusion and fast halide exchange reactions observed. By comparison to DFT-calculated values (with the PBE exchange-correlation functional), the relative change in band gap and the lattice contraction are shown to be consistent with a Cl/I ratio of a few percent in the mixed phase. At these incorporation levels, the half-life of the functional perovskite phase in a humid atmosphere increases by more than an order of magnitude. PMID:27135266

  15. Effects of low-level laser exposure on calcium channels and intracellular release in cultured astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mang, Thomas S.; Maneshi, Mohammed M.; Shucard, David W.; Hua, Susan; Sachs, Frederick

    2016-03-01

    Prompted by a study of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a model system of cultured astrocytes, we discovered that low level laser illumination (LLL) at 660nm elevates the level of intracellular Ca2+. The coherence of the illumination was not essential since incoherent red light also worked. For cells bathed in low Ca2+ saline so that influx was suppressed, the Ca2+ level rose with no significant latency following illumination and consistent with a slow leak of Ca2+ from storage such as from the endoplasmic reticulum and/or mitochondria. When the cells were bathed in normal Ca2+ saline, the internal Ca2+ rose, but with a latency of about 17 seconds from the beginning of illumination. Pharmacologic studies with ryanodine inhibited the light effect. Testing the cells with fluid shear stress as used in the TBI model showed that mechanically induced elevation of cell Ca2+ was unaffected by illumination.

  16. Regulation of intracellular levels of calmodulin and tubulin in normal and transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chafouleas, J G; Pardue, R L; Brinkley, B R; Dedman, J R; Means, A R

    1981-01-01

    Transformation of mammalian tissue culture cells by oncogenic viruses results in a 2-fold increase in the intracellular concentration of calmodulin quantitated by radioimmunoassay. The two pairs of companion cell lines used in this study were the Swiss mouse 3T3/simian virus 40-transformed 3T3 cells and the normal rat kidney (NRK)/Rous sarcoma virus-transformed NRK cells. The increased intracellular levels of calmodulin in the transformed cells are due to a greater increase in the rate of synthesis (3-fold) relative to the change in the rate of degradation (1.4-fold). On the other hand, no increases were observed in tubulin levels as quantitated by a colchicine-binding assay. The lack of change in tubulin concentration was accounted for by a 2-fold increase in the rate of degradation that is compensated by a similar increase in the rate of synthesis. The consequence of such changes in both transformed cell types is a 2-fold increase in the calmodulin-to-tubulin protein ratio relative to that in their nontransformed counterparts. PMID:6262788

  17. Elevation of intracellular calcium levels in spiral ganglion cells by trimethyltin.

    PubMed

    Fechter, L D; Liu, Y

    1995-11-01

    The neurotoxicant, trimethyltin (TMT) produces cochlear impairment at far lower dose levels and far more rapidly than it does central nervous system effects. The initial effects of TMT in the cochlea, in vivo, are consistent with disruption of the inner hair cell type-1 spiral ganglion cell synapse although it is uncertain whether the effect is on presynaptic and/or postsynaptic units. This synapse is believed to be an excitatory glutamatergic one, providing the possibility that TMT could induce an excitotoxic process resulting in elevations in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i). The objective of this study was to determine whether TMT had direct toxic effects on the postsynaptic spiral ganglion cells studied in primary culture and to identify the role of extracellular calcium in such an effect. The marker of interest was the effect of this agent on [Ca2+]i levels as determined using quantitation of the fluorescent calcium dye, Fura-2. TMT did induce a marked and sustained elevation in [Ca2+]i level in the spiral ganglion cells that appeared to have a rapid initial phase and a slower saturating phase. Studies performed using calcium-free medium showed that elevation of [Ca2+]i in spiral ganglion cells by TMT was attenuated but not entirely blocked. Further, the L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, was able to inhibit the initial increase in [Ca2+]i, suggesting that at least this phase of the TMT effect was mediated by calcium channels, although nifedipine had no significant effect on the time to reach the maximal [Ca2+]i level. Parallel control experiments performed using application of exogenous glutamate and depolarizing K+ concentrations also produced elevation in [Ca2+]i levels. The data indicate that TMT elevates [Ca2+]i in isolated spiral ganglion cells both by increasing extracellular uptake via Ca2+ channels and also by releasing Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Thus TMT ototoxicity appears to include a direct postsynaptic toxic event. PMID:8647712

  18. Chloride Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Addison disease, or increased salt intake. If both chloride and sodium levels are high in a person on a ... anything else I should know? Drugs that affect sodium blood levels will also cause changes in chloride. In addition, swallowing large amounts of baking soda ...

  19. CFTR genotypes in patients with normal or borderline sweat chloride levels.

    PubMed

    Feldmann, Delphine; Couderc, Remy; Audrezet, Marie-Pierre; Ferec, Claude; Bienvenu, Thierry; Desgeorges, Marie; Claustres, Mireille; Mittre, Hervé; Blayau, Martine; Bozon, Dominique; Malinge, Marie-Claire; Monnier, Nicole; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul; Iron, Albert; Bieth, Eric; Dumur, Viviane; Clavel, Christine; Cazeneuve, Cécile; Girodon, Emmanuelle

    2003-10-01

    In recent years, some patients bearing "atypical" forms of cystic fibrosis (CF) with normal sweat chloride concentrations have been described. To identify the spectrum of mutant combinations causing such atypical CF, we collected the results of CFTR (ABCC7) mutation analysis from 15 laboratories. Thirty patients with one or more typical symptoms of the disease associated with normal or borderline sweat chloride levels and bearing two CFTR mutations were selected. Phenotypes and genotypes of these 30 patients are described. A total of 18 different CFTR mutations were observed in the 60 chromosomes analysed. F508del was present in 31.6 % of the mutated chromosomes and 3849+10kbC>T in 13.3 %. R117H, D1152H, L206W, 3272-26A>G, S1235R, G149R, R1070W, S945L, and the poly-T tract variation commonly called IVS8-5T were also observed. The relative frequency of CFTR mutations clearly differed from that observed in typical CF patients or in CBAVD patients with the same ethnic origin. A mild genotype with one or two mild or variable mutations was observed in all the patients. These findings improve our understanding of the distribution of CFTR alleles in CF with normal or borderline sweat chloride concentrations and will facilitate the development of more sensitive CFTR mutation screening. PMID:12955726

  20. Apoptosis of macrophages during pulmonary Mycobacterium bovis infection: correlation with intracellular bacillary load and cytokine levels

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Michele F; Barsante, Michele M; Alves, Caio C S; Souza, Maria A; Ferreira, Ana P; Amarante-Mendes, Gustavo P; Teixeira, Henrique C

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis of macrophages infected with pathogenic mycobacteria is an alternative host defence capable of removing the environment supporting bacterial growth. In this work the influence of virulence and bacterial load on apoptosis of alveolar macrophages during the initial phase of infection by Mycobacterium bovis was investigated. BALB/c mice were infected intratracheally with high or low doses of the virulent (ATCC19274) or attenuated (bacillus Calmette–Guérin Moreau) strains of M. bovis. The frequency of macrophage apoptosis, the growth of mycobacteria in macrophages, and the in situ levels of the cytokines tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-12 and of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 were measured at day 3 and day 7 post-infection. An increase of macrophage apoptosis was observed after infection with both strains but the virulent strain induced less apoptosis than the attenuated strain. On the 3rd day after infection with the virulent strain macrophage apoptosis was reduced in the high-dose group, while on the 7th day post-infection macrophage apoptosis was reduced in the low-dose group. Inhibition of apoptosis was correlated with increased production of IL-10, reduced production of TNF-α and increased production of Bcl-2. In addition, the production of IL-12 was reduced at points where the lowest levels of macrophage apoptosis were observed. Our results indicate that virulent mycobacteria are able to modulate macrophage apoptosis to an extent dependent on the intracellular bacterial burden, which benefits its intracellular growth and dissemination to adjacent cells. PMID:19740330

  1. Determination of Vinyl Chloride at ug/l. Level in Water by Gas Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellar, Thomas A.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    A quantitative method for the determination of vinyl chloride in water is presented. Vinyl chloride is transfered to the gas phase by bubbling inert gas through the water. After concentration on silica gel or Carbosieve-B, determination is by gas chromatography. Confirmation of vinyl chloride is by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. (Author/BT)

  2. Lysozyme levels in rabbit lung after inhalation of nickel, cadmium, cobalt, and copper chlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Lundborg, M.; Camner, P.

    1984-08-01

    Groups of rabbits were exposed to chlorides of nickel, cadmium, copper, and cobalt at concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 0.6 mg/m/sup 3/ (as metal) for 4 to 6 weeks (5 days/weeks, 6 hr/day). Activity of lysozyme (muramidase) in lavage fluid, in alveolar macrophages, and in culture medium from macrophages incubated at 37/sup 0/C for 1 and 20 hr was estimated using the lyso-plate technique, agar plates with heat-killed Micrococcus lysodeikticus. In the nickel-exposed rabbits lysozyme activity in the mucous membrane from the left main bronchus was also estimated. Following nickel exposure the lysozyme level was significantly decreased in lavage fluid, macrophages, and in culture medium from incubated macrophages but remained unchanged in the mucous membrane. After exposure to cadmium, copper, and cobalt, lysozyme levels increased or were unchanged.

  3. Overexpression of Sly41 suppresses COPII vesicle–tethering deficiencies by elevating intracellular calcium levels

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Indrani; Barlowe, Charles

    2016-01-01

    SLY41 was identified as a multicopy suppressor of loss of Ypt1, a Rab GTPase essential for COPII vesicle tethering at the Golgi complex. SLY41 encodes a polytopic membrane protein with homology to a class of solute transporter proteins, but how overexpression suppresses vesicle-tethering deficiencies is not known. Here we show that Sly41 is efficiently packaged into COPII vesicles and actively cycles between the ER and Golgi compartments. SLY41 displays synthetic negative genetic interactions with PMR1, which encodes the major Golgi-localized Ca2+/Mn2+ transporter and suggests that Sly41 influences cellular Ca2+ and Mn2+ homeostasis. Experiments using the calcium probe aequorin to measure intracellular Ca2+ concentrations in live cells reveal that Sly41 overexpression significantly increases cytosolic calcium levels. Although specific substrates of the Sly41 transporter were not identified, our findings indicate that localized overexpression of Sly41 to the early secretory pathway elevates cytosolic calcium levels to suppress vesicle-tethering mutants. In vitro SNARE cross-linking assays were used to directly monitor the influence of Ca2+ on tethering and fusion of COPII vesicles with Golgi membranes. Strikingly, calcium at suppressive concentrations stimulated SNARE-dependent membrane fusion when vesicle-tethering activity was reduced. These results show that calcium positively regulates the SNARE-dependent fusion stage of ER–Golgi transport. PMID:27030673

  4. Comparison of the biological effects of {sup 18}F at different intracellular levels

    SciTech Connect

    Kashino, Genro; Hayashi, Kazutaka; Douhara, Kazumasa; Kobashigawa, Shinko; Mori, Hiromu

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • We estimated the inductions of DNA DSB in cell treated with {sup 18}F-FDG. • We found that inductions of DNA DSB are dependent on accumulation of {sup 18}F in cell. • Accumulation of {sup 18}F in cell may be indispensable for risk estimation of PET. - Abstract: We herein examined the biological effects of cells treated with {sup 18}F labeled drugs for positron emission tomography (PET). The relationship between the intracellular distribution of {sup 18}F and levels of damaged DNA has yet to be clarified in detail. We used culture cells (Chinese Hamster Ovary cells) treated with two types of {sup 18}F labeled drugs, fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and fluorine ion (HF). FDG efficiently accumulated in cells, whereas HF did not. To examine the induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSB), we measured the number of foci for 53BP1 that formed at the site of DNA DSB. The results revealed that although radioactivity levels were the same, the induction of 53BP1 foci was stronger in cells treated with {sup 18}F-FDG than in those treated with {sup 18}F-HF. The clonogenic survival of cells was significantly lower with {sup 18}F-FDG than with {sup 18}F-HF. We concluded that the efficient accumulation of {sup 18}F in cells led to stronger biological effects due to more severe cellular lethality via the induction of DNA DSB.

  5. A high precision apparatus for intracellular thermal response at single-cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wenjuan; Wang, Cangling; Wang, Jianqing; Chen, Qiuhua; Sun, Jianfei; Li, Can; Wang, Xing; Gu, Ning

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a nanoprobe that is highly thermo-sensitive to tiny temperature changes was prepared based on a thermocouple metal junction. A series of electro-element apparatuses were integrated to accomplish single-cell temperature measurement. The temperature measurement probe (TMP) was constructed by tungsten (W), polyurethane (PU), and platinum (Pt). The tip size of TMP was characterized at less than 500 nm, and the tip angle was between 10 and 20° with the resistance in the range of 500 to 1500 Ω. The single-cell temperature measurement probes were calibrated and calculated with a Seebeck coefficient ranging from 6 to 8 μV °C-1 at a precision of 0.1 °C. Monitoring the temperature at a single-cell level by inserting the TMP in marine lung epithelia (MLE)-12 cells displayed that the stimulation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and cobalt chloride induced different single-cell temperature fluctuation. This investigation could help reveal complex cellular functions and develop novel diagnoses.

  6. A high precision apparatus for intracellular thermal response at single-cell level.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wenjuan; Wang, Cangling; Wang, Jianqing; Chen, Qiuhua; Sun, Jianfei; Li, Can; Wang, Xing; Gu, Ning

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a nanoprobe that is highly thermo-sensitive to tiny temperature changes was prepared based on a thermocouple metal junction. A series of electro-element apparatuses were integrated to accomplish single-cell temperature measurement. The temperature measurement probe (TMP) was constructed by tungsten (W), polyurethane (PU), and platinum (Pt). The tip size of TMP was characterized at less than 500 nm, and the tip angle was between 10 and 20° with the resistance in the range of 500 to 1500 Ω. The single-cell temperature measurement probes were calibrated and calculated with a Seebeck coefficient ranging from 6 to 8 μV °C(-1) at a precision of 0.1 °C. Monitoring the temperature at a single-cell level by inserting the TMP in marine lung epithelia (MLE)-12 cells displayed that the stimulation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and cobalt chloride induced different single-cell temperature fluctuation. This investigation could help reveal complex cellular functions and develop novel diagnoses. PMID:26267315

  7. Temporal response of hydraulic head, temperature, and chloride concentrations to sea-level changes, Floridan aquifer system, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, J. D.; Vacher, H. L.; Sanford, Ward E.

    2009-06-01

    Three-dimensional density-dependent flow and transport modeling of the Floridan aquifer system, USA shows that current chloride concentrations are not in equilibrium with current sea level and, second, that the geometric configuration of the aquifer has a significant effect on system responses. The modeling shows that hydraulic head equilibrates first, followed by temperatures, and then by chloride concentrations. The model was constructed using a modified version of SUTRA capable of simulating multi-species heat and solute transport, and was compared to pre-development conditions using hydraulic heads, chloride concentrations, and temperatures from 315 observation wells. Three hypothetical, sinusoidal sea-level changes occurring over 100,000 years were used to evaluate how the simulated aquifer responds to sea-level changes. Model results show that hydraulic head responses lag behind sea-level changes only where the Miocene Hawthorn confining unit is thick and represents a significant restriction to flow. Temperatures equilibrate quickly except where the Hawthorn confining unit is thick and the duration of the sea-level event is long (exceeding 30,000 years). Response times for chloride concentrations to equilibrate are shortest near the coastline and where the aquifer is unconfined; in contrast, chloride concentrations do not change significantly over the 100,000-year simulation period where the Hawthorn confining unit is thick.

  8. Intracellular calcium and cyclic nucleotide levels modulate neurite guidance by microtopographical substrate features.

    PubMed

    Li, Shufeng; Tuft, Bradley; Xu, Linjing; Polacco, Marc; Clarke, Joseph C; Guymon, C Allan; Hansen, Marlan R

    2016-08-01

    Micro- and nanoscale surface features have emerged as potential tools to direct neurite growth into close proximity with next generation neural prosthesis electrodes. However, the signaling events underlying the ability of growth cones to respond to topographical features remain largely unknown. Accordingly, this study probes the influence of [Ca(2+) ]i and cyclic nucleotide levels on the ability of neurites from spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) to precisely track topographical micropatterns. Photopolymerization and photomasking were used to generate micropatterned methacrylate polymer substrates. Dissociated SGN cultures were plated on the micropatterned surfaces. Calcium influx and release from internal stores were manipulated by elevating extracellular K(+) , maintenance in calcium-free media, or bath application of various calcium channel blockers. Cyclic nucleotide activity was increased by application of cpt-cAMP or 8-Br-cGMP. Elevation of [Ca(2+) ]i by treatment of cultures with elevated potassium reduced neurite alignment to physical microfeatures. Maintenance of cultures in Ca(2+) -free medium or treatment with the non-selective voltage-gated calcium channel blocker cadmium or L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nifedipine did not signficantly alter SGN neurite alignment. By contrast, ryanodine or xestospongin C, which block release of internal calcium stores via ryanodine-sensitive channels or inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors respectively, each significantly decreased neurite alignment. Cpt-cAMP significantly reduced neurite alignment while 8-Br-cGMP significantly enhanced neurite alignment. Manipulation of [Ca(2+) ]i or cAMP levels significantly disrupts neurite guidance while elevation of cGMP levels increases neurite alignment. The results suggest intracellular signaling pathways similar to those recruited by chemotactic cues are involved in neurite guidance by topographical features. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2037

  9. Massive Intracellular Biodegradation of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Evidenced Magnetically at Single-Endosome and Tissue Levels.

    PubMed

    Mazuel, François; Espinosa, Ana; Luciani, Nathalie; Reffay, Myriam; Le Borgne, Rémi; Motte, Laurence; Desboeufs, Karine; Michel, Aude; Pellegrino, Teresa; Lalatonne, Yoann; Wilhelm, Claire

    2016-08-23

    Quantitative studies of the long-term fate of iron oxide nanoparticles inside cells, a prerequisite for regenerative medicine applications, are hampered by the lack of suitable biological tissue models and analytical methods. Here, we propose stem-cell spheroids as a tissue model to track intracellular magnetic nanoparticle transformations during long-term tissue maturation. We show that global spheroid magnetism can serve as a fingerprint of the degradation process, and we evidence a near-complete nanoparticle degradation over a month of tissue maturation, as confirmed by electron microscopy. Remarkably, the same massive degradation was measured at the endosome level by single-endosome nanomagnetophoretic tracking in cell-free endosomal extract. Interestingly, this spectacular nanoparticle breakdown barely affected iron homeostasis: only the genes coding for ferritin light chain (iron loading) and ferroportin (iron export) were up-regulated 2-fold by the degradation process. Besides, the magnetic and tissular tools developed here allow screening of the biostability of magnetic nanomaterials, as demonstrated with iron oxide nanocubes and nanodimers. Hence, stem-cell spheroids and purified endosomes are suitable models needed to monitor nanoparticle degradation in conjunction with magnetic, chemical, and biological characterizations at the cellular scale, quantitatively, in the long term, in situ, and in real time. PMID:27419260

  10. Fecundity of Cryptosporidium parvum is correlated with intracellular levels of the viral symbiont CPV.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, M C; Higgins, J; Abrahante, J E; Kniel, K E; O'Brien, C; Trout, J; Lancto, C A; Abrahamsen, M S; Fayer, R

    2008-07-01

    Differences in the virulence and fecundity of Cryptosporidium parvum isolates have been observed by several researchers studying cryptosporidiosis. The purpose of the present study was to determine if there was a correlation between intracellular levels of the viral symbiont CPV in C. parvum and fecundity of two isolates of the parasite, namely C. parvum Beltsville (B) and C. parvum Iowa (I). Dairy calves infected with 10(6)C. parvum-B excreted 5-fold more oocysts compared with calves infected with the same number of C. parvum-I oocysts. The increased fecundity of the former strain was corroborated by semi-quantitative PCR assay of DNA isolated from cell cultures infected with either C. parvum-B or C. parvum-I. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis of viral RNA revealed a 3-fold greater number of CPV in C. parvum-B compared with C. parvum-I oocysts. These findings may indicate a role for CPV in fecundity and possibly virulence of C. parvum. PMID:18096164

  11. Regulation of biofilm formation and cellular buoyancy through modulating intracellular cyclic di-GMP levels in engineered cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Agostoni, Marco; Waters, Christopher M; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2016-02-01

    The second messenger cyclic dimeric (3'→5') GMP (cyclic di-GMP or c-di-GMP) has been implicated in the transition between motile and sessile lifestyles in bacteria. In this study, we demonstrate that biofilm formation, cellular aggregation or flocculation, and cellular buoyancy are under the control of c-di-GMP in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (Synechocystis) and Fremyella diplosiphon. Synechocystis is a unicellular cyanobacterium and displays lower levels of c-di-GMP; F. diplosiphon is filamentous and displays higher intracellular c-di-GMP levels. We transformed Synechocystis and F. diplosiphon with a plasmid for constitutive expression of genes encoding diguanylate cylase (DGC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) proteins from Vibrio cholerae or Escherichia coli, respectively. These engineered strains allowed us to modulate intracellular c-di-GMP levels. Biofilm formation and cellular deposition were induced in the DGC-expressing Synechocystis strain which exhibited high intracellular levels of c-di-GMP; whereas strains expressing PDE in Synechocystis and F. diplosiphon to drive low intracellular levels of c-di-GMP exhibited enhanced cellular buoyancy. In addition, the PDE-expressing F. diplosiphon strain showed elevated chlorophyll levels. These results imply roles for coordinating c-di-GMP homeostasis in regulating native cyanobacterial phenotypes. Engineering exogenous DGC or PDE proteins to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP levels represents an effective tool for uncovering cryptic phenotypes or modulating phenotypes in cyanobacteria for practical applications in biotechnology applicable in photobioreactors and in green biotechnologies, such as energy-efficient harvesting of cellular biomass or the treatment of metal-containing wastewaters. PMID:26192200

  12. Intracellular levels of the viral symbiont CPV in Cryptosporidium parvum correlate with fecundity of the parasite in dairy calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous reports have cited differences in clinical signs and oocyst output among strains of Cryptosporidium parvum. The purpose of this study was to determine if levels of the C. parvum intracellular viral symbiont CPV correlated with observed clinical and parasitological differences. Calves infe...

  13. Heat and exercise acclimation increases intracellular levels of Hsp72 and inhibits exercise-induced increase in intracellular and plasma Hsp72 in humans

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Flávio de Castro; Amorim, Fabiano Trigueiro; Passos, Renata L. Freitas; Fonseca, Michele Atalla; Oliveira, Kenya Paula Moreira; Lima, Milene Rodrigues Malheiros; Guimarães, Juliana Bohen; Ferreira-Júnior, João Batista; Martini, Angelo R. P.; Lima, Nilo R. V.; Soares, Danusa Dias; Oliveira, Edilamar Menezes

    2010-01-01

    In order to verify the effects of heat and exercise acclimation (HA) on resting and exercise-induced expression of plasma and leukocyte heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) in humans, nine healthy young male volunteers (25.0 ± 0.7 years; 80.5 ± 2.0 kg; 180 ± 2 cm, mean ± SE) exercised for 60 min in a hot, dry environment (40 ± 0°C and 45 ± 0% relative humidity) for 11 days. The protocol consisted of running on a treadmill using a controlled hyperthermia technique in which the work rate was adjusted to elevate the rectal temperature by 1°C in 30 min and maintain it elevated for another 30 min. Before and after the HA, the volunteers performed a heat stress test (HST) at 50% of their individual maximal power output for 90 min in the same environment. Blood was drawn before (REST), immediately after (POST) and 1 h after (1 h POST) HST, and plasma and leukocytes were separated and stored. Subjects showed expected adaptations to HA: reduced exercise rectal and mean skin temperatures and heart rate, and augmented sweat rate and exercise tolerance. In HST1, plasma Hsp72 increased from REST to POST and then returned to resting values 1 h POST (REST: 1.11 ± 0.07, POST: 1.48 ± 0.10, 1 h POST: 1.22 ± 0.11 ng mL−1; p < 0.05). In HST2, there was no change in plasma Hsp72 (REST: 0.94 ± 0.08, POST: 1.20 ± 0.15, 1 h POST: 1.17 ± 0.16 ng mL−1; p > 0.05). HA increased resting levels of intracellular Hsp72 (HST1: 1 ± 0.02 and HST2: 4.2 ± 1.2 density units, p < 0.05). Exercise-induced increased intracellular Hsp72 expression was observed on HST1 (HST1: REST, 1 ± 0.02 vs. POST, 2.9 ± 0.9 density units, mean ± SE, p < 0.05) but was inhibited on HST2 (HST2: REST, 4.2 ± 1.2 vs. POST, 4.4 ± 1.1 density units, p > 0.05). Regression analysis showed that the lower the pre-exercise expression of intracellular Hsp72, the higher the exercise-induced increase (R = −0

  14. Dynamic changes in intracellular ROS levels regulate airway basal stem cell homeostasis through Nrf2-dependent Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Paul, MK; Bisht, B; Darmawan, DO; Chiou, R; Ha, VL; Wallace, WD; Chon, AC; Hegab, AE; Grogan, T; Elashoff, DA; Alva-Ornelas, JA; Gomperts, BN

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Airways are exposed to myriad environmental and damaging agents such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), which also have physiological roles as signaling molecules that regulate stem cell function. However, the functional significance of both steady and dynamically changing ROS levels in different stem cell populations, as well as downstream mechanisms that integrate ROS sensing into decisions regarding stem cell homeostasis, are unclear. Here, we show in mouse and human airway basal stem cells (ABSCs) that intracellular flux from low to moderate ROS levels is required for stem cell self-renewal and proliferation. Changing ROS levels activate Nrf2, which activates the Notch pathway to stimulate ABSC self-renewal as well an antioxidant program that scavenges intracellular ROS, returning overall ROS levels to a low state to maintain homeostatic balance. This redox-mediated regulation of lung stem cell function has significant implications for stem cell biology, repair of lung injuries, and diseases such as cancer. PMID:24953182

  15. Apoptosis in pyrogallol-treated Calu-6 cells is correlated with the changes of intracellular GSH levels rather than ROS levels.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong Hwan; Kim, Sung Zoo; Kim, Suhn Hee; Park, Woo Hyun

    2008-03-01

    We investigated the involvement of glutathione (GSH) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2 and O2-* in the deaths of pyrogallol-treated Calu-6 cells. Pyrogallol inhibited the growth of Calu-6 cells with an IC50 of approximately 50 microM. Levels of intracellular H2O2 were not altered or were decreased in pyrogallol-treated Calu-6 cells at 72 h. However, levels of O2*- were increased. Treatment with pyrogallol also reduced the intracellular GSH content. The activity of SOD was down-regulated, but the activity of catalase was up-regulated by pyrogallol at 72 h. ROS scavengers, including Tempol, Tiron, Trimetazidine, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), did not reduce the levels of the intracellular O2*-. Tempol showing the recovery of GSH depletion in pyrogallol-treated cells significantly prevented apoptosis, while Tiron prevented the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)). In contrast, treatment with NAC showing an increased effect on O2*- levels and depletion of GSH intensified pyrogallol-induced apoptosis. In addition, treatment with SOD and catalase significantly prevented the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)) in pyrogallol-treated Calu-6 cells. However, only catalase showing a decreased effect on O2*- levels and depletion of GSH prevented pyrogallol-induced apoptosis. Taken together, apoptosis in pyrogallol-treated Calu-6 cells is correlated with the changes of intracellular GSH levels rather than ROS levels. PMID:17920721

  16. The relationship between the violet pigment PP-V production and intracellular ammonium level in Penicillium purpurogenum.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Ryo; Arai, Teppei; Matsufuji, Hiroshi; Kasumi, Takafumi; Watanabe, Taisuke; Ogihara, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Penicillium purpurogenum is the fungus that produces an azaphilone pigment. However, details about the pigment biosynthesis pathway are unknown. The violet pigment PP-V is the one of the main pigments biosynthesized by this fungus. This pigment contains an amino group in a pyran ring as its core structure. We focused on this pigment and examined the relationship between intracellular ammonium concentration and pigment production using glutamine as a nitrogen source. The intracellular ammonium level decreased about 1.5-fold in conditions favoring PP-V production. Moreover, P. purpurogenum was transferred to medium in which it commonly produces the related pigment PP-O after cultivating it in the presence or absence of glutamine to investigate whether this fungus biosynthesizes PP-V using surplus ammonium in cells. Only mycelia cultured in medium containing 10 mM glutamine produced the violet pigment, and simultaneously intracellular ammonium levels decreased under this condition. From comparisons of the amount of PP-V that was secreted with quantity of surplus intracellular ammonium, it is suggested that P. purpurogenum maintains ammonium homeostasis by excreting waste ammonium as PP-V. PMID:27368914

  17. Alteration of intracellular cysteine and glutathione levels in alveolar macrophages and lymphocytes by diesel exhaust particle exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Humadi, Nabil H; Siegel, Paul D; Lewis, Daniel M; Barger, Mark W; Ma, Jane Y C; Weissman, David N; Ma, Joseph K H

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the effects of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on thiol regulation in alveolar macrophages (AM) and lymphocytes. We obtained AM and lymph node (thymic and tracheal) cells (LNC) (at different time points) from rats exposed intratracheally to DEP (5 mg/kg) or saline, and measured inflammatory markers, thiol levels, and glutathione reductase (GSH-R) activity. DEP exposure produced significant increases in neutrophils, lactate dehydrogenase, total protein, and albumin content in the lavage fluid. AM from DEP-exposed rats showed a time-dependent increase in intracellular cysteine (CYSH) and GSH. In LNC the intracellular GSH reached peak level by 24 hr, declining toward control levels by 72 hr after exposure. LNC-CYSH and AM-CYSH and GSH were increased at both 24 and 72 hr. Both Sprague-Dawley and Brown Norway rats showed similar trends of responses to DEP exposure as per measurement of the inflammatory markers and thiol changes. AM and, to a lesser degree, LNC were both active in cystine uptake. The DEP exposure stimulated GSH-R activity and increased the conversion of cystine to CYSH in both cell types. The intracellular level of GSH in DEP-exposed AM was moderately increased compared with the saline control, and was further augmented when cells were incubated with cystine. In contrast, the intracellular level of GSH in DEP-exposed LNC was significantly reduced despite the increased CYSH level and GSH-R activity when these cells were cultured for 16 hr. DEP absorbed 23-31% of CYSH, cystine, and GSH, and only 8% of glutathione disulfide when incubated in cell free media. These results indicate that DEP exposure caused lung inflammation and affected thiol levels in both AM and LNC. PMID:11940452

  18. Relationship between circadian oscillations of Rev-erb{alpha} expression and intracellular levels of its ligand, heme

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Pamela M.; Ying Ling; Burris, Thomas P.

    2008-04-18

    The nuclear hormone receptors, REV-ERB{alpha} [NR1D1] and REV-ERB{beta} [NR1D1], were recently demonstrated to be receptors for the porphyrin, heme. Heme regulates the ability of these receptors to repress transcription of their target genes via modulation of the affinity of the receptor's ligand binding domain for the corepressor, NCoR. The REV-ERBs function as critical components of the mammalian clock and their expression oscillates in a circadian manner. Here, we show that in NIH3T3 cells intracellular heme levels also oscillate in a circadian fashion. These data are the first to show the temporal relationship of intracellular heme levels to the expression of its receptor, Rev-erb{alpha}, and suggest that the rapid oscillations in heme levels may an important component regulating REV-ERB transcriptional activity.

  19. Time-resolved luminescence imaging of intracellular oxygen levels based on long-lived phosphorescent iridium(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shujuan; Zhang, Yangliu; Liang, Hua; Chen, Zejing; Liu, Ziyu; Zhao, Qiang

    2016-07-11

    Time-resolved luminescence imaging of intracellular oxygen levels has been demonstrated based on long-lived phosphorescent signal. A phosphorescent dinuclear iridium(III) complex Ir1 has been designed and synthesized, which exhibits excellent optical properties, such as high quantum yields, large Stokes shift, high photostability and long emission lifetime. The phosphorescent intensity and lifetime of complex are very sensitive to oxygen levels. Thus, the application of Ir1 for monitoring intracellular oxygen levels has been realized successfully. Especially, utilizing the advantageous long emission lifetime of Ir1, the background fluorescence interference could be eliminated effectively by using the photoluminescence lifetime imaging and time-gated luminescence imaging techniques, improving the signal-to-noise ratios in bioimaging. PMID:27410847

  20. [Effect of mercury chloride on the level of lipids and products of their peroxidation in rat vital organs].

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P A; Oksenenko, S V

    2002-01-01

    The influence of mercury chloride on peroxidation processes of lipids and level of common lipids, phospholipids and spectrum of neutral lipids in liver, heart, lung and kidney of rats has been investigated. Administration of mercury chloride in a dose 0.7 mg/100 g of body weight to animals has invoked accumulation of lipids peroxide products in fractions of neutral lipids and phospholipids so it testifies the development of oxidative stress. Decrease of the most sensitive to oxidation fractions in the early stages of oxidative stress development and increase of free cholesterol and its ethers content in kidney and free cholesterol in the heart in more later terms as a result of mercury chloride administration have been revealed. PMID:14964870

  1. Toxicity of triphenyltin chloride to the rotifer Brachionus koreanus across different levels of biological organization.

    PubMed

    Yi, Andy Xianliang; Han, Jeonghoon; Lee, Jae-Seong; Leung, Kenneth M Y

    2016-01-01

    Although triphenyltin (TPT) compounds are ubiquitous pollutants in urbanised coastal environments in Asian regions, their toxicities to marine organisms are still poorly known. This study was designed to investigate the toxicity of triphenyltin chloride (TPTCl) on the rotifer Brachionus koreanus across different levels of biological organisation. Firstly, we concurrently performed a 24 h static-acute toxicity test and a 6-day semi-static multigenerational life-cycle test using the rotifer. Our results demonstrated that the 24-h median lethal concentration of TPTCl for the rotifer was 29.6 μg/L and the 6-day median effect concentration, based on the population growth inhibition, was 3.31 μg/L. Secondly, we examined the expression of 12 heat shock protein (hsp) genes, four glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes, one retinoid X receptor (RXR) gene and 13 cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes in the rotifers after exposure to 20 µg/L TPTCl for 24 h. Among these studied genes, hsp90α2, GST-O and CYP3045C1 were the most significantly up-regulated genes with a relative expression level up to 32.9, 4.4 and 62.6 folds, respectively. The expression of these three genes in the rotifers showed an increasing trend in the first few hours of TPTCl exposure, peaked at 3 h (hsp90α2 and GST-O) and 12 h (CYP3045C1) respectively, and then gradually returned to a lower level at 24 h. Such up-regulations of hsp and GST genes probably offer cellular protection against the TPT-mediated oxidative stress while the accelerated induction of CYP genes possibly facilitates the detoxification of this toxicant in the rotifer. PMID:25045140

  2. Elevated level of nitric oxide mediates the anti-depressant effect of rubidium chloride in mice.

    PubMed

    Kordjazy, Nastaran; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Amiri, Shayan; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Kordjazy, Mehdi; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2015-09-01

    Rubidium has been used to treat psychiatric conditions including depression. We examined the antidepressant activity of rubidium chloride (RbCl) in male mice and the possible interference of nitric oxide (NO) in this effect. Mouse forced swimming test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST) were used to evaluate the antidepressant-like effect of RbCl. These drugs were used in this study: N(G)-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), a non-selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, 7-Nitroindazole and aminoguanidine, selective neuronal and inducible NOS inhibitors, respectively, and l-arginine, an NO precursor. We studied the changes of serum and hippocampus nitrite level after different treatments. RbCl (30mg/kg), when administered 60min before the tests, significantly reduced the immobility time. Non-effective doses of l-NAME (10mg/kg) and aminoguanidine (50mg/kg), co-administered with the effective dose of RbCl (30mg/kg), reversed the anti-immobility effect of RbCl, while 7-NI (25mg/kg) could not prevent the diminishing effect of RbCl on immobility time. Moreover, co-administration of non-effective doses of l-arginine (750mg/kg) and RbCl (10mg/kg) decreased the immobility time. None of the mentioned treatments altered the locomotor activity of mice in open-field test. Nitrite level was significantly increased in serum and hippocampus of animals after RbCl (30mg/kg) administration and this nitrite level elevation was reversed by non-effective dose of l-NAME and aminoguanidine, but not 7-NI. Our data for the first time reveal the role of NO pathway in the antidepressant-like activity of RbCl, concluding that this effect results from elevation of NO through involvement of iNOS in mice. PMID:26101064

  3. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits apoptosis in human neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes: role of intracellular cyclic AMP levels.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Gonella, R; Dapino, P; Sacchetti, C; Dallegri, F

    1998-08-01

    Human neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) are terminally differentiated cells that die by undergoing apoptosis. At present, the intracellular pathways governing this process are only partially known. In particular, although the adenylate cyclase-dependent generation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) has been implicated in the triggering of apoptosis in lymphoid cells, the role of the intracellular cAMP pathway in neutrophil apoptosis remains controversial. In the present study, we found that two cAMP-elevating agents, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and the phosphodiesterase type IV inhibitor RO 20-1724, inhibit neutrophil apoptosis without inducing cell necrosis. When administered in combination, PGE2 and RO 20-1724 displayed additive effects. Moreover, neutrophil apoptosis was inhibited by a membrane-permeable analog of cAMP, dibutyryl-cAMP, in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, treatment of neutrophils with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 prevented PGE2- and RO 20-1724-induced inhibition of cell apoptosis. In conclusion, taking into account that PGE2 and other cAMP-elevating agents are well known downregulators of neutrophil functions, our results suggest that conditions favoring a state of functional rest, such as intracellular cAMP elevation, prolong the life span of neutrophils by delaying apoptosis. PMID:9694511

  4. Effects of chronic sleep deprivation on autonomic activity by examining heart rate variability, plasma catecholamine, and intracellular magnesium levels.

    PubMed

    Takase, Bonpei; Akima, Takashi; Satomura, Kimio; Ohsuzu, Fumitaka; Mastui, Takemi; Ishihara, Masayuki; Kurita, Akira

    2004-10-01

    Chronic sleep deprivation is associated with cardiovascular events. In addition, autonomic activity determined from the levels of the heart rate variability (HRV), plasma catecholamine, and intracellular magnesium (Mg) are important in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular events. This study therefore aimed to determine the effects of chronic sleep deprivation on autonomic activity by examining the HRV, plasma catecholamine, and intracellular magnesium levels. Thirty (30) healthy male college students ranging in age from 20 to 24 years of age (average 22 +/- 1 years; mean +/- SD) with no coronary risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia or a family history of premature coronary artery disease (CAD) were included in the study. Over a 4-week period, the volunteers' plasma levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and erythrocyte-Mg were measured. The study was made during the 4 weeks before and immediately after college finals exams. HRV, obtained from 24-hour ambulatory ECG monitoring, included time and frequency domain indices. The HRV indices and erythrocyte-Mg decreased while norepinephrine increased during chronic sleep deprivation. It is concluded that chronic sleep deprivation causes an autonomic imbalance and decreases intracellular Mg, which could be associated with chronic sleep deprivation-induced cardiovascular events. PMID:15754837

  5. Transforming growth factor alpha treatment alters intracellular calcium levels in hair cells and protects them from ototoxic damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Staecker, H; Dazert, S; Malgrange, B; Lefebvre, P P; Ryan, A F; Van de Water, T R

    1997-07-01

    To determine if transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) pretreatment protects hair cells from aminoglycoside induced injury by modifying their intracellular calcium concentration, we assayed hair cell calcium levels in organ of Corti explants both before and after aminoglycoside (i.e. neomycin, 10(-3) M) exposure either with or without growth factor pretreatment. After TGF alpha (500 ng/ml) treatment, the intracellular calcium level of hair cells showed a five-fold increase as compared to the levels observed in the hair cells of control cultures. After ototoxin exposure, calcium levels in hair cells of control explants showed an increase relative to their baseline levels, while in the presence of growth factors pretreatment, hair cells showed a relative reduction in calcium levels. Pretreatment of organ of Corti explants afforded significant protection of hair cell stereocilia bundle morphology from ototoxic damage when compared to explants exposed to ototoxin alone. This study correlates a rise in hair cell calcium levels with the otoprotection of hair cells by TGF alpha in organ of Corti explants. PMID:9263032

  6. Tailoring of energy levels in lead chloride based layered perovskites and energy transfer between the organic and inorganic planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, M.; Tuffentsammer, W.; Wachtel, H.; Wolf, H. C.

    1999-04-01

    Excitonic inter-layer energy transfer is proved in a system consisting of bimolecular layers of organic dyes (benzyl, naphthyl, or anthryl) in lead chloride perovskites. By a systematic variation of the dye molecules we place the inorganic exciton band of lead chloride energetically beneath, above or between the singlet and triplet levels of the dye. Therefore we observe emission from that exciton band, the molecular singlet or triplet level due to energy transfer between the inorganic and organic layers. In the case of the layered perovskite (C 6H 5-CH 2-NH 3) 2PbCl 4 we succeeded in energetically matching the inorganic exciton band with the molecular triplet level.

  7. CalQuo: automated, simultaneous single-cell and population-level quantification of global intracellular Ca2+ responses

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsche, Marco; Fernandes, Ricardo A.; Colin-York, Huw; Santos, Ana M.; Lee, Steven F.; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Davis, Simon J.; Eggeling, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Detecting intracellular calcium signaling with fluorescent calcium indicator dyes is often coupled with microscopy techniques to follow the activation state of non-excitable cells, including lymphocytes. However, the analysis of global intracellular calcium responses both at the single-cell level and in large ensembles simultaneously has yet to be automated. Here, we present a new software package, CalQuo (Calcium Quantification), which allows the automated analysis and simultaneous monitoring of global fluorescent calcium reporter-based signaling responses in up to 1000 single cells per experiment, at temporal resolutions of sub-seconds to seconds. CalQuo quantifies the number and fraction of responding cells, the temporal dependence of calcium signaling and provides global and individual calcium-reporter fluorescence intensity profiles. We demonstrate the utility of the new method by comparing the calcium-based signaling responses of genetically manipulated human lymphocytic cell lines. PMID:26563585

  8. Imaging of Intracellular and Extracellular ROS Levels in Atherosclerotic Mouse Aortas Ex Vivo: Effects of Lipid Lowering by Diet or Atorvastatin

    PubMed Central

    Ekstrand, Matias; Gustafsson Trajkovska, Maria; Perman-Sundelin, Jeanna; Fogelstrand, Per; Adiels, Martin; Johansson, Martin; Mattsson-Hultén, Lillemor

    2015-01-01

    Objective The first objective was to investigate if intracellular and extracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the mouse aorta increase before or after diet-induced lesion formation. The second objective was to investigate if intracellular and extracellular ROS correlates to cell composition in atherosclerotic lesions. The third objective was to investigate if intracellular and extracellular ROS levels within established atherosclerotic lesions can be reduced by lipid lowering by diet or atorvastatin. Approach and Results To address our objectives, we established a new imaging technique to visualize and quantify intracellular and extracellular ROS levels within intact mouse aortas ex vivo. Using this technique, we found that intracellular, but not extracellular, ROS levels increased prior to lesion formation in mouse aortas. Both intracellular and extracellular ROS levels were increased in advanced lesions. Intracellular ROS correlated with lesion content of macrophages. Extracellular ROS correlated with lesion content of smooth muscle cells. The high levels of ROS in advanced lesions were reduced by 5 days high dose atorvastatin treatment but not by lipid lowering by diet. Atorvastatin treatment did not affect lesion inflammation (aortic arch mRNA levels of CXCL 1, ICAM-1, MCP-1, TNF-α, VCAM, IL-6, and IL-1β) or cellular composition (smooth muscle cell, macrophage, and T-cell content). Conclusions Aortic levels of intracellular ROS increase prior to lesion formation and may be important in initiation of atherosclerosis. Our results suggest that within lesions, macrophages produce mainly intracellular ROS whereas smooth muscle cells produce extracellular ROS. Short term atorvastatin treatment, but not lipid lowering by diet, decreases ROS levels within established advanced lesions; this may help explain the lesion stabilizing and anti-inflammatory effects of long term statin treatment. PMID:26098110

  9. Methamphetamine induces a rapid increase of intracellular Ca(++) levels in neurons overexpressing GCaMP5.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seong-Jin; Wu, Kou-Jen; Bae, Eun K; Hsu, Man-Jung; Richie, Christopher T; Harvey, Brandon K; Wang, Yun

    2016-03-01

    In this study, methamphetamine (Meth)- and glutamate (Glu)-mediated intracellular Ca(++) (Ca(++) i) signals were examined in real time in primary cortical neurons overexpressing an intracellular Ca(++) probe, GCaMP5, by adeno-associated viral (AAV) serotype 1. Binding of Ca(++) to GCaMP increased green fluorescence intensity in cells. Both Meth and Glu induced a rapid increase in Ca(++) i, which was blocked by MK801, suggesting that Meth enhanced Ca(++) i through Glu receptor in neurons. The Meth-mediated Ca(++) signal was also blocked by Mg(++) , low Ca(++) or the L-type Ca(++) channel inhibitor nifedipine. The ryanodine receptor inhibitor dantrolene did not alter the initial Ca(++) influx but partially reduced the peak of Ca(++) i. These data suggest that Meth enhanced Ca(++) influx through membrane Ca(++) channels, which then triggered the release of Ca(++) from the endoplasmic reticulum in the cytosol. AAV-GCaMP5 was also injected to the parietal cortex of adult rats. Administration of Meth enhanced fluorescence in the ipsilateral cortex. Using immunohistochemistry, Meth-induced green fluorescence was found in the NeuN-containing cells in the cortex, suggesting that Meth increased Ca(++) in neurons in vivo. In conclusion, we have used in vitro and in vivo techniques to demonstrate a rapid increase of Ca(++) i by Meth in cortical neurons through overexpression of GCaMP5. As Meth induces behavioral responses and neurotoxicity through Ca(++) i, modulation of Ca(++) i may be useful to reduce Meth-related reactions. PMID:25377775

  10. Method Development for the Determination of Diallyldimethylammonium Chloride at Trace Levels by Epoxidation Process.

    PubMed

    Mwangi, Isaac W; Ngila, J Catherine; Ndungu, Patrick; Msagati, Titus A M

    2013-01-01

    Domestic water is abstracted from its sources in raw form with a high content of dissolved and suspended material. Polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (polyDADMAC) is a cationic polyelectrolyte used in the initial water clarification process. However, its residues in treated water pose a health risk as they react with chlorine to produce a carcinogenic compound. There is a need to determine the concentration of the polyelectrolyte cations that pass through the flocculation stage before the chlorine disinfection process in water treatment plants to ascertain the safety of water to consumers. The cationic polymer is UV inactive, and previously available methods for determining the concentrations of polyelectrolytes are unsatisfactory due to poor detection limits. This paper describes a UV-Visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometry method for the determination of residual polyDADMAC as an epoxide. The novelty method lies on the epoxidation of polyDADMAC using 20 % sodium hydroxide dissolved in 30 % hydrogen peroxide to produce a UV-Vis active compound. The epoxidation was confirmed by UV-Vis, FTIR and (1)H NMR techniques. Dilute solutions of varying concentrations of polyDADMAC (0.2-1.0 mg L(-1)) were treated with a basic solution of hydrogen peroxide then analysed by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The wavelength at maximum absorption (λmax) was found to be 313 nm, and a linear calibration curve with a correlation coefficient (R (2)) of 0.993 was used for quantification purposes. The detection limit measured as three times the signal of the blank and was found to be 2.1 × 10(-4) mg L(-1). The method was applied to determine the concentration of polyDADMAC spiked in water samples collected from a pool as a model for environmental matrix. The results obtained agreed with the quantities spiked in the solution, thus qualified the method to be suitable for the determination of polyDADMAC in treated waters at trace levels. The method was also used to investigate the

  11. ZnO Nanoparticles Treatment Induces Apoptosis by Increasing Intracellular ROS Levels in LTEP-a-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caixia; Hu, Xiaoke; Gao, Yan; Ji, Yinglu

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the wide use of novel nanoparticles (NPs) such as zinc oxide (ZnO) in all aspects of life, toxicological research on ZnO NPs is receiving increasing attention in these days. In this study, the toxicity of ZnO NPs in a human pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell line LTEP-a-2 was tested in vitro. Log-phase cells were exposed to different levels of ZnO NPs for hours, followed by colorimetric cell viability assay using tetrazolium salt and cell survival rate assay using trypan blue dye. Cell morphological changes were observed by Giemsa staining and light microscopy. Apoptosis was detected by using fluorescence microscopy and caspase-3 activity assay. Both intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were examined by a microplate-reader method. Results showed that ZnO NPs (≥0.01 μg/mL) significantly inhibited proliferation (P < 0.05) and induced substantial apoptosis in LTEP-a-2 cells after 4 h of exposure. The intracellular ROS level rose up to 30–40% corresponding to significant depletion (approximately 70–80%) in GSH content in LTEP-a-2 cells (P < 0.05), suggesting that ZnO NPs induced apoptosis mainly through increased ROS production. This study elucidates the toxicological mechanism of ZnO NPs in human pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells and provides reference data for application of nanomaterials in the environment. PMID:26339612

  12. Reduced levels of intracellular calcium releasing in spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients

    PubMed Central

    Espino, Javier; Mediero, Matías; Lozano, Graciela M; Bejarano, Ignacio; Ortiz, Águeda; García, Juan F; Pariente, José A; Rodríguez, Ana B

    2009-01-01

    Background Asthenozoospermia is one of the most common findings present in infertile males characterized by reduced or absent sperm motility, but its aetiology remains unknown in most cases. In addition, calcium is one of the most important ions regulating sperm motility. In this study we have investigated the progesterone-evoked intracellular calcium signal in ejaculated spermatozoa from men with normospermia or asthenozoospermia. Methods Human ejaculates were obtained from healthy volunteers and asthenospermic men by masturbation after 4–5 days of abstinence. For determination of cytosolic free calcium concentration, spermatozoa were loaded with the fluorescent ratiometric calcium indicator Fura-2. Results Treatment of spermatozoa from normospermic men with 20 micromolar progesterone plus 1 micromolar thapsigargin in a calcium free medium induced a typical transient increase in cytosolic free calcium concentration due to calcium release from internal stores. Similar results were obtained when spermatozoa were stimulated with progesterone alone. Subsequent addition of calcium to the external medium evoked a sustained elevation in cytosolic free calcium concentration indicative of capacitative calcium entry. However, when progesterone plus thapsigargin were administered to spermatozoa from patients with asthenozoospermia, calcium signal and subsequent calcium entry was much smaller compared to normospermic patients. As expected, pretreatment of normospermic spermatozoa with both the anti-progesterone receptor c262 antibody and with progesterone receptor antagonist RU-38486 decreased the calcium release induced by progesterone. Treatment of spermatozoa with cytochalasin D or jasplakinolide decreased the calcium entry evoked by depletion of internal calcium stores in normospermic patients, whereas these treatments proved to be ineffective at modifying the calcium entry in patients with asthenozoospermia. Conclusion Our results suggest that spermatozoa from

  13. Distinct Regulatory Mechanisms of the Human Ferritin Gene by Hypoxia and Hypoxia Mimetic Cobalt Chloride at the Transcriptional and Post-transcriptional Levels

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo-Wen; Miyazawa, Masaki; Tsuji, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt chloride has been used as a hypoxia mimetic because it stabilizes hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1-α) and activates gene transcription through a hypoxia responsive element (HRE). However, differences between hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride in gene regulation remain elusive. Expression of ferritin, the major iron storage protein, is regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels through DNA and RNA regulatory elements. Here we demonstrate that hypoxia and cobalt chloride regulate ferritin heavy chain (ferritin H) expression by two distinct mechanisms. Both hypoxia and cobalt chloride increased HIF1-α but a putative HRE in the human ferritin H gene was not activated. Instead, cobalt chloride but not hypoxia activated ferritin H transcription through an antioxidant responsive element (ARE), to which Nrf2 was recruited. Intriguingly, cobalt chloride downregulated ferritin H protein expression while upregulated other ARE-regulated antioxidant genes in K562 cells. Further characterization demonstrated that cobalt chloride increased interaction between iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) and iron responsive element (IRE) in the 5′UTR of ferritin H mRNA, resulting in translational block of the accumulated ferritin H mRNA. In contrast, hypoxia had marginal effect on ferritin H transcription but increased its translation through decreased IRP1-IRE interaction. These results suggest that hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride employ distinct regulatory mechanisms through the interplay between DNA and mRNA elements at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. PMID:25172425

  14. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chp Chemosensory System Regulates Intracellular cAMP Levels by Modulating Adenylate Cyclase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fulcher, Nanette B.; Holliday, Phillip M.; Klem, Erich; Cann, Martin J.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Multiple virulence systems in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are regulated by the second messenger signaling molecule adenosine 3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). Production of cAMP by the putative adenylate cyclase enzyme CyaB represents a critical control point for virulence gene regulation. To identify regulators of CyaB, we screened a transposon insertion library for mutants with reduced intracellular cAMP. The majority of insertions resulting in reduced cAMP mapped to the Chp gene cluster encoding a putative chemotaxis-like chemosensory system. Further genetic analysis of the Chp system revealed that it has both positive and negative effects on intracellular cAMP and that it regulates cAMP levels by modulating CyaB activity. The Chp system was previously implicated in the production and function of type IV pili (TFP). Given that cAMP and the cAMP-dependent transcriptional regulator Vfr control TFP biogenesis gene expression, we explored the relationship between cAMP, the Chp system and TFP regulation. We discovered that the Chp system controls TFP production through modulation of cAMP while control of TFP-dependent twitching motility is cAMP-independent. Overall, our data define a novel function for a chemotaxis-like system in controlling cAMP production and establish a regulatory link between the Chp system, TFP and other cAMP-dependent virulence systems. PMID:20345659

  15. Effects of crocin and zinc chloride on blood levels of zinc and metabolic and oxidative parameters in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Asri-Rezaei, Siamak; Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Ghasemsoltani-Momtaz, Behnaz; Erfanparast, Amir; Gholamalipour, Sima

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Crocin is one of constituents of saffron and has antioxidant property. Zinc chloride is one of the common compounds of zinc with antioxidant activity. The present study was aimed to investigate separate and combined treatment effects of crocin and zinc chloride on blood levels of zinc and metabolic and oxidative parameters in diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 50 mg/kg of streptozotocin (STZ) and was confirmed by blood glucose levels higher than 250 mg/dL. After confirmation of diabetes, injections (i.p.) of crocin and zinc chloride were performed for six weeks. At the end of the experiment, blood levels of zinc, glucose, insulin, malodialdehyde (MDA), and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were measured. ‎ Results: Crocin (25 and 50 mg/kg) and zinc chloride (5 mg/kg) significantly recovered the decreased levels of zinc, insulin, and TAC and improved the increased levels of glucose and MDA in STZ-induced diabetic rats. In a combination treatment performed with an ineffective dose of crocin (12.5 mg/kg) and a low dose of zinc chloride (1.25 mg/kg), improving effects were observed on the above-mentioned biochemical parameters.‎ Conclusion: The results indicated that separate and combined treatments with crocin and zinc chloride produced improving effects on the blood levels of zinc, glucose, insulin, MDA and TAC in STZ-induced diabetic rats. PMID:26468459

  16. Chloride in vesicular trafficking and function.

    PubMed

    Stauber, Tobias; Jentsch, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Luminal acidification is of pivotal importance for the physiology of the secretory and endocytic pathways and its diverse trafficking events. Acidification by the proton-pumping V-ATPase requires charge compensation by counterion currents that are commonly attributed to chloride. The molecular identification of intracellular chloride transporters and the improvement of methodologies for measuring intraorganellar pH and chloride have facilitated the investigation of the physiology of vesicular chloride transport. New data question the requirement of chloride for pH regulation of various organelles and furthermore ascribe functions to chloride that are beyond merely electrically shunting the proton pump. This review surveys the currently established and proposed intracellular chloride transporters and gives an overview of membrane-trafficking steps that are affected by the perturbation of chloride transport. Finally, potential mechanisms of membrane-trafficking modulation by chloride are discussed and put into the context of organellar ion homeostasis in general. PMID:23092411

  17. Low levels of cadmium chloride alter the immunoprecipitation of corneal cadherin-complex proteins.

    PubMed

    Weidner, W J; Waddell, D S; Sillman, A J

    2000-12-01

    The effect of cadmium chloride on the immunoprecipitation of cadherin and the associated adherens junctional proteins, alpha- and beta-catenin, was examined in isolated bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) corneas utilizing Western blot and enhanced chemoluminescent techniques. Application of either 1.0 microM or 75.0 microM CdCl2 to the corneal endothelium for 2 h markedly decreased the immunoprecipitation of cadherins as compared to paired control corneas. Immunoprecipitation of alpha-catenin was increased in response to both doses of CdCl2, while the immunoprecipitation of beta-catenin was little changed by either cadmium dose. There is accumulating evidence that cadmium may increase epithelial paracellular permeability by interfering with cadherin complex activity at intercellular junctions. The present study suggests that inorganic cadmium in low micromolar concentrations may decrease the integrity of the corneal endothelium, at least in part through a similar mechanism involving disruption of junctional cadherin complex function. PMID:11201663

  18. Protection of Cells against Oxidative Stress by Nanomolar Levels of Hydroxyflavones Indicates a New Type of Intracellular Antioxidant Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hájek, Jan; Staňková, Veronika; Filipský, Tomáš; Balducci, Valentina; De Vito, Paolo; Leone, Stefano; Bavavea, Eugenia I.; Silvestri, Ilaria Proietti; Righi, Giuliana; Luly, Paolo; Saso, Luciano; Bovicelli, Paolo; Pedersen, Jens Z.; Incerpi, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Natural polyphenol compounds are often good antioxidants, but they also cause damage to cells through more or less specific interactions with proteins. To distinguish antioxidant activity from cytotoxic effects we have tested four structurally related hydroxyflavones (baicalein, mosloflavone, negletein, and 5,6-dihydroxyflavone) at very low and physiologically relevant levels, using two different cell lines, L-6 myoblasts and THP-1 monocytes. Measurements using intracellular fluorescent probes and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with cytotoxicity assays showed strong antioxidant activities for baicalein and 5,6-dihydroxyflavone at picomolar concentrations, while 10 nM partially protected monocytes against the strong oxidative stress induced by 200 µM cumene hydroperoxide. Wide range dose-dependence curves were introduced to characterize and distinguish the mechanism and targets of different flavone antioxidants, and identify cytotoxic effects which only became detectable at micromolar concentrations. Analysis of these dose-dependence curves made it possible to exclude a protein-mediated antioxidant response, as well as a mechanism based on the simple stoichiometric scavenging of radicals. The results demonstrate that these flavones do not act on the same radicals as the flavonol quercetin. Considering the normal concentrations of all the endogenous antioxidants in cells, the addition of picomolar or nanomolar levels of these flavones should not be expected to produce any detectable increase in the total cellular antioxidant capacity. The significant intracellular antioxidant activity observed with 1 pM baicalein means that it must be scavenging radicals that for some reason are not eliminated by the endogenous antioxidants. The strong antioxidant effects found suggest these flavones, as well as quercetin and similar polyphenolic antioxidants, at physiologically relevant concentrations act as redox mediators to enable endogenous

  19. Chloride channels as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride channels represent a relatively under-explored target class for drug discovery as elucidation of their identity and physiological roles has lagged behind that of many other drug targets. Chloride channels are involved in a wide range of biological functions, including epithelial fluid secretion, cell-volume regulation, neuroexcitation, smooth-muscle contraction and acidification of intracellular organelles. Mutations in several chloride channels cause human diseases, including cystic fibrosis, macular degeneration, myotonia, kidney stones, renal salt wasting and hyperekplexia. Chloride-channel modulators have potential applications in the treatment of some of these disorders, as well as in secretory diarrhoeas, polycystic kidney disease, osteoporosis and hypertension. Modulators of GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid A) receptor chloride channels are in clinical use and several small-molecule chloride-channel modulators are in preclinical development and clinical trials. Here, we discuss the broad opportunities that remain in chloride-channel-based drug discovery. PMID:19153558

  20. Intracellular GSH Alterations and Its Relationship to Level of Resistance following Exposure to Cisplatin in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Bardia; Nakhjavani, Maryam; Hosseinzadeh, Leila; Amidi, Salimeh; Nikounezhad, Nastaran; H. Shirazi, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    One of the major complications in cancer chemotherapy with cisplatin as one of the important medicines in treatment regimens of different cancers is the development of resistance. One of the most described cellular defense mechanisms involved in resistance is glutathione (GSH), thus in this study, the effects of cisplatin on the total intracellular GSH level (GSHi) in some sensitive and resistant variants of human cell lines (hepatocarcinoma HepG2, skin A375, cisplatin sensitive glioblastoma U373MG and cisplatin resistant glioblastoma U373MGCP, cisplatin sensitive ovary A2780S and cisplatin resistant A2780CP cells) were studied. MTT assay was performed to measure cytotoxicity of cisplatin (33.3 µM for 1 hour). Following cisplatin exposure, GSHi (per million cells) was evaluated using a photometrical assay up to 90 minutes. Our results indicate that there are significant differences between GSHi content of A2780CP and U373MGCP cells compared to other cell lines. Moreover, IC50 of cisplatin in different cells seems to have a relation with mean of GSH level in 90 minutes (GSH (mean)90). As a conclusion, it seems that resistance to cisplatin in different cell lines is more related with the diverse patterns of GSHi variations following cisplatin exposure than its original level, and/or its cellular increase or decrease. It is also suggested that GSH (mean)90 may be used as a factor for the prediction of cellular resistance to cisplatin. PMID:25901159

  1. Novel agmatine analogue, {gamma}-guanidinooxypropylamine (GAPA) efficiently inhibits proliferation of Leishmania donovani by depletion of intracellular polyamine levels

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sushma; Jhingran, Anupam; Sharma, Ankur; Simonian, Alina R.; Soininen, Pasi; Vepsalainen, Jouko; Khomutov, Alex R.; Madhubala, Rentala

    2008-10-10

    The efficacy of {gamma}-guanidinooxypropylamine (GAPA), a novel agmatine analogue against protozoan parasite, Leishmaniadonovani was evaluated. Wild-type and ornithine decarboxylase-overexpressors of L. donovani were used to study the effect and mode of action of this inhibitor. GAPA inhibited the growth of both promastigotes and amastigotes. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity and polyamine levels were markedly lower in cells treated with GAPA and proliferation was rescued by addition of putrescine or spermidine. GAPA inhibited L. donovani recombinant ODC with K{sub i} value of {approx}60 {mu}M. The ODC-overexpressors showed significant resistance to GAPA. GAPA has pK{sub a} 6.71 and at physiological pH the analogue can mimic protonated state of putrescine and can probably use putrescine transport system. Transport of putrescine in wild-type L. donovani promastigotes was inhibited by GAPA. We for the first time report that GAPA is a potential antileishmanial lead compound and it possibly inhibits L. donovani growth by depletion of intracellular polyamine levels.

  2. UV light induces premature senescence in Akt1-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts by increasing intracellular levels of ROS

    SciTech Connect

    Jee, Hye Jin; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Ae Jeong; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Bae, Sun Sik; Yun, Jeanho

    2009-06-05

    Akt/PKB plays a pivotal role in cell survival and proliferation. Previously, we reported that UV-irradiation induces extensive cell death in Akt2{sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) while Akt1{sup -/-} MEFs show cell cycle arrest. Here, we find that Akt1{sup -/-} MEFs exhibit phenotypic changes characteristics of senescence upon UV-irradiation. An enlarged and flattened morphology, a reduced cell proliferation and an increased senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA {beta}-gal) staining indicate that Akt1{sup -/-} MEFs undergo premature senescence after UV-irradiation. Restoring Akt1 expression in Akt1{sup -/-} MEFs suppressed SA {beta}-gal activity, indicating that UV-induced senescence is due to the absence of Akt1 function. Notably, levels of ROS were rapidly increased upon UV-irradiation and the ROS scavenger NAC inhibits UV-induced senescence of Akt1{sup -/-} MEFs, suggesting that UV light induces premature senescence in Akt1{sup -/-} MEFs by modulating intracellular levels of ROS. In conjunction with our previous work, this indicates that different isoforms of Akt have distinct function in response to UV-irradiation.

  3. Remote monitoring of sub ppb levels of vinyl chloride, dichloroethylene and trichloroethylene via modem operated automated GC

    SciTech Connect

    Linenberg, A.; Lander, N.J.

    1994-12-31

    The need for remote monitoring of certain compounds in a sparsely populated area with limited user assistance led to the development and manufacture of a self contained, portable gas chromatography with the appropriate software. Part per billion levels of vinyl chloride, cis 1,2 dichloroethylene and trichloroethylene were detected in air using a trap for preconcentration of the compounds. The units were continuously calibrated with certified standards from Scott Specialty Gases, which in one case was 1 part per billion of the aforementioned compounds. The entire operation of the units, including monitoring instrument responses, changing operating parameters, data transfer, data review and data reporting was done entirely on a remote basis from approximately 600 miles away using a remote computer with a modem and remote operating software. The entire system concept promises the availability of highly sensitive remote monitoring in sparsely populated areas for long periods of time.

  4. Effect of vanadate on ATP-induced increase in intracellular calcium ion levels in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nejime, Namie; Tada, Yukari; Kagota, Satomi; Kubota, Yoko; Shibuichi, Ikuo; Shinoda, Yuki; Yamamoto, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Yasuo; Shinozuka, Kazumasa

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effect of ammonium vanadate (vanadate) on ATP-induced increases in intracellular calcium ion level ([Ca(2+)](i)) of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) by fluorescence confocal microscopic imaging using the Ca(2+)-sensitive probe Calcium Green 1/AM. The ATP analogue 2-methylthio-ATP (2meS-ATP), at 10 microM, significantly increased the [Ca(2+)](i) of HUVEC, and this was abolished by 1 microM thapsigargin (a calcium pump inhibitor), whereas extracellular free calcium had no effect. Vanadate at 10 microM also significantly increased the [Ca(2+)](i) of HUVEC, which was abolished by 1 microM thapsigargin. However, vanadate at 1 microM did not exert such a significant effect. We thus examined the influence of < or =1 microM vanadate for 24 h on 2meS-ATP-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Vanadate significantly reduced the action of 2meS-ATP at 1 microM but not at 0.1 microM. Endogenously released ATP is known to induce various actions on endothelial cells. The present results suggest that vanadate exerts a regulatory influence on the function of vascular endothelial cells. PMID:20522978

  5. Peptides from sesame cake extend healthspan of Caenorhabditis elegans via upregulation of skn-1 and inhibition of intracellular ROS levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuanhua; Ma, Xiaoli; Li, Jiao; Cui, Xiaodong

    2016-09-01

    The peptides from sesame cake (PSC) which are the main by-product of agricultural processing of sesame were prepared. To evaluate benefits of PSC for health and longevity, antioxidant activity and anti-aging effects were studied in vitro and in a Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) model system. PSC exhibited antioxidant activity in vitro, and induced beneficial effects on lifespan and several health parameters of C.elegans, including pharyngeal pumping rate, locomotion and lipofuscin accumulation. In a mev-1 mutant, PSC increased lifespan, and it enhanced oxidative stress tolerance in wild-type nematodes. After treatment with PSC, SOD activity, GSH content, and GSH/GSSG ratio were increased, leading to low intracellular ROS levels in C. elegans. PSC up-regulated skn-1 mRNA, and its target gene gcs-1, and abolished the extension of lifespan in skn-1 mutant, indicating that PSC-mediated longevity is dependent on activation of the skn-1/Nrf-2 transcription factor. Current results warrant research into the use of PSC as nutraceuticals for overall health improvement. PMID:27381188

  6. A Fiber-Optic Sensor Using an Aqueous Solution of Sodium Chloride to Measure Temperature and Water Level Simultaneously

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Sim, Hyeok In; Shin, Sang Hun; Jang, Kyoung Won; Cho, Seunghyun; Moon, Joo Hyun; Lee, Bongsoo

    2014-01-01

    A fiber-optic sensor system using a multiplexed array of sensing probes based on an aqueous solution of sodium chloride (NaCl solution) and an optical time-domain reflectometer (OTDR) for simultaneous measurement of temperature and water level is proposed. By changing the temperature, the refractive index of the NaCl solution is varied and Fresnel reflection arising at the interface between the distal end of optical fiber and the NaCl solution is then also changed. We measured the modified optical power of the light reflected from the sensing probe using a portable OTDR device and also obtained the relationship between the temperature of water and the optical power. In this study, the water level was simply determined by measuring the signal difference of the optical power due to the temperature difference of individual sensing probes placed inside and outside of the water. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the temperature and water level can be obtained simultaneously by measuring optical powers of light reflected from sensing probes based on the NaCl solution. It is anticipated that the proposed fiber-optic sensor system makes it possible to remotely monitor the real-time change of temperature and water level of the spent fuel pool during a loss of power accident. PMID:25310471

  7. Neurotoxicity of a polybrominated diphenyl ether mixture (DE-71) in mouse neurons and astrocytes is modulated by intracellular glutathione levels

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, Gennaro; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Costa, Lucio G.

    2008-10-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants have become widespread environmental contaminants. Body burden in the U.S. population has been shown to be higher than in other countries, and infants and toddlers have highest exposure through maternal breast milk and household dust. The primary concern for adverse health effects of PBDEs relates to their potential developmental neurotoxicity, which has been found in a number of animal studies. Information on the possible mechanisms of PBDE neurotoxicity is limited, though some studies have suggested that PBDEs may elicit oxidative stress. The present study examined the in vitro neurotoxicity of DE-71, a penta-BDE mixture, in primary neurons and astrocytes obtained from wild-type and Gclm knockout mice, which lack the modifier subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase and, as a consequence, have very low levels of glutathione (GSH). These experiments show that neurotoxicity of DE-71 in these cells is modulated by cellular GSH levels. Cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) from Gclm (-/-) mice displayed a higher sensitivity to DE-71 toxicity compared to CGNs from wild-type animals. DE-71 neurotoxicity in CGNs from Gclm (+/+) mice was exacerbated by GSH depletion, and in CGNs from both genotypes it was antagonized by increasing GSH levels and by antioxidants. DE-71 caused an increase in reactive oxygen species and in lipid peroxidation in CGNs, that was more pronounced in Gclm (-/-) mice. Toxicity of DE-71 was mostly due to the induction of apoptotic cell death. An analysis of DE-71-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in neurons and astrocytes from different brain areas (cerebellum, hippocampus, cerebral cortex) in both mouse genotypes showed a significant correlation with intracellular GSH levels. As an example, DE-71 caused cytotoxicity in hippocampal neurons with IC50s of 2.2 and 0.3 {mu}M, depending on genotype, and apoptosis with IC50s of 2.3 and 0.4 {mu}M, respectively. These findings suggest that the developmental

  8. Effects of electric voltage and sodium chloride level on electrolysis of swine wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cho, J H; Lee, J E; Ra, C S

    2010-08-15

    The effects of electric voltage and NaCl concentration on the removal of pollutants in swine wastewater were investigated to determine the optimum operation conditions for a designed electrolysis process. An up-flow electrolytic reactor was fabricated from Plexiglas, and one titanium anode coated with iridium oxide (IrO(2)) and two stainless steel cathodes were installed in it. The anode surface area was 80 cm(2)/L and the hydraulic retention time (HRT) was 6h. The results indicated that the pollutant removal was highly proportional to the electric voltage and removal could be enhanced by adding NaCl. The removal efficiencies of NH(4)-N, soluble nitrogen (NH(4)-N plus NO(x)-N), soluble total organic carbon (STOC), and color were proportional to the NaCl level up to 0.05% NaCl level, beyond which no further enhancement in removal was observed. However, such a tendency was not observed in the case of PO(4)-P removal. The obtained results indicate that 7 V and 0.05% (8.56 mM) NaCl level would be the optimum conditions for the designed electrolysis process. Under these conditions, the average removal efficiencies of NH(4)-N, soluble nitrogen, PO(4)-P, STOC, and color were 99%, 94%, 59%, 64%, and 93%, respectively. PMID:20471168

  9. Lipofundin® MCT/LCT 20% increase left ventricular systolic pressure in an ex vivo rat heart model via increase of intracellular calcium level

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon A; Han, Jeong Yeol; Jin, Sangkyu; Ok, Seong-Ho; Lee, Heon-Keun; Chung, Young-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Lipid emulsions have been used to treat various drug toxicities and for total parenteral nutrition therapy. Their usefulness has also been confirmed in patients with local anesthetic-induced cardiac toxicity. The purpose of this study was to measure the hemodynamic and composition effects of lipid emulsions and to elucidate the mechanism associated with changes in intracellular calcium levels in myocardiocytes. Methods We measured hemodynamic effects using a digital analysis system after Intralipid® and Lipofundin® MCT/LCT were infused into hearts hanging in a Langendorff perfusion system. We measured the effects of the lipid emulsions on intracellular calcium levels in H9c2 cells by confocal microscopy. Results Infusion of Lipofundin® MCT/LCT 20% (1 ml/kg) resulted in a significant increase in left ventricular systolic pressure compared to that after infusing modified Krebs-Henseleit solution (1 ml/kg) (P = 0.003, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.4–12.5). Lipofundin® MCT/LCT 20% had a more positive inotropic effect than that of Intralipid® 20% (P = 0.009, 95% CI, 1.4–11.6). Both lipid emulsion treatments increased intracellular calcium levels. Lipofundin® MCT/LCT (0.01%) increased intracellular calcium level more than that of 0.01% Intralipid® (P < 0.05, 95% CI, 0.0–1.9). Conclusions These two lipid emulsions had different inotropic effects depending on their triglyceride component. The inotropic effect of lipid emulsions could be related with intracellular calcium level. PMID:26885303

  10. Modulation of Intracellular Calcium Levels by Calcium Lactate Affects Colon Cancer Cell Motility through Calcium-Dependent Calpain

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramoorthy, Pasupathi; Sim, Jae Jun; Jang, Yeong-Su; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Mander, Poonam; Chul, Oh Byung; Shim, Won-Sik; Oh, Seung Hyun; Nam, Ky-Youb; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell motility is a key phenomenon regulating invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a major role in cellular adhesion and metastasis of various cancers. The relationship between dietary supplementation of calcium and colon cancer has been extensively investigated. However, the effect of calcium (Ca2+) supplementation on calpain-FAK-motility is not clearly understood. We sought to identify the mechanism of FAK cleavage through Ca2+ bound lactate (CaLa), its downstream signaling and role in the motility of human colon cancer cells. We found that treating HCT116 and HT-29 cells with CaLa immediately increased the intracellular Ca2+ (iCa2+) levels for a prolonged period of time. Ca2+ influx induced cleavage of FAK into an N-terminal FAK (FERM domain) in a dose-dependent manner. Phosphorylated FAK (p-FAK) was also cleaved in to its p-N-terminal FAK. CaLa increased colon cancer cells motility. Calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, reversed the effects of CaLa on FAK and pFAK cleavage in both cancer cell lines. The cleaved FAK translocates into the nucleus and modulates p53 stability through MDM2-associated ubiquitination. CaLa-induced Ca2+ influx increased the motility of colon cancer cells was mediated by calpain activity through FAK and pFAK protein destabilization. In conclusion, these results suggest that careful consideration may be given in deciding dietary Ca2+ supplementation to patient undergoing treatment for metastatic cancer. PMID:25629974

  11. Sulfur mustard-induced increase in intracellular free calcium level and arachidonic acid release from cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.; Legere, R.H.; Majerus, B.J.; Petrali, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    The mechanism of action of the alkylating agent bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (sulfur mustard, SM) was studied using the in thai vitro mouse neuroblastoma-rat glioma hybrid NG 108-1 S clonal p cell line model. Following 0.3 mM SM exposure, cell viability remained high (>80% of untreated control) up to 9 hr and then declined steadily to about 40% of control after 20-24 hr. During the early period of SM exposure, when there was no significant cell viability loss, the following effects were observed. The cellular glutathione level decreased 20% after 1 hr and 34% after 6 hr. Between 2 and 6 hr, there was a time-dependent increase (about 10 to 30%) in intracellular free calcium (Ca2+), which was localized to the limiting membrane of swollen endoplasmic reticula and mitochondria, to euchromatin areas of the nucleus, and to areas of the cytosol and plasma membrane. Moreover,there was also a time-dependent increase in the release of isotopically labeled arachidonic acid ((3H)AA) from cellular membranes. Increase in (3H)AA release was 28% at 3 hr and about 60-80% between 6 and 9 hr. This increase in I3HIAA release was inhibited by quinacrine (20 uM), which is a phospholipase (PLA2) inhibitor. At 16 hr after SM exposure, there was a large increase (about 200% of control) in I3HIAA release, which was coincident with a 50% loss of cell viability. These results suggest a Ca2+-mediated toxic mechanism of SM via PLA2 activation and arachidonate release.

  12. The Environmental Pollutant Tributyltin Chloride Disrupts the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis at Different Levels in Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Eduardo; Podratz, Priscila L; Sena, Gabriela C; de Araújo, Julia F P; Lima, Leandro C F; Alves, Izabela S S; Gama-de-Souza, Letícia N; Pelição, Renan; Rodrigues, Lívia C M; Brandão, Poliane A A; Carneiro, Maria T W D; Pires, Rita G W; Martins-Silva, Cristina; Alarcon, Tamara A; Miranda-Alves, Leandro; Silva, Ian V; Graceli, Jones B

    2016-08-01

    Tributyltin chloride (TBT) is an environmental contaminant that is used as a biocide in antifouling paints. TBT has been shown to induce endocrine-disrupting effects. However, studies evaluating the effects of TBT on the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis are especially rare. The current study demonstrates that exposure to TBT is critically responsible for the improper function of the mammalian HPA axis as well as the development of abnormal morphophysiology in the pituitary and adrenal glands. Female rats were treated with TBT, and their HPA axis morphophysiology was assessed. High CRH and low ACTH expression and high plasma corticosterone levels were detected in TBT rats. In addition, TBT leads to an increased in the inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression in the hypothalamus of TBT rats. Morphophysiological abnormalities, including increases in inflammation, a disrupted cellular redox balance, apoptosis, and collagen deposition in the pituitary and adrenal glands, were observed in TBT rats. Increases in adiposity and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ protein expression in the adrenal gland were observed in TBT rats. Together, these data provide in vivo evidence that TBT leads to functional dissociation between CRH, ACTH, and costicosterone, which could be associated an inflammation and increased of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in hypothalamus. Thus, TBT exerts toxic effects at different levels on the HPA axis function. PMID:27267847

  13. Intracellular proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Kolset, Svein Olav; Prydz, Kristian; Pejler, Gunnar

    2004-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are proteins with glycosaminoglycan chains, are ubiquitously expressed and have a wide range of functions. PGs in the extracellular matrix and on the cell surface have been the subject of extensive structural and functional studies. Less attention has so far been given to PGs located in intracellular compartments, although several reports suggest that these have biological functions in storage granules, the nucleus and other intracellular organelles. The purpose of this review is, therefore, to present some of these studies and to discuss possible functions linked to PGs located in different intracellular compartments. Reference will be made to publications relevant for the topics we present. It is beyond the scope of this review to cover all publications on PGs in intracellular locations. PMID:14759226

  14. Chloride removal from vitrification offgas

    SciTech Connect

    Slaathaug, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    This study identified and investigated techniques of selectively purging chlorides from the low-level waste (LLW) vitrification process with the purge stream acceptable for burial on the Hanford Site. Chlorides will be present in high concentration in several individual feeds to the LLW Vitrification Plant. The chlorides are highly volatile in combustion type melters and are readily absorbed by wet scrubbing of the melter offgas. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process flow sheets show that the resulting chloride rich scrub solution is recycled back to the melter. The chlorides must be purged from the recycle loop to prevent the buildup of excessively high chloride concentrations.

  15. Bergamot essential oil differentially modulates intracellular Ca2+ levels in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells: a new finding seen with fura-2.

    PubMed

    You, Ji H; Kang, Purum; Min, Sun Seek; Seol, Geun Hee

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we compared the effect of the essential oil of Citrus bergamia Risso [bergamot, bergamot essential oil (BEO)] on the intracellular Ca levels in vascular endothelial (EA) and mouse vascular smooth muscle (MOVAS) cells, using the fura-2 fluorescence technique. BEO caused an initial transient increase in intracellular Ca concentration ([Ca]i) in EA cells, followed by a decrease, whereas it induced a sustained increase in [Ca]i in MOVAS cells. Linalyl acetate (LA) as a major component of BEO-induced [Ca]i mobilization was similar to BEO in EA cells. The increase of [Ca]i by LA was higher in EA cells than in MOVAS cells. [Ca]i rise induced by extracellular Ca application was significantly blocked by BEO or LA in EA cells but not in MOVAS cells, suggesting that BEO and LA block Ca influx in EA cells. The present results suggest that BEO and LA differentially modulate intracellular Ca levels in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In addition, blockade of Ca influx by BEO and LA in EA cells may explain the protective effects of BEO on endothelial dysfunction associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:23288200

  16. Caveats and limitations of plate reader-based high-throughput kinetic measurements of intracellular calcium levels

    SciTech Connect

    Heusinkveld, Harm J.; Westerink, Remco H.S.

    2011-08-15

    Calcium plays a crucial role in virtually all cellular processes, including neurotransmission. The intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) is therefore an important readout in neurotoxicological and neuropharmacological studies. Consequently, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput measurements of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}, e.g. using multi-well microplate readers, in hazard characterization, human risk assessment and drug development. However, changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} are highly dynamic, thereby creating challenges for high-throughput measurements. Nonetheless, several protocols are now available for real-time kinetic measurement of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in plate reader systems, though the results of such plate reader-based measurements have been questioned. In view of the increasing use of plate reader systems for measurements of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} a careful evaluation of current technologies is warranted. We therefore performed an extensive set of experiments, using two cell lines (PC12 and B35) and two fluorescent calcium-sensitive dyes (Fluo-4 and Fura-2), for comparison of a linear plate reader system with single cell fluorescence microscopy. Our data demonstrate that the use of plate reader systems for high-throughput real-time kinetic measurements of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} is associated with many pitfalls and limitations, including erroneous sustained increases in fluorescence, limited sensitivity and lack of single cell resolution. Additionally, our data demonstrate that probenecid, which is often used to prevent dye leakage, effectively inhibits the depolarization-evoked increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. Overall, the data indicate that the use of current plate reader-based strategies for high-throughput real-time kinetic measurements of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} is associated with caveats and limitations that require further investigation. - Research Highlights: > The use of plate readers for high-throughput screening of intracellular

  17. A chloride tolerant laccase from the plant pathogen ascomycete Botrytis aclada expressed at high levels in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Kittl, Roman; Mueangtoom, Kitti; Gonaus, Christoph; Khazaneh, Shima Tahvilda; Sygmund, Christoph; Haltrich, Dietmar; Ludwig, Roland

    2012-01-20

    Fungal laccases from basidiomycetous fungi are thoroughly investigated in respect of catalytic mechanism and industrial applications, but the number of reported and well characterized ascomycetous laccases is much smaller although they exhibit interesting catalytic properties. We report on a highly chloride tolerant laccase produced by the plant pathogen ascomycete Botrytis aclada, which was recombinantly expressed in Pichia pastoris with an extremely high yield and purified to homogeneity. In a fed-batch fermentation, 495 mg L(-1) of laccase was measured in the medium, which is the highest concentration obtained for a laccase by a yeast expression system. The recombinant B. aclada laccase has a typical molecular mass of 61,565 Da for the amino acid chain. The pI is approximately 2.4, a very low value for a laccase. Glycosyl residues attached to the recombinant protein make up for approximately 27% of the total protein mass. B. aclada laccase exhibits very low K(M) values and high substrate turnover numbers for phenolic and non-phenolic substrates at acidic and near neutral pH. The enzyme's stability increases in the presence of chloride ions and, even more important, its substrate turnover is only weakly inhibited by chloride ions (I(50)=1.4M), which is in sharp contrast to most other described laccases. This high chloride tolerance is mandatory for some applications such as implantable biofuel cells and laccase catalyzed reactions, which suffer from the presence of chloride ions. The high expression yield permits fast and easy production for further basic and applied research. PMID:22178779

  18. A spontaneous change in the intracellular cyclic AMP level in Aspergillus niger is influenced by the sucrose concentration in the medium and by light.

    PubMed Central

    Gradisnik-Grapulin, M; Legisa, M

    1997-01-01

    A spontaneous rise in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels was observed in the early stages of Aspergillus niger growth under conditions yielding large amounts of citric acid. The amount of cAMP formed was found to depend on the initial concentration of sucrose in the medium. Under higher-sucrose conditions, the cAMP peak appeared earlier and was higher, while in lower-sucrose media a flattened peak was observed later in fermentation. Since in media with higher concentrations of sucrose intracellular citric acid starts to accumulate earlier and more rapidly, cAMP synthesis may be triggered by intracellular acidification, which is caused by the dissociation of citric acid. No spontaneous increase in cAMP concentrations could be detected when the cells were grown in continuously illuminated cultures, suggesting that A. niger phosphodiesterase (PDE) is photoregulated. More evidence for the activation of PDE by light was obtained from morphological studies under light and dark conditions in the presence of cAMP or N6,O2'-dibutyryl cAMP, and this idea was additionally supported by experiments in which PDE inhibitors were tested. PMID:9212431

  19. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  3. Synthesis, structural characterization and effect on human granulocyte intracellular cAMP levels of abscisic acid analogs.

    PubMed

    Bellotti, Marta; Salis, Annalisa; Grozio, Alessia; Damonte, Gianluca; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Galatini, Andrea; Zocchi, Elena; Benatti, Umberto; Millo, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA), in addition to regulating physiological functions in plants, is also produced and released by several mammalian cell types, including human granulocytes, where it stimulates innate immune functions via an increase of the intracellular cAMP concentration ([cAMP]i). We synthesized several ABA analogs and evaluated the structure-activity relationship, by the systematical modification of selected regions of these analogs. The resulting molecules were tested for their ability to inhibit the ABA-induced increase of [cAMP]i in human granulocytes. The analogs with modified configurations at C-2' and C-3' abrogated the ABA-induced increase of the [cAMP]i and also inhibited several pro-inflammatory effects induced by exogenous ABA on granulocytes and monocytes. Accordingly, these analogs could be suitable as novel putative anti-inflammatory compounds. PMID:25496807

  4. Mycobacterium Lysine ε-aminotransferase is a novel alarmone metabolism related persister gene via dysregulating the intracellular amino acid level

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiangke; Li, Yunsong; Du, Qinglin; Huang, Qinqin; Guo, Siyao; Xu, Mengmeng; Lin, Yanping; Liu, Zhidong; Xie, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial persisters, usually slow-growing, non-replicating cells highly tolerant to antibiotics, play a crucial role contributing to the recalcitrance of chronic infections and treatment failure. Understanding the molecular mechanism of persister cells formation and maintenance would obviously inspire the discovery of new antibiotics. The significant upregulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3290c, a highly conserved mycobacterial lysine ε-aminotransferase (LAT) during hypoxia persistent model, suggested a role of LAT in persistence. To test this, a lat deleted Mycobacterium smegmatis was constructed. The expression of transcriptional regulator leucine-responsive regulatory protein (LrpA) and the amino acids abundance in M. smegmatis lat deletion mutants were lowered. Thus, the persistence capacity of the deletion mutant was impaired upon norfloxacin exposure under nutrient starvation. In summary, our study firstly reported the involvement of mycobacterium LAT in persister formation, and possibly through altering the intracellular amino acid metabolism balance. PMID:26806099

  5. Mycobacterium Lysine ε-aminotransferase is a novel alarmone metabolism related persister gene via dysregulating the intracellular amino acid level.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiangke; Li, Yunsong; Du, Qinglin; Huang, Qinqin; Guo, Siyao; Xu, Mengmeng; Lin, Yanping; Liu, Zhidong; Xie, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial persisters, usually slow-growing, non-replicating cells highly tolerant to antibiotics, play a crucial role contributing to the recalcitrance of chronic infections and treatment failure. Understanding the molecular mechanism of persister cells formation and maintenance would obviously inspire the discovery of new antibiotics. The significant upregulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3290c, a highly conserved mycobacterial lysine ε-aminotransferase (LAT) during hypoxia persistent model, suggested a role of LAT in persistence. To test this, a lat deleted Mycobacterium smegmatis was constructed. The expression of transcriptional regulator leucine-responsive regulatory protein (LrpA) and the amino acids abundance in M. smegmatis lat deletion mutants were lowered. Thus, the persistence capacity of the deletion mutant was impaired upon norfloxacin exposure under nutrient starvation. In summary, our study firstly reported the involvement of mycobacterium LAT in persister formation, and possibly through altering the intracellular amino acid metabolism balance. PMID:26806099

  6. Application of "FLUOR-P" device for analysis of the space flight effects on the intracellular level.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorieva, Olga; Rudimov, Evgeny; Buravkova, Ludmila; Galchuk, Sergey

    The mechanisms of cellular gravisensitivity still remain unclear despite the intensive research in the hypogravity effects on cellular function. In most cell culture experiments on unmanned vehicles "Bion" and "Photon", as well as on the ISS only allow post-flight analysis of biological material, including fixed cells is provided. The dynamic evaluation cellular parameters over a prolonged period of time is not possible. Thus, a promising direction is the development of equipment for onboard autonomous experiments. For this purpose, the SSC RF IBMP RAS has developed "FLUOR-P" device for measurement and recording of the dynamic differential fluorescent signal from nano- and microsized objects of organic and inorganic nature (human and animal cells, unicellular algae, bacteria, cellular organelles suspension) in hermetically sealed cuvettes. Besides, the device allows to record the main physical factors affecting the analyzed object (temperature and gravity loads: position in space, any vector acceleration, shock) in sync with the main measurements. The device is designed to perform long-term programmable autonomous experiments in space flight on biological satellites. The device software of allows to carry out complex experiments using cell. Permanent registration of data on built-in flash will give the opportunity to analyze the dynamics of the estimated parameters. FLUOR-P is designed as a monobloc (5.5 kg weight), 8 functional blocks are located in the inner space of the device. Each registration unit of the FLUOR-P has two channels of fluorescence intensity and excitation light source with the wavelength range from 300 nm to 700 nm. During biosatellite "Photon" flight is supposed to conduct a full analysis of the most important intracellular parameters (mitochondria activity and intracellular pH) dynamics under space flight factors and to assess the possible contribution of temperature on the effects of microgravity. Work is supported by Roskosmos and the

  7. High-level intracellular expression of heterologous proteins in Brevibacillus choshinensis SP3 under the control of a xylose inducible promoter

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In past years research has focused on the development of alternative Gram positive bacterial expression systems to produce industrially relevant proteins. Brevibacillus choshinensis is an easy to handle non-sporulating bacterium, lacking extracellular proteases, that has been already shown to provide a high level of recombinant protein expression. One major drawback, limiting the applicability of the Brevibacillus expression system, is the absence of expression vectors based on inducible promoters. Here we used the PxylA inducible promoter, commonly employed in other Bacillae expression systems, in Brevibacillus. Results Using GFP, α-amylase and TcdA-GT as model proteins, high level of intracellular protein expression (up to 250 mg/L for the GFP) was achieved in Brevibacillus, using the pHis1522 vector carrying the B. megaterium xylose-inducible promoter (PxylA). The GFP expression yields were more than 25 fold higher than those reported for B. megaterium carrying the same vector. All the tested proteins show significant increment in their expression levels (2-10 folds) than those obtained using the available plasmids based on the P2 constitutive promoter. Conclusion Combining the components of two different commercially available Gram positive expression systems, such as Brevibacillus (from Takara Bio) and B. megaterium (from Mobitec), we demonstrate that vectors based on the B. megaterium PxylA xylose inducible promoter can be successfully used to induce high level of intracellular expression of heterologous proteins in Brevibacillus. PMID:23374160

  8. Effects of chloride, sulfate and natural organic matter (NOM) on the accumulation and release of trace-level inorganic contaminants from corroding iron.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ching-Yu; Ferguson, John F; Korshin, Gregory V

    2013-09-15

    This study examined effects of varying levels of anions (chloride and sulfate) and natural organic matter (NOM) on iron release from and accumulation of inorganic contaminants in corrosion scales formed on iron coupons exposed to drinking water. Changes of concentrations of sulfate and chloride were observed to affect iron release and, in lesser extent, the retention of representative inorganic contaminants (vanadium, chromium, nickel, copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, lead and uranium); but, effects of NOM were more pronounced. DOC concentration of 1 mg/L caused iron release to increase, with average soluble and total iron concentrations being four and two times, respectively, higher than those in the absence of NOM. In the presence of NOM, the retention of inorganic contaminants by corrosion scales was reduced. This was especially prominent for lead, vanadium, chromium and copper whose retention by the scales decreased from >80% in the absence of NOM to <30% in its presence. Some of the contaminants, notably copper, chromium, zinc and nickel retained on the surface of iron coupons in the presence of DOC largely retained their mobility and were released readily when ambient water chemistry changed. Vanadium, arsenic, cadmium, lead and uranium retained by the scales were largely unsusceptible to changes of NOM and chloride levels. Modeling indicated that the observed effects were associated with the formation of metal-NOM complexes and effects of NOM on the sorption of the inorganic contaminants on solid phases that are typical for iron corrosion in drinking water. PMID:23863395

  9. Preparation and Characterization of a Calcium Phosphate Ceramic for the Immobilization of Chloride-containing Intermediate Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, Brian; Donald, Ian W.; Scheele, Randall D.; Strachan, Denis M.

    2003-12-01

    Attention has recently been given to the immobilization of special categories of radioactive wastes, some of which contain high concentrations of actinide chlorides. Although vitrification in phosphate glass has been proposed, this was rejected because of the high losses of chloride. On the basis of non-radioactive and, more recently, radioactive studies, we have shown that calcium phosphate is an effective host for immobilizing the chloride constituents [1]. In this instance, the chlorine is retained as chloride, rather than evolved as a chlorine-bearing gas. The immobilized product is in the form of a free-flowing, non-hygroscopic powder, in which the chlorides are chemically combined within the mineral phases chlorapatite [Ca5(PO4)3Cl] and spodiosite [Ca2(PO4)Cl]. Data from studies on non-radioactive simulated waste consisting of a mixture of CaCl2 and SmCl3, and radioactive simulated waste composed of CaCl2 with PuCl3 or PuCl3 and AmCl3, are presented and compared. The XRD data confirm the presence of chlorapatite and spodiosite in the non-radioactive and radioactive materials. The durability of all specimens was measured with a modified MCC-1 test. Releases of Cl after 28 days were 1.6 x 10-3 g m-2 for the non-radioactive specimens and 7 x 10-3 g m-2 for the Pu-bearing specimens. Releases of Ca after 28 days were 0.3 x 10-3 and 2.0 x 10-3 g m-2 for the non-radioactive composition and the Pu composition, respectively, whilst release of Pu from the radioactive specimens was lower for the mixed Pu/Am specimen at 1.2 x 10-5g m-2. The release of Am from the mixed Pu/Am composition was exceptionally low at 2.4 x 10-7 g m-2. Overall, the release rate data suggest that the ceramics dissolve congruently, followed by precipitation of Sm, Pu and Am as less soluble phases, possibly oxides or phosphates. The differences in behaviour noted between non-radioactive and radioactive specimens are interpreted in terms of the crystal chemistry of the individual systems.

  10. A new insight into the role of intracellular nickel levels for the stress response, surface properties and twitching motility by Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Tikhomirova, Alexandra; Jiang, Donald; Kidd, Stephen P

    2015-04-01

    Nickel acts as a co-factor for a small number of enzymes in bacteria. Urease is one of the two nickel-dependent enzymes that have been identified in Haemophilus influenzae; glyoxalase I is the other. However, nickel has been suggested to have roles in H. influenzae that can not attributed to the function of these enzymes. We have previously shown that in the H. influenzae strain Rd KW20 the inability to acquire nickel led to alterations to the cell-type; an increased biofilm formation and changes in cell surface properties. Here we report the differences in the genome wide gene expression between Rd KW20 and a strain incapable of importing nickel (nikQ); revealing a link between intracellular nickel levels and genes involved in metabolic pathways, stress responses and genes associated with surface factors such as type IV pili. We have then taken a strain previously shown to use type IV pili both in biofilm formation and for twitching motility (86-028NP) and have shown its homologous genes (NTHI1417-1422; annotated as cobalt transporter, cbiKLMOQ) did import nickel and mutations in this locus had pleiotropic effects correlating to stress response and motility. Compared to wild type cells, the nickel depleted cells were more electronegativity charged, they aggregated and formed a biofilm. Correct intracellular nickel levels were also important for resistance to oxidative stress; the nickel depleted cells were more sensitive to oxidative stress. The nickel depleted cells were also non-motile, but the addition specifically of nickel returned these cells to a wild type motility state. We have also analysed the role of nickel uptake in a naturally, urease negative strain (the blood isolate R2866) and depleting intracellular nickel (a nikQ mutant) in this strain effected a similar range of cell functions. These data reveal a role for the capacity to acquire nickel from the environment and for the correct intracellular nickel levels as part of H. influenzae stress response

  11. Suppression of the increasing level of acetylcholine-stimulated intracellular Ca2+ in guinea pig airway smooth muscle cells by mabuterol

    PubMed Central

    SONG, XIRUI; ZHAO, CHAO; DAI, CAILING; REN, YANXIN; AN, NAN; WEN, HUIMIN; PAN, LI; CHENG, MAOSHENG; ZHANG, YUYANG

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to establish an effective method for the in vitro culture of guinea pig airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, and also investigate the suppressive effect of mabuterol hydrochloride (Mab) on the increased level of intracellular Ca2+ in ASM cells induced with acetylcholine (Ach). Two different methods, i.e. with or without collagenase to pretreat tracheal tissues, were applied to the manufacture of ASM cells. Cell viability was determined with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthinazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence were used for the identification of ASM cells. Different concentration levels (10−3, 10−4, 10−5, 10−6 and 10−7 mmol/l) of Mab were administered 5 min before Ach (10−4 M) treatment, respectively. The Ca2+ fluorescent probe, Fura-2/AM or Fluo-3/AM were applied to the inspection of Ca2+ fluorescent intensity with Varioskan Flash, immunocytometry systems and an inverted system microscope, respectively. The results showed that the fresh method, in which isolated tracheal tissues were previously treated with collagenase for 20 min, was more advantageous for the preparation of guinea pig ASM cells compared to when the enzyme was not used. The time for the ASM cells to initially migrate out of the ‘tissue blocks’ and the culture having to be generated due to the thick cell density was significantly less. On identification with immunocytochemistry or immunofluorescent staining, >95% of the cells were ASM cells. Mab (10−3−10−7 mmol/l) significantly suppressed the elevation of intracellular Ca2+ induced by Ach in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory rates of intracellular Ca2+ by different concentrations of Mab, from low to high, were 14.93, 24.73, 40.06, 48.54 and 57.13%, respectively, when Varioskan Flash was used for determination. In conclusion, this novel method has a shorter harvesting period for ASM cells. Mab can suppress the increasing level of intracellular Ca2

  12. Sperm motility-initiating substance in newt egg-jelly induces differential initiation of sperm motility based on sperm intracellular calcium levels.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akihiko; Takayama-Watanabe, Eriko; Vines, Carol A; Cherr, Gary N

    2011-01-01

    Sperm motility-initiating substance (SMIS), a novel motility inducer from newt egg-jelly, is activated by the release from associated jelly substances at the beginning of internal fertilization and affects female-stored sperm. We examined motility initiation kinetics of newt sperm in response to SMIS by monitoring the changes of sperm intracellular calcium ([Ca²(+)](i)). In quiescent non-motile sperm loaded with the Ca²(+) indicator Fluo-4, intracellular free Ca²(+) was observed around mitochondria using confocal scanning laser microscopy. A slight increase in [Ca²(+)](i) occurred simultaneously and transiently at motility initiation in sperm treated with either heated jelly extract (hJE) containing activated SMIS, or a low osmotic solution, which naturally initiates motility in externally-fertilizing amphibians and can initiate motility in urodele sperm. When the increase of [Ca²(+)](i) at motility-initiation was monitored using spectrofluorometry, large increases in [Ca²(+)](i) occurred immediately in the low osmotic solution and within 1.5 min in the hJE. In the intact jelly extract (no heating), small increases of [Ca²(+)](i) irregularly occurred from around 1 min and for about 4 min, during which motility was differentially initiated among sperm. These results indicate that the SMIS induces differential initiation of sperm motility depending on the activational states of the SMIS and its overall activity. The motility initiation in the jelly extract was delayed in sperm whose intracellular Ca²(+) had been chelated with BAPTA-AM. The relative levels of [Ca²(+)](i) were variable with a mean of 414 ± 256 nmol/L among resting sperm, suggesting that the level of [Ca²(+)](i) in the resting sperm modulates the responsiveness to the SMIS. PMID:21261606

  13. Activation of the adenosine A2A receptor attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and is associated with increased intracellular calcium levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yumei; Zou, Haifeng; Zhao, Ping; Sun, Bo; Wang, Jinghua; Kong, Qingfei; Mu, Lili; Zhao, Sihan; Wang, Guangyou; Wang, Dandan; Zhang, Yao; Zhao, Jiaying; Yin, Pengqi; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Xiuli; Li, Hulun

    2016-08-25

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common autoimmune disease that inevitably causes inflammatory nerve demyelination. However, an effective approach to prevent its course is still lacking and urgently needed. Recently, the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) has emerged as a novel inflammation regulator. Manipulation of A2AR activity may suppress the MS process and protect against nerve damage. To test this hypothesis, we treated murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model for MS, with the selective A2AR agonist, CGS21680 (CGS). We evaluated the effects of CGS on the pathological features of EAE progression, including CNS cellular infiltration, inflammatory cytokine expression, lymphocyte proliferation, and cell surface markers. Treatment with CGS significantly suppressed specific lymphocyte proliferation, reduced infiltration of CD4(+) T lymphocytes, and attenuated the expression of inflammatory cytokines, which in turn inhibited the EAE progression. For the first time, we demonstrate that CGS can increase the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in murine lymphocytes, which may be the mechanism underlying the suppressive effects of CGS-induced A2AR activation on EAE progression. Our findings strongly suggest that A2AR is a potential therapeutic target for MS and provide insight into the mechanism of action of A2AR agonists, which may offer a therapeutic option for this disease. PMID:27217214

  14. Increased levels of hepatic and renal metallothionein in the rat and guinea pig after percutaneous application of zinc chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Wormser, U.; BenZakine, S. )

    1991-02-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is a cytoplasmic, low molecular weight, cysteine rich, heat stable protein. It was detected in various organs including liver, spleen, pancreas, testes, lung, intestine, brain, heart, adrenal, lacrimal and parotid glands. The most powerful inducers of metallothionein are cadmium and zinc. Water soluble zinc salts are common contaminants of the environment. In the present study dose-response relationship and the cumulative effect of topically applied zinc chloride have been demonstrated. For comparison, metal-binding protein induction by the same route of exposure has been also tested in the guinea pig.

  15. Diethyldithiocarbamate induces apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells by raising the intracellular copper level, triggering cytochrome c release and caspase activation.

    PubMed

    Matias, Andreza C; Manieri, Tânia M; Cipriano, Samantha S; Carioni, Vivian M O; Nomura, Cassiana S; Machado, Camila M L; Cerchiaro, Giselle

    2013-02-01

    Dithiocarbamates are nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds commonly used in pharmacology, medicine and agriculture. The molecular effects of dithiocarbamates on neuronal cell systems are not fully understood, especially in terms of their ability to accumulate copper ions inside the cell. In this work, the molecular effects of N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC) were studied in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells to determine the role of copper in the DEDTC toxicity and the pathway trigged in cell by the complex Cu-DEDTC. From concentration-dependent studies, we found that 5 μM of this compound induced a drastic decrease in viable cells with a concomitant accumulation in intracellular copper resulted from complexation with DEDTC, measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The mechanism of DEDTC-induced apoptosis in neuronal model cells is thought to occur through the death receptor signaling triggered by DEDTC-copper complex in low concentration that is associated with the activation of caspase 8. Our results indicated that the mechanism of cell death involves cytochrome c release forming the apoptosome together with Apaf-1 and caspase 9, converting the caspase 9 into its active form, allowing it to activate caspase 3 as observed by immunofluorescence. This pathway is induced by the cytotoxic effects that occur when DEDTC forms a complex with the copper ions present in the culture medium and transports them into the cell, suggesting that the DEDTC by itself was not able to cause cell death and the major effect is from its copper-complex in neuroblastoma cells. The present study suggests a role for the influence of copper by low concentrations of DEDTC in the extracellular media, the absorption and accumulation of copper in the cell and apoptotic events, induced by the cytotoxic effects that occur when DEDTC forms a complex with the copper ions. PMID:22951949

  16. Intracellular microlasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humar, Matjaž; Hyun Yun, Seok

    2015-09-01

    Optical microresonators, which confine light within a small cavity, are widely exploited for various applications ranging from the realization of lasers and nonlinear devices to biochemical and optomechanical sensing. Here we use microresonators and suitable optical gain materials inside biological cells to demonstrate various optical functions in vitro including lasing. We explore two distinct types of microresonator—soft and hard—that support whispering-gallery modes. Soft droplets formed by injecting oil or using natural lipid droplets support intracellular laser action. The laser spectra from oil-droplet microlasers can chart cytoplasmic internal stress (˜500 pN μm-2) and its dynamic fluctuations at a sensitivity of 20 pN μm-2 (20 Pa). In a second form, whispering-gallery modes within phagocytized polystyrene beads of different sizes enable individual tagging of thousands of cells easily and, in principle, a much larger number by multiplexing with different dyes.

  17. Vinyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Vinyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 01 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  18. Methyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl chloride ; CASRN 74 - 87 - 3 ( 07 / 17 / 2001 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  19. Ethyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 00 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  20. Benzyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzyl chloride ; CASRN 100 - 44 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  1. Hydrogen chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Hydrogen chloride ; CASRN 7647 - 01 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  2. Mepiquat chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mepiquat chloride ; CASRN 24307 - 26 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  3. Allyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Allyl chloride ; CASRN 107 - 05 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  4. Acetyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 36 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  5. The contribution of raised intraneuronal chloride to epileptic network activity.

    PubMed

    Alfonsa, Hannah; Merricks, Edward M; Codadu, Neela K; Cunningham, Mark O; Deisseroth, Karl; Racca, Claudia; Trevelyan, Andrew J

    2015-05-20

    Altered inhibitory function is an important facet of epileptic pathology. A key concept is that GABAergic activity can become excitatory if intraneuronal chloride rises. However, it has proved difficult to separate the role of raised chloride from other contributory factors in complex network phenomena, such as epileptic pathology. Therefore, we asked what patterns of activity are associated with chloride dysregulation by making novel use of Halorhodopsin to load clusters of mouse pyramidal cells artificially with Cl(-). Brief (1-10 s) activation of Halorhodopsin caused substantial positive shifts in the GABAergic reversal potential that were proportional to the charge transfer during the illumination and in adult neocortical pyramidal neurons decayed with a time constant of τ = 8.0 ± 2.8s. At the network level, these positive shifts in EGABA produced a transient rise in network excitability, with many distinctive features of epileptic foci, including high-frequency oscillations with evidence of out-of-phase firing (Ibarz et al., 2010). We show how such firing patterns can arise from quite small shifts in the mean intracellular Cl(-) level, within heterogeneous neuronal populations. Notably, however, chloride loading by itself did not trigger full ictal events, even with additional electrical stimulation to the underlying white matter. In contrast, when performed in combination with low, subepileptic levels of 4-aminopyridine, Halorhodopsin activation rapidly induced full ictal activity. These results suggest that chloride loading has at most an adjunctive role in ictogenesis. Our simulations also show how chloride loading can affect the jitter of action potential timing associated with imminent recruitment to an ictal event (Netoff and Schiff, 2002). PMID:25995461

  6. The Contribution of Raised Intraneuronal Chloride to Epileptic Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Alfonsa, Hannah; Merricks, Edward M.; Codadu, Neela K.; Cunningham, Mark O.; Deisseroth, Karl; Racca, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Altered inhibitory function is an important facet of epileptic pathology. A key concept is that GABAergic activity can become excitatory if intraneuronal chloride rises. However, it has proved difficult to separate the role of raised chloride from other contributory factors in complex network phenomena, such as epileptic pathology. Therefore, we asked what patterns of activity are associated with chloride dysregulation by making novel use of Halorhodopsin to load clusters of mouse pyramidal cells artificially with Cl−. Brief (1–10 s) activation of Halorhodopsin caused substantial positive shifts in the GABAergic reversal potential that were proportional to the charge transfer during the illumination and in adult neocortical pyramidal neurons decayed with a time constant of τ = 8.0 ± 2.8s. At the network level, these positive shifts in EGABA produced a transient rise in network excitability, with many distinctive features of epileptic foci, including high-frequency oscillations with evidence of out-of-phase firing (Ibarz et al., 2010). We show how such firing patterns can arise from quite small shifts in the mean intracellular Cl− level, within heterogeneous neuronal populations. Notably, however, chloride loading by itself did not trigger full ictal events, even with additional electrical stimulation to the underlying white matter. In contrast, when performed in combination with low, subepileptic levels of 4-aminopyridine, Halorhodopsin activation rapidly induced full ictal activity. These results suggest that chloride loading has at most an adjunctive role in ictogenesis. Our simulations also show how chloride loading can affect the jitter of action potential timing associated with imminent recruitment to an ictal event (Netoff and Schiff, 2002). PMID:25995461

  7. Measurements of copper ground-state and metastable level population densities in a copper-chloride laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerheim, N. M.

    1977-01-01

    The population densities of both the ground and the 2D(5/2) metastable states of copper atoms in a double-pulsed copper-chloride laser are correlated with laser energy as a function of time after the dissociation current pulse. Time-resolved density variations of the ground and excited copper atoms were derived from measurements of optical absorption at 324.7 and 510.6 nm, respectively, over a wide range of operating conditions in laser tubes with diameters of 4 to 40 mm. The minimum delay between the two current pulses at which lasing was observed is shown to be a function of the initial density and subsequent decay of the metastable state. Similarly, the maximum delay is shown to be a function of the initial density and decay of the ground state.

  8. Spilanthol from Acmella Oleracea Lowers the Intracellular Levels of cAMP Impairing NKCC2 Phosphorylation and Water Channel AQP2 Membrane Expression in Mouse Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Gerbino, Andrea; Schena, Giorgia; Milano, Serena; Milella, Luigi; Barbosa, Alan Franco; Armentano, Francesca; Procino, Giuseppe; Svelto, Maria; Carmosino, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Acmella oleracea is well recognized in Brazilian traditional medicine as diuretic, although few scientific data have been published to support this effect. Aim of this study was to determine the molecular effect of Acmella oleracea extract and its main alkylamide spilanthol on two major processes involved in the urine concentrating mechanism: Na-K-2Cl symporter (NKCC2) activity in the thick ascending limb and water channel aquaporin 2 accumulation at the apical plasma membrane of collecting duct cells. Phosphorylation of NKCC2 was evaluated as index of its activation by Western blotting. Rate of aquaporin 2 apical expression was analyzed by confocal laser microscopy. Spilanthol-induced intracellular signalling events were dissected by video-imaging experiments. Exposure to spilanthol reduced the basal phosphorylation level of NKCC2 both in freshly isolated mouse kidney slices and in NKCC2-expresing HEK293 cells. In addition, exposure to spilanthol strongly reduced both desmopressin and low Cl−-dependent increase in NKCC2 phosphorylation in mouse kidney slices and NKCC2-expressing HEK293 cells, respectively. Similarly, spilanthol reduced both desmopressin- and forskolin-stimulated aquaporin 2 accumulation at the apical plasma membrane of collecting duct in mouse kidney slice and MCD4 cells, respectively. Of note, when orally administered, spilanthol induced a significant increase in both urine output and salt urinary excretion associated with a markedly reduced urine osmolality compared with control mice. Finally, at cellular level, spilanthol rapidly reduced or reversed basal and agonist-increased cAMP levels through a mechanism involving increases in intracellular [Ca2+]. In conclusion, spilanthol-induced inhibition of cAMP production negatively modulates urine-concentrating mechanisms thus holding great promise for its use as diuretic. PMID:27213818

  9. Spilanthol from Acmella Oleracea Lowers the Intracellular Levels of cAMP Impairing NKCC2 Phosphorylation and Water Channel AQP2 Membrane Expression in Mouse Kidney.

    PubMed

    Gerbino, Andrea; Schena, Giorgia; Milano, Serena; Milella, Luigi; Barbosa, Alan Franco; Armentano, Francesca; Procino, Giuseppe; Svelto, Maria; Carmosino, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Acmella oleracea is well recognized in Brazilian traditional medicine as diuretic, although few scientific data have been published to support this effect. Aim of this study was to determine the molecular effect of Acmella oleracea extract and its main alkylamide spilanthol on two major processes involved in the urine concentrating mechanism: Na-K-2Cl symporter (NKCC2) activity in the thick ascending limb and water channel aquaporin 2 accumulation at the apical plasma membrane of collecting duct cells. Phosphorylation of NKCC2 was evaluated as index of its activation by Western blotting. Rate of aquaporin 2 apical expression was analyzed by confocal laser microscopy. Spilanthol-induced intracellular signalling events were dissected by video-imaging experiments. Exposure to spilanthol reduced the basal phosphorylation level of NKCC2 both in freshly isolated mouse kidney slices and in NKCC2-expresing HEK293 cells. In addition, exposure to spilanthol strongly reduced both desmopressin and low Cl--dependent increase in NKCC2 phosphorylation in mouse kidney slices and NKCC2-expressing HEK293 cells, respectively. Similarly, spilanthol reduced both desmopressin- and forskolin-stimulated aquaporin 2 accumulation at the apical plasma membrane of collecting duct in mouse kidney slice and MCD4 cells, respectively. Of note, when orally administered, spilanthol induced a significant increase in both urine output and salt urinary excretion associated with a markedly reduced urine osmolality compared with control mice. Finally, at cellular level, spilanthol rapidly reduced or reversed basal and agonist-increased cAMP levels through a mechanism involving increases in intracellular [Ca2+]. In conclusion, spilanthol-induced inhibition of cAMP production negatively modulates urine-concentrating mechanisms thus holding great promise for its use as diuretic. PMID:27213818

  10. Intracellular microlasers

    PubMed Central

    Humar, Matjaž; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Optical microresonators1 which confine light within a small cavity are widely exploited for various applications ranging from the realization of lasers2 and nonlinear devices3, 4, 5 to biochemical and optomechanical sensing6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. Here we employ microresonators and suitable optical gain materials inside biological cells to demonstrate various optical functions in vitro including lasing. We explored two distinct types of microresonators: soft and hard, that support whispering-gallery modes (WGM). Soft droplets formed by injecting oil or using natural lipid droplets support intracellular laser action. The laser spectra from oil-droplet microlasers can chart cytoplasmic internal stress (~500 pN/μm2) and its dynamic fluctuations at a sensitivity of 20 pN/μm2 (20 Pa). In a second form, WGMs within phagocytized polystyrene beads of different sizes enable individual tagging of thousands of cells easily and, in principle, a much larger number by multiplexing with different dyes. PMID:26417383

  11. Intracellular NAD+ levels are associated with LPS-induced TNF-α release in pro-inflammatory macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shabany, Abbas Jawad; Moody, Alan John; Foey, Andrew David; Billington, Richard Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism and immune responses have been shown to be closely linked and as our understanding increases, so do the intricacies of the level of linkage. NAD+ has previously been shown to regulate tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) synthesis and TNF-α has been shown to regulate NAD+ homoeostasis providing a link between a pro-inflammatory response and redox status. In the present study, we have used THP-1 differentiation into pro- (M1-like) and anti- (M2-like) inflammatory macrophage subset models to investigate this link further. Pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophages showed different resting NAD+ levels and expression levels of NAD+ homoeostasis enzymes. Challenge with bacterial lipopolysaccharide, a pro-inflammatory stimulus for macrophages, caused a large, biphasic and transient increase in NAD+ levels in pro- but not anti-inflammatory macrophages that were correlated with TNF-α release and inhibition of certain NAD+ synthesis pathways blocked TNF-α release. Lipopolysaccharide stimulation also caused changes in mRNA levels of some NAD+ homoeostasis enzymes in M1-like cells. Surprisingly, despite M2-like cells not releasing TNF-α or changing NAD+ levels in response to lipopolysaccharide, they showed similar mRNA changes compared with M1-like cells. These data further strengthen the link between pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages and NAD+. The agonist-induced rise in NAD+ shows striking parallels to well-known second messengers and raises the possibility that NAD+ is acting in a similar manner in this model. PMID:26764408

  12. GTP Cyclohydrolase I Expression, Protein, and Activity Determine Intracellular Tetrahydrobiopterin Levels, Independent of GTP Cyclohydrolase Feedback Regulatory Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tatham, Amy L.; Crabtree, Mark J.; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J.; Channon, Keith M.

    2009-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r2 = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r2 = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression. PMID:19286659

  13. GTP cyclohydrolase I expression, protein, and activity determine intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin levels, independent of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tatham, Amy L; Crabtree, Mark J; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J; Channon, Keith M

    2009-05-15

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression. PMID:19286659

  14. Lovastatin-induced decrease of intracellular cholesterol level attenuates fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transition in bronchial fibroblasts derived from asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Michalik, Marta; Soczek, Ewelina; Kosińska, Milena; Rak, Monika; Wójcik, Katarzyna Anna; Lasota, Sławomir; Pierzchalska, Małgorzata; Czyż, Jarosław; Madeja, Zbigniew

    2013-03-15

    Chronic inflammation of the airways and structural changes in the bronchial wall are basic hallmarks of asthma. Human bronchial fibroblasts derived from patients with diagnosed asthma display in vitro predestination towards TGF-β-induced fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transition (FMT), a key event in the bronchial wall remodelling. Statins inhibit 3-hydroxymethyl-3-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase, a key enzyme in the cholesterol synthesis pathway and are widely used as antilipidemic drugs. The pleiotropic anti-inflammatory effects of statins, independent of their cholesterol-lowering capacity, are also well established. Since commonly used anti-asthmatic drugs do not reverse the structural remodelling of the airways and statins have tentative anti-asthmatic activity, we have studied the effect of lovastatin on FMT in populations of human bronchial fibroblasts derived from asthmatic patients. We demonstrate that the intensity of FMT induced by TGF-β1 was strongly and dose-dependently attenuated by lovastatin. Furthermore, we show that neither the suppression of prenylation of signalling proteins nor the effect on reactive oxygen species formation are important for lovastatin-induced inhibition of myofibroblast differentiation. On the other hand, we show that a squalene synthase inhibitor, zaragozic acid A, reduced the TGF-β1-induced FMT to an extent comparable to lovastatin effect. Additionally we demonstrate that in bronchial fibroblast populations, both inhibitors (lovastatin and zaragozic acid A) attenuate the TGF-β1-induced Smad2 nuclear translocation in a manner dependent on intracellular cholesterol level. Our data suggest that statins can directly, by decrease of intracellular cholesterol level, affect basic cell signalling events crucial for asthmatic processes and potentially prevent perilous bronchial wall remodelling associated with intensive myofibroblast formation. PMID:23485731

  15. 3β-Acetyl tormentic acid reverts MRP1/ABCC1 mediated cancer resistance through modulation of intracellular levels of GSH and inhibition of GST activity.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Gleice da Graça; Oliveira, Rodrigo Rodrigues; Kaplan, Maria Auxiliadora Coelho; Gattass, Cerli Rocha

    2014-10-15

    ABC transporter overexpression is an important mechanism of multidrug resistance (MDR) and one of the main obstacles to successful cancer treatment. As these proteins actively remove chemotherapeutics from the tumor cells, the pharmacological inhibition of their activity is a possible strategy to revert drug resistance. Moreover, the ability of MDR inhibitors to sensitize resistant cells to conventional drugs is important for their clinical use. Evidence has shown that the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a negative prognostic marker in patients with lung, gastric, or breast cancers or neuroblastoma. Previous data have shown that 3β-acetyl tormentic acid (3ATA) inhibits the transport activity of the protein MRP1/ABCC1. In this study, we evaluated the ability of 3ATA to sensitize an MDR cell line (GLC4/ADR), which overexpresses MRP1, and investigated the anti-MRP1 mechanisms activated by 3ATA. The results showed that 3ATA is able to reverse the resistance of the MDR cell line to doxorubicin and vincristine, two drugs that are commonly used in cancer chemotherapy. Regarding the sensitizing mechanism induced by 3ATA, this work shows that the triterpene does not modulate the expression of MRP1/ABCC1 but is able to reduce total intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels and decrease the activity of glutathione-s-transferase (GST), the enzyme responsible for the glutathione conjugation of xenobiotics. Together, these results show that 3ATA sensitizes the MDR cell line overexpressing MRP1/ABCC1 to antineoplastic drugs and that this effect is mediated by the modulation of intracellular levels of GSH and GST activity. PMID:25111243

  16. Basolateral K+ channel involvement in forskolin-activated chloride secretion in human colon.

    PubMed

    McNamara, B; Winter, D C; Cuffe, J E; O'Sullivan, G C; Harvey, B J

    1999-08-15

    1. In this study we investigated the role of basolateral potassium transport in maintaining cAMP-activated chloride secretion in human colonic epithelium. 2. Ion transport was quantified in isolated human colonic epithelium using the short-circuit current technique. Basolateral potassium transport was studied using nystatin permeabilization. Intracellular calcium measurements were obtained from isolated human colonic crypts using fura-2 spectrofluorescence imaging. 3. In intact isolated colonic strips, forskolin and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) activated an inward transmembrane current (ISC) consistent with anion secretion (for forskolin DeltaISC = 63.8+/-6.2 microA cm(-2), n = 6; for PGE2 DeltaISC = 34.3+/-5.2 microA cm(-2), n = 6). This current was inhibited in chloride-free Krebs solution or by inhibiting basolateral chloride uptake with bumetanide and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid DIDS). 4. The forskolin- and PGE2-induced chloride secretion was inhibited by basolateral exposure to barium (5 mM), tetrapentylammonium (10 microM) and tetraethylammonium (10 mM). 5. The transepithelial current produced under an apical to serosal K+ gradient in nystatin-perforated colon is generated at the basolateral membrane by K+ transport. Forskolin failed to activate this current under conditions of high or low calcium and failed to increase the levels of intracellular calcium in isolated crypts 6. In conclusion, we propose that potassium recycling through basolateral K+ channels is essential for cAMP-activated chloride secretion. PMID:10432355

  17. Triclocarban-induced change in intracellular Ca²⁺ level in rat thymocytes: cytometric analysis with Fluo-3 under Zn²⁺-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yukari; Chen, Xiaohui; Yamada, Saki; Sugihara, Aya; Enkhjargal, Molomjamts; Sun, Yuanzhi; Kuroda, Keiko; Satoh, Masaya; Oyama, Yasuo

    2014-03-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is an antimicrobial used in personal hygiene products. Recent health concerns arose after TCC was detected in the blood of human subjects who showered with soap containing TCC. In this study, the effect of TCC on intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in rat thymocytes was examined using Fluo-3, an indicator of intracellular Ca(2+). TCC at concentrations ranging from 0.1 μM to 3 μM increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration biphasically: first by releasing Ca(2+) from intracellular Ca(2+) stores and then inducing Ca(2+) influx through store-operated Ca(2+) channels. The threshold TCC concentration to increase intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in this study was lower than the maximum TCC concentrations reported in human blood samples. Therefore, we anticipate that TCC at concentrations reported in human blood samples might disturb intracellular Ca(2+) signaling in human lymphocytes. PMID:24562054

  18. Serum microRNA181a: Correlates with the intracellular cytokine levels and a potential biomarker for acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Xie, Linna; Zhou, Fang; Liu, Ximin; Fang, Yuan; Yu, Zhe; Song, Ningxia; Kong, Fansheng

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical relevance of lymphocyte-related serum miRNAs to the pathogenesis of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) and evaluate the predictive and prognosis value of miRNAs. Consecutive patients who received allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (allo-PBSCT) in General Hospital of Jinan Military District were enrolled. aGVHD patients were diagnosed and graded clinically, and divided into the training set and the testing set. Blood samples were collected, total RNA was isolated, and RT-PCR was performed for miRNA expression (miR-181a-3p, miR-214-3p and miR-326). Intracellular cytokines levels were assayed by flow cytometry, and the disease specificity assay of miRNAs for aGVHD was detected. A total of 120 patients were admitted. Serum level of miR-181a in aGVHD patients was highly increased and associated with the severity of aGVHD, but not miR-214 and miR-326. Levels of cytokines including IL-2, IL-22, and IL-17a were positively correlated with miR-181a level, while serum IL-13 level was negatively correlated with miR-181a level in aGVHD patients. Moreover, increased miR-181a level was not detected in patients with acute rejection after kidney transplantation or sepsis patients. MiR-181a level was sensitively and specifically increased, especially in severe aGVHD patients. MiR-181a may be a potential biomarker for the identification, diagnosis, and prognosis of aGVHD patients. PMID:27288630

  19. Intracellular ion channels and cancer.

    PubMed

    Leanza, Luigi; Biasutto, Lucia; Managò, Antonella; Gulbins, Erich; Zoratti, Mario; Szabò, Ildikò

    2013-01-01

    Several types of channels play a role in the maintenance of ion homeostasis in subcellular organelles including endoplasmatic reticulum, nucleus, lysosome, endosome, and mitochondria. Here we give a brief overview of the contribution of various mitochondrial and other organellar channels to cancer cell proliferation or death. Much attention is focused on channels involved in intracellular calcium signaling and on ion fluxes in the ATP-producing organelle mitochondria. Mitochondrial K(+) channels (Ca(2+)-dependent BKCa and IKCa, ATP-dependent KATP, Kv1.3, two-pore TWIK-related Acid-Sensitive K(+) channel-3 (TASK-3)), Ca(2+) uniporter MCU, Mg(2+)-permeable Mrs2, anion channels (voltage-dependent chloride channel VDAC, intracellular chloride channel CLIC) and the Permeability Transition Pore (MPTP) contribute importantly to the regulation of function in this organelle. Since mitochondria play a central role in apoptosis, modulation of their ion channels by pharmacological means may lead to death of cancer cells. The nuclear potassium channel Kv10.1 and the nuclear chloride channel CLIC4 as well as the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER)-located inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor, the ER-located Ca(2+) depletion sensor STIM1 (stromal interaction molecule 1), a component of the store-operated Ca(2+) channel and the ER-resident TRPM8 are also mentioned. Furthermore, pharmacological tools affecting organellar channels and modulating cancer cell survival are discussed. The channels described in this review are summarized on Figure 1. Overall, the view is emerging that intracellular ion channels may represent a promising target for cancer treatment. PMID:24027528

  20. Actions of mammalian insulin on a Neurospora variant: effects on intracellular metabolite levels as monitored by P-31 NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, N.J.; McKenzie, M.A.; Jordan, F.; Takahashi, M.; Lenard, J.

    1986-05-01

    Fourier transform P-31 NMR spectroscopy (81 MHz) was used to investigate the biochemical nature of insulin action upon the cell wall-deficient slime mutant of Neurospora crassa. Spectra of oxygenated, living cells (ca.10/sup 9//ml.) in late logarithmic-early stationary phase of growth were accumulated for approximately 20 min. (350-450 pulses). Pronounced differences were seen in the metabolite levels of cells cultured for 18-21 hours in the presence of insulin (100 nM) as compared to cells cultured in its absence. Differences in the insulin-grown cells included higher levels of sugar phosphates, inorganic (cytoplasmic) phosphate, NAD+/NADH and UDP-glucose (UDPG) compared to control cells, in which UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDPNAG) was the prominent sugar nucleotide. When 100 mM glucose was administered with insulin immediately prior to measurement, short term effects were seen. There were significant increases of sugar phosphates, inorganic phosphate, NAD+/NADH, phosphodiesters and UDPG relative to the case of glucose addition alone. These results are wholly consistent with the known influence of insulin upon mammalian metabolism: stimulation of glucose uptake, phosphorylation and oxidation, phosphatide synthesis and Pi uptake.

  1. Global protein-level responses of Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 to prolonged changes in external sodium chloride concentrations.

    PubMed

    Leuko, Stefan; Raftery, Mark J; Burns, Brendan P; Walter, Malcolm R; Neilan, Brett A

    2009-05-01

    Responses to changes in external salinity were examined in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1. H. salinarum NRC-1 grows optimally at 4.3 M NaCl and is capable of growth between 2.6 and 5.1 M NaCl. Physiological changes following incubation at 2.6 M NaCl were investigated with respect to growth behavior and proteomic changes. Initial observations indicated delayed growth at low NaCl concentrations (2.6 M NaCl), and supplementation with different sugars, amino acids, or KCl to increase external osmotic pressure did not reverse these growth perturbations. To gain a more detailed insight into the adaptive responses of H. salinarum NRC-1 to changes in salinity, the proteome was characterized using iTRAQ (amine specific isobaric tagging reagents). Three hundred and nine differentially expressed proteins were shown to be associated with changes in the external sodium chloride concentration, with proteins associated with metabolism revealing the greatest response. PMID:19206189

  2. Regulation of intracellular beta-catenin levels by the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor-suppressor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Munemitsu, S; Albert, I; Souza, B; Rubinfeld, B; Polakis, P

    1995-01-01

    The APC tumor-suppressor protein associates with beta-catenin, a cell adhesion protein that is upregulated by the WNT1 oncogene. We examined the effects of exogenous APC expression on the distribution and amount of beta-catenin in a colorectal cancer cell containing only mutant APC. Expression of wild-type APC caused a pronounced reduction in total beta-catenin levels by eliminating an excessive supply of cytoplasmic beta-catenin indigenous to the SW480 colorectal cancer cell line. This reduction was due to an enhanced rate of beta-catenin protein degradation. Truncated mutant APC proteins, characteristic of those associated with cancer, lacked this activity. Mutational analysis revealed that the central region of the APC protein, which is typically deleted or severely truncated in tumors, was responsible for the down-regulation of beta-catenin. These results suggest that the tumor-suppressor activity of mutant APC may be compromised due to a defect in its ability to regulate beta-catenin. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7708772

  3. High-level intracellular expression of hydroxynitrile lyase from the tropical rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis in microbial hosts.

    PubMed

    Hasslacher, M; Schall, M; Hayn, M; Bona, R; Rumbold, K; Lückl, J; Griengl, H; Kohlwein, S D; Schwab, H

    1997-10-01

    (S)-Hydroxynitrile lyase (Hnl) from the tropical rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis catalyzes the formation of (S)-cyanohydrins from hydrocyanic acid and aldehydes or ketones. This enzyme accepts aliphatic, aromatic, and heterocyclic carbonyl compounds as substrates and is therefore considered a potent biocatalyst for the industrial production of optically active chemicals. Limitations in enzyme supply from natural resources were overcome by production of the enzyme in the microbial host systems Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Pichia pastoris. Expression of Hnl in the prokaryotic system led to the formation of inclusion bodies whereas in both yeast hosts high levels of soluble protein were obtained. Highest yields were obtained in a high cell density batch fermentation of a P. pastoris transformant that expressed heterologous Hnl to about 50% of the soluble cytosolic protein. At a cell density of 100 g/liter cell dry weight, a volume yield of 22 g/liter of heterologous product was obtained. Attempts to produce the Hnl protein extracellularly with the yeast hosts by applying different leader peptide strategies were not successful. Immunofluorescence microscopy studies indicated that the secretion-directed heterologous Hnl protein accumulated in the plasma membrane forming aggregated clusters of inactive protein. PMID:9325140

  4. Skeletal muscle intracellular pH and levels of high energy phosphates during hypercapnia in intact lizards by /sup 31/P NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.C.; Hitzig, B.M.; Elmden, K.; McFarland, E.; Koutcher, J.; Kazemi, H.

    1986-03-05

    Lizards have been shown to reduce ventilation during CO/sub 2/ breathing. This is thought to be detrimental to the maintenance of intracellular pH (pHi) and levels of high energy phosphates. The authors subjected chameleons (n=4) to 5% CO/sub 2/ breathing and made serial measurements of tail (skeletal) muscle pHi, levels of phosphocreatine (PCr), and ATP utilizing high resolution /sup 31/P NMR. pHi was unchanged from controls (7.27 +/- 0.06 units) (mean +/- SE) during 30 minutes of hypercapnia (7.19 +/- 0.09 units) (p>.2) demonstrating effective regulation of skeletal muscle pHi; however, there were significant decreases in the PCr/ATP ratios to 65% +/- 5% (p<.05) of control. The reduced PCr/ATP ratio does not appear due to decreased O/sub 2/ availability because there were no increases in the levels of glycolytic intermediates and inorganic phosphate which would indicate tissue hypoxia. It is possible that an active process requiring ATP is required for the maintenance of pHi in the presence of hypercapnia and that the reduction of PCr/ATP ratio is a reflection of an increased utilization of ATP.

  5. Fragrance chemicals lyral and lilial decrease viability of HaCat cells' by increasing free radical production and lowering intracellular ATP level: protection by antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Usta, Julnar; Hachem, Yassmine; El-Rifai, Omar; Bou-Moughlabey, Yolla; Echtay, Karim; Griffiths, David; Nakkash-Chmaisse, Hania; Makki, Rajaa Fakhoury

    2013-02-01

    We investigate in this study the biochemical effects on cells in culture of two commonly used fragrance chemicals: lyral and lilial. Whereas both chemicals exerted a significant effect on primary keratinocyte(s), HaCat cells, no effect was obtained with any of HepG2, Hek293, Caco2, NIH3T3, and MCF7 cells. Lyral and lilial: (a) decreased the viability of HaCat cells with a 50% cell death at 100 and 60 nM respectively; (b) decreased significantly in a dose dependant manner the intracellular ATP level following 12-h of treatment; (c) inhibited complexes I and II of electron transport chain in liver sub-mitochondrial particles; and (d) increased reactive oxygen species generation that was reversed by N-acetyl cysteine and trolox and the natural antioxidant lipoic acid, without influencing the level of free and/or oxidized glutathione. Lipoic acid protected HaCat cells against the decrease in viability induced by either compound. Dehydrogenation of lyral and lilial produce α,β-unsaturated aldehydes, that reacts with lipoic acid requiring proteins resulting in their inhibition. We propose lyral and lilial as toxic to mitochondria that have a direct effect on electron transport chain, increase ROS production, derange mitochondrial membrane potential, and decrease cellular ATP level, leading thus to cell death. PMID:22940465

  6. Raising the intracellular level of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate changes plasma membrane ion transport in characean algae.

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, G; MacRobbie, E A; Hanke, D E

    1990-01-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) was introduced into the cytoplasm of characean algae in two different ways: (i) by iontophoretic injection into cytoplasm-enriched fragments from Chara and (ii) by adding InsP3 to the permeabilization medium of locally permeabilized cells of Nitella. In both systems this operation induced a depolarization of the membrane potential, ranging from a few mV to sequences of action potentials. The effect of InsP3 on locally permeabilized Nitella cells was abolished when InsP3 was added together with 30 mM EGTA. When inositol 1,4-bisphosphate or myo-inositol were substituted for InsP3 in this system, there was no change in the membrane potential. On the other hand, increasing the free Ca2+ concentration in the permeabilization medium induced, in a similar fashion to InsP3, action potentials. Similarities between InsP3 and Ca2+ action were also observed upon injection into Chara fragments. Both injections increased an inward current. In the first few seconds after injection the current/voltage characteristics of the InsP3-induced current resembled those of the Ca2(+)-sensitive current. Subsequently, differences between the InsP3- and Ca2(+)-induced phenomena became apparent in that the InsP3-induced current continued to increase while the Ca2(+)-induced current declined, returning to the resting level. Our results suggest that these plant cells contain an InsP3 sensitive system that, under experimental conditions, is able to affect membrane transport via an increase in cytoplasmic free Ca2+. PMID:2112084

  7. Intracellular Acidosis Enhances the Excitability of Working Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Thomas H.; Nielsen, Ole B.; Lamb, Graham D.; Stephenson, D. George

    2004-08-01

    Intracellular acidification of skeletal muscles is commonly thought to contribute to muscle fatigue. However, intracellular acidosis also acts to preserve muscle excitability when muscles become depolarized, which occurs with working muscles. Here, we show that this process may be mediated by decreased chloride permeability, which enables action potentials to still be propagated along the internal network of tubules in a muscle fiber (the T system) despite muscle depolarization. These results implicate chloride ion channels in muscle function and emphasize that intracellular acidosis of muscle has protective effects during muscle fatigue.

  8. Synergism between arsenite and proteasome inhibitor MG132 over cell death in myeloid leukaemic cells U937 and the induction of low levels of intracellular superoxide anion

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, Tomás; Cavaliere, Victoria; Costantino, Susana N.; Kornblihtt, Laura; Alvarez, Elida M.; Blanco, Guillermo A.

    2012-02-01

    Increased oxygen species production has often been cited as a mechanism determining synergism on cell death and growth inhibition effects of arsenic-combined drugs. However the net effect of drug combination may not be easily anticipated solely from available knowledge of drug-induced death mechanisms. We evaluated the combined effect of sodium arsenite with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, and the anti-leukaemic agent CAPE, on growth-inhibition and cell death effect in acute myeloid leukaemic cells U937 and Burkitt's lymphoma-derived Raji cells, by the Chou–Talalay method. In addition we explored the association of cytotoxic effect of drugs with changes in intracellular superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup −}) levels. Our results showed that combined arsenite + MG132 produced low levels of O{sub 2}{sup −} at 6 h and 24 h after exposure and were synergic on cell death induction in U937 cells over the whole dose range, although the combination was antagonistic on growth inhibition effect. Exposure to a constant non-cytotoxic dose of 80 μM hydrogen peroxide together with arsenite + MG132 changed synergism on cell death to antagonism at all effect levels while increasing O{sub 2}{sup −} levels. Arsenite + hydrogen peroxide also resulted in antagonism with increased O{sub 2}{sup −} levels in U937 cells. In Raji cells, arsenite + MG132 also produced low levels of O{sub 2}{sup −} at 6 h and 24 h but resulted in antagonism on cell death and growth inhibition. By contrast, the combination arsenite + CAPE showed high levels of O{sub 2}{sup −} production at 6 h and 24 h post exposure but resulted in antagonism over cell death and growth inhibition effects in U937 and Raji cells. We conclude that synergism between arsenite and MG132 in U937 cells is negatively associated to O{sub 2}{sup −} levels at early time points after exposure. -- Highlights: ► Arsenic combined cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects by Chou–Talalay method. ► Cytotoxic effect associated

  9. Malate-aspartate shuttle inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid leads to decreased intracellular ATP levels and altered cell cycle of C6 glioma cells by inhibiting glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caixia; Chen, Heyu; Zhang, Mingchao; Zhang, Jie; Wei, Xunbin; Ying, Weihai

    2016-08-01

    NADH shuttles, including malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS) and glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle, can shuttle the reducing equivalents of cytosolic NADH into mitochondria. It is widely accepted that the major function of NADH shuttles is to increase mitochondrial energy production. Our study tested the hypothesis that the novel major function of NADH shuttles in cancer cells is to maintain glycolysis by decreasing cytosolic NADH/NAD(+) ratios. We found that AOAA, a widely used MAS inhibitor, led to decreased intracellular ATP levels, altered cell cycle and increased apoptosis and necrosis of C6 glioma cells, without affecting the survival of primary astrocyte cultures. AOAA also decreased the glycolytic rate and the levels of extracellular lactate and pyruvate, without affecting the mitochondrial membrane potential of C6 cells. Moreover, the toxic effects of AOAA were completely prevented by pyruvate treatment. Collectively, our study has suggested that AOAA may be used to selectively decrease glioma cell survival, and the major function of MAS in cancer cells may be profoundly different from its major function in normal cells: The major function of MAS in cancer cells is to maintain glycolysis, instead of increasing mitochondrial energy metabolism. PMID:27157912

  10. The level of an intracellular antioxidant during development determines the adult phenotype in a bird species: a potential organizer role for glutathione.

    PubMed

    Romero-Haro, Ana Angela; Alonso-Alvarez, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    Life-history traits are often involved in trade-offs whose outcome would depend on the availability of resources but also on the state of specific molecular signals. Early conditions can influence trade-offs and program the phenotype throughout the lifetime, with oxidative stress likely involved in many taxa. Here we address the potential regulatory role of a single intracellular antioxidant in life-history trade-offs. Blood glutathione levels were reduced in a large sample of birds (zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata) during development using the synthesis inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Results revealed several modifications in the adult phenotype. BSO-treated nestlings showed lower glutathione and plasma antioxidant levels. In adulthood, BSO birds endured greater oxidative damage in erythrocytes but stronger expression of a sexual signal. Moreover, adult BSO females also showed weaker resistance to oxidative stress but were heavier and showed better body condition. Results suggest that low glutathione values during growth favor the investment in traits that should improve fitness returns, probably in the form of early reproduction. Higher oxidative stress in adulthood may be endured if this cost is paid later in life. Either the presence of specific signaling mechanisms or the indirect effect of increased oxidative stress can explain our findings. PMID:25674693

  11. Development of an immune function assay by measuring intracellular adenosine triphosphate (iATP) levels in mitogen-stimulated CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Hadi; Najafi, Alireza; Khoshroo, Mohammad; Tajik, Nader

    2016-01-01

    We developed an immune function assay for monitoring CD4+ T cells activity based on changes in intracellular adenosine triphosphate (iATP) levels after phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation. Blood samples were obtained from 40 healthy subjects and 30 RTRs and incubated with 5 µg/mL of PHA for 15-18 hr at 37°C and 5% CO2. Afterward, the CD4+ T cells were separated by antibody-coated magnetic beads and lysed. Then, iATP content in unstimulated and stimulated conditions was measured by luciferin-luciferase reaction using a log-log standard curve. The iATP levels showed significant increase in CD4+ T cells in both healthy persons (mean: 550 ± 142 ng/mL vs. 109 ± 54 ng/mL) and RTRs (mean: 394 ± 160 ng/mL vs. 52 ± 37 ng/mL) after PHA stimulation (P < 0.001). However, the iATP production in RTRs was significantly lower than that in healthy individuals; both prior to and after stimulation with PHA (P < 0.001). No gender-specific difference in iATP production was observed between women and men subjects. This rapid and low-cost assay reflects the degree of immune cell function through assessment of CD4+ T cells activation. Thus, it can be used for evaluation of immune system status in immunodeficient individuals as well as in immunosuppressed transplant recipients who needs drug adjustment. PMID:27089103

  12. Deferoxamine-induced increase in the intracellular iron levels in highly aggressive breast cancer cells leads to increased cell migration by enhancing TNF-α-dependent NF-κB signaling and TGF-β signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; He, Kun; Song, Hongjiao; Ma, Zhufeng; Yin, Weihai; Xu, Lisa X

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have suggested that excess iron accumulation may be a risk factor for breast cancer. However the role of iron in breast cancer metastasis has remained unclear. The major goal of our study is to investigate the roles of iron in breast cancer metastasis. We modulated the intracellular iron levels of human breast cancer cells, including the aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells and non-aggressive MCF-7 cells, by using Deferoxamine (DFO) - a most widely used iron chelator. We found that DFO treatment could deplete intracellular iron in MCF-7 cells. In contrast, DFO treatment led to a significant increase in the intracellular iron level in MDA-MB-231 cells. The MDA-MB-231 cells with the increased intracellular iron level exhibited increases in both mesenchymal markers and cell migration. Furthermore, the DFO-treated MDA-MB-231 cells showed increases in both tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)-induced nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling, which could contribute to the enhanced cell migration. Collectively, our study has provided the first evidence suggesting that increased intracellular iron levels could lead to enhanced migration of aggressive breast cancer cells by increasing TNF-α-dependent NF-κB signaling and TGF-β signaling. Our study has also suggested that caution should be taken when DFO is applied for treating breast cancer cells, since DFO could produce differential effects on the intracellular iron levels for aggressive breast cancer cells and non-aggressive breast cancer cells. PMID:27138103

  13. Atmospheric chloride: Its implication for foliar uptake and damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, E. L.; Sealy, R. L.

    Atmospheric chloride is inversely related to distance from the Texas coast; r2 = 0.86. Levels of atmospheric chloride are higher in the early summer than in the winter because of salt storms. Leaf chloride l'evels of Tillandsia usneoides L. (Spanish moss) reflect the atmospheric chloride levels; r2 = 0.78. The importance of considering the effect of atmospheric chloride on leaf damage to horticultural crops is discussed.

  14. Low-Power Laser Irradiation Suppresses Inflammatory Response of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells by Modulating Intracellular Cyclic AMP Level and NF-κB Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chau-Zen; Ho, Mei-Ling; Yeh, Ming-Long; Wang, Yan-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based tissue regeneration is a promising therapeutic strategy for treating damaged tissues. However, the inflammatory microenvironment that exists at a local injury site might restrict reconstruction. Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) has been widely applied to retard the inflammatory reaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of LPLI on human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) in an inflammatory environment. We showed that the hADSCs expressed Toll-like Receptors (TLR) 1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, and TLR6 and that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) significantly induced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), and Interleukin-8 (IL-8)). LPLI markedly inhibited LPS-induced, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression at an optimal dose of 8 J/cm2. The inhibitory effect triggered by LPLI might occur through an increase in the intracellular level of cyclic AMP (cAMP), which acts to down-regulate nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcriptional activity. These data collectively provide insight for further investigations of the potential application of anti-inflammatory treatment followed by stem cell therapy. PMID:23342077

  15. Low-power laser irradiation suppresses inflammatory response of human adipose-derived stem cells by modulating intracellular cyclic AMP level and NF-κB activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jyun-Yi; Chen, Chia-Hsin; Wang, Chau-Zen; Ho, Mei-Ling; Yeh, Ming-Long; Wang, Yan-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based tissue regeneration is a promising therapeutic strategy for treating damaged tissues. However, the inflammatory microenvironment that exists at a local injury site might restrict reconstruction. Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) has been widely applied to retard the inflammatory reaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of LPLI on human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) in an inflammatory environment. We showed that the hADSCs expressed Toll-like Receptors (TLR) 1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, and TLR6 and that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) significantly induced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), and Interleukin-8 (IL-8)). LPLI markedly inhibited LPS-induced, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression at an optimal dose of 8 J/cm². The inhibitory effect triggered by LPLI might occur through an increase in the intracellular level of cyclic AMP (cAMP), which acts to down-regulate nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcriptional activity. These data collectively provide insight for further investigations of the potential application of anti-inflammatory treatment followed by stem cell therapy. PMID:23342077

  16. Mitochondria-rich cell activity in the yolk-sac membrane of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) larvae acclimatized to different ambient chloride levels.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Yih; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2004-03-01

    Mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs) in the yolk-sac membrane of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) larvae were examined by Na+/K(+)-ATPase immunocytochemistry and vital staining for glycoproteins following acclimation to high (7.5-7.9 mmol l(-1)), normal (0.48-0.52 mmol l(-1)) or low (0.002-0.007 mmol l(-1)) ambient Cl- levels. With a combination of concanavalin-A (Con-A)-Texas-Red conjugate staining (larvae exposed to the dye in vivo in the water) and a monoclonal antibody raised against Na+/K(+)-ATPase, MRCs were easily recognized and presumed to be active when Con-A-positive (i.e. with their apical membrane in contact with the water) or inactive when Con-A-negative. The proportion of active cells gradually increased during a 48-h acclimation to low-Cl- medium but decreased during acclimation to high-Cl- medium. Total densities of MRCs did not change when ambient chloride levels were altered. Furthermore, in live larvae exposed to changes in ambient Cl-, yolk-sac MRCs, vitally stained with DASPEI and subsequently traced in time, did not significantly alter turnover. The polymorphism of the apical membrane compartment of the MRCs represents structural modification of the active MRCs. Yolk-sac pavement cells labeled with the membrane marker FM1-43 (fluorescent lipophilic tracer) were shown to cover active MRCs in larvae transferred from normal to high ambient Cl- levels, thereby inactivating the MRCs. PMID:15010484

  17. A new level of regulation in gluconeogenesis: metabolic state modulates the intracellular localization of aldolase B and its interaction with liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase.

    PubMed

    Droppelmann, Cristian A; Sáez, Doris E; Asenjo, Joel L; Yáñez, Alejandro J; García-Rocha, Mar; Concha, Ilona I; Grez, Manuel; Guinovart, Joan J; Slebe, Juan C

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how glucose metabolism is finely regulated at molecular and cellular levels in the liver is critical for knowing its relationship to related pathologies, such as diabetes. In order to gain insight into the regulation of glucose metabolism, we studied the liver-expressed isoforms aldolase B and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase-1 (FBPase-1), key enzymes in gluconeogenesis, analysing their cellular localization in hepatocytes under different metabolic conditions and their protein-protein interaction in vitro and in vivo. We observed that glucose, insulin, glucagon and adrenaline differentially modulate the intracellular distribution of aldolase B and FBPase-1. Interestingly, the in vitro protein-protein interaction analysis between aldolase B and FBPase-1 showed a specific and regulable interaction between them, whereas aldolase A (muscle isozyme) and FBPase-1 showed no interaction. The affinity of the aldolase B and FBPase-1 complex was modulated by intermediate metabolites, but only in the presence of K(+). We observed a decreased association constant in the presence of adenosine monophosphate, fructose-2,6-bisphosphate, fructose-6-phosphate and inhibitory concentrations of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate. Conversely, the association constant of the complex increased in the presence of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and non-inhibitory concentrations of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate. Notably, in vivo FRET studies confirmed the interaction between aldolase B and FBPase-1. Also, the co-expression of aldolase B and FBPase-1 in cultured cells suggested that FBPase-1 guides the cellular localization of aldolase B. Our results provide further evidence that metabolic conditions modulate aldolase B and FBPase-1 activity at the cellular level through the regulation of their interaction, suggesting that their association confers a catalytic advantage for both enzymes. PMID:26417114

  18. Glutathione peroxidase 1 expression, malondialdehyde levels and histological alterations in the liver of Acrossocheilus fasciatus exposed to cadmium chloride.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Di; Sheng, Zhang; Wang, You-Fa; Han, Ying-Li; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Jun-Quan

    2016-03-10

    Cadmium (Cd) is known as a widespread pollutant in aquatic environment. The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is attributed to Cd exposure, which may affect the growth, development and physiological metabolism of aquatic organisms. In response to these unfavorable damages, antioxidant systems have been developed to protect against oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the expression pattern of glutathione peroxidase 1 genes (GPx-1a and GPx-1b) in the liver of Acrossocheilus fasciatus after Cd administration. Total RNA extraction, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) were performed in order to clone the A. fasciatus GPx-1a and GPx-1b full-length cDNA sequences and partial fragment of β-actin cDNA from the liver for the first time. Tissue-specific expression analysis proved that GPx-1 genes were widely expressed in the liver, kidney, gill, testis, muscle, spleen, heart and brain. The changes of GPx-1 mRNA and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the liver treated with Cd were measured. In addition, the acute toxic effects of Cd on the microstructure of the liver were studied using light microscopy. These results suggest that GPx-1, MDA and liver histology which represent molecular, biochemical and histological levels, can be used as potential biomarkers to monitor Cd pollution. The overall findings also highlight the potential use of those three bio-indicators combined together as a multi-level tool (molecular, biochemical and histological levels) when monitoring Cd contamination and other possible exogenetic pollutants in aquatic environment. PMID:26707212

  19. Chloride Anions Regulate Kinetics but Not Voltage-Sensor Qmax of the Solute Carrier SLC26a5.

    PubMed

    Santos-Sacchi, Joseph; Song, Lei

    2016-06-01

    In general, SLC26 solute carriers serve to transport a variety of anions across biological membranes. However, prestin (SLC26a5) has evolved, now serving as a motor protein in outer hair cells (OHCs) of the mammalian inner ear and is required for cochlear amplification, a mechanical feedback mechanism to boost auditory performance. The mechanical activity of the OHC imparted by prestin is driven by voltage and controlled by anions, chiefly intracellular chloride. Current opinion is that chloride anions control the Boltzmann characteristics of the voltage sensor responsible for prestin activity, including Qmax, the total sensor charge moved within the membrane, and Vh, a measure of prestin's operating voltage range. Here, we show that standard narrow-band, high-frequency admittance measures of nonlinear capacitance (NLC), an alternate representation of the sensor's charge-voltage (Q-V) relationship, is inadequate for assessment of Qmax, an estimate of the sum of unitary charges contributed by all voltage sensors within the membrane. Prestin's slow transition rates and chloride-binding kinetics adversely influence these estimates, contributing to the prevalent concept that intracellular chloride level controls the quantity of sensor charge moved. By monitoring charge movement across frequency, using measures of multifrequency admittance, expanded displacement current integration, and OHC electromotility, we find that chloride influences prestin kinetics, thereby controlling charge magnitude at any particular frequency of interrogation. Importantly, however, this chloride dependence vanishes as frequency decreases, with Qmax asymptoting at a level irrespective of the chloride level. These data indicate that prestin activity is significantly low-pass in the frequency domain, with important implications for cochlear amplification. We also note that the occurrence of voltage-dependent charge movements in other SLC26 family members may be hidden by inadequate

  20. Comparative evaluation of PCR and commercial DNA probes for detection and identification to species level of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    PubMed Central

    Devallois, A; Picardeau, M; Goh, K S; Sola, C; Vincent, V; Rastogi, N

    1996-01-01

    Selective amplification of a 187-bp fragment within the DT6 sequence using the AV6 and AV7 primers for Mycobacterium avium and of a 666-bp fragment within the DT1 sequence of Mycobacterium intracellulare using the IN38 and IN41 primers was performed for 69 clinical isolates identified as M. avium complex by conventional methods. The results were compared in parallel with results with commercial M. avium and M. intracellulare probes. A positive response to either of the two PCRs or M. avium-M. intracellulare AccuProbes constituted positive detection as M. avium complex; this cumulative detection limit was 94.2% for PCR, compared with 90% for AccuProbe. Concordance, on the other hand, was considered an identical species identification using either DT1 PCR and the M. intracellulare probe or DT6 and DT1 PCRs are inexpensive and at least equally sensitive, in-house options to the AccuProbe system for species identification of M. avium and M. intracellulare. PMID:8897178

  1. The basal level of intracellular calcium gates the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase - Akt signaling by brain-derived neurotrophic factor in cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fei; Soellner, Deborah; Nunez, Joseph; Wang, Hongbing

    2008-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mediates survival and neuroplasticity through the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt pathway. Although previous studies suggested the roles of MAPK, PLC-γ-mediated intra-cellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) increase, and extra-cellular calcium influx in regulating Akt activation, the cellular mechanisms are largely unknown. We demonstrated that sub-nanomolar BDNF significantly induced Akt activation in developing cortical neurons. The TrkB-dependent Akt phosphorylation at S473 and T308 required only PI3K, but not PLC and MAPK activity. Blocking NMDA receptors, L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, and chelating extra-cellular calcium by EGTA failed to block BDNF-induced Akt phosphorylation. In contrast, chelating [Ca2+]i by BAPTA-AM abolished Akt phosphorylation. Interestingly, sub-nanomolar BDNF did not stimulate [Ca2+]i increase under our culture conditions. Together with that NMDA- and membrane depolarization-induced [Ca2+]i increase did not activate Akt, we conclude that the basal level of [Ca2+]i gates BDNF function. Furthermore, inhibiting calmodulin by W13 suppressed Akt phosphorylation. On the other hand, inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 by okadaic acid and tautomycin rescued Akt phosphorylation in BAPTA- and W13-treated neurons. We further demonstrated that the phosphorylation of PDK1 did not correlate with Akt phosphorylation at T308. Our results suggested novel roles of basal [Ca2+]i, rather than activity-induced calcium elevation, in BDNF-Akt signaling. PMID:18485103

  2. Inorganic polymeric phosphate/polyphosphate as an inducer of alkaline phosphatase and a modulator of intracellular Ca2+ level in osteoblasts (SaOS-2 cells) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Wang, Xiaohong; Diehl-Seifert, Bärbel; Kropf, Klaus; Schlossmacher, Ute; Lieberwirth, Ingo; Glasser, Gunnar; Wiens, Matthias; Schröder, Heinz C

    2011-06-01

    Inorganic polymeric phosphate is a physiological polymer that accumulates in bone cells. In the present study osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells were exposed to this polymer, complexed in a 2:1 stoichiometric ratio with Ca(2+), polyP (Ca(2+) salt). At a concentration of 100 μM, polyP (Ca(2+) salt) caused a strong increase in the activity of the alkaline phosphatase and also an induction of the steady-state expression of the gene encoding this enzyme. Comparative experiments showed that polyP (Ca(2+) salt) can efficiently replace β-glycerophosphate in the in vitro hydroxyapatite (HA) biomineralization assay. In the presence of polyP (Ca(2+) salt) the cells extensively form HA crystallites, which remain intimately associated with or covered by the plasma membrane. Only the tips of the crystallites are directly exposed to the extracellular space. Element mapping by scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy coupled to a silicon drift detector supported the finding that organic material was dispersed within the crystallites. Finally, polyP (Ca(2+) salt) was found to cause an increase in the intracellular Ca(2+) level, while polyP, as well as inorganic phosphate (P(i)) or Ca(2+) alone, had no effect at the concentrations used. These findings are compatible with the assumption that polyP (Ca(2+) salt) is locally, on the surface of the SaOS-2 cells, hydrolyzed to P(i) and Ca(2+). We conclude that the inorganic polymer polyP (Ca(2+) salt) in concert with a second inorganic, and physiologically occurring, polymer, biosilica, activates osteoblasts and impairs the maturation of osteoclasts. PMID:21397057

  3. Nrbf2 Protein Suppresses Autophagy by Modulating Atg14L Protein-containing Beclin 1-Vps34 Complex Architecture and Reducing Intracellular Phosphatidylinositol-3 Phosphate Levels*

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yu; Morris, Deanna H.; Jin, Lin; Patel, Mittul S.; Karunakaran, Senthil K.; Fu, You-Jun; Matuszak, Emily A.; Weiss, Heidi L.; Chait, Brian T.; Wang, Qing Jun

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a tightly regulated lysosomal degradation pathway for maintaining cellular homeostasis and responding to stresses. Beclin 1 and its interacting proteins, including the class III phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase Vps34, play crucial roles in autophagy regulation in mammals. We identified nuclear receptor binding factor 2 (Nrbf2) as a Beclin 1-interacting protein from Becn1−/−;Becn1-EGFP/+ mouse liver and brain. We also found that Nrbf2-Beclin 1 interaction required the N terminus of Nrbf2. We next used the human retinal pigment epithelial cell line RPE-1 as a model system and showed that transiently knocking down Nrbf2 by siRNA increased autophagic flux under both nutrient-rich and starvation conditions. To investigate the mechanism by which Nrbf2 regulates autophagy, we demonstrated that Nrbf2 interacted and colocalized with Atg14L, suggesting that Nrbf2 is a component of the Atg14L-containing Beclin 1-Vps34 complex. Moreover, ectopically expressed Nrbf2 formed cytosolic puncta that were positive for isolation membrane markers. These results suggest that Nrbf2 is involved in autophagosome biogenesis. Furthermore, we showed that Nrbf2 deficiency led to increased intracellular phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate levels and diminished Atg14L-Vps34/Vps15 interactions, suggesting that Nrbf2-mediated Atg14L-Vps34/Vps15 interactions likely inhibit Vps34 activity. Therefore, we propose that Nrbf2 may interact with the Atg14L-containing Beclin 1-Vps34 protein complex to modulate protein-protein interactions within the complex, leading to suppression of Vps34 activity, autophagosome biogenesis, and autophagic flux. This work reveals a novel aspect of the intricate mechanism for the Beclin 1-Vps34 protein-protein interaction network to achieve precise control of autophagy. PMID:25086043

  4. Constitutive Intracellular Na+ Excess in Purkinje Cells Promotes Arrhythmogenesis at Lower Levels of Stress Than Ventricular Myocytes From Mice With Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Willis, B. Cicero; Pandit, Sandeep V.; Ponce-Balbuena, Daniela; Zarzoso, Manuel; Guerrero-Serna, Guadalupe; Limbu, Bijay; Deo, Makarand; Camors, Emmanuel; Ramirez, Rafael J.; Mironov, Sergey; Herron, Todd J.; Valdivia, Héctor H.

    2016-01-01

    Background— In catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT), cardiac Purkinje cells (PCs) appear more susceptible to Ca2+ dysfunction than ventricular myocytes (VMs). The underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Using a CPVT mouse (RyR2R4496C+/Cx40eGFP), we tested whether PC intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) dysregulation results from a constitutive [Na+]i surplus relative to VMs. Methods and Results— Simultaneous optical mapping of voltage and [Ca2+]i in CPVT hearts showed that spontaneous Ca2+ release preceded pacing-induced triggered activity at subendocardial PCs. On simultaneous current-clamp and Ca2+ imaging, early and delayed afterdepolarizations trailed spontaneous Ca2+ release and were more frequent in CPVT PCs than CPVT VMs. As a result of increased activity of mutant ryanodine receptor type 2 channels, sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ load, measured by caffeine-induced Ca2+ transients, was lower in CPVT VMs and PCs than respective controls, and sarcoplasmic reticulum fractional release was greater in both CPVT PCs and VMs than respective controls. [Na+]i was higher in both control and CPVT PCs than VMs, whereas the density of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger current was not different between PCs and VMs. Computer simulations using a PC model predicted that the elevated [Na+]i of PCs promoted delayed afterdepolarizations, which were always preceded by spontaneous Ca2+ release events from hyperactive ryanodine receptor type 2 channels. Increasing [Na+]i monotonically increased delayed afterdepolarization frequency. Confocal imaging experiments showed that postpacing Ca2+ spark frequency was highest in intact CPVT PCs, but such differences were reversed on saponin-induced membrane permeabilization, indicating that differences in [Na+]i played a central role. Conclusions— In CPVT mice, the constitutive [Na+]i excess of PCs promotes triggered activity and arrhythmogenesis at lower levels of stress than VMs. PMID:27169737

  5. Curcumin inhibits apoptosis by regulating intracellular calcium release, reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial depolarization levels in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Uğuz, Abdülhadi Cihangir; Öz, Ahmi; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    Neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases are incurable progressive neurological disorders caused by the degeneration of neuronal cells and characterized by motor and non-motor symptoms. Curcumin, a turmeric product, is an anti-inflammatory agent and an effective reactive oxygen and nitrogen species scavenging molecule. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is the main source of oxidative stress, which is claimed to be the major source of neurological disorders. Hence, in this study we aimed to investigate the effect of curcumin on Ca(2+) signaling, oxidative stress parameters, mitochondrial depolarization levels and caspase-3 and -9 activities that are induced by the H2O2 model of oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells. SH-SY5Y neuronal cells were divided into four groups namely, the control, curcumin, H2O2, and curcumin + H2O2 groups. The dose and duration of curcumin and H2O2 were determined from published data. The cells in the curcumin, H2O2, and curcumin + H2O2 groups were incubated for 24 h with 5 µM curcumin and 100 µM H2O2. Lipid peroxidation and cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentrations were higher in the H2O2 group than in the control group; however, their levels were lower in the curcumin and curcumin + H2O2 groups than in the H2O2 group alone. Reduced glutathione (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) values were lower in the H2O2 group although they were higher in the curcumin and curcumin + H2O2 groups than in the H2O2 group. Caspase-3 activity was lower in the curcumin group than in the H2O2 group. In conclusion, curcumin strongly induced modulator effects on oxidative stress, intracellular Ca(2+) levels, and the caspase-3 and -9 values in an experimental oxidative stress model in SH-SY5Y cells. PMID:26608462

  6. Adenosine A1 receptor-mediated changes in basal and histamine-stimulated levels of intracellular calcium in primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Peakman, M. C.; Hill, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of adenosine A1 receptor stimulation on basal and histamine-stimulated levels of intracellular free calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) have been investigated in primary astrocyte cultures derived from neonatal rat forebrains. 2. Histamine (0.1 microM-1 mM) caused rapid, concentration-dependent increases in [Ca2+]i over basal levels in single type-2 astrocytes in the presence of extracellular calcium. A maximum mean increase of 1,468 +/- 94 nM over basal levels was recorded in 90% of type-2 cells treated with 1 mM histamine (n = 49). The percentage of type-2 cells exhibiting calcium increases in response to histamine appeared to vary in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the application of 1 mM histamine to type-1 astrocytes had less effect, eliciting a mean increase in [Ca2+]i of 805 +/- 197 nM over basal levels in only 30% of the cells observed (n = 24). 3. In the presence of extracellular calcium, the A1 receptor-selective agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 10 microM), caused a maximum mean increase in [Ca2+]i of 1,110 +/- 181 nM over basal levels in 30% of type-2 astrocytes observed (n = 53). The size of this response was concentration-dependent; however, the percentage of type-2 cells exhibiting calcium increases in response to CPA did not appear to vary in a concentration-dependent manner. A mean calcium increase of 605 +/- 89 nM over basal levels was also recorded in 23% of type-1 astrocytes treated with 10 microM CPA (n = 30). 4. In the absence of extracellular calcium, in medium containing 0.1 mM EGTA, a mean increase in [Ca2+]i of 504 +/- 67 nM over basal levels was recorded in 41% of type-2 astrocytes observed (n = 41) after stimulation with 1 microM CPA. However, in the presence of extracellular calcium, pretreatment with the A1 receptor-selective antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, for 5-10 min before stimulation with 1 microM CPA, completely antagonized the response in 100% of the cells observed. 5. In type-2

  7. Sox2 functionally interacts with βAPP, the βAPP intracellular domain and ADAM10 at a transcriptional level in human cells.

    PubMed

    Sarlak, G; Htoo, H H; Hernandez, J-F; Iizasa, H; Checler, F; Konietzko, U; Song, W; Vincent, B

    2016-01-15

    Sox2 (SRY (Sex-determining region Y)-related high mobility group (HMG) box 2) is a transcription factor that serves key roles in controlling the balance between stem cells maintenance and commitment to differentiated lineages throughout the lifetime. Importantly, Sox2 deficiency results in early embryonic lethality whereas the down-regulation of Sox2 expression triggers neurodegeneration in the adult mouse brain. Moreover, Sox2 is decreased in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and co localizes with the β-amyloid precursor protein (βAPP) in stem cells. Here we report the existence of functional interactions between Sox2 and βAPP, the βAPP intracellular domain AICD50 and the α-secretase ADAM10 in human cells. We first show, as observed in embryonic stem cells, that βAPP overexpression in HEK293 cells results in an increase of Sox2 immunoreactivity and we further establish the transcriptional nature of this pathway. Moreover, overexpression of the pro-apoptotic C-terminal βAPP-derived AICD50 metabolite leads to the down-regulation of Sox2 transcription whereas the pharmacological inhibition of endogenous AICD production increases Sox2 expression in both HEK293 and SH-SY5Y cell lines. In addition, we demonstrate that Sox2 is a potent activator of the non amyloidogenic processing of βAPP as shown by the Sox2-dependent augmentation of ADAM10 catalytic activity, immunoreactivity, promoter transactivation and mRNA levels with no modification of the activity and the expression of the β-secretase BACE1. Finally, the fact that γ-secretase inhibition induces an increase of ADAM10 protein levels in SH-SY5Y cells further supports the occurrence of functional AICD/Sox2/ADAM10 interactions. Altogether, our study identifies and characterizes new functional cross-talks between Sox2 and proteins involved in AD, thereby adding support to the view that Sox2 likely behaves as a protective factor during the development of this neurodegenerative disease. PMID

  8. Nanovehicular intracellular delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Ales; Davidson, Jeffrey M

    2008-09-01

    This article provides an overview of principles and barriers relevant to intracellular drug and gene transport, accumulation and retention (collectively called as drug delivery) by means of nanovehicles (NV). The aim is to deliver a cargo to a particular intracellular site, if possible, to exert a local action. Some of the principles discussed in this article apply to noncolloidal drugs that are not permeable to the plasma membrane or to the blood-brain barrier. NV are defined as a wide range of nanosized particles leading to colloidal objects which are capable of entering cells and tissues and delivering a cargo intracelullarly. Different localization and targeting means are discussed. Limited discussion on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is also presented. NVs are contrasted to micro-delivery and current nanotechnologies which are already in commercial use. Newer developments in NV technologies are outlined and future applications are stressed. We also briefly review the existing modeling tools and approaches to quantitatively describe the behavior of targeted NV within the vascular and tumor compartments, an area of particular importance. While we list "elementary" phenomena related to different level of complexity of delivery to cancer, we also stress importance of multi-scale modeling and bottom-up systems biology approach. PMID:18200527

  9. Nanovehicular Intracellular Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    PROKOP, ALES; DAVIDSON, JEFFREY M.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of principles and barriers relevant to intracellular drug and gene transport, accumulation and retention (collectively called as drug delivery) by means of nanovehicles (NV). The aim is to deliver a cargo to a particular intracellular site, if possible, to exert a local action. Some of the principles discussed in this article apply to noncolloidal drugs that are not permeable to the plasma membrane or to the blood–brain barrier. NV are defined as a wide range of nanosized particles leading to colloidal objects which are capable of entering cells and tissues and delivering a cargo intracelullarly. Different localization and targeting means are discussed. Limited discussion on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is also presented. NVs are contrasted to micro-delivery and current nanotechnologies which are already in commercial use. Newer developments in NV technologies are outlined and future applications are stressed. We also briefly review the existing modeling tools and approaches to quantitatively describe the behavior of targeted NV within the vascular and tumor compartments, an area of particular importance. While we list “elementary” phenomena related to different level of complexity of delivery to cancer, we also stress importance of multi-scale modeling and bottom-up systems biology approach. PMID:18200527

  10. Effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles and/or zinc chloride on biochemical parameters and mineral levels in rat liver and kidney.

    PubMed

    Amara, S; Slama, I Ben; Mrad, I; Rihane, N; Khemissi, W; El Mir, L; Rhouma, K Ben; Abdelmelek, H; Sakly, M

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential subacute toxicity of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) in Wistar rats in comparison with reference toxicant, zinc chloride (ZnCl2), of a non-nanoparticulate form. We therefore studied the relationships between zinc (Zn) accumulation, liver and kidney trace element levels, and plasmatic biochemical parameters. Rats in all groups were treated by intraperitoneal injection of ZnO NPs and/or ZnCl2 solution (25 mg/kg) every other day for 10 days. The contents of trace element in the liver and kidney were slightly modulated after ZnO NPs and/or ZnCl2 solution exposure. The same treatment increased the aspartate aminotransferase activity and uric acid concentration. However, ZnO NPs or ZnCl2 solution decreased the creatinine levels, whereas the combined intake of ZnO NPs and ZnCl2 decreased the glucose concentration. Interestingly, the analysis of the lyophilized powder of liver using the x-ray diffractometer showed the degradation of ZnO NPs in ZnO-treated group, instead there is a lack of NPs ZnO biosynthesis from the ZnCl2 solution injected in rats. These investigations suggest that combined injection of ZnO NPs and ZnCl2 solution has a possible toxic effect in rats. This effect could be related to Zn(2+) ion release and accumulation of this element in organs. Our findings provide crucial information that ZnO appeared to be absorbed in the organs in an ionic form rather than in a particulate form. PMID:24501101

  11. Thioredoxin-1 promotes survival in cells exposed to S-nitrosoglutathione: Correlation with reduction of intracellular levels of nitrosothiols and up-regulation of the ERK1/2 MAP Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Roberto J.; Debbas, Victor; Stern, Arnold; Monteiro, Hugo P.

    2008-12-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that post-translational protein modifications by nitric oxide and its derived species are critical effectors of redox signaling in cells. These protein modifications are most likely controlled by intracellular reductants. Among them, the importance of the 12 kDa dithiol protein thioredoxin-1 (TRX-1) has been increasingly recognized. However, the effects of TRX-1 in cells exposed to exogenous nitrosothiols remain little understood. We investigated the levels of intracellular nitrosothiols and survival signaling in HeLa cells over-expressing TRX-1 and exposed to S-nitrosoglutahione (GSNO). A role for TRX-1 expression on GSNO catabolism and cell viability was demonstrated by the concentration-dependent effects of GSNO on decreasing TRX-1 expression, activation of caspase-3, and increasing cell death. The over-expression of TRX-1 in HeLa cells partially attenuated caspase-3 activation and enhanced cell viability upon GSNO treatment. This was correlated with reduction of intracellular levels of nitrosothiols and increasing levels of nitrite and nitrotyrosine. The involvement of ERK, p38 and JNK pathways were investigated in parental cells treated with GSNO. Activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinases was shown to be critical for survival signaling. In cells over-expressing TRX-1, basal phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 MAP kinases were higher and further increased after GSNO treatment. These results indicate that the enhanced cell viability promoted by TRX-1 correlates with its capacity to regulate the levels of intracellular nitrosothiols and to up-regulate the survival signaling pathway mediated by the ERK1/2 MAP kinases.

  12. Superoxide radicals increase transforming growth factor-{beta}1 and collagen release from human lung fibroblasts via cellular influx through chloride channels

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Shufan Hartog, Gertjan J.M. den; Bast, Aalt

    2009-05-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of fibrosis. However, it remains unclear which ROS is the major cause. We hypothesize that superoxide elicits specific toxicity to human lung fibroblasts and plays an important role in the development of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, superoxide generated from xanthine and xanthine oxidase activated lung fibroblasts by increasing the release of TGF-{beta}1 and collagen. This was associated with increased levels of intracellular superoxide. SOD and tempol, by scavenging respectively extracellular and intracellular superoxide, prevented the activation of fibroblasts induced by exposure to exogenous superoxide, whereas catalase did not. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide did not activate fibroblasts. Apparently, superoxide rather than hydrogen peroxide is involved in the regulation of TGF-{beta}1 and collagen release in lung fibroblasts. The chloride channel blocker, DIDS, inhibited the increase of intracellular superoxide levels induced by exogenous superoxide and consequently prevented the activation of fibroblasts. This suggests that the cellular influx of superoxide through chloride channels is essential for superoxide-induced activation of fibroblasts. ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs are involved in the intracellular pathway leading to superoxide-induced fibroblasts activation. Superoxide possesses until now undiscovered specific pro-fibrotic properties in human lung fibroblasts. This takes place via the cellular influx of superoxide through chloride channels rather than via the formation of hydrogen peroxide.

  13. Intracellular accumulation of indium ions released from nanoparticles induces oxidative stress, proinflammatory response and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Tabei, Yosuke; Sonoda, Akinari; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Makita, Yoji; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Horie, Masanori

    2016-02-01

    Due to the widespread use of indium tin oxide (ITO), it is important to investigate its effect on human health. In this study, we evaluated the cellular effects of ITO nanoparticles (NPs), indium chloride (InCl3) and tin chloride (SnCl3) using human lung epithelial A549 cells. Transmission electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry were employed to study cellular ITO NP uptake. Interestingly, greater uptake of ITO NPs was observed, as compared with soluble salts. ITO NP species released could be divided into two types: 'indium release ITO' or 'tin release ITO'. We incubated A549 cells with indium release ITO, tin release ITO, InCl3 or SnCl2 and investigated oxidative stress, proinflammatory response, cytotoxicity and DNA damage. We found that intracellular reactive oxygen species were increased in cells incubated with indium release ITO, but not tin release ITO, InCl3 or SnCl2. Messenger RNA and protein levels of the inflammatory marker, interleukin-8, also increased following exposure to indium release ITO. Furthermore, the alkaline comet assay revealed that intracellular accumulation of indium ions induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that the accumulation of ionic indium, but not ionic tin, from ITO NPs in the intracellular matrix has extensive cellular effects. PMID:26378248

  14. Effect of Chloride Depletion on the Magnetic Properties and the Redox Leveling of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex in Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Amin, Muhamed; Pokhrel, Ravi; Brudvig, Gary W; Badawi, Ashraf; Obayya, S S A

    2016-05-12

    Chloride is an essential cofactor in the oxygen-evolution reaction that takes place in photosystem II (PSII). The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) is oxidized in a linear four-step photocatalytic cycle in which chloride is required for the OEC to advance beyond the S2 state. Here, using density functional theory, we compare the energetics and spin configuration of two different states of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the S2 state: state A with Mn1(3+) and B with Mn4(3+) with and without chloride. The calculations suggest that model B with an S = 5/2 ground state occurs in the chloride-depleted PSII, which may explain the presence of the EPR signal at g = 4.1. Moreover, we use multiconformer continuum electrostatics to study the effect of chloride depletion on the redox potential associated with the S1/S2 and S2/S3 transitions. PMID:27077688

  15. Intracellular auxin transport in pollen

    PubMed Central

    Dal Bosco, Cristina; Dovzhenko, Alexander; Palme, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Cellular auxin homeostasis is controlled at many levels that include auxin biosynthesis, auxin metabolism, and auxin transport. In addition to intercellular auxin transport, auxin homeostasis is modulated by auxin flow through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). PIN5, a member of the auxin efflux facilitators PIN protein family, was the first protein to be characterized as an intracellular auxin transporter. We demonstrated that PIN8, the closest member of the PIN family to PIN5, represents another ER-residing auxin transporter. PIN8 is specifically expressed in the male gametophyte and is located in the ER. By combining genetic, physiological, cellular and biochemical data we demonstrated a role for PIN8 in intracellular auxin homeostasis. Although our investigation shed light on intracellular auxin transport in pollen, the physiological function of PIN8 still remains to be elucidated. Here we discuss our data taking in consideration other recent findings. PMID:22990451

  16. Intracellular calcium levels are differentially regulated in T lymphocytes triggered by anti-CD2 and anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Spinozzi, F; Agea, E; Bistoni, O; Belia, S; Travetti, A; Gerli, R; Muscat, C; Bertotto, A

    1995-03-01

    Antigen and/or mitogen-driven T-cell activation is mediated by a rise in intracellular free Ca2+, as second messenger. A regulatory key role for this process is represented by membrane-associated [Ca2+/Mg2+] ATP-ase that is mainly devoted to extrusion of intracellular ion excess. In the present study we have investigated the kinetics of CA2+ fluxes in both resting and already activated (Jurkat T-cell line) T lymphocytes after CD3 and CD2 (T11(2) and T11(3)) triggering and focused our attention on plasma membrane [Ca2+/Mg2+] ATP-ase activity. In both resting T cells and Jurkat cell line, the CD2 stimulation was able to determine a rise in intracellular free Ca2+ higher than that observed after CD3 triggering. In addition, this calcium signal was independent of negative feedback control exerted by [Ca2+/Mg2+] ATP-ase, as well as of IP3 generation. Thus the CD2 molecular system may, together with cell-adhesion properties, act as an amplifier of Ca2+ signals that, if delivered in the context of other molecular systems, such as CD3 or MHC class II antigens, are essentially devoted to the polyclonal co-stimulatory recruitment of a larger cellular repertoire. PMID:7662514

  17. Chloride in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in table salt or sea salt as sodium chloride. It is also found in many vegetables. Foods ... Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, and Sulfate. National Academy Press, Washington, DC: 2005. ...

  18. [Sodium chloride 0.9%: nephrotoxic crystalloid?].

    PubMed

    Dombre, Vincent; De Seigneux, Sophie; Schiffer, Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    Sodium chloride 0.9%, often incorrectly called physiological saline, contains higher concentration of chloride compared to plasma. It is known that the administration of sodium chloride 0.9% can cause hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis in a reproducible manner. The elevated chloride concentration in 0.9% NaCl solution can also adversely affect renal perfusion. This effect is thought to be induced by hyperchloremia that causes renal artery vasoconstriction. For these reasons, the use of 0.9% NaCl solution is raising attention and some would advocate the use of a more "physiological" solution, such as balanced solutions that contain a level of chloride closer to that of plasma. Few prospective, randomized, controlled trials are available today and most were done in a perioperative setting. Some studies suggest that the chloride excess in 0.9% NaCl solution could have clinical consequences; however, this remains to be established by quality randomized controlled trials. PMID:26999998

  19. Chloride secretagogues stimulate inositol phosphate formation in shark rectal gland tubules cultured in suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Ecay, T.W.; Valentich, J.D. )

    1991-03-01

    Neuroendocrine activation of transepithelial chloride secretion by shark rectal gland cells is associated with increases in cellular cAMP, cGMP, and free calcium concentrations. We report here on the effects of several chloride secretagogues on inositol phosphate formation in cultured rectal gland tubules. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), atriopeptin (AP), and ionomycin increase the total inositol phosphate levels of cultured tubules, as measured by ion exchange chromatography. Forskolin, a potent chloride secretagogue, has no effect on inositol phosphate formation. The uptake of {sup 3}H-myo-inositol into phospholipids is very slow, preventing the detection of increased levels of inositol trisphosphate. However, significant increases in inositol monophosphate (IP1) and inositol biphosphate (IP2) were measured. The time course of VIP- and AP-stimulated IP1 and IP2 formation is similar to the effects of these agents on the short-circuit current responses of rectal gland monolayer cultures. In addition, aluminum fluoride, an artificial activator of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, stimulates IP1 and IP2 formation. We conclude that rectal gland cells contain VIP and AP receptors coupled to the activation of phospholipase C. Coupling may be mediated by G-proteins. Receptor-stimulated increases in inositol phospholipid metabolism is one mechanism leading to increased intracellular free calcium concentrations, an important regulatory event in the activation of transepithelial chloride secretion by shark rectal gland epithelial cells.

  20. Chloride channels in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya-ping; Zhang, Hao; Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2013-01-01

    Vascular remodeling of cerebral arterioles, including proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), is the major cause of changes in the cross-sectional area and diameter of the arteries and sudden interruption of blood flow or hemorrhage in the brain, ie, stroke. Accumulating evidence strongly supports an important role for chloride (Cl−) channels in vascular remodeling and stroke. At least three Cl− channel genes are expressed in VSMCs: 1) the TMEM16A (or Ano1), which may encode the calcium-activated Cl− channels (CACCs); 2) the CLC-3 Cl− channel and Cl−/H+ antiporter, which is closely related to the volume-regulated Cl− channels (VRCCs); and 3) the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which encodes the PKA- and PKC-activated Cl− channels. Activation of the CACCs by agonist-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ causes membrane depolarization, vasoconstriction, and inhibition of VSMC proliferation. Activation of VRCCs by cell volume increase or membrane stretch promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, induces proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of VSMCs. Activation of CFTR inhibits oxidative stress and may prevent the development of hypertension. In addition, Cl− current mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor has also been implicated a role in ischemic neuron death. This review focuses on the functional roles of Cl− channels in the development of stroke and provides a perspective on the future directions for research and the potential to develop Cl− channels as new targets for the prevention and treatment of stroke. PMID:23103617

  1. Changes in metabolites, antioxidant system, and gene expression in Microcystis aeruginosa under sodium chloride stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Mao, Feijian; Kirumba, George Chira; Jiang, Cheng; Manefield, Mike; He, Yiliang

    2015-12-01

    Microcystis (M.) aeruginosa, one of the most common bloom-forming cyanobacteria, occurs worldwide. The Qingcaosha (QCS) Reservoir is undergoing eutrophication and faces the problem of saltwater intrusion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sudden salinity changes on physiological parameters and related gene transcription in M. aeruginosa under controlled laboratory conditions. The results showed that sodium chloride (50, 200 and 500 mg L(-1) NaCl) inhibited the algal growth and decreased pigment concentrations (chlorophyll a, carotenoid and phycocyanin). Sodium chloride increased both the intracellular and extracellular microcystin contents and elevated the mcyD transcript level in M. aeruginosa. It also increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and caused cytomembrane damage. This damage caused the release of intracellular toxins into the culture medium. In addition, NaCl decreased the maximum electron transport rate, increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and changed the cellular redox status. Consequently, NaCl inhibited the expression of cpcB, psbA and rbcL. Furthermore, NaCl increased the activities of superoxide dismutases (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), and total glutathione peroxidase (GPx). The transcript levels of sod and reduced glutathione (gsh) were also increased after exposure to NaCl. Our results indicate that a sudden increase in salinity increases the production and excretion of microcystin, changes the cellular redox status, enhances the activities of antioxidant enzymes, inhibits photosynthesis, and affects transcript levels of related genes in M. aeruginosa. PMID:26232039

  2. Intracellular Parasite Invasion Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibley, L. D.

    2004-04-01

    Intracellular parasites use various strategies to invade cells and to subvert cellular signaling pathways and, thus, to gain a foothold against host defenses. Efficient cell entry, ability to exploit intracellular niches, and persistence make these parasites treacherous pathogens. Most intracellular parasites gain entry via host-mediated processes, but apicomplexans use a system of adhesion-based motility called ``gliding'' to actively penetrate host cells. Actin polymerization-dependent motility facilitates parasite migration across cellular barriers, enables dissemination within tissues, and powers invasion of host cells. Efficient invasion has brought widespread success to this group, which includes Toxoplasma, Plasmodium, and Cryptosporidium.

  3. Intracellular Sterol Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mesmin, Bruno; Maxfield, Frederick R.

    2009-01-01

    We review the cellular mechanisms implicated in cholesterol trafficking and distribution. Recent studies have provided new information about the distribution of sterols within cells, including analysis of its transbilayer distribution. The cholesterol interaction with other lipids and its engagement in various trafficking processes will determine its proper level in a specific membrane; making the cholesterol distribution uneven among the various intracellular organelles. The cholesterol content is important since cholesterol plays an essential role in membranes by controlling their physicochemical properties as well as key cellular events such as signal transduction and protein trafficking. Cholesterol movement between cellular organelles is highly dynamic, and can be achieved by vesicular and non-vesicular processes. Various studies have analyzed the proteins that play a significant role in these processes, giving us new information about the relative importance of these two trafficking pathways in cholesterol transport. Although still poorly characterized in many trafficking routes, several potential sterol transport proteins have been described in detail; as a result, molecular mechanisms for sterol transport among membranes start to be appreciated. PMID:19286471

  4. Single-cell and population level viral infection dynamics revealed by phageFISH, a method to visualize intracellular and free viruses.

    PubMed

    Allers, Elke; Moraru, Cristina; Duhaime, Melissa B; Beneze, Erica; Solonenko, Natalie; Barrero-Canosa, Jimena; Amann, Rudolf; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2013-08-01

    Microbes drive the biogeochemical cycles that fuel planet Earth, and their viruses (phages) alter microbial population structure, genome repertoire, and metabolic capacity. However, our ability to understand and quantify phage-host interactions is technique-limited. Here, we introduce phageFISH - a markedly improved geneFISH protocol that increases gene detection efficiency from 40% to > 92% and is optimized for detection and visualization of intra- and extracellular phage DNA. The application of phageFISH to characterize infection dynamics in a marine podovirus-gammaproteobacterial host model system corroborated classical metrics (qPCR, plaque assay, FVIC, DAPI) and outperformed most of them to reveal new biology. PhageFISH detected both replicating and encapsidated (intracellular and extracellular) phage DNA, while simultaneously identifying and quantifying host cells during all stages of infection. Additionally, phageFISH allowed per-cell relative measurements of phage DNA, enabling single-cell documentation of infection status (e.g. early vs late stage infections). Further, it discriminated between two waves of infection, which no other measurement could due to population-averaged signals. Together, these findings richly characterize the infection dynamics of a novel model phage-host system, and debut phageFISH as a much-needed tool for studying phage-host interactions in the laboratory, with great promise for environmental surveys and lineage-specific population ecology of free phages. PMID:23489642

  5. Melaminium chloride hemihydrate.

    PubMed

    Janczak, J; Perpétuo, G J

    2001-09-01

    The crystals of a new melaminium salt, 2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazin-1-ium chloride hemihydrate, C(3)H(7)N(6)(+).Cl(-).0.5H(2)O, are built up from single-protonated melaminium residues, chloride anions and water molecules. The protonated melaminium cations lie on a twofold axis, while the chloride anions and water molecule lie on the m plane. The melaminium residues are interconnected by N-H...N hydrogen bonds, forming chains parallel to the (001) plane. The chains of melaminium residues form a three-dimensional network through hydrogen-bond interactions with chloride anions and water molecules. PMID:11588391

  6. Visualization of Intracellular Tyrosinase Activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Setty, Subba Rao Gangi

    2016-01-01

    Melanocytes produce the melanin pigments in melanosomes and these organelles protect the skin against harmful ultraviolet rays. Tyrosinase is the key cuproenzyme which initiates the pigment synthesis using its substrate amino acid tyrosine or L-DOPA (L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine). Moreover, the activity of tyrosinase directly correlates to the cellular pigmentation. Defects in tyrosinase transport to melanosomes or mutations in the enzyme or reduced intracellular copper levels results in loss of tyrosinase activity in melanosomes, commonly observed in albinism. Here, we described a method to detect the intracellular activity of tyrosinase in mouse melanocytes. This protocol will visualize the active tyrosinase present in the intracellular vesicles or organelles including melanosomes. PMID:27231711

  7. Preeclampsia serum-induced collagen I expression and intracellular calcium levels in arterial smooth muscle cells are mediated by the PLC-γ1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rongzhen; Teng, Yincheng; Huang, Yajuan; Gu, Jinghong; Ma, Li; Li, Ming; Zhou, Yuedi

    2014-01-01

    In women with preeclampsia (PE), endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction can lead to altered secretion of paracrine factors that induce peripheral vasoconstriction and proteinuria. This study examined the hypothesis that PE sera may directly or indirectly, through human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs), stimulate phospholipase C-γ1-1,4,5-trisphosphate (PLC-γ1-IP3) signaling, thereby increasing protein kinase C-α (PKC-α) activity, collagen I expression and intracellular Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]i) in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs). HUASMCs and HUVECs were cocultured with normal or PE sera before PLC-γ1 silencing. Increased PLC-γ1 and IP3 receptor (IP3R) phosphorylation was observed in cocultured HUASMCs stimulated with PE sera (P<0.05). In addition, PE serum significantly increased HUASMC viability and reduced their apoptosis (P<0.05); these effects were abrogated with PLC-γ1 silencing. Compared with normal sera, PE sera increased [Ca2+]i in cocultured HUASMCs (P<0.05), which was inhibited by PLC-γ1 and IP3R silencing. Finally, PE sera-induced PKC-α activity and collagen I expression was inhibited by PLC-γ1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) (P<0.05). These results suggest that vasoactive substances in the PE serum may induce deposition in the extracellular matrix through the activation of PLC-γ1, which may in turn result in thickening and hardening of the placental vascular wall, placental blood supply shortage, fetal hypoxia–ischemia and intrauterine growth retardation or intrauterine fetal death. PE sera increased [Ca2+]i and induced PKC-α activation and collagen I expression in cocultured HUASMCs via the PLC-γ1 pathway. PMID:25257609

  8. Inhibition of nitrite-induced toxicity in channel catfish by calcium chloride and sodium chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tommasso J.R., Wright, M. I.; Simco, B.A.; Davis, K.B.

    1980-01-01

    Environmental chloride has been shown to inhibit methemoglobin formation in fish, thereby offering a protective effect against nitrite toxicity. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were simultaneously exposed to various environmental nitrite and chloride levels (as either CaCl2 or NaCl) in dechlorinated tap water (40 mg/L total hardness, 47 mg/L alkalinity, 4 mg/L chloride, pH = 6.9-7.1, and temperature 21-24°C). Methemoglobin levels in fish simultaneously exposed to 2.5 mg/L nitrite and up to 30 mg/L chloride as either CaCl2 or NaCl were similar but significantly lower than in unprotected fish. Exposure to 10 mg/L nitrite and 60 mg/L chloride resulted in methemoglobin levels similar to those of the controls; most unprotected fish died. Fish exposed to 10 mg/L nitrite had significantly lower methemoglobin levels when protected with 15.0 mg/L chloride as CaCl2 than with NaCl. Fish exposed to nitrite in the presence of 60 mg/L chloride (as either CaCl2 or NaCl) had similar 24-h LC50 values that were significantly elevated above those obtained in the absence of chloride. Calcium had little effect on tolerance to nitrite toxicity in channel catfish in contrast to its large effect reported in steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri).

  9. Watershed scale chloride storage across a gradient of urbanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellen, C. C.; Oswald, C. J.; Oni, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Sodium chloride is the main de-icing agent used during the winter in Canada and the northern United States. However, little is known about the long term fate, residence time, and ecological effects of chloride. This talk integrates work taking place across three sites in Southern Ontario, Canada: Hamilton Harbour, the Toronto lakeshore, and Lake Simcoe. We quantify chloride inputs, outputs, and changes in storage for a number of watersheds across a gradient of urbanization. For the three winter months (January, February, March), we show that stream water chloride concentrations approach those of brackish waters for urban watersheds. Chloride is also highly persistent, with stream water chloride concentrations decreasing from the winter months and approaching baseline levels only in July. These baseline levels are greater than 100 mg Cl/l in the urban watersheds, suggesting high levels of chloride storage in soil and groundwater. Using road salt application rates and groundwater levels and chloride concentrations, we estimate the magnitude and residence time of the chloride pools in a number of watersheds across a gradient of urbanization. Our results suggest that the magnitude and residence time of chloride storage varies with urbanization and other factors. We show that summer baseflow concentrations do approach the EPA's chronic exposure guideline of 230 mg Cl/l, implying more work is needed to understand the in stream and downstream ecological effects of chloride.

  10. Interpretation of postmortem vitreous concentrations of sodium and chloride.

    PubMed

    Zilg, B; Alkass, K; Berg, S; Druid, H

    2016-06-01

    Vitreous fluid can be used to analyze sodium and chloride levels in deceased persons, but it remains unclear to what extent such results can be used to diagnose antemortem sodium or chloride imbalances. In this study we present vitreous sodium and chloride levels from more than 3000 cases. We show that vitreous sodium and chloride levels both decrease with approximately 2.2mmol/L per day after death. Since potassium is a well-established marker for postmortem interval (PMI) and easily can be analyzed along with sodium and chloride, we have correlated sodium and chloride levels with the potassium levels and present postmortem reference ranges relative the potassium levels. We found that virtually all cases outside the reference range show signs of antemortem hypo- or hypernatremia. Vitreous sodium or chloride levels can be the only means to diagnose cases of water or salt intoxication, beer potomania or dehydration. We further show that postmortem vitreous sodium and chloride strongly correlate and in practice can be used interchangeably if analysis of one of the ions fails. It has been suggested that vitreous sodium and chloride levels can be used to diagnose drowning or to distinguish saltwater from freshwater drowning. Our results show that in cases of freshwater drowning, vitreous sodium levels are decreased, but that this mainly is an effect of postmortem diffusion between the eye and surrounding water rather than due to the drowning process, since the decrease in sodium levels correlates with immersion time. PMID:27105154

  11. Phosphonium chloride for thermal storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, J. G.; Heimlich, P. F.; Tepper, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Development of systems for storage of thermal energy is discussed. Application of phosphonium chloride for heat storage through reversible dissociation is described. Chemical, physical, and thermodynamic properties of phosphonium chloride are analyzed and dangers in using phosphonium chloride are explained.

  12. Intracellular gene delivery is dependent on the type of non-viral carrier and defined by the cell surface glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Nomani, Alireza; Hyvönen, Zanna; Pulkkinen, Eveliina; Hiekkala, Marjo; Ruponen, Marika

    2014-08-10

    Intracellular limiting steps and molecules involved in internalization and intracellular routing of non-viral gene delivery systems are still poorly understood. In this study, the intracellular kinetics of three different gene delivery systems calcium phosphate precipitates (CaP), polyethyleneimine (PEI) and N-[1-(2,3-dioleyl)propyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride (DOTAP)) were quantified at cellular, nuclear, transcriptional and translational levels by using qRT-PCR. Additionally, a role of cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) was evaluated by performing the aforementioned studies in cells devoid of GAGs (pgsB-618) and cells lacking heparan sulphate (HS). The obtained data showed that the intracellular kinetics was dependent on the type of gene carrier and the weakest intracellular step varied between the carriers; rapid elimination of cell-associated pDNA in CaP, nuclear uptake in DOTAP and transcriptional and translational events in PEI mediated transfections. Overall, neither the amount of cell- nor nuclear associated pDNA correlated with transgene expression but the mRNA expression of the transgene correlated well with the expression at protein level. The nuclear uptake of pDNA in all cases was rapid and efficient thus indicating that the post-nuclear processes including transcription and translation steps have a critical role in defining the efficiency of non-viral gene delivery systems. Our study demonstrated that cell-surface GAGs are not essential for cell surface binding and internalization of gene delivery complexes, but they are able to define the intracellular routing of the complexes by leading them to pathways with high pDNA elimination. PMID:24838099

  13. Defects in a New Class of Sulfate/Anion Transporter Link Sulfur Acclimation Responses to Intracellular Glutathione Levels and Cell Cycle Control1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Su-Chiung; Chung, Chin-Lin; Chen, Chun-Han; Lopez-Paz, Cristina; Umen, James G.

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified a mutation, suppressor of mating type locus3 15-1 (smt15-1), that partially suppresses the cell cycle defects caused by loss of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor-related protein encoded by the MAT3 gene in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. smt15-1 single mutants were also found to have a cell cycle defect leading to a small-cell phenotype. SMT15 belongs to a previously uncharacterized subfamily of putative membrane-localized sulfate/anion transporters that contain a sulfate transporter domain and are found in a widely distributed subset of eukaryotes and bacteria. Although we observed that smt15-1 has a defect in acclimation to sulfur-limited growth conditions, sulfur acclimation (sac) mutants, which are more severely defective for acclimation to sulfur limitation, do not have cell cycle defects and cannot suppress mat3. Moreover, we found that smt15-1, but not sac mutants, overaccumulates glutathione. In wild-type cells, glutathione fluctuated during the cell cycle, with highest levels in mid G1 phase and lower levels during S and M phases, while in smt15-1, glutathione levels remained elevated during S and M. In addition to increased total glutathione levels, smt15-1 cells had an increased reduced-to-oxidized glutathione redox ratio throughout the cell cycle. These data suggest a role for SMT15 in maintaining glutathione homeostasis that impacts the cell cycle and sulfur acclimation responses. PMID:25361960

  14. Effects of Kaempferia parviflora Wall. Ex. Baker and sildenafil citrate on cGMP level, cardiac function, and intracellular Ca2+ regulation in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Weerateerangkul, Punate; Palee, Siripong; Chinda, Kroekkiat; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2012-09-01

    Although Kaempferia parviflora extract (KPE) and its flavonoids have positive effects on the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, its mechanisms on the heart are still unclear. Because our previous studies demonstrated that KPE decreased defibrillation efficacy in swine similar to that of sildenafil citrate, the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, it is possible that KPE may affect the cardiac NO signaling pathway. In the present study, the effects of KPE and sildenafil citrate on cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) level, modulation of cardiac function, and Ca transients in ventricular myocytes were investigated. In a rat model, cardiac cGMP level, cardiac function, and Ca transients were measured before and after treatment with KPE and sildenafil citrate. KPE significantly increased the cGMP level and decreased cardiac function and Ca transient. These effects were similar to those found in the sildenafil citrate-treated group. Furthermore, the nonspecific NOS inhibitor could abolish the effects of KPE and sildenafil citrate on Ca transient. KPE has positive effect on NO signaling in the heart, resulting in an increased cGMP level, similar to that of sildenafil citrate. This effect was found to influence the physiology of normal heart via the attenuation of cardiac function and the reduction of Ca transient in ventricular myocytes. PMID:22691878

  15. A pH-independent DNA nanodevice for quantifying chloride transport in organelles of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sonali; Prakash, Ved; Halder, Saheli; Chakraborty, Kasturi; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2015-07-01

    The concentration of chloride ions in the cytoplasm and subcellular organelles of living cells spans a wide range (5-130 mM), and is tightly regulated by intracellular chloride channels or transporters. Chloride-sensitive protein reporters have been used to study the role of these chloride regulators, but they are limited to a small range of chloride concentrations and are pH-sensitive. Here, we show that a DNA nanodevice can precisely measure the activity and location of subcellular chloride channels and transporters in living cells in a pH-independent manner. The DNA nanodevice, called Clensor, is composed of sensing, normalizing and targeting modules, and is designed to localize within organelles along the endolysosomal pathway. It allows fluorescent, ratiometric sensing of chloride ions across the entire physiological regime. We used Clensor to quantitate the resting chloride concentration in the lumen of acidic organelles in Drosophila melanogaster. We showed that lumenal lysosomal chloride, which is implicated in various lysosomal storage diseases, is regulated by the intracellular chloride transporter DmClC-b.

  16. Optical absorption and thermally stimulated depolarization current studies of nickel chloride-doped poly(vinyl alcohol) irradiated with low-level fast neutron doses

    SciTech Connect

    Abd El-Kader, F.H.; Ibrahim, S.S. . Physics Dept.); Attia, G. . Faculty of Education)

    1993-11-15

    The influence of neutron irradiation on ultraviolet/visible absorption and thermally stimulated depolarization current in nickel chloride-poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) cast films has been investigated. The spectral measurements indicate the responsibility of the Ni[sup 2][sup +] ion in its octahedral symmetry. Dopant concentrations higher than 10 wt % NiCl[sub 2] are found to make the samples more resistant to a degradation effect caused by neutron irradiation. The thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDC) of pure PVA revealed the existence of the glass transition T[sub g] and space charge relaxation peaks, whereas doped-PVA samples show a new sub-T[sub g] relaxation peak. A proposed mechanism is introduced to account for the neutron effects on both glass transition and space charge relaxation peaks. The peak positions, peak currents, and stored charges of the sub-T[sub g] relaxation peak are strongly affected by both the concentration of the dopant and neutron exposure doses.

  17. Strontium-89 Chloride

    MedlinePlus

    ... ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.Strontium-89 chloride is in a class of drugs known as radioisotopes. It delivers radiation to cancer sites and ultimately decreases bone pain. The length of treatment depends on the ...

  18. Mercuric chloride poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mercuric chloride is a very poisonous form of mercury. It is a type of mercury salt. There are different types of mercury poisonings . This article discusses poisoning from swallowing mercuric ...

  19. Hydrogen chloride test set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Detector uses tertiary amine, which makes reaction fairly specific for relatively small highly polarized hydrogen chloride molecule. Reaction is monitored by any microbalance capable of measuring extremely small mass differences in real time.

  20. Managing intracellular transport

    PubMed Central

    Chua, John J.E.; Jahn, Reinhard; Klopfenstein, Dieter R.

    2013-01-01

    Formation and normal function of neuronal synapses are intimately dependent on the delivery to and removal of biological materials from synapses by the intracellular transport machinery. Indeed, defects in intracellular transport contribute to the development and aggravation of neurodegenerative disorders. Despite its importance, regulatory mechanisms underlying this machinery remain poorly defined. We recently uncovered a phosphorylation-regulated mechanism that controls FEZ1-mediated Kinesin-1-based delivery of Stx1 into neuronal axons. Using C. elegans as a model organism to investigate transport defects, we show that FEZ1 mutations resulted in abnormal Stx1 aggregation in neuronal cell bodies and axons. This phenomenon closely resembles transport defects observed in neurodegenerative disorders. Importantly, diminished transport due to mutations of FEZ1 and Kinesin-1 were concomitant with increased accumulation of autophagosomes. Here, we discuss the significance of our findings in a broader context in relation to regulation of Kinesin-mediated transport and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24058857

  1. Association-Dissociation of Glycolate Oxidase with Catalase in Rice: A Potential Switch to Modulate Intracellular H2O2 Levels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhisheng; Xu, Yuanyuan; Xie, Zongwang; Li, Xiangyang; He, Zheng-Hui; Peng, Xin-Xiang

    2016-05-01

    Rapid and dynamic change in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels can serve as an important signal to regulate various biological processes in plants. The change is realized by tilting the balance between its production and scavenging rates, in which membrane-associated NADPH oxidases are known to play a crucial role. Functioning independently from NADPH oxidases, glycolate oxidase (GLO) was recently demonstrated as an alternative source for H2O2 production during both gene-for-gene and non-host resistance in plants. In this study, we show that GLO physically interacts with catalase (CAT) in rice leaves, and that the interaction can be deregulated by salicylic acid (SA). Furthermore, the GLO-mediated H2O2 accumulation is synergistically enhanced by SA. Based on the well-known mechanism of substrate channeling in enzyme complexes, SA-induced H2O2 accumulation likely results from SA-induced GLO-CAT dissociation. In the GLO-CAT complex, GLO-mediated H2O2 production during photorespiration is very high, whereas the affinity of CAT for H2O2 (measured Km ≈ 43 mM) is extraordinarily low. This unique combination can further potentiate the increase in H2O2 when GLO is dissociated from CAT. Taken together, we propose that the physical association-dissociation of GLO and CAT, in response to environmental stress or stimuli, seems to serve as a specific mechanism to modulate H2O2 levels in rice. PMID:26900141

  2. Identification of the different sources of chlorides in streams by regression analysis using chloride-discharge relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Albek, E.

    1999-12-01

    Chloride-discharge relationships at several stations on Turkish streams are investigated, both qualitatively and quantitatively, to identify natural and anthropogenic sources of chloride. Simple expressions are used to distinguish among sources. Linear regression analysis is conducted to estimate parameters of the models. Five groups of stations are distinguished respective to different sources of chloride and change of chloride concentration with stream discharge. Emphasis is placed on the identification of anthropogenic sources of chloride to aid in water pollution control strategies. The polluted Sakarya River and its primary tributary, the Porsuk Stream, are studied in detail to trace chloride behavior along the waterway and to assess the level of pollution from cities discharging to the streams. Among natural sources of chloride, evaporite sediment sources are examined in detail.

  3. Proteomic Study of Microsomal Proteins Reveals a Key Role for Arabidopsis Annexin 1 in Mediating Heat Stress-Induced Increase in Intracellular Calcium Levels*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Ma, Xiaolong; Wang, Hui; Li, Bingjie; Clark, Greg; Guo, Yi; Roux, Stan; Sun, Daye; Tang, Wenqiang

    2015-01-01

    To understand the early signaling steps in the response of plant cells to increased environmental temperature, 2-D difference gel electrophoresis was used to study the proteins in microsomes of Arabidopsis seedlings that are regulated early during heat stress. Using mass spectrometry, 19 microsomal proteins that showed an altered expression level within 5 min after heat treatment were identified. Among these proteins, annexin 1 (AtANN1) was one of those up-regulated rapidly after heat-shock treatment. Functional studies show loss-of-function mutants for AtANN1 and its close homolog AtANN2 were more sensitive to heat-shock treatment, whereas plants overexpressing AtANN1 showed more resistance to this treatment. Correspondingly, the heat-induced expression of heat-shock proteins and heat-shock factors is inhibited in ann1/ann2 double mutant, and the heat-activated increase in cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) is greatly impaired in the ann1 mutant and almost undetectable in ann1/ann2 double mutant. Taken together these results suggest that AtANN1 is important in regulating the heat-induced increase in [Ca2+]cyt and in the response of Arabidopsis seedlings to heat stress. PMID:25587034

  4. Ammonium chloride salting out extraction/cleanup for trace-level quantitative analysis in food and biological matrices by flow injection tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nanita, Sergio C; Padivitage, Nilusha L T

    2013-03-20

    A sample extraction and purification procedure that uses ammonium-salt-induced acetonitrile/water phase separation was developed and demonstrated to be compatible with the recently reported method for pesticide residue analysis based on fast extraction and dilution flow injection mass spectrometry (FED-FI-MS). The ammonium salts evaluated were chloride, acetate, formate, carbonate, and sulfate. A mixture of NaCl and MgSO4, salts used in the well-known QuEChERS method, was also tested for comparison. With thermal decomposition/evaporation temperature of <350°C, ammonium salts resulted in negligible ion source residual under typical electrospray conditions, leading to consistent method performance and less instrument cleaning. Although all ammonium salts tested induced acetonitrile/water phase separation, NH4Cl yielded the best performance, thus it was the preferred salting out agent. The NH4Cl salting out method was successfully coupled with FI/MS/MS and tested for fourteen pesticide active ingredients: chlorantraniliprole, cyantraniliprole, chlorimuron ethyl, oxamyl, methomyl, sulfometuron methyl, chlorsulfuron, triflusulfuron methyl, azimsulfuron, flupyrsulfuron methyl, aminocyclopyrachlor, aminocyclopyrachlor methyl, diuron and hexazinone. A validation study was conducted with nine complex matrices: sorghum, rice, grapefruit, canola, milk, eggs, beef, urine and blood plasma. The method is applicable to all analytes, except aminocyclopyrachlor. The method was deemed appropriate for quantitative analysis in 114 out of 126 analyte/matrix cases tested (applicability rate=0.90). The NH4Cl salting out extraction/cleanup allowed expansion of FI/MS/MS for analysis in food of plant and animal origin, and body fluids with increased ruggedness and sensitivity, while maintaining high-throughput (run time=30s/sample). Limits of quantitation (LOQs) of 0.01mgkg(-1) (ppm), the 'well-accepted standard' in pesticide residue analysis, were achieved in >80% of cases tested; while

  5. Vinyl chloride loss during laboratory holding time

    SciTech Connect

    Soule, R.G.; Jones, D.B.A.; Symonik, D.M.; Gerbec, B.A.; Turgeon, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    Because vinyl chloride is a potent human carcinogen, it`s important that analytical results from groundwater samples accurately reflect levels of exposure. This study investigated the current allowable sample holding time of 14 days to determine if vinyl chloride is lost from samples during this time. In addition to lab spiked samples, groundwater was collected from a well known to contain vinyl chloride. A statistically significant (a = 0.05) decrease in vinyl chloride concentrations was observed over the 14-day holding time. The most significant loss was seen for those samples held the maximum length of time (14 days). No differences in degradation pattern were noted between analytical detectors used (PID versus Hall) or sample type (lab versus field). There also was a loss of vinyl chloride observed during the sampling and handling process. Analytical variability at low concentrations and the establishment of health-based guidelines near the analytical detection limit require that multiple samples be collected from a single location when highly accurate results are required. These findings have implications for the accurate generation of public health exposure assessments and the implementation of health-based recommendations at sites with vinyl chloride groundwater contamination.

  6. Caffeine inhibits inositol trisphosphate-mediated liberation of intracellular calcium in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, I; Ivorra, I

    1991-01-01

    1. Voltage-clamp recording of Ca(2+)-activated chloride currents in Xenopus oocytes was used to study the effects of caffeine on the liberation of intracellular Ca2+ induced by photo-release of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) from caged InsP3. Bath application of caffeine, at concentrations between 0.1 and 10 mM, reduced or abolished the current evoked by photo-release of InsP3 and by microinjection of InsP3. 2. Caffeine did not appreciably reduce currents evoked by injection of Ca2+ into oocytes, whereas measurements using the Ca2+ indicator Rhod-2 showed that it instead inhibited the liberation of Ca2+ by InsP3. 3. Caffeine increased the threshold amount of InsP3 required to evoke a current response and proportionally reduced the currents evoked by suprathreshold levels of InsP3. 4. Theophylline and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) were much less potent than caffeine, and few changes were seen in the InsP3 responses following application of forskolin or intracellular injection of cyclic AMP. Thus, inhibition of InsP3 responses by caffeine does not arise through inhibition of phosphodiesterase enzymes. 5. Even at high (10 mM) concentrations, caffeine did not itself elicit any clear Ca(2+)-activated current. It is therefore unlikely that inhibition of the InsP3 responses arise because caffeine itself liberates Ca2+ from intracellular stores. 6. The site of action of caffeine is intracellular, because injections of caffeine into the oocyte strongly inhibited responses to InsP3, whereas local extracellular applications of similar amounts were almost without effect. PMID:1844813

  7. Chloride Transporting CLC Proteins1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusch, Michael

    In the early 1980s, Chris Miller and colleagues described a curious "double-barreled" chloride channel from the electric organ of Torpedo fish reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers (Miller and White, 1980). Single-channel openings occurred in "bursts" separated by long closures. A single burst was characterized by the presence of two open conductance levels of equal size and the gating (i.e., openings and closings) during a burst could be almost perfectly described as a superposition of two identical and independent conductances that switched between open and closed states with voltage-dependent rates α and β (Hanke and Miller, 1983) (Fig. 8.1).

  8. Pyramidal cells accumulate chloride at seizure onset

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Kyle P; Kramer, Mark A; Mertz, Jerome; Staley, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    Seizures are thought to originate from a failure of inhibition to quell hyperactive neural circuits, but the nature of this failure remains unknown. Here we combine high-speed two-photon imaging with electrophysiological recordings to directly evaluate the interaction between populations of interneurons and principal cells during the onset of seizure-like activity in mouse hippocampal slices. Both calcium imaging and dual patch clamp recordings reveal that in vitro seizure-like events (SLEs) are preceded by pre-ictal bursts of activity in which interneurons predominate. Corresponding changes in intracellular chloride concentration were observed in pyramidal cells using the chloride indicator Clomeleon. These changes were measurable at SLE onset and became very large during the SLE. Pharmacological manipulation of GABAergic transmission, either by blocking GABAA receptors or by hyperpolarizing the GABAA reversal potential, converted SLEs to short interictal-like bursts. Together, our results support a model in which pre-ictal GABAA receptor-mediated chloride influx shifts EGABA to produce a positive feedback loop that contributes to the initiation of seizure activity. PMID:22677032

  9. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04543.001 PMID:25513726

  10. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation. PMID:25513726

  11. CHLORIDE WASHER PERFORMACE TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, J; David Best, D; Robert Pierce, R

    2007-11-30

    Testing was performed to determine the chloride (Cl-) removal capabilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) designed and built Cl- washing equipment intended for HB-Line installation. The equipment to be deployed was tested using a cerium oxide (CeO2) based simulant in place of the 3013 plutonium oxide (PuO2) material. Two different simulant mixtures were included in this testing -- one having higher Cl- content than the other. The higher Cl- simulant was based on K-Area Interim Surveillance Inspection Program (KIS) material with Cl- content approximately equal to 70,000 ppm. The lower Cl- level simulant was comparable to KIS material containing approximately 8,000-ppm Cl- content. The performance testing results indicate that the washer is capable of reducing the Cl- content of both surrogates to below 200 ppm with three 1/2-liter washes of 0.1M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. Larger wash volumes were used with similar results - all of the prescribed test parameters consistently reduced the Cl- content of the surrogate to a value below 200 ppm Cl- in the final washed surrogate material. The washer uses a 20-micron filter to retain the surrogate solids. Tests showed that 0.16-0.41% of the insoluble fraction of the starting mass passed through the 20-micron filter. The solids retention performance indicates that the fissile masses passing through the 20-micron filter should not exceed the waste acceptance criteria for discard in grout to TRU waste. It is recommended that additional testing be pursued for further verification and optimization purposes. It is likely that wash volumes smaller than those tested could still reduce the Cl- values to acceptable levels. Along with reduced wash volumes, reuse of the third wash volume (in the next run processed) should be tested as a wash solution minimization plan. A 67% reduction in the number of grouted paint pails could be realized if wash solution minimization testing returned acceptable results.

  12. Strontium-89 Chloride

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor if you have or have ever had bone marrow disease, blood disorders, or kidney disease.you should know that strontium-89 chloride may interfere with the normal menstrual cycle (period) in women and may stop sperm production in men. However, ...

  13. Lithium thionyl chloride battery

    SciTech Connect

    Saathoff, D.J.; Venkatasetty, H.V.

    1982-10-19

    The discharge rate and internal conductivity of electrochemical cell including a lithium anode, and a cathode and an electrolyte including LiAlCl4 and SOC2 is improved by the addition of an amount of a mixture containing AlCl3 and butyl pyridinium chloride.

  14. PHOTOOXIDATION OF ALLYL CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The photooxidation of allyl chloride was studied by irradiation either in 100-L Teflon bags or in a 22.7-cu m Teflon smog chamber in the presence of added NOx. In the absence of added hydrocarbons, the reaction involves a Cl atom chain, which leads to a highly reactive system. A ...

  15. Aqueous extract of tamarind seeds selectively increases glucose transporter-2, glucose transporter-4, and islets' intracellular calcium levels and stimulates β-cell proliferation resulting in improved glucose homeostasis in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sole, Sushant Shivdas; Srinivasan, B P

    2012-08-01

    Tamarindus indica Linn. has been in use for a long time in Asian food and traditional medicine for different diseases including diabetes and obesity. However, the molecular mechanisms of these effects have not been fully understood. In view of the multidimensional activity of tamarind seeds due to their having high levels of polyphenols and flavonoids, we hypothesized that the insulin mimetic effect of aqueous tamarind seed extract (TSE) might increase glucose uptake through improvement in the expression of genes of the glucose transporter (GLUT) family and sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP) 1c messenger RNA (mRNA) in the liver. Daily oral administration of TSE to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced (90 mg/kg intraperitoneally) type 2 diabetic male Wistar rats at different doses (120 and 240 mg/kg body weight) for 4 weeks showed positive correlation with intracellular calcium and insulin release in isolated islets of Langerhans. Tamarind seed extract supplementation significantly improved the GLUT-2 protein and SREBP-1c mRNA expression in the liver and GLUT-4 protein and mRNA expression in the skeletal muscles of diabetic rats. The elevated levels of serum nitric oxide (NO), glycosylated hemoglobin level (hemoglobin (A1c)) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) decreased after TSE administration. Immunohistochemical findings revealed that TSE abrogated STZ-induced apoptosis and increased β-cell neogenesis, indicating its effect on islets and β-cell mass. In conclusion, it was found that the antidiabetic effect of TSE on STZ-induced diabetes resulted from complex mechanisms of β-cell neogenesis, calcium handling, GLUT-2, GLUT-4, and SREBP-1c. These findings show the scope for formulating a new herbal drug for diabetes therapy. PMID:22935346

  16. (Z)3,4,5,4‧-trans-tetramethoxystilbene, a new analogue of resveratrol, inhibits gefitinb-resistant non-small cell lung cancer via selectively elevating intracellular calcium level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xing-Xing; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Su Wei; Wong, Vincent Kam-Wai; He, Jian-Xing; Ding, Jian; Xue, Wei-Wei; Mujtaba, Tahira; Michelangeli, Francesco; Huang, Min; Huang, Jun; Xiao, Da-Kai; Jiang, Ze-Bo; Zhou, Yan-Ling; Kin-Ting Kam, Richard; Liu, Liang; Lai-Han Leung, Elaine

    2015-11-01

    Calcium is a second messenger which is required for regulation of many cellular processes. However, excessive elevation or prolonged activation of calcium signaling would lead to cell death. As such, selectively regulating calcium signaling could be an alternative approach for anti-cancer therapy. Recently, we have identified an effective analogue of resveratrol, (Z)3,4,5,4‧-trans-tetramethoxystilbene (TMS) which selectively elevated the intracellular calcium level in gefitinib-resistant (G-R) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. TMS exhibited significant inhibitory effect on G-R NSCLC cells, but not other NSCLC cells and normal lung epithelial cells. The phosphorylation and activation of EGFR were inhibited by TMS in G-R cells. TMS induced caspase-independent apoptosis and autophagy by directly binding to SERCA and causing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and AMPK activation. Proteomics analysis also further confirmed that mTOR pathway, which is the downstream of AMPK, was significantly suppressed by TMS. JNK, the cross-linker of ER stress and mTOR pathway was significantly activated by TMS. In addition, the inhibition of JNK activation can partially block the effect of TMS. Taken together, TMS showed promising anti-cancer activity by mediating calcium signaling pathway and inducing apoptosis as well as autophagy in G-R NSCLC cells, providing strategy in designing multi-targeting drug for treating G-R patients.

  17. (Z)3,4,5,4'-trans-tetramethoxystilbene, a new analogue of resveratrol, inhibits gefitinb-resistant non-small cell lung cancer via selectively elevating intracellular calcium level.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xing-Xing; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Su Wei; Wong, Vincent Kam-Wai; He, Jian-Xing; Ding, Jian; Xue, Wei-Wei; Mujtaba, Tahira; Michelangeli, Francesco; Huang, Min; Huang, Jun; Xiao, Da-Kai; Jiang, Ze-Bo; Zhou, Yan-Ling; Kam, Richard Kin-Ting; Liu, Liang; Leung, Elaine Lai-Han

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is a second messenger which is required for regulation of many cellular processes. However, excessive elevation or prolonged activation of calcium signaling would lead to cell death. As such, selectively regulating calcium signaling could be an alternative approach for anti-cancer therapy. Recently, we have identified an effective analogue of resveratrol, (Z)3,4,5,4'-trans-tetramethoxystilbene (TMS) which selectively elevated the intracellular calcium level in gefitinib-resistant (G-R) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. TMS exhibited significant inhibitory effect on G-R NSCLC cells, but not other NSCLC cells and normal lung epithelial cells. The phosphorylation and activation of EGFR were inhibited by TMS in G-R cells. TMS induced caspase-independent apoptosis and autophagy by directly binding to SERCA and causing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and AMPK activation. Proteomics analysis also further confirmed that mTOR pathway, which is the downstream of AMPK, was significantly suppressed by TMS. JNK, the cross-linker of ER stress and mTOR pathway was significantly activated by TMS. In addition, the inhibition of JNK activation can partially block the effect of TMS. Taken together, TMS showed promising anti-cancer activity by mediating calcium signaling pathway and inducing apoptosis as well as autophagy in G-R NSCLC cells, providing strategy in designing multi-targeting drug for treating G-R patients. PMID:26542098

  18. (Z)3,4,5,4′-trans-tetramethoxystilbene, a new analogue of resveratrol, inhibits gefitinb-resistant non-small cell lung cancer via selectively elevating intracellular calcium level

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xing-Xing; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Su Wei; Wong, Vincent Kam-Wai; He, Jian-Xing; Ding, Jian; Xue, Wei-Wei; Mujtaba, Tahira; Michelangeli, Francesco; Huang, Min; Huang, Jun; Xiao, Da-Kai; Jiang, Ze-Bo; Zhou, Yan-Ling; Kin-Ting Kam, Richard; Liu, Liang; Lai-Han Leung, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is a second messenger which is required for regulation of many cellular processes. However, excessive elevation or prolonged activation of calcium signaling would lead to cell death. As such, selectively regulating calcium signaling could be an alternative approach for anti-cancer therapy. Recently, we have identified an effective analogue of resveratrol, (Z)3,4,5,4′-trans-tetramethoxystilbene (TMS) which selectively elevated the intracellular calcium level in gefitinib-resistant (G-R) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. TMS exhibited significant inhibitory effect on G-R NSCLC cells, but not other NSCLC cells and normal lung epithelial cells. The phosphorylation and activation of EGFR were inhibited by TMS in G-R cells. TMS induced caspase-independent apoptosis and autophagy by directly binding to SERCA and causing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and AMPK activation. Proteomics analysis also further confirmed that mTOR pathway, which is the downstream of AMPK, was significantly suppressed by TMS. JNK, the cross-linker of ER stress and mTOR pathway was significantly activated by TMS. In addition, the inhibition of JNK activation can partially block the effect of TMS. Taken together, TMS showed promising anti-cancer activity by mediating calcium signaling pathway and inducing apoptosis as well as autophagy in G-R NSCLC cells, providing strategy in designing multi-targeting drug for treating G-R patients. PMID:26542098

  19. Comment on "Local impermeant anions establish the neuronal chloride concentration".

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Kirischuk, Sergei; Kilb, Werner

    2014-09-01

    Glykys et al. (Reports, 7 February 2014, p. 670) proposed that cytoplasmic impermeant anions and polyanionic extracellular matrix glycoproteins establish the local neuronal intracellular chloride concentration, [Cl(-)]i, and thereby the polarity of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor signaling. The experimental procedures and results in this study are insufficient to support these conclusions. Contradictory results previously published by these authors and other laboratories are not referred to. PMID:25190788

  20. Decreased chloride channel expression in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Courtney R; Funk, Adam J; Shan, Dan; Haroutunian, Vahram; McCullumsmith, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in GABAergic neurotransmission are implicated in several psychiatric illnesses, including schizophrenia. The Na-K-Cl and K-Cl cotransporters regulate intracellular chloride levels. Abnormalities in cotransporter expression levels could shift the chloride electrochemical gradient and impair GABAergic transmission. In this study, we performed Western blot analysis to investigate whether the Na-K-Cl and K-Cl cotransporter protein is abnormally expressed in the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex in patients with schizophrenia versus a control group. We found decreased K-Cl cotransporter protein expression in the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, but not the anterior cingulate cortex, in subjects with schizophrenia, supporting the hypothesis of region level abnormal GABAergic function in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Subjects with schizophrenia off antipsychotic medication at the time of death had decreased K-Cl cotransporter protein expression compared to both normal controls and subjects with schizophrenia on antipsychotics. Our results provide evidence for KCC2 protein abnormalities in schizophrenia and suggest that antipsychotic medications might reverse deficits of this protein in the illness. PMID:25826365

  1. Decreased Chloride Channel Expression in the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Courtney R.; Funk, Adam J.; Shan, Dan; Haroutunian, Vahram; McCullumsmith, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in GABAergic neurotransmission are implicated in several psychiatric illnesses, including schizophrenia. The Na-K-Cl and K-Cl cotransporters regulate intracellular chloride levels. Abnormalities in cotransporter expression levels could shift the chloride electrochemical gradient and impair GABAergic transmission. In this study, we performed Western blot analysis to investigate whether the Na-K-Cl and K-Cl cotransporter protein is abnormally expressed in the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex in patients with schizophrenia versus a control group. We found decreased K-Cl cotransporter protein expression in the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, but not the anterior cingulate cortex, in subjects with schizophrenia, supporting the hypothesis of region level abnormal GABAergic function in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Subjects with schizophrenia off antipsychotic medication at the time of death had decreased K-Cl cotransporter protein expression compared to both normal controls and subjects with schizophrenia on antipsychotics. Our results provide evidence for KCC2 protein abnormalities in schizophrenia and suggest that antipsychotic medications might reverse deficits of this protein in the illness. PMID:25826365

  2. Role of {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 5} integrin receptor in endocytosis of crocidolite and its effect on intracellular glutathione levels in human lung epithelial (A549) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, Priyadarshini; Mosleh, Tariq A.; Aust, Ann E. . E-mail: aaust@cc.usu.edu

    2006-01-15

    Crocidolite, containing 27% iron by weight, is the most carcinogenic form of asbestos. Crocidolite fibers are endocytized by {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 5} integrin receptors in rabbit pleural mesothelial cells. We show here that crocidolite fibers are endocytized in human lung epithelial (A549) cells and in primary small airway epithelial (SAEC) cells. Presence of the integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 5} blocking antibody, P1F6, significantly reduced the uptake of crocidolite fibers in A549 cells. Thus, the integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 5} receptor is involved in endocytosis of crocidolite fibers in A549 cells as well. Previously, it has been observed that asbestos fibers lead to changes in the intracellular redox environment, i.e. a marked decrease in intracellular glutathione concentrations and an increase in the extracellular glutathione in A549 cells. In addition, the decrease in intracellular glutathione was found to be largely independent of iron present on the surface of the fiber. A549 cells were treated with crocidolite in the presence of endocytosis inhibitor cytochalasin D. Our data indicate that, upon preventing endocytosis, we were able to reverse the decrease in total intracellular glutathione. The decrease in total intracellular glutathione could also be prevented in the presence of the monoclonal antibody P1F6. Thus, we observed that endocytosis of crocidolite fibers via integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 5} receptor is linked to the marked decrease in total intracellular glutathione in A549 cells.

  3. Apical membrane sodium and chloride entry during osmotic swelling of renal (A6) epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Crowe, W E; Ehrenfeld, J; Brochiero, E; Wills, N K

    1995-03-01

    To assess the role of chloride in cell volume and sodium transport regulation, we measured cell height changes (CH), transepithelial chloride and sodium fluxes, and intracellular chloride content during challenge with hyposmotic solutions under open circuit (OC) conditions. CH maximally increased following hyposmotic challenge within approximately 5 minutes. The change in CH was smaller under short circuit (SC) conditions or following replacement of chloride in the mucosal solution by gluconate or cyclamate (Cl(-)-freem). When corrected for the osmotically inactive cell volume (30 +/- 2%), delta CH for controls (OC) were greater than predicted for an ideal osmometer. In contrast, delta CH for Cl(-)-freem or SC conditions were similar to that predicted for an ideal osmometer. Na+ and Cl- mucosa-to-serosa fluxes increased following hyposmotic challenge. Chloride fluxes increased maximally within 5 min, then decreased. In contrast, the Na+ flux increased slowly and reached a steady state after approximately 25 min. Under isosmotic conditions, exposure to Cl(-)-freem solutions led to decreases in the transepithelial conductance, Na+ flux, and CH. Chloride permeabilities in the apical and basolateral membranes were detected using the fluorescent intracellular chloride indicator MQAE. The results indicate that during osmotic swelling, the entry of both sodium and chloride is increased. The time courses of these increases differ, suggesting distinct mechanisms for the osmotic regulation of these apical membrane transport processes. PMID:7541082

  4. Morin, a Bioflavonoid Suppresses Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Inflammatory Immune Response in RAW 264.7 Macrophages through the Inhibition of Inflammatory Mediators, Intracellular ROS Levels and NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Dhanasekar, Chitra; Kalaiselvan, Sowmiya; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies had reported that morin, a bioflavanoid exhibited potent anti-inflammatory effect against adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. In this current study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory mechanism of morin against monosodium urate crystal (MSU)-induced inflammation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells, an in vitro model for acute gouty arthritis. For comparison purpose, colchicine was used as a reference drug. We have observed that morin (100–300 μM) treatment significantly suppressed the levels of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1 and VEGF), inflammatory mediators (NO and PEG2), and lysosomal enzymes (acid phosphatase, β-galactosidase, N-acetyl glucosamindase and cathepsin D) in MSU-crystals stimulated macrophage cells. The mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and MCP-1), inflammatory enzymes (iNOS and COX-2), and NF-κBp65 was found downregulated in MSU crystal stimulated macrophage cells by morin treatment, however, the mRNA expression of hypoxanthine phospho ribosyl transferse (HPRT) was found to be increased. The flow cytometry analysis revealed that morin treatment decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species levels in MSU crystal stimulated macrophage cells. The western blot analysis clearly showed that morin mainly exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the MSU crystal-induced COX-2 and TNF-α protein expression through the inactivation of NF-κB signaling pathway in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells similar to that of BAY 11–7082 (IκB kinase inhibitor). Our results collectively suggest that morin can be a potential therapeutic agent for inflammatory disorders like acute gouty arthritis. PMID:26709520

  5. The level of intracellular glutathione is a key regulator for the induction of stress-activated signal transduction pathways including Jun N-terminal protein kinases and p38 kinase by alkylating agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, D; Bender, K; Knebel, A; Angel, P

    1997-01-01

    Monofunctional alkylating agents like methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) are potent inducers of cellular stress leading to chromosomal aberrations, point mutations, and cell killing. We show that these agents induce a specific cellular stress response program which includes the activation of Jun N-terminal kinases/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the upstream kinase SEK1/MKK4 and which depends on the reaction mechanism of the alkylating agent in question. Similar to another inducer of cellular stress, UV irradiation, damage of nuclear DNA by alkylation is not involved in the MMS-induced response. However, in contrast to UV and other inducers of the JNK/SAPKs and p38 pathways, activation of growth factor and G-protein-coupled receptors does not play a role in the MMS response. We identified the intracellular glutathione (GSH) level as critical for JNK/SAPK activation by MMS: enhancing the GSH level by pretreatment of the cells with GSH or N-acetylcysteine inhibits, whereas depletion of the cellular GSH pool causes hyperinduction of JNK/SAPK activity by MMS. In light of the JNK/SAPK-dependent induction of c-jun and c-fos transcription, and the Jun/Fos-induced transcription of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, these data provide a potential critical role of JNK/SAPK and p38 in the induction of a cellular defense program against cytotoxic xenobiotics such as MMS. PMID:9234735

  6. HEALTH ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT FOR VINYLIDENE CHLORIDE. FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vinylidene chloride is a highly reactive, flammable, clear colorless liquid. In the absence of chemical inhibitors, it can produce violently explosive, complex peroxides. The estimated, ambient air level of vinylidene chloride in urban-suburban areas of the United States is 20 mi...

  7. 21 CFR 520.260 - n-Butyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... a dosage level of 1 capsule per 21/2 pounds body weight. Capsules containing 884 milligrams of n... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false n-Butyl chloride. 520.260 Section 520.260 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.260 n-Butyl chloride....

  8. 21 CFR 520.260 - n-Butyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... a dosage level of 1 capsule per 21/2 pounds body weight. Capsules containing 884 milligrams of n... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false n-Butyl chloride. 520.260 Section 520.260 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.260 n-Butyl chloride....

  9. Molybdenum In Cathodes Of Sodium/Metal Chloride Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Attia, Alan I.; Halpert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetric curves of molybdenum wire in NaAlCl4 melt indicate molybdenum chloride useful as cathode material in rechargeable sodium/metal chloride electrochemical cells. Batteries used in electric vehicles, for electric-power load leveling, and other applications involving high energy and power densities.

  10. Contribution of the potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC2 to the strength of inhibition in the neonatal rodent spinal cord in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gackière, Florian; Vinay, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    In healthy mature motoneurons (MNs), KCC2 cotransporters maintain the intracellular chloride concentration at low levels, a prerequisite for postsynaptic inhibition mediated by GABA and glycine. KCC2 expression in lumbar MNs is reduced after spinal cord injury (SCI) resulting in a depolarizing shift of the chloride equilibrium potential. Despite modeling studies indicating that such a downregulation of KCC2 function would reduce the strength of postsynaptic inhibition, physiological evidence is still lacking. The present study aimed at investigating the functional impact of a modification of KCC2 function. We focused on a well characterized disynaptic inhibitory pathway responsible for reciprocal inhibition between antagonistic muscles. We performed in vitro extracellular recordings on spinal cords isolated from rodents at the end of the first postnatal week. Genetic reduction of KCC2 expression, pharmacological blockade of KCC2, as well as SCI-induced downregulation of KCC2 all resulted in a reduction of the strength of reciprocal inhibition. We then tried to restore endogenous inhibition after SCI by means of zinc ions that have been shown to boost KCC2 function in other models. Zinc chloride indeed hyperpolarized the chloride equilibrium potential in MNs and increased reciprocal inhibition after neonatal SCI. This study demonstrates that the level of KCC2 function sets the strength of postsynaptic inhibition and suggests that the downregulation of KCC2 after SCI likely contributes to the high occurrence of flexor-extensor cocontractions in SCI patients. PMID:25834055

  11. Alkyl Chlorides as Hydrogen Bond Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nadas, Janos I; Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    To gain an understanding of the role of an alkyl chloride as a hydrogen bond acceptor, geometries and interaction energies were calculated at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory for complexes between ethyl chloride and representative hydrogen donor groups. The results establish that these donors, which include hydrogen cyanide, methanol, nitrobenzene, pyrrole, acetamide, and N-methylurea, form X-H {hor_ellipsis} Cl hydrogen bonds (X = C, N, O) of weak to moderate strength, with {Delta}E values ranging from -2.8 to -5.3 kcal/mol.

  12. Extracellular ATP inhibits chloride channels in mature mammalian skeletal muscle by activating P2Y1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Voss, Andrew A

    2009-12-01

    ATP is released from skeletal muscle during exercise, a discovery dating back to 1969. Surprisingly, few studies have examined the effects of extracellular ATP on mature mammalian skeletal muscle. This electrophysiological study examined the effects of extracellular ATP on fully innervated rat levator auris longus using two intracellular microelectrodes. The effects of ATP were determined by measuring the relative changes of miniature endplate potentials (mEPPs) and voltage responses to step current pulses in individual muscle fibres. Exposure to ATP (20 microm) prolonged the mEPP falling phase by 31 +/- 7.5% (values +/- s.d., n = 3 fibres). Concurrently, the input resistance increased by 31 +/- 2.0% and the time course of the voltage responses increased by 59 +/- 3.0%. Analogous effects were observed using 2 and 5 microm ATP, and on regions distal from the neuromuscular junction, indicating that physiologically relevant levels of ATP enhanced electrical signalling over the entire muscle fibre. The effects of extracellular ATP were blocked by 200 microm anthracene-9-carboxylic acid, a chloride channel inhibitor, and reduced concentrations of extracellular chloride, indicating that ATP inhibited chloride channels. A high affinity agonist for P2Y receptors, 2-methylthioadenosine-5-O-diphosphate (2MeSADP), induced similar effects to ATP with an EC(50) of 160 +/- 30 nm. The effects of 250 nm2MeSADP were blocked by 500 nmMRS2179, a specific P2Y(1) receptor inhibitor, suggesting that ATP acts on P2Y(1) receptors to inhibit chloride channels. The inhibition of chloride channels by extracellular ATP has implications for muscle excitability and fatigue, and the pathophysiology of myotonias. PMID:19805741

  13. Chloride dysregulation and inhibitory receptor blockade yield equivalent disinhibition of spinal neurons yet are differentially reversed by carbonic anhydrase blockade.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwan Yeop; Prescott, Steven A

    2015-12-01

    Synaptic inhibition plays a key role in processing somatosensory information. Blocking inhibition at the spinal level is sufficient to produce mechanical allodynia, and many neuropathic pain conditions are associated with reduced inhibition. Disinhibition of spinal neurons can arise through decreased GABAA/glycine receptor activation or through dysregulation of intracellular chloride. We hypothesized that these distinct disinhibitory mechanisms, despite all causing allodynia, are differentially susceptible to therapeutic intervention. Specifically, we predicted that reducing bicarbonate efflux by blocking carbonic anhydrase with acetazolamide (ACTZ) would counteract disinhibition caused by chloride dysregulation without affecting normal inhibition or disinhibition caused by GABAA/glycine receptor blockade. To test this, responses to innocuous tactile stimulation were recorded in vivo from rat superficial dorsal horn neurons before and after different forms of pharmacological disinhibition and again after application of ACTZ. Blocking GABAA or glycine receptors caused hyperresponsiveness equivalent to that caused by blocking the potassium chloride cotransporter KCC2, but, consistent with our predictions, only disinhibition caused by KCC2 blockade was counteracted by ACTZ. ACTZ did not alter responses of neurons with intact inhibition. As pathological downregulation of KCC2 is triggered by brain-derived neurotrophic factor, we also confirmed that ACTZ was effective against brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced hyperresponsiveness. Our results argue that intrathecal ACTZ has antiallodynic effects only if allodynia arises through chloride dysregulation; therefore, behavioral evidence that ACTZ is antiallodynic in nerve-injured animals affirms the contribution of chloride dysregulation as a key pathological mechanism. Although different disinhibitory mechanisms are not mutually exclusive, these results demonstrate that their relative contribution dictates which

  14. [Degradation of succinylcholine chloride].

    PubMed

    Németh, G; Török, I; Paál, T

    1993-05-01

    Quantitative thin-layer chormatographic method has been developed for the investigation of the degradation of injection formulations containing succinylcholinium chloride. The method is based on the denistometric determination of the main degradation product, choline at 430 nm after visualization with iodine vapour. The stability of the injection was investigated under various storage conditions and it has been stated that considerable decomposition takes place during as short a period as one week. PMID:8362654

  15. Transformation of human osteoblast cells to the tumorigenic phenotype by depleted uranium-uranyl chloride.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A C; Blakely, W F; Livengood, D; Whittaker, T; Xu, J; Ejnik, J W; Hamilton, M M; Parlette, E; John, T S; Gerstenberg, H M; Hsu, H

    1998-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a dense heavy metal used primarily in military applications. Although the health effects of occupational uranium exposure are well known, limited data exist regarding the long-term health effects of internalized DU in humans. We established an in vitro cellular model to study DU exposure. Microdosimetric assessment, determined using a Monte Carlo computer simulation based on measured intracellular and extracellular uranium levels, showed that few (0.0014%) cell nuclei were hit by alpha particles. We report the ability of DU-uranyl chloride to transform immortalized human osteoblastic cells (HOS) to the tumorigenic phenotype. DU-uranyl chloride-transformants are characterized by anchorage-independent growth, tumor formation in nude mice, expression of high levels of the k-ras oncogene, reduced production of the Rb tumor-suppressor protein, and elevated levels of sister chromatid exchanges per cell. DU-uranyl chloride treatment resulted in a 9.6 (+/- 2.8)-fold increase in transformation frequency compared to untreated cells. In comparison, nickel sulfate resulted in a 7.1 (+/- 2.1)-fold increase in transformation frequency. This is the first report showing that a DU compound caused human cell transformation to the neoplastic phenotype. Although additional studies are needed to determine if protracted DU exposure produces tumors in vivo, the implication from these in vitro results is that the risk of cancer induction from internalized DU exposure may be comparable to other biologically reactive and carcinogenic heavy-metal compounds (e.g., nickel). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9681973

  16. Dynamic [Cl-]i measurement with chloride sensing quantum dots nanosensor in epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuchi; Mao, Hua; Wong, Lid B.

    2010-02-01

    We have synthesized a chloride sensing quantum dots (QD) nanosensor, Cl-QD, for the dynamic measurements of chloride ion concentration in the millimolar range, a sensitivity that is applicable to most physiological intracellular chloride ion concentration ([Cl-]i) measurements in epithelial cells. The Cl-QD is synthesized by conjugating an anion receptor, 1-(2-mercapto-ethyl)-3-phenyl-thiourea (MEPTU) to a water soluble CdSe/ZnS QD at an emission wavelength of 620 nm. Upon binding of chloride ions to the Cl-QD, a photo-induced electron transfer mechanism caused the fluorescence of the QD to quench. This resulted in an inversely proportional relationship between the chloride ion concentration and the fluorescence intensity of the Cl-QD. We have utilized this Cl-QD to measure [Cl-]i in T84 and CF-PAC cultured cells, with either the C1C-2 or CFTR chloride channels being manipulated by pharmacological chloride channel activators and inhibitors. Activations of C1C-2 and CFTR chloride channels in T84 by the respective lubiprostone and genistein caused predictive increases in the fluorescence of the Cl-QD, i.e., a decrease of [Cl-]i. Conversely, glibenclamide, a chloride channel inhibitor, applied to the CF-PAC cells caused a predictable decrease in the fluorescence of Cl-QD due to the increase of [Cl-]i. These are the first data in using QD-based chloride ion sensors for dynamic measurements of intracellular chloride ion concentrations in epithelial cells.

  17. Intracellular alkalization causes pain sensation through activation of TRPA1 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Fumitaka; Uchida, Kunitoshi; Moriyama, Tomoko; Shima, Asako; Shibasaki, Koji; Inada, Hitoshi; Sokabe, Takaaki; Tominaga, Makoto

    2008-01-01

    Vertebrate cells require a very narrow pH range for survival. Cells accordingly possess sensory and defense mechanisms for situations where the pH deviates from the viable range. Although the monitoring of acidic pH by sensory neurons has been attributed to several ion channels, including transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel (TRPV1) and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), the mechanisms by which these cells detect alkaline pH are not well understood. Here, using Ca2+ imaging and patch-clamp recording, we showed that alkaline pH activated transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) and that activation of this ion channel was involved in nociception. In addition, intracellular alkalization activated TRPA1 at the whole-cell level, and single-channel openings were observed in the inside-out configuration, indicating that alkaline pH activated TRPA1 from the inside. Analyses of mutants suggested that the two N-terminal cysteine residues in TRPA1 were involved in activation by intracellular alkalization. Furthermore, intraplantar injection of ammonium chloride into the mouse hind paw caused pain-related behaviors that were not observed in TRPA1-deficient mice. These results suggest that alkaline pH causes pain sensation through activation of TRPA1 and may provide a molecular explanation for some of the human alkaline pH–related sensory disorders whose mechanisms are largely unknown. PMID:19033673

  18. A calcium- and voltage-dependent chloride current in developing chick skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Hume, R I; Thomas, S A

    1989-01-01

    1. Depolarization of embryonic chick myotubes from negative potentials elicits a rapid spike followed by a long-duration after-potential. The ionic basis of the long-duration after-potential was examined by making intracellular recordings from cultured myotubes, and by making whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from myoblasts and myoballs. 2. The peak potential of the long-duration after-potential varied with the chloride gradient, suggesting that a conductance increase to chloride is involved in generating the after-potential. However, a calcium current was also implicated, since lowering the extracellular calcium or replacing extracellular calcium with cobalt abolished the after-potential. 3. When extracellular calcium was replaced with strontium or barium, short-duration spikes similar to calcium spikes were observed, but only strontium was able to support activation of long-duration after-potentials. Intracellular injection of calcium or strontium into myotubes bathed in calcium-free extracellular solutions restored the ability of depolarization to evoke an after-potential. Intracellular injection of magnesium, barium, nickel or cobalt did not restore this ability. These experiments strongly suggested that the long-duration after-potential was due to a calcium- and voltage-activated chloride current. 4. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings from myoballs and myoblasts showed that a large chloride conductance could be activated by depolarization when the internal free calcium concentration was buffered at levels greater than 10(-7) M. At 2.5 x 10(-7) M-calcium, the voltage dependence of activation was steepest in the range of -30 to -20 mV and the activation kinetics varied with the membrane potential. The time to half-maximal activation ranged from 0.1 s at positive potentials to greater than 1 s at more negative potentials. The time constant for deactivation was approximately 1 s at -50 mV. No inactivation was observed. 5. The selectivity of the chloride current

  19. Effect of application of ammonium chloride and calcium chloride on alfalfa cation-anion content and yield.

    PubMed

    Goff, J P; Brummer, E C; Henning, S J; Doorenbos, R K; Horst, R L

    2007-11-01

    A major factor predisposing the cow to periparturient hypocalcemia, or milk fever, is being fed a prepartum ration with a high dietary cation-anion difference (DCAD). The DCAD can be favorably altered to prevent milk fever by decreasing K and Na or increasing Cl and S in forages for cows in late gestation. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that application of Cl to alfalfa could increase Cl in forage, thereby lowering DCAD. We conducted a field experiment at 2 Iowa locations in which established plots of alfalfa were treated in April 2001 with 0, 56, 112, or 168 kg of Cl/ha using ammonium chloride, calcium chloride, or a mix of the 2 sources with equal amounts of chloride coming from each source. Plots were harvested 4 times in 2001 and once in 2002 and plant tissue analyzed for mineral composition. Applying chloride from either source once in the spring resulted in increased plant chloride content over all 4 cuttings for that year. Averaged across both locations, chloride levels were elevated from 0.52% in control plots to 0.77, 0.87, and 0.89% Cl in plots treated with 56, 112, and 168 kg of Cl/ha, respectively. Chloride application had no effect on plant potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium, or phosphorus. These results suggest chloride application can elevate chloride content and lower DCAD values of alfalfa, and also maintain crop yield. PMID:17954756

  20. Oxomemazine hydro-chloride.

    PubMed

    Siddegowda, M S; Butcher, Ray J; Akkurt, Mehmet; Yathirajan, H S; Ramesh, A R

    2011-08-01

    IN THE TITLE COMPOUND [SYSTEMATIC NAME: 3-(5,5-dioxo-phen-othia-zin-10-yl)-N,N,2-trimethyl-propanaminium chloride], C(18)H(23)N(2)O(2)S(+)·Cl(-), the dihedral angle between the two outer aromatic rings of the phenothia-zine unit is 30.5 (2)°. In the crystal, the components are linked by N-H⋯Cl and C-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds and C-H⋯π inter-actions. PMID:22090928

  1. Unique chloride-sensing properties of WNK4 permit the distal nephron to modulate potassium homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Terker, Andrew S.; Zhang, Chong; Erspamer, Kayla J.; Gamba, Gerardo; Yang, Chao-Ling; Ellison, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary potassium deficiency activates thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransport along the distal nephron. This may explain, in part, the hypertension and cardiovascular mortality observed in individuals who consume a low potassium diet. Recent data suggest plasma potassium affects the distal nephron directly by influencing intracellular chloride, an inhibitor of the With no lysine kinase (WNK)-Ste20p-related proline-and alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) pathway. Since previous studies used extreme dietary manipulations, we sought to determine if the relationship between potassium and NCC is physiologically relevant and clarify the mechanisms involved. We report that modest changes in both dietary and plasma potassium affect the thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride cotransporter, NCC, in vivo. Kinase assay studies showed that chloride inhibits WNK4 kinase activity at lower concentrations than it inhibits activity of WNK1 or WNK3. Also, chloride inhibited WNK4 within the range of distal cell chloride. Mutation of a previously identified WNK chloride-binding motif converted WNK4 effects on SPAK from inhibitory to stimulatory in mammalian cells. Disruption of this motif in WNKs 1, 3 and 4 had different effects on NCC, consistent with the three WNKs having different chloride sensitivities. Thus, potassium effects on NCC are graded within the physiological range, which explains how unique chloride-sensing properties of WNK4 enable kinase mediating effects of potassium on NCC in vivo. PMID:26422504

  2. Anti-Diarrheal Mechanism of the Traditional Remedy Uzara via Reduction of Active Chloride Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, Anja; Günzel, Dorothee

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose The root extract of the African Uzara plant is used in traditional medicine as anti-diarrheal drug. It is known to act via inhibition of intestinal motility, but malabsorptive or antisecretory mechanisms are unknown yet. Experimental Approach HT-29/B6 cells and human colonic biopsies were studied in Ussing experiments in vitro. Uzara was tested on basal as well as on forskolin- or cholera toxin-induced Cl− secretion by measuring short-circuit current (ISC) and tracer fluxes of 22Na+ and 36Cl−. Para- and transcellular resistances were determined by two-path impedance spectroscopy. Enzymatic activity of the Na+/K+-ATPase and intracellular cAMP levels (ELISA) were measured. Key Results In HT-29/B6 cells, Uzara inhibited forskolin- as well as cholera toxin-induced ISC within 60 minutes indicating reduced active chloride secretion. Similar results were obtained in human colonic biopsies pre-stimulated with forskolin. In HT-29/B6, the effect of Uzara on the forskolin-induced ISC was time- and dose-dependent. Analyses of the cellular mechanisms of this Uzara effect revealed inhibition of the Na+/K+-ATPase, a decrease in forskolin-induced cAMP production and a decrease in paracellular resistance. Tracer flux experiments indicate that the dominant effect is the inhibition of the Na+/K+-ATPase. Conclusion and Implications Uzara exerts anti-diarrheal effects via inhibition of active chloride secretion. This inhibition is mainly due to an inhibition of the Na+/K+-ATPase and to a lesser extent to a decrease in intracellular cAMP responses and paracellular resistance. The results imply that Uzara is suitable for treating acute secretory diarrhea. PMID:21479205

  3. INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A book chapter in ?Molecular Toxicology: Transcriptional Targets? reviewed the role of intracellular signaling in the developmental neurotoxicity of environmental chemicals. This chapter covered a number of aspects including the development of the nervous system, role of intrace...

  4. Altered chloride metabolism in cultured cystic fibrosis skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Mattes, P.M.; Maloney, P.C.; Littlefield, J.W.

    1987-05-01

    An abnormal regulation of chloride permeability has been described for epithelial cells from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). To learn more about the biochemical basis of this inherited disease, the authors have studied chloride metabolism in cultured CF fibroblasts by comparing the efflux of /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ from matched pairs of CF and normal fibroblasts. The rate constants describing /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ efflux did not differ between the two cell types, but in each of the four pairs tested the amount of /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ contained within CF cells was consistently reduced, by 25-30%, relative to normal cells. Comparisons of cell water content and /sup 22/Na/sup +/ efflux showed no differences between the two cell types, suggesting that overall intracellular chloride concentration is lower than normal in CF fibroblasts. Such data suggest that the CF gene defect is expressed in skin fibroblasts and that this defect may alter the regulation of intracellular Cl/sup -/ concentration, perhaps through changes in Cl/sup -/ permeability.

  5. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride, FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and hydrogen chloride. The...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric...

  8. Benzalkonium Chloride and Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Paul L.; Kiland, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Glaucoma patients routinely take multiple medications, with multiple daily doses, for years or even decades. Benzalkonium chloride (BAK) is the most common preservative in glaucoma medications. BAK has been detected in the trabecular meshwork (TM), corneal endothelium, lens, and retina after topical drop installation and may accumulate in those tissues. There is evidence that BAK causes corneal and conjunctival toxicity, including cell loss, disruption of tight junctions, apoptosis and preapoptosis, cytoskeleton changes, and immunoinflammatory reactions. These same effects have been reported in cultured human TM cells exposed to concentrations of BAK found in common glaucoma drugs and in the TM of primary open-angle glaucoma donor eyes. It is possible that a relationship exists between chronic exposure to BAK and glaucoma. The hypothesis that BAK causes/worsens glaucoma is being tested experimentally in an animal model that closely reflects human physiology. PMID:24205938

  9. Unique chloride-sensing properties of WNK4 permit the distal nephron to modulate potassium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Terker, Andrew S; Zhang, Chong; Erspamer, Kayla J; Gamba, Gerardo; Yang, Chao-Ling; Ellison, David H

    2016-01-01

    Dietary potassium deficiency activates thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransport along the distal nephron. This may explain, in part, the hypertension and cardiovascular mortality observed in individuals who consume a low-potassium diet. Recent data suggest that plasma potassium affects the distal nephron directly by influencing intracellular chloride, an inhibitor of the with-no-lysine kinase (WNK)-Ste20p-related proline- and alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) pathway. As previous studies used extreme dietary manipulations, we sought to determine whether the relationship between potassium and NaCl cotransporter (NCC) is physiologically relevant and clarify the mechanisms involved. We report that modest changes in both dietary and plasma potassium affect NCC in vivo. Kinase assay studies showed that chloride inhibits WNK4 kinase activity at lower concentrations than it inhibits activity of WNK1 or WNK3. Also, chloride inhibited WNK4 within the range of distal cell chloride concentration. Mutation of a previously identified WNK chloride-binding motif converted WNK4 effects on SPAK from inhibitory to stimulatory in mammalian cells. Disruption of this motif in WNKs 1, 3, and 4 had different effects on NCC, consistent with the three WNKs having different chloride sensitivities. Thus, potassium effects on NCC are graded within the physiological range, which explains how unique chloride-sensing properties of WNK4 enable it to mediate effects of potassium on NCC in vivo. PMID:26422504

  10. Reactor-chromatographic determination of vinyl chloride in polyvinyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Berezkin, V.G.

    1986-08-01

    The authors carry out a chromatographic study of the volatile products that evolve when various grades of domestic polyvinyl chloride are heated, to determine the concentration of residual monomer. To find vinyl chloride in complex mixtures of air pollutants the authors used sorptive reaction concentration of impurities. This new combination of methods is based on preliminary separation at the sampling stage of impurities that interfere in the analysis, followed by concentration of the desired components in a trap with an adsorbent, and chromatographic determination of the concentrated trace materials. The method obtains low vinyl chloride concentrations (down to 10/sup -4/-10/sup -5/ wt. %) with +/-5 relative error.

  11. Invasion and Intracellular Survival by Protozoan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Sibley, L. David

    2013-01-01

    Summary Intracellular parasitism has arisen only a few times during the long ancestry of protozoan parasites including in diverse groups such as microsporidians, kinetoplastids, and apicomplexans. Strategies used to gain entry differ widely from injection (e.g. microsporidians), active penetration of the host cell (e.g. Toxoplasma), recruitment of lysosomes to a plasma membrane wound (e.g. Trypanosoma cruzi), to host cell-mediated phagocytosis (e.g. Leishmania). The resulting range of intracellular niches is equally diverse ranging from cytosolic (e.g. T. cruzi) to residing within a nonfusigenic vacuole (e.g. Toxoplasma, Encephalitizoon) or a modified phagolysosome (e.g. Leishmania). These lifestyle choices influence access to nutrients, interaction with host cell signaling pathways, and detection by pathogen recognition systems. As such, intracellular life requires a repertoire of adaptations to assure entry-exit from the cell, as well as to thwart innate immune mechanisms and prevent clearance. Elucidating these pathways at the cellular and molecular level may identify key steps that can be targeted to reduce parasite survival or augment immunological responses and thereby prevent disease. PMID:21349087

  12. Intracellular calcium ions as regulators of renal tubular sodium transport.

    PubMed

    Windhager, E; Frindt, G; Yang, J M; Lee, C O

    1986-09-15

    This review addresses the putative role of intracellular calcium ions in the regulation of sodium transport by renal tubules. Cytoplasmic calcium-ion activities in proximal tubules of Necturus are less than 10(-7) M and can be increased by lowering the electrochemical potential gradient for sodium ions across the peritubular cell membrane, or by addition of quinidine or ionomycin to peritubular fluid. Whereas lowering of the peritubular Na concentration increases cytosolic [Ca++] and [H+], ionomycin, a calcium ionophore, raises intracellular [Ca++] without decreasing pHi. The intracellular calcium-ion level is maintained by transport processes in the plasma membrane and membranes of intracellular organelles, as well as by calcium-binding proteins. Calcium ions inhibit net transport of sodium by reducing the rate of sodium entry across the luminal cell membrane. In the collecting tubule this inhibition is caused, at least in part, by an indirect reduction in the activity of the amiloride-sensitive sodium channel. PMID:2430134

  13. Precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, S.A.; Miller, W.E.; Willit, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Precipitation of actinides, lanthanides, and fission products as nitrides from molten chloride melts is being investigated for use as a final cleanup step in treating radioactive salt wastes generated by electrometallurgical processing of spent nuclear fuel. The radioactive components (eg, fission products) need to be removed to reduce the volume of high-level waste that requires disposal. To extract the fission products from the salt, a nitride precipitation process is being developed. The salt waste is first contacted with a molten metal; after equilibrium is reached, a nitride is added to the metal phase. The insoluble nitrides can be recovered and converted to a borosilicate glass after air oxidation. For a bench-scale experimental setup, a crucible was designed to contact the salt and metal phases. Solubility tests were performed with candidate nitrides and metal nitrides for which there are no solubility data. Experiments were performed to assess feasibility of precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts.

  14. Sodium Is Not Required for Chloride Efflux via Chloride/Bicarbonate Exchanger from Rat Thymic Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stakišaitis, Donatas; Meilus, Vaidevutis; Juška, Alfonsas; Matusevičius, Paulius; Didžiapetrienė, Janina

    2014-01-01

    Sodium-dependent Cl−/HCO3− exchanger acts as a chloride (Cl−) efflux in lymphocytes. Its functional characterization had been described when Cl− efflux was measured upon substituting extracellular sodium (Na+) by N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG). For Na+ and Cl− substitution, we have used D-mannitol or NMDG. Thymocytes of male Wistar rats aged 7–9 weeks were used and intracellular Cl− was measured by spectrofluorimetry using MQAE dye in bicarbonate buffers. Chloride efflux was measured in a Cl−-free buffer (Cl− substituted with isethionate acid) and in Na+ and Cl−-free buffer with D-mannitol or with NMDG. The data have shown that Cl− efflux is mediated in the absence of Na+ in a solution containing D-mannitol and is inhibited by H2DIDS. Mathematical modelling has shown that Cl− efflux mathematical model parameters (relative membrane permeability, relative rate of exchanger transition, and exchanger efficacy) were the same in control and in the medium in which Na+ had been substituted by D-mannitol. The net Cl− efflux was completely blocked in the NMDG buffer. The same blockage of Cl− efflux was caused by H2DIDS. The study results allow concluding that Na+ is not required for Cl− efflux via Cl−/HCO3− exchanger. NMDG in buffers cannot be used for substituting Na+ because NMDG inhibits the exchanger. PMID:25003116

  15. Studies Update Vinyl Chloride Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1980-01-01

    Extensive study affirms that vinyl chloride is a potent animal carcinogen. Epidemiological studies show elevated rates of human cancers in association with extended contact with the compound. (Author/RE)

  16. Chloride in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... level based on scientific research evidence. Adequate Intake (AI): This level is established when there is not ... that is thought to ensure enough nutrition. Infants (AI) 0 to 6 months old: 0.18 grams ...

  17. An XAFS study of nickel chloride in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride/ aluminum chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; G Cheek; K Pandya; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Nickel chloride was studied with cyclic voltammetry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) ionic liquids. Acidic melts display metal stripping peaks which are not observed in the basic melt. EXAFS analysis shows that the nickel is tetrahedrally coordinated with chloride ions in the basic solution. In the acidic solution the nickel is coordinated by six chloride ions that are also associated with aluminum ions.

  18. Automatic electrochemical ambient air monitor for chloride and chlorine

    DOEpatents

    Mueller, Theodore R.

    1976-07-13

    An electrochemical monitoring system has been provided for determining chloride and chlorine in air at levels of from about 10-1000 parts per billion. The chloride is determined by oxidation to chlorine followed by reduction to chloride in a closed system. Chlorine is determined by direct reduction at a platinum electrode in 6 M H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 electrolyte. A fully automated system is utilized to (1) acquire and store a value corresponding to electrolyte-containing impurities, (2) subtract this value from that obtained in the presence of air, (3) generate coulometrically a standard sample of chlorine mixed with air sample, and determine it as chlorine and/or chloride, and (4) calculate, display, and store for permanent record the ratio of the signal obtained from the air sample and that obtained with the standard.

  19. Regeneration of zinc chloride hydrocracking catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Zielke, Clyde W.

    1979-01-01

    Improved rate of recovery of zinc values from the solids which are carried over by the effluent vapors from the oxidative vapor phase regeneration of spent zinc chloride catalyst is achieved by treatment of the solids with both hydrogen chloride and calcium chloride to selectively and rapidly recover the zinc values as zinc chloride.

  20. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS Reg. No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg. No. 7447-40-7) is a white... manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in infant formula in accordance with section 412(g)...

  2. Chloride cells and the hormonal control of teleost fish osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Foskett, J K; Bern, H A; Machen, T E; Conner, M

    1983-09-01

    Teleost fish osmoregulation is largely the result of integrated transport activities of the gill, gut and renal system. The basic 'epithelial fabric' in each of these tissues is adapted to provide the appropriate transport mechanisms depending upon whether the fish is in fresh water or sea water. Net NaCl transport by the branchial epithelium reverses direction when euryhaline species migrate between the two media, providing a useful focus in experiments designed to elucidate mechanisms of differentiation and integration of transport function. Isolated opercular membranes and skins from certain seawater-adapted species are good models to study branchial salt extrusion mechanisms. These heterogeneous tissues generate short-circuit currents equal to net chloride secretion. The vibrating probe technique has allowed localization of all current and almost all conductance to the apical crypt of chloride cells. Area-specific surface current and conductance of chloride cells are 18 mA cm-2 and 580 mS cm-2 (1.7 omega cm2), ranking them as one of the most actively transporting and conductive cells known. There is no net sodium transport under short-circuit conditions but the chloride secretion process is sodium-dependent and ouabain and 'loop'-diuretic sensitive. Sodium fluxes through chloride cells are large (PNa = 5.2 X 10(-4) cms-1) nd appear passive and rate-limited by a single barrier. A link may exist between the active transport and leak pathways since sodium fluxes always account for 50% of chloride cell conductance. The sodium pathway is probably the chloride cell-accessory cell tight junction, although this is still unresolved. Chloride secretion can be rapidly modulated by several hormones, including catecholamines, somatostatin, glucagon, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and urotensins I and II. Regulation by these hormones may be by rapid alterations of cellular cAMP levels. Differentiation of chloride cells and chloride secretion may be controlled by cortisol

  3. The gastric H,K-ATPase blocker lansoprazole is an inhibitor of chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Schmarda, Andreas; Dinkhauser, Patrick; Gschwentner, Martin; Ritter, Markus; Fürst, Johannes; Scandella, Elke; Wöll, Ewald; Laich, Andreas; Rossmann, Heidi; Seidler, Ursula; Lang, Florian; Paulmichl, Markus

    2000-01-01

    It was postulated that swelling dependent chloride channels are involved in the proton secretion of parietal cells. Since omeprazole, lansoprazole and its acid activated sulphenamide form AG2000 are structurally related to phenol derivatives known to block swelling dependent chloride channels, we set out to test, whether these substances – which are known to block the H,K-ATPase – could also lead to an inhibition of swelling-dependent chloride channels. Swelling-dependent chloride channels – characterized in many different cell types – show highly conserved biophysical and pharmacological features, therefore we investigated the effect of omeprazole, lansoprazole and its acid activated sulphenamide form AG2000 on swelling-dependent chloride channels elicited in fibroblasts, after the reduction of the extracellular osmolarity. Omeprazole, lansoprazole and its acid activated sulphenamide form AG2000 are able to block swelling-dependent chloride channels (IClswell). Lansoprazole and its protonated metabolite AG2000 act on at least two different sites of the IClswell protein: on an extracellular site which seems to be in a functional proximity to the nucleotide binding site, and on an intracellular site which allows the formation of disulfide-bridges. The inhibition of the proton pump and the simultaneous blocking of chloride channels by omeprazole, lansoprazole and its acid activated sulphenamide form AG2000, as described here could be an effective mode to restrict proton secretion in parietal cells. PMID:10711360

  4. Interaction of chloride and bicarbonate transport across the basolateral membrane of rabbit proximal straight tubule. Evidence for sodium coupled chloride/bicarbonate exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, S; Yoshiyama, N

    1988-01-01

    The existence of chloride/bicarbonate exchange across the basolateral membrane and its physiologic significance were examined in rabbit proximal tubules. S2 segments of the proximal straight tubule were perfused in vitro and changes in intracellular pH (pHi) and chloride activity (aCli) were monitored by double-barreled microelectrodes. Total peritubular chloride replacement with gluconate increased pHi by 0.8, and this change was inhibited by a pretreatment with an anion transport inhibitor, SITS. Peritubular bicarbonate reduction increased aCli, and most of this increase was lost when ambient sodium was totally removed. The reduction rates of pHi induced by a peritubular bicarbonate reduction or sodium removal were attenuated by 20% by withdrawal of ambient chloride. SITS application to the bath in the control condition quickly increased pHi, but did not change aCli. However, the aCli slightly decreased in response to SITS when the basolateral bicarbonate efflux was increased by reducing peritubular bicarbonate concentration. It is concluded that sodium coupled chloride/bicarbonate exchange is present in parallel with sodium-bicarbonate cotransport in the basolateral membrane of the rabbit proximal tubule, and it contributes to the basolateral bicarbonate and chloride transport. PMID:2450891

  5. ROS and intracellular ion channels.

    PubMed

    Kiselyov, Kirill; Muallem, Shmuel

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress is a well-known driver of numerous pathological processes involving protein and lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. The resulting increase of pro-apoptotic pressure drives tissue damage in a host of conditions, including ischemic stroke and reperfusion injury, diabetes, death in acute pancreatitis and neurodegenerative diseases. Somewhat less frequently discussed, but arguably as important, is the signaling function of oxidative stress stemming from the ability of oxidative stress to modulate ion channel activity. The evidence for the modulation of the intracellular ion channels and transporters by oxidative stress is constantly emerging and such evidence suggests new regulatory and pathological circuits that can be explored towards new treatments for diseases in which oxidative stress is an issue. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on the effects of oxidative stress on the intracellular ion channels and transporters and their role in cell function. PMID:26995054

  6. Direct Measurement of Intracellular Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Ryan J.; Koo, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    A method to directly measure the intracellular pressure of adherent, migrating cells is described in the Basic Protocol. This approach is based on the servo-null method where a microelectrode is introduced into the cell to directly measure the physical pressure of the cytoplasm. We also describe the initial calibration of the microelectrode as well as the application of the method to cells migrating inside three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM). PMID:24894836

  7. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Newby, Jay M.

    2013-01-01

    The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures.

  8. Intracellular proton access in a Cl(-)/H(+) antiporter.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun-Ho; Shane, Tania; Miller, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Chloride-transporting membrane proteins of the CLC family appear in two distinct mechanistic flavors: H(+)-gated Cl(-) channels and Cl(-)/H(+) antiporters. Transmembrane H(+) movement is an essential feature of both types of CLC. X-ray crystal structures of CLC antiporters show the Cl(-) ion pathway through these proteins, but the H(+) pathway is known only inferentially by two conserved glutamate residues that act as way-stations for H(+) in its path through the protein. The extracellular-facing H(+) transfer glutamate becomes directly exposed to aqueous solution during the transport cycle, but the intracellular glutamate E203, Glu(in), is buried within the protein. Two regions, denoted "polar" and "interfacial," at the intracellular surface of the bacterial antiporter CLC-ec1 are examined here as possible pathways by which intracellular aqueous protons gain access to Glu(in). Mutations at multiple residues of the polar region have little effect on antiport rates. In contrast, mutation of E202, a conserved glutamate at the protein-water boundary of the interfacial region, leads to severe slowing of the Cl(-)/H(+) antiport rate. An X-ray crystal structure of E202Y, the most strongly inhibited of these substitutions, shows an aqueous portal leading to Glu(in) physically blocked by cross-subunit interactions; moreover, this mutation has only minimal effect on a monomeric CLC variant, which necessarily lacks such interactions. The several lines of experiments presented argue that E202 acts as a water-organizer that creates a proton conduit connecting intracellular solvent with Glu(in). PMID:23239938

  9. Chloride Regulation in the Pain Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Price, Theodore J; Cervero, Fernando; Gold, Michael S; Hammond, Donna L; Prescott, Steven A

    2009-01-01

    Melzack and Wall’s Gate Control Theory of Pain laid the theoretical groundwork for a role of spinal inhibition in endogenous pain control. While the Gate Control Theory was based on the notion that spinal inhibition is dynamically regulated, mechanisms underlying the regulation of inhibition have turned out to be far more complex than Melzack and Wall could have ever imagined. Recent evidence indicates that an exquisitely sensitive form of regulation involves changes in anion equilibrium potential (Eanion), which subsequently impacts fast synaptic inhibition mediated GABAA, and to a lesser extent, glycine receptor activation, the prototypic ligand gated anion channels. The cation-chloride co-transporters (in particular NKCC1 and KCC2) have emerged as proteins that play a critical role in the dynamic regulation of Eanion which in turn appears to play a critical role in hyperalgesia and allodynia following peripheral inflammation or nerve injury. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge in this area with particular attention to how such findings relate to endogenous mechanisms of hyperalgesia and allodynia and potential applications for therapeutics based on modulation of intracellular Cl− gradients or pharmacological interventions targeting GABAA receptors PMID:19167425

  10. Chemical Analysis of Drug Biocrystals: A Role for Counterion Transport Pathways in Intracellular Drug Disposition.

    PubMed

    Keswani, Rahul K; Baik, Jason; Yeomans, Larisa; Hitzman, Chuck; Johnson, Allison M; Pawate, Ashtamurthy S; Kenis, Paul J A; Rodriguez-Hornedo, Nair; Stringer, Kathleen A; Rosania, Gus R

    2015-07-01

    In mammals, highly lipophilic small molecule chemical agents can accumulate as inclusions within resident tissue macrophages. In this context, we characterized the biodistribution, chemical composition, and structure of crystal-like drug inclusions (CLDIs) formed by clofazimine (CFZ), a weakly basic lipophilic drug. With prolonged oral dosing, CFZ exhibited a significant partitioning with respect to serum and fat due to massive bioaccumulation and crystallization in the liver and spleen. The NMR, Raman, and powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD) spectra of CLDIs isolated from the spleens of CFZ-treated mice matched the spectra of pure, CFZ hydrochloride crystals (CFZ-HCl). Elemental analysis revealed a 237-fold increase in chlorine content in CLDIs compared to untreated tissue samples and a 5-fold increase in chlorine content compared to CFZ-HCl, suggesting that the formation of CLDIs occurs through a chloride mediated crystallization mechanism. Single crystal analysis revealed that CFZ-HCl crystals had a densely packed orthorhombic lattice configuration. In vitro, CFZ-HCl formed at a pH of 4-5 only if chloride ions were present at sufficiently high concentrations (>50:1 Cl(-)/CFZ), indicating that intracellular chloride transport mechanisms play a key role in the formation of CLDIs. While microscopy and pharmacokinetic analyses clearly revealed crystallization and intracellular accumulation of the drug in vivo, the chemical and structural characterization of CLDIs implicates a concentrative, chloride transport mechanism, paralleling and thermodynamically stabilizing the massive bioaccumulation of a weakly basic drug. PMID:25926092

  11. Chemical Analysis of Drug Biocrystals: A Role for Counterion Transport Pathways in Intracellular Drug Disposition

    PubMed Central

    Keswani, Rahul K.; Baik, Jason; Yeomans, Larisa; Hitzman, Chuck; Johnson, Allison; Pawate, Ashtamurthy; Kenis, Paul J. A.; Rodriguez-Hornedo, Nair; Stringer, Kathleen A.; Rosania, Gus R.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, highly lipophilic small molecule chemical agents can accumulate as inclusions within resident tissue macrophages. In this context, we characterized the biodistribution, chemical composition and structure of crystal-like drug inclusions (CLDIs) formed by clofazimine (CFZ), a weakly basic lipophilic drug. With prolonged oral dosing, CFZ exhibited a significant partitioning with respect to serum and fat due to massive bioaccumulation and crystallization in the liver and spleen. The NMR, Raman and Powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD) spectra of CLDIs isolated from the spleens of CFZ-treated mice matched the spectra of pure, CFZ hydrochloride crystals (CFZ-HCl). Elemental analysis revealed a 237-fold increase in chlorine content in CLDIs compared to untreated tissue samples, and a five-fold increase in chlorine content compared to CFZ-HCl, suggesting that the formation of CLDIs occurs through a chloride mediated crystallization mechanism. Single crystal analysis revealed that CFZ-HCl crystals had a densely-packed orthorhombic lattice configuration. In vitro, CFZ-HCl formed at a pH of 4–5 only if chloride ions were present at sufficiently high concentrations (>50:1 Cl−:CFZ), indicating that intracellular chloride transport mechanisms play a key role in the formation of CLDIs. While microscopy and pharmacokinetic analyses clearly revealed crystallization and intracellular accumulation of the drug in vivo, the chemical and structural characterization of CLDIs implicates a concentrative, chloride transport mechanism, paralleling and thermodynamically stabilizing, the massive bioaccumulation of a weakly basic drug. PMID:25926092

  12. Antagonists for acute oral cadmium chloride intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Basinger, M.A.; Jones, M.M.; Holscher, M.A.; Vaughn, W.K.

    1988-01-01

    An examination has been carried out on the relative efficacy of a number of chelating agents when acting as antagonists for oral cadmium chloride intoxication in mice. The compounds were administered orally after the oral administration of cadmium chloride at 1 mmol/kg. Of the compounds examined, several were useful in terms of enhancing survival, but by far the most effective in both enhancing survival and leaving minimal residual levels of cadmium in the liver and the kidney, was meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). Several polyaminocarboxylic acids also enhanced survival. The most effective of these in reducing liver and kidney levels of cadmium were diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N'N'-tetraacetic acid (CDTA), and triethylenetetraminehexaacetic acid (TTHA). D-Penicillamine (DPA) was found to promote survival but also led to kidney cadmium levels higher than those found in the controls. Sodium 2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonate (DMPS) was as effective in promoting survival as DMSA but left levels of cadmium in the kidney and liver that were approximately four times greater than those found with DMSA.

  13. Coincident signalling between the Gi/Go-coupled delta-opioid receptor and the Gq-coupled m3 muscarinic receptor at the level of intracellular free calcium in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Yeo, A; Samways, D S; Fowler, C E; Gunn-Moore, F; Henderson, G

    2001-03-01

    In SH-SY5Y cells, activation of delta-opioid receptors with [D-Pen(2,5)]-enkephalin (DPDPE; 1 microM) did not alter the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration [Ca(2+)](i). However, when DPDPE was applied during concomitant Gq-coupled m3 muscarinic receptor stimulation by carbachol or oxotremorine-M, it produced an elevation of [Ca(2+)](i). The DPDPE-evoked increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was abolished when the carbachol-sensitive intracellular Ca(2+) store was emptied. There was a marked difference between the concentration-response relationship for the elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) by carbachol (EC(50) 13 microM, Hill slope 1) and the concentration-response relationship for carbachol's permissive action in revealing the delta-opioid receptor-mediated elevation of [Ca(2+)] (EC(50) 0.7 mM; Hill slope 1.8). Sequestration of free G protein beta gamma dimers by transient transfection of cells with a beta gamma binding protein (residues 495-689 of the C terminal tail of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2) reduced the ability of delta opioid receptor activation to elevate [Ca(2+)](i). However, DPDPE did not elevate either basal or oxotremorine-M-evoked inositol phosphate production indicating that delta-opioid receptor activation did not stimulate phospholipase C. Furthermore, delta-opioid receptor activation did not result in the reversal of muscarinic receptor desensitization, membrane hyperpolarization or stimulation of sphingosine kinase. There was no coincident signalling between the delta-opioid receptor and the lysophosphatidic acid receptor which couples to elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) in SH-SY5Y cells by a PLC-independent mechanism. In SH-SY5Y cells the coincident signalling between the endogenously expressed delta-opioid and m3 muscarinic receptors appears to occur in the receptor activation-Ca(2+) release signalling pathway at a step after the activation of phospholipase C. PMID:11259487

  14. Inhibition of ANO1/TMEM16A Chloride Channel by Idebenone and Its Cytotoxicity to Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minseo; Lee, Ho K.; Kim, Jin-Hee; Jeong, Jin-Hyun; Namkung, Wan

    2015-01-01

    The expression levels of anoctamin 1 (ANO1, TMEM16A), a calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC), are significantly increased in several tumors, and inhibition of ANO1 is known to reduce cell proliferation and migration. Here, we performed cell-based screening of a collection of natural products and drug-like compounds to identify inhibitors of ANO1. As a result of the screening, idebenone, miconazole and plumbagin were identified as novel ANO1 inhibitors. Electrophysiological studies showed that idebenone, a synthetic analog of coenzyme Q10, completely blocked ANO1 activity in FRT cells expressing ANO1 without any effect on intracellular calcium signaling and CFTR, a cAMP-regulated chloride channel. The CaCC activities in PC-3 and CFPAC-1 cells expressing abundant endogenous ANO1 were strongly blocked by idebenone. Idebenone inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in PC-3 and CFPAC-1 cells, but not in A549 cells, which do not express ANO1. These data suggest that idebenone, a novel ANO1 inhibitor, has potential for use in cancer therapy. PMID:26196390

  15. Stability of succinylcholine chloride injection.

    PubMed

    Schmutz, C W; Mühlebach, S F

    1991-03-01

    The stability of succinylcholine chloride injection prepared by a hospital pharmacy was studied under a wide variety of conditions. Batches of succinylcholine chloride injection 10 mg/mL containing sodium chloride, methyl-4-hydroxybenzoate, hydrochloric acid, and water were prepared. Samples were tested for the effect of initial pH (3.0 and 4.2) and sterilization (steam treatment at 100 degrees C for 30 minutes and 121 degrees C for 20 minutes) on stability after three weeks; long-term stability under refrigeration (12, 17, and 23 months of storage at 4 degrees C); and the effect of storage temperature (4-6 degrees C, 20-26 degrees C, 35 degrees C, and 70 degrees C) and light exposure at various intervals up to 12 months. Samples were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Unlike heating at 121 degrees C, heating at 100 degrees C produced no significant loss of succinylcholine chloride, independent of the initial pH. Succinylcholine chloride was hydrolyzed only minimally over 23 months if the solution was stored at 4-6 degrees C. A 10% loss of drug content occurred if solutions were kept at 20-26 degrees C for five months, at 35 degrees C for one month, or at 70 degrees C for one day. Initial degradation was slowed if the solution was protected from light. The assessments by TLC proved to be more sensitive than the HPLC measurements. Succinylcholine chloride injection sterilized at 100 degrees C for 30 minutes can be stored for up to five months at room temperature if protected from light. The preparation is stable for at least two years under refrigeration. PMID:2028996

  16. Intracellular membrane traffic at high resolution

    PubMed Central

    van Weering, Jan R.T.; Brown, Edward; Sharp, Thomas H.; Mantell, Judith; Cullen, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    I. Abstract Membrane traffic between organelles is essential for a multitude of processes that maintain cell homeostasis. Many steps in these tightly regulated trafficking pathways take place in microdomains on the membranes of organelles, which require analysis at nanometer resolution. Electron Microscopy (EM) can visualize these processes in detail and is mainly responsible for our current view of morphology on the subcellular level. This review discusses how EM can be applied to solve many questions of intracellular membrane traffic, with a focus on the endosomal system. We describe the expansion of the technique from purely morphological analysis to cryo-immuno-EM, Correlative Light Electron Microscopy (CLEM) and 3D electron tomography. In this review we go into some technical details of these various techniques. Furthermore, we provide a full protocol for immunolabeling on Lowicryl sections of high-pressure frozen cells as well as a detailed description of a simple CLEM method that can be applied to answer many membrane trafficking questions. We believe that these EM-based techniques are important tools to expand our understanding of the molecular details of endosomal sorting and intracellular membrane traffic in general. PMID:20869541

  17. Intracellular Calcium Dysregulation: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Magi, Simona; Castaldo, Pasqualina; Macrì, Maria Loredana; Maiolino, Marta; Matteucci, Alessandra; Bastioli, Guendalina; Gratteri, Santo; Lariccia, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive neuronal loss. AD is associated with aberrant processing of the amyloid precursor protein, which leads to the deposition of amyloid-β plaques within the brain. Together with plaques deposition, the hyperphosphorylation of the microtubules associated protein tau and the formation of intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles are a typical neuropathological feature in AD brains. Cellular dysfunctions involving specific subcellular compartments, such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), are emerging as crucial players in the pathogenesis of AD, as well as increased oxidative stress and dysregulation of calcium homeostasis. Specifically, dysregulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis has been suggested as a common proximal cause of neural dysfunction in AD. Aberrant calcium signaling has been considered a phenomenon mainly related to the dysfunction of intracellular calcium stores, which can occur in both neuronal and nonneuronal cells. This review reports the most recent findings on cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of AD, with main focus on the control of calcium homeostasis at both cytosolic and mitochondrial level. PMID:27340665

  18. Intracellular targeting with engineered proteins.

    PubMed

    Miersch, Shane; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2016-01-01

    If the isolation, production, and clinical use of insulin marked the inception of the age of biologics as therapeutics, the convergence of molecular biology and combinatorial engineering techniques marked its coming of age. The first wave of recombinant protein-based drugs in the 1980s demonstrated emphatically that proteins could be engineered, formulated, and employed for clinical advantage. Yet despite the successes of protein-based drugs such as antibodies, enzymes, and cytokines, the druggable target space for biologics is currently restricted to targets outside the cell. Insofar as estimates place the number of proteins either secreted or with extracellular domains in the range of 8000 to 9000, this represents only one-third of the proteome and circumscribes the pathways that can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. Clearly, a major objective for this field to reach maturity is to access, interrogate, and modulate the majority of proteins found inside the cell. However, owing to the large size, complex architecture, and general cellular impermeability of existing protein-based drugs, this poses a daunting challenge. In recent years, though, advances on the two related fronts of protein engineering and drug delivery are beginning to bring this goal within reach. First, prompted by the restrictions that limit the applicability of antibodies, intense efforts have been applied to identifying and engineering smaller alternative protein scaffolds for the modulation of intracellular targets. In parallel, innovative solutions for delivering proteins to the intracellular space while maintaining their stability and functional activity have begun to yield successes. This review provides an overview of bioactive intrabodies and alternative protein scaffolds amenable to engineering for intracellular targeting and also outlines advances in protein engineering and formulation for delivery of functional proteins to the interior of the cell to achieve therapeutic action

  19. Intracellular targeting with engineered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Miersch, Shane; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2016-01-01

    If the isolation, production, and clinical use of insulin marked the inception of the age of biologics as therapeutics, the convergence of molecular biology and combinatorial engineering techniques marked its coming of age. The first wave of recombinant protein-based drugs in the 1980s demonstrated emphatically that proteins could be engineered, formulated, and employed for clinical advantage. Yet despite the successes of protein-based drugs such as antibodies, enzymes, and cytokines, the druggable target space for biologics is currently restricted to targets outside the cell. Insofar as estimates place the number of proteins either secreted or with extracellular domains in the range of 8000 to 9000, this represents only one-third of the proteome and circumscribes the pathways that can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. Clearly, a major objective for this field to reach maturity is to access, interrogate, and modulate the majority of proteins found inside the cell. However, owing to the large size, complex architecture, and general cellular impermeability of existing protein-based drugs, this poses a daunting challenge. In recent years, though, advances on the two related fronts of protein engineering and drug delivery are beginning to bring this goal within reach. First, prompted by the restrictions that limit the applicability of antibodies, intense efforts have been applied to identifying and engineering smaller alternative protein scaffolds for the modulation of intracellular targets. In parallel, innovative solutions for delivering proteins to the intracellular space while maintaining their stability and functional activity have begun to yield successes. This review provides an overview of bioactive intrabodies and alternative protein scaffolds amenable to engineering for intracellular targeting and also outlines advances in protein engineering and formulation for delivery of functional proteins to the interior of the cell to achieve therapeutic action

  20. Pharmacology of intracellular signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nahorski, Stefan R

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a brief and somewhat personalized review of the dramatic developments that have occurred over the last 45 years in our understanding of intracellular signalling pathways associated with G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Signalling via cyclic AMP, the phosphoinositides and Ca2+ is emphasized and these systems have already been revealed as new pharmacological targets. The therapeutic benefits of most of such targets are, however, yet to be realized, but it is certain that the discipline of pharmacology needs to widen its boundaries to meet these challenges in the future. PMID:16402119

  1. The role of autophagy in the intracellular survival of Campylobacter concisus

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Portugal, Jose A.; Mitchell, Hazel M.; Castaño-Rodríguez, Natalia; Kaakoush, Nadeem O.

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter concisus is an emerging pathogen that has been associated with gastrointestinal diseases. Given the importance of autophagy for the elimination of intracellular bacteria and the subversion of this process by pathogenic bacteria, we investigated the role of autophagy in C. concisus intracellular survival. Gentamicin protection assays were employed to assess intracellular levels of C. concisus within Caco-2 cells, following autophagy induction and inhibition. To assess the interaction between C. concisus and autophagosomes, confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were employed. Expression levels of 84 genes involved in the autophagy process were measured using qPCR. Autophagy inhibition resulted in two- to four-fold increases in intracellular levels of C. concisus within Caco-2 cells, while autophagy induction resulted in a significant reduction in intracellular levels or bacterial clearance. C. concisus strains with low intracellular survival levels showed a dramatic increase in these levels upon autophagy inhibition. Confocal microscopy showed co-localization of the bacterium with autophagosomes, while transmission electron microscopy identified intracellular bacteria persisting within autophagic vesicles. Further, qPCR showed that following infection, 13 genes involved in the autophagy process were significantly regulated, and a further five showed borderline results, with an overall indication towards a dampening effect exerted by the bacterium on this process. Our data collectively indicates that while autophagy is important for the clearance of C. concisus, some strains may manipulate this process to benefit their intracellular survival. PMID:24918042

  2. A study on the toxic effects of chloride on the biooxidation efficiency of pyrite.

    PubMed

    Gahan, Chandra Sekhar; Sundkvist, Jan-Eric; Sandström, Ake

    2009-12-30

    Bioleaching operations in areas with limited chloride-free water and use of ashes and dust as neutralizing agents have motivated to study the chloride toxicity and tolerance level of the microorganisms. Biooxidation of pyrite using chloride containing waste ash compared with Ca(OH)(2)+NaCl as neutralizing agent was investigated to evaluate the causes of low pyrite oxidation. Both precipitation of jarosite as well as the toxic effect of chloride on the microorganisms were responsible for lower pyrite recoveries. Another study with sudden exposure of chloride during pyrite biooxidation, addition of 4 g/L was lethal for the microorganisms. Addition of 2g/L chloride resulted in precipitation of jarosite with slightly lower pyrite recovery whereas the addition of 3g/L chloride temporarily chocked the microorganisms but activity was regained after a short period of adaptation. Population dynamics study conducted on the experiment with 3g/L chloride surprisingly showed that Leptospirillum ferriphilum, which was dominating in the inoculum, completely disappeared from the culture already before chloride was added. Sulphobacillus sp. was responsible for iron oxidation in the experiment. Both Acidithiobacillus caldus and Sulphobacillus sp. were adaptive and robust in nature and their numbers were slightly affected after chloride addition. Therefore, it was concluded that the microbial species involved in the biooxidation of pyrite vary in population during the different stages of biooxidation. PMID:19720455

  3. CHEMILUMINESCENT MONITOR FOR VINYL CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A monitor for vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) in ambient air was constructed using commercially available components of a gas chromatograph (GC) coupled with a chemiluminescence ozone analyzer slightly modified to make it suitable for use as a GC detector. The specificity for VCM is...

  4. Laser using lead chloride vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    By applying electric discharge, lead chloride vapor in tube is dissociated into lead and chlorine atoms. Population inversion of lead atoms is attained subsequently by second discharge, before chemical recombination of lead and chlorine has occurred. Optimum time interval between two discharges is required for maximum laser output.

  5. Ferric chloride leach-electrolysis process for production of lead

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, R.G.; Wong, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, under a cost-sharing, cooperative research agreement with lead producers, is studying a process to eliminate sulfur oxide generation and to minimize lead emission in the production of lead. The new process consists of leaching lead sulfide concentrate with a ferric chloride-sodium chloride solution to produce lead chloride, and fused-salt electrolysis of lead chloride to produce lead metal and chlorine. The chlorine is used to regenerate ferric chloride in the leach solution. The study is being conducted in a process investigation unit which treats 750 lb of concentrate a day. This paper discusses the results of operation of the process investigation unit, data on lead monitoring, and the precautions employed to control lead levels in the workplace atmosphere. The monitoring data for the initial phase of the investigation show lead levels well within OSHA permissible exposure limits. Continued development is necessary before the process can be considered for implementation.

  6. High-Throughput Intracellular Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Chiaraviglio, Lucius

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative opportunistic human pathogen that causes a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Notably, in the human host, the organism is believed to replicate solely within an intracellular compartment, predominantly within pulmonary macrophages. Consequently, successful therapy is predicated on antimicrobials penetrating into this intracellular growth niche. However, standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods test solely for extracellular growth inhibition. Here, we make use of a high-throughput assay to characterize intracellular growth inhibition activity of known antimicrobials. For select antimicrobials, high-resolution dose-response analysis was then performed to characterize and compare activity levels in both macrophage infection and axenic growth assays. Results support the superiority of several classes of nonpolar antimicrobials in abrogating intracellular growth. Importantly, our assay results show excellent correlations with prior clinical observations of antimicrobial efficacy. Furthermore, we also show the applicability of high-throughput automation to two- and three-dimensional synergy testing. High-resolution isocontour isobolograms provide in vitro support for specific combination antimicrobial therapy. Taken together, findings suggest that high-throughput screening technology may be successfully applied to identify and characterize antimicrobials that target bacterial pathogens that make use of an intracellular growth niche. PMID:26392509

  7. High-Throughput Intracellular Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Chiaraviglio, Lucius; Kirby, James E

    2015-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative opportunistic human pathogen that causes a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Notably, in the human host, the organism is believed to replicate solely within an intracellular compartment, predominantly within pulmonary macrophages. Consequently, successful therapy is predicated on antimicrobials penetrating into this intracellular growth niche. However, standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods test solely for extracellular growth inhibition. Here, we make use of a high-throughput assay to characterize intracellular growth inhibition activity of known antimicrobials. For select antimicrobials, high-resolution dose-response analysis was then performed to characterize and compare activity levels in both macrophage infection and axenic growth assays. Results support the superiority of several classes of nonpolar antimicrobials in abrogating intracellular growth. Importantly, our assay results show excellent correlations with prior clinical observations of antimicrobial efficacy. Furthermore, we also show the applicability of high-throughput automation to two- and three-dimensional synergy testing. High-resolution isocontour isobolograms provide in vitro support for specific combination antimicrobial therapy. Taken together, findings suggest that high-throughput screening technology may be successfully applied to identify and characterize antimicrobials that target bacterial pathogens that make use of an intracellular growth niche. PMID:26392509

  8. Nanoparticles and intracellular applications of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jack; Huefner, Anna; Li, Li; Wingfield, Jonathan; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2016-08-15

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectrocopy (SERS) offers ultrasensitive vibrational fingerprinting at the nanoscale. Its non-destructive nature affords an ideal tool for interrogation of the intracellular environment, detecting the localisation of biomolecules, delivery and monitoring of therapeutics and for characterisation of complex cellular processes at the molecular level. Innovations in nanotechnology have produced a wide selection of novel, purpose-built plasmonic nanostructures capable of high SERS enhancement for intracellular probing while microfluidic technologies are being utilised to reproducibly synthesise nanoparticle (NP) probes at large scale and in high throughput. Sophisticated multivariate analysis techniques unlock the wealth of previously unattainable biomolecular information contained within large and multidimensional SERS datasets. Thus, with suitable combination of experimental techniques and analytics, SERS boasts enormous potential for cell based assays and to expand our understanding of the intracellular environment. In this review we trace the pathway to utilisation of nanomaterials for intracellular SERS. Thus we review and assess nanoparticle synthesis methods, their toxicity and cell interactions before presenting significant developments in intracellular SERS methodologies and how identified challenges can be addressed. PMID:27479539

  9. Method for the abatement of hydrogen chloride

    DOEpatents

    Winston, S.J.; Thomas, T.R.

    1975-11-14

    A method is described for reducing the amount of hydrogen chloride contained in a gas stream by reacting the hydrogen chloride with ammonia in the gas phase so as to produce ammonium chloride. The combined gas stream is passed into a condensation and collection vessel, and a cyclonic flow is created in the combined gas stream as it passes through the vessel. The temperature of the gas stream is reduced in the vessel to below the condensation temperature of ammonium chloride in order to crystallize the ammonium chloride on the walls of the vessel. The cyclonic flow creates a turbulence which breaks off the larger particles of ammonium chloride which are, in turn, driven to the bottom of the vessel where the solid ammonium chloride can be removed from the vessel. The gas stream exiting from the condensation and collection vessel is further cleaned and additional ammonium chloride is removed by passing through additional filters.

  10. Method for the abatement of hydrogen chloride

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Steven J.; Thomas, Thomas R.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for reducing the amount of hydrogen chloride contained in a gas stream by reacting the hydrogen chloride with ammonia in the gas phase so as to produce ammonium chloride. The combined gas stream is passed into a condensation and collection vessel and a cyclonic flow is created in the combined gas stream as it passes through the vessel. The temperature of the gas stream is reduced in the vessel to below the condensation temperature of ammonium chloride in order to crystallize the ammonium chloride on the walls of the vessel. The cyclonic flow creates a turbulence which breaks off the larger particles of ammonium chloride which are, in turn, driven to the bottom of the vessel where the solid ammonium chloride can be removed from the vessel. The gas stream exiting from the condensation and collection vessel is further cleaned and additional ammonium chloride is removed by passing through additional filters.

  11. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  13. Regulated trafficking of the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Kleizen, B; Braakman, I; de Jonge, H R

    2000-08-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the ABC transporter encoded by the cystic fibrosis gene, is localized in the apical membrane of epithelial cells where it functions as a cyclic AMP-regulated chloride channel and as a regulator of other ion channels and transporters. Whereas a key role of cAMP-dependent phosphorylation in CFTR-channel gating has been firmly established, more recent studies have provided clear evidence for the existence of a second level of cAMP regulation, i.e. the exocytotic recruitment of CFFR to the plasma membrane and its endocytotic retrieval. Regulated trafficking of the CFTR Cl- channel has sofar been demonstrated only in a subset of CFTR-expressing cell types. However, with the introduction of more sensitive methods to measure CFTR cycling and submembrane localization, it might turn out to be a more general phenomenon that could contribute importantly to both the regulation of CFTR-mediated chloride transport itself and to the regulation of other transporters and CFTR-modulated cellular functions. This review aims to summarize the present state of knowledge regarding polarized and regulated CFTR trafficking and endosomal recycling in epithelial cells, to discuss present gaps in our understanding of these processes at the cellular and molecular level, and to consider its possible implications for cystic fibrosis. PMID:11001491

  14. Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride

    DOEpatents

    Spormann, Alfred M [Stanford, CA; Muller, Jochen A [Baltimore, MD; Rosner, Bettina M [Berlin, DE; Von Abendroth, Gregory [Mannheim, DE; Meshulam-Simon, Galit [Los Angeles, CA; McCarty, Perry L [Stanford, CA

    2014-02-11

    Compositions and methods are provided that relate to the bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes, particularly the bioremediation of vinyl chloride by Dehalococcoides-like organisms. An isolated strain of bacteria, Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS, that metabolizes vinyl chloride is provided; the genetic sequence of the enzyme responsible for vinyl chloride dehalogenation; methods of assessing the capability of endogenous organisms at an environmental site to metabolize vinyl chloride; and a method of using the strains of the invention for bioremediation.

  15. Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride

    DOEpatents

    Spormann, Alfred M.; Muller, Jochen A.; Rosner, Bettina M.; Von Abendroth, Gregory; Meshulam-Simon, Galit; McCarty, Perry L

    2011-11-22

    Compositions and methods are provided that relate to the bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes, particularly the bioremediation of vinyl chloride by Dehalococcoides-like organisms. An isolated strain of bacteria, Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS, that metabolizes vinyl chloride is provided; the genetic sequence of the enzyme responsible for vinyl chloride dehalogenation; methods of assessing the capability of endogenous organisms at an environmental site to metabolize vinyl chloride; and a method of using the strains of the invention for bioremediation.

  16. Chloride content of Rocky Flats scrub alloy eleventh campaign solution following head end treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, H.P.

    1988-06-30

    A single batch of dissolver solution from the eleventh Rocky Flats Scrub Alloy (RFSA) campaign has been analyzed for chloride content following head end treatment to reduce its concentration. Scrub alloy buttons were dissolved in Tank 6.4D during May. In subsequent head end processing, chloride was precipitated with mercurous ion added as the nitrate. The precipitate, Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, was concurrently removed with the gelatin floc via centrifugation. Duplicate samples from Tank 11.2, containing the head end product, produced excellent agreement between their density measurements, acid analyses, and gross alpha activities, indicating them to be truly representative of the tank`s contents. Duplicate aliquots from each of these solutions were analyzed using the turbidimetric chloride method developed in the Separations Technology Laboratory. These resulted in an average chloride value of 41 ppm ({micro}g/mL) chloride for the head end product. Relative standard deviation of the measurement was {+-}4 ppm (n = 4), a precision of {+-}10%. Such a variance is normal at this low chloride level. Since initial chloride values prior to head end averaged 1455 ppm (0.041M), as analyzed by Laboratories Department, a chloride DF of approximately 35 was obtained. Such a reduced chloride level (to less than 100 ppm) in the treated solution will permit further canyon processing with minimal corrosion.

  17. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  18. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b)...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  20. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  1. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  3. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  4. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  6. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  7. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  8. REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, W.W.

    1959-08-01

    The removal of chlorides from aqueons solutions is described. The process involves contacting the aqueous chloride containing solution with a benzene solution about 0.005 M in phenyl mercuric acetate whereby the chloride anions are taken up by the organic phase and separating the organic phase from the aqueous solutions.

  9. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt separates out at elevated temperatures, and ammonium chloride is recovered... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt separates out at elevated temperatures, and ammonium chloride is recovered... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt separates out at elevated temperatures, and ammonium chloride is recovered... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt separates out at elevated temperatures, and ammonium chloride is recovered... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  13. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride....

  14. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  15. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  16. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  18. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  19. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  20. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  1. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  2. NKCC1 and NKCC2: The pathogenetic role of cation-chloride cotransporters in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Orlov, Sergei N.; Koltsova, Svetlana V.; Kapilevich, Leonid V.; Gusakova, Svetlana V.; Dulin, Nickolai O.

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes the data on the functional significance of ubiquitous (NKCC1) and renal-specific (NKCC2) isoforms of electroneutral sodium, potassium and chloride cotransporters. These carriers contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension via regulation of intracellular chloride concentration in vascular smooth muscle and neuronal cells and via sensing chloride concentration in the renal tubular fluid, respectively. Both NKCC1 and NKCC2 are inhibited by furosemide and other high-ceiling diuretics widely used for attenuation of extracellular fluid volume. However, the chronic usage of these compounds for the treatment of hypertension and other volume-expanded disorders may have diverse side-effects due to suppression of myogenic response in microcirculatory beds. PMID:26114157

  3. 46 CFR 151.50-34 - Vinyl chloride (vinyl chloride monomer).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vinyl chloride (vinyl chloride monomer). 151.50-34 Section 151.50-34 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-34 Vinyl chloride (vinyl chloride monomer). (a)...

  4. An XAFS Study of Tantalum Chloride in the Ionic Liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl Imidazolium Chloride/ aluminum Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; K Pandya; G Cheek; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Tantalum chloride was studied with extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ionic liquids (ILs). Anhydrous Ta2Cl10 is more soluble in the basic solution than in the acidic solution and the X-ray absorption data shows that the coordination shell of chlorides around the tantalum is larger in the basic solution. In the acidic solution, tantalum has five chlorides in its coordination shell while in the basic solution; the tantalum is coordinated by seven chlorides. This indicates that the Lewis acidity of the tantalum chloride causes the Ta to coordinate differently in the acidic and the basic solutions.

  5. Shock compression of polyvinyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-04-01

    This study presents shock compression simulation of atactic polyvinyl chloride (PVC) using ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics. The manuscript also identifies the limits of applicability of classical molecular dynamics based shock compression simulation for PVC. The mechanism of bond dissociation under shock loading and its progression is demonstrated in this manuscript using the density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations. The rate of dissociation of different bonds at different shock velocities is also presented in this manuscript.

  6. Regulation of the collagenase-3 receptor and its role in intracellular ligand processing in rat osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walling, H. W.; Chan, P. T.; Omura, T. H.; Barmina, O. Y.; Fiacco, G. J.; Jeffrey, J. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1998-01-01

    We have previously described a specific, saturable receptor for rat collagenase-3 in the rat osteosarcoma cell line, UMR 106-01. Binding of rat collagenase-3 to this receptor is coupled to the internalization and eventual degradation of the enzyme and correlates with observed extracellular levels of the enzyme. In this study we have shown that decreased binding, internalization, and degradation of 125I-rat collagenase-3 were observed in cells after 24 h of parathyroid hormone treatment; these activities returned to control values after 48 h and were increased substantially (twice control levels) after 96 h of treatment with the hormone. Subcellular fractionation studies to identify the route of uptake and degradation of collagenase-3 localized intracellular accumulation of 125I-rat collagenase-3 initially in Golgi-associated lysosomes and later in secondary lysosomes. Maximal lysosomal accumulation of the radiolabel and stimulation of general lysosomal activity occurred after 72 h of parathyroid hormone treatment. Preventing fusion of endosomes with lysosomes (by temperature shift, colchicine, or monensin) resulted in no internalized 125I-collagenase-3 in either lysosomal fraction. Treatment of UMR cells with the above agents or ammonium chloride decreased excretion of 125I-labeled degradation products of collagenase-3. These experiments demonstrated that degradation of collagenase-3 required receptor-mediated endocytosis and sequential processing by endosomes and lysosomes. Thus, parathyroid hormone regulates the expression and synthesis of collagenase-3 as well as the abundance and functioning of the collagenase-3 receptor and the intracellular degradation of its ligand. The coordinate changes in the secretion of collagenase-3 and expression of the receptor determine the net abundance of the enzyme in the extracellular space.

  7. Optical PEBBLE nanosensors and fiber optic sensors for real-time intracellular imaging and analysis of magnesium and oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Edwin J.

    A highly selective magnesium fluorescent optical nanosensor, made possible by PEBBLE (Probe Encapsulated By Biologically Localized Embedding) technology is presented. Ratiometric sensors were prepared, via a microemulsion polymerization process, by co-immobilizing a highly selective magnesium dye with a reference dye inside a polymer matrix. The resultant spherical sensors are ˜40 nm in diameter. Several dyes were investigated with coumarin 343 (C343) providing the best selectivity towards Mg2+ vs. ions such as Ca 2+, Na+, and K+. The dynamic range of the sensors was 1 to 30 mM (linear from 1 to 10 mM) with a response time of less than 4 s. The fully reversible sensors exhibit minimal leaching and photobleaching. In vitro intracellular changes in Mg2+ concentration were monitored in C6 Glioma cells. Preliminary experiments demonstrated the capability of these sensors thus they were used to investigate the PhoP/Q transmembrane protein system on the internal membrane of salmonella . The sensors were used to monitor the magnesium levels inside salmonella containing vacuoles. Previously believed hypotheses on changes in magnesium concentration are challenged with the newly obtained results. The selectivity for Mg2+ along with the biocompatibility of the matrix of these sensors provides a new and reliable tool for intracellular magnesium measurements. A second sensor platform was developed for the detection of intracellular dissolved oxygen, using a fiber optic probe. The design and fabrication of an oxygen fiber optic sensor based on the fluorescence quenching properties of the oxygen sensitive platinum (II) octaethylporphine ketone (PtOEPK) is presented. Octaethyl porphyrin (OEP) or bodipy maleimide 577/618, was also entrapped, as a reference dye, in a polyvinyl chloride matrix including the plasticizing agent bis 2-ethylhexyl sebacate (DOS). The multi mode fibers were pulled down to submicron dimensions and a dip coating procedure was used to apply the sensing

  8. Fluorescence Ratio Imaging Of Dynamic Intracellular Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harootunian, Alec T.; Kao, J. P.; Tsien, Roger Y.

    1989-12-01

    Traditional biochemical assays of cellular messengers require grinding up thousands or millions of cells for each data point. Such destructive measurements use up large amounts of tissue, have poor time resolution, and cannot assess heterogeneity between individual cells or dynamic spatial localizations. Recent technical advances now enable important ionic signals to be continuously imaged inside individual living cells with micron spatial resolution and subsecond time resolution. This methodology relies on the molecular engineering of indicator dyes whose fluorescence is strong and highly sensitive to ions such as Ca2+, H+, or Na+. Binding of these ions shifts the fluorescence excitation spectrum of the corresponding indicator. The ratio of excitation amplitudes at two wavelengths measures the free ion concentration while canceling out intensity variations due to nonuniform cell thickness or dye content. By rapidly alternating between the two ion-sensitive excitation wavelengths, a fluorescence microscope equipped with a low-light television camera and digital image processor can produce dynamic images of intracellular messenger levels. In many populations of cells traditionally assumed to be homogeneous, we find that neighboring individual cells can differ enormously in their cytosolic Ca2+ response to agonist stimulation, some ignoring the stimulus, others raising cytosolic Ca2+ transiently, others showing oscillations. Oscillations have been speculated to be important as a basis for frequency-coding of oscillations. Oscillations have been speculated to be important as a basis for frequency-coding of graded inputs; we are investigating the mechanism of their generation using light flashes to generate pulses of intracellular messengers. Spatial gradients of cytosolic Ca t+ within single cells have been observed in embryos during fertilization and development, neurons exposed to electrical or drug stimulation and in cytotoxic T lymphocytes during killing of target

  9. Open cycle lithium chloride cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, T. G.; Loef, G. O. G.; Iyer, R.; Wenger, J.

    1983-05-01

    A lithium chloride open cycle absorption chiller has been designed, built and tested. Solution reconcentration takes place in a small counter current packed column supplied with solar heated air. Removal of noncondensable gases that enter the chiller dissolved in the strong solution and the make-up refrigerant streams is accomplished by a liquid-jet ejector and a small vacuum pump. Cooling capacities approaching 1.4 tons and COP levels of 0.58 have been achieved at non-optimum operating conditions. Test results from preliminary system operation suggest that mass transfer processes in both the packed column reconcentrator and the absorber are controlled by concentration gradients in the lithium chloride solution. Liquid phase controlled mass transfer dictates an operating strategy different from the previously assumed gas phase controlled process to obtain maximum rates of evaporation in the packed column. Determination of optimal operating conditions leading to decreased electrical power consumption and improved cooling capacity and coefficient of performance will require further analysis and testing.

  10. Chloride flux out of Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Daniel R.; Friedman, Irving

    1985-12-01

    Monitoring of the chloride concentration, electrical conductivity, and discharge was carried out for the four major rivers of Yellowstone National Park from September 1982 to January 1984. Chloride flux out of the Park was determined from the measured values of chloride concentration and discharge. The annual chloride flux from the Park was 5.86 × 10 10 g. Of this amount 45% was from the Madison River drainage basin, 32% from the Yellowstone River basin, 12% from the Snake River basin, and 11% from the Falls River basin. Of the annual chloride flux from the Yellowstone River drainage basin 36% was attributed to the Yellowstone Lake drainage basin. The geothermal contribution to the chloride flux was determined by subtracting the chloride contribution from rock weathering and atmospheric precipitation and is 94% of the total chloride flux. Calculations of the geothermal chloride flux for each river are given and the implications of an additional chloride flux out of the western Park boundary discussed. An anomalous increase in chloride flux out of the Park was observed for several weeks prior to the Mt. Borah earthquake in Central Idaho on October 28, 1983, reaching a peak value shortly thereafter. It is suggested that the rise in flux was a precursor of the earthquake. The information in this paper provides baseline data against which future changes in the hydrothermal systems can be measured. It also provides measurements related to the thermal contributions from the different drainage basins of the Park.

  11. Chloride flux out of Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norton, D.R.; Friedman, I.

    1985-01-01

    Monitoring of the chloride concentration, electrical conductivity, and discharge was carried out for the four major rivers of Yellowstone National Park from September 1982 to January 1984. Chloride flux out of the Park was determined from the measured values of chloride concentration and discharge. The annual chloride flux from the Park was 5.86 ?? 1010 g. Of this amount 45% was from the Madison River drainage basin, 32% from the Yellowstone River basin, 12% from the Snake River basin, and 11% from the Falls River basin. Of the annual chloride flux from the Yellowstone River drainage basin 36% was attributed to the Yellowstone Lake drainage basin. The geothermal contribution to the chloride flux was determined by subtracting the chloride contribution from rock weathering and atmospheric precipitation and is 94% of the total chloride flux. Calculations of the geothermal chloride flux for each river are given and the implications of an additional chloride flux out of the western Park boundary discussed. An anomalous increase in chloride flux out of the Park was observed for several weeks prior to the Mt. Borah earthquake in Central Idaho on October 28, 1983, reaching a peak value shortly thereafter. It is suggested that the rise in flux was a precursor of the earthquake. The information in this paper provides baseline data against which future changes in the hydrothermal systems can be measured. It also provides measurements related to the thermal contributions from the different drainage basins of the Park. ?? 1985.

  12. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  13. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  14. Histone Acetylation Regulates Intracellular pH

    PubMed Central

    McBrian, Matthew A.; Behbahan, Iman Saramipoor; Ferrari, Roberto; Su, Trent; Huang, Ta-Wei; Li, Kunwu; Hong, Candice S.; Christofk, Heather R.; Vogelauer, Maria; Seligson, David B.; Kurdistani, Siavash K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Differences in global levels of histone acetylation occur in normal and cancer cells, although the reason why cells regulate these levels has been unclear. Here we demonstrate a role for histone acetylation in regulating intracellular pH (pHi). As pHi decreases, histones are globally deacetylated by histone deacetylases (HDACs), and the released acetate anions are coexported with protons out of the cell by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), preventing further reductions in pHi. Conversely, global histone acetylation increases as pHi rises, such as when resting cells are induced to proliferate. Inhibition of HDACs or MCTs decreases acetate export and lowers pHi, particularly compromising pHi maintenance in acidic environments. Global deacetylation at low pH is reflected at a genomic level by decreased abundance and extensive redistribution of acetylation throughout the genome. Thus, acetylation of chromatin functions as a rheostat to regulate pHi with important implications for mechanism of action and therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:23201122

  15. Influence of chloride on the chronic toxicity of sodium nitrate to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Hyalella azteca.

    PubMed

    Soucek, David J; Dickinson, Amy

    2016-09-01

    While it has been well established that increasing chloride concentration in water reduces the toxicity of nitrite to freshwater species, little work has been done to investigate the effect of chloride on nitrate toxicity. We conducted acute and chronic nitrate (as sodium nitrate) toxicity tests with the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia dubia and the amphipod Hyalella azteca (chronic tests only) over a range of chloride concentrations spanning natural chloride levels found in surface waters representative of watersheds of the Great Lakes Region. Chronic nitrate toxicity test results with both crustaceans were variable, with H. azteca appearing to be one of the more sensitive invertebrate species tested and C. dubia being less sensitive. While the variability in results for H. azteca were to an extent related to chloride concentration in test water that was distinctly not the case for C. dubia. We concluded that the chloride dependent toxicity of nitrate is not universal among freshwater crustaceans. An additional sodium chloride chronic toxicity test with the US Lab strain of H. azteca in the present study suggested that when present as predominantly sodium chloride and with relatively low concentrations of other ions, there is a narrow range of chloride concentrations over which this strain is most fit, and within which toxicity test data are reliable. PMID:27386878

  16. Congenital chloride-losing diarrhea in a Mexican child with the novel homozygous SLC26A3 mutation G393W

    PubMed Central

    Reimold, Fabian R.; Balasubramanian, Savithri; Doroquez, David B.; Shmukler, Boris E.; Zsengeller, Zsuzsanna K.; Saslowsky, David; Thiagarajah, Jay R.; Stillman, Isaac E.; Lencer, Wayne I.; Wu, Bai-Lin; Villalpando-Carrion, Salvador; Alper, Seth L.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital chloride diarrhea is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the intestinal lumenal membrane Cl−/HCO−3 exchanger, SLC26A3. We report here the novel SLC26A3 mutation G393W in a Mexican child, the first such report in a patient from Central America. SLC26A3 G393W expression in Xenopus oocytes exhibits a mild hypomorphic phenotype, with normal surface expression and moderately reduced anion transport function. However, expression of HA-SLC26A3 in HEK-293 cells reveals intracellular retention and greatly decreased steady-state levels of the mutant polypeptide, in contrast to peripheral membrane expression of the wildtype protein. Whereas wildtype HA-SLC26A3 is apically localized in polarized monolayers of filter-grown MDCK cells and Caco2 cells, mutant HA-SLC26A3 G393W exhibits decreased total polypeptide abundance, with reduced or absent surface expression and sparse punctate (or absent) intracellular distribution. The WT protein is similarly localized in LLC-PK1 cells, but the mutant fails to accumulate to detectable levels. We conclude that the chloride-losing diarrhea phenotype associated with homozygous expression of SLC26A3 G393W likely reflects lack of apical surface expression in enterocytes, secondary to combined abnormalities in polypeptide trafficking and stability. Future progress in development of general or target-specific folding chaperonins and correctors may hold promise for pharmacological rescue of this and similar genetic defects in membrane protein targeting. PMID:26157392

  17. Oscillatory chloride current evoked by temperature jumps during muscarinic and serotonergic activation in Xenopus oocyte.

    PubMed Central

    Miledi, R; Parker, I; Sumikawa, K

    1987-01-01

    1. Membrane currents were recorded from voltage-clamped oocytes of Xenopus laevis, during temperature jumps imposed by a heating light. Resting oocytes usually showed little response, but large oscillatory membrane currents developed in response to cooling steps applied during activation of 'native' muscarinic receptors. 2. Similar temperature jump (Tjump) currents were seen during activation of oscillatory chloride currents mediated by muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh), serotonin, glutamate and noradrenaline receptors, expressed in the oocyte following injection with messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) from rat brain. The Tjump response during muscarinic activation was selectively blocked by atropine, and that during serotonergic activation by methysergide. In contrast, the 'smooth' membrane currents elicited by nicotinic ACh, kainate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were not accompanied by Tjump responses. 3. Rapid cooling of the oocyte gave larger Tjump currents than a gradual cooling over a few seconds. The size of the Tjump current elicited by a fixed cooling step increased linearly with the preceding time of warming, becoming maximal at intervals greater than about 100 s. 4. The Tjump current was inward at a clamp potential of -60 mV and reversed direction at about -22 mV, which corresponds to the chloride equilibrium potential in the oocyte. In low-chloride solution the reversal potential was shifted to more positive potentials, but it was almost unchanged by changes in potassium and sodium concentration. The size of the Tjump current decreased as the membrane potential was made more negative than about -40 mV. 5. The period of oscillation of the Tjump current increased with decreasing temperature, following a Q10 of 3.15. Depolarization also caused a small increase in period. 6. The Tjump current was not abolished in calcium-free solution, or by addition of manganese or lanthanum to the bathing solution. However, it was abolished by intracellular injection of

  18. Cyclic AMP-and beta-agonist-activated chloride conductance of a toad skin epithelium.

    PubMed

    Willumsen, N J; Vestergaard, L; Larsen, E H

    1992-04-01

    1. The control by intracellular cyclic AMP and beta-adrenergic stimulation of chloride conductance was studied in toad skin epithelium mounted in a chamber on the stage of an upright microscope. Impalement of identified principal cells from the serosal side with single-barrelled conventional or double-barrelled Cl(-)-sensitive microelectrodes was performed at x500 magnification. For blocking the active sodium current 50 microM-amiloride was present in the mucosal bath. 2. When clamped at transepithelial potential difference V = 0 mV, the preparations generated clamping currents of 0.9 +/- 1 microA/cm2 (mean +/- S.E.M.; number of observations n = 55). The intracellular potential of principal cells (Vb) was -96 +/- 2 mV with a fractional resistance of the basolateral membrane (fRb) of 0.016 +/- 0.003 (n = 54), and an intracellular Cl- activity of 40 +/- 2 mM (n = 24). 3. At V = 0 mV, serosal application of a cyclic AMP analogue, dibutyryl cyclic AMP (500 microM) or a beta-adrenergic agonist, isoprenaline (5 microM) resulted in a sixfold increase in transepithelial Cl- conductance identified by standard 36Cl- tracer technique. 4. The clamping current at V = 0 mV was unaffected by cyclic AMP (short-circuit current Isc = 0.1 +/- 0.3 microA/cm2, n = 16) indicating that subepidermal Cl(-)-secreting glands are not functioning in our preparations obtained by collagenase treatment. 5. Cyclic AMP- or isoprenaline-induced chloride conductance (Gcl) activation (V = 0 mV) was not reflected in membrane potential and intracellular Cl- activity in principal cells. Intracellular chloride activity was constant at approximately 40 mM at membrane potentials between -90 and -100 mV. Therefore, it can be concluded that the principal cells are not contributing to activated Cl- currents. 6. At V = -100 mV where the voltage-dependent chloride conductance of mitochondria-rich (MR) cells was already fully activated, GCl was unaffected by cyclic AMP or isoprenaline. The major effect of these

  19. Monitoring the intracellular calcium response to a dynamic hypertonic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaowen; Yue, Wanqing; Liu, Dandan; Yue, Jianbo; Li, Jiaqian; Sun, Dong; Yang, Mengsu; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-03-01

    The profiling of physiological response of cells to external stimuli at the single cell level is of importance. Traditional approaches to study cell responses are often limited by ensemble measurement, which is challenging to reveal the complex single cell behaviors under a dynamic environment. Here we report the development of a simple microfluidic device to investigate intracellular calcium response to dynamic hypertonic conditions at the single cell level in real-time. Interestingly, a dramatic elevation in the intracellular calcium signaling is found in both suspension cells (human leukemic cell line, HL-60) and adherent cells (lung cancer cell line, A549), which is ascribed to the exposure of cells to the hydrodynamic stress. We also demonstrate that the calcium response exhibits distinct single cell heterogeneity as well as cell-type-dependent responses to the same stimuli. Our study opens up a new tool for tracking cellular activity at the single cell level in real time for high throughput drug screening.

  20. Gating the Selectivity Filter in ClC Chloride Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutzler, Raimund; Campbell, Ernest B.; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2003-04-01

    ClC channels conduct chloride (Cl-) ions across cell membranes and thereby govern the electrical activity of muscle cells and certain neurons, the transport of fluid and electrolytes across epithelia, and the acidification of intracellular vesicles. The structural basis of ClC channel gating was studied. Crystal structures of wild-type and mutant Escherichia coli ClC channels bound to a monoclonal Fab fragment reveal three Cl- binding sites within the 15-angstrom neck of an hourglass-shaped pore. The Cl- binding site nearest the extracellular solution can be occupied either by a Cl- ion or by a glutamate carboxyl group. Mutations of this glutamate residue in Torpedo ray ClC channels alter gating in electrophysiological assays. These findings reveal a form of gating in which the glutamate carboxyl group closes the pore by mimicking a Cl- ion.

  1. Secretome of obligate intracellular Rickettsia

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Joseph J.; Kaur, Simran J.; Rahman, M. Sayeedur; Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen; Sears, Khandra T.; Beier-Sexton, Magda; Azad, Abdu F.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Rickettsia (Alphaproteobacteria, Rickettsiales, Rickettsiaceae) is comprised of obligate intracellular parasites, with virulent species of interest both as causes of emerging infectious diseases and for their potential deployment as bioterrorism agents. Currently, there are no effective commercially available vaccines, with treatment limited primarily to tetracycline antibiotics, although others (e.g. josamycin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, and azithromycin) are also effective. Much of the recent research geared toward understanding mechanisms underlying rickettsial pathogenicity has centered on characterization of secreted proteins that directly engage eukaryotic cells. Herein, we review all aspects of the Rickettsia secretome, including six secretion systems, 19 characterized secretory proteins, and potential moonlighting proteins identified on surfaces of multiple Rickettsia species. Employing bioinformatics and phylogenomics, we present novel structural and functional insight on each secretion system. Unexpectedly, our investigation revealed that the majority of characterized secretory proteins have not been assigned to their cognate secretion pathways. Furthermore, for most secretion pathways, the requisite signal sequences mediating translocation are poorly understood. As a blueprint for all known routes of protein translocation into host cells, this resource will assist research aimed at uniting characterized secreted proteins with their apposite secretion pathways. Furthermore, our work will help in the identification of novel secreted proteins involved in rickettsial ‘life on the inside’. PMID:25168200

  2. Dynamics of intracellular information decoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.; Kamimura, Atsushi

    2011-10-01

    A variety of cellular functions are robust even to substantial intrinsic and extrinsic noise in intracellular reactions and the environment that could be strong enough to impair or limit them. In particular, of substantial importance is cellular decision-making in which a cell chooses a fate or behavior on the basis of information conveyed in noisy external signals. For robust decoding, the crucial step is filtering out the noise inevitably added during information transmission. As a minimal and optimal implementation of such an information decoding process, the autocatalytic phosphorylation and autocatalytic dephosphorylation (aPadP) cycle was recently proposed. Here, we analyze the dynamical properties of the aPadP cycle in detail. We describe the dynamical roles of the stationary and short-term responses in determining the efficiency of information decoding and clarify the optimality of the threshold value of the stationary response and its information-theoretical meaning. Furthermore, we investigate the robustness of the aPadP cycle against the receptor inactivation time and intrinsic noise. Finally, we discuss the relationship among information decoding with information-dependent actions, bet-hedging and network modularity.

  3. Intracellular signalling during neutrophil recruitment.

    PubMed

    Mócsai, Attila; Walzog, Barbara; Lowell, Clifford A

    2015-08-01

    Recruitment of leucocytes such as neutrophils to the extravascular space is a critical step of the inflammation process and plays a major role in the development of various diseases including several cardiovascular diseases. Neutrophils themselves play a very active role in that process by sensing their environment and responding to the extracellular cues by adhesion and de-adhesion, cellular shape changes, chemotactic migration, and other effector functions of cell activation. Those responses are co-ordinated by a number of cell surface receptors and their complex intracellular signal transduction pathways. Here, we review neutrophil signal transduction processes critical for recruitment to the site of inflammation. The two key requirements for neutrophil recruitment are the establishment of appropriate chemoattractant gradients and the intrinsic ability of the cells to migrate along those gradients. We will first discuss signalling steps required for sensing extracellular chemoattractants such as chemokines and lipid mediators and the processes (e.g. PI3-kinase pathways) leading to the translation of extracellular chemoattractant gradients to polarized cellular responses. We will then discuss signal transduction by leucocyte adhesion receptors (e.g. tyrosine kinase pathways) which are critical for adhesion to, and migration through the vessel wall. Finally, additional neutrophil signalling pathways with an indirect effect on the neutrophil recruitment process, e.g. through modulation of the inflammatory environment, will be discussed. Mechanistic understanding of these pathways provide better understanding of the inflammation process and may point to novel therapeutic strategies for controlling excessive inflammation during infection or tissue damage. PMID:25998986

  4. Recurring Slope Lineae (RSL) and Chloride Hydrates within Mars Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Wang, A.

    2012-12-01

    thermodynamics and kinetics properties of chloride hydrates. The goals are to determine (1) the stability fields of Mg-, Fe2+-, Fe3+-, Ca-, Al-, Na-chloride hydrates in RH-T space, especially the phase boundaries of hydrates-deliquescence; (2) the rate of their dehydration, and especially the rate of their deliquescence as function of T, P, and PH2O; (3) the RH level that each chloride hydrate can maintain in an enclosure at T relevant to those within Mars subsurface. We will report the experimental results from (3), and will compare them with a similar set of data from hydrous sulfates (Mg, Fe, Ca, Al). The criticality of learning the property (3) is that the deliquescence of a hydrous salt at a T only occurs when RH is higher than a threshold. For example, deliquescence of ferricopiapite would happen when RH > 75% at 0°C. If the environmental RH is lower, the dehydration of hydrous salt will go through solid-solid phase transition, instead of deliquescence, such that water would be released to the atmosphere and brine would not form. It is possible that deliquescence of both hydrous sulfates and chlorides (as well as the melting of Cl-enriched brines) contributed the RSL. Our working hypothesis favors chloride hydrates because dry chloride (after releasing water) in RSL would not be visible by Vis-NIR spectroscopy, which is consistent with the mission observations.

  5. Intracellular trafficking of heat shock factor 2.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Pascale; Le Dréan, Yves; Le Péron, Christine; Le Jossic-Corcos, Catherine; Ainouche, Abdelkadder; Michel, Denis

    2004-04-01

    HSF2 is an enigmatic member of the heat shock factor family, identified in the homeotherm classes of birds and mammals. We report the characterization of HSF2 from an evolutionary ancient vertebrate, the fish rainbow trout (rtHSF2). rtHSF2 appears closely related to its mammalian counterparts at structural and functional levels. The conservation of the distinctive features of HSF2 from fish to human suggests that it should ensure important biological functions, not redundant with those of HSF1. Proteasome inhibition, reported as a potent stimulator of HSF2, leads to the stabilization and to a striking nuclear trafficking of rtHSF2-GFP fusion protein. Upon treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, rtHSF2-GFP accumulates into PML nuclear bodies (NBs) independently of its sumoylation and, if expressed at moderate level, moves to nucleoli. The translocation of rtHSF2-GFP from NBs to nucleoli is greatly favored by overexpression of the heat shock protein Hsp70. The mammalian counterpart mouse HSF2 (mHSF2) also exhibited changes in intracellular distribution upon MG132 treatment. mHSF2 partitioned between a juxtanuclear area that we characterized as an aggresome and the nucleoli. These relocalizations are likely to reflect common structural changes of mouse and trout HSF2 upon activation. PMID:15023536

  6. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10616.001 PMID:26613410

  7. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. PMID:26613410

  8. Separating refractory and non-refractory particulate chloride and estimating chloride depletion by aerosol mass spectrometry in a marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuaaman, I.; Li, S.-M.; Hayden, K. L.; Onasch, T. B.; Massoli, P.; Sueper, D.; Worsnop, D. R.; Bates, T. S.; Quinn, P. K.; McLaren, R.

    2015-01-01

    + ion tracer signal and a scaling factor determined through simultaneous measurements of submicron aerosol chloride on filters. This scaling factor accounts for the low vaporization response of the AMS heater to ssCl, although regular calibration of this response is recommended in future applications. It follows that true total particulate chloride (pCl) is the sum of nssCl and ssCl. In this study, the median levels observed for the concentrations of pCl, nssCl and ssCl were 0.052, 0.017 and 0.024 μg m-3 respectively. The average contributions of nssCl and ssCl to pCl were 48 and 52% respectively, with nssCl dominating in periods of continental outflow and ssCl dominating during other periods. Finally, we propose a method to measure percentage chloride depletion of NaCl in ambient submicron sea salt aerosols, strictly using the AMS measurements of Na+ and Na35Cl+ ion signals. The median chloride depletion in submicron aerosols in this study was found to be 78%.

  9. Intracellular pH measurements using perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Michael J; Janjic, Jelena M; Teng, Haibing; O'Hear, Meredith R; Brown, Cortlyn W; Stokum, Jesse A; Schmidt, Brigitte F; Ahrens, Eric T; Waggoner, Alan S

    2013-12-11

    We report the synthesis and formulation of unique perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsions enabling intracellular pH measurements in living cells via fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. These nanoemulsions are formulated to readily enter cells upon coincubation and contain two cyanine-based fluorescent reporters covalently bound to the PFC molecules, specifically Cy3-PFC and CypHer5-PFC conjugates. The spectral and pH-sensing properties of the nanoemulsions were characterized in vitro and showed the unaltered spectral behavior of dyes after formulation. In rat 9L glioma cells loaded with nanoemulsion, the local pH of nanoemulsions was longitudinally quantified using optical microscopy and flow cytometry and displayed a steady decrease in pH to a level of 5.5 over 3 h, indicating rapid uptake of nanoemulsion to acidic compartments. Overall, these reagents enable real-time optical detection of intracellular pH in living cells in response to pharmacological manipulations. Moreover, recent approaches for in vivo cell tracking using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) employ intracellular PFC nanoemulsion probes to track cells using (19)F MRI. However, the intracellular fate of these imaging probes is poorly understood. The pH-sensing nanoemulsions allow the study of the fate of the PFC tracer inside the labeled cell, which is important for understanding the PFC cell loading dynamics, nanoemulsion stability and cell viability over time. PMID:24266634

  10. Intracellular pH measurements using perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Michael J.; Janjic, Jelena M.; Teng, Haibing; O’Hear, Meredith R.; Brown, Cortlyn W.; Stokum, Jesse A.; Schmidt, Brigitte F.; Ahrens, Eric T.; Waggoner, Alan S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis and formulation of unique perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsions enabling intracellular pH measurements in living cells via fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. These nanoemulsions are formulated to readily enter cells upon co-incubation and contain two cyanine-based fluorescent reporters covalently bound to the PFC molecules, specifically Cy3-PFC and CypHer5-PFC conjugates. The spectral and pH-sensing properties of the nanoemulsions where characterized in vitro and showed the unaltered spectral behavior of dyes after formulation. In rat 9L glioma cells loaded with nanoemulsion, the local pH of nanoemulsions was longitudinally quantified using optical microscopy and flow cytometry, and displayed a steady decrease in pH to a level of 5.5 over 3 hours, indicating rapid uptake of nanoemulsion to acidic compartments. Overall, these reagents enable real-time optical detection of intracellular pH in living cells in response to pharmacological manipulations. Moreover, recent approaches for in vivo cell tracking using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) employ intracellular PFC nanoemulsion probes to track cells using 19F MRI. However, the intracellular fate of these imaging probes is poorly understood. The pH sensing nanoemulsions allow the study of the fate of the PFC tracer inside the labeled cell, which is important for understanding the PFC cell loading dynamics and nanoemulsion stability and cell viability over time. PMID:24266634

  11. Oxomemazine hydro­chloride

    PubMed Central

    Siddegowda, M. S.; Butcher, Ray J.; Akkurt, Mehmet; Yathirajan, H. S.; Ramesh, A. R.

    2011-01-01

    In the title compound [systematic name: 3-(5,5-dioxo­phen­othia­zin-10-yl)-N,N,2-trimethyl­propanaminium chloride], C18H23N2O2S+·Cl−, the dihedral angle between the two outer aromatic rings of the phenothia­zine unit is 30.5 (2)°. In the crystal, the components are linked by N—H⋯Cl and C—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds and C—H⋯π inter­actions. PMID:22090928

  12. An XAFS Study of Niobium chloride in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride/ aluminum chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; K Pandya; G Cheek; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Niobium chloride was studied with extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) ionic liquids. Although anhydrous Nb2Cl10 is more soluble in the basic melt than in the acidic melt, the EXAFS data shows that the coordination shell around the niobium does not change in the different ionic liquids. Both the acidic and basic melts show a coordination of five chlorides in the first shell. This indicates that in this series of ionic liquids, the Nb2Cl10 breaks up into two NbCl5 entities in both the acidic and the basic melts.

  13. The effect of chloride ion on the ferric chloride leaching of galena concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, G. W.; Kim, Seon-Hyo; Henein, H.

    1987-03-01

    Previous investigations of the ferric chloride brine leaching of galena concentrate have shown that additions of chloride ion result in accelerated dissolution rates. The current study has provided the necessary information to extend and modify these previous results by incorporating the important effect of chloride ion on the dissolution kinetics. As part of this study the solubility of lead chloride in ferric chloride-brine solutions has been determined and results indicate that additions of either FeCl3 or NaCl increase the PbCl2 solubility. This is attributed to the effect of complexing on the level of free chloride ion. In addition, the dissolution kinetics of elemental lead and lead chloride were also determined and compared with the kinetics of PbS dissolution. It is significant that the rate of dissolution of PbCl2 decreases as the concentration of Cl- is decreased and as the concentration of dissolved lead increases. These results along with SEM examination of partially reacted Pb shot show that solid PbCl2 forms on the surface long before the bulk solution is saturated with lead. The PbCl2 is proposed to form by a direct electrochemical reaction between Cl- and PbS prior to the formation of dissolved lead. The reaction was determined to be first order with respect to Cl- and closely obeys the following kinetic model based on a rate limiting charge transfer reaction at the surface:1 - (1 - a)^{1/3} left[ {{5.01x10^{11} }/{r_0 }left[ {Fe^{3 + } } right]_T^{0.21} left[ {Cl^ - } right]_T^{1.0} exp left( {{ - 72100}/{RT}} right)} right]t The model is in excellent agreement with experimental results up to about 95 pct reaction as long as the solubility of PbCl2 is greater than about 0.051 M. Where these conditions are not met, deviation from the surface reaction model occurs due to the extremely slow dissolution rate of PbCl2. Therefore the effect of Cl- on the brine leaching of PbS is attributed to two factors, the direct reaction of Cl- with the pbS surface

  14. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition

    DOEpatents

    Vandergrift, G.F. III; Krumpelt, M.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1981-10-08

    A process is described for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  15. Chloride transport in human red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Dalmark, M

    1975-01-01

    1. The chloride equilibrium flux (chloride self-exchange) was determined by measuring the rate of 36Cl efflux from radioactively labelled human red cells. The cellular chloride concentration was varied between 5 and 700 mM by the nystatin technique (Cass & Dalmark, 1973). The chloride transport capacity was not affected by the nystatin technique. 2. The chloride equilibrium flux showed saturation kinetics in the pH range between 6-2 and 9-2 (0 degrees C). The chloride transport decreased at chloride concentrations higher than those which gave the maximum transport. 3. The apparent half-saturation constant, (K1/2), depended on the pH and whether the chloride transport was perceived as a function of the chloride concentration in the medium or in the cell water. The (K1/2)m increased and the (K1/2)c decreased with increasing pH. The dependence of the chloride transport on the chloride concentration was described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics at pH 7-2, but at values of pH outside pH 7-8 S-shaped or steeper graphs were observed. 4. The chloride equilibrium flux varied with the pH at constant chloride concentration in the medium (pH 5-7-9-5). The transport had a bell-shaped pH dependence at chloride concentrations below 200 mM. At chloride concentrations between 300 and 600 mM the chloride transport increased with increasing pH to reach a plateau around pH 8. The position of the acidic branches of the pH graphs was independent of the chloride concentration (25-600 mM), but the position of the alkaline branches moved towards higher values of pH with increasing chloride concentration (5-150 mM). Thus, the position of the pH optimum increased with increasing chloride concentration. The chloride transport at low pH values was a function of the inverse second power of the hydrogen ion concentration. The pK of the groups which caused the inhibition was approximately 6 and independent of the temperature (0-18 degrees C). 5. The chloride equilibrium flux as a function of

  16. Different effect of prostaglandin E2 on B-cell activation by two distinct B-cell differentiation factors, B151-TRF1/IL-5 and B151-TRF2: selective inhibition of B151-TRF2-induced antibody response through increases in intracellular cyclic AMP levels

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, K.; Ono, S.; Takahama, Y.; Hirayama, F.; Hirano, H.; Itoh, K.; Dobashi, K.; Murakami, S.; Katoh, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.; Hamaoka, T.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on murine B-cell activation induced by two distinct B-cell differentiation factors, B151-TRF1/IL-5 and B151-TRF2, were examined. A final differentiation of unprimed B cells into IgM-producing cells induced by B151-TRF2 was markedly inhibited by PGE2 at physiological concentrations (around 10-8 M), whereas B151-TRF1/IL-5-induced antibody responses of unprimed as well as activated B cells were not affected by PGE2, even at 10-6 M. B-cell responses induced by B151-TRF2-like factors from autoimmune-prone MRL/1pr mice were also inhibited by PGE2. Biphasic increases in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels were induced by culturing B cells with 10-6 or 10-8 M PGE2: rapid increases within 8 min and delayed increases around 16 hr. The direct addition of dibutyryl cAMP to cultures of B cells resulted in marked inhibition of antibody responses when stimulated with B151-TRF2 but not with B151-TRF1/IL-5. The B151-TRF2-induced antibody responses were also inhibited by cAMP-elevating reagents such as forskolin, cholera toxin and theophyline. Furthermore, 2′, 5′-dideoxyadenosine, which is an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, prevented the PGE2-mediated cAMP accumulation in unprimed B cells as well as the PGE2-mediated inhibition of B151-TRF2-induced B-cell responses when added at the initiation of culture. These results suggest that PGE2 inhibits B151-TRF2-induced antibody responses through the activation of adenylate cyclase and subsequent accumulation of intracellular cAMP, whereas B151-TRF1/IL-5-responsive B cells are resistant to the inhibitory effect of PGE2 and cAMP. PMID:2553585

  17. Autophagy and checkpoints for intracellular pathogen defense

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Geraldine L.C.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Autophagy plays a crucial role in intracellular defense against various pathogens. Xenophagy is a form of selective autophagy that targets intracellular pathogens for degradation. In addition, several related yet distinct intracellular defense responses depend on autophagy-related (ATG) genes. This review gives an overview of these processes, pathogen strategies to subvert them, and their crosstalk with various cell death programs. Recent findings The recruitment of ATG proteins plays a key role in multiple intracellular defense programs, specifically xenophagy, LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP), and the IFNγ-mediated elimination of pathogens such as Toxoplasma gondii and murine norovirus. Recent progress has revealed methods employed by pathogens to resist these intracellular defense mechanisms and/or persist in spite of them. The intracellular pathogen load can tip the balance between cell survival and cell death. Further, it was recently observed that LAP is indispensable for the efficient clearance of dying cells. Summary Autophagy-dependent and ATG gene-dependent pathways are essential in intracellular defense against a broad range of pathogens. PMID:25394238

  18. Improved tag-switch method reveals that thioredoxin acts as depersulfidase and controls the intracellular levels of protein persulfidation† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5sc04818d Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Wedmann, Rudolf; Onderka, Constantin; Wei, Shengwei; Szijártó, István András; Miljkovic, Jan Lj.; Mitrovic, Aleksandra; Lange, Mike; Savitsky, Sergey; Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Torregrossa, Roberta; Harrer, Ellen G.; Harrer, Thomas; Ishii, Isao; Gollasch, Maik; Wood, Mark E.; Galardon, Erwan; Xian, Ming; Whiteman, Matthew; Banerjee, Ruma

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as a signalling molecule capable of regulating several important physiological functions such as blood pressure, neurotransmission and inflammation. The mechanisms behind these effects are still largely elusive and oxidative posttranslational modification of cysteine residues (protein persulfidation or S-sulfhydration) has been proposed as the main pathway for H2S-induced biological and pharmacological effects. As a signalling mechanism, persulfidation has to be controlled. Using an improved tag-switch assay for persulfide detection we show here that protein persulfide levels are controlled by the thioredoxin system. Recombinant thioredoxin showed an almost 10-fold higher reactivity towards cysteine persulfide than towards cystine and readily cleaved protein persulfides as well. This reaction resulted in H2S release suggesting that thioredoxin could be an important regulator of H2S levels from persulfide pools. Inhibition of the thioredoxin system caused an increase in intracellular persulfides, highlighting thioredoxin as a major protein depersulfidase that controls H2S signalling. Finally, using plasma from HIV-1 patients that have higher circulatory levels of thioredoxin, we could prove depersulfidase role in vivo. PMID:27170841

  19. Progressive NKCC1-dependent neuronal chloride accumulation during neonatal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Dzhala, Volodymyr I.; Kuchibhotla, Kishore V.; Glykys, Joseph C.; Kahle, Kristopher T.; Swiercz, Waldemar B.; Feng, Guoping; Kuner, Thomas; Augustine, George J.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Staley, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    Seizures induce excitatory shifts in the reversal potential for GABAA receptor-mediated responses, which may contribute to the intractability of electroencephalographic seizures and preclude the efficacy of widely-used GABAergic anticonvulsants such as phenobarbital. We now report that in intact hippocampi prepared from neonatal rats and transgenic mice expressing Clomeleon, recurrent seizures progressively increase the intracellular chloride concentration ([Cl−]i) assayed by Clomeleon imaging and invert the net effect of GABAA receptor activation from inhibition to excitation assayed by the frequency of action potentials and intracellular Ca2+ transients. These changes correlate with increasing frequency of seizure-like events and reduction in phenobarbital efficacy. The Na+-K+-2Cl− (NKCC1) co-transporter blocker bumetanide inhibited seizure-induced neuronal Cl− accumulation and the consequent facilitation of recurrent seizures. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanism by which seizure activity leads to [Cl−]i accumulation, thereby increasing the probability of subsequent seizures. This provides a potential mechanism for the early crescendo phase of neonatal seizures. PMID:20810895

  20. Double isotopic method using dansyl chloride for the determination of GABA in rat C6 astrocytoma cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, R.L.; Quay, W.B.; Perez-Polo, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Methods are described for the quantitative measurement of GABA in culture. The method can be adapted to any amino acid or dansyl-chloride-reactive species. The sensitivity and selectivity of the procedure result from the double isotopic design in which (/sup 14/C)-labeled internal standard was added to the samples before reaction with (3M)-labeled dansyl chloride. Values obtained by ion-exchange amino acid analysis of cultures agree closely with the values obtained by the double isotopic method. This method is sensitive enough to measure GABA intracellularly and the condition medium.

  1. Indium-111 chloride imaging with ununited fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Sayle, B.A.; Fawcett, H.D.; Yudt, W.M.; Wang, S.C.; Mader, J.T.; Cierny, G. 3d.

    1987-03-01

    Twenty patients with ununited fractures and a suspicion of infection had In-111 chloride imaging. Surgically obtained cultures were positive for infection in 12 and negative in eight patients. In-111 chloride images were positive in all 12 patients with infection but also were positive in six of the patients with negative cultures. It is not possible to differentiate infected from noninfected ununited fractures by In-111 chloride imaging.

  2. Metal chloride cathode for a battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Distefano, Salvador (Inventor); Bankston, C. Perry (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method of fabricating a rechargeable battery is disclosed which includes a positive electrode which contains a chloride of a selected metal when the electrode is in its active state. The improvement comprises fabricating the positive electrode by: providing a porous matrix composed of a metal; providing a solution of the chloride of the selected metal; and impregnating the matrix with the chloride from the solution.

  3. Enrofloxacin hydro-chloride dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Calderón, Jorge E; Gutiérrez, Lilia; Flores-Alamo, Marcos; García-Gutiérrez, Ponciano; Sumano, Héctor

    2014-04-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C19H23FN3O3 (+)·Cl(-)·2H2O [systematic name: 4-(3-carb-oxy-1-cyclo-propyl-6-fluoro-4-oxo-1,4-di-hydro-quin-o-lin-7-yl)-1-ethyl-piperazin-1-ium chloride dihydrate], consists of two independent monocations of the protonated enrofloxacin, two chloride anions and four water mol-ecules. In the cations, the piperazinium rings adopt chair conformations and the dihedral angles between the cyclo-propyl ring and the 10-membered quinoline ring system are 56.55 (2) and 51.11 (2)°. An intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond is observed in each cation. In the crystal, the components are connected via O-H⋯Cl, N-H⋯Cl and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, and a π-π inter-action between the benzene rings [centroid-centroid distance = 3.6726 (13) Å], resulting in a three-dimensional array. PMID:24826167

  4. Irreversible gettering of thionyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    LeRoy Whinnery; Steve Goods; George Buffleben; Tim Sheppodd

    1999-11-01

    The authors have successfully demonstrated the irreversible gettering of SOCl{sub 2} by ZnO/ASZMTEDA carbon over a modest temperature range. While thionyl chloride decomposition was slow below {minus}20 C, lower temperatures are expected to be less of a problem than at higher temperatures. The approximately 30 cc of thionyl chloride in a typical D-cell would require 50 g of ZnO and 107 g of ASZMTEDA carbon. Fortunately, since it is unlikely to happen at all, it is common practice to assume only one cell will fail (leak) in a given battery pack. So, one charge of getter can protect the whole battery pack. In summary, ZnO/ASZMTEDA carbon fulfills all of the requirements of an ideal getter including: irreversible binding or reaction with SOCl{sub 2}, high volumetric uptake capacity, high efficiency, non-volatile, air stable, insensitive to poisoning, non-toxic, cheap, non-corrosive, and the gettering product is not a liquid or oil that could block further flow or accessibility. Future work in this area includes incorporation of the ZnO and carbon into a structural open-celled porous monolith, as well as, gettering for other types of batteries (e.g., Li/MnO{sub 2}).

  5. Arsenic removal by ferric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Hering, J.G.; Chen, P.Y.; Wilkie, J.A.; Elimelech, M.; Liang, S.

    1996-04-01

    Bench-scale studies were conducted in model freshwater systems to investigate how various parameters affected arsenic removal during coagulation with ferric chloride and arsenic adsorption onto preformed hydrous ferric oxide. Parameters included arsenic oxidation state and initial concentration, coagulant dosage or adsorbent concentration, pH, and the presence of co-occurring inorganic solutes. Comparison of coagulation and adsorption experiments and of experimental results with predictions based on surface complexation modeling demonstrated that adsorption is an important (though not the sole) mechanism governing arsenic removal during coagulation. Under comparable conditions, better removal was observed with arsenic(V) [As(V)] than with arsenic(III) [As(III)] in both coagulation and adsorption experiments. Below neutral pH values, As(III) removal-adsorption was significantly decreased in the presence of sulfate, whereas only a slight decrease in As(V) removal-adsorption was observed. At high pH, removal-adsorption of As(V) was increased in the presence of calcium. Removal of As(V) during coagulation with ferric chloride is both more efficient and less sensitive than that of As(III) to variations in source water composition.

  6. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 entry by chloride channel inhibitors tamoxifen and NPPB

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Kai; Chen, Maoyun; Xiang, Yangfei; Ma, Kaiqi; Jin, Fujun; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Shaoxiang; Wang, Yifei

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We analyze the anti-HSV potential of chloride channel inhibitors. • Tamoxifen and NPPB show anti-HSV-1 and anti-ACV-resistant HSV-1 activities. • HSV-1 infection induces intracellular chloride concentration increasing. • Tamoxifen and NPPB inhibit HSV-1 early infection. • Tamoxifen and NPPB prevent the fusion process of HSV-1. - Abstract: Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection is very common worldwide and can cause significant health problems from periodic skin and corneal lesions to encephalitis. Appearance of drug-resistant viruses in clinical therapy has made exploring novel antiviral agents emergent. Here we show that chloride channel inhibitors, including tamoxifen and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenyl-propylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB), exhibited extensive antiviral activities toward HSV-1 and ACV-resistant HSV viruses. HSV-1 infection induced chloride ion influx while treatment with inhibitors reduced the increase of intracellular chloride ion concentration. Pretreatment or treatment of inhibitors at different time points during HSV-1 infection all suppressed viral RNA synthesis, protein expression and virus production. More detailed studies demonstrated that tamoxifen and NPPB acted as potent inhibitors of HSV-1 early entry step by preventing viral binding, penetration and nuclear translocation. Specifically the compounds appeared to affect viral fusion process by inhibiting virus binding to lipid rafts and interrupting calcium homeostasis. Taken together, the observation that tamoxifen and NPPB can block viral entry suggests a stronger potential for these compounds as well as other ion channel inhibitors in antiviral therapy against HSV-1, especially the compound tamoxifen is an immediately actionable drug that can be reused for treatment of HSV-1 infections.

  7. Stochastic resonance in an intracellular genetic perceptron.

    PubMed

    Bates, Russell; Blyuss, Oleg; Zaikin, Alexey

    2014-03-01

    Intracellular genetic networks are more intelligent than was first assumed due to their ability to learn. One of the manifestations of this intelligence is the ability to learn associations of two stimuli within gene-regulating circuitry: Hebbian-type learning within the cellular life. However, gene expression is an intrinsically noisy process; hence, we investigate the effect of intrinsic and extrinsic noise on this kind of intracellular intelligence. We report a stochastic resonance in an intracellular associative genetic perceptron, a noise-induced phenomenon, which manifests itself in noise-induced increase of response in efficiency after the learning event under the conditions of optimal stochasticity. PMID:24730883

  8. Production of chlorine from chloride salts

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.

    1981-01-01

    A process for converting chloride salts and sulfuric acid to sulfate salts and elemental chlorine is disclosed. A chloride salt and sulfuric acid are combined in a furnace where they react to produce a sulfate salt and hydrogen chloride. Hydrogen chloride from the furnace contacts a molten salt mixture containing an oxygen compound of vanadium, an alkali metal sulfate and an alkali metal pyrosulfate to recover elemental chlorine. In the absence of an oxygen-bearing gas during the contacting, the vanadium is reduced, but is regenerated to its active higher valence state by separately contacting the molten salt mixture with an oxygen-bearing gas.

  9. Chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, O.M.; Hansen, P.F.; Coats, A.M.; Glasser, F.P.

    1999-09-01

    In this paper chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar is followed by electron probe microanalysis. The influence of several paste and exposure parameters on chloride ingress are examined (e.g., water-cement ratio, silica fume addition, exposure time, and temperature). The measurements are modelled on Fick's law modified by a term for chloride binding. Inclusion of chloride binding significantly improves the profile shape of the modelled ingress profiles. The presence of fine aggregate and formation of interfacial transition zones at paste-aggregate boundaries does not significantly affect diffusion rates.

  10. Fabrication Of Metal Chloride Cathodes By Sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Di Stefano, Salvador; Bankston, C. Perry

    1992-01-01

    Transition-metal chloride cathodes for use in high-temperature rechargeable sodium batteries prepared by sintering transition-metal powders mixed with sodium chloride. Need for difficult and dangerous chlorination process eliminated. Proportions of transition metal and sodium chloride in mixture adjusted to suit specific requirements. Cathodes integral to sodium/metal-chloride batteries, which have advantages over sodium/sulfur batteries including energy densities, increased safety, reduced material and thermal-management problems, and ease of operation and assembly. Being evaluated for supplying electrical power during peak demand and electric vehicles.

  11. Strength, porosity, and chloride resistance of mortar using the combination of two kinds of pozzolanic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukzon, Sumrerng; Chindaprasirt, Prinya

    2013-08-01

    This article presents a study on the resistance to chloride penetration, corrosion, porosity, and strength of mortar containing fine fly ash (FA), ground rice husk-bark ash (RB), and ground bagasse ash (BA). Ordinary Portland cement (CT) was blended with a single pozzolan and two pozzolans. Strength, porosity, rapid chloride penetration, immersion, and corrosion tests were performed to characterize the mortar. Test results showed that the use of ternary blends of CT, FA, and RB or BA decreased the porosity of the mortar, as compared with binary blended mortar containing CT and RB or BA. The resistance to chloride penetration of the mortar improved substantially with partial replacement of CT with FA, RB, and BA. The use of ternary blends of CT, FA and RB or BA produced the mortar with good strength and resistance to chloride penetration. The resistance to chloride penetration was higher with an increase in the replacement level due to the reduced calcium hydroxide.

  12. Does Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation of Vinyl Chloride Yield Cold Vinylidene?

    PubMed

    Fernando, Ravin; Qu, Chen; Bowman, Joel M; Field, Robert W; Suits, Arthur G

    2015-07-01

    Velocity map imaging of the infrared multiphoton dissociation of vinyl chloride shows the formation of HCl in rotational levels below J = 10 that are associated with the three-center elimination pathway. The total translational energy release is observed to peak at 3-5 kcal/mol, which is consistent with the low reverse barrier predicted for the formation of HCl with vinylidene coproducts. Direct dynamics trajectory studies from the three-center transition state reproduce the observed distributions and show that the associated vinylidene is formed with only modest rotational excitation, precluding Coriolis-induced mixing among the excited vibrational levels of acetylene that would lead to distribution of vinylidene character into many vibrationally mixed acetylene vibrational levels. The results suggest that infrared multiphoton dissociation of vinyl chloride is an efficient route to synthesis of stable, cold vinylidene. PMID:26266719

  13. Simultaneous conduction mapping and intracellular membrane potential recording in isolated atria.

    PubMed

    Neo, Melissa; Morris, David G; Kuklik, Pawel; Lau, Dennis H; Dimitri, Hany; Lim, Wei-Wen; Sanders, Prashanthan; Saint, David A

    2016-05-01

    We describe a novel approach for simultaneously determining regional differences in action potential (AP) morphology and tissue electrophysiological properties in isolated atria. The epicardial surface of rat atrial preparations was placed in contact with a multi-electrode array (9 × 10 silver chloride electrodes, 0.1 mm diameter and 0.1 mm pitch). A glass microelectrode (100 MΩ) was simultaneously inserted into the endocardial surface to record intracellular AP from either of 2 regions (A, B) during pacing from 2 opposite corners of the tissue. AP duration at 80% of repolarisation and its restitution curve was significantly different only in region A (p < 0.01) when AP was initiated at different stimulation sites. Alternans in AP duration and AP amplitude, and in conduction velocity were observed during 2 separate arrhythmic episodes. This approach of combining microelectrode array and intracellular membrane potential recording may provide new insights into arrhythmogenic mechanisms in animal models of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26771118

  14. A rapid method for measuring intracellular pH using BCECF-AM.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Pinar; Mutharasan, Raj

    2002-08-15

    A rapid intracellular pH (pH(i)) measurement method based on initial rate of increase of fluorescence ratio of 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5,6-carboxyfluorescein upon dye addition to a cell suspension in growth medium is reported. A dye transport model that describes dye concentration and fluorescence values in intracellular and extracellular spaces provides the mathematical basis for the approach. Experimental results of ammonium chloride challenge response of the two suspension cells, Spodoptera frugiperda and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, successfully compared with results obtained using traditional perfusion method. Since the cell suspension does not require any preparation, measurement of pH(i) can be completed in about 1 min minimizing any potential errors due to dye leakage. PMID:12204343

  15. Determination of Intracellular Vitrification Temperatures for Unicellular Micro Organisms under Conditions Relevant for Cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Fernanda; Meneghel, Julie; Cenard, Stéphanie; Passot, Stéphanie; Morris, G John

    2016-01-01

    During cryopreservation ice nucleation and crystal growth may occur within cells or the intracellular compartment may vitrify. Whilst previous literature describes intracellular vitrification in a qualitative manner, here we measure the intracellular vitrification temperature of bacteria and yeasts under conditions relevant to cryopreservation, including the addition of high levels of permeating and nonpermeating additives and the application of rapid rates of cooling. The effects of growth conditions that are known to modify cellular freezing resistance on the intracellular vitrification temperature are also examined. For bacteria a plot of the activity on thawing against intracellular glass transition of the maximally freeze-concentrated matrix (Tg') shows that cells with the lowest value of intracellular Tg' survive the freezing process better than cells with a higher intracellular Tg'. This paper demonstrates the role of the physical state of the intracellular environment in determining the response of microbial cells to preservation and could be a powerful tool to be manipulated to allow the optimization of methods for the preservation of microorganisms. PMID:27055246

  16. Determination of Intracellular Vitrification Temperatures for Unicellular Micro Organisms under Conditions Relevant for Cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fernanda; Meneghel, Julie; Cenard, Stéphanie; Passot, Stéphanie; Morris, G. John

    2016-01-01

    During cryopreservation ice nucleation and crystal growth may occur within cells or the intracellular compartment may vitrify. Whilst previous literature describes intracellular vitrification in a qualitative manner, here we measure the intracellular vitrification temperature of bacteria and yeasts under conditions relevant to cryopreservation, including the addition of high levels of permeating and nonpermeating additives and the application of rapid rates of cooling. The effects of growth conditions that are known to modify cellular freezing resistance on the intracellular vitrification temperature are also examined. For bacteria a plot of the activity on thawing against intracellular glass transition of the maximally freeze-concentrated matrix (Tg’) shows that cells with the lowest value of intracellular Tg’ survive the freezing process better than cells with a higher intracellular Tg’. This paper demonstrates the role of the physical state of the intracellular environment in determining the response of microbial cells to preservation and could be a powerful tool to be manipulated to allow the optimization of methods for the preservation of microorganisms. PMID:27055246

  17. Cohort and case-control analyses of workers exposed to vinyl chloride: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W.A.; Steenland, K.; Brown, D.; Wells, V.; Jones, J.; Schulte, P.; Halperin, W.

    1989-06-01

    The mortality in a cohort of workers at a vinyl chloride polymerization plant has been updated, extending the period of observation in the original study from 1974 to 1986. Workers at this plant may have been exposed to vinyl chloride monomer and/or polyvinyl chloride dust, or may have had no exposure to either substance. Seventy-six percent of the work force worked in jobs with potential exposure to vinyl chloride monomer. Among the total cohort, statistically significant excess risks were observed for liver, lung, and brain cancer. For the subcohort of workers exposed to vinyl chloride monomer, the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for liver cancer was 333 (90% confidence interval (CI) 202 to 521). However, there were no significant excesses of either brain (SMR = 145, 90% CI 78 to 249) or lung cancer (SMR = 115, 90% CI 96 to 141). To investigate dose response, nested case-control studies for liver, brain, and lung cancer were conducted among the total cohort (including the nonexposed). For these studies there were two exposure variables, cumulative dose of vinyl chloride monomer and cumulative dose of polyvinyl chloride dust. Cumulative dose was defined as the product of level and duration of exposure. The only significant association between disease risk and cumulative dose was for liver cancer and cumulative dose of vinyl chloride monomer. Further division of the liver cancers into angiosarcoma (n = 12) and other liver cancers (n = 7), based on review of death certificates and medical records, showed that the dose response existed only for angiosarcomas.

  18. Relating road salt to exceedances of the water quality standard for chloride in New Hampshire streams.

    PubMed

    Trowbridge, Philip R; Kahl, J Steve; Sassan, Dari A; Heath, Douglas L; Walsh, Edward M

    2010-07-01

    Six watersheds in New Hampshire were studied to determine the effects of road salt on stream water quality. Specific conductance in streams was monitored every 15 min for one year using dataloggers. Chloride concentrations were calculated from specific conductance using empirical relationships. Stream chloride concentrations were directly correlated with development in the watersheds and were inversely related to streamflow. Exceedances of the EPA water quality standard for chloride were detected in the four watersheds with the most development. The number of exceedances during a year was linearly related to the annual average concentration of chloride. Exceedances of the water quality standard were not predicted for streams with annual average concentrations less than 102 mg L(-1). Chloride was imported into three of the watersheds at rates ranging from 45 to 98 Mg Cl km(-2) yr(-1). Ninety-one percent of the chloride imported was road salt for deicing roadways and parking lots. A simple, mass balance equation was shown to predict annual average chloride concentrations from streamflow and chloride import rates to the watershed. This equation, combined with the apparent threshold for exceedances of the water quality standard, can be used for screening-level TMDLs for road salt in impaired watersheds. PMID:20545352

  19. Characterizations of intracellular arsenic in a bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe-Simon, F.; Yannone, S. M.; Tainer, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Life requires a key set of chemical elements to sustain growth. Yet, a growing body of literature suggests that microbes can alter their nutritional requirements based on the availability of these chemical elements. Under limiting conditions for one element microbes have been shown to utilize a variety of other elements to serve similar functions often (but not always) in similar molecular structures. Well-characterized elemental exchanges include manganese for iron, tungsten for molybdenum and sulfur for phosphorus or oxygen. These exchanges can be found in a wide variety of biomolecules ranging from protein to lipids and DNA. Recent evidence suggested that arsenic, as arsenate or As(V), was taken up and incorporated into the cellular material of the bacterium GFAJ-1. The evidence was interpreted to support As(V) acting in an analogous role to phosphate. We will therefore discuss our ongoing efforts to characterize intracellular arsenate and how it may partition among the cellular fractions of the microbial isolate GFAJ-1 when exposed to As(V) in the presence of various levels of phosphate. Under high As(V) conditions, cells express a dramatically different proteome than when grown given only phosphate. Ongoing studies on the diversity and potential role of proteins and metabolites produced in the presence of As(V) will be reported. These investigations promise to inform the role and additional metabolic potential for As in biology. Arsenic assimilation into biomolecules contributes to the expanding set of chemical elements utilized by microbes in unusual environmental niches.

  20. XAFS Studies of Ni Ta and Nb Chlorides in the Ionic Liquid 1-Ethyl-3-Methyl Imidazolium Chloride / Aluminum Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    W OGrady; D Roeper; K Pandya; G Cheek

    2011-12-31

    The structures of anhydrous nickel, niobium, and tantalum chlorides have been investigated in situ in acidic and basic ionic liquids (ILs) of 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (EMIC)/AlCl{sub 3} with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The coordination of NiCl{sub 2} changes from tetrahedral in basic solution to octahedral in acidic solution. The NiCl{sub 2} is a strong Lewis acid in that it can induce the AlCl{sub 3} to share its chlorides in the highly acidic IL, forming a structure with six near Cl{sup -} ions and eight further distant Al ions which share the chloride ions surrounding the Ni{sup 2+}. When Nb{sub 2}Cl{sub 10}, a dimer, is added to the acidic or basic solution, the dimer breaks apart and forms two species. In the acid solution, two trigonal bipyramids are formed with five equal chloride distances, while in the basic solution, a square pyramid with four chlorides forming a square base and one shorter axial chloride bond. Ta{sub 2}Cl{sub 10} is also a dimer and divides into half in the acidic solution and forms two trigonal bipyramids. In the basic solution, the dimer breaks apart but the species formed is sufficiently acidic that it attracts two additional chloride ions and forms a seven coordinated tantalum species.

  1. KRIT1 Regulates the Homeostasis of Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Goitre, Luca; Balzac, Fiorella; Degani, Simona; Degan, Paolo; Marchi, Saverio; Pinton, Paolo; Retta, Saverio Francesco

    2010-01-01

    KRIT1 is a gene responsible for Cerebral Cavernous Malformations (CCM), a major cerebrovascular disease characterized by abnormally enlarged and leaky capillaries that predispose to seizures, focal neurological deficits, and fatal intracerebral hemorrhage. Comprehensive analysis of the KRIT1 gene in CCM patients has suggested that KRIT1 functions need to be severely impaired for pathogenesis. However, the molecular and cellular functions of KRIT1 as well as CCM pathogenesis mechanisms are still research challenges. We found that KRIT1 plays an important role in molecular mechanisms involved in the maintenance of the intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) homeostasis to prevent oxidative cellular damage. In particular, we demonstrate that KRIT1 loss/down-regulation is associated with a significant increase in intracellular ROS levels. Conversely, ROS levels in KRIT1−/− cells are significantly and dose-dependently reduced after restoration of KRIT1 expression. Moreover, we show that the modulation of intracellular ROS levels by KRIT1 loss/restoration is strictly correlated with the modulation of the expression of the antioxidant protein SOD2 as well as of the transcriptional factor FoxO1, a master regulator of cell responses to oxidative stress and a modulator of SOD2 levels. Furthermore, we show that the KRIT1-dependent maintenance of low ROS levels facilitates the downregulation of cyclin D1 expression required for cell transition from proliferative growth to quiescence. Finally, we demonstrate that the enhanced ROS levels in KRIT1−/− cells are associated with an increased cell susceptibility to oxidative DNA damage and a marked induction of the DNA damage sensor and repair gene Gadd45α, as well as with a decline of mitochondrial energy metabolism. Taken together, our results point to a new model where KRIT1 limits the accumulation of intracellular oxidants and prevents oxidative stress-mediated cellular dysfunction and DNA damage by enhancing the

  2. Polymer physics of intracellular phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brangwynne, Clifford P.; Tompa, Peter; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-11-01

    Intracellular organelles are either membrane-bound vesicles or membrane-less compartments that are made up of proteins and RNA. These organelles play key biological roles, by compartmentalizing the cell to enable spatiotemporal control of biological reactions. Recent studies suggest that membrane-less intracellular compartments are multicomponent viscous liquid droplets that form via phase separation. Proteins that have an intrinsic tendency for being conformationally heterogeneous seem to be the main drivers of liquid-liquid phase separation in the cell. These findings highlight the relevance of classical concepts from the physics of polymeric phase transitions for understanding the assembly of intracellular membrane-less compartments. However, applying these concepts is challenging, given the heteropolymeric nature of protein sequences, the complex intracellular environment, and non-equilibrium features intrinsic to cells. This provides new opportunities for adapting established theories and for the emergence of new physics.

  3. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S. O.; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S.

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  4. Pharmacodynamics of benzyl chloride in rats.

    PubMed

    Saxena, S; Abdel-Rahman, M S

    1989-09-01

    In today's world of high industrialization, toxicity and pollution have become common terms of references. Both laymen and experts are becoming increasingly concerned about various health hazards created by occupational and industrial wastes dumped in and around public places. Benzyl chloride (BCl) was one of the chemicals dumped by Hooker Chemicals in Love Canal, N.Y. Benzyl chloride (BCl) is extensively used in industry in the manufacture of dyes, perfumes, resins, and synthetic tannins. It has been found at various dump sites and industrial wastes, which has led to potential hazards to health. This study was conducted to investigate the pharmacodynamics of BCl in rats. Rats were given 14C-BCl in corn oil by gavage. The peak plasma level was reached at 30 min and began to decline. BCl elimination pattern follows a two compartment model. The distribution half-life (alpha-phase) was 1.3 hr while the half-life of elimination (beta-phase) was 58.53 hr. Distribution studies after 48 hr of BCl administration revealed that the concentration of radioisotopes was highest in the stomach, gastric content, ileum, and duodenum followed by liver, adrenal, bone marrow, whole blood, pancreas, lung, esophagus, skin, kidney, heart, thymus, fat, testes, spleen, brain, and carcass. Approximately 76% of the initial dose was excreted by kidney during the 72 hr studies. About 7% was detected in expired air as 14CO2, while less than 1.3% was present as 14C-BCl or 14C-BCl metabolites in expired air during 72 hr. Metabolism studies revealed that S-benzyl-N-acetyl cysteine, benzyl alcohol, and benzaldehyde were the metabolites present in the urine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2802671

  5. Chloride substitution in sodium borohydride

    SciTech Connect

    Ravnsbaek, Dorthe B.; Rude, Line H.; Jensen, Torben R.

    2011-07-15

    The dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other resulting in formation of solid solutions of composition Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 1-x}Cl{sub x} is studied. The dissolution reaction is facilitated by two methods: ball milling or combination of ball milling and annealing at 300 deg. C for three days of NaBH{sub 4}-NaCl samples in molar ratios of 0.5:0.5 and 0.75:0.25. The degree of dissolution is studied by Rietveld refinement of synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD) data. The results show that dissolution of 10 mol% NaCl into NaBH{sub 4}, forming Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 0.9}Cl{sub 0.1}, takes place during ball milling. A higher degree of dissolution of NaCl in NaBH{sub 4} is obtained by annealing resulting in solid solutions containing up to 57 mol% NaCl, i.e. Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 0.43}Cl{sub 0.57}. In addition, annealing results in dissolution of 10-20 mol% NaBH{sub 4} into NaCl. The mechanism of the dissolution during annealing and the decomposition pathway of the solid solutions are studied by in situ SR-PXD. Furthermore, the stability upon hydrogen release and uptake were studied by Sieverts measurements. - Graphical Abstract: Dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other resulting in formation of solid solutions of composition Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 1-x}Cl{sub x} is studied. Dissolution is facilitated by two methods: ball milling or annealing at 300 deg. C for three days of NaBH{sub 4}-NaCl samples. Sample compositions and dissolution mechanism are studied by Rietveld refinement of synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction data. Highlights: > Studies of dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other. > Solid state diffusion facilitated by mechanical and thermal treatments. > Dissolution is more efficiently induced by heating than by mechanical treatment. > Mechanism for dissolution studied by Rietveld refinement of in situ SR-PXD data.

  6. Nesfatin-1 increases intracellular calcium concentration by protein kinase C activation in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mete; Gok, Zeynep Betul; Kacar, Emine; Serhatlioglu, Ihsan; Kelestimur, Haluk

    2016-04-21

    Nesfatin-1 is a recently identified anorexigenic hypothalamic polypeptide derived from the posttranslational processing of nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2). Several studies have indicated that this neuropeptide may be participated in somatosensory and visceral transmission including pain signals in addition to energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to explore the possible role of nesfatin-1 in the transmission of peripheral neural signals by investigating the effects of nesfatin-1 on intracellular free calcium levels ([Ca(2+)]i) in cultured neonatal rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The effects of nesfatin-1 on [Ca(2+)]i in DRG neurons were investigated by using an in vitro calcium imaging system. DRG neurons were grown in primary culture following enzymatic and mechanical dissociation of ganglia from 1-or 2-day-old neonatal Wistar rats. Using the fura-2-based calcium imaging technique, the effects of nesfatin-1 on [Ca(2+)]i and role of the protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated pathway in nesfatin-1 effect were assessed. Nesfatin-1 elevated [Ca(2+)]i in cultured DRG neurons. The response was prevented by pretreating the cells with pertussis toxin. The protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine chloride suppressed nesfatin-1-induced rise in [Ca(2+)]i. The result shows that nesfatin-1 interacts with a G protein-coupled receptor, leading to an increase of [Ca(2+)]i, which is linked to protein kinase C activation in cultured rat DRG neurons. PMID:26975784

  7. Specific Polymorphisms in Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 3 Core Protein Associated with Intracellular Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Ravi; McHutchison, John; Patel, Keyur; Qiang, Guan; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2008-01-01

    Background Steatosis is a common histological finding and a poor prognostic indicator in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In HCV genotype 3–infected patients, the etiology of steatosis appears to be closely correlated with unknown viral factors that increase intracellular lipid levels. We hypothesize that specific sequence polymorphisms in HCV genotype 3 core protein may be associated with hepatic intracellular lipid accumulation. Methods Using selected serum samples from 8 HCV genotype 3–infected patients with or without steatosis, we sequenced the HCV core gene to identify candidate polymorphisms associated with increased intracellular lipid levels. Results Two polymorphisms at positions 182 and 186 of the core protein correlated with the presence (P = .03) and absence (P = .005) of intrahepatic steatosis. Transfected liver cell lines expressing core protein with steatosis-associated polymorphisms had increased intracellular lipid levels compared with non–steatosis-associated core isolates, as measured by oil red O staining (P = .02). Site-specific mutagenesis performed at positions 182 and 186 in steatosis-associated core genes yielded proteins that had decreased intracellular lipid levels in transfected cells (P = .03). Conclusions We have identified polymorphisms in HCV core protein genotype 3 that produce increased intracellular lipid levels and thus may play a significant role in lipid metabolism or trafficking, contributing to steatosis. PMID:18177246

  8. Piezoresistive Properties of Polyvinyl Chloride Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toprakci, Hatice Aylin Karahan

    Textile based sensors provide an interface between the user and the electronic system by converting any type of physiological or environmental signal into electrical signals. Common applications include health monitoring, rehabilitation, multimedia, and surveillance. In this research we demonstrate fabrication of piezoresistive sensors on textile fabrics through application of a screen-printed conductive nanocomposite layer of plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), and carbon nanofiber (CNF). In order to understand the behavior of conductive plastisol, morphological, mechanical and electrical properties of composite films were investigated for different molecular weights of PVC. Homogeneous filler dispersion and good filler/polymer interphase were observed without any dominant filler orientation. Mechanical and electrical properties were found to be affected by CNF, plasticizer content and matrix molecular weight. CNFs were found to provide substantial bridging in the matrix and enhance strength. These nanostructured composite sensors were found to be sensitive under different levels of strain which can be monitored by change in electrical resistance. Finally, we demonstrate the fabrication of piezoresistive sensors on textile fabrics through application of a screen-printed conductive nanocomposite layer of conductive plastisol. Conductive plastisol was found to show good adhesion to fabric with homogeneous CNF distribution. As in composite films, samples were found to show negative piezoresistance at different levels of strain. Strain level and filler concentration were found to affect the piezoresistive behavior and sensitivity of the printed sensors.

  9. Glutamate-gated Chloride Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Wolstenholme, Adrian J.

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) are found only in protostome invertebrate phyla but are closely related to mammalian glycine receptors. They have a number of roles in these animals, controlling locomotion and feeding and mediating sensory inputs into behavior. In nematodes and arthropods, they are targeted by the macrocyclic lactone family of anthelmintics and pesticides, making the GluCls of considerable medical and economic importance. Recently, the three-dimensional structure of a GluCl was solved, the first for any eukaryotic ligand-gated anion channel, revealing a macrocyclic lactone-binding site between the channel domains of adjacent subunits. This minireview will highlight some unique features of the GluCls and illustrate their contribution to our knowledge of the entire Cys loop ligand-gated ion channel superfamily. PMID:23038250

  10. Chloride ion pairs in water

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, L.X.; Pettitt, B.M.

    1987-09-02

    The study of ions in water by statistical mechanical methods has made a significant contribution to the authors understanding of solution chemistry and biological processes in saline solutions. Integral equation methods have been used recently by Pettitt and Rossky to study solvent-averaged forces and the effective interactions or the potentials of mean force (PMF) for the alkali halides in water at infinite dilution. In this communication, they report a quantitative study of the Cl/sup -/-Cl/sup -/ PMF in water with use of an umbrella sampling method and the same Hamiltonian as that used in the integral equation study. The system studied here consists of two chloride ions and 295 water molecules in a rectangular box with periodic boundary conditions and lengths of 25.4, 18.6, and 18.6 A in the x,y,z directions, respectively.

  11. Sodium-metal chloride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Attia, A. I.; Halpert, G.

    1992-01-01

    It was concluded that rapid development in the technology of sodium metal chloride batteries has been achieved in the last decade mainly due to the: expertise available with sodium sulfur system; safety; and flexibility in design and fabrication. Long cycle lives of over 1000 and high energy densities of approx. 100 Wh/kg have been demonstrated in both Na/FeCl2 and Na/NiCl2 cells. Optimization of porous cathode and solid electrolyte geometries are essential for further enhancing the battery performance. Fundamental studies confirm the capabilities of these systems. Nickel dichloride emerges as the candidate cathode material for high power density applications such as electric vehicle and space.

  12. 29 CFR 1910.1052 - Methylene Chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Methylene Chloride. 1910.1052 Section 1910.1052 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS (CONTINUED) Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1910.1052 Methylene Chloride. This...

  13. 29 CFR 1910.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1910.1017 Section 1910.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS (CONTINUED) Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1910.1017 Vinyl chloride. (a) Scope and...

  14. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1117 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  16. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1117 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1117 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  19. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  20. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  1. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1117 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  2. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  3. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1117 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a)...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride....

  6. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride....

  7. Process for synthesis of beryllium chloride dietherate

    DOEpatents

    Bergeron, Charles; Bullard, John E.; Morgan, Evan

    1991-01-01

    A low temperature method of producing beryllium chloride dietherate through the addition of hydrogen chloride gas to a mixture of beryllium metal in ether in a reaction vessel is described. A reflux condenser provides an exit for hydrogen produced form the reaction. A distillation condenser later replaces the reflux condenser for purifying the resultant product.

  8. Fiber-optic chloride sensor development

    SciTech Connect

    Cosentino, P.; Grossman, B.; Shieh, C.; Doi, S.; Xi, H.; Erbland, P.

    1995-08-01

    Chloride in the form of salt water is a major contaminant of ground water, percolating through landfill liners and causing corrosion of steel. Four fiber-optic sensors capable of detecting chloride concentrations were developed. The most promising sensor detects chloride concentrations from 100 {micro}g/mL to greater than 3,000 {micro}g/mL. This sensor works when the chloride changes a reddish-brown silver chromate strip to white silver chloride. The color change causes the intensity of light propagating through the fiber to increase. The increase is monitored, and a calibration curve depicting light intensity versus chloride concentration results. The most promising sensor was multiplexed to determine the diffusion coefficients of chloride in a saturated sand column. The development, operation, and sensitivity of the sensors are described. Upon further development the sensor could be placed in the soil or in reinforced concrete for insitu monitoring of chloride. The sensor`s advantages over electronic sensors include immunity to corrosion and electromagnetic interference, and the ability for multiplexing sensors onto a single fiber.

  9. Hydrocracking with molten zinc chloride catalyst containing 2-12% ferrous chloride

    DOEpatents

    Zielke, Clyde W.; Bagshaw, Gary H.

    1981-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy aromatic polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce hydrocarbon fuels boiling below about 475.degree. C. by contacting the feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten zinc chloride catalyst and thereafter separating at least a major portion of the hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten zinc chloride catalyst, an improvement comprising: adjusting the FeCl.sub.2 content of the molten zinc chloride to from about 2 to about 12 mol percent based on the mixture of ferrous chloride and molten zinc chloride.

  10. Evolution of the Calcium-Based Intracellular Signaling System.

    PubMed

    Marchadier, Elodie; Oates, Matt E; Fang, Hai; Donoghue, Philip C J; Hetherington, Alistair M; Gough, Julian

    2016-01-01

    To progress our understanding of molecular evolution from a collection of well-studied genes toward the level of the cell, we must consider whole systems. Here, we reveal the evolution of an important intracellular signaling system. The calcium-signaling toolkit is made up of different multidomain proteins that have undergone duplication, recombination, sequence divergence, and selection. The picture of evolution, considering the repertoire of proteins in the toolkit of both extant organisms and ancestors, is radically different from that of other systems. In eukaryotes, the repertoire increased in both abundance and diversity at a far greater rate than general genomic expansion. We describe how calcium-based intracellular signaling evolution differs not only in rate but in nature, and how this correlates with the disparity of plants and animals. PMID:27358427

  11. Modulation of Host miRNAs by Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Das, Kishore; Garnica, Omar; Dhandayuthapani, Subramanian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of protein coding genes of viruses and eukaryotes at the post-transcriptional level. The eukaryotic genes regulated by miRNAs include those whose products are critical for biological processes such as cell proliferation, metabolic pathways, immune response, and development. It is now increasingly recognized that modulation of miRNAs associated with biological processes is one of the strategies adopted by bacterial pathogens to survive inside host cells. In this review, we present an overview of the recent findings on alterations of miRNAs in the host cells by facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens. In addition, we discuss how the altered miRNAs help in the survival of these pathogens in the intracellular environment. PMID:27536558

  12. Modulation of Host miRNAs by Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kishore; Garnica, Omar; Dhandayuthapani, Subramanian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of protein coding genes of viruses and eukaryotes at the post-transcriptional level. The eukaryotic genes regulated by miRNAs include those whose products are critical for biological processes such as cell proliferation, metabolic pathways, immune response, and development. It is now increasingly recognized that modulation of miRNAs associated with biological processes is one of the strategies adopted by bacterial pathogens to survive inside host cells. In this review, we present an overview of the recent findings on alterations of miRNAs in the host cells by facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens. In addition, we discuss how the altered miRNAs help in the survival of these pathogens in the intracellular environment. PMID:27536558

  13. Evolution of the Calcium-Based Intracellular Signaling System

    PubMed Central

    Marchadier, Elodie; Oates, Matt E.; Fang, Hai; Donoghue, Philip C.J.; Hetherington, Alistair M.; Gough, Julian

    2016-01-01

    To progress our understanding of molecular evolution from a collection of well-studied genes toward the level of the cell, we must consider whole systems. Here, we reveal the evolution of an important intracellular signaling system. The calcium-signaling toolkit is made up of different multidomain proteins that have undergone duplication, recombination, sequence divergence, and selection. The picture of evolution, considering the repertoire of proteins in the toolkit of both extant organisms and ancestors, is radically different from that of other systems. In eukaryotes, the repertoire increased in both abundance and diversity at a far greater rate than general genomic expansion. We describe how calcium-based intracellular signaling evolution differs not only in rate but in nature, and how this correlates with the disparity of plants and animals. PMID:27358427

  14. Determination of residual vinyl chloride in polyvinyl chloride, vinyl chloride copolymers, and articles from polyvinyl chloride by the method of equilibrium vapor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykova, T.A.; Konstantinova, E.I.; Lazaris, A. Ya.

    1985-11-01

    In connection with the fact that vinyl chloride (VC) has carcinogenic properties, norms for its content both in the work place and also in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and articles made from it have been sharply reduced. The method of equilibrium vapor analysis (EVA) has been used to determine vinyl chloride; this is carried out with the aid of devices for automatic metering. In the present work, the authors have investigated the possibility of applying the EVA method to PVC resins, VC copolymers, and articles made of PVC with the objective of developing universal methods of analyzing such objects. A two-stage separation is used in which the sample is preliminarily separated in a fore-column. The separation was worked out on the model mixture of methyl chloride-VC-ethyl chloride. The limit of VC detection is shown to be 5 x 10/sup -6/ to 5 x 10/sup -7/% by wt.

  15. Fatal exposure to methylene chloride among bathtub refinishers - United States, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    2012-02-24

    In 2010, the Michigan Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation program conducted an investigation into the death of a bathtub refinisher who used a methylene chloride-based paint stripping product marketed for use in aircraft maintenance. The program identified two earlier, similar deaths in Michigan. Program staff members notified CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which in turn notified the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). In addition to the three deaths, OSHA identified 10 other bathtub refinisher fatalities associated with methylene chloride stripping agents that had been investigated in nine states during 2000-2011. Each death occurred in a residential bathroom with inadequate ventilation. Protective equipment, including a respirator, either was not used or was inadequate to protect against methylene chloride vapor, which has been recognized as potentially fatal to furniture strippers and factory workers but has not been reported previously as a cause of death among bathtub refinishers. Worker safety agencies, public health agencies, methylene chloride-based stripper manufacturers, and trade organizations should communicate the extreme hazards of using methylene chloride-based stripping products in bathtub refinishing to employers, workers, and consumers. Employers should strongly consider alternative methods of bathtub stripping and always ensure worker safety protections that reduce the risk for health hazards to acceptable levels. Employers choosing to use methylene chloride-based stripping products must comply with OSHA's standard to limit methylene chloride exposures to safe levels. PMID:22357403

  16. Testing Metal Chlorides For Use In Sodium-Cell Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Attia, Alan I.; Halpert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetric curves of transition-metal wires in molten NaAlCl4 electrolyte used to eliminate suitability of transition metals as cathodes in sodium cells. Cyclic voltammetry used in conjunction with measurement of galvanostatic polarization curves determines whether given metal chloride suitable as cathode material in such cell. Cells useful in such high-energy-density and high-power-density applications as leveling loads on electric-power plants, supplying power to electric ground vehicles, and aerospace applications.

  17. Intracellular replication is essential for the virulence of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Leung, K Y; Finlay, B B

    1991-12-15

    Salmonella typhimurium is a facultative intracellular parasite, capable of penetrating, surviving, and multiplying within diverse eukaryotic cell types, including epithelial and phagocytic cells. We have been studying intracellular replication of S. typhimurium and found that it is essential in the pathogenesis of this bacterium. A total of 45,000 independent mini-Mu MudJ transposon mutants in S. typhimurium SL1344 were screened in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells with a beta-lactam, cefotaxime, to enrich for mutants defective for intracellular replication. Ten different auxotrophic (purine, pyrimidine, purine/methionine, and valine/isoleucine) and three prototrophic replication-defective mutants (Rep-) were identified. All Rep- mutants showed no differences in aerobic and anaerobic growth patterns, motility, serum sensitivity, mouse macrophage survival, iron uptake, and phosphate requirements. All Rep- mutants were unable to multiply inside MDCK, HeLa, and Caco-2 epithelial cells. When required nutrients for various auxotrophs were supplemented, auxotrophs then replicated inside MDCK cells. Although the parental strain multiplies in large vacuoles inside MDCK cells that distort the host cells, MDCK cells infected with the Rep- mutants appeared relatively normal and few bacteria were seen inside vacuoles. The purine auxotrophs and the three prototrophic Rep- mutants were highly attenuated in mice, and oral and intraperitoneal LD50 levels were 3 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than the wild type level. The three prototrophs were invasive and persisted in the murine organs such as livers and spleens for at least 3 weeks. Therefore, these prototrophic genes are needed for intracellular replication and are essential to the virulence of S. typhimurium. PMID:1763061

  18. Effects of inhibitors on chloride outflux from CSF

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, M.; Johnson, D.C.; Pappagianopoulos, P.; Kazemi, H.

    1986-03-05

    The regulation of the CSF (Cl/sup -/) plays a key role in CNS acid-base homeostasis. The authors have shown in previous studies that chloride influx from blood to CSF is largely dependent upon sodium-coupled carrier mediated movement. Therefore, the mechanism of chloride outflux from CSF to brain was evaluated in anesthetized dogs using ventricular-cisternal perfusion (VCP) with the short-lived isotope /sup 38/Cl/sup -/ and dextran. The outflux of /sup 38/Cl/sup -/ from CSF was determined from the different movements between /sup 38/Cl/sup -/ and dextran using a one compartment model. VCP was performed at a rate of 1.4 ml/min for 14 min, and then slowed to 0.28 ml/min. The /sup 38/Cl/sup -/ activity decreased to a steady state level about 12% lower than that of dextran within 40-50 minutes. Under control conditions (19 runs in 7 dogs), the rate of chloride outflux was 0.059 +/- 0.004 min/sup -1/ (mean +/- SE). It was not significantly changed after the inclusion of bumetanide (10/sup -5/ molar) in the VCP fluid (n=6), which inhibits sodium-coupled Cl/sup -/ transport, or with acetazolamide 4.5 x 10/sup -3/ molar (n=4) which inhibits carbonic anhydrase. The authors conclude that chloride outflux from CSF is not dependent upon sodium-coupled carrier mediated movement, which is in contrast with chloride influx from blood to CSF, nor is it dependent upon carbonic anhydrase activity.

  19. Feasibility demonstration for hydrogen chloride detection using a chemisorption technique and a quartz crystal microbalance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, D. W.; Workman, G. L.

    1975-01-01

    A method of measuring concentrations of hydrogen chloride between 1 part per billion and 10 parts per million at standard temperature and pressure is presented. The feasibility of a low-cost device incorporating a chemisorption technique coupled with a quartz crystal microbalance was demonstrated in the field at the Viking B launch using a Titan-Centaur vehicle from Kennedy Space Center on August 20, 1975. Hydrogen chloride is a product of solid rocket combustion. The concentration level of hydrogen chloride for this particular launch was measured as approximately 0.2 parts per million at 4 km from the launch site.

  20. Differences in mortality among bobwhite fed methylmercury chloride dissolved in various carriers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spann, J.W.; Heinz, G.H.; Camardese, M.B.; Hill, E.F.; Moore, J.F.; Murray, H.C.

    1986-01-01

    Twelve-day-old bobwhite chicks were fed a diet containing 0, 5.4 or 20 ppm methylmercury chloride. The methylmercury chloride was added to the diet either in a dry, pulverized form or dissolved in acetone, propylene glycol or corn oil. Mortality was measured for 6 weeks, and samples of liver were saved for mercury analysis. Mortality was significantly lower in birds fed 20 ppm methylmercury chloride when acetone was the solvent. The reduced mortality could not be explained by effects of acetone on dietary level of mercury or on uptake of mercury into the body.

  1. Radioprotective effect on HepG2 cells of low concentrations of cobalt chloride: induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha and clearance of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Wensen; Wang, Juan; Xu, Shiguo; Xiao, Linlin; Chen, Guangfu; Zhang, Wukui; Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    It has been found that low doses of certain toxicants might generate a protective response to cellular damage. Previous data have shown that elevated doses of cobalt (Co) induce injury to cells and organisms or result in radiological combined toxicity. Whether low doses of Co generate a protective effect or not, however, remains controversial. In this study, we investigated the effect and mechanism of action of low dose cobalt chloride (CoCl2, 100 μM) on the viability of irradiated cells. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay was used to observe the radio-sensitivity of HepG2 cells under different pretreatments. The alteration of intracellular DNA damage was further measured using micronucleus (MN) assay. Levels of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression and its target gene, EPO, were monitored by western blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively, and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) content was determined by 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) probe staining. Our results show that low dose CoCl2does not influence HepG2 cell viability, but induces the expression of HIF-1α, followed by increased radio-resistance. Additionally, cells treated with HIF-1α siRNA retained a partial refractory response to irradiation concomitant with a marked reduction in intracellular ROS. The change of MN further indicated that the reduction of DNA damage was confirmed with the alteration of ROS. Our results demonstrate that low dose CoCl2may protect cells against irradiative harm by two mechanisms, namely HIF-1α expression and ROS clearance. PMID:23065176

  2. GABAAergic stimulation modulates intracellular protein arginine methylation.

    PubMed

    Denman, Robert B; Xie, Wen; Merz, George; Sung, Ying-Ju

    2014-06-20

    Changes in cytoplasmic pH are known to regulate diverse cellular processes and influence neuronal activities. In neurons, the intracellular alkalization is shown to occur after stimulating several channels and receptors. For example, it has previously demonstrated in P19 neurons that a sustained intracellular alkalinization can be mediated by the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter. In addition, the benzodiazepine binding subtypes of the γ-amino butyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor mediate a transient intracellular alkalinization when they are stimulated. Because the activities of many enzymes are sensitive to pH shift, here we investigate the effects of intracellular pH modulation resulted from stimulating GABAA receptor on the protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMT) activities. We show that the major benzodiazepine subtype (2α1, 2β2, 1γ2) is constitutively expressed in both undifferentiated P19 cells and retinoic acid (RA) differentiated P19 neurons. Furthermore stimulation with diazepam and, diazepam plus muscimol produce an intracellular alkalinization that can be detected ex vivo with the fluorescence dye. The alkalinization results in significant perturbation in protein arginine methylation activity as measured in methylation assays with specific protein substrates. Altered protein arginine methylation is also observed when cells are treated with the GABAA agonist muscimol but not an antagonist, bicuculline. These data suggest that pH-dependent and pH-independent methylation pathways can be activated by GABAAergic stimulation, which we verified using hippocampal slice preparations from a mouse model of fragile X syndrome. PMID:24793772

  3. Chloride conductance in amphibian skin: regulatory control in the skin of Rana pipiens.

    PubMed

    Rozman, A; Katz, U; Nagel, W

    2008-09-01

    Chloride conductance across the isolated skin of Rana pipiens shows a voltage-activated component (G(Cl)(V)) which requires the presence of mucosal Cl. G(Cl)(V) is normally low or dormant. It is stimulated by elevated intracellular cAMP, irrespective whether originating from application of ss-adrenergic agonists (isoproterenol), stimulators of the adenylyl-cyclase (forskolin), inhibitors of the phosphodiesterases (isobutyl-methyl-xanthine) or membrane-permeable cAMP analogues (CPT-cAMP). Baseline G(Cl) under inactivating conditions increases also with cAMP dose-dependently. The data indicate that cAMP is a central regulator of the passive, conductive chloride transport across amphibian skin. PMID:18599332

  4. Synthetic ion transporters can induce apoptosis by facilitating chloride anion transport into cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Sung-Kyun; Kim, Sung Kuk; Share, Andrew; Lynch, Vincent M.; Park, Jinhong; Namkung, Wan; van Rossom, Wim; Busschaert, Nathalie; Gale, Philip A.; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Shin, Injae

    2014-10-01

    Anion transporters based on small molecules have received attention as therapeutic agents because of their potential to disrupt cellular ion homeostasis. However, a direct correlation between a change in cellular chloride anion concentration and cytotoxicity has not been established for synthetic ion carriers. Here we show that two pyridine diamide-strapped calix[4]pyrroles induce coupled chloride anion and sodium cation transport in both liposomal models and cells, and promote cell death by increasing intracellular chloride and sodium ion concentrations. Removing either ion from the extracellular media or blocking natural sodium channels with amiloride prevents this effect. Cell experiments show that the ion transporters induce the sodium chloride influx, which leads to an increased concentration of reactive oxygen species, release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria and apoptosis via caspase activation. However, they do not activate the caspase-independent apoptotic pathway associated with the apoptosis-inducing factor. Ion transporters, therefore, represent an attractive approach for regulating cellular processes that are normally controlled tightly by homeostasis.

  5. Modeling heterogeneous ClNO 2 formation, chloride availability, and chlorine cycling in Southeast Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, H.; Kimura, Y.; McGaughey, G.; Allen, D. T.; Brown, S. S.; Coffman, D.; Dibb, J.; Osthoff, H. D.; Quinn, P.; Roberts, J. M.; Yarwood, G.; Kemball-Cook, S.; Byun, D.; Lee, D.

    2010-12-01

    Nitryl Chloride (ClNO 2) mixing ratios above 1 ppbv have been measured off the coast of Southeast Texas. ClNO 2 formation, the result of heterogeneous N 2O 5 uptake on chloride-containing aerosols, has a significant impact on oxidant formation for the Houston area. This work reports on the modeling of ClNO 2 formation and describes the sensitivity of ClNO 2 formation to key parameters. Model sensitivity analyses found that: (1) Chloride availability limits the formation of nitryl chloride at ground level but not aloft; (2) When excess particulate chloride was assumed to be present at ground level through sea salt, ClNO 2 concentrations increased in some locations by a factor of 13, as compared to cases where sea salt chloride was assumed to be limited; (3) Inland formation of ClNO 2 seems feasible based on chloride availability and could have a large impact on total ClNO 2 formed in the region; and (4) ClNO 2 formation is quite sensitive to the assumed yield of ClNO 2 from N 2O 5 uptake. These results demonstrate that there is a need for further field studies to better understand the geographic extent of ClNO 2 formation and the atmospheric conditions which control partitioning of chloride into the particle phase. In addition, this work examined the role of ClNO 2 in the cycling of chlorine between chloride and reactive chlorine radicals. The modeling indicated that the majority of reactive chlorine in Texas along the Gulf coast is cycled through ClNO 2, demonstrating the importance of including ClNO 2 into photochemical models for this region.

  6. Embedded chloride detectors for roadways and bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhr, Peter L.; Huston, Dryver R.; McPadden, Adam P.; Cauley, Robert F.

    1996-04-01

    The problems associated with the application of chloride-based deicing agents to roadways and specifically bridges include chemical pollution and accelerated corrosion of strength members (especially rebar) within the structure. In many instances, local ordinances are attempting to force state agencies to reduce, if not eliminate, the use of these chlorides (typically at the cost of increased driving hazards). With respect to the corrosion aspects of chloride application, cracks that occur in the roadway/bridge pavement allow water to seep into the pavement carrying the chloride to the rebar with the resultant increase in corrosion. In response to this problem, particularly in high roadsalt usage areas, a chloride/water impermeable membrane is placed above the rebar matrix so if/when roadway cracking occurs, the roadsalts won't be able to damage the rebar. Such a membrane is costly -- and the question of its in-service performance is questionable. In a joint effort between the University of Vermont and the Vermont Agency of Transportation, we are developing fiber optic chloride detectors which are capable of being embedded into the rebar-concrete roadway under this membrane. The sensing mechanism relies on spectroscopic analysis of a chemical reaction of chloride and reagents (which have been coated onto the ends of fibers). Laboratory results of these detectors and a usable system configuration are presented.

  7. Materials for Conoco zinc chloride hydrocracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, V.B.; Keiser, J.R.; DeVan, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Use of zinc chloride to augment hydrogenation of coal and yield a high-octane gasoline product is the most significant feature of a coal liquefaction process being developed by Conoco Coal Development Company. The zinc chloride catalyst is regenerated in a fluidized sand bed, where the spent melt is mixed with air and hydrogen chloride at about 1000/sup 0/C. Recovery is completed at 370/sup 0/C in a condenser, where the zinc chloride is collected and the oxygen and sulfur are separated as H/sub 2/O and SO/sub 2/. The economic viability of the entire process is highly dependent on almost complete recovery of the zinc chloride. The severe environmental conditions of this recovery process cause unique materials problems. Although high-temperature oxidation and sulfidation are being studied in related programs, suitable materials to resist their combined effects along with those of chlorides have not yet been specifically addressed. Common engineering materials, such as the austenitic stainless steels and many nickel-base alloys, are unsuitable because of their inability to tolerate the elevated temperatures and sulfidation, respectively. The objectives of this task are to screen various metallic and ceramic materials for resistance to the zinc chloride recovery system environment and to determine the nature of the attack by exposing coupons to the simulated environment in the laboratory.

  8. Methylene chloride poisoning in a cabinet worker.

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, M; Kales, S N

    1999-01-01

    More than a million workers are at risk for methylene chloride exposure. Aerosol sprays and paint stripping may also cause significant nonoccupational exposures. After methylene chloride inhalation, significant amounts of carbon monoxide are formed in vivo as a metabolic by-product. Poisoning predominantly affects the central nervous system and results from both carboxyhemoglobin formation and direct solvent-related narcosis. In this report, we describe a case of methylene chloride intoxication probably complicated by exogenous carbon monoxide exposure. The worker's presentation of intermittent headaches was consistent with both methylene chloride intoxication and carbon monoxide poisoning. The exposures and symptoms were corroborated by elevated carboxyhemoglobin saturations and a workplace inspection that documented significant exposures to both methylene chloride and carbon monoxide. When both carbon monoxide and methylene chloride are inhaled, additional carboxyhemoglobin formation is expected. Preventive efforts should include education, air monitoring, and periodic carboxyhemoglobin determinations. Methylene chloride should never be used in enclosed or poorly ventilated areas because of the well-documented dangers of loss of consciousness and death. Images Figure 1 PMID:10464079

  9. Shelf life of unrefrigerated succinylcholine chloride injection.

    PubMed

    Boehm, J J; Dutton, D M; Poust, R I

    1984-02-01

    The shelf life of succinylcholine chloride injection at several pH values when stored at room temperature was evaluated. Solutions containing 20 mg/ml of succinylcholine chloride were stored at 25 and 40 degrees C. The reaction was studied at pH values ranging from 3.0 to 4.5. At two-week intervals, the solutions were assayed by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The initial amount of succinylcholine chloride in all samples was 100.1 +/- 2.37% of label claim. Hydrolysis of succinylcholine chloride in unbuffered solutions followed apparent zero-order kinetics. The pH range of maximum stability was found to be from 3.75 to 4.50. Succinylcholine chloride decomposed at a considerably higher rate at 40 degrees C. Allowing for the effects of pH adjustment during manufacture and degradation during shipping, losses of 7.0% and 9.0% potency can be expected after storage at 25 degrees C for four and six weeks, respectively. Succinylcholine Chloride Injection, USP, should be stored in the refrigerator; if unbuffered succinylcholine chloride injection complying with USP pH limits must be stored at room temperature, it should not be kept for longer than four weeks. PMID:6702837

  10. ROAD SALT APPLICATION CREATES A UNIQUE CHLORIDE BIOCHEMISTRY IN AN URBAN STREAM OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent evidence from the mid-Atlantic suggests that freshwater supplies are threatened by chronic chloride inputs from road salts applied to improve highway safety. Elevated chloride levels also may limit the ability of aquatic systems to microbially process nitrate nitrogen, a ...

  11. Rapid measurements of intracellular calcium using a fluorescence plate reader.

    PubMed

    Lin, K; Sadée, W; Quillan, J M

    1999-02-01

    Intracellular calcium is a universal second messenger that can serve as a broad-based measure of receptor activity. Recent developments in multi-well plate fluorescence readers facilitate measurement of intracellular free-calcium levels and reduce reliance on slower, more cumbersome or expensive data collection methods. In this report, we describe a rapid and sensitive method to assay intracellular calcium ions in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells from multi-well plates using a fluorometer equipped with on-line injectors. We examine the compatibility of visible-light excitable dyes Calcium Green-1 and Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1. Using this assay, we were able to detect and quantify activity from muscarinic and beta-adrenergic receptors endogenous to HEK293 cells and detect calcium signals generated by activation of Gi-coupled recombinant mu-opioid and dopamine D2L receptors, and the Gs-coupled melanocortin subtype 4 (MC4) receptor. Fluorescence signals, stable in HEK293 cells, required the use of Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1 and an inhibitor of organic anion transport in CHO cells. Under appropriate conditions, both cell types can be used to collect complete concentration-response data for a variety of receptors (including a recombinant muscarinic M1 receptor expressed in CHO cells) from a single plate of dye-loaded cells. PMID:10023544

  12. Chemical development of intracellular protein heterodimerizers.

    PubMed

    Erhart, Dominik; Zimmermann, Mirjam; Jacques, Olivier; Wittwer, Matthias B; Ernst, Beat; Constable, Edwin; Zvelebil, Marketa; Beaufils, Florent; Wymann, Matthias P

    2013-04-18

    Cell activation initiated by receptor ligands or oncogenes triggers complex and convoluted intracellular signaling. Techniques initiating signals at defined starting points and cellular locations are attractive to elucidate the output of selected pathways. Here, we present the development and validation of a protein heterodimerization system based on small molecules cross-linking fusion proteins derived from HaloTags and SNAP-tags. Chemical dimerizers of HaloTag and SNAP-tag (HaXS) show excellent selectivity and have been optimized for intracellular reactivity. HaXS force protein-protein interactions and can translocate proteins to various cellular compartments. Due to the covalent nature of the HaloTag-HaXS-SNAP-tag complex, intracellular dimerization can be easily monitored. First applications include protein targeting to cytoskeleton, to the plasma membrane, to lysosomes, the initiation of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, and multiplexed protein complex formation in combination with the rapamycin dimerization system. PMID:23601644

  13. L-Tryptophan L-tryptophanium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazaryan, V. V.; Fleck, M.; Petrosyan, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    L-Tryptophan L-tryptophanium chloride is a new salt with (A⋯A+) type dimeric cation. It crystallizes in the monoclinic system (space group P21, Z = 2). The asymmetric unit contains one zwitterionic L-tryptophan molecule, one L-tryptophanium cation and one chloride anion. The dimeric cation is formed by a Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond with the O⋯O distance equal to 2.5556(18) Å. The infrared and Raman spectra of the crystal are studied and compared with the spectra of L-tryptophanium chloride.

  14. Binary Nucleation of Water and Sodium Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Nemec, Thomas; Marsik, Frantisek; Palmer, Donald

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation processes in the binary water-sodium chloride system are investigated in the sense of the classical nucleation theory (CNT). The CNT is modified to be able to handle the electrolytic nature of the system and is employed to investigate the acceleration of the nucleation process due to the presence of sodium chloride in the steam. This phenomenon, frequently observed in the Wilson zone of steam turbines, is called early condensation. Therefore, the nucleation rates of the water-sodium chloride mixture are of key importance in the power cycle industry.

  15. Water structure in concentrated lithium chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromp, R. H.; Neilson, G. W.; Soper, A. K.

    1992-06-01

    The radial pair distribution functions gHH(r) and gOH(r) (to a good approximation) of 1 and 10 m solutions of lithium chloride in water have been obtained from neutron diffraction. It turns out that the intermolecular water structure in a solution of 10 m is affected considerably by the presence of ions—the number of hydrogen bonds is about 70% lower than in pure water. The intermolecular water structure in 1 m lithium chloride as well as the intramolecular water structure in both 1 and 10 m lithium chloride is not distinguishable from that of pure water in any measurable extent.

  16. Macrophage defense mechanisms against intracellular bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Günter; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils play a decisive role in host responses to intracellular bacteria including the agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis as they represent the forefront of innate immune defense against bacterial invaders. At the same time, these phagocytes are also primary targets of intracellular bacteria to be abused as host cells. Their efficacy to contain and eliminate intracellular M. tuberculosis decides whether a patient initially becomes infected or not. However, when the infection becomes chronic or even latent (as in the case of TB) despite development of specific immune activation, phagocytes have also important effector functions. Macrophages have evolved a myriad of defense strategies to combat infection with intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. These include induction of toxic anti-microbial effectors such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen intermediates, the stimulation of microbe intoxication mechanisms via acidification or metal accumulation in the phagolysosome, the restriction of the microbe's access to essential nutrients such as iron, fatty acids, or amino acids, the production of anti-microbial peptides and cytokines, along with induction of autophagy and efferocytosis to eliminate the pathogen. On the other hand, M. tuberculosis, as a prime example of a well-adapted facultative intracellular bacterium, has learned during evolution to counter-balance the host's immune defense strategies to secure survival or multiplication within this otherwise hostile environment. This review provides an overview of innate immune defense of macrophages directed against intracellular bacteria with a focus on M. tuberculosis. Gaining more insights and knowledge into this complex network of host-pathogen interaction will identify novel target sites of intervention to successfully clear infection at a time of rapidly emerging multi-resistance of M. tuberculosis against conventional antibiotics. PMID:25703560

  17. Endosomal escape: a bottleneck in intracellular delivery.

    PubMed

    Shete, Harshad K; Prabhu, Rashmi H; Patravale, Vandana B

    2014-01-01

    With advances in therapeutic science, apart from drugs, newer bioactive moieties like oligonucleotides, proteins, peptides, enzymes and antibodies are constantly being introduced for the betterment of therapeutic efficacy. These moieties have intracellular components of the cells like cytoplasm and nucleus as one of their pharmacological sites for exhibiting therapeutic activity. Despite their promising efficacy, their intracellular bioavailability has been critically hampered leading to failure in the treatment of numerous diseases and disorders. The endosomal uptake pathway is known to be a rate-limiting barrier for such systems. Bioactive molecules get trapped in the endosomal vesicles and degraded in the lysosomal compartment, necessitating the need for effective strategies that facilitate the endosomal escape and enhance the cytosolic bioavailability of bioactives. Microbes like viruses and bacteria have developed their innate mechanistic tactics to translocate their genome and toxins by efficiently penetrating the host cell membrane. Understanding this mechanism and exploring it further for intracellular delivery has opened new avenues to surmount the endosomal barrier. These strategies include membrane fusion, pore formation and proton sponge effects. On the other hand, progress in designing a novel smart polymeric carrier system that triggers endosomal escape by undergoing modulations in the intracellular milieu has further led to an improvement in intracellular delivery. These comprise pH, enzyme and temperature-induced modulators, synthetic cationic lipids and photo-induced physical disruption. Each of the aforementioned strategies has its own unique mechanism to escape the endosome. This review recapitulates the numerous strategies designed to surmount the bottleneck of endosomal escape and thereby achieve successful intracellular uptake of bioactives. PMID:24730275

  18. Intracellular accumulation of boceprevir according to plasma concentrations and pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Cusato, Jessica; Allegra, Sarah; De Nicolò, Amedeo; Boglione, Lucio; Fatiguso, Giovanna; Abdi, Adnan Mohamed; Cariti, Giuseppe; Di Perri, Giovanni; D'Avolio, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Boceprevir (BOC) is a directly-acting antiviral agent for the treatment of hepatitis C virus genotype 1 (HCV-1) infection. It is a mixture of two stereoisomers, the inactive R and the active S isomers. No data have previously been published on BOC intracellular accumulation. In this study, BOC isomer concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and plasma were determined. The influence of various single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on plasma and intracellular drug exposure at Week 4 of triple therapy were also evaluated. Plasma and intracellular BOC concentrations were determined at the end of the dosing interval (C(trough)) using a UPLC-MS/MS validated method. Allelic discrimination was performed through real-time PCR. Median plasma concentrations were 65.97 ng/mL for the S isomer and 36.31 ng/mL for the R isomer; the median S/R plasma concentration ratio was 1.66. The median PBMC concentration was 2285.88 ng/mL for the S isomer; the R isomer was undetectable within PBMCs. The median S isomer PBMC/plasma concentration ratio was 28.59. A significant positive correlation was found between plasma and PBMC S isomer concentrations. ABCB1 1236, SLC28A2 124 and IL28B rs12979860 SNPs were associated with the S isomer PBMC/plasma concentration ratio. In regression models, S isomer plasma levels and FokI polymorphism were able to predict S isomer intracellular exposure, whereas SNPs in AKR1, BCRP1 and SLC28A2 predicted the S isomer PBMC/plasma concentration ratio. No similar data regarding BOC pharmacogenetics and pharmacokinetics have been published previously. This study adds a novel and useful overview of the pharmacological properties of this drug. PMID:25836019

  19. Nicotinic acid modulates intracellular calcium concentration and disassembles the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIEJING; LI, YANXI; ZHANG, PENGHUI; NIU, HUA; SHI, YU

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acid (NA), a member of the vitamin B family, is well known for its functions in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerosis due to decreasing plasma levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In recent years, the major side effect of NA, cutaneous flushing, has also attracted extensive attention. However, the effects of NA in other aspects of physiology or cell biology have remained elusive. The present study provided evidence that high concentrations of NA were able to first reduce and later elevate intracellular [Ca2+] in the NIH3T3 cell line. The reduction of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration was achieved within the initial 10 sec, and was preceded by a gradual elevation of intracellular [Ca2+]. Notably, marked accumulation of opaque materials in the perinuclear region was observed in NIH3T3 cells treated with 70 mM NA. Further analysis revealed that treatment with 70 mM NA for 1 h disassembled the microtubule and F-actin cytoskeleton systems and resulted in β-tubulin degradation in an ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent manner. These data indicated that high concentrations of NA disrupted cytoskeleton structures, which may have contributed to minus end (nucleus region) to plus end (cell membrane region)-directed transport processes and resulted in the deposition of material in the perinuclear region. Artificially increasing [Ca2+] adding CaCl2 to the culture media effected the disassembly of F-actin, while it had no apparent effect on microtubules. These results suggested that the disruption of the cytoskeleton systems was not entirely due to the NA-induced elevation of [Ca2+]. Finally, microinjection of NA into xenopus embryos blocked the transport of melanosomes to the peripheral cellular area. In conclusion, the present study indicated that NA disassembles F-actin and microtubule systems, thereby blocking cytoskeleton-dependent intracellular transport. PMID:25241762

  20. Nicotinic acid modulates intracellular calcium concentration and disassembles the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiejing; Li, Yanxi; Zhang, Penghui; Niu, Hua; Shi, Yu

    2014-12-01

    Nicotinic acid (NA), a member of the vitamin B family, is well known for its functions in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerosis due to decreasing plasma levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In recent years, the major side effect of NA, cutaneous flushing, has also attracted extensive attention. However, the effects of NA in other aspects of physiology or cell biology have remained elusive. The present study provided evidence that high concentrations of NA were able to first reduce and later elevate intracellular [Ca2+] in the NIH3T3 cell line. The reduction of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration was achieved within the initial 10 sec, and was preceded by a gradual elevation of intracellular [Ca2+]. Notably, marked accumulation of opaque materials in the perinuclear region was observed in NIH3T3 cells treated with 70 mM NA. Further analysis revealed that treatment with 70 mM NA for 1 h disassembled the microtubule and F‑actin cytoskeleton systems and resulted in β‑tubulin degradation in an ubiquitin‑proteasome-dependent manner. These data indicated that high concentrations of NA disrupted cytoskeleton structures, which may have contributed to minus end (nucleus region) to plus end (cell membrane region)-directed transport processes and resulted in the deposition of material in the perinuclear region. Artificially increasing [Ca2+] adding CaCl2 to the culture media effected the disassembly of F‑actin, while it had no apparent effect on microtubules. These results suggested that the disruption of the cytoskeleton systems was not entirely due to the NA-induced elevation of [Ca2+]. Finally, microinjection of NA into xenopus embryos blocked the transport of melanosomes to the peripheral cellular area. In conclusion, the present study indicated that NA disassembles F‑actin and microtubule systems, thereby blocking cytoskeleton-dependent intracellular transport. PMID:25241762

  1. Multiplexed imaging of intracellular protein networks.

    PubMed

    Grecco, Hernán E; Imtiaz, Sarah; Zamir, Eli

    2016-08-01

    Cellular functions emerge from the collective action of a large number of different proteins. Understanding how these protein networks operate requires monitoring their components in intact cells. Due to intercellular and intracellular molecular variability, it is important to monitor simultaneously multiple components at high spatiotemporal resolution. However, inherent trade-offs narrow the boundaries of achievable multiplexed imaging. Pushing these boundaries is essential for a better understanding of cellular processes. Here the motivations, challenges and approaches for multiplexed imaging of intracellular protein networks are discussed. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27183498

  2. Peroxisome is a reservoir of intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhury, Bikramjit; Gupta, Shreedhara; Banerjee, Shouvik; Datta, Salil C

    2006-07-01

    We have examined fura 2-loaded purified peroxisomes under confocal microscope to prove that this mammalian organelle is a store of intracellular calcium pool. Presence of calcium channel and vanadate sensitive Ca(2+)-ATPase in the purified peroxisomal membrane has been demonstrated. We have further observed that machineries to maintain calcium pool in this mammalian organelle are impaired during infection caused by Leishmania donovani. Results reveal that peroxisomes have a merit to play a significant role in the metabolism of intracellular calcium. PMID:16713100

  3. Captopril in congenital chloride diarrhoea: a case study.

    PubMed

    Bin Islam, Shoeb; Mazumder, Ramendra Nath; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Sharifuzzaman; Sahreen, Lubaba; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Haque Alam, Nur

    2015-03-01

    An 11 months 22 days old girl presented with a history of watery diarrhoea since birth, failure to thrive, and developmental delay. Her diagnosis was congenital chloride diarrhoea (CCD) with raised level of chloride (>90 mmol/L) in stool in the absence of cystic fibrosis. Management of CCD included replacement of NaCl, KCl, and correction of dehydration. Diarrhoea of the patient was resolved with Captopril, which was initially provided to the patient for managing heart failure. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of CCD that shows the beneficial effect of Captopril. Therefore, we suggest that further study is warranted as to the potential for Captopril as additional option in the treatment for CCD. We present this case report with the informed consent of the patient's guardian. PMID:25995737

  4. Captopril in Congenital Chloride Diarrhoea: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, Ramendra Nath; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Sharifuzzaman; Sahreen, Lubaba; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Haque Alam, Nur

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT An 11 months 22 days old girl presented with a history of watery diarrhoea since birth, failure to thrive, and developmental delay. Her diagnosis was congenital chloride diarrhoea (CCD) with raised level of chloride (>90 mmol/L) in stool in the absence of cystic fibrosis. Management of CCD included replacement of NaCl, KCl, and correction of dehydration. Diarrhoea of the patient was resolved with Captopril, which was initially provided to the patient for managing heart failure. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of CCD that shows the beneficial effect of Captopril. Therefore, we suggest that further study is warranted as to the potential for Captopril as additional option in the treatment for CCD. We present this case report with the informed consent of the patient's guardian. PMID:25995737

  5. Chloride inhibition of nitrite-induced methemoglobinemia in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomasso, J.R.; Simco, B.A.; Davis, K.B.

    1979-01-01

    Exposure of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fingerlings for 24?h to 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0?mg/L nitrite (pH?=?7; hardness?=?40?mg/L; temperature?=?22–25 °C) produced methemoglobin levels of 20.7?±?1.9%, 59.8?±?1.9%, and 77.4?±?1.4% (SE), respectively. However, methemoglobin levels were not elevated when fish were simultaneously exposed to 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0?mg/L nitrite and 25, 50, and 100?mg/L sodium chloride, respectively. Acclimation to sodium chloride for 24?h before exposure to nitrite did not enhance the inhibitory action of sodium chloride. Fish exposed to 5?mg/L nitrite for 5?h developed 42.5?±?3.8% methemoglobin. When transferred to water containing 5?mg/L nitrite and 250?mg/L sodium chloride, methemoglobin levels returned to normal within 24?h. Environmental chloride probably inhibits methemoglobin formation by competing with nitrite for entrance into the gills of the fish. An ionic ratio of 16 Cl- to 1 NO2- is capable of complete suppression of nitrite-induced methemoglobin formation. Bicarbonate ion present in the test water (1?meq/L) may also have contributed to the inhibitive action of chloride.

  6. Intracellular Induction of Listeria monocytogenes actA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Shetron-Rama, Lynne M.; Marquis, Hélène; Bouwer, H. G. Archie; Freitag, Nancy E.

    2002-01-01

    Following entry into the host cytosol, the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes dramatically increases the expression of several key virulence factors. The expression of actA, whose protein product is required for L. monocytogenes actin-based intracellular motility, is increased by more than 200-fold in cytosolic bacteria in comparison to broth-grown cultures. Two distinct promoter elements have been reported to regulate actA expression. One promoter is located immediately upstream of actA coding sequences, while the second promoter is contributed by the upstream mpl gene via the generation of an mpl-actA-plcB transcript. A series of L. monocytogenes mutants were constructed to define the contributions of individual promoter elements to actA expression. The intracellular induction of actA expression was found to be dependent upon the actA proximal promoter; the mpl promoter appeared to contribute to the extracellular induction of actA but did not affect intracellular levels of expression. The actA promoter is dependent upon a regulatory factor known as PrfA for transcriptional activation; however, no increase in actA expression was detected following the introduction of a high-affinity PrfA binding site within the actA promoter. The presence of a mutationally activated form of PrfA, known as PrfA*, increased overall actA expression in broth-grown cultures of both wild-type and actA promoter mutant strains, but the levels of induction observed were still approximately 50-fold lower than those observed for intracellularly grown L. monocytogenes. Collectively, these results indicate that the dramatic induction of actA expression that occurs in the host cell cytosol is mediated through a single promoter element. Furthermore, intracellular induction of actA appears to require additional steps or factors beyond those necessary for the activation and binding of PrfA to the actA promoter. PMID:11854187

  7. Nanomechanical sensing of the endothelial cell response to anti-inflammatory action of 1-methylnicotinamide chloride

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziejczyk, AM; Brzezinka, GD; Khurana, K; Targosz-Korecka, M; Szymonski, M

    2013-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that cell elastic properties should change considerably in response to chemical agents affecting the physiological state of the endothelium. In this work, a novel assay for testing prospective endothelium-targeted agents in vitro is presented. Materials and methods The proposed methodology is based on nanoindentation spectroscopy using an atomic force microscope tip, which allows for quantitative evaluation of cell stiffness. As an example, we chose a pyridine derivative, 1-methylnicotinamide chloride (MNA), known to have antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory properties, as reported in recent in vivo experiments. Results First, we determined a concentration range of MNA in which physiological parameters of the endothelial cells in vitro are not affected. Then, cell dysfunction was induced by incubation with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and the cellular response to MNA treatment after TNF-α incubation was studied. In parallel to the nanoindentation spectroscopy, the endothelium phenotype was characterized using a fluorescence spectroscopy with F-actin labeling, and biochemical methods, such as secretion measurements of both nitric oxide (NO), and prostacyclin (PGI2) regulatory agents. Conclusion We found that MNA could reverse the dysfunction of the endothelium caused by inflammation, if applied in the proper time and to the concentration scheme established in our investigations. A surprisingly close correlation was found between effective Young’s modulus of the cells and actin polymerization/depolymerization processes in the endothelium cortical cytoskeleton, as well as NO and PGI2 levels. These results allow us to construct the physiological model of sequential intracellular pathways activated in the endothelium by MNA. PMID:23946648

  8. Localization of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in chloride secretory epithelia.

    PubMed

    Denning, G M; Ostedgaard, L S; Cheng, S H; Smith, A E; Welsh, M J

    1992-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in the gene coding for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). To further our understanding of CFTR's function and regulation, we used confocal immunofluorescence microscopy to localize CFTR in cells stained with monoclonal antibodies against different regions of the protein: the R (regulatory) domain (M13-1), the COOH terminus (M1-4), and a predicted extracellular domain (M6-4). All three antibodies immunoprecipitated a 155-170-kD polypeptide from cells expressing CFTR. Each antibody stained HeLa and 3T3 cells expressing recombinant CFTR, but not cells lacking endogenous CFTR: HeLa, NIH-3T3, and endothelial cells. For localization studies, we used epithelial cell lines that express endogenous CFTR and have a cAMP-activated apical Cl- permeability: T84, CaCo2, and HT29 clone 19A. Our results demonstrate that CFTR is an apical membrane protein in these epithelial cells because (a) staining for CFTR resembled staining for several apical membrane markers, but differed from staining for basolateral membrane proteins; (b) thin sections of cell monolayers show staining at the apical membrane; and (c) M6-4, an extracellular domain antibody, stained the apical surface of nonpermeabilized cells. Our results do not exclude the possibility that CFTR is also located beneath the apical membrane. Increasing intracellular cAMP levels did not change the apical membrane staining pattern for CFTR. Moreover, insertion of channels by vesicle fusion with the apical membrane was not required for cAMP-mediated increases in apical membrane Cl- conductance. These results indicate that CFTR is located in the apical plasma membrane of Cl(-)-secreting epithelia, a result consistent with the conclusion that Cl TR is an apical membrane chloride channel. PMID:1370301

  9. Polarization and charge transfer in the hydration of chloride ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Zhen; Rogers, David M.; Beck, Thomas L.

    2010-01-07

    A theoretical study of the structural and electronic properties of the chloride ion and water molecules in the first hydration shell is presented. The calculations are performed on an ensemble of configurations obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of a single chloride ion in bulk water. The simulations utilize the polarizable AMOEBA force field for trajectory generation and MP2-level calculations are performed to examine the electronic structure properties of the ions and surrounding waters in the external field of more distant waters. The ChelpG method is employed to explore the effective charges and dipoles on the chloride ions and first-shell waters. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) is further utilized to examine charge transfer from the anion to surrounding water molecules. The clusters extracted from the AMOEBA simulations exhibit high probabilities of anisotropic solvation for chloride ions in bulk water. From the QTAIM analysis, 0.2 elementary charges are transferred from the ion to the first-shell water molecules. The default AMOEBA model overestimates the average dipole moment magnitude of the ion compared to the quantum mechanical value. The average magnitude of the dipole moment of the water molecules in the first shell treated at the MP2-level, with the more distant waters handled with an AMOEBA effective charge model, is 2.67 D. This value is close to the AMOEBA result for first-shell waters (2.72 D) and is slightly reduced from the bulk AMOEBA value (2.78 D). The magnitude of the dipole moment of the water molecules in the first solvation shell is most strongly affected by the local water-water interactions and hydrogen bonds with the second solvation shell, rather than by interactions with the ion.

  10. Preliminary projections of the effects of chloride-control structures on the Quaternary aquifer at Great Salt Plains, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    About 1,200 tons of chloride per day are added to the salt load of the Salt Fork of the Arkansas River at Great Salt Plains Lake from natural sources. The source of this chloride is brine discharge from the rocks of Permian age in the vicinity of the lake. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has planned a chloride-control project. The Corps requested that the U.S. Geological Survey use a digital model to project the effects of the chloride-control plan on ground water. Ground-water flow and ground-water transport models were calibrated to represent the Quaternary aquifer that is the near-surface part of the flow system. The models were used to project the effects of planned chloride-control structures. Based on model results, ground-water levels are projected to rise as much as 19 feet. However, these water-level rises will occur only in areas near three reservoirs. Changes in ground-water level caused by the project will be small throughout most of the area. Chloride concentration of ground water is projected to increase by more than 90,000 milligrams per liter at one location. However, significant increases in chloride concentration during the 50-year period simulated are projected to be limited to areas where the ground water already contains excessive chloride concentrations.

  11. Catastrophic event modeling. [lithium thionyl chloride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H. A.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model for the catastrophic failures (venting or explosion of the cell) in lithium thionyl chloride batteries is presented. The phenomenology of the various processes leading to cell failure is reviewed.

  12. Qualitative Determination of Nitrate with Triphenylbenzylphosphonium Chloride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Donna A.; Cole, Jerry J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses two procedures for the identification of nitrate, the standard test ("Brown Ring" test) and a new procedure using triphenylbenzylphosphonium chloride (TPBPC). Effectiveness of both procedures is compared, with the TPBPC test proving to be more sensitive and accurate. (JM)

  13. Hydrothermal carbonization of poly(vinyl chloride).

    PubMed

    Poerschmann, J; Weiner, B; Woszidlo, S; Koehler, R; Kopinke, F-D

    2015-01-01

    Poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) was subjected to hydrothermal carbonization in subcritical water at 180-260 °C. Dehydrochlorination increased with increasing reaction temperature. The release of chlorine was almost quantitative above ∼235 °C. The fraction of organic carbon (OC) recovered in the hydrochar decreased with increasing operating temperature from 93% at 180 °C to 75% at 250 °C. A wide array of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) could be detected in the aqueous phase, but their combined concentration amounted to only ∼140 μg g(-1) PVC-substrate at 240 °C. A pathway for the formation of cyclic hydrocarbons and O-functionalized organics was proposed. Chlorinated hydrocarbons including chlorophenols could only be identified at trace levels (low ppb). Polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) could not be detected. The sorption potential of the hydrochar turned out to be very low, in particular for polar organic pollutants. Our results provide strong evidence that hydrothermal carbonization of household organic wastes which can be tied to co-discarded PVC-plastic residues is environmentally sound regarding the formation of toxic organic products. Following these findings, hydrothermal treatment of PVC-waste beyond operating temperatures of ∼235 °C to allow complete release of organic chlorine should be further pursued. PMID:25150971

  14. Regulation of neuronal chloride homeostasis by neuromodulators.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Vivek; Woodin, Melanie A

    2016-05-15

    KCC2 is the central regulator of neuronal Cl(-) homeostasis, and is critical for enabling strong hyperpolarizing synaptic inhibition in the mature brain. KCC2 hypofunction results in decreased inhibition and increased network hyperexcitability that underlies numerous disease states including epilepsy, neuropathic pain and neuropsychiatric disorders. The current holy grail of KCC2 biology is to identify how we can rescue KCC2 hypofunction in order to restore physiological levels of synaptic inhibition and neuronal network activity. It is becoming increasingly clear that diverse cellular signals regulate KCC2 surface expression and function including neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. In the present review we explore the existing evidence that G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signalling can regulate KCC2 activity in numerous regions of the nervous system including the hypothalamus, hippocampus and spinal cord. We present key evidence from the literature suggesting that GPCR signalling is a conserved mechanism for regulating chloride homeostasis. This evidence includes: (1) the activation of group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors and metabotropic Zn(2+) receptors strengthens GABAergic inhibition in CA3 pyramidal neurons through a regulation of KCC2; (2) activation of the 5-hydroxytryptamine type 2A serotonin receptors upregulates KCC2 cell surface expression and function, restores endogenous inhibition in motoneurons, and reduces spasticity in rats; and (3) activation of A3A-type adenosine receptors rescues KCC2 dysfunction and reverses allodynia in a model of neuropathic pain. We propose that GPCR-signals are novel endogenous Cl(-) extrusion enhancers that may regulate KCC2 function. PMID:26876607

  15. Antibiotic bonding to polytetrafluoroethylene with tridodecylmethylammonium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.A.; Alcid, D.V.; Greco, R.S.

    1982-09-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) treated with the cationic surfactant, triodecylmethylammonium chloride (TDMAC), binds /sup 14/C-penicillin (1.5 to 2 mg antibiotic/cm graft), whereas untreated PTFE or PTFE treated with anionic detergents shows little binding of antibiotic. TDMAC-treated PTFE concomitantly binds penicillin and heparin, generating a surface that potentially can resist both infection and thrombosis. The retention of these biologically active molecules is not due to passive entrapment in the PTFE but reflects an ionic interaction between the anionic ligands and surface-bound TDMAC. Penicillin bound to PTFE is not removed by exhaustive washing in aqueous buffers but is slowly released in the presence of plasma or when the PTFE is placed in a muscle pouch in the rat. Muscle tissue adjacent to the treated PTFE shows elevated levels of antibiotic following implantation. PTFE treated with TDMAC and placed in a muscle pouch binds /sup 14/C-penicillin when it is locally irrigated with antibiotic or when penicillin is administered intravenously. Thus, the TDMAC surface treated either in vitro or in vivo with penicillin provides an effective in situ source for the timed release of antibiotic.

  16. NEXAFS and XPS studies of nitrosyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Schio, Luca; Li, Cui; Monti, Susanna; Salén, Peter; Yatsyna, Vasyl; Feifel, Raimund; Alagia, Michele; Richter, Robert; Falcinelli, Stefano; Stranges, Stefano; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali; Carravetta, Vincenzo

    2015-04-14

    The electronic structure of nitrosyl chloride (ClNO) has been investigated in the gas phase by X-ray Photoelectron (XPS) and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at the Cl 2p, Cl 2s, N 1s and O 1s edges in a combined experimental and theoretical study. The theoretical calculations at different levels of approximation predict ionization potential values in good agreement with the experimental data and allow us to assign the main features of the absorption spectra. An unexpected failure of the density functional model is, however, observed in the calculation of the Cl 2s binding energy, which is related to a large self-interaction error. Largely different photoabsorption cross-section patterns are experimentally observed in core excitations from the investigated quantum shells (n = 1, 2). This finding is confirmed by the oscillator strength distributions calculated at different absorption edges; in the case of the n = 2 shell the bands below the threshold are extremely weak and most of the absorption intensity is due to excitations in the continuum. PMID:25754872

  17. Chloride stress triggers maturation and negatively affects the postharvest quality of persimmon fruit. Involvement of calyx ethylene production.

    PubMed

    Besada, Cristina; Gil, Rebeca; Bonet, Luis; Quiñones, Ana; Intrigliolo, Diego; Salvador, Alejandra

    2016-03-01

    In recent years many hectares planted with persimmon trees in E Spain have been diagnosed with chloride toxicity. An effect of this abiotic stress on fruit quality has been reported in different crops. However, the impact of chloride stress on persimmon fruit quality is unknown. The harvest and postharvest quality of persimmons harvested from trees that manifest different intensities of chloride toxicity foliar symptoms was evaluated herein. Our results revealed that fruits from trees under chloride stress conditions underwent chloride accumulation in the calyx, which was more marked the greater the salt stress intensity trees were exposed to. Increased chloride concentrations in the calyx stimulated ethylene production in this tissue. In the fruits affected by slight and moderate chloride stress, calyx ethylene production accelerated the maturity process, as reflected by increased fruit colour and diminished fruit firmness. In the fruits under severe chloride stress, the high ethylene levels in the calyx triggered autocatalytic ethylene production in other fruit tissues, which led fruit maturity to drastically advance. In these fruits effectiveness of CO2 deastringency treatment was not complete and fruit softening enhanced during the postharvest period. Moreover, chloride stress conditions had a marked effect on reducing fruit weight, even in slightly stressed trees. PMID:26807935

  18. Copper chloride cathode for a secondary battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Distefano, Salvador (Inventor); Nagasubramanian, Ganesan (Inventor); Bankston, Clyde P. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Higher energy and power densities are achieved in a secondary battery based on molten sodium and a solid, ceramic separator such as a beta alumina and a molten catholyte such as sodium tetrachloroaluminate and a copper chloride cathode. The higher cell voltage of copper chloride provides higher energy densities and the higher power density results from increased conductivity resulting from formation of copper as discharge proceeds.

  19. Methyl chloride via oxhydrochlorination of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, R.F. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    Dow Corning is developing a route from methane to methyl chloride via oxyhydrochlorination (OHC) chemistry with joint support from the Gas Research Institute and the Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center. Dow Corning is the world`s largest producer of methyl chloride and uses it as an intermediate in the production of silicone materials. Other uses include production of higher hydrocarbons, methyl cellulose, quaternary ammonium salts and herbicides. The objective of this project is to demonstrate and develop a route to methyl chloride with reduced variable cost by using methane instead of methanol raw materials. Methyl chloride is currently produced from methanol, but U.S. demand is typically higher than available domestic supply, resulting in fluctuating prices. OHC technology utilizes domestic natural gas as a feedstock, which allows a lower-cost source of methyl chloride which is independent of methanol. In addition to other uses of methyl chloride, OHC could be a key step in a gas-to-liquid fuels process. These uses could divert significant methanol demand to methane. A stable and selective catalyst has been developed in the laboratory and evaluated in a purpose-built demonstration unit. Materials of construction issues have been resolved and the unit has been run under a range of conditions to evaluate catalyst performance and stability. Many technological advances have been made, especially in the areas of catalyst development, online FTIR analysis of the product stream, and recovery of methyl chloride product via an absorber/stripper system. Significant technological hurdles still remain including heat transfer, catalysts scaleup, orthogonality in modeling, and scaleable absorption data. Economics of the oxyhydrochlorination process have been evaluated an found to be unfavorable due to high capital and utility costs. Future efforts will focus on improved methane conversion at high methyl chloride selectivity.

  20. The 5-(4-Ethynylophenoxy) isophthalic chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Jensen, B. J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    Sulfone-ester polymers containing pendent ethynyl groups and a direct and multistep process for preparing them are disclosed. The multistep process involves the conversion of a pendent bromo group to the ethynyl group while the direct route involves reating hydroxy-terminated sulfone oligomer or polymers with a stoichiometric amount of 5-(4-ethynylphenoxy) isophthaloyl chloride. The 5-(4-ethynylphenoxy) isophthaloyl chloride and the process for preparing it are also disclosed.

  1. Effect of Lead Chloride on the Growth and Surface Properties of Potassium Chloride Crystals from Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podder, Jiban; Evitts, Richard William; Besant, Robert William

    2014-05-01

    Pure potassium chloride (KCl) and lead chloride (PbCl2)-doped KCl crystals were grown from saturated aqueous solutions by a solvent evaporation process. The effects of Pb2+ on the surface morphology, structural and mechanical properties of KCl crystal were investigated. The surface morphology of the cubic structured crystals was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction and the elemental mappings at the microstructural level were determined by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The mass growth rate was found to decrease when the Pb2+ ions were present and the volume growth flux was also found to decrease with time and initial concentration of impurity. A Vickers micro-hardness study shows that Pb-doped KCl crystals are harder than pure KCl crystals.

  2. The molecular basis of chloride transport in shark rectal gland.

    PubMed

    Riordan, J R; Forbush, B; Hanrahan, J W

    1994-11-01

    Transepithelial Cl- secretion in vertebrates is accomplished by a secondary active transport process brought about by the coordinated activity of apical and basolateral transport proteins. The principal basolateral components are the Na+/K(+)-ATPase pump, the Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransporter (symporter) and a K+ channel. The rate-limiting apical component is a cyclic-AMP-stimulated Cl- channel. As postulated nearly two decades ago, the net Cl- movement from the blood to the lumen involves entry into the epithelial cells with Na+ and K+, followed by active Na+ extrusion via the pump and passive K+ exit via a channel. Intracellular [Cl-] is raised above electrochemical equilibrium and exits into the lumen when the apical Cl- channel opens. Cl- secretion is accompanied by a passive paracellular flow of Na+. The tubules of the rectal glands of elasmobranchs are highly specialized for secreting concentrated NaCl by this mechanism and hence have served as an excellent experimental model in which to characterize the individual steps by electrophysiological and ion flux measurements. The recent molecular cloning and heterologous expression of the apical Cl- channel and basolateral cotransporter have enabled more detailed analyses of the mechanisms and their regulation. Not surprisingly, since hormones acting through kinases control secretion, both the Cl- channel, which is the shark counterpart of the CFTR (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator), and the cotransporter are regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. The primary stimulation of secretion by hormones employing cyclic AMP as second messenger activates CFTR via the direct action of protein kinase A (PKA), which phosphorylates multiple sites on the R domain. In contrast, phosphorylation of the cotransporter by as yet unidentified kinases is apparently secondary to the decrease in intracellular chloride concentration caused by anion exit through CFTR. PMID:7529818

  3. Electrodialysis field test for selective chloride removal from the chemical recovery cycle of a kraft pulp mill

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, H.J.; Pfromm, P.H.

    1998-12-01

    Chloride accumulation is a serious issue in the kraft pulping process. Chloride can be selectively removed from dissolved electrostatic precipitator dust (ESP dust) in the kraft chemical recovery cycle by electrodialysis with monovalent-selective anion-exchange membranes. In a pilot-scale field test, this process was investigated (total run time, 750 h). The test was performed at about 3.5% of full scale. The process showed outstanding performance and no significant membrane fouling. In feed-and-bleed operation, chloride removal levels of 94% and 61% were tested. The energy consumption for electrodialysis is low (120 kWh per metric ton of chloride removed at a 63% chloride removal level). The process performed very well even with no feed pretreatment, polarity reversal, or membrane cleaning.

  4. Abnormal passive chloride absorption in cystic fibrosis jejunum functionally opposes the classic chloride secretory defect

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Michael A.; Högenauer, Christoph; Coates, Stephen W.; Santa Ana, Carol A.; Porter, Jack L.; Rosenblatt, Randall L.; Emmett, Michael; Fordtran, John S.

    2003-01-01

    Due to genetic defects in apical membrane chloride channels, the cystic fibrosis (CF) intestine does not secrete chloride normally. Depressed chloride secretion leaves CF intestinal absorptive processes unopposed, which results in net fluid hyperabsorption, dehydration of intestinal contents, and a propensity to inspissated intestinal obstruction. This theory is based primarily on in vitro studies of jejunal mucosa. To determine if CF patients actually hyperabsorb fluid in vivo, we measured electrolyte and water absorption during steady-state perfusion of the jejunum. As expected, chloride secretion was abnormally low in CF, but surprisingly, there was no net hyperabsorption of sodium or water during perfusion of a balanced electrolyte solution. This suggested that fluid absorption processes are reduced in CF jejunum, and further studies revealed that this was due to a marked depression of passive chloride absorption. Although Na+-glucose cotransport was normal in the CF jejunum, absence of passive chloride absorption completely blocked glucose-stimulated net sodium absorption and reduced glucose-stimulated water absorption 66%. This chloride absorptive abnormality acts in physiological opposition to the classic chloride secretory defect in the CF intestine. By increasing the fluidity of intraluminal contents, absence of passive chloride absorption may reduce the incidence and severity of intestinal disease in patients with CF. PMID:12840066

  5. Structure of complexes between aluminum chloride and other chlorides, 2: Alkali-(chloroaluminates). Gaseous complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargittai, M.

    1980-01-01

    The structural chemistry of complexes between aluminum chloride and other metal chlorides is important both for practice and theory. Condensed-phase as well as vapor-phase complexes are of interest. Structural information on such complexes is reviewed. The first emphasis is given to the molten state because of its practical importance. Aluminum chloride forms volatile complexes with other metal chlorides and these vapor-phase complexes are dealt with in the second part. Finally, the variations in molecular shape and geometrical parameters are summarized.

  6. Histoplasma capsulatum surmounts obstacles to intracellular pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Garfoot, Andrew L; Rappleye, Chad A

    2016-02-01

    The fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum causes respiratory and disseminated disease, even in immunocompetent hosts. In contrast to opportunistic pathogens, which are readily controlled by phagocytic cells, H. capsulatum yeasts are able to infect macrophages, survive antimicrobial defenses, and proliferate as an intracellular pathogen. In this review, we discuss some of the molecular mechanisms that enable H. capsulatum yeasts to overcome obstacles to intracellular pathogenesis. H. capsulatum yeasts gain refuge from extracellular obstacles such as antimicrobial lung surfactant proteins by engaging the β-integrin family of phagocytic receptors to promote entry into macrophages. In addition, H. capsulatum yeasts conceal immunostimulatory β-glucans to avoid triggering signaling receptors such as the β-glucan receptor Dectin-1. H. capsulatum yeasts counteract phagocyte-produced reactive oxygen species by expression of oxidative stress defense enzymes including an extracellular superoxide dismutase and an extracellular catalase. Within the phagosome, H. capsulatum yeasts block phagosome acidification, acquire essential metals such as iron and zinc, and utilize de novo biosynthesis pathways to overcome nutritional limitations. These mechanisms explain how H. capsulatum yeasts avoid and negate macrophage defense strategies and establish a hospitable intracellular niche, making H. capsulatum a successful intracellular pathogen of macrophages. PMID:26235362

  7. Resistant mechanism study of benzalkonium chloride selected Salmonella Typhimurium mutants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Cui, Shenghui; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Haoyan

    2014-02-01

    Benzalkonium chloride is one of the invaluable biocides that is extensively used in healthcare settings as well as in the food processing industry. After exposing wild-type Salmonella Typhimurium 14028s or its AcrAB inactivation mutant to gradually increasing levels of benzalkonium chloride, resistance mutants S-41, S-150, S-AB-23, S-AB-38, and S-AB-73 were selected and these mutants also showed a 2-64-fold stable minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) increase to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, and tetracycline. In S-41 and S-150, the expression of acrB was increased 2.7- and 7.6-fold, and ΔtolC or ΔacrAB mutants of S-41 and S-150 showed the same MICs to all tested antimicrobials as the equivalent Salmonella Typhimurium 14028s mutants. However, in S-AB-23, S-AB-38, and S-AB-73, the expression of acrF was increased 96-, 230-, and 267-fold, respectively, and ΔtolC or ΔacrEF mutants of S-AB-23, S-AB-38, and S-AB-73 showed the similar MICs to all tested antimicrobials as the ΔtolC mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium 14028s. Our data showed that constitutively over-expressed AcrAB working through TolC was the main resistance mechanism in ST14028s benzalkonium chloride resistance mutants. However, after AcrAB had been inactivated, benzalkonium chloride-resistant mutants could still be selected and constitutively over-expressed, AcrEF became the dominant efflux pump working through TolC and being responsible for the increasing antimicrobial resistance. These data indicated that different mechanisms existed for acrB and acrF constitutive over-expression. Since exposure to benzalkonium chloride may lead to Salmonella mutants with a decreased susceptibility to quinolones, which is currently one of the drugs of choice for the treatment of life-threatening salmonelosis, research into the pathogenesis and epidemiology of the benzalkonium chloride resistance mutants will be of increasing importance. PMID:23987991

  8. Liquid and solid-state Cl- -sensitive microelectrodes. Characteristics and application to intracellular Cl- activity in Balanus photoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    When intracellular chloride activity (aiCl) was monitored with chloride- sensitive liquid ion exchanges (CLIX) microelectrodes in Balanus photoreceptors, replacement of extracellular chloride (Cl0) by methanesulfonate or glutamate was followed by a rapid but incomplete loss of aiCl. When propionate was used as the extracellular anion substitute, CLIX electrodes detected an apparent gain in aiCl, while a newly designed Ag-AgCl wire-in glass microelectrode showed a loss of aiCl under the same conditions. This discrepancy in Cl- washout when propionate replaced Cl0 is explained by the differences in selectivity of CLIX and Ag-AgCl electrodes for native intracellular anions and for the extracellular anion substitute which also replaces Cli and interferes in the determination of aiCl. Both electrodes indicate that ECl approximately Em when the cells are bathed in normal barnacle saline, and both electrodes showed the rate of Cl washout (tau approximately 5 min) to be independent of Cli when Cl0 was replaced by glutamate. Details of Ag-AgCl microelectrode construction are presented. These electrodes were tested and found to be insensitive to the organic anion substitutes used in this study. Selectivity data of CLIX electrodes for several anions of biological interest are described. PMID:21223

  9. Bacteriophage lambda cro mutations: effects on activity and intracellular degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Pakula, A A; Young, V B; Sauer, R T

    1986-01-01

    Following random mutagenesis of the bacteriophage lambda cro gene, we have isolated missense mutations that affect approximately half of the 66 residue positions of Cro. About two-thirds of the mutations change residues involved in the maintenance of Cro structure and stability. The corresponding mutant proteins are severely degraded in the cell but often have specific activities near that of wild-type Cro. The remaining mutations affect residues involved in DNA binding. These mutant proteins are present at moderately reduced intracellular levels, but their specific activities are much lower than that of wild type. Images PMID:2947238

  10. Jak2-Independent Activation of Stat3 by Intracellular Angiotensin II in Human Mesangial Cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rekha

    2011-01-01

    Ang II is shown to mediate the stimulatory effect of high glucose on TGF-b1 and extracellular matrix proteins in glomerular mesangial cells. Also inhibition of Ang II formation in cell media (extracellular) and lysates (intracellular) blocks high-glucose effects on TGF-b1 and matrix more effectively compared to inhibition of extracellular Ang II alone. To investigate whether intracellular Ang II can stimulate TGF-b1 and matrix independent of extracellular Ang II, cultured human mesangial cells were transfected with Ang II to increase intracellular Ang II levels and its effects on TGF-b1 and matrix proteins were determined. Prior to transfection, cells were treated with candesartan to block extracellular Ang II-induced responses via cell membrane AT1 receptors. Transfection of cells with Ang II resulted in increased levels of intracellular Ang II which was accompanied by increased production of TGF-b1, collagen IV, fibronectin, and cell proliferation as well. On further examination, intracellular Ang II was found to activate Stat3 transcription factor including increased Stat3 protein expression, tyrosine 705 phosphorylation, and DNA-binding activity. Treatment with AG-490, an inhibitor of Jak2, did not block intracellular Ang II-induced Stat3 phosphorylation at tyrosine 705 residue indicating a Jak2-independent mechanism used by intracellular Ang II for Stat3 phosphorylation. In contrast, extracellular Ang II-induced tyrosine 705 phosphorylation of Stat3 was inhibited by AG-490 confirming the presence of a Jak2-dependent pathway. These findings suggest that intracellular Ang II increases TGF-b1 and matrix in human mesangial cells and also activates Stat3 transcription factor without involvement of the extracellular Ang II signaling pathway. PMID:21915376

  11. 42 CFR 84.250 - Vinyl chloride respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vinyl chloride respirators; description. 84.250... Respirators § 84.250 Vinyl chloride respirators; description. Vinyl chloride respirators, including all... escape from vinyl chloride atmospheres containing adequate oxygen to support life, are...

  12. 42 CFR 84.250 - Vinyl chloride respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vinyl chloride respirators; description. 84.250... Respirators § 84.250 Vinyl chloride respirators; description. Vinyl chloride respirators, including all... escape from vinyl chloride atmospheres containing adequate oxygen to support life, are...

  13. 42 CFR 84.250 - Vinyl chloride respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vinyl chloride respirators; description. 84.250... Respirators § 84.250 Vinyl chloride respirators; description. Vinyl chloride respirators, including all... escape from vinyl chloride atmospheres containing adequate oxygen to support life, are...

  14. 42 CFR 84.250 - Vinyl chloride respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vinyl chloride respirators; description. 84.250... Respirators § 84.250 Vinyl chloride respirators; description. Vinyl chloride respirators, including all... escape from vinyl chloride atmospheres containing adequate oxygen to support life, are...

  15. 42 CFR 84.250 - Vinyl chloride respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vinyl chloride respirators; description. 84.250... Respirators § 84.250 Vinyl chloride respirators; description. Vinyl chloride respirators, including all... escape from vinyl chloride atmospheres containing adequate oxygen to support life, are...

  16. 21 CFR 178.3290 - Chromic chloride complexes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Chromic chloride complexes. 178.3290 Section 178... SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3290 Chromic chloride complexes. Myristo chromic chloride complex and stearato chromic chloride complex may be safely used as release agents in the...

  17. 49 CFR 179.102-17 - Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. 179.102-17... Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. Each tank car used to transport hydrogen chloride, refrigerated... on or after March 16, 2009 used for the transportation of hydrogen chloride, refrigerated...

  18. 49 CFR 179.102-17 - Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. 179.102-17... Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. Each tank car used to transport hydrogen chloride, refrigerated... on or after March 16, 2009 used for the transportation of hydrogen chloride, refrigerated...

  19. 49 CFR 179.102-17 - Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. 179.102-17... Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. Each tank car used to transport hydrogen chloride, refrigerated... on or after March 16, 2009 used for the transportation of hydrogen chloride, refrigerated...

  20. 49 CFR 179.102-17 - Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. 179.102-17... Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. Each tank car used to transport hydrogen chloride, refrigerated... on or after March 16, 2009 used for the transportation of hydrogen chloride, refrigerated...