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Sample records for intracerebral atypical calcification

  1. An atypical case of intracerebral schwannoma.

    PubMed

    AlBatly, Abdulrahman Abdullah; Zakzouk, Reem Seraj; Alhaidey, Ali Khalaf

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of intracerebral cystic schwannoma in the temporal fossa manifested as a gradually worsening headache in a 49-years-old woman. Computed Tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a left temporal partly cystic, partly solid mass. The preoperative diagnosis was astrocytoma or glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), but microscopic examination of the mass showed the characteristic pattern with cellular Antony A component. Immunohistochemically, the tumor was positive for S-100 protein. These findings are consistent with a schwannoma. Intracerebral schwannomas not related to cranial nerves are rare and most reported cases involved young patients. PMID:25574318

  2. An atypical case of intracerebral schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    AlBatly, Abdulrahman Abdullah; Zakzouk, Reem Seraj; Alhaidey, Ali Khalaf

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of intracerebral cystic schwannoma in the temporal fossa manifested as a gradually worsening headache in a 49-years-old woman. Computed Tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a left temporal partly cystic, partly solid mass. The preoperative diagnosis was astrocytoma or glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), but microscopic examination of the mass showed the characteristic pattern with cellular Antony A component. Immunohistochemically, the tumor was positive for S-100 protein. These findings are consistent with a schwannoma. Intracerebral schwannomas not related to cranial nerves are rare and most reported cases involved young patients. PMID:25574318

  3. Atypical localizations of calcific deposits in the shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Vinanti, G.B.; Pavan, D.; Rossato, A.; Biz, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Calcific tendinopathies of the shoulder are due to inflammation around deposits of calcium within periarticular tendineal structures. Presentation of cases We present three cases of atypical localization of calcium deposits in the shoulder. All of the cases have been treated with arthroscopic excision, followed by post-operative rehabilitation, regaining excellent results. Patients were evaluated 6 months after surgery using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) and the UCLA modified shoulder rating. Discussion Calcific tendinopathy is a self-limiting condition or is successfully treated with conservative therapy especially during the early phases of the pathology. If conservative measures fail, removal of calcium deposits is recommended. Arthroscopic management showed good results in our three cases. Conclusion We suggest that arthroscopic treatment of calcific tendonitis guarantees good results even when calcium deposits are in atypical locations. PMID:25884610

  4. Evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow in patient with atypical senile dementia with asymmetrical calcification.

    PubMed

    Shoyama, Masaru; Ukai, Satoshi; Shinosaki, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    We report an 83-year-old woman with atypical senile dementia with Fahr-type calcification. Brain computed tomography demonstrated asymmetrical calcification predominant in the basal ganglia on the right side and pronounced diffuse cortical atrophy in the frontotemporal areas. The patient was clinically diagnosed with diffuse neurofibrillary tangles with calcification. Brain single photon emission computed tomography findings revealed that cerebral blood flow was reduced on the right side, as compared with the left side, in widespread areas. Hemispheric asymmetry in both calcification and cerebral blood flow suggests a relationship between calcification and vascular changes. PMID:25737312

  5. Intracerebral haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Mendelow, A David; Hanley, Daniel F

    2011-01-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage is an important public health problem leading to high rates of death and disability in adults. Although the number of hospital admissions for intracerebral haemorrhage has increased worldwide in the past 10 years, mortality has not fallen. Results of clinical trials and observational studies suggest that coordinated primary and specialty care is associated with lower mortality than is typical community practice. Development of treatment goals for critical care, and new sequences of care and specialty practice can improve outcome after intracerebral haemorrhage. Specific treatment approaches include early diagnosis and haemostasis, aggressive management of blood pressure, open surgical and minimally invasive surgical techniques to remove clot, techniques to remove intraventricular blood, and management of intracranial pressure. These approaches improve clinical management of patients with intracerebral haemorrhage and promise to reduce mortality and increase functional survival. PMID:19427958

  6. Intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Mendelow, A David; Hanley, Daniel F

    2009-05-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage is an important public health problem leading to high rates of death and disability in adults. Although the number of hospital admissions for intracerebral haemorrhage has increased worldwide in the past 10 years, mortality has not fallen. Results of clinical trials and observational studies suggest that coordinated primary and specialty care is associated with lower mortality than is typical community practice. Development of treatment goals for critical care, and new sequences of care and specialty practice can improve outcome after intracerebral haemorrhage. Specific treatment approaches include early diagnosis and haemostasis, aggressive management of blood pressure, open surgical and minimally invasive surgical techniques to remove clot, techniques to remove intraventricular blood, and management of intracranial pressure. These approaches improve clinical management of patients with intracerebral haemorrhage and promise to reduce mortality and increase functional survival. PMID:19427958

  7. Atraumatic multifocal intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Fetcko, Kaleigh M; Hendricks, Benjamin K; Scott, John; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2016-09-01

    This article describes a patient with atraumatic multifocal intracerebral, subarachnoid, and bilateral frontal convexity acute subdural hematomas. The patient is a 46-year-old Caucasian man who presented with a spontaneous severe progressive headache. Following a description of the case, this article reviews the reported incidence, proposed etiology, and current management strategies for multifocal spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27234608

  8. Atypicality of Atypical Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To review the current definition of atypicality, discuss the unique features of each atypical antipsychotic, and determine whether the available drugs in this class really meet the classical definition of atypicality. Data Sources: A PubMed search was conducted to identify literature on the subject of this review, supported by additional articles based on the author's clinical knowledge and experience. Study Selection and Data Extraction: Relevant references were extracted and summarized in order to meet the objective of the article. Data Synthesis: Atypical antipsychotics are considered a major advance over conventional antipsychotics, primarily because they offer effective treatment alternatives that are relatively free of extrapyramidal symptoms. In fact, the term atypicality was originally used to describe antipsychotic agents with a minimal risk of causing extrapyramidal symptoms. However, over the years the definition has been modified such that there is currently no consensus on a true definition of atypicality for these agents. Each of the atypical antipsychotics (clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, and aripiprazole) commercially available in the United States is unique in terms of its pharmacologic profile, differing with respect to receptor-binding affinity, mechanism of action, and adverse events. Of the available atypical antipsychotics, clozapine and quetiapine have shown the lowest propensity to cause extrapyramidal symptoms. Although the risk of extra-pyramidal symptoms is lower with risperidone and olanzapine than with conventional antipsychotics, risk increases with dose escalation. Data for ziprasidone indicate that the risk of extrapyramidal symptoms may be similar to that of risperidone and olanzapine. There is a concern of akathisia with aripiprazole; however, more experience with this agent is needed before definitive conclusions are made. Conclusion: If the definition of “atypical” antipsychotic is

  9. Neuroinflammation after intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mracsko, Eva; Veltkamp, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a particularly severe type of stroke for which no specific treatment has been established yet. Although preclinical models of ICH have substantial methodological limitations, important insight into the pathophysiology has been gained. Mounting evidence suggests an important contribution of inflammatory mechanisms to brain damage and potential repair. Neuroinflammation evoked by intracerebral blood involves the activation of resident microglia, the infiltration of systemic immune cells and the production of cytokines, chemokines, extracellular proteases and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous studies focused on innate immunity including microglia, monocytes and granulocytes. More recently, the role of adaptive immune cells has received increasing attention. Little is currently known about the interactions among different immune cell populations in the setting of ICH. Nevertheless, immunomodulatory strategies are already being explored in ICH. To improve the chances of translation from preclinical models to patients, a better characterization of the neuroinflammation in patients is desirable. PMID:25477782

  10. Atypical pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... that cause typical pneumonia. These include Legionella pneumophila , Mycoplasma pneumoniae , and Chlamydophila pneumoniae . Atypical pneumonia also tends to have milder symptoms than typical pneumonia. Causes Mycoplasma pneumonia is a type of atypical pneumonia. It ...

  11. Atypical presentation of atypical mycobacteria in atypical diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sugata Narayan; Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Satpathi, Partha Sarathi; Patra, Shinjan

    2016-01-01

    A 45-year-old, non-obese male presented with low-grade, remittent fever and a fluctuant swelling over the posterior aspect of his lower left flank. Laboratory tests revealed leukocytosis, raised ESR, hyperglycemia and raised HbA1C levels. Light microscopy of Ziehl–Neelsen-stained pus sample revealed numerous acid-fast bacilli. After 72 h of incubating aspirated pus in Löwenstein–Jensen media, non-pigmented, cream-colored colonies were observed, suggestive of rapid-growing atypical forms of mycobacteria. Polymerase chain reaction of isolated bacteria identified Mycobacterium chelonae as causative organism. Abdominal skiagram revealed extensive pancreatic intraductal calcifications suggestive of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes and lumbar vertebral body destruction with evidence of paravertebral abscess. The patient was prescribed a split-mixed insulin regimen, clarithromycin and ciprofloxacin with complete resolution of the subcutaneous abscess at 6 months. Diabetic patients are prone to infections. Mycobacteria, especially atypical ones, involving the spine and subcutaneous tissues have rarely been reported. PMID:27127641

  12. Prevention of intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Patrick; Mitra, Dipayan; Gregson, Barbara A; Mendelow, A David

    2007-07-01

    Nontraumatic intracerebral haemorrhages arise from a wide range of causes falling into two broad groups: discreet vascular "ictohaemorrhagic" lesions such as aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, cavernomas, tumours, and dural fistulae; and more generalised amyloid or hypertension related conditions. It is now possible using family history, associated risk factors and gradient echo MRI to predict cases at high risk of hypertensive or amyloid related haemorrhage. There is considerable potential for prevention of hypertensive haemorrhages by treatment of high risk cases with antihypertensive medication. As yet no effective preventative treatment for amyloid angiopathy related ICH has emerged although a variety of drugs are under investigation. Prevention of haemorrhage from ictohaemorrhagic lesions revolves around removal or obliteration of the lesion. Although there is a wide range of such lesions available treatments come down to three modalities. These are surgical excision, stereotactic radiosurgery and endovascular embolisation. PMID:17630936

  13. Warfarin and Vascular Calcification.

    PubMed

    Poterucha, Timothy J; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2016-06-01

    The vitamin K antagonist, warfarin, is the most commonly prescribed oral anticoagulant. Use of warfarin is associated with an increase in systemic calcification, including in the coronary and peripheral vasculature. This increase in vascular calcification is due to inhibition of the enzyme matrix gamma-carboxyglutamate Gla protein (MGP). MGP is a vitamin K-dependent protein that ordinarily prevents systemic calcification by scavenging calcium phosphate in the tissues. Warfarin-induced systemic calcification can result in adverse clinical effects. In this review article, we highlight some of the key translational and clinical studies that associate warfarin with vascular calcification. PMID:26714212

  14. Mechanism of atherosclerotic calcification.

    PubMed

    Shioi, A; Mori, K; Jono, S; Wakikawa, T; Hiura, Y; Koyama, H; Okuno, Y; Nishizawa, Y; Morii, H

    2000-01-01

    Calcification is almost invariably associated with atherosclerotic plaque lesions. Recent data suggest that plaque calcification is an active, regulated process similar to osteogenesis. In order to clarify the mechanism of plaque calcification, we developed an in vitro model of vascular calcification by utilizing bovine vascular smooth muscle cells (BVSMCs). This model is useful in that diffuse and massive calcification can be induced within 2 weeks and thereby biochemical analyses of vascular calcification can be performed. We have analyzed several aspects of vascular calcification by using this model and demonstrated as follows: 1) in vitro calcification of BVSMCs is regulated by calciotropic hormones and BVSMCs are equipped with a unique autocrine and/or paracrine system regulating calcium metabolism. 2) Sodium-dependent phosphate cotransport plays a crucial role in BVSMC calcification as well as in mineralization of skeletal tissues. 3) BVSMCs acquire osteoblastic phenotype under certain conditions. Finally, we discuss the roles of macrophages in the development of atherosclerotic calcification. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) induces gene expression of 25-hydrovitamin D-1 alpha-hydroxylase (1 alpha OHase) and its activity in macrophages. Since 1 alpha OHase can locally convert 25-hydroxyvitamin D into 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), an active metabolite of vitamin D, it is suggested that local production of 1,25(OH)2D by macrophages may promote atherosclerotic calcification. Moreover, macrophages may be involved in the phenotypic changes of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to acquire calcifying capacity. Therefore, the phenotypic changes of VSMCs in atherosclerotic plaque may contribute to the development of atherosclerotic calcification. PMID:10769407

  15. Primary Intracerebral Haematoma Evacuation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Velnar, Tomaz; Bunc, Gorazd

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage is one of the most devastating types of stroke, leading to disability and high mortality rate. Besides blood pressure reduction and intensive medical and surgical treatment, immediate coagulopathy reversal is vital. On the other hand, the haemostatic disturbances may contribute to improve the recovery. We describe the evacuation of intracerebral hemorrhage with the insertion of external ventricular drainage in a patient suffering from deep hypertensive intracerebral haemorrhage and haematocephalus. PMID:27066398

  16. Dense calcification in a GH-secreting pituitary macroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ramez; Kalhan, Atul; Lammie, Alistair; Kotonya, Christine; Nannapanenni, Ravindra; Rees, Aled

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 30-year-old female presented with a history of secondary amenorrhoea, acromegalic features and progressive visual deterioration. She had elevated serum IGF1 levels and unsuppressed GH levels after an oral glucose tolerance test. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a heterogeneously enhancing space-occupying lesion with atypical extensive calcification within the sellar and suprasellar areas. Owing to the extent of calcification, the tumour was a surgical challenge. Postoperatively, there was clinical, radiological and biochemical evidence of residual disease, which required treatment with a somatostatin analogue and radiotherapy. Mutational analysis of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene was negative. This case confirms the relatively rare occurrence of calcification within a pituitary macroadenoma and its associated management problems. The presentation, biochemical, radiological and pathological findings are discussed in the context of the relevant literature. Learning points Calcification of pituitary tumours is relatively rare.Recognising calcification in pituitary adenomas on preoperative imaging is important in surgical decision-making.Gross total resection can be difficult to achieve in the presence of extensive calcification and dictates further management and follow-up to achieve disease control. PMID:24683483

  17. [Disk calcifications in children].

    PubMed

    Schmit, P; Fauré, C; Denarnaud, L

    1985-05-01

    It is not unusual for intervertebral disk calcifications to be detected in pediatric practice, the 150 or so cases reported in the literature probably representing only a small proportion of lesions actually diagnosed. Case reports of 33 children with intervertebral disk calcifications were analyzed. In the majority of these patients (31 of 33) a diagnosis of "idiopathic" calcifications had been made, the cervical localization of the lesions being related to repeated ORL infections and/or trauma. A pre-existing pathologic factor was found in two cases (one child with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis treated by corticoids and one child with Williams and Van Beuren's syndrome). An uncomplicated course was noted in 31 cases, the symptomatology (pain, spinal stiffness and febricula) improving after several days. Complications developed in two cases: one child had very disabling dysphagia due to an anteriorly protruding cervical herniated disc and surgery was necessary; the other child developed cervicobrachial neuralgia due to herniated disc protrusion into the cervical spinal canal, but symptoms regressed within several days although calcifications persisted unaltered. These findings and the course of the rare complications documented in the literature suggest the need for the most conservative treatment possible in cases of disc calcifications in children. PMID:4032343

  18. Quantitative intracerebral brain hemorrhage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loncaric, Sven; Dhawan, Atam P.; Cosic, Dubravko; Kovacevic, Domagoj; Broderick, Joseph; Brott, Thomas

    1999-05-01

    In this paper a system for 3-D quantitative analysis of human spontaneous intracerebral brain hemorrhage (ICH) is described. The purpose of the developed system is to perform quantitative 3-D measurements of the parameters of ICH region and from computed tomography (CT) images. The measured parameter in this phase of the system development is volume of the hemorrhage region. The goal of the project is to measure parameters for a large number of patients having ICH and to correlate measured parameters to patient morbidity and mortality.

  19. [Atypical odontalgia].

    PubMed

    Türp, Jens Christoph

    2005-01-01

    In spite of its first description by the English surgeon JOHN HUNTER more than 200 years ago, atypical odontalgia (AO), or phantom tooth pain, is not universally known among dentists. AO is a persistent neuropathic pain which may be initiated after deafferentiation of trigeminal nerve fibers following root canal treatment, apicectomy, or tooth extraction. In the absence of pathological clinical or radiological findings, the diagnosis is made by exclusion. After a thorough patient education about the condition, pharmacological and psychological pain management is required. Invasive and irreversible treatment attempts are contraindicated. PMID:16342640

  20. Atypical Inflammasomes.

    PubMed

    Janowski, Ann M; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors, including members of the NLR and PYHIN families, are essential for recognition of both pathogen- and host-derived danger signals. A number of molecules in these families are capable of forming multiprotein complexes termed inflammasomes that result in the activation of caspase-1. In addition to NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRC4, and AIM2, which form well-described inflammasome complexes, IFI16, NLRP6, NLRP7, NLRP12, and NLRC5 have also been proposed to form inflammasomes under specific conditions. The structure and function of these atypical inflammasomes will be highlighted here. PMID:27221480

  1. Acute Prevertebral Calcific Tendinitis

    PubMed Central

    Tamm, Alexander; Jeffery, Caroline C; Ansari, Khalid; Naik, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of neck pain in a middle-aged woman, initially attributed to a retropharyngeal infection and treated with urgent intubation. With the help of computed tomography, the diagnosis was later revised to acute prevertebral calcific tendinitis, a self-limiting condition caused by abnormal calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the longus colli muscles. It is critical to differentiate between these two disease entities due to dramatic differences in management. A discussion of acute prevertebral calcific tendinitis and its imaging findings is provided below. PMID:27252789

  2. Calcific Metamorphosis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Shoaib Haider; Mohamed, Ahmed Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Dental trauma to the permanent dentition can lead to clinical complications and its management may considerably challenge a practitioner. The incidence of pulp canal obliteration following dental trauma has been reported to be approximately 4 – 24%. Attempting to locate canals following calcific metamorphosis and negotiating it to full working length may lead to iatrogenic errors such as fractured instrument and perforation. This review article describes the possible etiology of Calcific Metamorphosis, its clinical and radiographic features as well as its management. PMID:27610067

  3. Genetic Pathways of Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Marion A. Hofmann; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Arterial calcification of the aorta, coronary, carotid and peripheral arteries becomes more prevalent with age. Genomewide association studies have identified regions of the genome linked to vascular calcification, and these same regions are linked to myocardial infarction risk. The 9p21 region linked to vascular disease and inflammation also associates with vascular calcification. In addition to these common variants, rare genetic defects can serve as primary triggers of accelerated and premature calcification. Infancy-associated calcific disorders are caused by loss of function mutations in ENPP1 an enzyme that produces extracellular pyrophosphate. Adult onset vascular calcification is linked to mutations NTE5, another enzyme that regulates extracellular phosphate metabolism. Common conditions that secondarily enhance vascular calcification include atherosclerosis, metabolic dysfunction, diabetes, and impaired renal clearance. Oxidative stress and vascular inflammation, along with biophysical properties, converge with these predisposing factors to promote soft tissue mineralization. Vascular calcification is accompanied by an osteogenic profile, and this osteogenic conversion is seen within the vascular smooth muscle itself as well as the matrix. Herein we will review the genetic causes of medial calcification in the smooth muscle layer, focusing on recent discoveries of gene mutations that regulate extracellular matrix phosphate production and the role of S100 proteins as promoters of vascular calcification. PMID:23040839

  4. Arterial calcification: Conscripted by collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jordan D.

    2016-03-01

    In atherosclerotic plaques, patterns of calcification -- which have profound implications for plaque stability and vulnerability to rupture -- are determined by the collagen's content and patterning throughout the plaque.

  5. Development in intracerebral stem cell grafts

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Stephanny; Tajiri, Naoki; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2015-01-01

    The field of stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising research area for brain repair. Optimizing the safety and efficacy of the therapy for clinical trials will require revisiting transplantation protocols. The cell delivery route stands as a key translational item that warrants careful consideration in facilitating the success of stem cell therapy in the clinic. Intracerebral administration, compared to peripheral route, requires an invasive procedure to directly implant stem cells into injured brain. Although invasive, intracerebral transplantation circumvents the prohibitive blood brain barrier in allowing grafted cells when delivered peripherally to penetrate the brain and reach the discreet damaged brain tissues. This review will highlight milestone discoveries in cell therapy for neurological disorders, with emphasis on intracerebral transplantation in relevant animal models and provide insights necessary to optimize the safety and efficacy of cell therapy for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, stroke, and traumatic brain injury. PMID:25739415

  6. Developments in intracerebral stem cell grafts.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Stephanny; Tajiri, Naoki; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-04-01

    The field of stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising research area for brain repair. Optimizing the safety and efficacy of the therapy for clinical trials will require revisiting transplantation protocols. The cell delivery route stands as a key translational item that warrants careful consideration in facilitating the success of stem cell therapy in the clinic. Intracerebral administration, compared to peripheral route, requires an invasive procedure to directly implant stem cells into injured brain. Although invasive, intracerebral transplantation circumvents the prohibitive blood brain barrier in allowing grafted cells when delivered peripherally to penetrate the brain and reach the discreet damaged brain tissues. This review will highlight milestone discoveries in cell therapy for neurological disorders, with emphasis on intracerebral transplantation in relevant animal models and provide insights necessary to optimize the safety and efficacy of cell therapy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, stroke and traumatic brain injury. PMID:25739415

  7. Surgical Craniotomy for Intracerebral Haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mendelow, A David

    2015-01-01

    Craniotomy is probably indicated for patients with superficial spontaneous lobar supratentorial intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) when the level of consciousness drops below 13 within the first 8 h of the onset of the haemorrhage. Once the level drops below 9, it is probably too late to consider craniotomy for these patients, so clinical vigilance is paramount. While this statement is only backed up by evidence that is moderately strong, meta-analysis of available data suggests that it is true in the rather limited number of patients with ICH. Meta-analyses like this can often predict the results of future prospective randomised controlled trials a decade or more before the trials are completed and published. Countless such examples exist in the literature, as is the case for thrombolysis in patients with myocardial infarction in the last millennium: meta-analysis determined the efficacy more than a decade BEFORE the last trial (ISIS-2) confirmed the benefit of thrombolysis for myocardial infarction. Careful examination of the meta-analysis' Forest plots in this chapter will demonstrate why this statement is made at the outset. Other meta-analyses of surgery for ICH have also indicated that minimal interventional techniques using topical thrombolysis or endoscopy via burrholes or even twist drill aspiration may be particularly successful for the treatment of supratentorial ICH, especially when the clot is deep seated. Ongoing clinical trials (CLEAR III and MISTIE III) should confirm this in the fullness of time. There are 2 exceptions to these generalisations. First, based on trial evidence, aneurysmal ICH is best treated with surgery. Second, cerebellar ICH represents a special case because of the development of hydrocephalus, which may require expeditious drainage as the intracranial pressure rises. The cerebellar clot will then require evacuation, usually via posterior fossa craniectomy, rather than craniotomy. Technical advances suggest that image-guided surgery

  8. Emergency Imaging of Intracerebral Haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Alobeidi, Farah; Aviv, Richard I

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating condition with high mortality and morbidity despite advances in neurocritical care. Early deterioration is common in the first few hours after ICH onset, secondary to rapid haematoma expansion and growth. Rapid diagnosis and aggressive early management of these patients are therefore crucial. Imaging plays a key role in establishing the diagnosis and the underlying aetiology of ICH, identifying complications and predicting patients who are at high risk for haematoma expansion. In this chapter, we present an evidence-based imaging framework for the management of spontaneous ICH in the acute setting. Non-enhanced computed tomography is long established as the gold standard for ICH diagnosis but has limitations in demonstrating the underlying aetiology in cases of secondary ICH. There is now growing evidence for the ability of non-invasive angiography to establish the underlying aetiology and to predict further haematoma expansion. The presence of small enhancing foci within the haematoma on computed tomography angiography (CTA), the CTA Spot Sign, has been prospectively validated as a predictor of haematoma expansion. Early identification of patients at risk of haematoma expansion allows for the appropriate escalation of care to a neurosurgical team, admission to a neurocritical care unit, appropriate supportive therapy and targeted novel medical and surgical interventions. Catheter angiography, which remains the gold standard for identifying underlying secondary vascular lesions, should be used in selected cases. However, non-invasive vascular imaging should be considered as an important step in the diagnosis and early management of secondary ICH patients. Previous concerns related to the radiation dose, contrast-induced nephropathy and cost are addressed in this chapter. Recently, animal models have enabled the qualitative assessment of haematoma expansion, and our increased understanding of ICH may

  9. Chondrocalcinosis and other calcifications.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P S

    1988-11-01

    Less than 30 years ago, McCarty and others first described a syndrome which presented with gout-like attacks of arthritis but was due to CPPD crystals instead of urate crystals. They termed the condition "pseudogout." It was noted that this was often associated with chondrocalcinosis and it was commonly held that cartilage calcification had to be present if the diagnosis was to be suggested on the basis of the radiographic findings. Subsequently, a clinical and radiographic pattern has emerged in which the diagnosis of CPPD deposition disease can be suggested in the absence of chondrocalcinosis. This condition is termed pyrophosphate arthropathy and is differentiated from degenerative disease by the pattern and distribution of the joint disease. It is important to recognize CPPD deposition disease because of its association with other diseases, such as hemochromatosis and hyperparathyroidism. Although painful periarticular tendinous calcification (peritendinitis calcarea) resulting from the deposition of calcium HA crystals has long been recognized, it has only recently been discovered that intra-articular HA can be associated with an acute inflammatory synovitis. Additionally, patients are now being identified who have CPPD deposition at one anatomic location and HA deposition at another. Differentiation of these various types of crystal-induced arthropathies should lead to more effective therapy in the future. PMID:2845468

  10. Acute diquat poisoning with intracerebral bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, S; Wilks, M; Coupe, M

    2001-01-01

    A case of severe diquat poisoning complicated by the development of aggressive behaviour, oliguric renal failure, and intracerebral bleeding is described. The patient was successfully managed and made a complete recovery. In this paper special attention has been given to the major clinical differences between diquat and paraquat intoxication.


Keywords: poisoning; diquat; paraquat PMID:11320278

  11. Macrovascular Lesions Underlying Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jacky; Cord, Branden J; O'Rourke, Timothy K; Maina, Renee M; Sommaruga, Samuel; Matouk, Charles C

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a morbid disease with a high case fatality rate. Prognosis, rehemorrhage rates, and acute, clinical decision making are greatly affected by the underlying etiology of hemorrhage. This review focuses on the evaluation, diagnosis, and management of structural, macrovascular lesions presenting with ICH, including ruptured aneurysms, brain arteriovenous malformations, cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas, and cerebral cavernous malformations. PMID:27214699

  12. [Calcifications in the maxillofacial area].

    PubMed

    Németh Bertalan; Pataky, Levente; Arpád, Joób F; Koppany, Ferenc; Barabás, József

    2015-09-01

    Among patients presenting for dental treatment we could reveal various calcifications on panoramic x-rays or on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) Calcifications is more likely to occur in vessels, ligaments, glandular tissues and is usually associated with chronic inflammation or scarring. The purpose of this article is to describe the imaging characteristics of commonly observed calcifications of the maxillofacial area with presenting our own cases such as: tonsilloliths, calcified lymph nodes, elongeated styloid process (calcified stylohyoid chain), phleboliths, carotid atheromas, calcified laryngeal cartilage. PMID:26731963

  13. Thyroid calcifications: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Lacout, Alexis; Chevenet, Carole; Thariat, Juliette; Marcy, Pierre Yves

    2016-05-01

    Incidental diagnosis of thyroid nodules is very common on adult neck ultrasonography examination. Thyroid calcifications are encountered in benign thyroid nodules and goiters as well as in thyroid malignancy. Depiction and characterization of such calcifications within a thyroid nodule may be a key element in the thyroid nodule diagnosis algorithm. The goal of this paper is to display typical radio-pathological correlations of various thyroid pathologies of benign and malignant conditions in which the calcification type diagnosis can play a key role in the final diagnosis of the thyroid nodule. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 44:245-251, 2016. PMID:26891122

  14. Calcification prevention tablets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, Geoffrey A.; Hasting, Michael A.; Gustavson, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Citric acid tablets, which slowly release citric acid when flushed with water, are under development by the Navy for calcification prevention. The citric acid dissolves calcium carbonate deposits and chelates the calcium. For use in urinals, a dispenser is not required because the tablets are non-toxic and safe to handle. The tablets are placed in the bottom of the urinal, and are consumed in several hundred flushes (the release rate can be tailored by adjusting the formulation). All of the ingredients are environmentally biodegradable. Mass production of the tablets on commercial tableting machines was demonstrated. The tablets are inexpensive (about 75 cents apiece). Incidences of clogged pipes and urinals were greatly decreased in long term shipboard tests. The corrosion rate of sewage collection pipe (90/10 Cu/Ni) in citric acid solution in the laboratory is several mils per year at conditions typically found in traps under the urinals. The only shipboard corrosion seen to date is of the yellow brass urinal tail pieces. While this is acceptable, the search for a nontoxic corrosion inhibitor is underway. The shelf life of the tablets is at least one year if stored at 50 percent relative humidity, and longer if stored in sealed plastic buckets.

  15. Intracerebral fibroma: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Stephen E.; McGinity, Michael J.; Henry, James M.; Vecil, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral fibromas are among the most rare neoplasms found in the central nervous system. Ten previously reported cases have been documented in the literature including only two reported cases since 1985. As a result, little is known about these uncommon intracerebral fibrous tumors. We report a case of an intracerebral fibroma without dural or leptomeningeal attachment, discuss the pertinent diagnostic findings and briefly review all prior reports of this entity. PMID:27194681

  16. Intracerebral fibroma: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Stephen E; McGinity, Michael J; Henry, James M; Vecil, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral fibromas are among the most rare neoplasms found in the central nervous system. Ten previously reported cases have been documented in the literature including only two reported cases since 1985. As a result, little is known about these uncommon intracerebral fibrous tumors. We report a case of an intracerebral fibroma without dural or leptomeningeal attachment, discuss the pertinent diagnostic findings and briefly review all prior reports of this entity. PMID:27194681

  17. European research priorities for intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Thorsten; Petersson, Jesper; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Christensen, Hanne; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Csiba, Laszlo; Harnof, Sagi; Krieger, Derk; Mendelow, David; Molina, Carlos; Montaner, Joan; Overgaard, Karsten; Roine, Risto O; Schmutzhard, Erich; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Toni, Danilo; Stapf, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Over 2 million people are affected by intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) worldwide every year, one third of them dying within 1 month, and many survivors being left with permanent disability. Unlike most other stroke types, the incidence, morbidity and mortality of ICH have not declined over time. No standardised diagnostic workup for the detection of the various underlying causes of ICH currently exists, and the evidence for medical or surgical therapeutic interventions remains limited. A dedicated European research programme for ICH is needed to identify ways to reduce the burden of ICH-related death and disability. The European Research Network on Intracerebral Haemorrhage EURONICH is a multidisciplinary academic research collaboration that has been established to define current research priorities and to conduct large clinical studies on all aspects of ICH. PMID:21986448

  18. European Research Priorities for Intracerebral Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Thorsten; Petersson, Jesper; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Christensen, Hanne; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Csiba, Laszlo; Harnof, Sagi; Krieger, Derk; Mendelow, David; Molina, Carlos; Montaner, Joan; Overgaard, Karsten; Roine, Risto O.; Schmutzhard, Erich; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Toni, Danilo; Stapf, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Over 2 million people are affected by intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) worldwide every year, one third of them dying within 1 month, and many survivors being left with permanent disability. Unlike most other stroke types, the incidence, morbidity and mortality of ICH have not declined over time. No standardised diagnostic workup for the detection of the various underlying causes of ICH currently exists, and the evidence for medical or surgical therapeutic interventions remains limited. A dedicated European research programme for ICH is needed to identify ways to reduce the burden of ICH-related death and disability. The European Research Network on Intracerebral Haemorrhage EURONICH is a multidisciplinary academic research collaboration that has been established to define current research priorities and to conduct large clinical studies on all aspects of ICH. PMID:21986448

  19. Critical Care Management of Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Morawo, Adeolu O; Gilmore, Emily J

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), the most devastating and debilitating form of stroke, remains a major healthcare concern all over the world. Intracerebral hemorrhage is frequently managed in critical care settings where intensive monitoring and treatment are employed to prevent and address primary and secondary brain injury as well as other medical complications that may arise. Although there has been increasing data guiding the management of ICH in the past decade, prognosis remains dismal. In this article, the authors discuss the risk factors for ICH, the role of imaging, the major targets of neurocritical care management, the etiology and management of raised intracranial pressure, as well as prevention of and prompt response to the emergence of medical complications. They also discuss the effect of early withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy on prognosis. Finally, we outline several clinical trials that hold promise in improving our management of ICH in the near future. PMID:27214697

  20. Intracerebral lymphoma deposits: investigation and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Plowman, P.N.; Wise, R.J.S.

    1984-06-01

    In a recently studied series of 12 patients with intracerebral lymphoma deposits, the following are noteworthy: Although most intracerebral lymphoma deposits are dramatically and homogenously enhanced on CT brain scan, this is not always the case; two patients with apparently necrotic centers are presented. Subtraction of enhanced CT brain scanning cuts before and after radiotherapy allow a quantitation of tumor response. The apparent paradox of deficient lymphoma deposit angiogenesis on angiography and good enhancement on CT scan was probed by positron emission topmography (ECAT) in the only patient who did not have a confounding prior craniotomy. ECAT and histopathological examination suggest that the microvasculature of intracerebral lymphoma deposits is rich. The ECAT data demonstrated that regional tumor blood flow was comparable to that in grey matter, but tumor oxygen metabolism was intermediate between grey and white matter. The interesting observation of coupled depression of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the cerebrum overlying the tumor and its surrounding edema is discussed. A protracted radiotherapy prescription (with daily fractions of 175 cGY) is favored.

  1. Calcification Transformation of Diasporic Bauxite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiuyue; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Lv, Guozhi; Zhang, Zimu; Yin, Zhengnan; Zhang, Tingan

    2016-06-01

    The disposal of red mud, which is a solid waste that is generated during the extraction of alumina from bauxite, is one of major problems faced by the aluminum industry. Alkali in red mud seeping under the soil may pollute land and water. The Northeastern University, China, has proposed a calcification-carbonation method to deal with low-grade bauxite or red mud. Its main purpose is to change the equilibrium phase of red mud to 2CaO·SiO2 and CaCO3 hydrometallurgically, so that recomposed alkali-free red mud can be widely used. We conducted calcification transformation experiments using diasporic bauxite sampled from Wenshan, and investigated the effects of parameters such as diasporic bauxite grain size, temperature and treatment time on the calcification transformation digestion rate, which is also termed the calcification transformation rate (CTR). The main phase in the calcification transformation slag (CTS) is hydrogarnet with different grain sizes. The CTR increases with decrease in diasporic bauxite grain size, or increase in temperature or reaction time. The CTR reaches a maximum of 87% after 120 min reaction at 240°C. The Na2O/Al2O3 ratio decreases with increase in temperature and reaches 1.5. The sodium content in the CTS decreases with increasing reaction time and is lower than that in the red mud treated using the Bayer process (4-12%).

  2. CT of schistosomal calcification of the intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Fataar, S.; Bassiony, H.; Satyanath, S.; Rudwan, M.; Hebbar, G.; Khalifa, A.; Cherian, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of schistosomal colonic calcification on abdominal radiographs has been described. The appearance on computed tomography (CT) is equally distinctive and occurs with varying degrees of genitourinary calcification. The authors have experience in three cases with the appearance on CT of intestinal calcification due to schistosomiasis.

  3. Prognostic factors in patients with intracerebral haematoma.

    PubMed Central

    Franke, C L; van Swieten, J C; Algra, A; van Gijn, J

    1992-01-01

    In a prospective study, the prognostic value of clinical characteristics in 157 consecutive patients with spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral haemorrhage were examined by means of multivariate analysis. Two days after the event 37 (24%) patients had died. Factors independently contributing to the prediction of two day mortality were pineal gland displacement on CT of 3 mm or more (p less than 0.001), blood glucose level on admission of 8.0 mmol/l or more (p = 0.01), eye and motor score on the Glasgow Coma Scale of eight out of 10 or less (p = 0.022) and haematoma volume of 40 cm3 or more (p = 0.037). Between the third day and one year after the event another 46 of the 120 two day survivors had died; the independent prognostic indicators for death during that period were: age 70 years or more (p less than 0.001) and severe handicap (Rankin grade five) on the third day (p less than 0.001). Functional independence (Rankin grade two or less) at one year was most common not only with the converse features of age less than 70 years (p less than 0.01) and Rankin grade four or less on the third day (p = 0.002), but also with an eye and motor score on the Glasgow Coma Scale of nine or 10 on the third day (p less than 0.001). The 120 patients with intracerebral haemorrhage who were still alive two days after the event were matched with 120 patients with cerebral infarction, according to age, level of consciousness on the third day after stroke (Glasgow Coma Scale) and handicap (Rankin grade). Survival and handicap after one year did not differ between these two groups. The conclusion drawn is that it is not the cause (intracerebral haemorrhage or cerebral infarction) but the extent of the brain lesion that determines the outcome in patients who survive the first two days. PMID:1527534

  4. Acute calcific tendinitis in children.

    PubMed

    Lassoued, S; Billey, T; Millet, J P; Henia, A O

    1999-01-01

    Acute calcific tendinitis is uncommon in children. Clinical manifestations are similar to those in adults. The abrupt onset, functional impairment, and frequent presence of fever suggest an infection. Radiographic findings establish the diagnosis, obviating the need for further investigations. PMID:10526384

  5. Intracerebral pneumatoceles following facial trauma: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, D.B.; Hertzanu, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Three patients with delayed frontal intracerebral pneumatoceles following facial injury are presented. In one patient an unusual appearance of bilateral and symmetrical frontal lobe pneumatoceles was demonstrated. While diagnosis is not difficult on routine radiographs, CT is valuable for determining effects on the brain and clearly delineating the fracture site; CT shows the location of the pneumatocele and may show an associated air-fluid level, mass effect or surrounding edema, or rim enhancement following administration of contrast material. The radiological appearances in conjunction with the clinical findings are highly characteristic and should not be mistaken for gas-forming cerebral abscesses.

  6. Genetics and molecular biology of brain calcification.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hao; Zheng, Wen; Jankovic, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Brain calcification is a common neuroimaging finding in patients with neurological, metabolic, or developmental disorders, mitochondrial diseases, infectious diseases, traumatic or toxic history, as well as in otherwise normal older people. Patients with brain calcification may exhibit movement disorders, seizures, cognitive impairment, and a variety of other neurologic and psychiatric symptoms. Brain calcification may also present as a single, isolated neuroimaging finding. When no specific cause is evident, a genetic etiology should be considered. The aim of the review is to highlight clinical disorders associated with brain calcification and provide summary of current knowledge of diagnosis, genetics, and pathogenesis of brain calcification. PMID:25906927

  7. Atypical autoerotic deaths

    SciTech Connect

    Gowitt, G.T.; Hanzlick, R.L. )

    1992-06-01

    So-called typical' autoerotic fatalities are the result of asphyxia due to mechanical compression of the neck, chest, or abdomen, whereas atypical' autoeroticism involves sexual self-stimulation by other means. The authors present five atypical autoerotic fatalities that involved the use of dichlorodifluoromethane, nitrous oxide, isobutyl nitrite, cocaine, or compounds containing 1-1-1-trichloroethane. Mechanisms of death are discussed in each case and the pertinent literature is reviewed.

  8. Mineralization (calcification) of coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, M; Pfitzner, R; Wachowiak, J

    1994-01-01

    Mineralogical investigations of calcifications located in coronary vessels were performed on the material obtained from the endarterectomized arteries of 18 patients (15 M, 3 F, aged 36-65) during surgical revascularization procedures consisting in coronary artery bypass grafting. The samples were tested using scanning microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, infrared spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, electron microprobe and neutron activation spectroscopy. The results of analyses were calculated with the use of computer programmes. Two types of mineralization were determined: 1. secret mineralization identified as higher than normal content of elements in biological tissues, not demonstrating any mineral grains, and 2. apparent mineralization, appearing micro- and macroscopically as grains composed mainly of hydroxyapatite containing admixture of carbonate groups, i.e. a mineral identical with apatite present in bones, or as calcification of other tissues (heart valves, lungs etc.). The authors suggest that the phenomenon of mineralization should be taken into consideration in the preventive treatment of coronary atheriosclerosis. PMID:7808039

  9. Coral calcification and ocean acidification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jokiel, Paul L.; Jury, Christopher P.; Kuffner, Ilsa B.

    2016-01-01

    Over 60 years ago, the discovery that light increased calcification in the coral plant-animal symbiosis triggered interest in explaining the phenomenon and understanding the mechanisms involved. Major findings along the way include the observation that carbon fixed by photosynthesis in the zooxanthellae is translocated to animal cells throughout the colony and that corals can therefore live as autotrophs in many situations. Recent research has focused on explaining the observed reduction in calcification rate with increasing ocean acidification (OA). Experiments have shown a direct correlation between declining ocean pH, declining aragonite saturation state (Ωarag), declining [CO32_] and coral calcification. Nearly all previous reports on OA identify Ωarag or its surrogate [CO32] as the factor driving coral calcification. However, the alternate “Proton Flux Hypothesis” stated that coral calcification is controlled by diffusion limitation of net H+ transport through the boundary layer in relation to availability of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The “Two Compartment Proton Flux Model” expanded this explanation and synthesized diverse observations into a universal model that explains many paradoxes of coral metabolism, morphology and plasticity of growth form in addition to observed coral skeletal growth response to OA. It is now clear that irradiance is the main driver of net photosynthesis (Pnet), which in turn drives net calcification (Gnet), and alters pH in the bulk water surrounding the coral. Pnet controls [CO32] and thus Ωarag of the bulk water over the diel cycle. Changes in Ωarag and pH lag behind Gnet throughout the daily cycle by two or more hours. The flux rate Pnet, rather than concentration-based parameters (e.g., Ωarag, [CO3 2], pH and [DIC]:[H+] ratio) is the primary driver of Gnet. Daytime coral metabolism rapidly removes DIC from the bulk seawater. Photosynthesis increases the bulk seawater pH while providing the energy that drives

  10. Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis. [Radiological findings

    SciTech Connect

    Karasick, D.; Karasick, S.

    1981-12-01

    Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis is an imflammation of the longus colli muscle tendon which is located on the anterior surface of the verterbral column extending from the atlas to the third thoracic vertebra. The acute inflammatory condition is selflimiting with symptoms consisting of a gradually increasing neck pain often associated with throat pain and difficulty swallowing. The pain is aggravated by head and neck movement. Clinically the condition can be confused with retropharyngeal absecess, meningitis, infectious spondylitis, and post-traumatic muscle spasm. The radiographic features of this condition consist of pre-vertebral soft tissue swelling from C1 to C4 and amorphous calcific density in the longus colli tendon anterior to the body of C2 and inferior to the anterior arch of C1.

  11. Pleural calcification in northwest Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Bazas, T.; Oakes, D.; Gilson, J.C.; Bazas, B.; McDonald, J.C.

    1985-12-01

    Mass miniature radiography in 1969 detected a high prevalence of pleural calcification in three villages in northwest Greece. In 1980 a survey of a 15% sample of the population over the age of 10 was carried out with a 80% response rate. Full-size radiographs, ventilatory capacity measurements, and a detailed questionnaire on respiratory symptoms, type of work, and residence were used. Independent classification of the 408 films by two readers using the ILO/UC scheme showed very few small opacities but a very high prevalence of pleural calcification first evident in young adults and rising to 70% in the elderly. The overall prevalence was 34.7% in men and 21.5% in women. A comparison with the 1969 survey showed a progression rate of 5% per annum. In neither sex was there a significant relation of pleural calcification to smoking, ventilatory capacity, nor type of work, though those classified as field croppers had a slightly higher prevalence. There was no obvious evidence of increased lung cancer or mesothelioma in the village. The agent responsible for this apparently benign condition was not identified.

  12. Atypical Optic Neuritis.

    PubMed

    Gaier, Eric D; Boudreault, Katherine; Rizzo, Joseph F; Falardeau, Julie; Cestari, Dean M

    2015-12-01

    Classic demyelinative optic neuritis is associated with multiple sclerosis and typically carries a good prognosis for visual recovery. This disorder is well characterized with respect to its presentation and clinical features by baseline data obtained through the optic neuritis treatment trial and numerous other studies. Atypical optic neuritis entails clinical manifestations that deviate from this classic pattern of features. Clinical signs and symptoms that deviate from the typical presentation should prompt consideration of less common etiologies. Atypical features to consider include lack of pain, simultaneous or near-simultaneous onset, lack of response to or relapse upon tapering from corticosteroids, or optic nerve head or peripapillary hemorrhages. The most important alternative etiologies to consider and the steps towards their respective diagnostic evaluations are suggested for these atypical features. PMID:26467052

  13. Imaging Atherosclerotic Plaque Calcification: Translating Biology.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Grant; Meadows, Judith; Morrison, Alan R

    2016-08-01

    Calcification of atherosclerotic lesions was long thought to be an age - related, passive process, but increasingly data has revealed that atherosclerotic calcification is a more active process, involving complex signaling pathways and bone-like genetic programs. Initially, imaging of atherosclerotic calcification was limited to gross assessment of calcium burden, which is associated with total atherosclerotic burden and risk of cardiovascular mortality and of all cause mortality. More recently, sophisticated molecular imaging studies of the various processes involved in calcification have begun to elucidate information about plaque calcium composition and consequent vulnerability to rupture, leading to hard cardiovascular events like myocardial infarction. As such, there has been renewed interest in imaging calcification to advance risk assessment accuracy in an evolving era of precision medicine. Here we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the biologic process of atherosclerotic calcification as well as some of the molecular imaging tools used to assess it. PMID:27339750

  14. [Anticoagulants after intracerebral haemorrhage in frail elderly].

    PubMed

    Olde Rikkert, Marcel; Claassen, Jurgen

    2015-01-01

    Restarting anticoagulants in frail older patients who have had an intracerebral haemorrhage as an adverse reaction to anticoagulant therapy is a major dilemma, and one which is not specifically addressed in the state-of-the-art paper on restarting anticoagulants elsewhere in this issue. Frail older persons have the highest risk of recurrent bleeding, but, in theory, also have the most benefit from anticoagulants due to the high absolute risk for ischemic events in atrial fibrillation, which is the major indication. However, frail older persons are largely excluded from trials with anticoagulants, which makes it impossible to solve this dilemma in an evidence-based way. Therefore, we argue that sound decision making cannot only be based on neurological or cardiological expertise, as proposed by others, but should include an overall comprehensive geriatric assessment, and, most importantly, patients and caregivers should be included in shared goal setting and shared decision making. PMID:25873225

  15. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaochun; Wen, Zunjia; Shen, Haitao; Shen, Meifen

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI) following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches. PMID:27190572

  16. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaochun; Wen, Zunjia; Shen, Haitao; Shen, Meifen; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI) following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches. PMID:27190572

  17. Targeting heme oxygenase after intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Roetling, Jing; Lu, Xiangping; Regan, Raymond F.

    2015-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the primary event in approximately 10% of strokes, and has higher rates of morbidity and mortality than ischemic stroke. Experimental evidence suggests that the toxicity of hemoglobin and its degradation products contributes to secondary injury that may be amenable to therapeutic intervention. Hemin, the oxidized form of heme, accumulates in intracranial hematomas to cytotoxic levels. The rate limiting step of its breakdown is catalyzed by the heme oxygenase (HO) enzymes, which consist of inducible HO-1 and constitutively-expressed HO-2. The effect of these enzymes on perihematomal injury and neurological outcome has been investigated in ICH models using both genetic and pharmacological approaches to alter their expression, with variable results reported. These findings are summarized and reconciled in this review; therapeutic strategies that may optimize HO expression and activity after ICH are described. PMID:25642455

  18. Surgical Strategies for Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ziai, Wendy; Nyquist, Paul; Hanley, Daniel F

    2016-06-01

    In recent decades, the surgical treatment of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has become a focus of scientific inquest. This effort has been led by an international group of neurologists and neurosurgeons with the goal of studying functional recovery and developing new surgical techniques to facilitate improved clinical outcomes. Currently, the two most pressing ICH investigational goals are (1) early blood pressure control, and (2) safe hematoma volume reduction. Achieving these goals would support decision-making, level-of-care choices, and the global research strategy of developing biologically informed treatments. Herein the authors review conventional and minimally invasive surgical approaches to spontaneous ICH, articulating the scope of the problem, recent clinical trials, management issues, and relevant questions for future research. The authors propose that strategies using minimally invasive techniques including clot aspiration with stereotactic guidance may give better results with improved clinical outcomes compared with standard open surgical approaches. PMID:27214701

  19. Leakage Sign for Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hirohata, Masaru; Nakamura, Yukihiko; Takeshige, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Takachika; Hattori, Gousuke; Sakata, Kiyohiko; Abe, Toshi; Uchiyama, Yuusuke; Sakamoto, Teruo; Morioka, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Recent studies of intracerebral hemorrhage treatments have highlighted the need to identify reliable predictors of hematoma expansion. Several studies have suggested that the spot sign on computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is a sensitive radiological predictor of hematoma expansion in the acute phase. However, the spot sign has low sensitivity for hematoma expansion. In this study, we evaluated the usefulness of a novel predictive method, called the leakage sign. Methods— We performed CTA for 80 consecutive patients presenting with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Two scans were completed: CTA phase and delayed phase (5 minutes after the CTA phase). By comparing the CTA phase images, we set a region of interest with a 10-mm diameter and calculated the Hounsfield units. We defined a positive leakage sign as a >10% increase in Hounsfield units in the region of interest. Additionally, hematoma expansion was determined on plain computed tomography at 24 hours in patients who did not undergo emergent surgery. Results— Positive spot signs and leakage signs were present in 18 (22%) patients and 35 (43%) patients, respectively. The leakage sign had higher sensitivity (93.3%) and specificity (88.9%) for hematoma expansion than the spot sign. The leakage sign, but not the spot sign, was significantly related with poor outcomes (severely disabled, vegetative state, and death) in all of the patients (P=0.03) and in patients with a hemorrhage in the putamen (P=0.0016). Conclusions— The results indicate that the leakage sign is a useful and sensitive method to predict hematoma expansion. PMID:26931155

  20. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding. PMID:27200163

  1. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification.

    PubMed

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic. PMID:22669889

  2. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification

    PubMed Central

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic. PMID:22669889

  3. Calcification

    MedlinePlus

    ... soft tissue tumors. In: Kumar V, Abbas AK, Aster JC, eds. Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of ... Saunders; 2015:chap 26. Kumar V, Abbas AK, Aster JC. Cellular responses to stress and toxic insults: ...

  4. Endocervical Atypical Polypoid Adenomyoma.

    PubMed

    Protopapas, Athanasios; Sotiropoulou, Maria; Athanasiou, Stavros; Loutradis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Atypical polypoid adenomyomas (APAMs) are rare uterine tumors that occur predominantly in premenopausal women, with less than 250 cases reported so far, worldwide. They may recur after treatment, and they may coexist with, or precede development of an endometrial adenocarcinoma. For this reason cases managed with conservative surgery or medical therapies require long-term follow-up. We report the case of a 41 years old nulliparous patient who during a diagnostic hysteroscopy was found with an endocervical atypical polypoid adenomyoma (APAM). The patient was desirous of a pregnancy, reported menometrorrhagia, and had a coexistent 5 cm, grade 2, submucous myoma, 3 endometrial polyps, and diffuse adenomyosis. She was treated with hysteroscopic resection of the APAM and polyps, plus laparoscopic myomectomy and wedge resection of adenomyosis. She is on an IVF list and after 4 months she is symptoms-free. PMID:26304721

  5. History of Preclinical Models of Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qingyi; Khatibi, Nikan; Chen, Hank; Zhang, John H.

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand a disease process, effective modeling is required that can assist scientists in understanding the pathophysiological processes that take place. Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), a devastating disease representing 15% of all stroke cases, is just one example of how scientists have developed models that can effectively mimic human clinical scenarios. Currently there are three models of hematoma injections that are being used to induce an ICH in subjects. They include the microballoon model introduced in 1987 by Dr. David Mendelow, the bacterial collagenase injection model introduced in 1990 by Dr. Gary Rosenberg, and the autologous blood injection model introduced by Dr. Guo-Yuan Yang in 1994. These models have been applied on various animal models beginning in 1963 with canines, followed by rats and rabbits in 1982, pigs in 1996, and mice just recently in 2003. In this review, we will explore in detail the various injection models and animal subjects that have been used to study the ICH process while comparing and analyzing the benefits and disadvantages of each. PMID:21725723

  6. Blood Pressure Management in Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Yousef; Qureshi, Adnan

    2016-06-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with devastating outcomes. Admission to the intensive care unit has been the only proven course to improve outcomes. All other treatment modalities have failed so far. The majority of patients presenting with ICH have an elevated blood pressure (BP). Initial data on the safety and efficacy of BP treatment in acute ICH have been conflicting. This has led to large prospective and randomized clinical trials to assess the safety and efficacy of early BP lowering in acute ICH. These trials showed safety and a tendency toward improved functional outcomes. In fact, the results of three subsequent meta-analyses also showed safety and possible efficacy of early lowering of BP in ICH. Based on the results of the published clinical trials and meta-analyses, the American Heart Association and the European Stroke Association concluded that early intensive treatment of BP in acute ICH is safe and might improve functional outcome. The authors advocate that-pending additional data from ongoing trials-health care professionals should maintain the SBp < 140 mm Hg in patients presenting with acute ICH. PMID:27214702

  7. History of preclinical models of intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingyi; Khatibi, Nikan H; Chen, Hank; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand a disease process, effective modeling is required that can assist scientists in understanding the pathophysiological processes that take place. Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), a devastating disease representing 15% of all stroke cases, is just one example of how scientists have developed models that can effectively mimic human clinical scenarios. Currently there are three models of hematoma injections that are being used to induce an ICH in subjects. They include the microballoon model introduced in 1987 by Dr. David Mendelow, the bacterial collagenase injection model introduced in 1990 by Dr. Gary Rosenberg, and the autologous blood injection model introduced by Dr. Guo-Yuan Yang in 1994. These models have been applied on various animal models beginning in 1963 with canines, followed by rats and rabbits in 1982, pigs in 1996, and mice just recently in 2003. In this review, we will explore in detail the various injection models and animal subjects that have been used to study the ICH process while comparing and analyzing the benefits and disadvantages of each. PMID:21725723

  8. Intracerebral hemorrhage due to developmental venous anomalies.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaodi; Wang, Yuzhou; Chen, Wenming; Wang, Wensheng; Chen, Kaizhe; Liao, Huayin; Lu, Jianjun; Li, Zhigang

    2016-04-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVA) and cavernous malformations (CM) are a common form of mixed vascular malformation. The relationship between DVA, CM and hemorrhage is complicated. It is important to differentiate hemorrhagic CM and hemorrhagic DVA. A retrospective review of all patients with acute spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH) between 1 May 2008 and 1 May 2013 was performed. ICH due to DVA or CM were identified and compared for demographic features, clinical symptoms, neurological deficits, and radiological findings. A total of 1706 patients with acute spontaneous ICH were admitted to our hospital during the study period. Among these, 10 (0.59%) were caused by DVA and 42 (2.47%) were caused by CM. No significant differences were found in age (p=0.252) or sex ratio (p=1.000) between the two groups. Compared with CM-induced ICH, DVA-induced ICH were characterized by cerebellar predominance (p=0.000) and less severe neurological deficits (p=0.008). Infratentorial hemorrhagic DVA are characterized by cerebellar predominance and benign clinical course. Infratentorial hemorrhagic CM are mainly located in the brainstem. DVA should be given suspected rather than CM when considering the etiology of a cerebellar hemorrhage, especially in young adults. PMID:26803466

  9. Hematoma expansion following acute intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Brouwers, H Bart; Greenberg, Steven M

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), the most devastating form of stroke, has no specific therapy proven to improve outcome by randomized controlled trial. Location and baseline hematoma volume are strong predictors of mortality, but are nonmodifiable by the time of diagnosis. Expansion of the initial hematoma is a further marker of poor prognosis that may be at least partly preventable. Several risk factors for hematoma expansion have been identified, including baseline ICH volume, early presentation after symptom onset, anticoagulation, and the CT angiography spot sign. Although the biological mechanisms of hematoma expansion remain unclear, accumulating evidence supports a model of ongoing secondary bleeding from ruptured adjacent vessels surrounding the initial bleeding site. Several large clinical trials testing therapies aimed at preventing hematoma expansion are in progress, including aggressive blood pressure reduction, treatment with recombinant factor VIIa guided by CT angiography findings, and surgical intervention for superficial hematomas without intraventricular extension. Hematoma expansion is so far the only marker of outcome that is amenable to treatment and thus a potentially important therapeutic target. PMID:23466430

  10. Delayed-onset Ureteral Obstruction and Calcification Masquerading as Renal Colic Following Deflux Injection.

    PubMed

    Romain, Julie; Fourcade, Laurent; Centi, Joachim; Blanc, Philippe; Masselin, Mathilde Casson; Lescure, Victor; Guigonis, Vincent; Descazeaud, Aurélien; Ballouhey, Quentin

    2016-08-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux is a common disorder in children, and its management has changed entirely as a result of widespread use of endoscopy procedures to inject filler materials. Complications with this type of treatment, particularly ureteral obstruction, are rare. Very few patients with delayed obstruction have been reported in the literature. We here present the case of an 8-year-old girl who exhibited symptoms of febrile renal colic and renal distension more than 5 years after undergoing endoscopic treatment. This is the first reported case of atypical late presentation combining pyelonephritis with ureteral obstruction and calcification. PMID:26970448

  11. Notch signaling in cardiovascular disease and calcification.

    PubMed

    Rusanescu, Gabriel; Weissleder, Ralph; Aikawa, Elena

    2008-08-01

    Recent increase in human lifespan has shifted the spectrum of aging-related disorders to an unprecedented upsurge in cardiovascular diseases, especially calcific aortic valve stenosis, which has an 80% risk of progression to heart failure and death. A current therapeutic option for calcified valves is surgical replacement, which provides only temporary relief. Recent progress in cardiovascular research has suggested that arterial and valve calcification are the result of an active process of osteogenic differentiation, induced by a pro-atherogenic inflammatory response. At molecular level, the calcification process is regulated by a network of signaling pathways, including Notch, Wnt and TGFbeta/BMP pathways, which control the master regulator of osteogenesis Cbfa1/Runx2. Genetic and in vitro studies have implicated Notch signaling in the regulation of macrophage activation and cardiovascular calcification. Individuals with inactivating Notch1 mutations have a high rate of cardiovascular disorders, including valve stenosis and calcification. This article reviews recent progress in the mechanism of cardiovascular calcification and discusses potential molecular mechanisms involved, focusing on Notch receptors. We propose a calcification model where extreme increases in vascular wall cell density due to inflammation-induced cell proliferation can trigger an osteogenic differentiation program mediated by Notch receptors. PMID:19936191

  12. Corneal calcification after amniotic membrane transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, S B; de Souza, R Ferreira; Hofmann-Rummelt, C; Seitz, B

    2003-01-01

    Background/aims: Amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) has become well established as a treatment for chronic epithelial defects, conjunctival reconstruction, and partial limbal cell deficiency. The aim of this study was to describe cases of corneal calcification following AMT and to search for risk factors that might predispose to this unusual finding. Methods: Details of 117 AMTs on 93 corneas of 91 patients with a follow up period of at least 1 month performed since 1999 were collected prospectively. In those with calcification clinical photographs were studied and the medical records retrospectively examined. Results: 15 calcifications in 117 AMTs (12.8%) were identified, occurring 3–17 (median 6.1) weeks after AMT, during a follow up period of 4–151 (median 25) weeks. Overall epithelial healing rate was 83%. Calcification covered a surface area between 0.7–40.5 mm2 maximum size with varied morphology. The primary diagnosis was diverse. Risk factors included the use of phosphate eye drops and pre-existing calcification in the operative or other eye. No patient with a “patch” AMT developed calcification. Conclusions: Corneal calcification occurs after some cases of AMT. A common risk factor was the postoperative use of phosphate containing eye drops. PMID:12714401

  13. Does the volume and localization of intracerebral hematoma affect short-term prognosis of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage?

    PubMed

    Salihović, Denisa; Smajlović, Dževdet; Ibrahimagić, Omer Ć

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether volume and localization of intracerebral hematoma affects the six-month prognosis of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Patients and Methods. The study included 75 patients with ICH of both sex and all age groups. ICH, based on CT scan findings, was divided in the following groups: lobar, subcortical, infratentorial, intraventricular haemorrhage and multiple hematomas. Volume of intracerebral hematoma was calculated according to formula V = 0.5 × a × b × c. Intracerebral hematomas, according to the volume, are divided in three groups (0-29 mL, 30-60 mL, and >60 mL). Results. The highest mortality rate was recorded in the group with multiple hematomas (41%), while the lowest in infratentorial (12.8%). The best six-month survival was in patients with a volume up to 29 mL, 30 of them (64%) survived. The highest mortality rate was recorded in patients with the hematoma volume >60 mL (85%). Kaplan-Meier's analysis showed that there was statistical significance between the size of the hematoma and the six-month survival (P < 0.0001). More than half of patients (61.1%) who survived 6 months after ICH were functionally independent (Rankin scale ≤2). Conclusion The volume of hematoma significantly affects six-month prognosis in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, while localization does not. PMID:24967309

  14. Does the Volume and Localization of Intracerebral Hematoma Affect Short-Term Prognosis of Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage?

    PubMed Central

    Salihović, Denisa; Smajlović, Dževdet; Ibrahimagić, Omer Ć.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether volume and localization of intracerebral hematoma affects the six-month prognosis of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Patients and Methods. The study included 75 patients with ICH of both sex and all age groups. ICH, based on CT scan findings, was divided in the following groups: lobar, subcortical, infratentorial, intraventricular haemorrhage and multiple hematomas. Volume of intracerebral hematoma was calculated according to formula V = 0.5 × a × b × c. Intracerebral hematomas, according to the volume, are divided in three groups (0–29 mL, 30–60 mL, and >60 mL). Results. The highest mortality rate was recorded in the group with multiple hematomas (41%), while the lowest in infratentorial (12.8%). The best six-month survival was in patients with a volume up to 29 mL, 30 of them (64%) survived. The highest mortality rate was recorded in patients with the hematoma volume >60 mL (85%). Kaplan-Meier's analysis showed that there was statistical significance between the size of the hematoma and the six-month survival (P < 0.0001). More than half of patients (61.1%) who survived 6 months after ICH were functionally independent (Rankin scale ≤2). Conclusion The volume of hematoma significantly affects six-month prognosis in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, while localization does not. PMID:24967309

  15. Language recovery after acute intracerebral hematoma in temporoparietal region.

    PubMed

    Kolundžić, Zdravko; Klarić, Andrea Šimić; Krip, Marija; Gotovac, Nikola; Banožić, Ljerka; Vodanović, Dinah

    2015-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations are the most common cause of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages in older children. Intracerebral hematoma can cause serious lasting neurologic, cognitive, and language deficits, or even possible death. We present the case of a 16-year-old boy who had language impairments after suffering a large hemorrhagic stroke in the left temporoparietal region. All language components, verbal and nonverbal communication, reading, and writing, were found to be affected. These impairments were expected as they are characteristic of the location of the hematoma. After a year of speech language rehabilitation, there was an almost complete recovery of language skills. Quick diagnosis and adequate therapeutic interventions are important to diminish the influence of intracerebral hemorrhage on cognitive and language functions in children. PMID:24532808

  16. Radiographic spectrum of rectocolonic calcification from schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Fataar, S; Bassiony, H; Hamed, M S; Ghoneim, I; Satyanath, S; Hebbar, H G; Elgindy, N N; Hanna, R M

    1984-05-01

    Rectocolonic calcification was detected radiographically in 17 sites in 14 patients undergoing excretory urography for the assessment of urinary schistosomiasis. The right colon was involved in 11 sites, the rectum in four, and the left colon in two. The pattern of calcification varied according to the degree of bowel distension. A laminar pattern was common to all sites and occurred when the rectum or colon was distended with air, feces, or barium. A laminar or irregular amorphous density was found in the empty colon, whereas the calcified, empty rectum had a corrugated pattern. Rectocolonic calcification is probably the most common radiographic manifestation of schistosomal infestation of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:6609576

  17. Atypical odontalgia--an update.

    PubMed

    Patel, Seena B; Boros, Audrey L; Kumar, Satish K S

    2012-09-01

    Atypical odontalgia is a commonly misdiagnosed condition that frequently leads to unnecessary dental treatments such as extraction and endodontic therapy. These treatments often worsen the pain. Despite greater recognition and understanding of this condition, proper diagnosis and treatment remains a challenge. It is believed that atypical odontalgia is a neuropathic condition. This article updates the current understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of atypical odontalgia, and provides appropriate diagnostic and management approaches for this condition. PMID:23097829

  18. A new NOTCH3 mutation presenting as primary intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pradotto, Luca; Orsi, Laura; Daniele, Dino; Caroppo, Paola; Lauro, Danilo; Milesi, Alessandra; Sellitti, Luigi; Mauro, Alessandro

    2012-04-15

    Primary intracerebral haemorrhages (PICH) are defined as haemorrhages within the brain parenchyma in the absence of readily identifiable causes. CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy) is a hereditary vascular disease and its mainly clinical manifestations are early-onset infarcts. Spontaneous lobar haematomas are a rare occurrence. We report a very unusual presentation of CADASIL in a 65 year-old man carrying a new NOTCH3 mutation. The clinical onset of the disease was related to an intracerebral haematoma following colon surgery and causing a delirium. In brief, our report suggests that CADASIL must be considered in patient with PICH. PMID:22206696

  19. Costs and benefits of calcification in coccolithophorids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anning, T.; Nimer, N.; Merrett, M. J.; Brownlee, C.

    1996-10-01

    Calcification in coccolithophorids requires major intracellular fluxes of inorganic carbon and calcium. This paper summarises the major cellular fluxes of substrates and products of calcification described in a simple four compartment model (cytosol, Golgi, coccolith vesicle and chloroplast). Measurements of the cytosolic and intra-coccolith vesicle pH and electrical potentials across the plasma membrane and coccolith vesicle membrane allow calculations of the proton electrochemical gradients across these membranes and estimates of the free carbonate and calcium concentrations in the coccolith vesicle. Calcification may provide a relatively low cost route for elevating the concentration of carbon dioxide in the chloroplast. This may have benefits in terms of the nutrient requirements for photosynthesis and growth. In particular, a close relationship appears to exist between calcification and the availability of phosphorus which may correlate with the occurrence of large scale blooms of Emiliania huxleyi in the North Atlantic.

  20. Alendronate conjugated nanoparticles for calcification targeting.

    PubMed

    Li, Nanying; Song, Juqing; Zhu, Guanglin; Shi, Xuetao; Wang, Yingjun

    2016-06-01

    In this article, the synthesis of a novel calcification-targeting nanoparticle (NP) is reported, which is realized through dopamine self-polymerization on the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particle surface and subsequent alendronate conjugation. Cell viability and proliferation tests confirmed that such particle has low cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility. Experiments were designed to observe whether the synthesized NPs can pass through an obstructive hydrogel and directly bind themselves to hydroxyapatite (HA) NPs (mimicking calcified spots) and HA porous scaffolds (mimicking calcified tissues); and the result was positive, indicating ingenious targeting of NPs on calcifications. The calcification-targeting NPs are expected to be with promising applications on calcification-related disease diagnoses and therapies. PMID:26970822

  1. Nanobacteria-associated calcific aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jelic, Tomislav M; Chang, Ho-Huang; Roque, Rod; Malas, Amer M; Warren, Stafford G; Sommer, Andrei P

    2007-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve stenosis is the most common valvular disease in developed countries, and the major reason for operative valve replacement. In the US, the current annual cost of this surgery is approximately 1 billion dollars. Despite increasing morbidity and mortality, little is known of the cellular basis of the calcifications, which occur in high-perfusion zones of the heart. The case is presented of a patient with calcific aortic valve stenosis and colonies of progressively mineralized nanobacteria in the fibrocalcific nodules of the aortic cusps, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. Consistent with their outstanding bioadhesivity, nanobacteria might serve as causative agents in the development of calcific aortic valve stenosis. PMID:17315391

  2. Coral calcification in a changing ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuffner, Ilsa B.

    2010-01-01

    One of the goals of the Coral Reef Ecosystem Studies (CREST) project is to examine how calcification rates in reef-building corals and encrusting coralline algae are changing in response to changes in the ocean environment.

  3. The relationship between pulp calcifications and salivary gland calcifications

    PubMed Central

    Kaswan, Sumita; Maheshwari, Sneha; Rahman, Farzan; Khandelwal, Suneet

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Pulp stones are discrete calcified bodies found in the dental pulp. Sialolithasis is the most common salivary gland disease. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between the pulp stones and salivary gland stones. Material and Methods: 196 patients were randomly selected from the out patient department for the study. The periapical radiographs for all patients were evaluated for the presence or absence of the narrowing of dental pulp chambers and pulp canals. The intra oral occlusal radiographs were also evaluated to determine the presence or absence of salivary stones. The results were compared and analyzed using the Chi-square test (p<0.001). Results: Salivary gland calcifications were detected in 5 patients. 191 patients had pulp narrowing and 118 patients had pulp stones. There was no statistical correlation between pulp narrowing and salivary stones (p>0.001) and also between pulp stones and salivary gland stones (p>0.001). Conclusions: However, the incidental findings of salivary gland stones on intra oral occlusal radiographs can provide useful information in the early diagnosis of the condition, but in the present study no significant relationship was found between the presence of pulp stones and salivary gland stones. Key words:Pulp stone, salivary gland stone, periapical radiograph, occlusal radiograph. PMID:25674311

  4. Testing atypical depression definitions.

    PubMed

    Benazzi, Franco

    2005-01-01

    The evidence supporting the DSM-IV definition of atypical depression (AD) is weak. This study aimed to test different definitions of AD. Major depressive disorder (MDD) patients (N = 254) and bipolar-II (BP-II) outpatients (N = 348) were interviewed consecutively, during major depressive episodes, with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. DSM-IV criteria for AD were followed. AD validators were female gender, young onset, BP-II, axis I comorbidity, bipolar family history. Frequency of DSM-IV AD was 43.0%. AD, versus non-AD, was significantly associated with all AD validators, apart from comorbidity when controlling for age and sex. Factor analysis of atypical symptoms found factor 1 including oversleeping, overeating and weight gain (leaden paralysis at trend correlation), and factor 2 including interpersonal sensitivity, mood reactivity, and leaden paralysis. Multiple logistic regression of factor 1 versus AD validators found significant associations with several validators (including bipolar family history), whereas factor 2 had no significant associations. Findings may support a new definition of AD based on the state-dependent features oversleeping and overeating (plus perhaps leaden paralysis) versus the current AD definition based on a combination of state and trait features. Pharmacological studies are required to support any new definition of AD, as the current concept of AD is based on different response to TCA antidepressants versus non-AD. PMID:16175877

  5. Comparative histology of pineal calcification.

    PubMed

    Vígh, B; Szél, A; Debreceni, K; Fejér, Z; Manzano e Silva, M J; Vígh-Teichmann, I

    1998-07-01

    The pineal organ (pineal gland, epiphysis cerebri) contains several calcified concretions called "brain sand" or acervuli (corpora arenacea). These concretions are conspicuous with imaging techniques and provide a useful landmark for orientation in the diagnosis of intracranial diseases. Predominantly composed of calcium and magnesium salts, corpora arenacea are numerous in old patients. In smaller number they can be present in children as well. The degree of calcification was associated to various diseases. However, the presence of calcified concretions seems not to reflect a specific pathological state. Corpora arenacea occur not only in the actual pineal tissue but also in the leptomeninges, in the habenular commissure and in the choroid plexus. Studies with the potassium pyroantimonate (PPA) method on the ultrastructural localization of free calcium ions in the human pineal, revealed the presence of calcium alongside the cell membranes, a finding that underlines the importance of membrane functions in the production of calcium deposits. Intrapineal corpora arenacea are characterized by a surface with globular structures. Meningeal acervuli that are present in the arachnoid cover of the organ, differ in structure from intrapineal ones and show a prominent concentric lamination of alternating dark and light lines. The electron-lucent lines contain more calcium than the dark ones. There is a correlation between the age of the subject and the number of layers in the largest acervuli. This suggests that the formation of these layers is connected to circannual changes in the calcium level of the organ. The histological organization of the human pineal is basically the same as that of mammalian experimental animals. Pineal concretions present in mammalian animal species are mainly of the meningeal type. Meningeal cells around acervuli contain active cytoplasmic organelles and exhibit alkaline phosphatase reaction in the rat and mink, an indication of a presumable

  6. The Role of Epigenetics in Arterial Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shan-Shan; Lin, Xiao; Yuan, Ling-Qing; Liao, Er-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Arterial calcification is highly prevalent and correlated with cardiovascular mortality, especially in patients with ESRD or diabetes. The pathogenesis of arterial calcification is multifactorial, with both genetic and environmental factors being implicated. In recent years, several mechanisms contributing to arterial calcification have been proposed. However, these can only explain a small proportion of the variability in arterial calcification, which is a major obstacle for its prevention and management. Epigenetics has emerged as one of the most promising areas that may fill in some of the gaps in our current knowledge of the interaction between the environmental insults with gene regulation in the development of diseases. Epigenetics refers to heritable and acquired changes in gene transcription that occur independently of the DNA sequence. Well-known components of epigenetic regulation include DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNAs. Epigenetics research in the regulation of arterial calcification has only recently been elucidated. In this review, we will summarise recent progress in epigenetic pathways involved in arterial calcification and discuss potential therapeutic interventions based on epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:26221588

  7. Soft tissue calcification in chronic dialysis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kuzela, D. C.; Huffer, W. E.; Conger, J. D.; Winter, S. D.; Hammond, W. S.

    1977-01-01

    Autopsy protocols and microscopic slides of 56 dialyzed and 18 nondialyzed chronically uremic patients were reviewed to assess the presence, extent, and severity of extraosseous soft tissue calcification. Calcification was identified in 79% of the dialysis patients and 44% of the nondialysis patients (P iss less than .025). Soft tissue calcification most frequently involved the heart, lungs, stomach, and kidneys. Lesions were severe in 36% of the dialysis patients and, when strategically located within the myocardium, were life-threatening. The deaths of 6 dialysis patients were attributed to severe calcification of the cardiac conduction system and/or myocardium. The presence and severity of soft tissue calcification was not related to duration of dialysis, patients' age, degree of parathyroid gland hyperplasia, radiographic evidence of soft tissue calcification, serum calcium and phosphate levels, Ca X P products, or type or severity of metabolic bone disease. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:836675

  8. Atypical histiocytosis in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weijun; Zhang, Rongxuan; Zhou, Ying; Xu, Jinfu; Garfield, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To report a rare case of atypical histiocytic tumor of the lung with a review of literature. Methods The clinical materials were noted. Literature related to this condition from the past 50 years was reviewed from the group of histiocytic tumors. Results and conclusions Clinical manifestations were non-specific. The imaging characteristics of our case were infiltrative lesions with multiple cysts in both lungs. Pathology showed nodular proliferation of atypical cells. Immunohistochemistry suggested a histiocytic origin of the infiltrating atypical cells. Because the pathological findings did not fall into any particular category of typical histiocytic tumors, the final diagnosis was atypical histiocytic tumor. The presentation of atypical histiocytic tumor of the lungs, only, with infiltrative lesions and multiple air cysts seems very rare, with pathological examination being “gold standard” for the diagnosis. PMID:23991320

  9. Intracerebral hemorrhage caused by varicella-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Lizarazo, Jairo; Castellanos, María Fernanda; Omaña, Claudia Rosa; Chaín, Miguel; Villamizar, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a previously healthy 44-years-old man with chickenpox, severe thrombocytopenia, mucosal hemorrhage, and intracerebral hemorrhage in the right hemisphere. The patient was treated with platelets and high doses of steroids. He recovered although with persistent left homonymous hemianopsia and epilepsy, which were controlled with medication. PMID:27622799

  10. Combined neuroradiological and neurosurgical treatment of intracerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Adelt, D; Brückmann, H; Krenkel, W; Hacke, W; Zeumer, H

    1988-07-01

    Four patients with intracerebral vascular malformations underwent preoperative butylcyanoacrylate embolization via a calibrated leak catheter, in order to reduce the risks of surgery alone. In three cases the malformation was removed without causing neurological deficits. One patient died later from recurrent bleeding. PMID:3171616

  11. Acute Renal Infarction Secondary to Calcific Embolus from Mitral Annular Calcification

    SciTech Connect

    Bande, Dinesh; Abbara, Suhny; Kalva, Sanjeeva P.

    2011-06-15

    We report a case of a 62-year-old man who presented with right groin pain who subsequently was found to have a renal infarct secondary to calcific embolus from mitral annular calcification on CT and angiography. We briefly review the literature and discuss the importance of this entity in clinical practice.

  12. Atypical causes of cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ken D; Sundaram, Vinay; Ayoub, Walid S

    2014-01-01

    Cholestatic liver disease consists of a variety of disorders. Primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis are the most commonly recognized cholestatic liver disease in the adult population, while biliary atresia and Alagille syndrome are commonly recognized in the pediatric population. In infants, the causes are usually congenital or inherited. Even though jaundice is a hallmark of cholestasis, it is not always seen in adult patients with chronic liver disease. Patients can have “silent” progressive cholestatic liver disease for years prior to development of symptoms such as jaundice and pruritus. In this review, we will discuss some of the atypical causes of cholestatic liver disease such as benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis, progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, Alagille Syndrome, biliary atresia, total parenteral nutrition induced cholestasis and cholestasis secondary to drug induced liver injury. PMID:25071336

  13. Dermatofibroma: Atypical Presentations.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Mousumi Roy; Besra, Mrinal; Dutta, Somasree; Sarkar, Somnath

    2016-01-01

    Dermatofibroma is a common benign fibrohistiocytic tumor and its diagnosis is easy when it presents classical clinicopathological features. However, a dermatofibroma may show a wide variety of clinicopathological variants and, therefore, the diagnosis may be difficult. The typical dermatofibroma generally occurs as a single or multiple firm reddish-brown nodules. We report here two atypical presentations of dermatofibroma - Atrophic dermatofibroma and keloidal presentation of dermatofibroma. Clinical dermal atrophy is a common phenomenon in dermatofibromas as demonstrated by the dimpling on lateral pressure. However, this feature is exaggerated in the atrophic variant of dermatofibroma. Atrophic dermatofibroma is defined by dermal atrophy of more than 50% of the lesion apart from the usual features of common dermatofibroma. The keloidal variant of dermatofibroma should not be overlooked as a simple keloid. The findings of keloidal change in dermatofibromas may support that trauma is a possible cause of dermatofibroma. PMID:26955137

  14. Atypical odontalgia: a review.

    PubMed

    Koratkar, Harish; Pedersen, Jerome

    2008-01-01

    Since persistent and chronic pain is more common in the head and neck region than in any other part of the body, dentists are more likely to encounter these rather complex cases in their practices. This article is a review and update on atypical odontalgia (AO). AO is a persistent neuropathic pain which may be initiated after deafferentiation of trigeminal nerve fibers following root canal treatment, apicectomy, or tooth extraction, or it may be of idiopathic origin. Details concerning its characteristics, pathophysiology, diagnostic criteria, differential diagnosis, and treatment are made. The aim of this article is to help the clinician with the diagnosis and management of AO. The prognosis for AO is most often only fair, and the administration of tricyclic antidepressants often resolves symptoms. Invasive and irreversible treatment attempts are not recommended. PMID:18363287

  15. Atypical neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    PubMed

    Collins, Ann; Davies, Drew; Menon, Sharmila

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old man was admitted to a psychiatric ward in a confused state. He had a 30-year history of lately stable schizophrenia and antipsychotic medication had recently been reduced. The clinical picture was characterised by confusion, agitation, autonomic instability, muscle rigidity and elevated creatine kinase. Despite no other identifiable cause, physicians were reluctant to accept a diagnosis of neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) due to the absence of fever. Despite acute renal failure, the patient was repeatedly transferred between medical and psychiatric wards; diagnosis and management were delayed, with potentially catastrophic consequences. NMS is a rare, life-threatening neurological disorder that can present atypically and requires emergency medical rather than psychiatric care. Clinicians must proactively distinguish between medical emergencies (including acute confusional states/delirium) and mental illness. Prompt, accurate diagnosis, management on the appropriate ward and effective teamwork between specialties are essential to improve patient outcomes in this potentially fatal condition. PMID:27298291

  16. Dermatofibroma: Atypical Presentations

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Mousumi Roy; Besra, Mrinal; Dutta, Somasree; Sarkar, Somnath

    2016-01-01

    Dermatofibroma is a common benign fibrohistiocytic tumor and its diagnosis is easy when it presents classical clinicopathological features. However, a dermatofibroma may show a wide variety of clinicopathological variants and, therefore, the diagnosis may be difficult. The typical dermatofibroma generally occurs as a single or multiple firm reddish-brown nodules. We report here two atypical presentations of dermatofibroma - Atrophic dermatofibroma and keloidal presentation of dermatofibroma. Clinical dermal atrophy is a common phenomenon in dermatofibromas as demonstrated by the dimpling on lateral pressure. However, this feature is exaggerated in the atrophic variant of dermatofibroma. Atrophic dermatofibroma is defined by dermal atrophy of more than 50% of the lesion apart from the usual features of common dermatofibroma. The keloidal variant of dermatofibroma should not be overlooked as a simple keloid. The findings of keloidal change in dermatofibromas may support that trauma is a possible cause of dermatofibroma. PMID:26955137

  17. [Atypical antipsychotics in the elderly].

    PubMed

    van Melick, E J M

    2004-12-01

    Central criteria for the definition of atypical antipsychotics are antipsychotic efficacy and minimal or none extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS). This last criterium is of importance in the differentiation with the traditional antipsychotics. Of the four atypical antipsychotics which are discussed here, clozapine is the most atypical. The best proof is its good efficacy in the treatment of Parkinson psychosis with minimal adverse effects on motor function. Clozapine is the best choice for this indication. At this moment there is not enough evidence available concerning quetiapine. Risperidon and olanzapine give more Dopamine2-occupancy with higher doses and can evoke EPS, but this is still less compared to the traditional antipsychotics. All four atypical drugs cause less tardive dyskinesia. Atypical antipsychotics are not well studied in the treatment of elderly patients with functional psychosis. However the available information and the literature on the treatment of young adults makes it probable that the atypical antipsychotics are at least as effective in the elderly as the traditional antipsychotics. The median daily doses are lower for elderly than for younger patients. Risperidon has been proven effective in the treatment of agressive behaviour in dementia. Atypical antipsychotics have their 'own' adverse effects. Those which have the most impact in the elderly are discussed. PMID:15704604

  18. Phenotype Shift from Atypical Scrapie to CH1641 following Experimental Transmission in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Marion M.; Moore, S. Jo; Lockey, Richard; Chaplin, Melanie J; Konold, Timm; Vickery, Christopher; Spiropoulos, John

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of host and infecting strain in ovine transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are known to be complex, and have a profound effect on the resulting phenotype of disease. In contrast to classical scrapie, the pathology in naturally-occurring cases of atypical scrapie appears more consistent, regardless of genotype, and is preserved on transmission within sheep homologous for the prion protein (PRNP) gene. However, the stability of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy phenotypes on passage across and within species is not absolute, and there are reports in the literature where experimental transmissions of particular isolates have resulted in a phenotype consistent with a different strain. In this study, intracerebral inoculation of atypical scrapie between two genotypes both associated with susceptibility to atypical forms of disease resulted in one sheep displaying an altered phenotype with clinical, pathological, biochemical and murine bioassay characteristics all consistent with the classical scrapie strain CH1641, and distinct from the atypical scrapie donor, while the second sheep did not succumb to challenge. One of two sheep orally challenged with the same inoculum developed atypical scrapie indistinguishable from the donor. This study adds to the range of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy phenotype changes that have been reported following various different experimental donor-recipient combinations. While these circumstances may not arise through natural exposure to disease in the field, there is the potential for iatrogenic exposure should current disease surveillance and feed controls be relaxed. Future sheep to sheep transmission of atypical scrapie might lead to instances of disease with an alternative phenotype and onward transmission potential which may have adverse implications for both public health and animal disease control policies. PMID:25710519

  19. Idiopathic Arterial Calcification of Infancy: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Tarek Hamed; Abd Alhamed, Mohamed Maisara; Selim, Mohamed Fouad; Haggag, Mohamed Salah; Fathalla, Diaa

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic arterial calcification of infancy is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by deposition of calcium along the internal elastic membrane of arteries, accompanied by fibrous thickening of the intima which causes luminal narrowing. Here we are reporting a case of idiopathic arterial calcification of infancy in a Saudi female newborn of non-consanguineous pregnant woman who had polyhydramnios. The newborn baby had severe respiratory distress, systemic hypertension and persistent pulmonary hypertension of newborn. She was admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, where she was ventilated and proper treatment was provided. Molecular genetic testing was positive for mutations of ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase1 gene which is reported in 80% of cases of Idiopathic arterial calcification of infancy. The baby died at about 5 month of age because of myocardial ischemia and cardiorespiratory arrest. Idiopathic Arterial Calcification of Infancy should be considered in any newborn who presented with persistent pulmonary hypertension of newborn, severe systemic hypertension and echogenic vessels on any radiological study. Calcifications of large and medium-sized arteries are important diagnostic finding. PMID:27252793

  20. Idiopathic Arterial Calcification of Infancy: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Attia, Tarek Hamed; Abd Alhamed, Mohamed Maisara; Selim, Mohamed Fouad; Haggag, Mohamed Salah; Fathalla, Diaa

    2015-11-01

    Idiopathic arterial calcification of infancy is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by deposition of calcium along the internal elastic membrane of arteries, accompanied by fibrous thickening of the intima which causes luminal narrowing. Here we are reporting a case of idiopathic arterial calcification of infancy in a Saudi female newborn of non-consanguineous pregnant woman who had polyhydramnios. The newborn baby had severe respiratory distress, systemic hypertension and persistent pulmonary hypertension of newborn. She was admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, where she was ventilated and proper treatment was provided. Molecular genetic testing was positive for mutations of ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase1 gene which is reported in 80% of cases of Idiopathic arterial calcification of infancy. The baby died at about 5 month of age because of myocardial ischemia and cardiorespiratory arrest. Idiopathic Arterial Calcification of Infancy should be considered in any newborn who presented with persistent pulmonary hypertension of newborn, severe systemic hypertension and echogenic vessels on any radiological study. Calcifications of large and medium-sized arteries are important diagnostic finding. PMID:27252793

  1. Current understanding of coronary artery calcification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Yue; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Ji, Qing-Wei; Cai, Meng; Zhao, Ying-Xin; Zhou, Yu-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is highly prevalent in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and is associated with major adverse cardiovascular events. There are two recognized type of CAC—intimal and medial calcification, and each of them have specific risk factors. Several theories about the mechanism of vascular calcification have been put forward, and we currently believe that vascular calcification is an active, regulated process. CAC can usually be found in patients with severe CHD, and this asymptomatic phenomenon make early diagnosis of CAC important. Coronary computed tomographic angiography is the main noninvasive tool to detect calcified lesions. Measurement of coronary artery calcification by scoring is a reasonable metric for cardiovascular risk assessment in asymptomatic adults at intermediate risk. To date, effective medical treatment of CAC has not been identified. Several strategies of percutaneous coronary intervention have been applied to CHD patients with CAC, but with unsatisfactory results. Prognosis of CAC is still a major problem of CHD patients. Thus, more details about the mechanisms of CAC need to be elucidated in order to improve the understanding and treatment of CAC. PMID:26788045

  2. High-Dose Menaquinone-7 Supplementation Reduces Cardiovascular Calcification in a Murine Model of Extraosseous Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Scheiber, Daniel; Veulemans, Verena; Horn, Patrick; Chatrou, Martijn L.; Potthoff, Sebastian A.; Kelm, Malte; Schurgers, Leon J.; Westenfeld, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular calcification is prevalent in the aging population and in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus, giving rise to substantial morbidity and mortality. Vitamin K-dependent matrix Gla-protein (MGP) is an important inhibitor of calcification. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of high-dose menaquinone-7 (MK-7) supplementation (100 µg/g diet) on the development of extraosseous calcification in a murine model. Calcification was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy combined with high phosphate diet in rats. Sham operated animals served as controls. Animals received high or low MK-7 diets for 12 weeks. We assessed vital parameters, serum chemistry, creatinine clearance, and cardiac function. CKD provoked increased aortic (1.3 fold; p < 0.05) and myocardial (2.4 fold; p < 0.05) calcification in line with increased alkaline phosphatase levels (2.2 fold; p < 0.01). MK-7 supplementation inhibited cardiovascular calcification and decreased aortic alkaline phosphatase tissue concentrations. Furthermore, MK-7 supplementation increased aortic MGP messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression (10-fold; p < 0.05). CKD-induced arterial hypertension with secondary myocardial hypertrophy and increased elastic fiber breaking points in the arterial tunica media did not change with MK-7 supplementation. Our results show that high-dose MK-7 supplementation inhibits the development of cardiovascular calcification. The protective effect of MK-7 may be related to the inhibition of secondary mineralization of damaged vascular structures. PMID:26295257

  3. Dark calcification and the daily rhythm of calcification in the scleractinian coral, Galaxea fascicularis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Horani, F. A.; Tambutté, É.; Allemand, D.

    2007-09-01

    The rate of calcification in the scleractinian coral Galaxea fascicularis was followed during the daytime using 45Ca tracer. The coral began the day with a low calcification rate, which increased over time to a maximum in the afternoon. Since the experiments were carried out under a fixed light intensity, these results suggest that an intrinsic rhythm exists in the coral such that the calcification rate is regulated during the daytime. When corals were incubated for an extended period in the dark, the calcification rate was constant for the first 4 h of incubation and then declined, until after one day of dark incubation, calcification ceased, possibly as a result of the depletion of coral energy reserves. The addition of glucose and Artemia reduced the dark calcification rate for the short duration of the experiment, indicating an expenditure of oxygen in respiration. Artificial hypoxia reduced the rate of dark calcification to about 25% compared to aerated coral samples. It is suggested that G. fascicularis obtains its oxygen needs from the surrounding seawater during the nighttime, whereas during the day time the coral exports oxygen to the seawater.

  4. Coronary Artery Disease Risk Factors, Coronary Artery Calcification and Coronary Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ulusoy, Fatih Rifat; Ipek, Emrah; Korkmaz, Ali Fuat; Gurler, Mehmet Yavuz; Gulbaran, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Atherosclerosis is an intimal disease which affects large and medium size arteries including aorta and carotid, coronary, cerebral and radial arteries. Calcium accumulated in the coronary arterial plaques have substantial contribution to the plaque volume. The aim of our study is to investigate the relationship between coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors and coronary arterial calcification, and to delineate the importance of CACS in coronary artery bypass surgery. Materials and Methods The current study is retrospective and 410 patients admitted to our clinic with atypical chest pain and without known CAD were included. These individuals were evaluated by 16 slice electron beam computed tomography with suspicion of CAD and their calcium scores were calculated. Detailed demographic and medical history were obtained from all of the patients. Results In our study, we employed five different analyses using different coronary arterial calcification score (CACS) thresold levels reported in previous studies. All of the analyses, performed according to the previously defined thresold levels, showed that risk factors had strong positive relationship with CACS as mentioned in previous studies. Conclusion Coronary arterial calcification is part of the athero-sclerotic process and although it can be detected in atherosclerotic vessel, it is absent in a normal vessel. It can be concluded that the clinical scores, even they are helpful, have some limitations in a significant part of the population for cardiovascular risk determination. It is important for an anastomosis region to be noncalcified in coronary bypass surgery. In a coronary artery, it will be helpness for showing of calcific field and anostomosis spot. PMID:26155507

  5. Regulatory Circuits Controlling Vascular Cell Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Sallam, Tamer; Cheng, Henry; Demer, Linda L.; Tintut, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a common feature of chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, and aging. Such abnormal calcium deposition occurs in medial and/or intimal layers of blood vessels as well as in cardiac valves. Once considered a passive and inconsequential finding, the presence of calcium deposits in the vasculature is widely accepted as a predictor of increased morbidity and mortality. Recognition of the importance of vascular calcification in health is driving research into mechanisms that govern its development, progression, and regression. Diverse, but highly interconnected factors, have been implicated, including disturbances in lipid metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines, and mineral and hormonal balances, which can lead to formation of osteoblast-like cells in the artery wall. A tight balance of procalcific and anticalcific regulators dictates the extent of disease. In this review, we focus on the main regulatory circuits modulating vascular cell calcification. PMID:23269436

  6. Fibroblast involvement in soft connective tissue calcification

    PubMed Central

    Ronchetti, Ivonne; Boraldi, Federica; Annovi, Giulia; Cianciulli, Paolo; Quaglino, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Soft connective tissue calcification is not a passive process, but the consequence of metabolic changes of local mesenchymal cells that, depending on both genetic and environmental factors, alter the balance between pro- and anti-calcifying pathways. While the role of smooth muscle cells and pericytes in ectopic calcifications has been widely investigated, the involvement of fibroblasts is still elusive. Fibroblasts isolated from the dermis of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) patients and of patients exhibiting PXE-like clinical and histopathological findings offer an attractive model to investigate the mechanisms leading to the precipitation of mineral deposits within elastic fibers and to explore the influence of the genetic background and of the extracellular environment on fibroblast-associated calcifications, thus improving the knowledge on the role of mesenchymal cells on pathologic mineralization. PMID:23467434

  7. Acute calcific periarthritis in a child.

    PubMed

    Mercer, N S; Newman, J H; Watt, I

    1984-10-01

    We wish to present an account of a child who developed acute calcification in his thenar eminence to highlight the difficulty in differentiation between calcific periarthritis, acute infection, on clinical grounds. Calcific periarthritis is due to hydroxyapatite crystal deposits in bursae, tendons and ligaments (Bonavita 1980) with characteristic radiographic appearances of opacities of variable density and shape around joints (Hitchcock 1959). The condition was first described in the shoulder, by Duplay in 1870 (Sandstrom 1938) and this remains the most commonly affected site. The hip, elbow, wrist, knee and ankle may also be involved but involvement of the hand is uncommon. Involvement in this site was first described in 1924 by Cohen (Carroll 1955). The previously reported age span ranged from thirteen years upwards, with an average of forty-five years, both sexes being equally affected (Currey 1970, Hitchcock 1959, Bonavita 1980). PMID:6512382

  8. [Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Blasco Pelicano, Miquel; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Campistol Plana, Josep M

    2015-11-20

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a clinical entity characterized by thrombocytopenia, non-immune hemolytic anemia and renal impairment. Kidney pathology shows thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) with endothelial cell injury leading to thrombotic occlusion of arterioles and capillaries. Traditionally, HUS was classified in 2 forms: Typical HUS, most frequently occurring in children and caused by Shiga-toxin-producing bacteria, and atypical HUS (aHUS). aHUS is associated with mutations in complement genes in 50-60% of patients and has worse prognosis, with the majority of patients developing end stage renal disease. After kidney transplantation HUS may develop as a recurrence of aHUS or as de novo disease. Over the last years, many studies have demonstrated that complement dysregulation underlies the endothelial damage that triggers the development of TMA in most of these patients. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of aHUS, together with the availability of novel therapeutic options, will enable better strategies for the early diagnosis and etiological treatment, which are changing the natural history of aHUS. This review summarizes the aHUS clinical entity and describes the role of complement dysregulation in the pathogenesis of aHUS. Finally, we review the differential diagnosis and the therapeutic options available to patients with aHUS. PMID:25433773

  9. [Cardiac valves calcifications in dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Klarić, Dragan; Klarić, Vera; Kristić, Ivica

    2011-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, especially those with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), are at much higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than the general population. High serum phosphorus (P) level play important role in pathogenesis of cardiovascular calcifications and is a frequent and important cardiovascular risk factor in patients with CKD. We aimed to investigate the association of serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), parathyroid hormon (PTH). calcium phosphorus product (CaxP) with cardiac valves calcifications (VC) in patients on hemodialysis (HD). We investigated for VC using colour Doppler echocardiography. VC were considered present if mitral annular calcifications and/or aortic annular calcifications were visualized. We divided patients in two groups. VC negative group (VC-) were patients with absence of VC. Patients with presence of VC were VC positive (VC+). CRP mean levels in two samples were higher in VC+ group than in VC- group (17.0 vs 3.4mg/L) and (17.1 vs 4.0 mg/L) p<0.0001. CaxP mean level in both samples was higher in VC+ group than in VC- group, 4.8 vs 4.2 (p=0.0219) and 5.0 vs 4.3 (p=0.0078). We also made analysis of absolute highest levels of three samples of CRP (CRPmax) between groups. CRPmax was higher in VC+ group than in VC- group, 19.5 vs 9.7 mg/L, (p=0.0045). We made analysis of absolute higher levels of two samples of Ca x P (CaxPmax) between groups. CaxPmax was higher in VC+ group than in VC- group, 5.2 vs 4.4 (p=0.0014). We found cardiac valve calcifications in 40 percent of patients on hemodialysis. We found that patients with correlation between PTH level, CRP level, CaxP product and cardiac valve calcifications have higher serum levels of PTH and CRP. We also found that CaxP product is higher in patients with cardiac valve calcifications. We didn't find correlation between age, dialysis duration, BMI and cardiac valve calcifications. These findings support careful monitoring of calcium metabolisum in end stage

  10. Where do we stand on vascular calcification?

    PubMed

    Boström, Kristina I

    2016-09-01

    Vascular disease, such as atherosclerosis and diabetic vasculopathy, is frequently complicated by vascular calcification. Previously believed to be an end-stage process of unregulated mineral precipitation, it is now well established to be a multi-faceted disease influenced by the characteristics of its vascular location, the origins of calcifying cells and numerous regulatory pathways. It reflects the fundamental plasticity of the vasculature that is gradually being revealed by progress in vascular and stem cell biology. This review provides a brief overview of where we stand in our understanding of vascular calcification, facing the challenge of translating this knowledge into viable preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27260939

  11. KINOMIC ALTERATIONS IN ATYPICAL MENINGIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Joshua C.; Taylor, Robert B.; Fiveash, John B.; de Wijn, Rik; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Willey, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to profile Atypical Meningioma in a high-throughput manner to better understand the altered signaling within these tumors and specifically the kinases altered in recurrent atypical meningioma. Kinomic Profiles could be used to identify prognostic biomarkers for responders/non-responders to classify future patients that are unlikely to benefit from current therapies. Directly these results could be used to identify drug-actionable kinase targets as well. Methods Peptide-substrate microarray kinase activity analysis was conducted with a PamStation®12 analyzing the tyrosine kinome in each tumor kinetically against ~144 target peptides. These data were then analyzed relative to clinical outcome (e.g., tumor recurrence). Results 3 major clusters of atypical meningiomas were identified with highly variant peptides primarily being targets of EGFR family, ABL, BRK and BMX kinases. Kinomic analysis of recurrent atypical meningiomas indicated patterns of increased phosphorylation of BMX, TYRO3 and FAK substrates as compared to non-recurrent tumors. Conclusion The atypical meningiomas profiled here exhibited molecular sub-clustering that may have phenotypic corollaries predictive of outcome. Recurrent tumors had increases in kinase activity that may predict resistance to current therapies, and may guide selection of directed therapies. Taken together these data further the understanding of kinomic alteration in atypical meningioma, and the processes that may not only mediate recurrence, but additionally may identify kinase targets for intervention. PMID:27158663

  12. Delayed supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage following posterior fossa surgery

    PubMed Central

    Salunke, Pravin; Malik, Vinod; Kovai, Priyamvadha; Aggarwal, Ashish; Khandelwal, Niranjan K.

    2016-01-01

    Delayed supratentorial intracerebral hematoma after posterior fossa surgery is uncommon. Only few cases have been reported in the past. The cause has been attributed to sitting position leading to changes in intracranial arterial and venous pressures. We report two cases of delayed intracerebral hematoma following posterior fossa surgery, none of which were operated in sitting position. MR venogram done in one patient showed venous sinus thrombosis. Intracererbal hematoma following infratentorial surgery is uncommon and is possibly due to venous sinus thrombosis leading to venous hypertension. Control of bleeding from venous sinuses due to avulsion of emissary veins during craniotomy/craniectomy possibly induces sinus thrombosis that may propagate antegrade or retrograde, leading to venous hypertension and parenchymal bleed. PMID:27366274

  13. Markerless surgical robotic system for intracerebral hemorrhage surgery.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sangkyun; Cho, Hyunchul; Yoon, Siyeop; Park, Kyusic; Kim, Youngjun; Park, Sehyung; Kim, Laehyun; Lee, Deukhee

    2015-01-01

    Conventional intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) surgery uses a stereotactic frame to access an intracerebral hematoma. Using a stereotactic frame for ICH surgery requires a long preparation time. In order to resolve this problem, we propose a markerless surgical robotic system. This system uses weighted iterative closest point technology for surface registration, hand-eye calibration for needle insertion, and 3D surface scanning for registration. We need calibration to integrate the technologies: calibration of robot and needle coordinates and calibration of 3D surface scanning and needle coordinates. These calibrations are essential elements of the markerless surgical robotic system. This system has the advantages of being non-invasive, a short total operation time, and low radiation exposure compared to conventional ICH surgery. PMID:26737481

  14. How Does Calcification Influence Plaque Vulnerability? Insights from Fatigue Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Baijian; Pei, Xuan; Li, Zhi-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Background. Calcification is commonly believed to be associated with cardiovascular disease burden. But whether or not the calcifications have a negative effect on plaque vulnerability is still under debate. Methods and Results. Fatigue rupture analysis and the fatigue life were used to evaluate the rupture risk. An idealized baseline model containing no calcification was first built. Based on the baseline model, we investigated the influence of calcification on rupture path and fatigue life by adding a circular calcification and changing its location within the fibrous cap area. Results show that 84.0% of calcified cases increase the fatigue life up to 11.4%. For rupture paths 10D far from the calcification, the life change is negligible. Calcifications close to lumen increase more fatigue life than those close to the lipid pool. Also, calcifications in the middle area of fibrous cap increase more fatigue life than those in the shoulder area. Conclusion. Calcifications may play a positive role in the plaque stability. The influence of the calcification only exists in a local area. Calcifications close to lumen may be influenced more than those close to lipid pool. And calcifications in the middle area of fibrous cap are seemly influenced more than those in the shoulder area. PMID:24955401

  15. Calcific tendinitis of the gluteus maximus tendon (Gluteus maximus tendinitis)

    SciTech Connect

    Wepfer, J.F.; Reed, J.G.; Cullen, G.M.; McDevitt, W.P.

    1983-02-01

    Seven cases of calcific tendinitis of the gluteus maximus tendon are presented. Awareness of the precise anatomic location of the calcific deposit is essential for the accurate diagnosis of this uncommon site of tendinitis. Clinically, the presenting complaint is that of pain. In some instances, however, the patients are asymptomatic and the calcification is an incidental finding.

  16. Early heparin therapy in patients with spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Boeer, A; Voth, E; Henze, T; Prange, H W

    1991-01-01

    In 68 patients with spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage the effect of heparin treatment beginning on the second, fourth or tenth day was investigated. Early (day 2) low-dose heparin medication significantly lowered the incidence of pulmonary embolism. An increase in the number of patients with rebleeding was not observed. The results indicate that the early use of heparin in these patients is safe and can be recommended for the prevention of thromboembolic complications. PMID:1865215

  17. Nontraumatic intracerebral hemorrhage unassociated with arterial aneurysmal rupture as a cause of sudden unexpected death

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Carey Camille; Snipes, George J.; Ko, Jong Mi; Guileyardo, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Sudden death from intracerebral hemorrhage was observed in two patients admitted to Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas in a single month. Each had been drinking alcohol at the time of onset of first symptoms. Intracerebral hemorrhage was diagnosed in one patient by computed tomography, but not in the second patient who clinically was diagnosed as having acute coronary syndrome. Both died within 24 hours of onset of symptoms, and autopsy in both disclosed intracerebral hemorrhage, an infrequent cause of sudden death. This report calls attention to intracerebral hemorrhage as a cause of sudden death. PMID:25484501

  18. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is defined by the triad of mechanical hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal impairment. Atypical HUS (aHUS) defines non Shiga-toxin-HUS and even if some authors include secondary aHUS due to Streptococcus pneumoniae or other causes, aHUS designates a primary disease due to a disorder in complement alternative pathway regulation. Atypical HUS represents 5 -10% of HUS in children, but the majority of HUS in adults. The incidence of complement-aHUS is not known precisely. However, more than 1000 aHUS patients investigated for complement abnormalities have been reported. Onset is from the neonatal period to the adult age. Most patients present with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal failure and 20% have extra renal manifestations. Two to 10% die and one third progress to end-stage renal failure at first episode. Half of patients have relapses. Mutations in the genes encoding complement regulatory proteins factor H, membrane cofactor protein (MCP), factor I or thrombomodulin have been demonstrated in 20-30%, 5-15%, 4-10% and 3-5% of patients respectively, and mutations in the genes of C3 convertase proteins, C3 and factor B, in 2-10% and 1-4%. In addition, 6-10% of patients have anti-factor H antibodies. Diagnosis of aHUS relies on 1) No associated disease 2) No criteria for Shigatoxin-HUS (stool culture and PCR for Shiga-toxins; serology for anti-lipopolysaccharides antibodies) 3) No criteria for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (serum ADAMTS 13 activity > 10%). Investigation of the complement system is required (C3, C4, factor H and factor I plasma concentration, MCP expression on leukocytes and anti-factor H antibodies; genetic screening to identify risk factors). The disease is familial in approximately 20% of pedigrees, with an autosomal recessive or dominant mode of transmission. As penetrance of the disease is 50%, genetic counseling is difficult. Plasmatherapy has been first line treatment until presently

  19. Mutations in DDX58, which Encodes RIG-I, Cause Atypical Singleton-Merten Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Mi-Ae; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Now, Hesung; Nguyen, Nhung T.H.; Kim, Woo-Jong; Yoo, Joo-Yeon; Lee, Jinhyuk; Jeong, Yun-Mi; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Sohn, Seongsoo; Nam, Seong-Hyeuk; Hong, Yoojin; Lee, Yong Seok; Chang, Sung-A; Jang, Shin Yi; Kim, Jong-Won; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lim, So Young; Sung, Ki-Sun; Park, Ki-Tae; Kim, Byoung Joon; Lee, Joo-Heung; Kim, Duk-Kyung; Kee, Changwon; Ki, Chang-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Singleton-Merten syndrome (SMS) is an autosomal-dominant multi-system disorder characterized by dental dysplasia, aortic calcification, skeletal abnormalities, glaucoma, psoriasis, and other conditions. Despite an apparent autosomal-dominant pattern of inheritance, the genetic background of SMS and information about its phenotypic heterogeneity remain unknown. Recently, we found a family affected by glaucoma, aortic calcification, and skeletal abnormalities. Unlike subjects with classic SMS, affected individuals showed normal dentition, suggesting atypical SMS. To identify genetic causes of the disease, we performed exome sequencing in this family and identified a variant (c.1118A>C [p.Glu373Ala]) of DDX58, whose protein product is also known as RIG-I. Further analysis of DDX58 in 100 individuals with congenital glaucoma identified another variant (c.803G>T [p.Cys268Phe]) in a family who harbored neither dental anomalies nor aortic calcification but who suffered from glaucoma and skeletal abnormalities. Cys268 and Glu373 residues of DDX58 belong to ATP-binding motifs I and II, respectively, and these residues are predicted to be located closer to the ADP and RNA molecules than other nonpathogenic missense variants by protein structure analysis. Functional assays revealed that DDX58 alterations confer constitutive activation and thus lead to increased interferon (IFN) activity and IFN-stimulated gene expression. In addition, when we transduced primary human trabecular meshwork cells with c.803G>T (p.Cys268Phe) and c.1118A>C (p.Glu373Ala) mutants, cytopathic effects and a significant decrease in cell number were observed. Taken together, our results demonstrate that DDX58 mutations cause atypical SMS manifesting with variable expression of glaucoma, aortic calcification, and skeletal abnormalities without dental anomalies. PMID:25620203

  20. Associations between Thyroid Hormones, Calcification Inhibitor Levels and Vascular Calcification in End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meuwese, Christiaan Lucas; Olauson, Hannes; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Ripsweden, Jonaz; Barany, Peter; Vermeer, Cees; Drummen, Nadja; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Vascular calcification is a common, serious and elusive complication of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). As a pro-calcifying risk factor, non-thyroidal illness may promote vascular calcification through a systemic lowering of vascular calcification inhibitors such as matrix-gla protein (MGP) and Klotho. Methods and Material In 97 ESRD patients eligible for living donor kidney transplantation, blood levels of thyroid hormones (fT3, fT4 and TSH), total uncarboxylated MGP (t-ucMGP), desphospho-uncarboxylated MGP (dp-ucMGP), descarboxyprothrombin (PIVKA-II), and soluble Klotho (sKlotho) were measured. The degree of coronary calcification and arterial stiffness were assessed by means of cardiac CT-scans and applanation tonometry, respectively. Results fT3 levels were inversely associated with coronary artery calcification (CAC) scores and measures of arterial stiffness, and positively with dp-ucMGP and sKlotho concentrations. Subfractions of MGP, PIVKA-II and sKlotho did not associate with CAC scores and arterial stiffness. fT4 and TSH levels were both inversely associated with CAC scores, but not with arterial stiffness. Discussion The positive associations between fT3 and dp-ucMGP and sKlotho suggest that synthesis of MGP and Klotho is influenced by thyroid hormones, and supports a link between non-thyroidal illness and alterations in calcification inhibitor levels. However, the absence of an association between serum calcification inhibitor levels and coronary calcification/arterial stiffness and the fact that MGP and Klotho undergo post-translational modifications underscore the complexity of this association. Further studies, measuring total levels of MGP and membrane bound Klotho, should examine this proposed pathway in further detail. PMID:26147960

  1. Aneurysm strength can decrease under calcification.

    PubMed

    Volokh, Konstantin Y; Aboudi, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    Aneurysms are abnormal dilatations of vessels in the vascular system that are prone to rupture. Prediction of the aneurysm rupture is a challenging and unsolved problem. Various factors can lead to the aneurysm rupture and, in the present study, we examine the effect of calcification on the aneurysm strength by using micromechanical modeling. The calcified tissue is considered as a composite material in which hard calcium particles are embedded in a hyperelastic soft matrix. Three experimentally calibrated constitutive models incorporating a failure description are used for the matrix representation. Two constitutive models describe the aneurysmal arterial wall and the third one - the intraluminal thrombus. The stiffness and strength of the calcified tissue are simulated in uniaxial tension under the varying amount of calcification, i.e. the relative volume of the hard inclusion within the periodic unit cell. In addition, the triaxiality of the stress state, which can be a trigger for the cavitation instability, is tracked. Results of the micromechanical simulation show an increase of the stiffness and a possible decrease of the strength of the calcified tissue as compared to the non-calcified one. The obtained results suggest that calcification (i.e. the presence of hard particles) can significantly affect the stiffness and strength of soft tissue. The development of refined experimental techniques that will allow for the accurate quantitative assessment of calcification is desirable. PMID:26717251

  2. Role of Vitamin K in Calcification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Observational studies are promising in terms of associations between vitamin K (either diet or biochemical measures) and bone health and other conditions of normal calcification in the elderly. The level of evidence from randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials with phylloquinone is very ...

  3. Reversible vascular calcifications associated with hypervitaminosis D.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Massimo; Bilancio, Giancarlo; Cirillo, Chiara

    2016-02-01

    A 64-year-old man was hospitalized in 2002 with symptoms of stupor, weakness, and renal colic. The clinical examination indicated borderline hypertension, small masses in the glutei, and polyuria. Laboratory tests evidenced high serum concentrations of creatinine, calcium, and phosphate. Imaging assessments disclosed widespread vascular calcifications, gluteal calcifications, and pelvic ectasia. Subsequent lab tests indicated suppressed serum parathyroid hormone, extremely high serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D, and normal serum 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D. Treatment was started with intravenous infusion of saline and furosemide due to the evidence of hypercalcemia. Prednisone and omeprazole were added given the evidence of hypervitaminosis D. The treatment improved serum calcium, kidney function, and consciousness. The medical history disclosed recent treatment with exceptionally high doses of slow-release intra-muscular cholecalciferol and the recent excretion of urinary stones. The patient was discharged when it was possible to stop the intravenous treatment. The post-discharge treatment included oral hydration, furosemide, prednisone and omeprazole for approximately 6 months up to complete resolution of the hypercalcemia. The patient came back 12 years later because of microhematuria. Lab tests were normal for calcium/phosphorus homeostasis and kidney function. Imaging tests indicated only minor vascular calcifications. This is the first evidence of reversible vascular calcifications secondary to hypervitaminosis D. PMID:26318020

  4. Acute Calcific Bursitis After Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Barbotage of Rotator Cuff Calcific Tendinopathy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bo-Sung; Lee, Seung Hak; Cho, Yung; Chung, Sun Gun

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous barbotage is an effective treatment for rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy, providing rapid and substantial pain relief. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with aggravated pain early after ultrasound-guided barbotage of a large calcific deposit in the supraspinatus tendon. Subsequent examination revealed a thick calcification spreading along the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa space, suggesting acute calcific bursitis complicated by barbotage. Additional barbotage alleviated her pain completely. Therefore, a high index of suspicion for acute calcific bursitis is required in patients with unresolved or aggravated pain after barbotage. Repeated barbotage could be effective for this condition. PMID:26902864

  5. Adipocyte induced arterial calcification is prevented with sodium thiosulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Neal X.; O’Neill, Kalisha; Akl, Nader Kassis; Moe, Sharon M.

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • High phosphorus can induce calcification of adipocytes, even when fully differentiated. • Adipocytes can induce vascular calcification in an autocrine manner. • Sodium thiosulfate inhibits adipocyte calcification. - Abstract: Background: Calcification can occur in fat in multiple clinical conditions including in the dermis, breasts and in the abdomen in calciphylaxis. All of these are more common in patients with advanced kidney disease. Clinically, hyperphosphatemia and obesity are risk factors. Thus we tested the hypothesis that adipocytes can calcify in the presence of elevated phosphorus and/or that adipocytes exposed to phosphorus can induce vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification. Methods: 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were induced into mature adipocytes and then treated with media containing high phosphorus. Calcification was assessed biochemically and PCR performed to determine the expression of genes for osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation. Adipocytes were also co-cultured with bovine VSMC to determine paracrine effects, and the efficacy of sodium thiosulfate was determined. Results: The results demonstrated that high phosphorus induced the calcification of differentiated adipocytes with increased expression of osteopontin, the osteoblast transcription factor Runx2 and decreased expression of adipocyte transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein α (CEBPα), indicating that high phosphorus led to a phenotypic switch of adipocytes to an osteoblast like phenotype. Sodium thiosulfate, dose dependently decreased adipocyte calcification and inhibited adipocyte induced increase of VSMC calcification. Co-culture studies demonstrated that adipocytes facilitated VSMC calcification partially mediated by changes of secretion of leptin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from adipocytes. Conclusion: High phosphorus induced calcification of mature adipocytes, and

  6. Identification of atypical flight patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, Irving C. (Inventor); Ferryman, Thomas A. (Inventor); Amidan, Brett G. (Inventor); Whitney, Paul D. (Inventor); White, Amanda M. (Inventor); Willse, Alan R. (Inventor); Cooley, Scott K. (Inventor); Jay, Joseph Griffith (Inventor); Lawrence, Robert E. (Inventor); Mosbrucker, Chris (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Method and system for analyzing aircraft data, including multiple selected flight parameters for a selected phase of a selected flight, and for determining when the selected phase of the selected flight is atypical, when compared with corresponding data for the same phase for other similar flights. A flight signature is computed using continuous-valued and discrete-valued flight parameters for the selected flight parameters and is optionally compared with a statistical distribution of other observed flight signatures, yielding atypicality scores for the same phase for other similar flights. A cluster analysis is optionally applied to the flight signatures to define an optimal collection of clusters. A level of atypicality for a selected flight is estimated, based upon an index associated with the cluster analysis.

  7. [Atypical antipsychotics and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Baranyi, Andreas; Yazdani, Renè; Haas-Krammer, Alexandra; Stepan, Alexandra; Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter; Rothenhäusler, Hans-Bernd

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of atypical antipsychotics in psychopharmacology represented a major advance in the treatment of psychotic disorders. However, there have been numerous studies that certain atypical antipsychotics may be associated with a greater risk of metabolic abnormalities than others, including weight gain, hyperlipidemia and new-onset typ 2 diabetes mellitus. A G-Protein beta3 subunit Gen (C825T) polymorphism, an increased carbohydrate metabolism and dyshormonism are discussed as pathogenetic mechanisms. High risk patients (adiposity, hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, preexisting diabetes) should maintain an antipsychotic agent with a favourable side effect profile. In these cases a periodical diabetes screening and blood lipid controls are required. Clinicans must balance the significant benefits of atypical antipsychotics against the risk of metabolic disturbances. In this article recent findings are reviewed. PMID:17915438

  8. [Pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture].

    PubMed

    Iwata, Ken; Mashiba, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated microdamage accumulation in the fracture sites in the patients of subtrochanteric atypical femoral fracture with long term bisphosphonate therapy and of incomplete shaft fracture of lateral femoral bowing without bisphosphonate therapy. Based on these findings, pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture is revealed stress fracture caused by accumulation of microdamages between distal to the lesser trochanter and proximal to the supracondylar flare in the femur in association with severely suppressed bone turnover and/or abnormal lower limb alignment, that causes stress concentration on the lateral side cortex of the femur. PMID:26728533

  9. Atypical neurological manifestations of malaria

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Neeraj; Gupta, Monica; Singh, Ram; Kumar, Ashwani

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is known as a great mimic. It can manifest subtly or abruptly, typically or atypically. This aspect of the disease can frequently mislead physicians. We present two patients of malaria with atypical neurological manifestations. The first patient of Plasmodium falciparum malaria presented with fever and altered sensorium; MRI of the brain suggested cerebral venous thrombosis. The second patient of Plasmodium vivax presented with fever, double vision and right eye lateral rectus palsy due to unilateral sixth cranial nerve involvement. Both patients were managed with antimalarials and supportive medical management, and had uneventful recoveries. PMID:25150266

  10. Calcification by reef-building sclerobionts.

    PubMed

    Mallela, Jennie

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that deteriorating water quality associated with increased sediment stress has reduced calcification rates on coral reefs. However, there is limited information regarding the growth and development of reef building organisms, aside from the corals themselves. This study investigated encruster calcification on five fore-reefs in Tobago subjected to a range of sedimentation rates (1.2 to 15.9 mg cm(-2) d(-1)). Experimental substrates were used to assess rates of calcification in sclerobionts (e.g. crustose coralline algae, bryozoans and barnacles) across key reef microhabitats: cryptic (low-light), exposed (open-horizontal) and vertical topographic settings. Sedimentation negatively impacted calcification by photosynthesising crustose coralline algae in exposed microhabitats and encrusting foram cover (%) in exposed and cryptic substrates. Heterotrophs were not affected by sedimentation. Fore-reef, turbid water encruster assemblages calcified at a mean rate of 757 (SD ±317) g m(-2) y(-1). Different microhabitats were characterised by distinct calcareous encruster assemblages with different rates of calcification. Taxa with rapid lateral growth dominated areal cover but were not responsible for the majority of CaCO3 production. Cryptobiont assemblages were composed of a suite of calcifying taxa which included sciaphilic cheilostome bryozoans and suspension feeding barnacles. These calcified at mean rates of 20.1 (SD ±27) and 4.0 (SD ±3.6) g m(-2) y(-1) respectively. Encruster cover (%) on exposed and vertical substrates was dominated by crustose coralline algae which calcified at rates of 105.3 (SD ±67.7) g m(-2) y(-1) and 56.3 (SD ±8.3) g m(-2) y(-1) respectively. Globally, encrusting organisms contribute significant amounts of carbonate to the reef framework. These results provide experimental evidence that calcification rates, and the importance of different encrusting organisms, vary significantly according to topography and sediment

  11. Calcification by Reef-Building Sclerobionts

    PubMed Central

    Mallela, Jennie

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that deteriorating water quality associated with increased sediment stress has reduced calcification rates on coral reefs. However, there is limited information regarding the growth and development of reef building organisms, aside from the corals themselves. This study investigated encruster calcification on five fore-reefs in Tobago subjected to a range of sedimentation rates (1.2 to 15.9 mg cm−2 d−1). Experimental substrates were used to assess rates of calcification in sclerobionts (e.g. crustose coralline algae, bryozoans and barnacles) across key reef microhabitats: cryptic (low-light), exposed (open-horizontal) and vertical topographic settings. Sedimentation negatively impacted calcification by photosynthesising crustose coralline algae in exposed microhabitats and encrusting foram cover (%) in exposed and cryptic substrates. Heterotrophs were not affected by sedimentation. Fore-reef, turbid water encruster assemblages calcified at a mean rate of 757 (SD ±317) g m−2 y−1. Different microhabitats were characterised by distinct calcareous encruster assemblages with different rates of calcification. Taxa with rapid lateral growth dominated areal cover but were not responsible for the majority of CaCO3 production. Cryptobiont assemblages were composed of a suite of calcifying taxa which included sciaphilic cheilostome bryozoans and suspension feeding barnacles. These calcified at mean rates of 20.1 (SD ±27) and 4.0 (SD ±3.6) g m−2 y−1 respectively. Encruster cover (%) on exposed and vertical substrates was dominated by crustose coralline algae which calcified at rates of 105.3 (SD ±67.7) g m−2 y−1 and 56.3 (SD ±8.3) g m−2 y−1 respectively. Globally, encrusting organisms contribute significant amounts of carbonate to the reef framework. These results provide experimental evidence that calcification rates, and the importance of different encrusting organisms, vary significantly according to topography and sediment

  12. COX2 Inhibition Reduces Aortic Valve Calcification In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wirrig, Elaine E.; Gomez, M. Victoria; Hinton, Robert B.; Yutzey, Katherine E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, which affects approximately 1% of the US population and is characterized by calcific nodule formation and stenosis of the valve. Klotho-deficient mice were used to study the molecular mechanisms of CAVD as they develop robust aortic valve (AoV) calcification. Through microarray analysis of AoV tissues from klotho-deficient and wild type mice, increased expression of the gene encoding cyclooxygenase 2/COX2 (Ptgs2) was found. COX2 activity contributes to bone differentiation and homeostasis, thus the contribution of COX2 activity to AoV calcification was assessed. Approach and Results In klotho-deficient mice, COX2 expression is increased throughout regions of valve calcification and is induced in the valvular interstitial cells (VICs) prior to calcification formation. Similarly, COX2 expression is increased in human diseased AoVs. Treatment of cultured porcine aortic VICs with osteogenic media induces bone marker gene expression and calcification in vitro, which is blocked by inhibition of COX2 activity. In vivo, genetic loss of function of COX2 cyclooxygenase activity partially rescues AoV calcification in klotho-deficient mice. Moreover, pharmacologic inhibition of COX2 activity in klotho-deficient mice via celecoxib-containing diet reduces AoV calcification and blocks osteogenic gene expression. Conclusions COX2 expression is upregulated in CAVD and its activity contributes to osteogenic gene induction and valve calcification in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25722432

  13. Computed tomographic evaluation of pineal calcification.

    PubMed

    Kohli, N; Rastogi, H; Bhadury, S; Tandon, V K

    1992-04-01

    A prospective study to ascertain the incidence of normally calcified pineal gland, was carried out in 1000 consecutive patients from different parts of Uttar Pradesh (India), undergoing cranial computed tomography for reasons other than a pineal or parapineal pathology. A total of 167 (16.70%) patients were found to have calcified pineals. Of these 128 were males and 39 females. The incidence rose from 1.16 per cent in the first decade to 31.88 per cent above the age of 50 yr. The percentage incidence of normal pineal calcification was lower than that seen in the Western population. No significant difference was found between men and women in any age group. Although calcification appeared as early as the first decade, this percentage was significantly lower than in the higher age groups. Significantly higher incidence rates were seen in the second decade, third decade and sixth decade onwards. PMID:1428055

  14. Dystrophic Calcification of the Prostate after Cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present a previously undocumented complication of dystrophic calcification of the prostate after cryotherapy. An 87-year-old male presented with recurrent lower urinary tract infections and was found to have an obstructing large calcified mass in the right lobe of the prostate. Subsequently, he underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and bladder neck with laser lithotripsy to remove the calculus. We propose that chronic inflammation and necrosis of the prostate from cryotherapy resulted in dystrophic calcification of the prostate. As the use of cryotherapy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer continues to increase, it is important that clinicians be aware of this scenario and the technical challenges it poses. PMID:25548712

  15. Unusual ganglioglioma with extensive calcification and ossification.

    PubMed

    Kavishwar, Vikas Shashikant; Chadha, Kirti G; Barodawala, Shaikhali Moiz; Murthy, Anuradha Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Ganglioglioma is a slow-growing relatively low-grade mixed glioneuronal tumor with most cases corresponding to the WHO Grade I category. It frequently presents with seizures. The temporal lobe is the most common location followed by frontal, parietal, and occipital lobes. These generally behave in a benign fashion and have a favorable prognosis. We describe a case of a 24-year-old male presenting with convulsions and a calcified parieto-occipital mass. This mass removed from the parietal lobe showed neoplastic glial and dysplastic neuronal tissue amidst extensive areas of calcification and foci of ossification. On immunohistochemistry, the glial component expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein whereas the dysplastic neuronal component expressed synaptophysin and CD34. Epithelial membrane antigen was negative and Ki-67 showed a low proliferative index. After the surgery, the patient is free of neurological symptoms. Widespread calcification and ossification are very unusual in ganglioglioma, which prompted us to report this case. PMID:27510688

  16. Vascular calcification in diabetes: mechanisms and implications.

    PubMed

    Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Budoff, Matthew J; Hokanson, John E

    2013-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death among adults with diabetes, and CVD prevention remains a major challenge. Coronary artery calcium (CAC) score measured by electron beam tomography (EBT) or multi-slice detector computed tomography correlates closely with plaque burden and coronary angiography, and predicts coronary events independently of other risk factors. Further, progression of CAC over several years has been shown to predict increased mortality. Coronary calcification is an active process strongly associated with atherosclerotic plaque evolution and is an accepted surrogate endpoint in studies of patients with diabetes older than 30. In this review, recent findings regarding the mechanisms and implications of vascular calcification in diabetes will be discussed. PMID:23526400

  17. Intracerebral Cell Implantation: Preparation and Characterization of Cell Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Tiziana; Nicholls, Francesca; Modo, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral cell transplantation is increasingly finding a clinical translation. However, the number of cells surviving after implantation is low (5-10%) compared to the number of cells injected. Although significant efforts have been made with regard to the investigation of apoptosis of cells after implantation, very little optimization of cell preparation and administration has been undertaken. Moreover, there is a general neglect of the biophysical aspects of cell injection. Cell transplantation can only be an efficient therapeutic approach if an optimal transfer of cells from the dish to the brain can be ensured. We therefore focused on the in vitro aspects of cell preparation of a clinical-grade human neural stem cell (NSC) line for intracerebral cell implantation. NSCs were suspended in five different vehicles: phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM), artificial cerebral spinal fluid (aCSF), HypoThermosol, and Pluronic. Suspension accuracy, consistency, and cell settling were determined for different cell volume fractions in addition to cell viability, cell membrane damage, and clumping. Maintenance of cells in suspension was evaluated while being stored for 8 h on ice, at room temperature, or physiological normothermia. Significant differences between suspension vehicles and cellular volume fractions were evident. HypoThermosol and Pluronic performed best, with PBS, aCSF, and DMEM exhibiting less consistency, especially in maintaining a suspension and preserving viability under different storage conditions. These results provide the basis to further investigate these preparation parameters during the intracerebral delivery of NSCs to provide an optimized delivery process that can ensure an efficient clinical translation. PMID:26720923

  18. Enlarging mediastinal/hilar lymphadenopathy with calcification.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Takashi; Nakahata, Masashi; Moritani, Suzuko; Iida, Hiroatsu; Ogawa, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    A 77-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to enlarging mediastinal/hilar lymphadenopathy with calcification. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and bone marrow aspiration were performed. Subsequently, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) associated with mediastinal amyloidosis was diagnosed. We hereby report a case in which EBUS-TBNA led to a successful diagnosis of amyloidosis. PMID:26862422

  19. Atypical cadherin negotiates a turn.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dongbo; Fujimori, Toshihiko; Uemura, Tadashi

    2013-07-15

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling is involved in many polarized cell behaviors. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Tatin et al. (2013) show that the atypical cadherin Celsr1 is transiently localized to cellular protrusions in lymphatic endothelial cells and acts to orient valve-forming cells perpendicular to the vessel axis. PMID:23867224

  20. Atypical Cogan's syndrome mimicking encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Lepur, Dragan; Vranjican, Zoran; Himbele, Josip; Barsić, Bruno; Klinar, Igor

    2004-01-01

    Cogan's syndrome is a rare autoimmune multisystem disease. The main clinical features of typical Cogan's syndrome are vestibuloauditory dysfunction and interstitial keratitis. The authors present a case of atypical Cogan's syndrome with headache, fever, deafness, trigeminal neuralgia and electroencephalographic abnormality which mimicked viral encephalitis. PMID:15307593

  1. Intracerebral haemorrhage in primary and metastatic brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Salmaggi, Andrea; Erbetta, Alessandra; Silvani, Antonio; Maderna, Emanuela; Pollo, Bianca

    2008-09-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage may both be a presenting manifestation in unrecognised brain tumour or--more frequently--take place in the disease course of known/suspected brain tumour due to diagnostic/therapeutic procedures, including biopsy, locoregional treatments and anti-angiogenic therapies. Apart from the difficulties inherent to accurate neuroradiological diagnosis in selected cases with small tumour volume, the main clinical problem that neurologists face is represented by decision making in prophylaxis/treatment of venous thromboembolism in these patients. These points are briefly discussed and available evidence on the last point is commented on. PMID:18690513

  2. Oxidative Stress in Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Sources, Mechanisms, and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin; Tao, Chuanyuan; Gan, Qi; Zheng, Jun; Li, Hao; You, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with the highest mortality and morbidity despite only constituting approximately 10–15% of all strokes. Complex underlying mechanisms consisting of cytotoxic, excitotoxic, and inflammatory effects of intraparenchymal blood are responsible for its highly damaging effects. Oxidative stress (OS) also plays an important role in brain injury after ICH but attracts less attention than other factors. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that the metabolite axis of hemoglobin-heme-iron is the key contributor to oxidative brain damage after ICH, although other factors, such as neuroinflammation and prooxidases, are involved. This review will discuss the sources, possible molecular mechanisms, and potential therapeutic targets of OS in ICH. PMID:26843907

  3. [Intracerebral tuberculoma. Clinical and x-ray computed tomographic characteristics].

    PubMed

    Ruelle, A; Boccardo, M; Lasio, G

    1984-01-01

    Intracranial tuberculomas have become uncommon in industrial nations, while they still have a high incidence in underdeveloped countries. Four cases of intracerebral supratentorial tuberculomas are reported in this paper. Clinical findings suggestive of tuberculosis were present in only one case. The other cases were thought to be gliomas or metastases and the diagnosis was made only after surgery. The CT scan provided a good image of the lesions whose characteristics, however, were diagnostically confusing. When a tuberculoma is suspected, medical therapy alone should be administered initially. Surgery should be resorted to in cases of markedly increased intracranial pressure. PMID:6571449

  4. [Intracerebral abscess after infection with non-toxigenic Vibrio cholerae].

    PubMed

    Torp-Pedersen, Trine; Nielsen, Xiaohui Chen; Olsen, Katharina E P; Barfod, Toke S

    2012-02-20

    We present the first case of intracerebral abscess after blood-borne infection with non-toxigenic Vibrio cholerae (non-01). The patient was a 66 year-old woman who was infected after swimming in Danish seawater during an unusually hot summer. She had predisposing haemochromatosis and a skin lesion on the ankle. We treated the patient with meropenem and ciprofloxacin for six weeks followed by ciprofloxacin for four weeks, and she recovered with hemiparesis and speech impairment. Marine Vibrio species may produce intracranial infection in predisposed individuals, even in temperate climate zones. PMID:22348672

  5. Intracerebral hemorrhage in mouse models: therapeutic interventions and functional recovery

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, S. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    There has been strong pre-clinical research on mechanisms of initial cell death and tissue injury in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). This data has led to the evaluation of several therapeutics for neuroprotection or the mitigation of early tissue damage. Most of these studies have been done in the rat. Also, there has been little study of the mechanisms of tissue repair and recovery. This review examines the testing of candidate therapeutics in mouse models of ICH for their effect on tissue protection and repair. This review will help the readers compare it to the extensively researched rat model of ICH and thus enhance work that are pending in mouse model. PMID:24810632

  6. Recognition and diagnosis of atypical depression.

    PubMed

    Thase, Michael E

    2007-01-01

    The term atypical depression dates to the first wave of reports describing differential response to monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). In contrast to more TCA-responsive depressions, patients with so-called atypical symptoms (e.g., hypersomnia, interpersonal sensitivity, leaden paralysis, increased appetite and/or weight, and phobic anxiety) were observed to be more responsive to MAOIs. After several decades of controversy and debate, the phrase "with atypical features" was added as an episode specifier in the DSM-IV in 1994. The 1-year prevalence of the defined atypical depression subtype is approximately 1% to 4%; around 15% to 29% of patients with major depressive disorder have atypical depression. Hardly "atypical" in contemporary contexts, atypical depression also is common in dysthymic bipolar II disorders and is notable for its early age at onset, more chronic course, and high rates of comorbidity with social phobia and panic disorder with agoraphobia. The requirement of preserved mood reactivity is arguably the most controversial of the DSM-IV criteria for atypical depression. When compared with melancholia, the neurobiological profiles of patients with atypical depression are relatively normal. The utility of the atypical depression subtype for differential therapeutics diminished substantially when the TCAs were supplanted as first-line antidepressants by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Although introduction of safer MAOIs has fostered renewed interest in atypical depression, the validity and importance of the DSM-IV definition of atypical depression for the nosology of affective illness remains an open question. PMID:17640153

  7. Calcification of intraocular implant lens surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenju; Guan, Xiangying; Tang, Ruikang; Hook, Daniel; Yan, Wenyan; Grobe, George; Nancollas, George H

    2004-02-17

    Calcification of octacalcium phosphate [Ca8H2(PO4)6 x 5H2O, OCP] on differently packaged "Ultem" and "Surefold" intraocular implant lens surfaces has been studied in vitro in solutions supersaturated with respect to OCP at pH = 7.10 and 37 degrees C. No mineral deposition was observed on the lenses packaged in Ultem vials even after treatment with behenic acid, one of the fatty acids identified on explanted lenses. Following treatment with behenic acid, nucleation of OCP occurred on the lenses from Surefold vials, which incorporate silicone gaskets; induction periods preceding calcification were about 6 h. No mineralization was found on the lenses in vials with other gasket materials, including polytetrafluoroethylene, fluorocarbon elastomer, and polypropylene. The results of this study indicate that both silicone and fatty acids such as behenic acid play important roles in inducing the in vivo calcification of OCP on IOL lenses; all of the lens treatment steps were necessary for nucleation induction. PMID:15803719

  8. Aortic Stenosis and Vascular Calcifications in Alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Hannoush, Hwaida; Introne, Wendy J.; Chen, Marcus Y.; Lee, Sook-Jin; O'Brien, Kevin; Suwannarat, Pim; Kayser, Michael A.; Gahl, William A.; Sachdev, Vandana

    2011-01-01

    Alkaptonuria is a rare metabolic disorder of tyrosine catabolism in which homogentisic acid (HGA) accumulates and is deposited throughout the spine, large joints, cardiovascular system, and various tissues throughout the body. In the cardiovascular system, pigment deposition has been described in the heart valves, endocardium, pericardium, aortic intima and coronary arteries. The prevalence of cardiovascular disease in patients with alkaptonuria varies in previous reports . We present a series of 76 consecutive adult patients with alkaptonuria who underwent transthoracic echocardiography between 2000 and 2009. A subgroup of 40 patients enrolled in a treatment study underwent non-contrast CT scans and these were assessed for vascular calcifications. Six of the 76 patients had aortic valve replacement. In the remaining 70 patients, 12 patients had aortic sclerosis and 7 patients had aortic stenosis. Unlike degenerative aortic valve disease, we found no correlation with standard cardiac risk factors. There was a modest association between the severity of aortic valve disease and joint involvement, however, we saw no correlation with urine HGA levels. Vascular calcifications were seen in the coronaries, cardiac valves, aortic root, descending aorta and iliac arteries. These findings suggest an important role for echocardiographic screening of alkaptonuria patients to detect valvular heart disease and cardiac CT to detect coronary artery calcifications. PMID:22100375

  9. Treatment of hypophosphatemic rickets in generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) without worsening of vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Carlos R; Ziegler, Shira G; Gupta, Ashutosh; Groden, Catherine; Hsu, Kevin S; Gahl, William A

    2016-05-01

    Patients with generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) develop vascular calcifications early in life. About half of them die within the first 6 months despite optimal medical care. A subset of those who survive eventually develop hypophosphatemic rickets. Since hypophosphatemia and hyperphosphaturia have been previously associated with increased survival in GACI patients, physicians often avoid phosphate repletion as treatment for rickets. As a consequence, GACI patients develop severe rachitic complications such as short stature and skeletal deformities. It appears that the recognition of hypophosphatemia later in life in some GACI patients is a consequence of having survived the first few months of life, and not the cause of their survival per se. Here, we report the long-term follow-up of a GACI patient who was phosphate-repleted for his rickets for more than 7 years without worsening of vascular calcification. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26857895

  10. Revisiting cardiovascular calcification: A multifaceted disease requiring a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, Joshua D; Goettsch, Claudia; Rogers, Maximillian A; Aikawa, Elena

    2015-10-01

    The presence of cardiovascular calcification significantly predicts patients' morbidity and mortality. Calcific mineral deposition within the soft cardiovascular tissues disrupts the normal biomechanical function of these tissues, leading to complications such as heart failure, myocardial infarction, and stroke. The realization that calcification results from active cellular processes offers hope that therapeutic intervention may prevent or reverse the disease. To this point, however, no clinically viable therapies have emerged. This may be due to the lack of certainty that remains in the mechanisms by which mineral is deposited in cardiovascular tissues. Gaining new insight into this process requires a multidisciplinary approach. The pathological changes in cell phenotype that lead to the physicochemical deposition of mineral and the resultant effects on tissue biomechanics must all be considered when designing strategies to treat cardiovascular calcification. In this review, we overview the current cardiovascular calcification paradigm and discuss emerging techniques that are providing new insight into the mechanisms of ectopic calcification. PMID:26358815

  11. Corals concentrate dissolved inorganic carbon to facilitate calcification.

    PubMed

    Allison, Nicola; Cohen, Itay; Finch, Adrian A; Erez, Jonathan; Tudhope, Alexander W

    2014-01-01

    The sources of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) used to produce scleractinian coral skeletons are not understood. Yet this knowledge is essential for understanding coral biomineralization and assessing the potential impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs. Here we use skeletal boron geochemistry to reconstruct the DIC chemistry of the fluid used for coral calcification. We show that corals concentrate DIC at the calcification site substantially above seawater values and that bicarbonate contributes a significant amount of the DIC pool used to build the skeleton. Corals actively increase the pH of the calcification fluid, decreasing the proportion of DIC present as CO2 and creating a diffusion gradient favouring the transport of molecular CO2 from the overlying coral tissue into the calcification site. Coupling the increases in calcification fluid pH and [DIC] yields high calcification fluid [CO3(2-)] and induces high aragonite saturation states, favourable to the precipitation of the skeleton. PMID:25531981

  12. The role of apoptosis in the initiation of vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, D; Skepper, J N; Hegyi, L; Farzaneh-Far, A; Shanahan, C M; Weissberg, P L

    2001-01-01

    The initiation sites for calcification in cartilage and bone are cellular products called matrix vesicles. Similar structures have been found in calcified arteries and recent studies suggest that these may be derived from apoptotic cells. It is well established that there is a link between cell death and calcification but the mechanism involved is not known. Since apoptotic cell death is known to occur in the vasculature, we set out to investigate the role of apoptosis in the initiation of vascular calcification. We used a human vascular calcification model in which postconfluent vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) cultures form nodules spontaneously and calcify after approximately 28 days. Our studies revealed that apoptosis occurred prior to the onset of calcification and that VSMC "blebs" or apoptotic bodies (ABs) could concentrate calcium in a crystallised form. These observations suggest that apoptosis is involved in the development of VSMC calcification and that VSMC-derived ABs have similarities with matrix vesicles. PMID:11374032

  13. Apoptosis and calcification of vascular endothelial cell under hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Fang, Kuaifa; Chen, Zhujun; Liu, Meng; Peng, Jian; Wu, Pingsheng

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it is found that increase in Hcy level in blood can directly or indirectly cause vascular endothelial cell injury and induce vascular calcification. However, the mechanism of vascular endothelial cell injury and vascular calcification has not been studied thoroughly. This paper carried out experiment for research aiming at discussing the effect and action mechanism of Hhcy on endothelial cells and vascular calcification. Firstly, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured and then intervened by Hcy of different concentrations (0, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0 mmol/L) and at different action time (3, 6, 12, 24 h). Then apoptosis rate and reactive oxygen were detected by flow cytometry. At the same time, the model for the culture of rat vascular calcification was set up and induced into Hhcy so as to detect the total plasma Hcy level and judge vascular calcification degree. The results showed that with the increase in Hcy concentration and extension of action period, the apoptosis rate and generation of reactive oxygen of HUVECs all significantly increased, and the differences were all statistically significant (P < 0.01). In animal calcification model, mass of black particle deposition was seen after Von Kossa staining of rat vessels in calcification group. Compared with the control group, the vascular calcium content, alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin content in calcification group all increased (P < 0.01). The content of plasma lipid conjugated olefine from highest to lowest wasas follows: calcification plus homoetheionin, homoetheionin, and calcification group. There was no significant difference between the calcification group and control group. All these findings suggested that Hcy could induce the apoptosis of endothelial cells and its effect degree depended on its concentration and action period; Hhcy could promote the calcification of blood vessels, and its mechanism might relate with the strengthening of

  14. Dystrophic calcifications after autologous fat injection on face.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dai Hyun; Jang, Hee Won; Kim, Hee Joo; Son, Sang Wook

    2014-06-01

    Autologous fat injection is widely used procedure for various functional and aesthetic purposes. However, it could result in many immediate or delayed complications including dystrophic calcifications. Almost all of the case reports about dystrophic calcification after autologous fat injection were result from the iatrogenic tissue trauma of breast augmentation. This is a report of a 30-year-old patient who developed pathologically proven multiple dystrophic calcifications on the face after autologous fat injection. PMID:24131074

  15. Clinical review: Critical care management of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Rincon, Fred; Mayer, Stephan A

    2008-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage is by far the most destructive form of stroke. The clinical presentation is characterized by a rapidly deteriorating neurological exam coupled with signs and symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure. The diagnosis is easily established by the use of computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Ventilatory support, blood pressure control, reversal of any preexisting coagulopathy, intracranial pressure monitoring, osmotherapy, fever control, seizure prophylaxis, treatment of hyerglycemia, and nutritional supplementation are the cornerstones of supportive care in the intensive care unit. Dexamethasone and other glucocorticoids should be avoided. Ventricular drainage should be performed urgently in all stuporous or comatose patients with intraventricular blood and acute hydrocephalus. Emergent surgical evacuation or hemicraniectomy should be considered for patients with large (>3 cm) cerebellar hemorrhages, and in those with large lobar hemorrhages, significant mass effect, and a deteriorating neurological exam. Apart from management in a specialized stroke or neurological intensive care unit, no specific medical therapies have been shown to consistently improve outcome after intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:19108704

  16. Comparison of Different Preclinical Models of Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Manaenko, Anatol; Chen, Hank; Zhang, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the most devastating type of stroke. It is characterized by spontaneous bleeding in brain parenchyma and is associated with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. Presently, there is neither an effective therapy to increase survival after intracerebral hemorrhage nor a treatment to improve the quality of life for survivors. A reproducible animal model of spontaneous ICH mimicking the development of acute and delayed brain injury after ICH is an invaluable tool for improving our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of ICH-induced brain injury and evaluating potential therapeutic interventions. A number of models have been developed. While different species have been studied, rodents have become the most popular and widely utilized animals used in ICH research. The most often used methods for experimental induction of ICH are injection of bacterial collagenase and direct injection of blood into the brain parenchyma. The “balloon” method has also been used to mimic ICH for study. In this summary, we intend to provide a comparative overview of the technical methods, aspects, and pathologic findings of these types of ICH models. We will also focus on the similarities and differences among these rodent models, achievements in technical aspects of the ICH model, and discuss important aspects in selecting relevant models for study. PMID:21725724

  17. Vascular calcification is dependent on plasma levels of pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Lomashvili, Koba A; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, Jose L; O'Neill, W Charles

    2014-06-01

    Plasma levels of pyrophosphate, an endogenous inhibitor of vascular calcification, are reduced in end-stage renal disease and correlate inversely with arterial calcification. However, it is not known whether the low plasma levels are directly pathogenic or are merely a marker of reduced tissue levels. This was tested in an animal model in which aortas were transplanted between normal mice and Enpp1(-/-) mice lacking ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase phosphodiesterase, the enzyme that synthesizes extracellular pyrophosphate. Enpp1(-/-) mice had very low plasma pyrophosphate and developed aortic calcification by 2 months that was greatly accelerated with a high-phosphate diet. Aortas of Enpp1(-/-) mice showed no further calcification after transplantation into wild-type mice fed a high-phosphate diet. Aorta allografts of wild-type mice calcified in Enpp1(-/-) mice but less so than the adjacent recipient Enpp1(-/-) aorta. Donor and recipient aortic calcium contents did not differ in transplants between wild-type and Enpp1(-/-) mice, demonstrating that transplantation per se did not affect calcification. Histology revealed medial calcification with no signs of rejection. Thus, normal levels of extracellular pyrophosphate are sufficient to prevent vascular calcification, and systemic Enpp1 deficiency is sufficient to produce vascular calcification despite normal vascular extracellular pyrophosphate production. This establishes an important role for circulating extracellular pyrophosphate in preventing vascular calcification. PMID:24717293

  18. Sortilin mediates vascular calcification via its recruitment into extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Goettsch, Claudia; Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Aikawa, Masanori; Iwata, Hiroshi; Pham, Tan; Nykjaer, Anders; Kjolby, Mads; Rogers, Maximillian; Michel, Thomas; Shibasaki, Manabu; Hagita, Sumihiko; Kramann, Rafael; Singh, Sasha A.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a common feature of major cardiovascular diseases. Extracellular vesicles participate in the formation of microcalcifications that are implicated in atherosclerotic plaque rupture; however, the mechanisms that regulate formation of calcifying extracellular vesicles remain obscure. Here, we have demonstrated that sortilin is a key regulator of smooth muscle cell (SMC) calcification via its recruitment to extracellular vesicles. Sortilin localized to calcifying vessels in human and mouse atheromata and participated in formation of microcalcifications in SMC culture. Sortilin regulated the loading of the calcification protein tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) into extracellular vesicles, thereby conferring its calcification potential. Furthermore, SMC calcification required Rab11-dependent trafficking and FAM20C/casein kinase 2–dependent C-terminal phosphorylation of sortilin. In a murine model, Sort1-deficiency reduced arterial calcification but did not affect bone mineralization. Additionally, transfer of sortilin-deficient BM cells to irradiated atherosclerotic mice did not affect vascular calcification, indicating a primary role of SMC-derived sortilin. Together, the results of this study identify sortilin phosphorylation as a potential therapeutic target for ectopic calcification/microcalcification and may clarify the mechanism that underlies the genetic association between the SORT1 gene locus and coronary artery calcification. PMID:26950419

  19. Role of Glutaraldehyde in Calcification of Porcine Aortic Valve Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kookmin M.; Herrera, Guillermo A.; Battarbee, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    Glutaraldehyde-treated porcine aortic valve xenografts frequently fail due to calcification. Calcification in the prostheses begins intracellularly. In a previous study, various types of cell injury to canine valvular fibroblasts, including glutaraldehyde treatment, led to calcification. An influx of extracellular Ca2+ into the phosphate-rich cytosol was theorized to be the mechanism of calcification. To test the Ca2+ influx theory, cytosolic Ca2+ and Pi concentrations were assessed in glutaraldehyde-treated porcine aortic valve fibroblasts, and their relationship to a subsequent calcification was studied. Glutaraldehyde caused an immediate and sustained massive cytosolic Ca2+ increase that was dose dependent and a several-fold increase in Pi. Calcification of cells followed within a week. The earliest calcification was observed in blebs formed on glutaraldehyde-treated cells. Live control cells or cells fixed with glutaraldehyde in Ca2+-free solution did not calcify under the same conditions. Concomitant increases in Ca2+ and Pi in glutaraldehyde-treated cells appear to underlie the mechanism of calcification, and the presence of extracellular Ca2+ during glutaraldehyde fixation promotes calcification. PMID:10079262

  20. Magnesium intake is inversely associated with coronary artery calcification: the Framingham Heart Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine whether magnesium intake is associated with coronary artery calcification (CAC) and abdominal aortic calcification (AAC). BACKGROUND: Animal and cell studies suggest that magnesium may prevent calcification within atherosclerotic plaques underlying c...

  1. Calcification and photosynthesis of the coral acropora cervicornis under calcium limited conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathfon, Megan; Brewer, Debbie

    1997-01-01

    Differing hypothesis about the function of calcification are based on an interesting dilemma. Is the purpose of calcification mainly a structural and protective one or does calcification serve other functions? Does photosynthesis increase carbonate ion activity and cause calcification or does calcification increase CO2 levels and stimulate photsynthesis? It is proposed that calcification in corals is not dependent upon photosynthesis but upon calcium levels in the water. Under normal ocean conditions, corals convert a certain percentage of energy to photosynthesis and respiration and another percentage to calcification. As corals become nutrient stressed, particularly calcium limited, the ratio of photosynthesis to calcification shifts towards calcification in order to generate protons. The protons generated during calcification may stimulate photosynthesis and aid in the uptake of nutrients and biocarbonates. The results of the calcification experiment show a trend towards increased calcification and decreased photosynthesis when the coral Acropora cervicornis is calcium limited, but the data are inconclusive and further research is needed.

  2. Atypical fractures, a biased perspective.

    PubMed

    Aspenberg, Per

    2016-01-01

    When stress fractures started to show up in the femurs of elderly ladies, it was soon evident that bisphosphonate use lay behind, and the absolute risk increase due to bisphosphonate use was reasonably well estimated already in 2008. Thereafter followed a period of confusion: the term atypical fracture was introduced, with a definition so vague that the true stress fractures tended to disappear in a cloud of ambiguity. This cast doubt on the association with bisphosphonates. The association was then re-established by large epidemiological studies based on radiographic adjudication. Atypical fractures are largely caused by bisphosphonates. With a correct indication, bisphosphonates prevent many more fractures than they cause, at least during the first years of use. With an incorrect indication they are likely to cause more harm than good. PMID:26768286

  3. Intracerebral infusion of a second-generation ciliary neurotrophic factor reduces neuronal loss in rat striatum following experimental intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Del Bigio, M R; Yan, H J; Xue, M

    2001-11-15

    Neuronal and glial cell death in the striatum of a rat model of collagenase-induced intracerebral hemorrhage begins at 1 day and continues for at least 3 weeks. We hypothesized that administration of a neurotrophic agent would reduce neuronal loss in this experimental model. Because it has been shown to protect striatal neurons against excitotoxic injury, a second-generation ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) (AXOKINE) was administered by continuous intracerebral infusion (2 microg/day) beginning 28 h after hemorrhage and continuing for 2 weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the hematoma size was comparable in control and treated rats prior to treatment. Counts of medium-sized striatal neurons within 320 microm of the hematoma 8 weeks after the hemorrhage revealed a slight but statistically significant benefit with a 42.5% loss in treated rats compared to 51.7% loss in controls. The results suggest that AXOKINE might be protective of striatal neurons in the vicinity of a hemorrhagic lesion. PMID:11701153

  4. What are the next breakthroughs in the management of acute intracerebral hemorrhage?

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Kazunori; Koga, Masatoshi; Sato, Shoichiro

    2016-06-01

    The impact of acute therapy for intracerebral hemorrhage is far behind that for acute ischemic stroke. Potential breakthroughs in the management of acute intracerebral hemorrhage are presented. To prevent early hematoma growth, acute blood pressure lowering, emergent hemostatic therapy, and minimally invasive surgery with topical thrombolysis have been attempted. Anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective pharmacotherapies may attenuate perihematomal edema as a surrogate marker for the inflammatory response and improve clinical outcomes after intracerebral hemorrhage. Hyperacute modification of vital parameters, early seizure control, early rehabilitation, and neuroregenerative therapy are other promising strategies in the foreseeable future. PMID:26912534

  5. Atypical centrioles during sexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    Avidor-Reiss, Tomer; Khire, Atul; Fishman, Emily L; Jo, Kyoung H

    2015-01-01

    Centrioles are conserved, self-replicating, microtubule-based, 9-fold symmetric subcellular organelles that are essential for proper cell division and function. Most cells have two centrioles and maintaining this number of centrioles is important for animal development and physiology. However, how animals gain their first two centrioles during reproduction is only partially understood. It is well established that in most animals, the centrioles are contributed to the zygote by the sperm. However, in humans and many animals, the sperm centrioles are modified in their structure and protein composition, or they appear to be missing altogether. In these animals, the origin of the first centrioles is not clear. Here, we review various hypotheses on how centrioles are gained during reproduction and describe specialized functions of the zygotic centrioles. In particular, we discuss a new and atypical centriole found in sperm and zygote, called the proximal centriole-like structure (PCL). We also discuss another type of atypical centriole, the "zombie" centriole, which is degenerated but functional. Together, the presence of centrioles, PCL, and zombie centrioles suggests a universal mechanism of centriole inheritance among animals and new causes of infertility. Since the atypical centrioles of sperm and zygote share similar functions with typical centrioles in somatic cells, they can provide unmatched insight into centriole biology. PMID:25883936

  6. Atypical centrioles during sexual reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Avidor-Reiss, Tomer; Khire, Atul; Fishman, Emily L.; Jo, Kyoung H.

    2015-01-01

    Centrioles are conserved, self-replicating, microtubule-based, 9-fold symmetric subcellular organelles that are essential for proper cell division and function. Most cells have two centrioles and maintaining this number of centrioles is important for animal development and physiology. However, how animals gain their first two centrioles during reproduction is only partially understood. It is well established that in most animals, the centrioles are contributed to the zygote by the sperm. However, in humans and many animals, the sperm centrioles are modified in their structure and protein composition, or they appear to be missing altogether. In these animals, the origin of the first centrioles is not clear. Here, we review various hypotheses on how centrioles are gained during reproduction and describe specialized functions of the zygotic centrioles. In particular, we discuss a new and atypical centriole found in sperm and zygote, called the proximal centriole-like structure (PCL). We also discuss another type of atypical centriole, the “zombie” centriole, which is degenerated but functional. Together, the presence of centrioles, PCL, and zombie centrioles suggests a universal mechanism of centriole inheritance among animals and new causes of infertility. Since the atypical centrioles of sperm and zygote share similar functions with typical centrioles in somatic cells, they can provide unmatched insight into centriole biology. PMID:25883936

  7. The time of onset of abnormal calcification in spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type.

    PubMed

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Gazioğlu, Nurperi; Ungür, Savaş; Aji, Dolly Yafet; Türkmen, Seval

    2009-01-01

    A 1-month-old boy with shortness of extremities on prenatal US was referred to our department with a provisional diagnosis of achondroplasia. His height was normal but he had short extremities and platyspondyly, premature carpal epiphyses on both hands, and short tubular bones with irregular metaphyses on radiographs. Re-evaluation of the patient at the age of 1 year revealed very short height and premature calcification of the costal cartilages and epiphyses. Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type was diagnosed. This condition is a very rare autosomal recessively inherited disorder, and most of the patients die in early childhood due to neurological involvement. At the age of 2 years and 5 months, a CT scan showed narrowing of the cervical spinal canal. One month later he died suddenly because of spinal cord injury. In conclusion early diagnosis is very important because the recurrence risk is high and patients may die due to early neurological complications. The time of onset of abnormal calcifications, a diagnostic finding of the disease, is at the age of around 1 year in most patients. When abnormal calcifications are not yet present, but radiological changes associated with SMED are present, this rare disease must be considered. PMID:19002453

  8. Association between calcifying nanoparticles and placental calcification

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanan; Zhang, Dechun; Lu, He; Luo, Shuang; Shen, Xuecheng

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the possible contribution of calcifying nanoparticles to the pathogenesis of placental calcification. Methods Calcified placental tissues and distal tissue samples were collected from 36 confirmed placental calcification cases. In addition, 20 normal placental tissue samples were obtained as a control group. All the tissue samples were cultured using special nanobacterial culture methods. The cultured calcifying nanoparticles were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their growth was monitored by optical density (OD) at a wavelength of 650 nm. 16S rRNA gene expression of the cultured calcifying nanoparticles was also isolated and sequenced. Results Novel calcifying nanoparticles wrapped with electron-dense shells between 50 nm to 500 nm in diameter were observed in the extracellular matrix of calcified placental tissues. They were detected in placental villi and hydroxyapatite crystals, and contained “nucleic acid-like materials”. After isolation and four weeks of culture, 28 of 36 calcified placental tissue samples showed white granular precipitates attached to the bottom of the culture tubes. OD650 measurements indicated that the precipitates from the calcified placental tissues were able to grow in culture, whereas no such precipitates from the control tissues were observed. The 16S rRNA genes were isolated from the cultured calcifying nanoparticles and calcified placental tissues, and their gene sequencing results implied that calcifying nanoparticles were novel nanobacteria (GenBank JF823648). Conclusion Our results suggest that these novel calcifying nanoparticles may play a role in placental calcification. PMID:22615531

  9. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    ElShewy, Mohamed Taha

    2016-01-18

    Calcific tendinitis within the rotator cuff tendon is a common shoulder disorder that should be differentiated from dystrophic calcification as the pathogenesis and natural history of both is totally different. Calcific tendinitis usually occurs in the fifth and sixth decades of life among sedentary workers. It is classified into formative and resorptive phases. The chronic formative phase results from transient hypoxia that is commonly associated with repeated microtrauma causing calcium deposition into the matrix vesicles within the chondrocytes forming bone foci that later coalesce. This phase may extend from 1 to 6 years, and is usually asymptomatic. The resorptive phase extends from 3 wk up to 6 mo with vascularization at the periphery of the calcium deposits causing macrophage and mononuclear giant cell infiltration, together with fibroblast formation leading to an aggressive inflammatory reaction with inflammatory cell accumulation, excessive edema and rise of the intra-tendineous pressure. This results in a severely painful shoulder. Radiological investigations confirm the diagnosis and suggest the phase of the condition and are used to follow its progression. Although routine conventional X-ray allows detection of the deposits, magnetic resonance imaging studies allow better evaluation of any coexisting pathology. Various methods of treatment have been suggested. The appropriate method should be individualized for each patient. Conservative treatment includes pain killers and physiotherapy, or "minimally invasive" techniques as needling or puncture and aspiration. It is almost always successful since the natural history of the condition ends with resorption of the deposits and complete relief of pain. Due to the intolerable pain of the acute and severely painful resorptive stage, the patient often demands any sort of operative intervention. In such case arthroscopic removal is the best option as complete removal of the deposits is unnecessary. PMID

  10. Intracranial Carotid Calcification on Cranial Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Deepak; Zishan, Umme Sara; Chappell, Francesca; Gregoriades, Maria-Lena; Sudlow, Cathie; Sellar, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification is associated with cerebrovascular risk factors and stroke, but few quantification methods are available. We tested the reliability of visual scoring, semiautomated Agatston score, and calcium volume measurement in patients with recent stroke. Methods— We used scans from a prospective hospital stroke registry and included patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke or transient ischemic stroke whose noncontrast cranial computed tomographic scans were available electronically. Two raters measured semiautomatic quantitative Agatston score, and calcium volume, and performed qualitative visual scoring using the original 4-point Woodcock score and a modified Woodcock score, where each image on which the internal carotid arteries appeared was scored and the slice scores summed. Results— Intra- and interobserver coefficient of variations were 8.8% and 16.5% for Agatston, 8.8% and 15.5% for calcium volume, and 5.7% and 5.4% for the modified Woodcock visual score, respectively. The modified Woodcock visual score correlated strongly with both Agatston and calcium volume quantitative measures (both R2=0.84; P<0.0001); calcium volume increased by 0.47-mm/point increase in modified Woodcock visual score. Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification increased with age by all measures (eg, visual score, Spearman ρ=0.4; P=0.005). Conclusions— Visual scores correlate highly with quantitative intracranial internal carotid artery calcification measures, with excellent observer agreements. Visual intracranial internal carotid artery scores could be a rapid and practical method for epidemiological studies. PMID:26251250

  11. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff

    PubMed Central

    ElShewy, Mohamed Taha

    2016-01-01

    Calcific tendinitis within the rotator cuff tendon is a common shoulder disorder that should be differentiated from dystrophic calcification as the pathogenesis and natural history of both is totally different. Calcific tendinitis usually occurs in the fifth and sixth decades of life among sedentary workers. It is classified into formative and resorptive phases. The chronic formative phase results from transient hypoxia that is commonly associated with repeated microtrauma causing calcium deposition into the matrix vesicles within the chondrocytes forming bone foci that later coalesce. This phase may extend from 1 to 6 years, and is usually asymptomatic. The resorptive phase extends from 3 wk up to 6 mo with vascularization at the periphery of the calcium deposits causing macrophage and mononuclear giant cell infiltration, together with fibroblast formation leading to an aggressive inflammatory reaction with inflammatory cell accumulation, excessive edema and rise of the intra-tendineous pressure. This results in a severely painful shoulder. Radiological investigations confirm the diagnosis and suggest the phase of the condition and are used to follow its progression. Although routine conventional X-ray allows detection of the deposits, magnetic resonance imaging studies allow better evaluation of any coexisting pathology. Various methods of treatment have been suggested. The appropriate method should be individualized for each patient. Conservative treatment includes pain killers and physiotherapy, or “minimally invasive” techniques as needling or puncture and aspiration. It is almost always successful since the natural history of the condition ends with resorption of the deposits and complete relief of pain. Due to the intolerable pain of the acute and severely painful resorptive stage, the patient often demands any sort of operative intervention. In such case arthroscopic removal is the best option as complete removal of the deposits is unnecessary. PMID

  12. Calcification of the breasts due to loiasis.

    PubMed

    Lemmenmeier, Eva; Keller, Nicole; Chuck, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old HIV-positive female from Cameroon was diagnosed with loiasis in 2013 due to symptoms of polyarthritis and laboratory confirmed eosinophilia. Because of high microfilaremia primary treatment was given with two courses of albendazol and ivermectin and completed with a course of diethylcarbamazine. Therapy was successful as symptoms, eosinophilia and microfilaremia disappeared. In 2015, she had a gynecology check-up where a screening mammography showed several round and linear, meandering calcifications in both breasts, the latter are typically seen in filariasis. PMID:27051574

  13. Medial vascular calcification revisited: review and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lanzer, Peter; Boehm, Manfred; Sorribas, Victor; Thiriet, Marc; Janzen, Jan; Zeller, Thomas; St Hilaire, Cynthia; Shanahan, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcifications (VCs) are actively regulated biological processes associated with crystallization of hydroxyapatite in the extracellular matrix and in cells of the media (VCm) or intima (VCi) of the arterial wall. Both patterns of VC often coincide and occur in patients with type II diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and other less frequent disorders; VCs are also typical in senile degeneration. In this article, we review the current state of knowledge about the pathology, molecular biology, and nosology of VCm, expand on potential mechanisms responsible for poor prognosis, and expose some of the directions for future research in this area. PMID:24740885

  14. Matrix Gla Protein polymorphisms are associated with coronary artery calcification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Matrix Gla Protein (MGP) is a key regulator of vascular calcification. Genetic variation at the MGP locus could modulate the development of coronary artery calcification (CAC). We examined the cross-sectional association between MGP SNPs [rs1800802 (T-138C), rs1800801 (G-7A),and rs4236 (Ala102Thr)...

  15. Liposarcoma of the thigh with mixed calcification and ossification.

    PubMed

    Child, Jeremy R; Young, Colin R; Amini, Behrang

    2016-09-01

    Liposarcoma is one of the most common soft-tissue sarcomas. Calcification and ossification can occur in liposarcoma; however, the presence of both ossification and calcification is a very rare entity. We present a case of a partially calcified and ossified dedifferentiated liposarcoma of the thigh in a 76-year-old woman, which contained heterologous elements of chondrosarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. PMID:27594953

  16. Calcific Aortic Valve Disease: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lerman, Daniel Alejandro; Prasad, Sai; Alotti, Nasri

    2016-01-01

    Calcification occurs in atherosclerotic vascular lesions and In the aortic valve. Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a slow, progressive disorder that ranges from mild valve thickening without obstruction of blood flow, termed aortic sclerosis, to severe calcification with impaired leaflet motion, termed aortic stenosis. In the past, this process was thought to be ‘degenerative’ because of time-dependent wear and tear of the leaflets, with passive calcium deposition. The presence of osteoblasts in atherosclerotic vascular lesions and in CAVD implies that calcification is an active, regulated process akin to atherosclerosis, with lipoprotein deposition and chronic inflammation. If calcification is active, via pro-osteogenic pathways, one might expect that development and progression of calcification could be inhibited. The overlap in the clinical factors associated with calcific valve disease and atherosclerosis provides further support for a shared disease mechanism. In our recent research we used an in vitro porcine valve interstitial cell model to study spontaneous calcification and potential promoters and inhibitors. Using this model, we found that denosumab, a human monoclonal antibody targeting the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand may, at a working concentration of 50 μg/mL, inhibit induced calcium deposition to basal levels.

  17. Elastin Degradation and Calcification in an Abdominal Aorta Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Basalyga, Dina M.; Simionescu, Dan T.; Xiong, Wanfen; Timothy Baxter, B.; Starcher, Barry C.; Vyavahare, Narendra R.

    2005-01-01

    Background Elastin calcification is a widespread feature of vascular pathology, and circumstantial evidence exists for a correlation between elastin degradation and calcification. We hypothesized that matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)–mediated vascular remodeling plays a significant role in elastin calcification. Methods and Results In the present studies, we determined that short-term periadventitial treatment of the rat abdominal aorta with low concentrations of calcium chloride (CaCl2) induced chronic degeneration and calcification of vascular elastic fibers in the absence of aneurysm formation and inflammatory reactions. Furthermore, the rate of progression of calcification depended on the application method and concentration of CaCl2 applied periarterially. Initial calcium deposits, associated mainly with elastic fibers, were persistently accompanied by elastin degradation, disorganization of aortic extracellular matrix, and moderate levels of vascular cell apoptosis. Application of aluminum ions (known inhibitors of elastin degradation) before the CaCl2-mediated injury significantly reduced elastin calcification and abolished both extracellular matrix degradation and apoptosis. We also found that MMP-knockout mice were resistant to CaCl2-mediated aortic injury and did not develop elastin degeneration and calcification. Conclusion Collectively, these data strongly indicate a correlation between MMP-mediated elastin degradation and vascular calcification. PMID:15545515

  18. Chest xerotomography: evaluation of calcification within lung nodules.

    PubMed

    Penkrot, R J; Gordon, R

    1980-01-01

    Through the use of a chest phantom and beeswax nodules containing calcium, xerotomography is shown to be a valuable tool in the evaluation of calcifications within lung nodules. The technique gives superior definition of calcium, especially fine calcifications in the 1-2-mm, or less, range. Our results suggest that clinical trials should follow and clinicopathologic correlation be obtained. PMID:7203908

  19. A laser Doppler system for monitoring of intracerebral microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Rejmstad, Peter; Åkesson, Gustav; Hillman, Jan; Wårdell, Karin

    2012-01-01

    A two-channel standard laser Doppler perfusion monitor has been adapted for intracerebral measurements. Software developed in Labview makes it possible to present the microvascular perfusion, total light intensity (TLI), heart rate and trend curves in real-time during surgery. A custom-made optical probe was designed in order to enable easy fixation during brain surgery. The constructed brain probe was evaluated and compared to a standard probe. Both probes presented similar feasibility when used for the skin recordings. In addition, evaluation was done in one patient in relation to tumor resection. Stable perfusion and TLI signals were immediately recorded when the probe was positioned in cerebral tissue. Movement artifacts were clearly seen when the probe was moved to a new site. Recordings in cortex and tumor border showed higher perfusion and lower TLI compared to measurements in subcortical white matter. The calculated heart rate estimate agreed well with the noted value from the electrocardiographic patient monitoring system. PMID:23366307

  20. Minimally invasive endoscopic surgery for treatment of spontaneous intracerebral haematomas.

    PubMed

    Beynon, Christopher; Schiebel, Patrick; Bösel, Julian; Unterberg, Andreas W; Orakcioglu, Berk

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating disease with a mortality rate of more than 40 % and a high morbidity rate with 10-15 % of survivors remaining fully dependent [11]. The role of surgical treatment of ICH remains a matter of controversy and ongoing investigation. Advances in neurosurgical techniques such as endoscopy and neuronavigation have been established in various fields of neurosurgery. Results of reported case series have suggested that some patients with ICH may benefit from haematoma evacuation through minimally invasive endoscopic procedures. In this article, we focus on the pathophysiologic rationales behind minimally invasive haematoma evacuation through endoscopic surgery and provide an overview of technical developments and reported patient series. In addition, the modalities of the surgical procedure at the authors' institution are described. Controlled clinical trials are needed to evaluate the full potential and limitations of this promising technique. PMID:25687253

  1. Genetic Determinants of Risk, Severity, and Outcome in Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Guido J; Rosand, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous, nontraumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the most severe manifestation of common forms of cerebral small vessel disease. Although ICH represents only 15% of all strokes, it accounts for a large proportion of stroke-related costs and mortality. Preventive and acute treatments remain limited. Because genetic variation contributes substantially to ICH, genomic analyses constitute a powerful tool to identify new biological mechanisms involved in its occurrence. Through translational research efforts, these newly identified mechanisms can become targets for innovative therapeutic interventions. Here, the authors summarize the most recent genetic discoveries for ICH. They also introduce the Platform for Accelerating Genetic Discovery for Cerebrovascular Disease, a newly created resource that aims to create a common workspace for genetic analyses that will bring together 100,000 stroke cases and suitable controls from numerous institutions in several countries. PMID:27214705

  2. TBS Predict Coronary Artery Calcification in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Tzyy-Ling; Hsiao, Fu-Tsung; Li, Yi-Da

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study analyzes the association between the bony microarchitecture score (trabecular bone score, TBS) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) in adults undergoing health exams. Materials and Methods. We retrospectively collected subjects (N = 81) who underwent coronary computed tomography and bone mineral density studies simultaneously. CAC was categorized to three levels (Group 0, G0, no CAC, score = 0, N = 45; Group 1, G1, moderate CAC, score = 1–100, N = 17; Group 2, G2, high CAC, score ≧ 101, N = 19). Multinomial logistic regression was used to study the association between TBS and CAC levels. Results. CAC is present in 44.4% of the population. Mean TBS ± SD was 1.399 ± 0.090. Per 1 SD increase in TBS, the unadjusted odds ratio (2.393) of moderate CAC compared with no CAC was significantly increased (95% CI, 1.219–4.696, p = 0.011). However, there has been no association of TBS with high CAC (OR: 1.026, 95% CI: 0.586–1.797, p = 0.928). These relationships also existed when individually adjusted for age, sex, and multiple other covariates. Conclusions. Higher TBS was related to moderate CAC, but not high CAC; a possible explanation may be that bone microarchitecture remodeling becomes more active when early coronary artery calcification occurs. However, further researches are needed to clarify this pathophysiology. PMID:27042671

  3. Susceptibility weighted imaging: differentiating between calcification and hemosiderin*

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Jeam Haroldo Oliveira; Santos, Antonio Carlos; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present a detailed explanation on the processing of magnetic susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), demonstrating the effects of echo time and sensitive mask on the differentiation between calcification and hemosiderin. Materials and Methods Computed tomography and magnetic resonance (magnitude and phase) images of six patients (age range 41– 54 years; four men) were retrospectively selected. The SWI images processing was performed using the Matlab’s own routine. Results Four out of the six patients showed calcifications at computed tomography images and their SWI images demonstrated hyperintense signal at the calcification regions. The other patients did not show any calcifications at computed tomography, and SWI revealed the presence of hemosiderin deposits with hypointense signal. Conclusion The selection of echo time and of the mask may change all the information on SWI images, and compromise the diagnostic reliability. Amongst the possible masks, the authors highlight that the sigmoid mask allows for contrasting calcifications and hemosiderin on a single SWI image. PMID:25987750

  4. Mechanisms of ectopic calcification: implications for diabetic vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fadini, Gian Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is the deposition of calcium/phosphate in the vasculature, which portends a worse clinical outcome and predicts major adverse cardiovascular events. VC is an active process initiated and regulated via a variety of molecular signalling pathways. There are mainly two types of calcifications: the media VC and the intima VC. All major risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) have been linked to the presence/development of VC. Besides the risk factors, a genetic component is also operative to determine arterial calcification. Several events take place before VC is established, including inflammation, trans-differentiation of vascular cells and homing of circulating pro-calcific cells. Diabetes is an important predisposing factor for VC. Compared with non-diabetic subjects, patients with diabetes show increased VC and higher expression of bone-related proteins in the medial layer of the vessels. In this review we will highlight the mechanisms underlying vascular calcification in diabetic patients. PMID:26543821

  5. Medial Arterial Calcification: An Overlooked Player in Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chin Yee; Shanahan, Catherine M

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a global health issue that is becoming more prevalent in an aging world population. Diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease are also on the increase, and both are associated with accelerated vascular calcification and an unfavorable prognosis in PAD. These data challenge the traditional athero-centric view of PAD, instead pointing toward a disease process complicated by medial arterial calcification. Like atherosclerosis, aging is a potent risk factor for medial arterial calcification, and accelerated vascular aging may underpin the devastating manifestations of PAD, particularly in patients prone to calcification. Consequently, this review will attempt to dissect the relationship between medial arterial calcification and atherosclerosis in PAD and identify common as well as novel risk factors that may contribute to and accelerate progression of PAD. In this context, we focus on the complex interplay between oxidative stress, DNA damage, and vascular aging, as well as the unexplored role of neuropathy. PMID:27312224

  6. Late calcification and rupture: a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunting.

    PubMed

    Kural, Cahit; Kirik, Alparslan; Pusat, Serhat; Senturk, Tolga; Izci, Yusuf

    2012-01-01

    A 10-year old boy who had undergone a ventriculoperitoneal (V/P) shunt because of hydrocephalus at 10 days of age was doing well until 20 days ago, when he began to experience headache and seizures. CT scan revealed dilated lateral ventricles and calcification at the shunt site. X-rays showed an unusual calcification pattern around the shunt tube and rupture of the tube between the mastoid bone and clavicle. The patient underwent surgery and the shunt was changed completely. The ventricles became small in the follow-up. Even though V/P shunts may induce fibrous tissue formation and calcification around the tube, there are a few cases of shunt rupture and calcification of shunts in the literature. Possible mechanisms of the rupture and calcification are discussed in this paper. PMID:23208915

  7. Mechanisms of ectopic calcification: implications for diabetic vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Avogaro, Angelo; Fadini, Gian Paolo

    2015-10-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is the deposition of calcium/phosphate in the vasculature, which portends a worse clinical outcome and predicts major adverse cardiovascular events. VC is an active process initiated and regulated via a variety of molecular signalling pathways. There are mainly two types of calcifications: the media VC and the intima VC. All major risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) have been linked to the presence/development of VC. Besides the risk factors, a genetic component is also operative to determine arterial calcification. Several events take place before VC is established, including inflammation, trans-differentiation of vascular cells and homing of circulating pro-calcific cells. Diabetes is an important predisposing factor for VC. Compared with non-diabetic subjects, patients with diabetes show increased VC and higher expression of bone-related proteins in the medial layer of the vessels. In this review we will highlight the mechanisms underlying vascular calcification in diabetic patients. PMID:26543821

  8. Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II) Protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Within the spectrum of spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage there are some patients with large or space occupying haemorrhage who require surgery for neurological deterioration and others with small haematomas who should be managed conservatively. There is equipoise about the management of patients between these two extremes. In particular there is some evidence that patients with lobar haematomas and no intraventricular haemorrhage might benefit from haematoma evacuation. The STICH II study will establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients will improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. Methods/Design an international multicentre randomised parallel group trial. Only patients for whom the treating neurosurgeon is in equipoise about the benefits of early craniotomy compared to initial conservative treatment are eligible. All patients must have a CT scan confirming spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (≤1 cm from the cortex surface of the brain and 10-100 ml in volume). Any clotting or coagulation problems must be corrected and randomisation must take place within 48 hours of ictus. With 600 patients, the study will be able to demonstrate a 12% benefit from surgery (2p < 0.05) with 80% power. Stratified randomisation is undertaken using a central 24 hour randomisation service accessed by telephone or web. Patients randomised to early surgery should have the operation within 12 hours. Information about the status (Glasgow Coma Score and focal signs) of all patients through the first five days of their trial progress is also collected in addition to another CT scan at about five days (+/- 2 days). Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire to the patient. Primary outcome is death or severe disability defined using a prognosis based 8 point Glasgow Outcome Scale. Secondary outcomes include: Mortality, Rankin, Barthel, EuroQol, and Survival. Trial

  9. Racial disparities in methamphetamine-associated intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Vento, Megan A.; Ing, Marissa M.; Seto, Todd B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess racial disparities in the prevalence of methamphetamine-associated intracerebral hemorrhage (Meth-ICH) among Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders (NHOPI). Methods: Prospectively collected data from an ongoing, multiethnic, single-center cohort study were analyzed. The inclusion criteria for the cohort study required that patients be adult (age 18 years or older) residents of Hawaii with nontraumatic spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Patients of race other than white, Asian, or NHOPI were excluded. Determination of Meth-ICH was made prospectively by positive urine toxicology result and lack of other clinically suspected ICH etiology. Prevalence of Meth-ICH among NHOPI was compared with that of white and Asian patients. Results: A total of 193 patients (white 16%, Asian 61%, NHOPI 23%) were analyzed. NHOPI were younger than white (54 ± 15 vs 68 ± 15 years, respectively, p = 0.0001) and Asian (vs 65 ± 16 years, p = 0.0001) patients. Overall, 25 (13%) Meth-ICHs (mean age: 49 ± 6 years, range: 33–56 years) were identified. NHOPI had higher prevalence of Meth-ICH compared with white (24% vs 0%, respectively, p = 0.003) and Asian (vs 12%, p = 0.046) patients. The observed age differences between the racial groups persisted even after excluding the Meth-ICH group (p < 0.01 for all comparison). Conclusions: NHOPI have higher prevalence of Meth-ICH compared with white and Asian patients. However, the age disparity is not entirely driven by methamphetamine abuse. PMID:25663228

  10. Information Display System for Atypical Flight Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, Irving C. (Inventor); Ferryman, Thomas A. (Inventor); Amidan, Brett G. (Inventor); Whitney, Paul D. (Inventor); White, Amanda M. (Inventor); Willse, Alan R. (Inventor); Cooley, Scott K. (Inventor); Jay, Joseph Griffith (Inventor); Lawrence, Robert E. (Inventor); Mosbrucker, Chris J. (Inventor); Rosenthal, Loren J. (Inventor); Lynch, Robert E. (Inventor); Chidester, Thomas R. (Inventor); Prothero, Gary L. (Inventor); Andrei, Adi (Inventor); Romanowski, Timothy P. (Inventor); Robin, Daniel E. (Inventor); Prothero, Jason W. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for displaying information on one or more aircraft flights, where at least one flight is determined to have at least one atypical flight phase according to specified criteria. A flight parameter trace for an atypical phase is displayed and compared graphically with a group of traces, for the corresponding flight phase and corresponding flight parameter, for flights that do not manifest atypicality in that phase.

  11. [Intracerebral hemorrhage associated with nephrotic syndrome-Prevalemce and clinical characteristics].

    PubMed

    Kono, Ryuhei; Iwaki, Hirotaka; Takeshima, Shinichi; Shimoe, Yutaka; Ota, Shinzo; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Of the 11,161 cases of stroke observed for over 9 years, 21 cases in which both levels of serum albumin and cholesterol were < 3 g/dl and > 250 mg/dl, respectively, were identified. Out of these 21 cases, cases of severe proteinuria, i.e., nephrotic syndrome were selected. These included 10 cases of arterial ischemic thrombosis, 2 cases of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, and 4 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage. The incidence of intracerebral hemorrhage associated with nephrotic syndrome was 0.18% of total stroke or 0.036% intracerebral hemorrhage. Nephrotic syndrome essentially induced a hypercoagulable state. The 4 cases with intracerebral hemorrhage associated with nephrotic syndrome, however, had strong risk factors for intracerebral hemorrhage, suggesting that they overcame the risk for thrombophilia. The diseases associated with the nephrotic syndrome were diabetic nephropathy and amyloidosis in 3 cases and in 1 case, respectively. The nephrotic syndrome tends to be associated with a risk for venous or arterial thrombosis. In addition, we must pay attention to intracerebral hemorrhage associated with nephrotic syndrome in cases of stroke. PMID:26887837

  12. Sensitivity and specificity of fluid-blood levels for coagulopathy in acute intracerebral hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Pfleger, M.J.; Hardee, E.P.; Hayman, L.A.; Contant, C.F. Jr. )

    1994-02-01

    To characterize the imaging features of intracerebral hemorrhages in patients with coagulopathies that alter prothrombin time or partial thromboplastin time. A fluid-blood level was defined as a horizontal interface between hypodense bloody serum layered above hyperdense settled blood. The prevalence of fluid-blood levels in acute intracerebral hemorrhages was determined on third-generation CT scans in 32 patients with elevation in prothrombin time or partial thromboplastin time. This was compared with the frequency of fluid-blood levels in 185 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage in which there was no laboratory evidence of coagulopathy. The probability of finding a fluid-blood level in an intracerebral hemorrhage of a patient with abnormal prothrombin time or partial thromboplastin time was 59% (sensitivity). The probability that there will be no fluid-blood level in a patient with a normal prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time was 98% (specificity). Fluid-blood levels in acute intracerebral hemorrhage are moderately sensitive to the presence of coagulopathy (i.e., abnormal prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time) and highly specific for this condition. Thus, an intracerebral hemorrhage with a fluid-blood level should prompt a thorough search for coagulopathy because early treatment of this condition may improve the 40% mortality in these patients. Caution should be used to distinguish the horizontal interface of a fluid-blood level from a clot with a flat top. A decubitus CT is useful in these rare instances. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. ENPP1-Fc prevents mortality and vascular calcifications in rodent model of generalized arterial calcification of infancy

    PubMed Central

    Albright, Ronald A.; Stabach, Paul; Cao, Wenxiang; Kavanagh, Dillon; Mullen, Isabelle; Braddock, Alexander A.; Covo, Mariel S.; Tehan, Martin; Yang, Guangxiao; Cheng, Zhiliang; Bouchard, Keith; Yu, Zhao-Xue; Thorn, Stephanie; Wang, Xiangning; Folta-Stogniew, Ewa J.; Negrete, Alejandro; Sinusas, Albert J.; Shiloach, Joseph; Zubal, George; Madri, Joseph A.; De La Cruz, Enrique M.; Braddock, Demetrios T.

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of ectopic calcification of the vascular wall range from lethal orphan diseases such as generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI), to common diseases such as hardening of the arteries associated with aging and calciphylaxis of chronic kidney disease (CKD). GACI is a lethal orphan disease in which infants calcify the internal elastic lamina of their medium and large arteries and expire of cardiac failure as neonates, while calciphylaxis of CKD is a ubiquitous vascular calcification in patients with renal failure. Both disorders are characterized by vascular Mönckeburg's sclerosis accompanied by decreased concentrations of plasma inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi). Here we demonstrate that subcutaneous administration of an ENPP1-Fc fusion protein prevents the mortality, vascular calcifications and sequela of disease in animal models of GACI, and is accompanied by a complete clinical and biomarker response. Our findings have implications for the treatment of rare and common diseases of ectopic vascular calcification. PMID:26624227

  14. Atypical presentation of infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, Karuppiah

    2016-01-01

    The HACEK group of organisms are one of the infrequent causes of infective endocarditis. Infective endocarditis should be recognized and treated promptly to prevent excessive morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. Sometimes the diagnosis is delayed due to vague and subtle presentation. Through this case report, risk factors of Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis and its atypical presentation is illustrated to increase the recognition of infective endocarditis as one of the differential diagnosis. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-07.asp, free with no login]. PMID:27379355

  15. Atypical parkinsonism: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Stamelou, Maria; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2015-02-01

    Atypical parkinsonism comprises typically progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, and mutilple system atrophy, which are distinct pathologic entities; despite ongoing research, their cause and pathophysiology are still unknown, and there are no biomarkers or effective treatments available. The expanding phenotypic spectrum of these disorders as well as the expanding pathologic spectrum of their classic phenotypes makes the early differential diagnosis challenging for the clinician. Here, clinical features and investigations that may help to diagnose these conditions and the existing limited treatment options are discussed. PMID:25432722

  16. Atypical odontalgia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Koratkar, Harish; Koratkar, Sonal

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of orofacial pain is not uncommon; however, reaching a definitive diagnosis in these cases can be a complex challenge. Dentists are most likely to face this situation, because persistent and chronic pain is more common in the head and neck region than in any other part of the body. However, the complexities and diagnostic challenges mean that misdiagnosing neuropathic pain is common. This article presents a case of atypical odontalgia and illustrates the complexities involved when diagnosing the condition. PMID:19284197

  17. Atypical Teratomas of the Pineal

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, I.; Baxter, D. W.; Stratford, J. G.

    1963-01-01

    Atypical teratomas of the pineal were studied pathologically and clinically, and five illustrative cases are described. The results of three postmortem examinations are available, while two of the patients are living, one leading a normal life. Pathological verification revealed that two had suprasellar “ectopic” pinealomas. One neoplasm was located in the pineal (collicular) region. The histology of the tumours was identical, consisting of small cells resembling lymphocytes and large cells with prominent nucleoli and mitoses. This feature plus the midline location led to adoption of the term “atypical teratoma”. Patients with collicular pinealomas presented with headache, vomiting, papilledema, Parinaud's syndrome and, rarely, nystagmus retractorius. Diabetes insipidus, visual difficulty and hypopituitarism were characteristic features in those with suprasellar neoplasms. Treatment of collicular pinealoma has consisted of the use of a palliative shunt followed by a course of radiation. Chiasmal decompression and radiation have produced favourable results in patients with suprasellar pinealoma. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12 PMID:20327617

  18. Observer study to evaluate the simulation of mammographic calcification clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Maria A. Z.; Marcomini, Karem D.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Schiabel, Homero

    2016-03-01

    Numerous breast phantoms have been developed to be as realistic as possible to ensure the accuracy of image quality analysis, covering a greater range of applications. In this study, we simulated three different densities of the breast parenchyma using paraffin gel, acrylic plates and PVC films. Hydroxyapatite was used to simulate calcification clusters. From the images acquired with a GE Senographe DR 2000D mammography system, we selected 68 regions of interest (ROIs) with and 68 without a simulated calcification cluster. To validate the phantom simulation, we selected 136 ROIs from the University of South Florida's Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM). Seven trained observers performed two observer experiments by using a high-resolution monitor Barco mod. E-3620. In the first experiment, the observers had to distinguish between real or phantom ROIs (with and without calcification). In the second one, the observers had to indicate the ROI with calcifications between a pair of ROIs. Results from our study show that the hydroxyapatite calcifications had poor contrast in the simulated breast parenchyma, thus observers had more difficulty in identifying the presence of calcification clusters in phantom images. Preliminary analysis of the power spectrum was conducted to investigate the radiographic density and the contrast thresholds for calcification detection. The values obtained for the power spectrum exponent (β) were comparable with those found in the literature.

  19. Periodontal Disease Is an Independent Predictor of Intracardiac Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Pressman, Gregg S.; Qasim, Atif; Verma, Nitin; Arishiro, Kumiko; Notohara, Yasuhiro; Crudu, Vitalie; Figueredo, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Periodontitis is the most common chronic inflammatory condition worldwide and is associated with incident coronary disease. Hypothesis. We hypothesized that periodontal disease would also be associated with cardiac calcification, a condition which shares many risk factors with atherosclerosis and is considered a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods. Cross-sectional study at two sites (USA and Japan) involving subjects with both clinical echocardiograms and detailed dental examinations. Semiquantitative scoring systems were used to assess severity of periodontal disease and echocardiographic calcification. Results. Fifty-six of 73 subjects (77%) had cardiac calcifications, and 51% had moderate to severe periodontal disease (score > 2). In unadjusted analysis, a significant relationship between periodontal score and cardiac calcification (Spearman rho = 0.4, P = 0.001) was noted, with increases in mean calcification score seen across increasing levels of periodontal disease. On multivariate logistic regression, adjusted for age, gender, race, glomerular filtration rate, and traditional risk factors, this association remained significant (P = 0.024). There was no significant interaction by study site, race, or gender. Conclusions. In a multiracial population, we found a significant association between the degree of periodontal disease, a chronic inflammatory condition, and cardiac calcification. Further, higher periodontal scores were associated with greater degrees of calcification. PMID:24106721

  20. Mechanisms and treatment of extraosseous calcification in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ketteler, Markus; Rothe, Hansjörg; Krüger, Thilo; Biggar, Patrick H; Schlieper, Georg

    2011-09-01

    Strong and unidirectional associations exist between the severity of cardiovascular calcifications and mortality in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. In the past 10 years, a wealth of experimental and clinical information has been published on the key pathophysiological events that contribute to the development and progression of vascular and soft-tissue calcifications. These processes involve a sensitive balance of calcification inhibition, induction and removal. The traditional view of regarding secondary hyperparathyroidism and elevated calcium × phosphate product as the pivotal risk factors for calcification has been challenged by data demonstrating a role for other, more subtle and complex pathomechanisms. These mechanisms include the loss of endogenous calcification inhibitors, deficient clearance of calcified debris, effects of vitamin K and vitamin D, and the action of calcification inducers as in osteogenic transdifferentiation. In this Review, we describe our current knowledge of the factors involved in the passive and active regulation of extraosseous calcification processes, with an assessment of their importance as targets for future diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. PMID:21769106

  1. Preliminary Study on Composition and Microstructure of Calcification in Craniopharyngiomas

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Junxiang; Qi, Songtao; Pan, Jun; Zhang, Xi’an; Huang, Guanglong; Li, Danling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To analyze the element composition and microstructure of calcification in craniopharyngiomas and to explore the differences among differing degrees of calcification, 50 consecutive patients with craniopharyngioma were selected. X-ray diffraction analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis were performed on the calcified plaques isolated from the tumor specimens. All calcified plaques were constituted of hydroxyapatite crystals and some amorphous materials. The main elements for the analysis were calcium, phosphate, carbon, and oxygen. There were significant differences among groups of differing degrees of calcification in the percentage composition of calcium, phosphorus, and carbon (P < 0.05), in which the element content of calcium and phosphorus had a positive correlation with the extent of calcification (rp = 0.745 and 0.778, respectively, P < 0.01), while the element content of carbon had a negative correlation with the extent of calcification (rp =−0.526, P <0.01). The calcium, phosphorus, and carbon content are different in calcified plaques with different extents of calcification. The element content of calcium, phosphorus, and carbon influences the degree of calcification. PMID:27213742

  2. Adaptation of Coccolith Calcification to Sea Water Carbonate Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziveri, P.; Langer, G.; Probert, I.; Young, J.

    2008-12-01

    Coccolithophores are major calcifiers and through calcification cause feedbacks to atmospheric CO2 cycling. The formation of CaCO3 in seawater, in fact, causes a shift of the carbonate system towards CO2, which in turn affects atmosphere / ocean CO2 exchange. A change in marine calcification provides a concomitant feedback in organic carbon export and would lead to a change in the drawdown of atmospheric CO2. Coccolithophore culture experiments and field observations showed controversial results regarding the response of calcification to high CO2. The three strains of Emiliania huxleyi (the most abundant living coccolithophore species) tested so far show both increased and decreased calcification at high CO2 levels (lower pH). Living E. huxleyi is known to have a large variability in both size and carbonate content. The hypothesis that we want to test in this work is the importance of adaptation of calcification to the seawater carbonate chemistry where coccolithophores calcify. We selected 4 strains of E. huxleyi maintained at the Roscoff culture collection, collected from different oceanographic settings with different carbon speciation. The selected strains are collected from environments with very different water carbonate chemistry and they have different carbonate mass. They have been experimentally grown at different CO2 levels to test the strain calcification response to sea water carbonate chemistry. . With these experiments we test the importance of the calcification strain adaptation to carbonate chemistry. Size and possibly different responses to carbonate chemistry variations will also be discussed.

  3. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Role of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular calcification].

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen with aging, chronic kidney disese (CKD), diabetes, and atherosclerosis, and is closely associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as the final stage of degeneration and necrosis of arterial wall and a passive, unregulated process. However, it is now known to be an active and tightly regulated process involved with phenotypic transition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that resembles bone mineralization. Briefly, calcium deposits of atherosclerotic plaque consist of hydroxyapatite and may appear identical to fully formed lamellar bone. By using a genetic fate mapping strategy, VSMC of the vascular media give rise to the majority of the osteochondrogenic precursor- and chondrocyte-like cells observed in the calcified arterial media of MGP (- / -) mice. Osteogenic differentiation of VSMC is characterized by the expression of bone-related molecules including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) -2, Msx2 and osteopontin, which are produced by osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Our recent findings are that (i) Runx2 and Notch1 induce osteogenic differentiation, and (ii) advanced glycation end-product (AGE) /receptor for AGE (RAGE) and palmitic acid promote osteogenic differentiation of VSMC. To understand of the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification is now under intensive research area. PMID:25926569

  4. Association of a bovine prion gene haplotype with atypical BSE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathies (BSEs) are recently recognized prion diseases of cattle. Atypical BSEs are rare; approximately 30 cases have been identified worldwide. We tested prion gene (PRNP) haplotypes for an association with atypical BSE. Methodology/Principal Findin...

  5. Pathological calcifications studied with micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Stuart R.; Rajamannan, Nalini M.; Brooks, Ellen R.; Langman, Craig B.; Pachman, Lauren M.

    2004-10-01

    The microstructure of pathological biomineral deposits has received relatively little attention, perhaps, in part because of the difficulty preparing samples for microscopy. MicroCT avoids these difficulties, and laboratory microCT results are reviewed for aortic valve calcification (human as well as a rabbit model), for human renal calculi (stones) and for calcinoses formed in juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). In calcified aortic valves of rabbits, numerical analysis of the data shows statistically significant correlation with diet. In a large kidney stone the pattern of mineralization is clearly revealed and may provide a temporal blueprint for stone growth. In JDM calcified deposits, very different microstructures are observed and may be related to processes unique to this disease.

  6. Intracranial Artery Calcification and Its Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao Hong; Wang, Li Juan; Wong, Ka Sing

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial arterial calcification (IAC) is an easily identifiable entity on plain head computed tomography scans. Recent studies have found high prevalence rates for IAC worldwide, and this may be associated with ischemic stroke and cognitive decline. Aging, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, and chronic kidney disease have been found to be associated with IAC. The severity of IAC can be assessed using different visual grading scales or various quantitative methods (by measuring volume or intensity). An objective method for assessing IAC using consistent criteria is urgently required to facilitate comparisons between multiple studies involving diverse populations. There is accumulating evidence from clinical studies that IAC could be utilized as an indicator of intracranial atherosclerosis. However, the pathophysiology underlying the potential correlation between IAC and ischemic stroke—through direct arterial stenosis or plaque stability—remains to be determined. More well-designed clinical studies are needed to explore the predictive values of IAC in vascular events and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:27165425

  7. Pineal and habenula calcification in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R

    1992-01-01

    Animal data indicate that melatonin secretion is stimulated by the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus and that lesions of the PVN mimic the endocrine effects of pinealectomy. Since the PVN lies adjacent to the third ventricle, I propose that periventricular damage, which is found in schizophrenia and may account for the third ventricular dilatation seen on computed tomographic (CT), may disrupt PVN-pineal interactions and ultimately enhance the process of pineal calcification (PC). To investigate this hypothesis, I conducted CT study on the relationship of PC size to third ventricular width (TVW) in 12 chronic schizophrenic patients (mean age: 33.7 years; SD = 7.3). For comparison, I also studied the relationship of PC size to the ventricular brain ratio and prefrontal cortical atrophy. As predicted, there was a significant correlation between PC size and TVW (r pbi = .61, p < .05), whereas PC was unrelated to the control neuroradiological measures. The findings support the hypothesis that periventricular damage may be involved in the process of PC in schizophrenia and may indirectly implicate damage to the PVN in the mechanisms underlying dysfunction of the pineal gland in schizophrenia. In a second study, I investigated the prevalence of habenular calcification (HAC) on CT in a cohort of 23 chronic schizophrenic-patients (mean age: 31.2 years; SD = 5.95). In this sample HAC was present in 20 patients (87%). Since the prevalence of HAC in a control population of similar age is only 15% these data reveal an almost 6-fold higher prevalence of HAC (X2 = 84.01, p < .0001) in chronic schizophrenia as compared to normal controls. The implications of HAC for the pathophysiology of schizophrenia are discussed in light of the central role of the habenula in the regulation of limbic functions. PMID:1305634

  8. Screening of Cyanobacterial Species for Calcification

    SciTech Connect

    Brady D. Lee; William A. Apel; Michelle R. Walton

    2004-07-01

    Species of cyanobacteria in the genera Synechococcus and Synechocystis are known to be the catalysts of a phenomenon called "whitings", which is the formation and precipitation of fine-grained CaCO3 particles. Whitings occur when the cyanobacteria fix atmospheric CO2 through the formation of CaCO3 on their cell surfaces, which leads to precipitation to the ocean floor and subsequent entombment in mud. Whitings represent one potential mechanism for CO2 sequestration. Research was performed to determine the ability of various strains of Synechocystis and Synechococcus to calcify when grown in microcosms amended with 2.5 mM HCO3- and 3.4 mM Ca2+. Results indicated that although all strains tested have the ability to calcify, only two Synechococcus species, strains PCC 8806 and PCC 8807, were able to calcify to the extent that a CaCO3 precipitate was formed. Enumeration of the cyanobacterial cultures during testing indicated that cell density did not appear to have a direct effect on calcification. Factors that had the greatest effect on calcification were CO2 removal and subsequent generation of alkaline pH. Whereas cell density was similar for all strains tested, differences in maximum pH were demonstrated. As CO2 was removed, growth medium pH increased and soluble Ca2+ was removed from solution. The largest increases in growth medium pH occurred when CO2 levels dropped below 400 ppmv. Research presented demonstrates that, under the conditions tested, many species of cyanobacteria in the genera Synechocystis and Synechococcus are able to calcify but only two species of Synechococcus were able to calcify to an extent that led to the precipitation of calcium carbonate.

  9. Course and treatment of atypical depression.

    PubMed

    Nierenberg, A A; Alpert, J E; Pava, J; Rosenbaum, J F; Fava, M

    1998-01-01

    Atypical depression is the most common form of depression in outpatients, but compared with melancholia, little is known about its comorbidity, course, and treatment. Beyond the well-characterized constellation of symptoms that define atypical depression (mood reactivity, hypersomnia, leaden paralysis, hyperphagia, and rejection sensitivity), specific Axis I and II comorbid conditions may differentiate atypical from other depressed patients. Similarly, age at onset, duration of episodes, frequency of relapses and recurrences, and frequency of complete remission in atypical depression may be different. It has not even been established if atypical depression is a stable subtype or if it is just one of several forms of depression that an individual may express during a lifetime of recurrent depressions. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are superior to tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) for the treatment of atypical depression, but few studies have compared MAOIs to the newer generation of antidepressants (SSRIs, bupropion, venlafaxine, nefazodone, and mirtazapine). Because of the favorable benefit/risk ratio, clinicians tend to use these newer antidepressants for all outpatients, including those with atypical depression, even though the literature is limited. A review and critique of the relevant literature on atypical depression will be presented. PMID:9840192

  10. Higher Education and the Black Atypical Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, W. Frank, IV

    The black atypical student, defined as that black student who would be excluded from most colleges and universities in America by traditional admission policy, is beginning to find entrance into institutions of higher education. There is no indication reported of these institutions admitting large numbers of black atypical students. In the…

  11. Soft-tissue calcification after subcutaneus emphysema in a neonate

    SciTech Connect

    Naidech, H.J.; Chawla, H.S.

    1982-08-01

    Bilateral, almost symmetric, calcifications of the soft tissues after subcutaneous emphysema have not, to our knowledge, been described. Because of the close clinical and radiographic evaluation in our case, the finding of calcinosis was not a diagnostic problem. Several 1.5 mm computed tomographic (CT) sections of the thorax were scanned and they were confirmatory in showing the distribution of the calcifications. Since subcutaneous emphysema is commonplace, and calcification after it is apparently unknown, the literature was reviewed and an additional cause of soft-tissue calcinosis is presented.

  12. Surgery for Patients With Spontaneous Deep Supratentorial Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Li, Hao; Zhao, He-Xiang; Guo, Rui; Lin, Sen; Dong, Wei; Ma, Lu; Fang, Yuan; Tian, Meng; Liu, Ming; You, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) is one of the most dangerous cerebrovascular diseases, especially when in deep brain. The treatment of spontaneous deep supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage is still controversial. We conducted a retrospective case-control study using propensity score matching to compare the efficacy of surgery and conservative treatment for patients with deep surpatentorial hemorrhage. We observed the outcomes of consecutive patients with spontaneous deep supratentorial hemorrhage retrospectively from December 2008 to July 2013. Clinical outcomes of surgery and conservative treatments were compared in patients with deep sICH using propensity score matching method. The primary outcome was neurological function status at 6 months post ictus. The second outcomes included mortality at 30 days and 6 months, and the incidence of complications. Subgroup analyses of 6-month outcome were conducted. Sixty-three (22.66%) of the 278 patients who received surgery had a favorable neurological function status at 6 months, whereas in the conservative group, 66 of 278 (23.74%) had the same result (P = 0.763). The 30-day mortality in the surgical group was 19.06%, whereas 30.58% in the conservative group (P = 0.002). There was significant difference in the mortality at 6 months after ictus as well (23.38% vs 36.33%, P = 0.001). The subgroup analyses showed significantly better outcomes for the surgical group when hematoma was >40 mL (13.33% vs 0%, P = 0.005) or complicated with intraventricular hemorrhage (16.67% vs 7.27%, P = 0.034). For complications, the risk of pulmonary infection, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, urinary infection, pulmonary embolus, and need for tracheostomy/long term ventilation in the surgical group was higher than the conservative group (31.29% vs 15.47%, P < 0.001; 6.83% vs 3.96%, P = 0.133; 2.88% vs 1.80%, P = 0.400; 1.80% vs 1.08%, P = 0.476; 32.73% vs 23.38%, P = 0

  13. Consent for Brain Tissue Donation after Intracerebral Haemorrhage: A Community-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Samarasekera, Neshika; Lerpiniere, Christine; Farrall, Andrew J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; White, Philip M.; Torgersen, Antonia; Ironside, James W.; Smith, Colin; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2015-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage is a devastating form of stroke and its incidence increases with age. Obtaining brain tissue following intracerebral haemorrhage helps to understand its cause. Given declining autopsy rates worldwide, the feasibility of establishing an autopsy-based collection and its generalisability are uncertain. Methods We used multiple overlapping sources of case ascertainment to identify every adult diagnosed with intracerebral haemorrhage between 1st June 2010-31st May 2012, whilst resident in the Lothian region of Scotland. We sought consent from patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (or their nearest relative if the patient lacked mental capacity) to conduct a research autopsy. Results Of 295 adults with acute intracerebral haemorrhage, 110 (37%) could not be approached to consider donation. Of 185 adults/relatives approached, 91 (49%) consented to research autopsy. There were no differences in baseline demographic variables or markers of intracerebral haemorrhage severity between consenters and non-consenters. Adults who died and became donors (n = 46) differed from the rest of the cohort (n = 249) by being older (median age 80, IQR 76–86 vs. 75, IQR 65–83, p = 0.002) and having larger haemorrhages (median volume 23ml, IQR 13–50 vs. 13ml, IQR 4–40; p = 0.002). Conclusions Nearly half of those approached consent to brain tissue donation after acute intracerebral haemorrhage. The characteristics of adults who gave consent were comparable to those in an entire community, although those who donate early are older and have larger haemorrhage volumes. PMID:26302447

  14. Neuroprotection and sensorimotor functional improvement by curcumin after intracerebral hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuhao; Dai, Minchao; Wang, Yongting; Wang, Wenjing; Sun, Qingfang; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Bian, Liuguan

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies revealed that curcumin is neuroprotective in diseases of the central nervous system such as cerebral ischemia and traumatic brain injury. However, the effect of curcumin on intracerebral hemorrhage remains unclear. We, therefore, investigated the pre-clinical effect of curcumin treatment on neurological outcomes following intracerebral hemorrhage, using a mouse model. Intracerebral hemorrhage was induced by autologous blood injection into the right basal ganglia. Curcumin (150 mg/kg) was administered 15 min after intracerebral hemorrhage. Grid walk and neurological scores were evaluated at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days post-injury. Mice were killed at 24 h or 28 days following injury, for histological examination. Evans Blue and water content in the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres were measured to evaluate the extent of blood-brain barrier disruption and brain edema. Zonula occludens-1 was detected by immunostaining. In situ zymography was used to measure the localization and focal enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase. Our results demonstrated that curcumin reduced brain edema, measured by alleviated water content and Evans Blue leakage at 24 h (p<0.05). Lateral ventricle measurements indicated that curcumin reduced brain tissue loss in the ipsilateral hemisphere (p<0.05). The same dose of curcumin also significantly attenuated neurological deficits at 1 and 3 days of intracerebral hemorrhage (p<0.05). Immunostaining showed that tight junction continuity around the hematoma was better sustained in curcumin-treated mice than in vehicle-treated mice. At 24 h, the number of matrix metalloproteinase-positive cells was significantly reduced by curcumin (p<0.05). Our study suggests that curcumin ameliorates intracerebral hemorrhage damage by preventing matrix metalloproteinase-mediated blood-brain barrier damage and brain edema, which might provide therapeutic potential for intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:21770745

  15. Neuroprotection and Sensorimotor Functional Improvement by Curcumin after Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuhao; Dai, Minchao; Wang, Yongting; Wang, Wenjing; Sun, Qingfang; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies revealed that curcumin is neuroprotective in diseases of the central nervous system such as cerebral ischemia and traumatic brain injury. However, the effect of curcumin on intracerebral hemorrhage remains unclear. We, therefore, investigated the pre-clinical effect of curcumin treatment on neurological outcomes following intracerebral hemorrhage, using a mouse model. Intracerebral hemorrhage was induced by autologous blood injection into the right basal ganglia. Curcumin (150 mg/kg) was administered 15 min after intracerebral hemorrhage. Grid walk and neurological scores were evaluated at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days post-injury. Mice were killed at 24 h or 28 days following injury, for histological examination. Evans Blue and water content in the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres were measured to evaluate the extent of blood–brain barrier disruption and brain edema. Zonula occludens-1 was detected by immunostaining. In situ zymography was used to measure the localization and focal enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase. Our results demonstrated that curcumin reduced brain edema, measured by alleviated water content and Evans Blue leakage at 24 h (p<0.05). Lateral ventricle measurements indicated that curcumin reduced brain tissue loss in the ipsilateral hemisphere (p<0.05). The same dose of curcumin also significantly attenuated neurological deficits at 1 and 3 days of intracerebral hemorrhage (p<0.05). Immunostaining showed that tight junction continuity around the hematoma was better sustained in curcumin-treated mice than in vehicle-treated mice. At 24 h, the number of matrix metalloproteinase-positive cells was significantly reduced by curcumin (p<0.05). Our study suggests that curcumin ameliorates intracerebral hemorrhage damage by preventing matrix metalloproteinase-mediated blood–brain barrier damage and brain edema, which might provide therapeutic potential for intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:21770745

  16. An Atypical Case of Hemoptysis.

    PubMed

    Wang'ondu, Ruth W; Long, Theodore

    2016-03-01

    Hemoptysis, a common sign of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, can be caused by multiple factors, both infectious and noninfectious. A 45-year-old male with hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea, and stage IV pulmonary sarcoidosis with cardiac involvement, presented with a two-month history of cough and acute nonmassive hemoptysis with hypoxia. A chest CT showed ground glass consolidation and interlobular septal thickening, concerning for diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. Flexible bronchoscopy confirmed diffuse alveolar hemorrhage; microbiological analyses of bronchoalveolar washings did not reveal a causative organism. Mycoplasma pneumoniae-specific IgM in serum studies was consistent with mycoplasma pneumonia as the most likely etiology of this patient's diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and resultant hemoptysis. This report points to the need to consider atypical mycoplasma pneumonia as a possible etiology of hemoptysis in patients with underlying sarcoidosis. PMID:27169298

  17. [Atypical trajectory of gunshot injury].

    PubMed

    Aygün, Mert; Tulay, Cumhur Murat

    2014-11-01

    Gunshot injuries are common medical-legal issues. Atypical tract lines resulting from this type of injuries cause difficulties in diagnosis and treatment. In this paper, a gunshot injury on the right anterior thigh extending to the right hemithorax was presented. A 67-year-old Syrian refugee patient was brought to the emergency service due to gunshot injury. Bullet entrance hole was determined on the right anterior thigh region; however, exit side could not be seen. Bullet was determined on the right thorax at tomography and the patient was taken to operation due to diaphragm rupture and lung parenchymal injury. Other body parts must be examined radiologically for the bullet which cannot be determined at gunshot injury side. PMID:25541926

  18. Atypical combinations and scientific impact.

    PubMed

    Uzzi, Brian; Mukherjee, Satyam; Stringer, Michael; Jones, Ben

    2013-10-25

    Novelty is an essential feature of creative ideas, yet the building blocks of new ideas are often embodied in existing knowledge. From this perspective, balancing atypical knowledge with conventional knowledge may be critical to the link between innovativeness and impact. Our analysis of 17.9 million papers spanning all scientific fields suggests that science follows a nearly universal pattern: The highest-impact science is primarily grounded in exceptionally conventional combinations of prior work yet simultaneously features an intrusion of unusual combinations. Papers of this type were twice as likely to be highly cited works. Novel combinations of prior work are rare, yet teams are 37.7% more likely than solo authors to insert novel combinations into familiar knowledge domains. PMID:24159044

  19. Atypical parasitic ischiopagus conjoined twins.

    PubMed

    Corona-Rivera, J Román; Corona-Rivera, Enrique; Franco-Topete, Ramón; Acosta-León, Jorge; Aguila-Dueñas, Virginia; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2003-02-01

    Occurrence of asymmetrical or parasitic conjoined twins (CT) is rare, and currently they are classified analogically to the common unions of symmetrical CT. The authors report on an infant with a parasitic third limb attached to the left lateral aspect of the autosite trunk, in whom male gonadal tissue was found histologically. Parasite parts included complete left lower limb, hemipelvis, lumbosacral vertebral column, spinal cord, and one kidney with ureter and adrenal gland. Autosite anomalies comprised a small left diaphragmatic defect, omphalocele, exstrophy of cloaca, and lumbar meningomyelocele. The authors considered this case to be a rare atypical parasitic ischiopagus CT. The differential diagnosis of the type of twining and other entities with caudal duplications is analyzed briefly. PMID:12596123

  20. Typical and atypical AIS. Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dudin, M; Pinchuk, D

    2012-01-01

    AIS hypothesis has the right to recognition, if it explains the transition of "healthy" vertebra column into status of "scoliotic" one. AIS is the most investigated disease in the history of orthopedics, but up the present time there is no clear explanation of some its phenomena: vertebra column mono-form deformation along with its poly etiology character, interrelation of its origin and development and child's growth process etc. The key for authors' view at AIS was scoliosis with non-standard (concave side) rotation. On the bases of its' multifunctional instrumental investigation results (Rtg, EMG, EEG, optical topography, hormonal and neuropeptides trials, thermo-vision methods and other) in comparison with typical AIS was worked out the new hypothesis, part of it is suggested for discussion. In the work under observation is the sequence of appearance of typical and atypical scoliosis symptomatology beginning from the preclinical stage. PMID:22744477

  1. Acute Calcific Tendinitis of the Rectus Femoris: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    IKobayashi, Hideo; Kaneko, Haruka; Homma, Yasuhiro; Baba, Tomonori; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Periarticular calcific tendinitis is a common cause of Orthopedic outpatient referral. Calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris, however, is very rare and not well known. Due to its rarity, correct diagnosis and prompt treatment are not fully understood. Case Report: Two females (38 and 40 years old) of acute calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris with the good clinical course without any operative treatment were presented. The pain was managed with oral non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs and/or local steroid injection. Interval radiographic assessment showed complete resorption of the calcification. Conclusion: Establishing the correct diagnosis and initiating prompt treatment are shown to be important in achieving resolution of symptoms and in avoiding unnecessary investigations. PMID:27299063

  2. Genetics Home Reference: generalized arterial calcification of infancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... It is characterized by abnormal accumulation of the mineral calcium (calcification) in the walls of the blood ... characterized by the accumulation of calcium and other minerals (mineralization) in elastic fibers, which are a component ...

  3. Calcification generates protons for nutrient and bicarbonate uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnaughey, T. A.; Whelan, J. F.

    1997-03-01

    The biosphere's great carbonate deposits, from caliche soils to deep-sea carbonate oozes, precipitate largely as by-products of autotrophic nutrient acquisition physiologies. Protons constitute the critical link: Calcification generates protons, which plants and photosynthetic symbioses use to assimilate bicarbonate and nutrients. A calcium ATPase-based "trans" mechanism underlies most biological calcification. This permits high calcium carbonate supersaturations and rapid carbonate precipitation. The competitive advantages of calcification become especially apparent in light and nutrient-deficient alkaline environments. Calcareous plants often dominate the lower euphotic zone in both the benthos and the plankton. Geographically and seasonally, massive calcification concentrates in nutrient-deficient environments including alkaline soils, coral reefs, cyanobacterial mats and coccolithophorid blooms. Structural and defensive uses for calcareous skeletons are sometimes overrated.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification

    MedlinePlus

    ... in regulating phosphate levels within the body (phosphate homeostasis) by transporting phosphate across cell membranes. The SLC20A2 ... link familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification with phosphate homeostasis. Nat Genet. 2012 Feb 12;44(3):254- ...

  5. Effects of. gamma. irradiation on cartilage matrix calcification

    SciTech Connect

    Nijweide, P.J.; Burger, E.H.; van Delft, J.L.; Kawilarange-de Haas, E.W.M.; Wassenaar, A.M.; Mellink, J.H.

    1980-10-01

    The effect of ..gamma.. irradiation on cartilage matrix calcification was studied in vitro. Metatarsal bones of 14- to 17-day-old embryonic mice were dissected and cultured under various conditions. Prior to culture, half of the metatarsal bones received absorbed doses of 1.0 to 30.0 Gy ..gamma.. radiation. Their paired counterparts served as controls. Irradiation inhibited longitudinal growth and calcification of the cartilage matrix during culture. In addition, a number of histological changes were noted. The inhibition of matrix calcification appeared to be due to an inhibition of the intracellular calcium accumulation. The formation of extracellular calcification foci and the growth of the calcified area already present at the moment of explanation were not inhibited during culture.

  6. Stem cell therapy in intracerebral hemorrhage rat model.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Marcos F; Horn, Ana P

    2015-04-26

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a very complex pathology, with many different not fully elucidated etiologies and prognostics. It is the most severe subtype of stroke, with high mortality and morbidity rates. Unfortunately, despite the numerous promising preclinical assays including neuroprotective, anti-hypertensive, and anti-inflammatory drugs, to this moment only symptomatic treatments are available, motivating the search for new alternatives. In this context, stem cell therapy emerged as a promising tool. However, more than a decade has passed, and there is still much to be learned not only about stem cells, but also about ICH itself, and how these two pieces come together. To date, rats have been the most widely used animal model in this research field, and there is much more to be learned from and about them. In this review, we first summarize ICH epidemiology, risk factors, and pathophysiology. We then present different methods utilized to induce ICH in rats, and examine how accurately they represent the human disease. Next, we discuss the different types of stem cells used in previous ICH studies, also taking into account the tested transplantation sites. Finally, we summarize what has been achieved in assays with stem cells in rat models of ICH, and point out some relevant issues where attention must be given in future efforts. PMID:25914768

  7. Brain Injury After Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gang; Bao, Xuhui; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard; Thompson, B. Gregory; Hua, Ya

    2011-01-01

    Object Hypertension is the main cause of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH), but the effects of hypertension on ICH-induced brain injury have not been well studied. In this study, we examined ICH-induced brain injury in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Methods This two-part study was performed on 12 weeks old male SHR and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. First, rats received an intracaudate injection of 0.3 units collagenase and hematoma sizes were determined at 24 hours. Second, rats were injected with 100-μL autologous whole blood into the right basal ganglia. Brain edema, neuronal death, ferritin expression, microglia activation, and neurological deficits were examined. Results Hematoma sizes were the same in SHR and WKY rats 24 hours after collagenase injection. SHR had greater neuronal death and neurological deficits after blood injection. ICH also resulted in higher brain ferritin levels and stronger activation of microglia in SHR. However, perihematomal brain edema was same in the SHR and WKY rats. Conclusion Moderate chronic hypertension resulted in more severe ICH-induced neuronal death and neurological deficits, but did not exaggerate hematoma enlargement and perihematomal brain edema in the rat ICH models. PMID:21294617

  8. Image Guided Endoscopic Evacuation of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chad M; Vespa, Paul; Saver, Jeffrey L; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Carmichael, Stanley T.; Alger, Jeffry; Frazee, John; Starkman, Sid; Liebeskind, David; Nenov, Valeriy; Elashoff, Robert; Martin, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality. ICH lacks an effective medical or surgical treatment despite the acknowledged pathophysiological benefits of achieved hemostasis and clot removal. Image guided stereotactic endoscopic hematoma evacuation is a promising minimally invasive approach designed to limit operative injury and maximize hematoma removal. Methods A single center randomized controlled trial was designed to assess the safety and efficacy of stereotactic hematoma evacuation compared to best medical management. Patients were randomized within 24 hours of hemorrhage in a 3:2 fashion to best medical management plus endoscopic hematoma evacuation or best medical management alone. Data was collected to assess efficacy and safety of hematoma evacuation and to identify procedural components requiring technical improvement. Results 10 patients have been enrolled and randomized to treatment. Six patients underwent endoscopic evacuation with a hematoma volume reduction of 80% +/−13 at 24 hours post procedure. The medical arm demonstrated a hematoma enlargement of 78% +/−142 during this same period. Rehemorrhage rates and deterioration rates were similar in the two groups. Mortality was 20% in the endoscopic group and 50% in the medical treatment cohort. The endoscopic technique was shown to be effective in identification and evacuation of hematomas while reduction in the number of endoscopic passes and maintenance of hemostasis require further study. Conclusion Image guided stereotactic endoscopic hematoma removal is a promising minimally invasive technique that is effective in immediate hematoma evacuation. This technique deserves further investigation to determine its role in ICH management. PMID:18424298

  9. Ethnic Differences in Withdrawal of Life Support After Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Gallek, Matthew J; Sheppard, Kate G; Ritter, Leslie; Vento, Megan A; Asai, Susan M; Nakagawa, Kazuma

    2015-01-01

    Minorities are less likely to decide on withdrawal of life support (WOLS) after acute severe illness. However, the decision-making process for WOLS after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) among Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders (NHOPI) has not been described. To address this gap in the literature, a retrospective study was conducted on consecutive spontaneous ICH patients admitted to a tertiary center in Honolulu between 2006 and 2010. The occurrence of WOLS and time-to-WOLS were the outcome measures. Unadjusted and multivariable logistic regression models were performed to determine associations between NHOPI ethnicity and WOLS. This study assessed 396 patients (18% NHOPI, 63% Asians, 15% non-Hispanic whites [NHW], 4% others) with ICH. NHOPI was associated with lower rate of WOLS than NHW in the univariate analysis (OR 0.35, 95% CI: 0.15, 0.80). However, NHOPI ethnicity was no longer significant when adjusted for age (OR 0.59, 95% CI: 0.25, 1.43) and in the fully adjusted model (OR 0.68, 95% CI: 0.20, 2.39). Although NHOPI with ICH were initially perceived to have less WOLS compared to NHW, this observed difference was largely driven by the younger age of NHOPI rather than from underlying cultural differences that are inherent to their ethnicity. PMID:26114075

  10. Decompressive craniectomy for arteriovenous malformation-related intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Takasato, Yoshio; Masaoka, Hiroyuki; Nagatani, Kimihiro; Otani, Naoki; Wada, Kojiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2015-03-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM)-related intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the cause of approximately 2-3% of ICH and is an important factor in the significant morbidity and mortality in patients with AVM. Decompressive craniectomy (DC) is a surgical procedure to relieve malignant elevation of intracranial pressure. The use of DC to treat patients with AVM-ICH has been much less common. The present study describes our experience with DC for AVM-ICH and discusses the safety of this procedure. The present retrospective analysis compared 12 consecutive patients treated with DC for AVM-ICH with 23 patients treated with DC for hypertensive ICH. Nine patients were male and three were female, aged from 11 to 53 years (mean, 31.7 years). Hematoma volumes ranged from 50 to 106 ml (mean, 75.8 ml). The outcomes were good recovery in one patient, moderate disability in three, severe disability in seven, and vegetative state in one. Complications after DC included subdural hygroma in four patients, hydrocephalus in one, intracranial infection in two, and intracranial hemorrhage in one. No significant difference was found in the incidence of complications between DC for large AVM-ICH and DC for hypertensive ICH. In conclusion, the present study found no significant difference in the incidence of complications between DC for large AVM-ICH and DC for hypertensive ICH. Further investigations including a prospective randomized trial are needed to confirm the safety and efficacy of DC for the treatment of large AVM-ICH. PMID:25564272

  11. The Evaluation and Management of Adult Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xuemei; Rosand, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the most disabling and deadly form of stroke. Although mortality remains high, new data suggest that outcomes can be improved with standardized medical care. In this review, the authors outline the most up-to-date knowledge, including the results of the latest phase III clinical trials on the specialized care needed to treat patients with ICH. They provide an overview on how to achieve rapid diagnosis and the initial steps of intervention to reduce hematoma volume or prevent expansion by modifying potentially treatable conditions, such as underlying vascular etiologies, blood pressure control, and coagulopathies. Grading scales can help identify patients at risk for hematoma expansion and functional disabilities and guide clinical decision making. Other medical management topics important to recovery and prevention of secondary brain injury include seizure prevention and treatment, glycemic control, temperature control, and deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis and treatment. Treatment options in surgery are also possible in select patients; there are emerging studies regarding minimally invasive surgery for the management of ICH. These aggressive therapies are essential to lower the morbidity and mortality of patients presenting with ICH. PMID:26595864

  12. Influence of hematoma location on acute mortality after intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Yong; King, Caroline; Stradling, Dana; Warren, Michael; Nguyen, Dennis; Lee, Johnny; Riola, Mark A.; Montoya, Ricardo; Patel, Dipika; Le, Vu H.; Welbourne, Susan J.; Cramer, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose The current study aimed to identify predictors of acute mortality after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), including voxel-wise analysis of hematoma location. Methods In 282 consecutive patients with acute ICH, clinical and radiological predictors of acute mortality were identified. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping examined spatial correlates of acute mortality, contrasting results in basal ganglia ICH and lobar ICH. Results Acute mortality was 47.9%. In bivariate analyses, one clinical (serum glucose) and two radiological (hematoma volume and intraventricular extension) measures significantly predicted mortality. The relationship was strongest for hematoma volume. Multivariable modeling identified four significant predictors of mortality (ICH volume, intraventricular extension, serum glucose, and serum hemoglobin), although this model only minimally improved the predictive value provided by ICH volume alone. Voxel-wise analysis found that for patients with lobar ICH, brain regions where acute hematoma was significantly associated with higher acute mortality included inferior parietal lobule and posterior insula; for patients with basal ganglia ICH, a large region extending from cortex to brainstem. Conclusions For patients with lobar ICH, acute mortality is related to both hematoma size and location, with findings potentially useful for therapeutic decision-making. The current findings also underscore differences between the syndromes of acute deep and lobar ICH. PMID:23279617

  13. Management of intracerebral hemorrhage–use of statins

    PubMed Central

    Van Matre, Edward T; Sherman, Deb S; Kiser, Tyree H

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a neurologic injury resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Statins play a significant role in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular ischemic events. Despite clear benefits of statins in ischemic stroke, post hoc analyses of some studies suggest there may be a link between statin therapy and development of ICH. Direct pharmacologic effects of decreased serum levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins in conjunction with pleiotropic effects are thought to be linked to this possible increase in ICH risk. In the face of the potential of statins to increase the risk of ICH, recent evidence suggests that statins may also have beneficial effects on patient outcomes when continued or initiated following an ICH. This discordance in findings and the overall lack of well-designed prospective clinical trials increase the complexity of clinical decision making when utilizing statin therapy in patients with, or at risk for, ICH. This review evaluates the pharmacologic effects of statin therapy and describes how these effects translate to both risks and benefits in ICH. The current literature regarding the effects of statin therapy on clinical outcomes in ICH is evaluated to help guide clinicians with decisions regarding initiation, continuation, or discontinuation of statin therapy in patients with ICH. PMID:27143909

  14. Stem cell therapy in intracerebral hemorrhage rat model

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Marcos F; Horn, Ana P

    2015-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a very complex pathology, with many different not fully elucidated etiologies and prognostics. It is the most severe subtype of stroke, with high mortality and morbidity rates. Unfortunately, despite the numerous promising preclinical assays including neuroprotective, anti-hypertensive, and anti-inflammatory drugs, to this moment only symptomatic treatments are available, motivating the search for new alternatives. In this context, stem cell therapy emerged as a promising tool. However, more than a decade has passed, and there is still much to be learned not only about stem cells, but also about ICH itself, and how these two pieces come together. To date, rats have been the most widely used animal model in this research field, and there is much more to be learned from and about them. In this review, we first summarize ICH epidemiology, risk factors, and pathophysiology. We then present different methods utilized to induce ICH in rats, and examine how accurately they represent the human disease. Next, we discuss the different types of stem cells used in previous ICH studies, also taking into account the tested transplantation sites. Finally, we summarize what has been achieved in assays with stem cells in rat models of ICH, and point out some relevant issues where attention must be given in future efforts. PMID:25914768

  15. Tranexamic Acid as Antifibrinolytic Agent in Non Traumatic Intracerebral Hemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    ARUMUGAM, Ananda; A RAHMAN, Noor Azman; THEOPHILUS, Sharon Casilda; SHARIFFUDIN, Ashraf; ABDULLAH, Jafri Malin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mortality and morbidity associated with intracerebral hemorrhage is still high. Up to now, there are no evidence-based effective treatments for acute ICH. This study is to assess the effect of tranexamic acid (TXA) on hematoma growth of patients with spontaneous ICH compared to a placebo. Methods: We performed a single-blinded, randomised placebo-controlled trial of TXA (intravenous 1g bolus, followed by infusion TXA 1 g/hour for 8 hours) in acute (< 8 hours) primary ICH. Strict blood pressure control (target SBP 140-160 mmHg). A repeat Computed Tomography brain was done after 24 hours to reassess hematoma growth. The primary objective is to test the effect of TXA on hematoma growth. Other objective was to test the feasibility, tolerability, and adverse events of TXA in primary ICH. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant hematoma growth in control group after 24 hours compared to baseline (14.3300 vs 17.9940, P = 0.001) whereas the treatment group there is no significant hematoma size expansion between baseline and after 24 hours (P = 0.313). Conclusions: This study showed a significant hematoma volume expansion in the control group compared to the treatment group. PMID:27006639

  16. Sturge-Weber syndrome with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage in childhood.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Madoka; Sugano, Hidenori; Iimura, Yasushi; Higo, Takuma; Nakanishi, Hajime; Shimoji, Kazuaki; Karagiozov, Kostadin; Miyajima, Masakazu; Arai, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    A girl aged 2 years 10 months suddenly went into a deep coma and demonstrated left hemiplegia. At birth, she had exhibited a left-sided facial port-wine stain typical of Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) and involving the V1 and V2 distributions of the trigeminal nerve. Computed tomography showed a right thalamic hemorrhage with acute hydrocephalus. Magnetic resonance imaging with Gd enhancement 8 months before the hemorrhage had shown a patent superior sagittal sinus (SSS) and deep venous system. Magnetic resonance imaging and MR angiography studies 2 months before the hemorrhage had revealed obstruction of the SSS and right internal cerebral vein (ICV). Given that a digital subtraction angiography study obtained after the hemorrhage did not show the SSS or right ICV, the authors assumed that impaired drainage was present in the deep venous system at that stage. The authors speculated that the patient's venous drainage pattern underwent compensatory changes because of the occluded SSS and deep venous collectors, shifting outflow through other cortical venous channels to nonoccluded dural sinuses. Sudden congestion (nearly total to total obstruction) of the ICV may have caused the thalamic hemorrhage in this case, which is the first reported instance of pediatric SWS with intracerebral hemorrhage and no other vascular lesion. Findings suggested that the appearance of major venous sinus occlusion in a child with SWS could be a warning sign of hemorrhage. PMID:24160667

  17. Animal Stroke Model: Ischemia-Reperfusion and Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ren, Changhong; Sy, Christopher; Gao, Jinhuan; Ding, Yuchuan; Ji, Xunming

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a major health issue worldwide-one with serious financial and public health implications. As a result, ongoing clinical research on novel and improved stroke therapies is not only pertinent but also paramount. Due to the complexity of a stroke-like event and its many sequelae, devising usable methods and experimental models are necessary to study and better understand the pathophysiological processes that ensue. As it stands, animal models that simulate stroke-like events have proven to be the most logical and effective options in regards to experimental studies. A number of animal stroke models exist and have been demonstrated in previous studies on ischemic as well as hemorrhagic stroke. Considering the efficiency and reproducibility of animal models, here, we introduce an ischemic stroke model induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and an intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke model induced by collagenase injection. The models outlined here have been proven to demonstrate the clinical relevance desired for use in continued research on stroke pathophysiology and the study of future therapeutic options. PMID:27604729

  18. Intracerebral hematoma extends via perivascular spaces and perineurium.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia; Lü, Tian-Ming; Qiu, Guang; Huang, Rui-Yu; Fang, Min; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Xiao, Duan; Liu, Xiao-Jia

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating disorder associated with high morbidity and mortality. ICH results in the formation of hematoma that affects not only the primary site of injury but also the remote regions. In fact, hematoma can extend via perivascular spaces (also called Virchow-Robin spaces, VRS) and perineurium in an animal model of ICH. In the present study, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to investigate the characteristics of the perivascular and perineural extensions of hematomas in patients with ICH. A total of 20 ICH patients without secondary subarachnoid and secondary intraventricular hemorrhages were recruited. Brain MRI scans, including SWI, T1, and T2-weighted images, were performed between 17 h to 7 days after the onset of ICH. MRI with SWI revealed that paramagnetic substances spread along the VRS or the perineurium. Such distribution could cause the formation of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs). However, the distribution of remote hemorrhagic lesions varied, depending on the size and location of the original hematoma. The unenhanced CT scans of the 20 patients did not show any hyperdensity around the blood vessels and nerve tracts outside the hematoma. These results indicate the perivascular and perineural extensions of hematomas in patients with ICH, which is formed by the leakage of the original hematoma via the VRS or perineurium. We also provide a new explanation for the series of pathological processes involved in ICH, including the remote effects of hematoma and the formation of CMBs in patients with ICH. PMID:23812162

  19. Diagnosis and Management of Coagulopathy-Related Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    VanDerWerf, Joshua; Kumar, Monisha A

    2016-06-01

    Coagulopathy, defined as impaired clot formation, is common in intensive care units (ICUs). Many physiological derangements lead to dysfunctional hemostasis in the ICU; most of these are acquired rather than congenital. Coagulopathies in the ICU are often related to systemic diseases, autoimmune dysfunction, acute infection, organ dysfunction, therapeutic medications, and/or other medical treatments. A significant complication of coagulopathy in the critically ill is major bleeding, defined as fatal hemorrhage, hemodynamic instability, transfusion requirement, or intracranial hematomas. Coagulopathy in the ICU often poses complex management dilemmas, especially when coagulopathy coexists with a thrombotic state. Coagulopathy associated with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) bears directly on neurologic prognosis and functional outcome. There is a paucity of high-quality evidence for the management of coagulopathies in neurocritical care; however, data derived from studies of patients with ICH may inform treatment decisions. This article focuses on acquired conditions such as pharmacological therapies, organ failure, and platelet dysfunction that are often associated with defective clot formation in the ICU that result in or exacerbate ICH. PMID:27214703

  20. Robot-assisted intracerebral hemorrhage evacuation: an experimental evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgner, Jessica; Swaney, Philip J.; Lathrop, Ray A.; Weaver, Kyle D.; Webster, Robert J.

    2013-03-01

    We present a novel robotic approach for the rapid, minimally invasive treatment of Intracerebral Hemorrhage (ICH), in which a hematoma or blood clot arises in the brain parenchyma. We present a custom image-guided robot system that delivers a steerable cannula into the lesion and aspirates it from the inside. The steerable cannula consists of an initial straight tube delivered in a manner similar to image-guided biopsy (and which uses a commercial image guidance system), followed by the sequential deployment of multiple individual precurved elastic tubes. Rather than deploying the tubes simultaneously, as has been done in nearly all prior studies, we deploy the tubes one at a time, using a compilation of their individual workspaces to reach desired points inside the lesion. This represents a new paradigm in active cannula research, defining a novel procedure-planning problem. A design that solves this problem can potentially save many lives by enabling brain decompression both more rapidly and less invasively than is possible through the traditional open surgery approach. Experimental results include a comparison of the simulated and actual workspaces of the prototype robot, and an accuracy evaluation of the system.

  1. Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage Image Analysis Methods: A Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Noel; Valdés, Jose; Guevara, Miguel; Silva, Augusto

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH) account for 10-30% of all strokes and are a result of acute bleeding into the brain due to ruptures of small penetrating arteries. Despite major advancements in the management of ischemic strokes and other causes of hemorrhagic strokes, such as ruptured aneurysm, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), or cavernous angioma, during the past several decades, limited progress has been made in the treatment of ICH, and the prognosis for patients who suffer them remains poor. The societal impact of these hemorrhagic strokes is magnified by the fact that affected patients typically are a decade younger than those afflicted with ischemic strokes. The ICH continues to kill or disable most of their victims. Some studies show that those who suffer ICH have a 30-day mortality rate of 35-44% and a 6-month mortality rate approaching 50%. Approximately 700,000 new strokes occur in the United States annually and approximately 15% are hem-orrhagic strokes related to ICH. The poor outcome associated with ICH is related to the extent of brain damage. ICH produces direct destruction and compression of surrounding brain tissue. Direct compression causes poor perfusion and venous drainage to surrounding penumbra at risk, resulting in ischemia to the tissues that most need perfusion [16].

  2. Experimental intracerebral hemorrhage: avoiding pitfalls in translational research

    PubMed Central

    Kirkman, Matthew A; Allan, Stuart M; Parry-Jones, Adrian R

    2011-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has the highest mortality of all stroke subtypes, yet treatments are mainly limited to supportive management, and surgery remains controversial. Despite significant advances in our understanding of ICH pathophysiology, we still lack preclinical models that accurately replicate the underlying mechanisms of injury. Current experimental ICH models (including autologous blood and collagenase injection) simulate different aspects of ICH-mediated injury but lack some features of the clinical condition. Newly developed models, notably hypertension- and oral anticoagulant therapy-associated ICH models, offer added benefits but further study is needed to fully validate them. Here, we describe and discuss current approaches to experimental ICH, with suggestions for changes in how this condition is studied in the laboratory. Although advances in imaging over the past few decades have allowed greater insight into clinical ICH, there remains an important role for experimental models in furthering our understanding of the basic pathophysiologic processes underlying ICH, provided limitations of animal models are borne in mind. Owing to differences in existing models and the failed translation of benefits in experimental ICH to clinical practice, putative neuroprotectants should be trialed in multiple models using both histological and functional outcomes until a more accurate model of ICH is developed. PMID:21863040

  3. Local aspects of sleep: observations from intracerebral recordings in humans.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Lino; De Gennaro, Luigi; Proserpio, Paola; Moroni, Fabio; Sarasso, Simone; Pigorini, Andrea; De Carli, Fabrizio; Ferrara, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Human sleep is considered a global phenomenon, orchestrated by central specialized neuronal networks modulating the whole-brain activity. However, recent studies point to a local regulation of sleep. Sleep disorders, such as sleepwalking, suggest that electroencephalographic (EEG) features of sleep and wakefulness might be simultaneously present in different cerebral regions. Recently, intracranial EEG recording techniques, mainly applied for the presurgical evaluation of drug-resistant epileptic patients, have provided new and interesting information on the activity of different cortical and subcortical structures during sleep in humans. In particular, it has been observed that the thalamus, during the transition between wake and sleep undergoes a deactivation process that precedes the one occurring within the cortex, with extensive cortical territories maintaining an activated pattern for several minutes after the thalamic deactivation. Very recent intracerebral EEG studies have also shown that human NREM sleep can be characterized by the coexistence of wake-like and sleep-like EEG patterns in different cortical areas. Moreover, unit-firing recordings in multiple brain regions of neurosurgical patients evidenced that most sleep slow waves and the underlying active and inactive neuronal states do occur locally. These findings add a new dimension to the concept of local sleep regulation and opens new perspectives in the interpretation of the substrates underlying behavioral states of vigilance. The implications for sleep medicine are also discussed. PMID:22877668

  4. Genetics of intracerebral hemorrhage: Insights from candidate gene approaches.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoqiong; Zhang, Le; Yang, Qidong

    2012-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a heterogeneous disease with genetic factors playing an important role. Association studies on a wide range of candidate pathways suggest a weak but significant effect for several alleles with ICH risk. Among the most widely investigated genes are those involved in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (e.g., angiotensin-converting enzyme), coagulation pathway (e.g., Factor XIII, Factor VII, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, Factor V Leiden, and beta1-tubulin), lipid metabolism (e.g., apolipoproteins (Apo)E, Apo(a), ApoH), homocysteine metabolism (e.g., methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase), inflammation (e.g., interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis-alpha) and other candidate pathways. To identify the robustness of the above associations with ICH, a search of Pubmed (1988 through December 2011) was performed, with searches limited to English-language studies conducted among adult human subjects. This article presents a review of the examined literature on the genetics of ICH. PMID:22406772

  5. Intracerebral haemorrhage in Down syndrome: protected or predisposed?

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Lewis; Fisher, Elizabeth; Hardy, John; Nizetic, Dean; Groet, Jurgen; Pulford, Laura; Strydom, André

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), which arises from trisomy of chromosome 21, is associated with deposition of large amounts of amyloid within the central nervous system. Amyloid accumulates in two compartments: as plaques within the brain parenchyma and in vessel walls of the cerebral microvasculature. The parenchymal plaque amyloid is thought to result in an early onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia, a phenomenon so common amongst people with DS that it could be considered a defining feature of the condition. The amyloid precursor protein ( APP) gene lies on chromosome 21 and its presence in three copies in DS is thought to largely drive the early onset AD. In contrast, intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH), the main clinical consequence of vascular amyloidosis, is a more poorly defined feature of DS. We review recent epidemiological data on stroke (including haemorrhagic stroke) in order to make comparisons with a rare form of familial AD due to duplication (i.e. having three copies) of the APP region on chromosome 21, here called ‘dup-APP’, which is associated with more frequent and severe ICH. We conclude that although people with DS are at increased risk of ICH, this is less common than in dup-APP, suggesting the presence of mechanisms that act protectively. We review these mechanisms and consider comparative research into DS and dup-APP that may yield further pathophysiological insight. PMID:27239286

  6. Rare Coding Variation and Risk of Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Radmanesh, Farid; Falcone, Guido J.; Anderson, Christopher D.; McWilliams, David; Devan, William J.; Brown, W Mark; Battey, Thomas W. K.; Ayres, Alison M.; Raffeld, Miriam R.; Schwab, Kristin; Sun, Guangyun; Deka, Ranjan; Viswanathan, Anand; Goldstein, Joshua N.; Greenberg, Steven M.; Tirschwell, David L.; Silliman, Scott L.; Selim, Magdy; Meschia, James F.; Brown, Devin L.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Woo, Daniel; Rosand, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has a substantial genetic component. We performed a preliminary search for rare coding variants associated with ICH. Methods 757 cases and 795 controls were genotyped using the Illumina HumanExome Beadchip (Illumina, Inc. San Diego, CA, USA). Meta-analyses of single-variant and gene-based association were computed. Results No rare coding variants were associated with ICH. Three common variants on chromosome 19q13 at an established susceptibility locus, encompassing TOMM40, APOE, and APOC1 met genome-wide significance (p<5e-08). After adjusting for the APOE epsilon alleles, this locus was no longer convincingly associated with ICH. No gene reached genome-wide significance level in gene-based association testing. Conclusions While no coding variants of large effect were detected, this study further underscores a major challenge for the study of genetic susceptibility loci – large sample sizes are required for sufficient power except for loci with large effects. PMID:26111891

  7. A Review of the Effect of Diet on Cardiovascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Nicoll, Rachel; Howard, John McLaren; Henein, Michael Y.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) calcification is known as sub-clinical atherosclerosis and is recognised as a predictor of CV events and mortality. As yet there is no treatment for CV calcification and conventional CV risk factors are not consistently correlated, leaving clinicians uncertain as to optimum management for these patients. For this reason, a review of studies investigating diet and serum levels of macro- and micronutrients was carried out. Although there were few human studies of macronutrients, nevertheless transfats and simple sugars should be avoided, while long chain ω-3 fats from oily fish may be protective. Among the micronutrients, an intake of 800 μg/day calcium was beneficial in those without renal disease or hyperparathyroidism, while inorganic phosphorus from food preservatives and colas may induce calcification. A high intake of magnesium (≥380 mg/day) and phylloquinone (500 μg/day) proved protective, as did a serum 25(OH)D concentration of ≥75 nmol/L. Although oxidative damage appears to be a cause of CV calcification, the antioxidant vitamins proved to be largely ineffective, while supplementation of α-tocopherol may induce calcification. Nevertheless other antioxidant compounds (epigallocatechin gallate from green tea and resveratrol from red wine) were protective. Finally, a homocysteine concentration >12 µmol/L was predictive of CV calcification, although a plasma folate concentration of >39.4 nmol/L could both lower homocysteine and protect against calcification. In terms of a dietary programme, these recommendations indicate avoiding sugar and the transfats and preservatives found in processed foods and drinks and adopting a diet high in oily fish and vegetables. The micronutrients magnesium and vitamin K may be worthy of further investigation as a treatment option for CV calcification. PMID:25906474

  8. A review of the effect of diet on cardiovascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, Rachel; Howard, John McLaren; Henein, Michael Y

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) calcification is known as sub-clinical atherosclerosis and is recognised as a predictor of CV events and mortality. As yet there is no treatment for CV calcification and conventional CV risk factors are not consistently correlated, leaving clinicians uncertain as to optimum management for these patients. For this reason, a review of studies investigating diet and serum levels of macro- and micronutrients was carried out. Although there were few human studies of macronutrients, nevertheless transfats and simple sugars should be avoided, while long chain ω-3 fats from oily fish may be protective. Among the micronutrients, an intake of 800 μg/day calcium was beneficial in those without renal disease or hyperparathyroidism, while inorganic phosphorus from food preservatives and colas may induce calcification. A high intake of magnesium (≥380 mg/day) and phylloquinone (500 μg/day) proved protective, as did a serum 25(OH)D concentration of ≥75 nmol/L. Although oxidative damage appears to be a cause of CV calcification, the antioxidant vitamins proved to be largely ineffective, while supplementation of α-tocopherol may induce calcification. Nevertheless other antioxidant compounds (epigallocatechin gallate from green tea and resveratrol from red wine) were protective. Finally, a homocysteine concentration >12 µmol/L was predictive of CV calcification, although a plasma folate concentration of >39.4 nmol/L could both lower homocysteine and protect against calcification. In terms of a dietary programme, these recommendations indicate avoiding sugar and the transfats and preservatives found in processed foods and drinks and adopting a diet high in oily fish and vegetables. The micronutrients magnesium and vitamin K may be worthy of further investigation as a treatment option for CV calcification. PMID:25906474

  9. [Neuroimaging findings in cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts].

    PubMed

    Herrera, Diego Alberto; Vargas, Sergio Alberto; Montoya, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts is a rare condition characterized by brain, retinal and bone anomalies, as well as a predisposition to gastrointestinal bleeding. There are few reported cases of this condition in adults, among whom the incidence is low. Neuroimaging findings are characteristic, with bilateral calcifications, leukoencephalopathy and intracranial cysts. The purpose of this article was to do a literature survey and illustrate two cases diagnosed with the aid of neuroimaging. PMID:24967922

  10. Non-progressive familial idiopathic intracranial calcification: a family report.

    PubMed Central

    Callender, J S

    1995-01-01

    The clinical features and long term outcome of familial idiopathic intracranial calcification in three members of one family are described. The illness presented as psychiatric disorder in all patients, and in one patient, epilepsy and intellectual deterioration were later manifestations. Skull radiographs and CT were performed sequentially, in one patient, over a 22 year period and, in another, CT was carried out eight years apart. In neither patient was there any evidence of progression of calcification. Images PMID:7561925

  11. Computed tomography study of pineal calcification in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bersani, G; Garavini, A; Taddei, I; Tanfani, G; Nordio, M; Pancheri, P

    1999-06-01

    Computed tomography studies concerning pineal calcification (PC) in schizophrenia have been conducted mainly by one author who correlated this calcification with several aspects of the illness. On the basis of these findings the aim of the present study was to analyze size and incidence of pineal gland calcification by CT in schizophrenics and healthy controls, and to verify the relationship between pineal calcification and age, and the possible correlation with psychopathologic variables. Pineal calcification was measured on CT scans of 87 schizophrenics and 46 controls divided into seven age subgroups of five years each. No significant differences in PC incidence and mean size between patients and controls were observed as far as the entire group was considered. PC size correlated with age both in schizophrenics and controls. We found a higher incidence of PC in schizophrenics in the age subgroup of 21-25 years, and a negative correlation with positive symptoms of schizophrenia in the overall group. These findings could suggest a premature calcific process in schizophrenics and a probable association with 'non-paranoid' aspects of the illness. Nevertheless the potential role of this process possibly related to some aspects of the altered neurodevelopment in schizophrenia is still unclear. PMID:10572342

  12. Ocean Acidification Reduces Growth and Calcification in a Marine Dinoflagellate

    PubMed Central

    Van de Waal, Dedmer B.; John, Uwe; Ziveri, Patrizia; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Hoins, Mirja; Sluijs, Appy; Rost, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification is considered a major threat to marine ecosystems and may particularly affect calcifying organisms such as corals, foraminifera and coccolithophores. Here we investigate the impact of elevated pCO2 and lowered pH on growth and calcification in the common calcareous dinoflagellate Thoracosphaera heimii. We observe a substantial reduction in growth rate, calcification and cyst stability of T. heimii under elevated pCO2. Furthermore, transcriptomic analyses reveal CO2 sensitive regulation of many genes, particularly those being associated to inorganic carbon acquisition and calcification. Stable carbon isotope fractionation for organic carbon production increased with increasing pCO2 whereas it decreased for calcification, which suggests interdependence between both processes. We also found a strong effect of pCO2 on the stable oxygen isotopic composition of calcite, in line with earlier observations concerning another T. heimii strain. The observed changes in stable oxygen and carbon isotope composition of T. heimii cysts may provide an ideal tool for reconstructing past seawater carbonate chemistry, and ultimately past pCO2. Although the function of calcification in T. heimii remains unresolved, this trait likely plays an important role in the ecological and evolutionary success of this species. Acting on calcification as well as growth, ocean acidification may therefore impose a great threat for T. heimii. PMID:23776586

  13. ADVANCE: Study to Evaluate Cinacalcet Plus Low Dose Vitamin D on Vascular Calcification in Subjects With Chronic Kidney Disease Receiving Hemodialysis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-14

    Chronic Kidney Disease; End Stage Renal Disease; Coronary Artery Calcification; Vascular Calcification; Calcification; Cardiovascular Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Hyperparathyroidism; Kidney Disease; Nephrology; Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

  14. Imaging appearances of atypical hydatid cysts

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Amita; Chandra, Ranjan; Prasad, Rajni; Khanna, Geetika; Thukral, Brij B

    2016-01-01

    Hydatid disease continues to be a significant health problem in many parts of the world. It can occur in any part of the body, but liver is the commonest site of involvement. The disease may remain asymptomatic for years. Symptoms occur due to compression of local structures or complications like rupture and infection. The diagnosis is clear when typical radiological appearance is observed at the common sites of involvement. Complications give rise to atypical appearances. These coupled with unusual localizations pose diagnostic difficulty. The aim of this pictorial essay is to demonstrate the atypical manifestations of hydatid cysts – atypical either due to complications or the unusual site. PMID:27081221

  15. Retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis mimicking a retropharyngeal phlegmon.

    PubMed

    Gabra, Nathalie; Belair, Manon; Ayad, Tareck

    2013-01-01

    Background. Acute retropharyngeal tendinitis is a little known but not an uncommon condition. It was first described by Hartley in 1964 as an inflammation of the longus colli muscle secondary to calcium crystals deposition on its insertion. The calcifications are mostly located on the oblique portion of the muscle at the level of C1-C2. Methods. We will describe this disease through 4 cases that presented in our institution. Results. The most common symptoms are severe neck pain, odynophagia, and a painful restriction of neck movement. It is associated with mild fever and inflammatory lab findings such as a slight elevation of white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein. CT scan is recommended as the first-line imaging modality to establish a diagnosis. Treatments consist of NSAIDs and analgesics to accelerate the healing process. If symptoms are severe, a course of corticosteroids is required. Conclusion. Since the clinical and laboratory findings of this condition and those of a retropharyngeal abscess overlap, it is important to establish the right diagnosis in order to prevent more invasive procedures. A good knowledge of this clinical entity by otolaryngologists would prevent delays in hospital discharge and unnecessary anxiety. PMID:23862089

  16. Retropharyngeal Calcific Tendinitis Mimicking a Retropharyngeal Phlegmon

    PubMed Central

    Belair, Manon; Ayad, Tareck

    2013-01-01

    Background. Acute retropharyngeal tendinitis is a little known but not an uncommon condition. It was first described by Hartley in 1964 as an inflammation of the longus colli muscle secondary to calcium crystals deposition on its insertion. The calcifications are mostly located on the oblique portion of the muscle at the level of C1-C2. Methods. We will describe this disease through 4 cases that presented in our institution. Results. The most common symptoms are severe neck pain, odynophagia, and a painful restriction of neck movement. It is associated with mild fever and inflammatory lab findings such as a slight elevation of white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein. CT scan is recommended as the first-line imaging modality to establish a diagnosis. Treatments consist of NSAIDs and analgesics to accelerate the healing process. If symptoms are severe, a course of corticosteroids is required. Conclusion. Since the clinical and laboratory findings of this condition and those of a retropharyngeal abscess overlap, it is important to establish the right diagnosis in order to prevent more invasive procedures. A good knowledge of this clinical entity by otolaryngologists would prevent delays in hospital discharge and unnecessary anxiety. PMID:23862089

  17. Vascular Calcification and Renal Bone Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Wu, Chia-Chao; Yen, Jen-Fen; Liu, Wen-Chih

    2014-01-01

    At the early stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD), the systemic mineral metabolism and bone composition start to change. This alteration is known as chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). It is well known that the bone turnover disorder is the most common complication of CKD-MBD. Besides, CKD patients usually suffer from vascular calcification (VC), which is highly associated with mortality. Many factors regulate the VC mechanism, which include imbalances in serum calcium and phosphate, systemic inflammation, RANK/RANKL/OPG triad, aldosterone, microRNAs, osteogenic transdifferentiation, and effects of vitamins. These factors have roles in both promoting and inhibiting VC. Patients with CKD usually have bone turnover problems. Patients with high bone turnover have increase of calcium and phosphate release from the bone. By contrast, when bone turnover is low, serum calcium and phosphate levels are frequently maintained at high levels because the reservoir functions of bone decrease. Both of these conditions will increase the possibility of VC. In addition, the calcified vessel may secrete FGF23 and Wnt inhibitors such as sclerostin, DKK-1, and secreted frizzled-related protein to prevent further VC. However, all of them may fight back the inhibition of bone formation resulting in fragile bone. There are several ways to treat VC depending on the bone turnover status of the individual. The main goals of therapy are to maintain normal bone turnover and protect against VC. PMID:25136676

  18. Vascular calcification and renal bone disorders.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Wu, Chia-Chao; Yen, Jen-Fen; Liu, Wen-Chih

    2014-01-01

    At the early stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD), the systemic mineral metabolism and bone composition start to change. This alteration is known as chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). It is well known that the bone turnover disorder is the most common complication of CKD-MBD. Besides, CKD patients usually suffer from vascular calcification (VC), which is highly associated with mortality. Many factors regulate the VC mechanism, which include imbalances in serum calcium and phosphate, systemic inflammation, RANK/RANKL/OPG triad, aldosterone, microRNAs, osteogenic transdifferentiation, and effects of vitamins. These factors have roles in both promoting and inhibiting VC. Patients with CKD usually have bone turnover problems. Patients with high bone turnover have increase of calcium and phosphate release from the bone. By contrast, when bone turnover is low, serum calcium and phosphate levels are frequently maintained at high levels because the reservoir functions of bone decrease. Both of these conditions will increase the possibility of VC. In addition, the calcified vessel may secrete FGF23 and Wnt inhibitors such as sclerostin, DKK-1, and secreted frizzled-related protein to prevent further VC. However, all of them may fight back the inhibition of bone formation resulting in fragile bone. There are several ways to treat VC depending on the bone turnover status of the individual. The main goals of therapy are to maintain normal bone turnover and protect against VC. PMID:25136676

  19. Blood serum atherogenicity and coronary artery calcification.

    PubMed

    Sobenin, Igor A; Myasoedova, Veronica A; Anisimova, Elena V; Pavlova, Xenia N; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Schmermund, Axel; Seibel, Rainer; Berenbein, Sina; Lehmann, Nils; Moebus, Susanne; Jöckel, KarlHeinz; Orekhov, Alexander N; Erbel, Raimund

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of blood serum atherogenicity was described as the ability of human serum to induce lipid accumulation in cultured cells. The results of recent two-year prospective study in asymptomatic men provided the evidence for association between the changes in serum atherogenicity and dynamics of carotid intima-media thickness progression. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that blood serum atherogenicity and its changes in dynamics may be associated with accumulation of coronary calcium in subclinical atherosclerosis. It was performed in 782 CHD-free participants of The Heinz Nixdorf RECALL (Risk Factors, Evaluation of Coronary Calcium and Lifestyle) Study, in whom blood samples have been taken at the baseline and at the end of 5-year follow-up. Opposite to the previous findings, the changes in serum atherogenicity did not correlate neither with the extent of coronary artery calcification, nor with the changes in Agatston CAC score. There was a moderate but significant rise in serum atherogenicity after 5-year followup period, and the same dynamics was observed for Agatston CAC score, but not for convenient lipid-related risk factors. The absence of association of the changes in serum atherogenicity with the changes in Agatston CAC score, along with previous findings, provides a point of view that serum-induced intracellular cholesterol accumulation is not related to the processes of calcium deposition in arterial wall, since the last one reflects the progression of already existing subclinical atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:24533940

  20. Elastin Calcification and its Prevention with Aluminum Chloride Pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Vyavahare, Narendra; Ogle, Matthew; Schoen, Frederick J.; Levy, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Elastin, an abundant structural protein present in the arterial wall, is prone to calcification in a number of disease processes including porcine bioprosthetic heart valve calcification and atherosclerosis. The mechanisms of elastin calcification are not completely elucidated. In the present work, we demonstrated calcification of purified elastin in rat subdermal implants (Ca2+ = 89.73 ± 9.84 μg/mg after 21 days versus control, unimplanted Ca2+ = 0.16 ± 0.04 μg/mg). X-ray diffraction analysis along with resolution enhanced FTIR spectroscopy demonstrated the mineral phase to be a poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite. We investigated the time course of calcification, the effect of glutaraldehyde crosslinking on calcification, and mechanisms of inhibition of elastin calcification by pretreatment with aluminum chloride (AlCl3). Glutaraldehyde pretreatment did not affect calcification (Ca2+ = 89.06 ± 17.93 μg/mg for glutaraldehyde crosslinked elastin versus Ca2+ = 89.73 ± 9.84 μg/mg for uncrosslinked elastin). This may be explained by radioactive (3H) glutaraldehyde studies showing very low reactivity between glutaraldehyde and elastin. Our results further demonstrated that AlCl3 pretreatment of elastin led to complete inhibition of elastin calcification using 21-day rat subdermal implants, irrespective of glutaraldehyde crosslinking (Ca2+ = 0.73–2.15 μg/mg for AlCl3 pretreated elastin versus 89.73 ± 9.84 for untreated elastin). The AlCl3 pretreatment caused irreversible binding of aluminum ions to elastin, as assessed by atomic emission spectroscopy. Moreover, aluminum ion binding altered the spatial configuration of elastin as shown by circular dichroism (CD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy studies, suggesting a net structural change including a reduction in the extent of β sheet structures and an increase in coil-turn conformations. Thus, it is concluded that purified elastin calcifies in rat

  1. Computer aided breast calcification auto-detection in cone beam breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Ning, Ruola; Liu, Jiangkun

    2010-03-01

    In Cone Beam Breast CT (CBBCT), breast calcifications have higher intensities than the surrounding tissues. Without the superposition of breast structures, the three-dimensional distribution of the calcifications can be revealed. In this research, based on the fact that calcifications have higher contrast, a local thresholding and a histogram thresholding were used to select candidate calcification areas. Six features were extracted from each candidate calcification: average foreground CT number value, foreground CT number standard deviation, average background CT number value, background CT number standard deviation, foreground-background contrast, and average edge gradient. To reduce the false positive candidate calcifications, a feed-forward back propagation artificial neural network was designed. The artificial neural network was trained with the radiologists confirmed calcifications and used as classifier in the calcification auto-detection task. In the preliminary experiments, 90% of the calcifications in the testing data sets were detected correctly with an average of 10 false positives per data set.

  2. CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and improves neurological functions in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen-jing; Yu, Hong-quan; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qun; Meng, Hong-mei

    2016-01-01

    Clinical outcomes are positively associated with hematoma absorption. The monocyte-macrophage scavenger receptor, CD163, plays an important role in the metabolism of hemoglobin, and a soluble form of CD163 is present in plasma and other tissue fluids; therefore, we speculated that serum CD163 affects hematoma absorption after intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage were divided into high- and low-level groups according to the average CD163 level (1,977.79 ± 832.91 ng/mL). Compared with the high-level group, the low-level group had a significantly slower hematoma absorption rate, and significantly increased National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores and modified Rankin Scale scores. These results suggest that CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and the recovery of neurological function in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

  3. Interstellar A-type methanol masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Q.; Lou, G. F.

    1990-02-01

    The formation conditions for A-type methanol masers are discussed. The correlation between A-type masers and external radiation fields is determined, with emphasis on the energy levels of A-type methanol and brightness temperature. Radiative transfer equations and statistical equilibrium are solved using a large velocity gradient model and the escape probability model. It is demonstrated that the 9(2)-10(1)A+ emission in W3(OH) and 7(0)-6(1)A in SgrB2 are masers, as discovered previously. The formation of the first type of masers requires pumping from an external radiation field, while the second type might be excited in the absence of an external radiation field. It is also pointed out that according to calculations there are A-type maser series similar to E-type methanol maser series of J2-J1E.

  4. Minimally invasive evacuation of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage using sonothrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Newell, David W.; Shah, M. Mohsin; Wilcox, Robert; Hansmann, Douglas R.; Melnychuk, Erik; Muschelli, John; Hanley, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Object Catheter-based evacuation is a novel surgical approach for the treatment of brain hemorrhage. The object of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ultrasound in combination with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) delivered through a microcatheter directly into spontaneous intraventricular (IVH) or intracerebral (ICH) hemorrhage in humans. Methods Thirty-three patients presenting to the Swedish Medical Center in Seattle, Washington, with ICH and IVH were screened between November 21, 2008, and July 13, 2009, for entry into this study. Entry criteria included the spontaneous onset of intracranial hemorrhage ≥ 25 ml and/or IVH producing ventricular obstruction. Nine patients (6 males and 3 females, with an average age of 63 years [range 38–83 years]) who met the entry criteria consented to participate and were entered into the trial. A ventricular drainage catheter and an ultrasound microcatheter were stereotactically delivered together, directly into the IVH or ICH. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and 24 hours of continuous ultrasound were delivered to the clot. Gravity drainage was performed. In patients with IVHs, 3 mg of rt-PA was injected; in patients with intraparenchymal hemorrhages, 0.9 mg of rt-PA was injected. The rt-PA was delivered in 3 doses over 24 hours. Results All patients had significant volume reductions in the treated hemorrhage. The mean percentage volume reduction after 24 hours of therapy, as determined on CT and compared with pretreatment stability scans, was 59 ± 5% (mean ± SEM) for ICH and 45.1 ± 13% for IVH (1 patient with ICH was excluded from analysis because of catheter breakage). There were no intracranial infections and no significant episodes of rebleeding according to clinical or CT assessment. One death occurred by 30 days after admission. Clinical improvements as determined by a decrease in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score were demonstrated at 30 days after

  5. Development and validation of the Essen Intracerebral Haemorrhage Score

    PubMed Central

    Weimar, C; Benemann, J; Diener, H‐C

    2006-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) accounts for the highest in‐hospital mortality of all stroke types. Nevertheless, outcome is favourable in about 30% of patients. Only one model for the prediction of favourable outcome has been validated so far. Objective To describe the development and validation of the Essen ICH score. Methods Inception cohorts were assessed on the National Institutes of Health stroke scale (NIH‐SS) on admission and after follow up of 100 days. On the basis of previously validated clinical variables, a simple clinical score was developed to predict mortality and complete recovery (Barthel index after 100 days ⩾95) in 340 patients with acute ICH. Subscores for age (<60 = 0; 60–69 = 1; 70–79 = 2; ⩾80 = 3), NIH‐SS level of consciousness (alert = 0; drowsy = 1; stuporose = 2; comatose = 3), and NIH‐SS total score (0–5 = 0; 6–10 = 1; 11–15 = 2; 16–20 = 3; >20 or coma = 4) were combined into a prognostic scale with <3 predicting complete recovery and >7 predicting death. The score was subsequently validated in an external cohort of 371 patients. Results The Essen ICH score showed a high prognostic accuracy for complete recovery and death in both the development and validation cohort. For prediction of complete recovery on the Barthel index after 100 days, the Essen ICH score was superior to the physicians' prognosis and to two previous prognostic scores developed for a slightly modified outcome. Conclusions The Essen ICH score provides an easy to use scale for outcome prediction following ICH. Its high positive predictive values for adverse outcomes and easy applicability render it useful for individual prognostic indications or the design of clinical studies. In contrast, physicians tended to predict outcome too pessimistically. PMID:16354736

  6. Response of intracerebral human glioblastoma xenografts to multifraction radiation exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Tomoko; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Hu, Lily J.; Bollen, Andrew W.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Deen, Dennis F. . E-mail: ddeen@itsa.ucsf.edu

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: We investigated the effects of fractionated radiation treatments on the life spans of athymic rats bearing intracerebral brain tumors. Methods and Materials: U-251 MG or U-87 MG human glioblastoma cells were implanted into the brains of athymic rats, and the resulting tumors were irradiated once daily with various doses of ionizing radiation for 5 consecutive days or for 10 days with a 2-day break after Day 5. Results: Five daily doses of 1 and 1.5 Gy, and 10 doses of 0.75 and 1 Gy, cured some U-251 MG tumors. However, five daily doses of 0.5 Gy increased the survival time of animals bearing U-251 MG tumors 5 days without curing any animals of their tumors. Ten doses of 0.3 Gy given over 2 weeks extended the lifespan of the host animals 9 days without curing any animals. For U-87 MG tumors, 5 daily doses of 3 Gy produced an increased lifespan of 8 days without curing any animals, and 10 doses of 1 Gy prolonged lifespan 5.5 days without curing any animals. The differences in extension of life span between the 5- and 10-fraction protocols were minor for either tumor type. Conclusion: The finding that the U-251 MG tumors are more sensitive than U-87 MG tumors, despite the fact that U-251 MG tumors contain many more hypoxic cells than U-87 MG tumors, suggests the intrinsic cellular radiosensitivities of these cell lines are more important than hypoxia in determining their in vivo radiosensitivities.

  7. High Rate of Microbleed Formation Following Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Jason; Wing, Jeffrey J.; Norato, Gina; Sobotka, Ian; Menon, Ravi S.; Burgess, Richard E.; Gibbons, M. Chris; Shara, Nawar M.; Fernandez, Stephen; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni; Russell, Laura; Edwards, Dorothy F.; Kidwell, Chelsea S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We sought to investigate the frequency of microbleed (MB) development following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a predominantly African-American population and to identify predictors of new MB formation. Methods The DECIPHER study was a prospective, longitudinal, MR-based cohort study designed to evaluate racial/ethnic differences in risk factors for MBs and to evaluate the prognostic impact of MBs in this ICH population. We evaluated new MB formation in 2 time periods: from baseline to 30 days and from 30 days to year 1. Results Of 200 subjects enrolled in DECIPHER, 84 had MRIs at all required timepoints to meet criteria for this analysis. In the baseline to day 30 analysis, 11 (13.1%) had new MBs, compared to 25 (29.8%) in the day 30 to year 1 analysis. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that baseline number of MBs (OR 1.05 [95% CI 1.01, 1.08], p=0.01) was associated with new MB formation at 30 days. A logistic regression model predicting new MB at 1 year included baseline number of MBs (OR 1.05 [1.00, 1.11], p=0.046), baseline age (OR 1.05 [1.00, 1.10], p=0.04) and WMD disease score (OR 1.18 [0.96, 1.45]. p=0.115). Overall 28 of 84 (33.3%) ICH subjects formed new MBs at some point in the first year post-ICH. Conclusions We found that one-third of ICH subjects in this cohort surviving one year developed new MBs, which suggests a dynamic and rapidly progressive vasculopathy. Future studies are needed to examine the impact of new MB formation on patient outcomes. PMID:26311530

  8. Intraventricular hemorrhage expansion in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Witsch, Jens; Bruce, Eliza; Meyers, Emma; Velazquez, Angela; Schmidt, J. Michael; Suwatcharangkoon, Sureerat; Agarwal, Sachin; Park, Soojin; Falo, M. Cristina; Connolly, E. Sander

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether delayed appearance of intraventricular hemorrhage (dIVH) represents an independent entity from intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) present on admission CT or is primarily related to the time interval between symptom onset and admission CT. Methods: A total of 282 spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) patients, admitted February 2009–March 2014 to the neurological intensive care unit of a tertiary care university hospital, were prospectively enrolled in the ICH Outcomes Project. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine associations with acute mortality and functional long-term outcome (modified Rankin Scale). Results: A cohort of 282 ICH patients was retrospectively studied: 151 (53.5%) had intraventricular hemorrhage on initial CT scan (iIVH). Of the remaining 131 patients, 19 (14.5%) developed IVH after the initial CT scan (dIVH). The median times from symptom onset to admission CT were 1.1, 6.0, and 7.4 hours for the dIVH, iIVH, and no IVH groups (Mann-Whitney U test, dIVH vs iIVH, p < 0.001) and median time from onset to dIVH detection was 7.2 hours. The increase in ICH volume following hospital admission was larger in dIVH than in iIVH and no IVH patients (mean 17.6, 0.2, and 0.4 mL). After controlling for components of the ICH score and hematoma expansion, presence of IVH on initial CT was associated with discharge mortality and poor outcome at 3, 6, and 12 months, but dIVH was not associated with any of the outcome measures. Conclusions: In ICH patients, associated IVH on admission imaging is commonly encountered and is associated with poor long-term outcome. In contrast, dIVH on subsequent scans is far less common and does not appear to portend worse outcome. PMID:25663233

  9. Reversal Strategies for Vitamin K Antagonists in Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Parry-Jones, Adrian R; Di Napoli, Mario; Goldstein, Joshua N; Schreuder, Floris H B M; Tetri, Sami; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Yan, Bernard; van Nieuwenhuizen, Koen M; Dequatre-Ponchelle, Nelly; Lee-Archer, Matthew; Horstmann, Solveig; Wilson, Duncan; Pomero, Fulvio; Masotti, Luca; Lerpiniere, Christine; Godoy, Daniel Agustin; Cohen, Abigail S; Houben, Rik; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Pennati, Paolo; Fenoglio, Luigi; Werring, David; Veltkamp, Roland; Wood, Edith; Dewey, Helen M; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Klijn, Catharina J M; Meligeni, Fabrizio; Davis, Stephen M; Huhtakangas, Juha; Staals, Julie; Rosand, Jonathan; Meretoja, Atte

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is little evidence to guide treatment strategies for intracerebral hemorrhage on vitamin K antagonists (VKA-ICH). Treatments utilized in clinical practice include fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC). Our aim was to compare case fatality with different reversal strategies. Methods We pooled individual ICH patient data from 16 stroke registries in 9 countries (n = 10 282), of whom 1,797 (17%) were on VKA. After excluding 250 patients with international normalized ratio < 1.3 and/or missing data required for analysis, we compared all-cause 30-day case fatality using Cox regression. Results We included 1,547 patients treated with FFP (n = 377, 24%), PCC (n = 585, 38%), both (n = 131, 9%), or neither (n = 454, 29%). The crude case fatality and adjusted hazard ratio (HR) were highest with no reversal (61.7%, HR = 2.540, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.784–3.616, p < 0.001), followed by FFP alone (45.6%, HR = 1.344, 95% CI = 0.934–1.934, p = 0.112), then PCC alone (37.3%, HR = 1.445, 95% CI = 1.014–2.058, p = 0.041), compared to reversal with both FFP and PCC (27.8%, reference). Outcomes with PCC versus FFP were similar (HR = 1.075, 95% CI = 0.874–1.323, p = 0.492); 4-factor PCC (n = 441) was associated with higher case fatality compared to 3-factor PCC (n = 144, HR = 1.441, 95% CI = 1.041–1.995, p = 0.027). Interpretation The combination of FFP and PCC might be associated with the lowest case fatality in reversal of VKA-ICH, and FFP may be equivalent to PCC. Randomized controlled trials with functional outcomes are needed to establish the most effective treatment. PMID:25857223

  10. Intracerebral hemorrhage mortality is not changing despite declining incidence

    PubMed Central

    Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Sánchez, Brisa N.; Smith, Melinda A.; Brown, Devin L.; Garcia, Nelda M.; Skolarus, Lesli E.; Meurer, William J.; Burke, James F.; Adelman, Eric E.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine trends in incidence and mortality of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a rigorous population-based study. Methods: We identified all cases of spontaneous ICH in a South Texas community from 2000 to 2010 using rigorous case ascertainment methods within the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi Project. Yearly population counts were determined from the US Census, and deaths were determined from state and national databases. Age-, sex-, and ethnicity-adjusted incidence was estimated for each year with Poisson regression, and a linear trend over time was investigated. Trends in 30-day case fatality and long-term mortality (censored at 3 years) were estimated with log-binomial or Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for demographics, stroke severity, and comorbid disease. Results: A total of 734 cases of ICH were included. The age-, sex-, and ethnicity-adjusted ICH annual incidence rate was 5.21 per 10,000 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.36, 6.24) in 2000 and 4.30 per 10,000 (95% CI 3.21, 5.76) in 2010. The estimated 10-year change in demographic-adjusted ICH annual incidence rate was −31% (95% CI −47%, −11%). Yearly demographic-adjusted 30-day case fatality ranged from 28.3% (95% CI 19.9%, 40.3%) in 2006 to 46.5% (95% CI 35.5, 60.8) in 2008. There was no change in ICH case fatality or long-term mortality over time. Conclusions: ICH incidence decreased over the past decade, but case fatality and long-term mortality were unchanged. This suggests that primary prevention efforts may be improving over time, but more work is needed to improve ICH treatment and reduce the risk of death. PMID:24838789

  11. Clinical features of recurrent stroke after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Nakase, Taizen; Yoshioka, Shotaroh; Sasaki, Masahiro; Suzuki, Akifumi

    2012-06-14

    There have been many reports about the prognosis and risk factors of stroke recurrence following brain infarction (BI). However, little is known about the stroke recurrence after primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH). Therefore, we explored the recurrent stroke patients after initial PICH retrospectively, to reveal the critical factors of stroke recurrence. Acute BI (n=4013) and acute PICH patients (n=1067) admitted to the hospital between April 2000 and March 2009 were consecutively screened. PICH patients with a history of ICH and BI patients with a history of ICH were then classified into the ICH-ICH group (n=64, age 70.8±9.5 years) and ICH-BI group (n=52, age 72.8±9.7years), respectively. ICH lesions were categorized into ganglionic and lober types according to the brain magnetic resonance imaging. Subtypes of BI were classified into cardioembolism, large-artery atherosclerosis, small-artery occlusion and others. There was no difference in incidence of risk factors between ICH-ICH and ICH-BI groups. Distribution of initial PICH lesions was significantly abundant in the lobar type in the ICH-ICH group (P<0.01) and in ganglionic type in the ICH-BI group (P<0.02). Age of onset was significantly older in recurrent lobar ICH compared with recurrent ganglionic ICH (P<0.01: 73.6±10.0 and 59.1±9.0 years, respectively). In conclusion, ganglionic ICH patients may have a chance of recurrent stroke in both brain infarction and ganglionic ICH, suggesting the participation of atherosclerosis in intracranial arteries. Lobar ICH patients were older and prone to recurrent lobar ICH, suggesting the participation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy as a risk of stroke recurrence. PMID:23139848

  12. Optimal achieved blood pressure in acute intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Arima, Hisatomi; Heeley, Emma; Delcourt, Candice; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Wang, Xia; Woodward, Mark; Robinson, Thompson; Stapf, Christian; Parsons, Mark; Lavados, Pablo M.; Huang, Yining; Wang, Jiguang; Chalmers, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effects of intensive blood pressure (BP) lowering according to baseline BP levels and optimal achieved BP levels in patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: INTERACT2 was an open, blinded endpoint, randomized controlled trial in 2,839 patients with ICH within 6 hours of onset and elevated systolic BP (SBP) (150–220 mm Hg) who were allocated to receive intensive (target SBP <140 mm Hg within 1 hour, with lower limit of 130 mm Hg for treatment cessation) or guideline-recommended (target SBP <180 mm Hg) BP-lowering treatment. Outcome was physical function across all 7 levels of the modified Rankin Scale at 90 days. Results: Analysis of the randomized comparisons showed that intensive BP lowering produced comparable benefits on physical function at 90 days in 5 subgroups defined by baseline SBP of <160, 160–169, 170–179, 180–189, and ≥190 mm Hg (p homogeneity = 0.790). Analyses of achieved BP showed linear increases in the risk of physical dysfunction for achieved SBP above 130 mm Hg for both hyperacute (1–24 hours) and acute (2–7 days) phases while modest increases were also observed for achieved SBP below 130 mm Hg. Conclusions: Intensive BP lowering appears beneficial across a wide range of baseline SBP levels, and target SBP level of 130–139 mm Hg is likely to provide maximum benefit in acute ICH. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that the effect of intensive BP lowering on physical function is not influenced by baseline BP. PMID:25552575

  13. APOE polymorphisms influence longitudinal lipid trends preceding intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Phuah, Chia-Ling; Raffeld, Miriam R.; Ayres, Alison M.; Gurol, M. Edip; Viswanathan, Anand; Greenberg, Steven M.; Biffi, Alessandro; Rosand, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine whether APOE genotype influences a previously observed decline in serum total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels preceding primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), as a potential demonstration of nonamyloid mechanisms of APOE in ICH risk. Methods: We performed a single-center retrospective longitudinal analysis using patients with known APOE genotype drawn from an ongoing cohort study of ICH. Serum lipid measurements for TC, triglycerides (TGs), LDL, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) collected within 2 years before and after index ICH were extracted from electronic medical records. Piecewise linear mixed-effects models were used to compare APOE allele–specific effects on temporal serum lipid trends in ICH. Demographics, medical history, medications, and health maintenance data were included as fixed effects. Inter- and intraindividual variations in lipid levels were modeled as random effects. Results: A total of 124 ICH cases were analyzed. APOE ε4 carriers had greater rates of decline in serum TC and LDL within 6 months preceding ICH (TC: −7.30 mg/dL/mo, p = 0.0035; LDL: −8.44 mg/dL/mo, p = 0.0001). Conversely, serum TC and LDL levels in APOE ε2 carriers were unchanged within the same time period. APOE genotype had no associations with serum HDL or TG trends. Conclusions: APOE allele status predicts serum TC and LDL changes preceding acute ICH. Our results have implications for ongoing efforts in dissecting the role of dyslipidemia in cerebrovascular disease risk. APOE genotype–specific influence on lipid trends provides a clue for one mechanism by which APOE may influence risk of ICH. Further characterization of the metabolic roles of APOE is needed to improve the understanding of APOE biology in cerebrovascular disease risk. PMID:27433544

  14. Low Ambient Temperature and Intracerebral Hemorrhage: The INTERACT2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Danni; Arima, Hisatomi; Sato, Shoichiro; Gasparrini, Antonio; Heeley, Emma; Delcourt, Candice; Lo, Serigne; Huang, Yining; Wang, Jiguang; Stapf, Christian; Robinson, Thompson; Lavados, Pablo; Chalmers, John; Anderson, Craig S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rates of acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) increase in winter months but the magnitude of risk is unknown. We aimed to quantify the association of ambient temperature with the risk of ICH in the Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Haemorrhage Trial (INTERACT2) participants on an hourly timescale. Methods INTERACT2 was an international, open, blinded endpoint, randomized controlled trial of patients with spontaneous ICH (<6h of onset) and elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP, 150–220 mmHg) assigned to intensive (target SBP <140 mmHg) or guideline-recommended (SBP <180 mmHg) BP treatment. We linked individual level hourly temperature to baseline data of 1997 participants, and performed case-crossover analyses using a distributed lag non-linear model with 24h lag period to assess the association of ambient temperature and risk of ICH. Results were presented as overall cumulative odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CI. Results Low ambient temperature (≤10°C) was associated with increased risks of ICH: overall cumulative OR was 1.37 (0.99–1.91) for 10°C, 1.92 (1.31–2.81) for 0°C, 3.13 (1.89–5.19) for -10°C, and 5.76 (2.30–14.42) for -20°C, as compared with a reference temperature of 20°C.There was no clear relation of low temperature beyond three hours after exposure. Results were consistent in sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Exposure to low ambient temperature within several hours increases the risk of ICH. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00716079 PMID:26859491

  15. NLRP3 Inflammasome Contributes to Inflammation after Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qingyi; Chen, Sheng; Hu, Qin; Feng, Hua; Zhang, John H.; Tang, Jiping

    2015-01-01

    Objective The NLRP3 (NALP3, cryopyrin) inflammasome, a key component of the innate immune system, facilitates caspase-1 and interleukin (IL)–1β processing, which amplifies the inflammatory response. Here, we investigated whether NLRP3 knockdown decreases neutrophil infiltration, reduces brain edema, and improves neurological function in an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) mouse model. We also determined whether mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) governed by mitochondrial permeability transition pores (mPTPs) would trigger NLRP3 inflammasome activation following ICH. Methods ICH was induced by injecting autologous arterial blood (30μl) into a mouse brain. NLRP3 small interfering RNAs were administered 24 hours before ICH. A mPTP inhibitor (TRO-19622) or a specific mitochondria ROS scavenger (Mito-TEMPO) was coinjected with the blood. In naive animals, rotenone, which is a respiration chain complex I inhibitor, was applied to induce mitochondrial ROS production, and followed by TRO-19622 or Mito-TEMPO treatment. Neurological deficits, brain edema, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot, in vivo chemical cross-linking, ROS assay, and immunofluorescence were evaluated. Results ICH activated the NLRP3 inflammasome. NLRP3 knockdown reduced brain edema and decreased myeloper-oxidase (MPO) levels at 24 hours, and improved neurological functions from 24 to 72 hours following ICH. TRO-19622 or Mito-TEMPO reduced ROS, NLRP3 inflammasome components, and MPO levels following ICH. In naive animals, rotenone administration induced mPTP formation, ROS generation, and NLRP3 inflammasome activation, which were then reduced by TRO-19622 or Mito-TEMPO. Interpretation The NLRP3 inflammasome amplified the inflammatory response by releasing IL-1β and promoting neutrophil infiltration following ICH. Mitochondria ROS may be a major trigger of NLRP3 inflammasome activation. The results of our study suggest that the inhibition of the NLRP3 inflammasome may effectively

  16. Acute intracerebral haemorrhage: grounds for optimism in management.

    PubMed

    Delcourt, Candice; Anderson, Craig

    2012-12-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is one of the most devastating types of stroke, which has considerable disease burden in "non-white" ethnic groups where the population-attributable risks of elevated blood pressure are very high. Since the treatment of ICH remains largely supportive and expectant, nihilism and the early withdrawal of active therapy influence management decisions in clinical practice. However, approaches to management are now better defined on the basis of evidence that both survival and speed (and degree) of recovery are critically dependent on the location, size, and degree of expansion and extension into the intraventricular system of the haematoma of the ICH. Although no medical treatment has been shown to improve outcome in ICH, several promising avenues have emerged that include haemostatic therapy and intensive control of elevated blood pressure. Conversely, there is continued controversy over the role of evacuation of the haematoma of ICH via open craniotomy. Despite being an established practice for several decades, and having undergone evaluation in multiple randomised trials, there is uncertainty over which patients have the most to gain from an intervention with clear procedural risk. Minimally invasive surgery via local anaesthetic applied drill-puncture of the cranium and infusion of a thrombolytic agent is an attractive option for patients requiring critical management of the haematoma, not just in low resource settings but arguably also in specialist centres of western countries. With several ongoing clinical trials nearing completion, these treatments could enter routine practice within the next few years, further justifying the urgency of "time is brain" and that active management within well-organized, comprehensive acute stroke care units includes patients with ICH. PMID:23088860

  17. Early prediction of death in acute hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, GUOFANG; PING, LEI; ZHOU, SHENGKUI; LIU, WEIWEI; LIU, LEIJING; ZHANG, DONGMEI; LI, ZAILI; TIAN, YONGFANG; CHEN, ZHEN

    2016-01-01

    Hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage (HICH) has been on the decline. However, mortality at long-term follow up is on the increase. The aim of the present study was to investigate early warning signals of death in patients with acute HICH. The medical records of 128 patients with acute HICH within 6 h of onset were retrospectively analyzed. For these patients, systolic blood pressure (BP) was recorded at different time points (emergency, admission, every 6 h within 24 h and twice daily after 24 h) within 1 week. Computed tomography scanning was performed at emergency and the following 24±3 h to assess the hematoma volume. Neurological impairment was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Scale and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Outcomes were death, defined as a modified Rankin scale score 6, at 90 days. The results showed that at 90 days, 15 HICH patients succumbed (mortality of 11.7%). Of the 15 patients, 1 patient (6.7%) sucumbed within 24 h and 6 patients (40%) within 1 week. HICH mortality was closely associated with age (P<0.001) but not with gender. A significant association was detected between mortality and high BP taken at 30 min, 45 min and 6 h after admission (P=0.003), albeit not at emergency and admission (P>0.05). Death was also correlated with hematoma volume at 24 h but not with the site. Results from the multivariate binary logistic regression analysis showed that age and hematoma volume were independent risk factors of death of HICH. In conclusion, age and hematoma volume may be important early predictors of death in HICH. Proactive control and management of hematoma may reduce the mortality of HICH. PMID:26889222

  18. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . The effect of cinacalcet on vascular calcification].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Keitaro

    2015-05-01

    Cinacalcet acts on calcium receptors (CaR) expressed on chief cells of the parathyroid gland to inhibit the secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) . This drug inhibits PTH secretion without causing an elevation of serum calcium and phosphorus, unlike active vitamin D. Several experimental studies demonstrated an inhibitory effect of calcimimetics on the progression of vascular calcification in animals with chronic kidney disease (CKD), in keeping with the expression of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) in vascular tissue. The EVOLVE, evaluated in patients with CKD 5D the effects of the cinacalcet on the progression of vascular calcification and hard cardiovascular outcomes, respectively. The EVOLVE trials missed their respective primary end point by intent-to-treat analysis. However, recently, in order to define the frequency of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events attributable to atherosclerotic and nonatherosclerotic mechanisms, risk factors for these events, and the effects of cinacalcet, post hoc analysis using adjudicated data collected during the EVOLVE Trial were perfomed. In this trial, combining fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events, randomization to cinacalcet reduced the rates of sudden death and heart failure. Patients randomized to cinacalcet experienced fewer nonatherosclerotic cardiovascular events, while the effect of cinacalcet on atherosclerotic events did not reach statistical significance. PMID:25926577

  19. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Extracellular matrix tenascin-X in calcific aortic valves].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichi

    2015-05-01

    We previously disclosed a novel extracellular matrix tenascin-X (TNX) , the largest member of the tenascin family. So far, we have made efforts to elucidate the roles of TNX. TNX is involved in collagen deposition, collagen fibrillogenesis, and modulation of collagen stiffness. Homozygous mutations in TNXB, the gene encoding TNX, cause a classic-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) , a heritable connective tissue disorder, whereas haploinsufficiency of TNXB and heterozygous mutations in TNXB are associated with hypermobility-type EDS. Recently, we performed proteomic analyses of calcific aortic valves (CAVs) compared with relatively adjacent normal tissues to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms of dystrophic valvular calcification. Interestingly, we found that TNX was the protein with the greatest decrease in expression among the differentially expressed proteins and that expression levels of proteins modulating collagen structure and function, such as type I collagen and decorin, were also decreased in CAVs. In this review, I will discuss about the decreased level of collagen due to the reduction of expression levels of proteins that play regulatory roles in collagen functions such as fibril organization and fibrillogenesis in CAVs. PMID:25926574

  20. Surgical Options for Atypical Facial Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Rahimpour, Shervin; Lad, Shivanand P

    2016-07-01

    Atypical neuropathic facial pain is a syndrome of intractable and unremitting facial pain that is secondary to nociceptive signaling in the trigeminal system. These syndromes are often recalcitrant to pharmacotherapy and other common interventions, including microvascular decompression and percutaneous procedures. Herein, the authors present two other viable approaches (nucleus caudalis dorsal root entry zone lesioning and motor cortex stimulation), their indications, and finally a possible treatment algorithm to consider when assessing patients with atypical facial pain. PMID:27325003

  1. Shunt tube calcification as a late complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunting.

    PubMed

    Salim, Abubakr Darrag; Elzain, Mohammed Awad; Mohamed, Haddab Ahmed; Ibrahim Zayan, Baha Eldin Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Shunt calcification is a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunting that occurs years later after the initial operation this condition is rarely reported in literature. Two patients with shunt calcifications were described. The first patient was 17-year-old lady who had congenital hydrocephalus and shunted in the early infancy, she was presented recently complaining of itching of the skin along the shunt track and limitation of neck movement. The patient was then operated with removal of the old peritoneal catheter and replacing it with a new one. The second patient was 17-year-old boy originally was a case of posterior fossa pilocytic astrocytoma associated with obstructive hydrocephalus, he was operated with both shunting for the hydrocephalus and tumor removal, 6 years later he presented with shunt exposure. Calcification of the shunt tube was discovered intraoperatively upon shunt removal. Shunt calcification has been observed mainly in barium-impregnated catheters. Introducing plain silicone-coated shunt tubing may reduce the rate of this condition. The usual complaints of the patients suffering from this condition are pain in the neck and chest wall along the shunt pathway and limitation of the neck movement due to shunt tube tethering, but features of shunt dysfunction and skin irritation above the shunt may be present. In this review, plain X-ray and operative findings showed that the most extensive calcification is present in the neck, where the catheters were subject to heavy mechanical stress. Disturbed calcium and phosphate metabolisms may be involved in this condition. Shunt calcification is a rare condition that occurs due to material aging presenting with features of shunt tethering, dysfunction or overlying skin irritation. Plain X-ray is needed to detect calcification while shunt removal, replacement or endoscopic third ventriculostomy may carry solution for this condition. PMID:26396620

  2. The dark and bright side of atherosclerotic calcification.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Giuseppe; Iacobini, Carla; Blasetti Fantauzzi, Claudia; Menini, Stefano

    2015-02-01

    Vascular calcification is an unfavorable event in the natural history of atherosclerosis that predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, increasing evidence suggests that different calcification patterns are associated with different or even opposite histopathological and clinical features, reflecting the dual relationship between inflammation and calcification. In fact, initial calcium deposition in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli results in the formation of spotty or granular calcification ("microcalcification"), which induces further inflammation. This vicious cycle favors plaque rupture, unless an adaptive response prevails, with blunting of inflammation and survival of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). VSMCs promote fibrosis and also undergo osteogenic transdifferentiation, with formation of homogeneous or sheet-like calcification ("macrocalcification"), that stabilizes the plaque by serving as a barrier towards inflammation. Unfortunately, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating this adaptive response. The advanced glycation/lipoxidation endproducts (AGEs/ALEs) have been shown to promote vascular calcification and atherosclerosis. Recent evidence suggests that two AGE/ALE receptors, RAGE and galectin-3, modulate in divergent ways, not only inflammation, but also vascular osteogenesis, by favoring "microcalcification" and "macrocalcification", respectively. Galectin-3 seems essential for VSMC transdifferentiation into osteoblast-like cells via direct modulation of the WNT-β-catenin signaling, thus driving formation of "macrocalcification", whereas RAGE favors deposition of "microcalcification" by promoting and perpetuating inflammation and by counteracting the osteoblastogenic effect of galectin-3. Further studies are required to understand the molecular mechanisms regulating transition from "microcalcification" to "macrocalcification", thus allowing to design therapeutic strategies which favor this adaptive process

  3. Atypical antipsychotics: sedation versus efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kane, John M; Sharif, Zafar A

    2008-01-01

    Many patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder experience disturbances in their sleep-wake cycle, which may be a result of the disorder itself, of pharmacotherapy, or of a comorbid sleep disorder. These sleep disruptions can seriously impair patients' functioning as well as their quality of life. Therefore, accurate assessment of sleep problems is essential to appropriately treat patients and promote symptomatic remission. Sedating antipsychotics may ameliorate sleep disturbances, as well as agitation or other behavioral emergencies; however, these agents may also sedate patients to the point of dissatisfaction with the medication and/or impaired functioning, which may, in turn, increase treatment noncompliance and nonadherence. Using short-term adjunctive medications, such as benzo-diazepines or hypnotic agents, with a nonsedating antipsychotic to alleviate sleep disturbances is a reasonable treatment option for patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Overall, the pharma-cokinetics and pharmacodynamics of atypical antipsychotics are important factors to consider in the risk-benefit analysis, as are dosing strategies and individual patient factors, and clinicians must decide which agents are most appropriate for which patients. PMID:18484805

  4. Interventional trials in atypical parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Eschlböck, S; Krismer, F; Wenning, G K

    2016-01-01

    Atypical parkinson disorders (APD) are rapidly progressive neurodegenerative diseases with a variable clinical presentation that may even mimic Parkinson's disease. Multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD) are commonly summarized under this umbrella term. Significant developments in research have expanded knowledge and have broadened available symptomatic treatments, particularly for the treatment of neurogenic orthostatic hypotension. Nonetheless, symptomatic support still remains limited in all of these disorders. Currently, there exists no effective treatment to delay disease progression and disease-modifying trials have failed to provide coherent and convincing results. Recent trials of rasagiline (in MSA), rifampicin (in MSA), tideglusib (in PSP) and davunetide (in PSP) reported negative results. Nevertheless, large cohorts of patients were recruited for interventional studies in the last few years which improved our understanding of trial methodology in APDs immensely. In addition, remarkable progress in basic research has been reported recently and will provide a solid foundation for future therapeutic trials. In this review, we will summarize published randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials (RCTs) in APDs. Additionally, the design of ongoing and unpublished interventions will be presented. PMID:26421389

  5. Biopsychosocial Aspects of Atypical Odontalgia

    PubMed Central

    Ciaramella, A.; Paroli, M.; Lonia, L.; Bosco, M.; Poli, P.

    2013-01-01

    Background. A few studies have found somatosensory abnormalities in atypical odontalgia (AO) patients. The aim of the study is to explore the presence of specific abnormalities in facial pain patients that can be considered as psychophysical factors predisposing to AO. Materials and Methods. The AO subjects (n = 18) have been compared to pain-free (n = 14), trigeminal neuralgia (n = 16), migraine (n = 17), and temporomandibular disorder (n = 14). The neurometer current perception threshold (CPT) was used to investigate somatosensory perception. Structured clinical interviews based on the DSM-IV axis I and DSM III-R axis II criteria for psychiatric disorders and self-assessment questionnaires were used to evaluate psychopathology and aggressive behavior among subjects. Results. Subjects with AO showed a lower Aβ, Aδ, and C trigeminal fiber pain perception threshold when compared to a pain-free control group. Resentment was determined to be inversely related to Aβ (rho: 0.62, P < 0.05), Aδ (rho: 0.53, P < 0.05) and C fibers (rho: 0.54, P < 0.05), and depression was inversely related with C fiber (rho: 0.52, P < 0.05) perception threshold only in AO subjects. Conclusion. High levels of depression and resentment can be considered predictive psychophysical factors for the development of AO after dental extraction. PMID:24959561

  6. Biopsychosocial aspects of atypical odontalgia.

    PubMed

    Ciaramella, A; Paroli, M; Lonia, L; Bosco, M; Poli, P

    2013-01-01

    Background. A few studies have found somatosensory abnormalities in atypical odontalgia (AO) patients. The aim of the study is to explore the presence of specific abnormalities in facial pain patients that can be considered as psychophysical factors predisposing to AO. Materials and Methods. The AO subjects (n = 18) have been compared to pain-free (n = 14), trigeminal neuralgia (n = 16), migraine (n = 17), and temporomandibular disorder (n = 14). The neurometer current perception threshold (CPT) was used to investigate somatosensory perception. Structured clinical interviews based on the DSM-IV axis I and DSM III-R axis II criteria for psychiatric disorders and self-assessment questionnaires were used to evaluate psychopathology and aggressive behavior among subjects. Results. Subjects with AO showed a lower A β , A δ , and C trigeminal fiber pain perception threshold when compared to a pain-free control group. Resentment was determined to be inversely related to A β (rho: 0.62, P < 0.05), A δ (rho: 0.53, P < 0.05) and C fibers (rho: 0.54, P < 0.05), and depression was inversely related with C fiber (rho: 0.52, P < 0.05) perception threshold only in AO subjects. Conclusion. High levels of depression and resentment can be considered predictive psychophysical factors for the development of AO after dental extraction. PMID:24959561

  7. Saccular cyst with atypical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Zamfir-Chiru-Anton, A; Gheorghe, DC

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory obstruction and stridor in infants and children are not uncommon. A rare cause of these sometimes life-threatening symptoms is the congenital saccular cyst. Objectives: We present the case of a 5-year-old girl with a cervical tumor, which appeared after a laryngeal endoscopic surgery of a saccular cyst with two relapses and a particular local evolution of its recurrence through the cricothyroid membrane. Material and method: The patient data has been reviewed over the entire follow-up period and a thorough an analysis of her investigations and surgery was performed. Results: The unusual evolution of this case was marked by an atypical exteriorization – not found in the published literature. The surgical approach was external, by paramedian thyrotomy, with no further long-term recurrence. Conclusions: An accurate diagnosis of saccular cysts can be made with the help of medical history, by an endoscopic visualization of the lesion and by the CT-scan imaging of the cervical region. Sometimes, saccular cysts can extend beyond laryngeal limits, determining fluid-filled tumors in the cervical region. PMID:27453755

  8. [Advance in research on the genetic etiology of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Kang, Jifeng; Huang, Qing; Liu, Yunhai

    2016-10-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH) is a form of brain parenchymal hemorrhage caused by a variety of non-traumatic reasons, resulting in cerebral artery, veins or capillaries rupture. The etiology of SICH is variable, with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage being the most common, accounting for 60% ~ 81% of all cases. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy, drug use related hemorrhage, Moyamoya disease are also important causes of SICH. Previous studies showed that genetic factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of SICH. Here the genetic mechanisms of SICH and classification of its etiology are reviewed. PMID:27577228

  9. Noninvasive detection of intracerebral hemorrhage using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennes, Hans-Juergen; Lott, Carsten; Windirsch, Michael; Hanley, Daniel F.; Boor, Stephan; Brambrink, Ansgar; Dick, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    Intracerebral Hemorrhage (IH) is an important cause of secondary brain injury in neurosurgical patients. Early identification and treatment improve neurologic outcome. We have tested Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) as an alternative noninvasive diagnostic tool compared to CT-Scans to detect IH. We prospectively studied 212 patients with neurologic symptoms associated with intracranial pathology before performing a CT-scan. NIRS signals indicated pathologies in 181 cases (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.29). In a subgroup of subdural hematomas NIRS detected 45 of 46 hematomas (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.79). Identification of intracerebral hemorrhage using NIRS has the potential to allow early treatment, thus possibly avoiding further injury.

  10. Noninvasive detection of intracerebral hemorrhage using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennes, Hans J.; Lott, C.; Windirsch, Michael; Hanley, Daniel F.; Boor, Stephan; Brambrink, Ansgar; Dick, Wolfgang

    1997-12-01

    Intracerebral Hemorrhage (IH) is an important cause of secondary brain injury in neurosurgical patients. Early identification and treatment improve neurologic outcome. We have tested Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) as an alternative noninvasive diagnostic tool compared to CT-Scans to detect IH. We prospectively studied 212 patients with neurologic symptoms associated with intracranial pathology before performing a CT-scan. NIRS signals indicated pathologies in 181 cases (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.29). In a subgroup of subdural hematomas NIRS detected 45 of 46 hematomas (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.79). Identification of intracerebral hemorrhage using NIRS has the potential to allow early treatment, thus possibly avoiding further injury.

  11. Intracranial Cortical Calcifications in a Focal Epilepsy Patient with Pseudohypoparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ye Sel; Park, Jihyung; Park, Yoonkyung; Hwang, KyoungJin; Koo, Dae Lim; Kim, Daeyoung; Seo, Dae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic parathyroid dysfunction often have intracranial calcification in deep gray matter (GM) and subcortical white matter (WM) of their brain. Some of them are also epilepsy patients. Although cortical etiologies are main cause of epileptic seizure, cortical calcification has not been reported in these patients. We report a newly diagnosed focal epilepsy patient whose brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed intracranial calcifications in cortical as well as subcortical areas. Blood lab revealed that he had hypocalcemia due to pseudohypoparathyroidism. Video EEG monitoring revealed the ictal EEG mainly consist of polymorphic delta to theta waves with maximum at right temporal area followed by background attenuation and muscle artifacts. The interictal EEG showed multiple focal spike-wave discharges. After given oral calcium and calcitriol supplement, his calcium and phosphorous level normalized and he remains seizure free. This is the first case to show cortical calcification in a patient with pseudohypoparathyroidism. Cortical calcification could be an important measure of seizure burden in these patients and thus sophisticated imaging protocols should be used to visualize the extent of calcium deposits. PMID:27390678

  12. Permanent tooth calcification in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): patterns and polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Kuykendall, K L; Conroy, G C

    1996-01-01

    Tooth calcification is an important developmental marker for use in constructing models for early hominid life history, particularly for its application to the fossil record. As chimpanzees are commonly utilized in interspecific comparisons in such research, this study aims to improve available baseline data for tooth calcification patterns in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), and to quantify basic patterns and polymorphisms. We present an analysis of developmental patterns for the left mandibular dentition (I1-M3) based on intraoral radiographs obtained from a cross-sectional sample of chimpanzees (58 males, 60 females) housed at LEMSIP (NYU Medical Center) and Yerkes (Emory University). No significant differences with previous descriptions of the basic sequences of tooth calcification in chimpanzees were found, but variation in such patterns was documented for the first time. In the overall sequence, polymorphisms between the canine and the group (M2 P4 P3) reached significant levels. This is due to the relative delay in canine crown formation compared to other teeth. Differences in the basic sequence between males and females were recorded, but are due to minor shifts in the percentages of occurrence for polymorphic sequences which are common to both genders. Perhaps our most important findings are that a) different polymorphic sequences occur in tooth calcification and tooth emergence in chimpanzees, and b) developmental relationships among teeth fluctuate throughout tooth calcification. Thus, characterizations of dental developmental patterns based on particular stages of development cannot necessarily be extrapolated to other stages without supporting data. PMID:8928717

  13. Gaussian weighted projection for visualization of cardiac calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiang; Li, Ke; Gilkeson, Robert; Fei, Baowei

    2008-03-01

    At our institution, we are using dual-energy digital radiography (DEDR) as a cost-effective screening tool for the detection of cardiac calcification. We are evaluating DEDR using CT as the gold standard. We are developing image projection methods for the generation of digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) from CT image volumes. Traditional visualization methods include maximum intensity projection (MIP) and average-based projection (AVG) that have difficulty to show cardiac calcification. Furthermore, MIP can over estimate the calcified lesion as it displays the maximum intensity along the projection rays regardless of tissue types. For AVG projection, the calcified tissue is usually overlapped with bone, lung and mediastinum. In order to improve the visualization of calcification on DRR images, we developed a Gaussian-weighted projection method for this particular application. We assume that the CT intensity values of calcified tissues have a Gaussian distribution. We then use multiple Gaussian functions to fit the intensity histogram. Based on the mean and standard deviation parameters, we incorporate a Gaussian weighted function into the perspective projection and display the calcification exclusively. Our digital and physical phantom studies show that the new projection method can display tissues selectively. In addition, clinical images show that the Gaussian-weighted projection method better visualizes cardiac calcification than either the AVG or MIP method and can be used to evaluate DEDR as a screening tool for the detection of coronary artery diseases.

  14. Molecular mechanisms mediating vascular calcification: role of matrix Gla protein.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Diane; Shanahan, Catherine M

    2006-10-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a higher incidence of vascular calcification and a greatly increased risk of cardiovascular death. The mechanisms involved in the accelerated vascular calcification observed in CKD have recently become clearer, leading to the hypothesis that a lack of natural inhibitors of calcification may trigger calcium deposition. One of these inhibitory factors, matrix Gla protein (MGP), is the focus of the present review. MGP, originally isolated from bone, is a vitamin K-dependent protein that is also highly expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells. MGP has been confirmed as a calcification-inhibitor in numerous studies; however, its mechanism of action is not completely understood. It potentially acts in several ways to regulate calcium deposition including: (i) binding calcium ions and crystals; (ii) antagonizing bone morphogenetic protein and altering cell differentiation; (iii) binding to extracellular matrix components; and (iv) regulating apoptosis. Its expression is regulated by several factors including retinoic acid, vitamin D and extracellular calcium ions, and a reduced form of vitamin K (KH2) is important in maintaining MGP in an active form. Therefore, strategies aimed at increasing its expression and activity may be beneficial in tipping the balance in favour of inhibition of calcification in CKD. PMID:17014561

  15. Efficacy of reversal of aortic calcification by chelating agents

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yang; Sinha, Aditi; Vyavahare, Naren

    2013-01-01

    Elastin specific medial vascular calcification, termed Monckeberg’s sclerosis has been recognized as a major risk factor for various cardiovascular events. We hypothesize that chelating agents, such as disodium ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and sodium thiosulfate (STS) might reverse elastin calcification by directly removing calcium (Ca) from calcified tissues into soluble calcium complexes. We assessed the chelating ability of EDTA, DTPA, and STS on removal of calcium from hydroxyapatite (HA) powder, calcified porcine aortic elastin, and calcified human aorta in vitro. We show that both EDTA and DTPA could effectively remove calcium from HA and calcified tissues, while STS was not effective. The tissue architecture was not altered during chelation. In the animal model of aortic elastin-specific calcification, we further show that local periadventitial delivery of EDTA loaded in to poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles regressed elastin specific calcification in the aorta. Collectively, the data indicate that elastin-specific medial vascular calcification could be reversed by chelating agents. PMID:23963635

  16. Intracranial Cortical Calcifications in a Focal Epilepsy Patient with Pseudohypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye Sel; Park, Jihyung; Park, Yoonkyung; Hwang, KyoungJin; Koo, Dae Lim; Kim, Daeyoung; Seo, Dae-Won

    2016-06-01

    Patients with chronic parathyroid dysfunction often have intracranial calcification in deep gray matter (GM) and subcortical white matter (WM) of their brain. Some of them are also epilepsy patients. Although cortical etiologies are main cause of epileptic seizure, cortical calcification has not been reported in these patients. We report a newly diagnosed focal epilepsy patient whose brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed intracranial calcifications in cortical as well as subcortical areas. Blood lab revealed that he had hypocalcemia due to pseudohypoparathyroidism. Video EEG monitoring revealed the ictal EEG mainly consist of polymorphic delta to theta waves with maximum at right temporal area followed by background attenuation and muscle artifacts. The interictal EEG showed multiple focal spike-wave discharges. After given oral calcium and calcitriol supplement, his calcium and phosphorous level normalized and he remains seizure free. This is the first case to show cortical calcification in a patient with pseudohypoparathyroidism. Cortical calcification could be an important measure of seizure burden in these patients and thus sophisticated imaging protocols should be used to visualize the extent of calcium deposits. PMID:27390678

  17. Effect of calcium carbonate saturation of seawater on coral calcification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gattuso, J.-P.; Frankignoulle, M.; Bourge, I.; Romaine, S.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    The carbonate chemistry of seawater is usually not considered to be an important factor influencing calcium-carbonate-precipitation by corals because surface seawater is supersaturated with respect to aragonite. Recent reports, however, suggest that it could play a major role in the evolution and biogeography of recent corals. We investigated the calcification rates of five colonies of the zooxanthellate coral Stylophora pistillata in synthetic seawater using the alkalinity anomaly technique. Changes in aragonite saturation from 98% to 585% were obtained by manipulating the calcium concentration. The results show a nonlinear increase in calcification rate as a function of aragonite saturation level. Calcification increases nearly 3-fold when aragonite saturation increases from 98% to 390%, i.e., close to the typical present saturation state of tropical seawater. There is no further increase of calcification at saturation values above this threshold. Preliminary data suggest that another coral species, Acropora sp., displays a similar behaviour. These experimental results suggest: (l) that the rate of calcification does not change significantly within the range of saturation levels corresponding to the last glacial-interglacial cycle, and (2) that it may decrease significantly in the future as a result of the decrease in the saturation level due to anthropogenic release of CO2 into the atmosphere. Experimental studies that control environmental conditions and seawater composition provide unique opportunities to unravel the response of corals to global environmental changes.

  18. Epilepsy, occipital calcifications, and oligosymptomatic celiac disease in childhood.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Hugo A; De Rosa, Susana; Ruggieri, Victor; de Dávila, María T G; Fejerman, Natalio

    2002-11-01

    The association of epilepsy, occipital calcifications, and celiac disease has been recognized as a distinct syndrome. The objective of this study was to present the clinical, electrophysiologic, and neuroradiologic features in a series of patients with this syndrome. Thirty-two patients with the constellation of epilepsy, occipital calcifications, and celiac disease were identified in our epilepsy clinic. The mean age was 11 years and the mean length of follow-up was 7.4 years. The 1990 criteria of the European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition were used to diagnose celiac disease. The Kruskal-Wallis statistics test was employed with a signficance of P < .05. Thirty-one patients had partial seizures, 21 of them with symptoms related to the occipital lobe. In most patients, the epilepsy was controlled or the seizures were sporadic. Three developed severe epilepsy. Occipital calcifications were present in all cases. Computed tomography in 7 patients showed hypodense areas in the white matter around calcifications, which decreased or disappeared after a period of gluten-free diet in 3 patients. A favorable outcome of epilepsy was detected in patients with the earliest dietary therapy. This study presents the largest series of children with this syndrome outside Italy. White-matter hypodensities surrounding calcifications are rarely reported. A prompt diagnosis of celiac disease might improve the evolution of the epilepsy and may improve cognitive status. PMID:12585717

  19. Analysis of breast tissue calcifications using FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Rebecca N.; Rogers, Keith D.; Shepherd, Neil; Stone, Nicholas

    2007-07-01

    Microalcifications can be found in both benign and malignant breast lesions and their composition can indicate the disease state. Type I microcalcifications are composed of calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) and are associated mainly with benign tissue, whereas hydroxyapatite (HAP) can be present in both tissue types. As current practices such as mammography and histopathology examine the morphology of the specimen, they can not reliably distinguish between the two types of calcification, which frequently are the only mammographic features that indicate the presence of a cancerous lesion. Analysis of tissue by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR) allows biochemical information to be achieved from the sample. Spectral maps have been carried out on paraffinized sections of breast tissue from 9 patients of different pathology types containing calcification. The chemical composition of the calcifications and surrounding tissue has been analysed and correlated with tissue pathology. This preliminary study has demonstrated the ability to conduct FTIR in paraffinized sections of breast tissue, and initial observations show a correlation between HAP carbonate substitution and tissue pathology. It is hoped that this and further studies will give insight into how the calcifications are linked to the disease process and will give an increased understanding of the significance of calcifications in breast tissue. If type II microcalcifications can be differentiated in benign and malignant tissue by spectroscopic techniques, this may have positive implications in early diagnosis if the techniques can be applied in vivo and spectroscopy of paraffin sections enables biochemical information to accompany histopathology of the sample.

  20. Recent progress in the treatment of vascular calcification

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, W. Charles; Lomashvili, Koba A.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular calcification is common in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease and is associated with poorer outcomes. Although the pathophysiology is not completely understood, it is clear that it is a multifactorial process involving altered mineral metabolism, as well as changes in systemic and local factors that can promote or inhibit vascular calcification, and all of these are potential therapeutic targets. Current therapy is closely linked to strategies for preventing disordered bone and mineral metabolism in advanced kidney disease and involves lowering the circulating levels of both phosphate and calcium. The efficacy of compounds that specifically target calcification, such as bisphosphonates and thiosulfate, has been shown in animals but only in small numbers of humans, and safety remains an issue. Additional therapies, such as pyrophosphate, vitamin K, and lowering of pH, are supported by animal studies, but are yet to be investigated clinically. As the mineral composition of vascular calcifications is the same as in bone, potential effects on bone must be addressed with any therapy for vascular calcification. PMID:20861819

  1. Tablet fluoridation influences the calcification of primary tooth pulp.

    PubMed

    Holtgrave, E A; Hopfenmüller, W; Ammar, S

    2001-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the influence of long-term tablet fluoridation on primary pulp calcification by light microscopy. Twenty-four caries-free primary molars (after continuous postpartally initiated 1- to 10-year tablet fluoridation) were compared to 17 primary molars of children without fluoride prophylaxis. Pulp calcification in children with tablet fluoridation was significantly more frequent and more pronounced than in untreated children (p = 0.001). Besides the known pulp stones, the prophylaxis group evidenced a special form of calcification consisting of fibrodentin-like hard tissue not observed in the untreated children. These hard tissue bodies developed "intramurally" on the pulp floor and the inside of the dental roots with an irregular extramural spread into the coronal and radicular pulp by displacement and fibrotization of the pulp tissue. Moreover, some of the teeth had more or less extensive areas of interglobular dentin. The affected teeth were ankylosed in the area of the bi- and trifurcation and on the inside of the roots and were thus infra-occluded. Although the duration of tablet fluoridation has no statistically significant influence on pulp calcification, there is a correlation between extensive pulp calcification, postnatally initiated fluoride prophylaxis and the infraocclusion of primary molars. PMID:11227204

  2. [New Developments in CKD-MBD. Imbalance of myocardial oxygen supply and demand in CKD patients with cardiovascular calcification].

    PubMed

    Joki, Nobuhiko; Hayashi, Toshihide

    2014-12-01

    Cardiovascular calcification is well known as an important factor for poor prognosis in CKD patients. It is not well understood why even no significant narrowing the presence of vascular calcification have a great impact for tissue ischemia, especially myocardial ischemia. Many studies have demonstrated that the presence of coronary calcification, aortic calcification, arterial calcification and aortic valve calcification is susceptible to induce an imbalance of myocardial oxygen supply and demand. PMID:25423922

  3. Activity in A-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balona, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Kepler photometry shows that most A-type stars have low frequency variations which can be understood in terms of rotational modulation. Indeed, the distribution of equatorial velocities derived from the photometric periods agrees with the distribution of equatorial velocities of A-type stars in the general field. The amplitude of the rotational frequency varies by 20-30 percent as might be expected of star spots. From the light amplitudes we estimate that most spots are considerably larger than typical sunspots but generally smaller than the largest sunspots. The rotation peaks in the periodograms of a significant fraction of A-type stars have a peculiar structure which is not understood. Although peaks corresponding to the rotation frequency can be identified in many δ Scuti stars, the low frequency peaks in these stars are too numerous to be caused by rotational modulation. It thus appears that while the variability of non-pulsating A stars can be explained by rotation, the low-frequency variability in A-type δ Sct stars requires a new pulsation mechanism. We also find several γ Dor stars much hotter than the theoretical hot edge of the instability strip. We find 13 new A-type flare stars, which means that about 1.5 percent of A stars flare. Less dramatic flares may be common in all A-type stars. We show that these superflares cannot be attributed to normal flares on a cool companion. We conclude that A-type stars are active and, like cooler stars, have starspots and flares. Surprisingly, there does not seem to be a drop in activity as the granulation boundary is crossed.

  4. Idiopathic Basal Ganglia Calcification Presented with Impulse Control Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Cem; Levent, Mustafa; Akbaba, Gulhan; Kara, Bilge; Yeniceri, Emine Nese; Inanc, Betul Battaloglu

    2015-01-01

    Primary familial brain calcification (PFBC), also referred to as Idiopathic Basal Ganglia Calcification (IBGC) or “Fahr's disease,” is a clinical condition characterized by symmetric and bilateral calcification of globus pallidus and also basal ganglions, cerebellar nuclei, and other deep cortical structures. It could be accompanied by parathyroid disorder and other metabolic disturbances. The clinical features are dysfunction of the calcified anatomic localization. IBGC most commonly presents with mental damage, convulsion, parkinson-like clinical picture, and neuropsychiatric behavior disorders; however, presentation with impulse control disorder is not a frequent presentation. In the current report, a 43-year-old male patient who has been admitted to psychiatry policlinic with the complaints of aggressive behavior episodes and who has been diagnosed with impulse control disorder and IBGC was evaluated in the light of the literature. PMID:26246920

  5. Coconut Atrium: Transmural Calcification of the Entire Left Atrium

    PubMed Central

    Campo, Carlos Del; Weinstein, Paul; Kunnelis, Constantine; DiStefano, Peter; Ebers, Gloria M.

    2000-01-01

    Massive calcification of the left atrium usually spares the interatrial septum, which provides a cleavage plane for surgical access to the mitral valve. Endoatriectomy with mitral valve replacement is the currently accepted corrective procedure because it affords maximum exposure while decreasing the risk of embolization and intraoperative hemorrhage. We describe a case in which the entire left atrium, including the septum, was thickly calcified and resembled a coconut shell. This condition prevented surgical correction of severe mitral stenosis. To our knowledge, this is the most severe case of left atrial calcification yet reported in the literature. Although it is not possible to establish preoperatively that the atrium is completely calcified and impossible to incise, when predisposing factors and evidence of complete transmural calcification are present, the surgeon should be aware of this possibility and should weigh carefully the decision to operate. PMID:10830629

  6. Leukoencephalopathy, cerebral calcifications and cysts: a family study.

    PubMed

    Karlinger, Kinga; Tárnoki, Ádám Domonkos; Tárnoki, Dávid László; Polvi, Anne; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Kelemen, Andrea; Szegedi, László; Turányi, Eszter; Kamondi, Anita; Szűcs, Anna

    2014-10-01

    We present a clinical, neuro-radiological and genetic study on a family with members suffering from an autosomal dominantly inherited syndrome characterised by epilepsy, cerebral calcifications and cysts, bone abnormalities; progressive neuro-cognitive deterioration and paranasal sinusitis. This syndrome shares several features with leukoencephalopathy with calcifications and cysts also called Labrune syndrome and the condition of cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts (CRMCC; Coats plus syndrome). Genetic studies in this family did not reveal mutations in the CTC1 gene defected in CRMCC. We interpret our results as those supporting recent findings that despite clinical similarities, late-onset Labrune and Coats plus syndrome might be distinct entities. This family may have Labrune syndrome or a yet unclassified entity; exploration of similar cases could help classifying this one, and related conditions. PMID:25034270

  7. An Imaging Review of Intra-ocular Calcifications.

    PubMed

    Kachewar, Sushil G; Kulkarni, Devidas S

    2014-01-01

    Intra-ocular calcifications can occur due to a variety of reasons. In cataract, the lovely lens gets calcified and the bright beautiful world becomes dark and dreadful. Cataract comes in various forms like; congenital, traumatic and senile. Asteroid Hyalosis (AH) occurs because of the accumulation of calcium soaps in vitreous of the eyes. Although it is asymptomatic and unilateral, it is seen more often in diabetic patients. Tumours of eye like retinoblastoma and optic nerve meningioma too are known to show calcifications. This review has focussed on imaging appearances of intra-ocular calcifications, a small process in a small organ that nevertheless has a wide impact on the entire organs. PMID:24596775

  8. Decreased calcification in the Southern Ocean over the satellite record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Natalie M.; Lovenduski, Nicole S.

    2015-03-01

    Widespread ocean acidification is occurring as the ocean absorbs anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, threatening marine ecosystems, particularly the calcifying plankton that provide the base of the marine food chain and play a key role within the global carbon cycle. We use satellite estimates of particulate inorganic carbon (PIC), surface chlorophyll, and sea surface temperature to provide a first estimate of changing calcification rates throughout the Southern Ocean. From 1998 to 2014 we observe a 4% basin-wide reduction in summer calcification, with ˜9% reductions in large regions (˜1 × 106 km2) of the Pacific and Indian sectors. Southern Ocean trends are spatially heterogeneous and primarily driven by changes in PIC concentration (suspended calcite), which has declined by ˜24% in these regions. The observed decline in Southern Ocean calcification and PIC is suggestive of large-scale changes in the carbon cycle and provides insight into organism vulnerability in a changing environment.

  9. Spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage: Does surgery benefit comatose patients?

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Cem; Kabatas, Serdar; Gulsen, Salih; Cansever, Tufan; Gurkanlar, Doga; Caner, Hakan; Altinors, Nur

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Treatment of spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH) is still controversial. We therefore analyzed the comatose patients diagnosed as having spontaneous SICH and treated by surgery. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the collected data of 25 comatose patients with initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) ≤ 8 diagnosed as having spontaneous SICH and they had been treated by surgical evacuation between 1996 and 2008. The outcome was assessed using Glasgow outcome scale (GOS). The side and location of the hematoma and ventricular extension of the hematoma were recorded. The hematoma volume was graded as mild (<30 cc), moderate (30–60 cc) and massive (>60 cc). Results: Age of the patients ranged from 25 to 78 years (mean: 59.6 ± 15.14 years). Among the 25 patients studied, 11 (44%) were females and 14 (56%) were males. GCS before surgery was <5 in 8 (32%) patients and between 5 and 8 in 17 (68%) patients. The hematoma volume was less than 30 cc in 2 patients, between 30 and 60 cc in 9 patients and more than 60 cc in 14 patients. Fourteen of the patients had no ventricular connection and 11 of the hematomas were connected to ventricle. All the 25 patients were treated with craniotomy and evacuation of the hematoma was done within an average of 2 hours on admission to the emergency department. Postoperatively, no rebleeding occurred in our patients. The most important complication was infection in 14 of the patients. The mortality of our surgical series was 56%. GCS before surgery was one of the strongest factors affecting outcome GCS (oGCS) (P = 0.017). Income GCS (iGCS), however, did not affect GOS (P = 0.64). The volume of the hematoma also affected the outcome (P = 0.037). Ventricular extension of the hematoma did affect the oGCS and GOS (P = 0.002), but not the iGCS of the patients (P = 0.139). Conclusion: Our data suggest that being surgically oriented is very important to achieve successful outcomes in a select group

  10. Boron neutron capture therapy of intracerebral rat gliosarcomas.

    PubMed Central

    Joel, D D; Fairchild, R G; Laissue, J A; Saraf, S K; Kalef-Ezra, J A; Slatkin, D N

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for the treatment of intracerebrally implanted rat gliosarcomas was tested. Preferential accumulation of 10B in tumors was achieved by continuous infusion of the sulfhydryl borane dimer, Na4(10)B24H22S2, at a rate of 45-50 micrograms of 10B per g of body weight per day from day 11 to day 14 after tumor initiation (day 0). This infusion schedule resulted in average blood 10B concentrations of 35 micrograms/ml in a group of 12 gliosarcoma-bearing rats and 45 micrograms/ml in a group of 10 similar gliosarcoma-bearing rats treated by BNCT. Estimated tumor 10B levels in these two groups were 26 and 34 micrograms/g, respectively. On day 14, boron-treated and non-boron-treated rats were exposed to 5.0 or 7.5 MW.min of radiation from the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor that yielded thermal neutron fluences of approximately 2.0 x 10(12) or approximately 3.0 x 10(12) n/cm2, respectively, in the tumors. Untreated rats had a median postinitiation survival time of 21 days. Reactor radiation alone increased median postinitiation survival time to 26 (5.0 MW.min) or 28 (7.5 MW.min) days. The 12 rats that received 5 MW.min of BNCT had a median postinitiation survival time of 60 days. Two of these animals survived greater than 15 months. In the 7.5 MW.min group, the median survival time is not calculable since 6 of the 10 animals remain alive greater than 10 months after BNCT. The estimated radiation doses to tumors in the two BNCT groups were 14.2 and 25.6 Gy equivalents, respectively. Similar gliosarcoma-bearing rats treated with 15.0 or 22.5 Gy of 250-kilovolt peak x-rays had median survival times of only 26 or 31 days, respectively, after tumor initiation. Images PMID:2263630

  11. Congenital Erythropoietic Porphyria With Calcific Constrictive Pericarditis: A Case Report and Brief Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Ujjwal K; Patel, Kartik; Seth, Sandeep; Ray, Ruma; Jagia, Priya; Sahu, Manoj

    2015-10-01

    An 18-year-old boy with congenital erythropoietic porphyria and calcific constrictive pericarditis underwent total pericardiectomy. The cause of pericardial calcification could be deposition of porphyrins in the pericardium. Surgical importance of this rare condition is highlighted. PMID:26467880

  12. TRANSMISSION OF CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE OF MULE DEER TO SUFFOLK SHEEP FOLLOWING INTRACEREBRAL INOCULATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the transmissibility of chronic wasting disease (CWD) to sheep, 8 Suffolk lambs of various prion protein (PRNP) genotype (4 ARQ/ARR, 3 ARQ/ARQ, 1 ARQ/VRQ at codons 136, 154 and 171, respectively) were inoculated intracerebrally with brain suspension from mule deer with CWD (CWD**md). Tw...

  13. White-tailed Deer are Susceptible to Sheep Scrapie by Intracerebral Inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interspecies transmission studies afford the opportunity to better understand the potential host range and origins of prion diseases. The purpose of this experiment was to determine susceptibility of white-tailed deer to scrapie after intracerebral inoculation and to compare clinical signs and lesi...

  14. Susceptibility of Cattle to First-Passage Intracerebral Inoculation with Chronic Wasting Disease Agent from Elk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle could be exposed to chronic wasting disease (CWD) from infected farmed or free-ranging cervids. The purpose of this study was to assess the transmissibility of CWD derived from elk to cattle. Intracerebral inoculation of calves (n=14) of approximately 3 months of age was done with 1 ml of a...

  15. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date premarket approval application (PMA) or notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is.... Any other implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief shall have an approved PMA...

  16. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date premarket approval application (PMA) or notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is.... Any other implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief shall have an approved PMA...

  17. Early detection of ocean acidification effects on marine calcification

    SciTech Connect

    Ilyina, T.; Zeebe, R. E.; E. Maier-Reimer; C. Heinze

    2009-02-19

    Ocean acidification is likely to impact calcification rates in many pelagic organisms, which may in turn cause significant changes in marine ecosystem structure. We examine effects of changes in marine CaCO3 production on total alkalinity (TA) in the ocean using the global biogeochemical ocean model HAMOCC. We test a variety of future calcification scenarios because experimental studies with different organisms have revealed a wide range of calcification sensitivities to CaCO3 saturation state. The model integrations start at a preindustrial steady state in the year 1800 and run until the year 2300 forced with anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Calculated trends in TA are evaluated taking into account the natural variability in ocean carbonate chemistry, as derived from repeat hydrographic transects. We conclude that the data currently available does not allow discerning significant trends in TA due to changes in pelagic calcification caused by ocean acidification. Given different calcification scenarios, our model calculations indicate that the TA increase over time will start being detectable by the year 2040, increasing by 5–30 umol/kg compared to the present-day values. In a scenario of extreme reductions in calcification, large TA changes relative to preindustrial conditions would have occurred at present, which we consider very unlikely. However, the time interval of reliable TA observations is too short to disregard this scenario. The largest increase in surface ocean TA is predicted for the tropical and subtropical regions. In order to monitor and quantify possible early signs of acidification effects, we suggest to specifically target those regions during future ocean chemistry surveys.

  18. Reversal of ocean acidification enhances net coral reef calcification.

    PubMed

    Albright, Rebecca; Caldeira, Lilian; Hosfelt, Jessica; Kwiatkowski, Lester; Maclaren, Jana K; Mason, Benjamin M; Nebuchina, Yana; Ninokawa, Aaron; Pongratz, Julia; Ricke, Katharine L; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider, Kenneth; Sesboüé, Marine; Shamberger, Kathryn; Silverman, Jacob; Wolfe, Kennedy; Zhu, Kai; Caldeira, Ken

    2016-03-17

    Approximately one-quarter of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere each year is absorbed by the global oceans, causing measurable declines in surface ocean pH, carbonate ion concentration ([CO3(2-)]), and saturation state of carbonate minerals (Ω). This process, referred to as ocean acidification, represents a major threat to marine ecosystems, in particular marine calcifiers such as oysters, crabs, and corals. Laboratory and field studies have shown that calcification rates of many organisms decrease with declining pH, [CO3(2-)], and Ω. Coral reefs are widely regarded as one of the most vulnerable marine ecosystems to ocean acidification, in part because the very architecture of the ecosystem is reliant on carbonate-secreting organisms. Acidification-induced reductions in calcification are projected to shift coral reefs from a state of net accretion to one of net dissolution this century. While retrospective studies show large-scale declines in coral, and community, calcification over recent decades, determining the contribution of ocean acidification to these changes is difficult, if not impossible, owing to the confounding effects of other environmental factors such as temperature. Here we quantify the net calcification response of a coral reef flat to alkalinity enrichment, and show that, when ocean chemistry is restored closer to pre-industrial conditions, net community calcification increases. In providing results from the first seawater chemistry manipulation experiment of a natural coral reef community, we provide evidence that net community calcification is depressed compared with values expected for pre-industrial conditions, indicating that ocean acidification may already be impairing coral reef growth. PMID:26909578

  19. [Mechanism of losartan suppressing vascular calcification in rat aortic artery].

    PubMed

    Shao, Juan; Wu, Panfeng; Wu, Jiliang; Li, Mincai

    2016-08-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of the angiotensin II receptor 1 (AT1R) blocker losartan on vascular calcification in rat aortic artery and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods SD rats were divided randomly into control group, vascular calcification model group and treatment group. Vascular calcification models were made by subcutaneous injection of warfarin plus vitamin K1 for two weeks. Rats in the treatment group were subcutaneously injected with losartan (10 mg/kg) at the end of the first week and consecutively for one week. We observed the morphological changes by HE staining and the calcium deposition by Alizarin red staining in the artery vascular wall. The mRNA expressions of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) were analyzed by reverse transcription PCR. The BMP2 and RUNX2 protein expressions were determined by Western blotting. The apoptosis of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were detected by TUNEL. The AT1R expression was tested by fluorescent immunohistochemistry. Results The aortic vascular calcification was induced by warfarin and vitamin K1. Compared with the vascular calcification model group, the mRNA and protein expressions of BMP2 and RUNX2 were significantly downregulated in the aorta in the losartan treatment group. Furthermore, the apoptosis of SMCs and the AT1R expression obviously decreased. Conclusion AT1R blocker losartan inhibits the apoptosis of SMCs and reduces AT1R expression; it downregulates the BMP2 and RUNX2 expressions in the vascular calcification process. PMID:27412937

  20. Alkalinity Enrichment Enhances Net Calcification of a Coral Reef Flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, R.; Caldeira, K.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean acidification is projected to shift reefs from a state of net accretion to one of net dissolution sometime this century. While retrospective studies show large-scale changes in coral calcification over the last several decades, it is not possible to unequivocally link these results to ocean acidification due to confounding factors of temperature and other environmental parameters. Here, we quantified the calcification response of a coral reef flat to alkalinity enrichment to test whether reef calcification increases when ocean chemistry is restored to near pre-industrial conditions. We used sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to increase the total alkalinity of seawater flowing over a reef flat, with the aim of increasing carbonate ion concentrations [CO32-] and the aragonite saturation state (Ωarag) to values that would have been attained under pre-industrial atmospheric pCO2 levels. We developed a dual tracer regression method to estimate alkalinity uptake (i.e., calcification) in response to alkalinity enrichment. This approach uses the change in ratios between a non-conservative tracer (alkalinity) and a conservative tracer (a non-reactive dye, Rhodamine WT) to assess the fraction of added alkalinity that is taken up by the reef as a result of an induced increase in calcification rate. Using this method, we estimate that an average of 17.3% ± 2.3% of the added alkalinity was taken up by the reef community. In providing results from the first seawater chemistry manipulation experiment performed on a natural coral reef community (without artificial confinement), we demonstrate that, upon increase of [CO32-] and Ωarag to near pre-industrial values, reef calcification increases. Thus, we conclude that, the impacts of ocean acidification are already being felt by coral reefs. This work is the culmination of years of work in the Caldeira lab at the Carnegie Institution for Science, involving many people including Jack Silverman, Kenny Schneider, and Jana Maclaren.

  1. Reversal of ocean acidification enhances net coral reef calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, Rebecca; Caldeira, Lilian; Hosfelt, Jessica; Kwiatkowski, Lester; MacLaren, Jana K.; Mason, Benjamin M.; Nebuchina, Yana; Ninokawa, Aaron; Pongratz, Julia; Ricke, Katharine L.; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider, Kenneth; Sesboüé, Marine; Shamberger, Kathryn; Silverman, Jacob; Wolfe, Kennedy; Zhu, Kai; Caldeira, Ken

    2016-03-01

    Approximately one-quarter of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere each year is absorbed by the global oceans, causing measurable declines in surface ocean pH, carbonate ion concentration ([CO32‑]), and saturation state of carbonate minerals (Ω). This process, referred to as ocean acidification, represents a major threat to marine ecosystems, in particular marine calcifiers such as oysters, crabs, and corals. Laboratory and field studies have shown that calcification rates of many organisms decrease with declining pH, [CO32‑], and Ω. Coral reefs are widely regarded as one of the most vulnerable marine ecosystems to ocean acidification, in part because the very architecture of the ecosystem is reliant on carbonate-secreting organisms. Acidification-induced reductions in calcification are projected to shift coral reefs from a state of net accretion to one of net dissolution this century. While retrospective studies show large-scale declines in coral, and community, calcification over recent decades, determining the contribution of ocean acidification to these changes is difficult, if not impossible, owing to the confounding effects of other environmental factors such as temperature. Here we quantify the net calcification response of a coral reef flat to alkalinity enrichment, and show that, when ocean chemistry is restored closer to pre-industrial conditions, net community calcification increases. In providing results from the first seawater chemistry manipulation experiment of a natural coral reef community, we provide evidence that net community calcification is depressed compared with values expected for pre-industrial conditions, indicating that ocean acidification may already be impairing coral reef growth.

  2. Adipokines, Insulin Resistance and Coronary Artery Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Atif; Mehta, Nehal N.; Tadesse, Mahlet G.; Wolfe, Megan L.; Rhodes, Thomas; Girman, Cynthia; Reilly, Muredach P

    2008-01-01

    Objectives We evaluated the hypothesis that plasma levels of adiponectin and leptin are independently but oppositely associated with coronary calcification (CAC), a measure of subclinical atherosclerosis. In addition, we assessed which biomarkers of adiposity and insulin resistance are the strongest predictors of CAC beyond traditional risk factors, the metabolic syndrome and plasma C-reactive protein (CRP). Background Adipokines are fat-secreted biomolecules with pleiotropic actions that converge in diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Methods We examined the association of plasma adipocytokines with CAC in 860 asymptomatic, non-diabetic participants in the Study of Inherited Risk of Coronary Atherosclerosis (SIRCA). Results Plasma adiponectin and leptin levels had opposite and distinct associations with adiposity, insulin resistance and inflammation. Plasma leptin was positively (top vs. bottom quartile) associated with higher CAC after adjusting for age, gender, traditional risk factors and Framingham Risk Scores (FRS) [tobit regression ratio 2.42 (95% CI 1.48–3.95, p=0.002)] and further adjusting for metabolic syndrome and CRP [ratio 2.31 (95% CI 1.36–3.94, p=0.002)]. In contrast, adiponectin levels were not associated with CAC. Comparative analyses suggested that levels of leptin, IL-6 and sol-TNFR2 as well as HOMA-IR predicted CAC scores but only leptin and HOMA-IR provided value beyond risk factors, the metabolic syndrome and CRP. Conclusion In SIRCA, while both leptin and adiponectin levels were associated with metabolic and inflammatory markers, only leptin was a significant independent predictor of CAC. Of several metabolic markers, leptin and the HOMA-IR index had the most robust, independent associations with CAC. Condensed Abstract Adipokines are fat-secreted biomolecules with pleiotropic actions and represent novel markers for cardiovascular risk. We examined the association of plasma adipocytokines with CAC in 860 asymptomatic, non

  3. Breast calcifications following electrical defibrillation: An unusual mammographic appearance.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Steven M; Jani, Manish; Badve, Sunil

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of a 57-year-old woman with a past medical history of end-stage renal disease and a recent history of electrical defibrillation who arrived for her annual mammogram with no breast-related complaints. The mammogram showed interval development of unusual clusters of heterogeneous calcifications. The patient underwent stereotactic core-needle biopsy for definitive diagnosis. The pathologic evaluation revealed fibrosis, abnormal adipocytes, and calcifications with no evidence of malignancy. The constellation of findings was consistent with fat necrosis and fibrosis related to tissue damage sustained during the recent defibrillation. PMID:27307857

  4. Residual Cyst Associated with Calcifications in an Elderly Patient

    PubMed Central

    Sridevi, K; Nandan, S. Ratheesh Kumar; Ratnakar, P.; Srikrishna, K.; Vamsi Pavani, B.

    2014-01-01

    A residual cyst, as the name implies, is a radicular, lateral periodotal, dentigerous or any other cyst that has persisted after it’s associated tooth has been lost. Residual cysts show more predilection in males and they commonly affect the maxillary region. Usually, residual cysts are asymptomatic and calcifications occurring in the residual cysts are quite rare. We are reporting a case of symptomatic residual cyst, associated with calcifications involving the anterior region of the body of the mandible in a 60-year-old male patient. The pathogenesis, clinical, radiological features and differential diagnosis have been discussed. PMID:24701547

  5. Circumferential Calcification of Silicone Implant Misunderstood as a Bony Substitute.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sae Bin; Min, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    Silicone implant is known to be safe and easy to handle, and frequently used in Asian rhinoplasty. Compared with breast implant, complication studies about silicone calcification used in rhinoplasty are very limited. Recently, the authors experienced an interesting patient who underwent revision rhinoplasty in our institution. Based on preoperative images, previously inserted dorsal augmentation material was identified. It was circumferentially enclosed with bony material and hypertrophied bony lesion induced hump on the mid portion of nasal dorsum. During operation, the authors found it was the calcified capsule of silicone implant, and the calcification was surrounding the whole implant material. PMID:26703034

  6. Emergence of a novel bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prion from an atypical H-type BSE

    PubMed Central

    Masujin, Kentaro; Okada, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Matsuura, Yuichi; Imamura, Morikazu; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The H-type of atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (H-BSE) was serially passaged in bovinized transgenic (TgBoPrP) mice. At the fourth passage, most challenged mice showed a typical H-BSE phenotype with incubation periods of 223 ± 7.8 days. However, a different phenotype of BSE prion with shorter incubation periods of 109 ± 4 days emerged in a minor subset of the inoculated mice. The latter showed distinct clinical signs, brain pathology, and abnormal prion protein profiles as compared to H-BSE and other known BSE strains in mice. This novel prion was transmitted intracerebrally to cattle, with incubation periods of 14.8 ± 1.5 months, with phenotypes that differed from those of other bovine prion strains. These data suggest that intraspecies transmission of H-BSE in cattle allows the emergence of a novel BSE strain. Therefore, the continuation of feed ban programs may be necessary to exclude the recycling of H-BSE prions, which appear to arise spontaneously, in livestock. Such measures should help to reduce the risks from both novel and known strains of BSE. PMID:26948374

  7. Emergence of a novel bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prion from an atypical H-type BSE.

    PubMed

    Masujin, Kentaro; Okada, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Matsuura, Yuichi; Imamura, Morikazu; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The H-type of atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (H-BSE) was serially passaged in bovinized transgenic (TgBoPrP) mice. At the fourth passage, most challenged mice showed a typical H-BSE phenotype with incubation periods of 223 ± 7.8 days. However, a different phenotype of BSE prion with shorter incubation periods of 109 ± 4 days emerged in a minor subset of the inoculated mice. The latter showed distinct clinical signs, brain pathology, and abnormal prion protein profiles as compared to H-BSE and other known BSE strains in mice. This novel prion was transmitted intracerebrally to cattle, with incubation periods of 14.8 ± 1.5 months, with phenotypes that differed from those of other bovine prion strains. These data suggest that intraspecies transmission of H-BSE in cattle allows the emergence of a novel BSE strain. Therefore, the continuation of feed ban programs may be necessary to exclude the recycling of H-BSE prions, which appear to arise spontaneously, in livestock. Such measures should help to reduce the risks from both novel and known strains of BSE. PMID:26948374

  8. Role of admission serum albumin levels in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Limaye, Kaustubh; Yang, Ju Dong; Hinduja, Archana

    2016-03-01

    Low serum albumin levels have been reported to be an independent predictor of increased morbidity and mortality in multiple disease conditions. The aim of our study was to identify the impact of low serum albumin levels on mortality and outcomes at discharge in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. We retrospectively reviewed our prospective database of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage from January 2010 to December 2011. Patients were dichotomized into two groups based on their serum albumin levels upon admission. Hypoalbuminemia was defined as serum albumin levels ≤3.4 g/dl. The two groups were compared using Fisher's exact test for categorical variables and t test for continuous variables. Poor outcome was defined as death or discharge to a long-term nursing facility (modified Rankin Score 4-6). Out of 97 patients admitted with intracerebral hemorrhage, 90 met our inclusion criteria (42 had normal levels and 48 had hypoalbuminemia). The baseline characteristics, risk factors, etiology, location and volume of intracerebral hemorrhage, admission blood glucose, white cell count, length of hospital stay, length of intensive care unit stay, and complications were similar between both groups. Although admission hypoalbuminemia did not impact in-hospital mortality (28 vs 24 %, p = 0.635), there was a significant increase in poor outcomes at discharge (59 vs 31 %, p = 0.009) (OR 1.8; 95 % CI; 1.2-2.8). Similar to other diseases, hypoalbuminemia was associated with poor functional outcomes in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. This will need to be confirmed in larger prospective studies before adopting therapeutic and preventive strategies in future. PMID:26133948

  9. PLASMA VITAMIN K LEVELS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH CORONARY CALCIFICATION IN OLDER ADULTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin K is involved in regulation of vascular calcification, as mediated by '-carboxylation of matrix Gla protein (MGP), which inhibits calcification in vivo.Associations between MGP and calcification are equivocal in humans; less is known about interrelationships among vitamin K, MGP, and calcifi...

  10. Atypical arthritis revisited: Acute rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Binoy; Bhutia, Euden; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy presented with vague musculoskeletal pain and involvement of multiple small and large joints along with axial skeleton for the last 3 years, poorly responsive to aspirin. However, on account of presence of carditis and fulfilment of Jones criteria, a diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) with atypical arthritis was made. We report this case to break the myth and sensitize pediatricians and rheumatologists to keep the possibility of atypical articular presentations, as in our case, in patients with ARF and prevent delayed diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27212853

  11. Association between atypical parathyroid adenoma and neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Favere, Aline Mesquita Ferreira de; Tsukumo, Daniela Miti; Matos, Patrícia Sabino de; Santos, Sérgio Luiz Marques dos; Lalli, Cristina Alba

    2015-10-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a disease characterized by excessive production of parathyroid hormone (PTH), which is due to a parathyroid adenoma in 85% of cases. An atypical parathyroid adenoma, with some histopathological features of parathyroid carcinoma, may be found in some of the cases, although it may not fulfill all the criteria for this diagnosis. Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant systemic disease that may be associated with hyperparathyroidism. We report here the rare combination of a patient with NF1 and clinical manifestations of hyperparathyroidism due to an atypical parathyroid adenoma. PMID:26421674

  12. Intracranial physiological calcifications in adults on computed tomography in Tabriz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Daghighi, M H; Rezaei, V; Zarrintan, S; Pourfathi, H

    2007-05-01

    Intracranial physiological calcifications are unaccompanied by any evidence of disease and have no demonstrable pathological cause. They are often due to calcium and sometimes iron deposition in the blood vessels of different structures of the brain. Computed tomography (CT) is the most sensitive means of detection of these calcifications. The aim of this study was the assessment of intracranial physiological calcifications in adults. We studied 1569 cases ranging in age from 15 to 85 in Tabriz Imam Khomeini Hospital, Iran. These patients had a history of head trauma and their CT scan did not show any evidence of pathological findings. The structures evaluated consisted of (A) the pineal gland, (B) the choroid plexus, (C) the habenula, (D) the basal ganglia, (E) the tentorium cerebelli, sagittal sinus and falx cerebri, (F) vessels and (G) lens and other structures which could be calcified. Of the 1569 subjects, 71.0% had pineal calcification, 66.2% had choroid plexus calcification, 20.1% had habenular calcification, 7.3% had tentorium cerebelli, sagittal sinus or falx cerebri calcifications, 6.6% had vascular calcification, 0.8% had basal ganglia calcification and 0.9% had lens and other non-defined calcifications. In general, the frequency of intracranial physiological calcifications was greater in men than in women. All types of calcification increased at older ages except for lens and other non-defined calcifications. We evaluated all the cranial structures and determined percentages for all types of intracranial physiological calcification. These statistics can be used for comparing physiological and pathological intracranial calcifications. Moreover, these statistics may be of interest from the clinical perspective and are potentially of clinical use. PMID:17594669

  13. Metastatic calcification of the stomach imaged on a bone scan

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.; Ryo, U.Y.; Pinsky, S.M.

    1984-10-01

    A whole body bone scan obtained on a 21-year-old woman with sickle cell disease and chronic renal failure showed localization of the radionuclide diffusely in the stomach. The localization of the radionuclide represented metastatic calcification of the stomach caused by secondary hyperparathyroidism.

  14. Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr’s disease)

    PubMed Central

    Mufaddel, Amir A.; Al-Hassani, Ghanem A.

    2014-01-01

    Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr’s disease) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by symmetrical and bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia. Calcifications may also occur in other brain regions such as dentate nucleus, thalamus, and cerebral cortex. Both familial and non-familial cases of Fahr’s disease have been reported, predominantly with autosomal-dominant fashion. The disease has a wide range of clinical presentations, predominantly with neuropsychiatric features and movement disorders. Psychiatric features reported in the literature include: cognitive impairment, depression, hallucinations, delusions, manic symptoms, anxiety, schizophrenia-like psychosis, and personality change. Other clinical features include: Parkinsonism, ataxia, headache, seizures, vertigo, stroke-like events, orthostatic hypotension, tremor, dysarthria, and paresis. Fahr’s disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of psychiatric symptoms, particularly when associated with movement disorder. The disease should be differentiated from other conditions that can cause intracranial calcification. No specific treatment is currently available. Further research is needed to bridge the gap existing in our current knowledge of the prevalence, etiology, symptoms, and treatment of Fahr’s disease. PMID:24983277

  15. Endothelial microparticles mediate inflammation-induced vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Paula; Montes de Oca, Addy; Madueño, Juan Antonio; Merino, Ana; Martín-Malo, Alejandro; Aljama, Pedro; Ramírez, Rafael; Rodríguez, Mariano; Carracedo, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of endothelial cells (ECs) with TNF-α causes an increase in the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and the production of endothelial microparticles (EMPs). BMP-2 is known to produce osteogenic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). It was found that EMPs from TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells (HUVECs) contained a significant amount of BMP-2 and were able to enhance VSMC osteogenesis and calcification. Calcium content was greater in VSMCs exposed to EMPs from TNF-α-treated HUVECs than EMPs from nontreated HUVECs (3.56 ± 0.57 vs. 1.48 ± 0.56 µg/mg protein; P < 0.05). The increase in calcification was accompanied by up-regulation of Cbfa1 (osteogenic transcription factor) and down-regulation of SM22α (VSMC lineage marker). Inhibition of BMP-2 by small interfering RNA reduced the VSMC calcification induced by EMPs from TNF-α-treated HUVECs. Similar osteogenic capability was observed in EMPs from both patients with chronic kidney disease and senescent cells, which also presented a high level of BMP-2 expression. Labeling of EMPs with CellTracker shows that EMPs are phagocytized by VSMCs under all conditions (with or without high phosphate, control, and EMPs from TNF-α-treated HUVECs). Our data suggest that EC damage results in the release of EMPs with a high content of calcium and BMP-2 that are able to induce calcification and osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs. PMID:25342130

  16. Premature Calcifications of Costal Cartilages: A New Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Rhomberg, Walter; Schuster, Antonius

    2014-01-01

    Background. Calcifications of the costal cartilages occur, as a rule, not until the age of 30 years. The knowledge of the clinical significance of early and extensive calcifications is still incomplete. Materials and Methods. A search was made to find patients below the age of 30 years who showed distinct calcifications of their lower costal cartilages by viewing 360 random samples of intravenous pyelograms and abdominal plain films. The histories, and clinical and laboratory findings of these patients were analyzed. Results. Nineteen patients fulfilled the criteria of premature calcifications of costal cartilages (CCCs). The patients had in common that they were frequently referred to a hospital and were treated by several medical disciplines. Nevertheless many complaints of the patients remained unsolved. Premature CCCs were often associated with rare endocrine disorders, inborn errors of metabolism, and abnormal hematologic findings. Among the metabolic disorders there were 2 proven porphyrias and 7 patients with a suspected porphyria but with inconclusive laboratory findings. Conclusion. Premature CCCs are unlikely to be a normal variant in skeletal radiology. The findings in this small group of patients call for more intensive studies, especially in regard to the putative role of a porphyria. PMID:25587444

  17. Sturge-Weber syndrome with bilateral intracranial calcification.

    PubMed Central

    Boltshauser, E; Wilson, J; Hoare, R D

    1976-01-01

    Four children affected by Sturge-Weber syndrome and demonstrating bilateral intracranial calcification are described, bringing up to 21 the number of similar reported cases. The frequency of bilateral hemisphere involvement in this syndrome is not known, but it might be as high as 15%. If present, neurosurgical intervention is, in our opinion, contraindicated. Images PMID:932761

  18. Vascular diseases: aortitis, aortic aneurysms, and vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Ladich, Elena; Yahagi, Kazuyuki; Romero, Maria E; Virmani, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the aorta broadly include noninfectious and infectious aortitis, periaortitis, atherosclerosis, and inflammatory atherosclerotic aneurysms. Aortitis is uncommon but is increasingly recognized as an important cause of aortic aneurysms and dissections. Abdominal (AAA) and thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) have different pathologies and etiologies. AAAs are the most common type of aortic aneurysm, and the vast majority of these are atherosclerotic. The causes of TAA vary depending on the site of involvement, but medial degeneration is a common pathologic substrate, regardless of etiology, and genetic influences play a prominent role in TAA expression. Standardized classification schemes for inflammatory and degenerative diseases of the aorta have only recently been added to the pathology literature. A brief overview of the new histopathologic classifications for aortic inflammatory and degenerative diseases has recently been published by the Society for Cardiovascular Pathology and the Association for European Cardiovascular Pathology as a consensus document on the surgical pathology of the aorta. Vascular calcification is a highly regulated biologic process, and the mechanisms leading to vascular calcification are under investigation. Calcification may occur in the intima (atherosclerotic) or in the media secondary to metabolic disease. Rarely, vascular calcification may be associated with genetic disorders. PMID:27526100

  19. Inflammatory, metabolic, and genetic mechanisms of vascular calcification

    PubMed Central

    Demer, Linda L.; Tintut, Yin

    2014-01-01

    This review centers on updating the active research area of vascular calcification. This pathology underlies substantial cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, through adverse mechanical effects on vascular compliance, vasomotion, and, most likely, plaque stability. Biomineralization is a complex, regulated process occurring widely throughout nature. Decades ago, its presence in the vasculature was considered a mere curiosity and an unregulated, “dystrophic” process that does not involve biological mechanisms. While it remains controversial whether the process has any adaptive value or past evolutionary advantage, substantial advances have been made in understanding the biological mechanisms driving the process. Different types of calcific vasculopathy, such as inflammatory vs. metabolic, have parallel mechanisms in skeletal bone calcification, such as intramembranous and endochondral ossification. Recent work has identified important regulatory roles for inflammation, oxidized lipids, elastin, alkaline phosphatase, osteoprogenitor cells, matrix gamma-carboxyglutamic acid protein (MGP), transglutaminase, osteoclastic regulatory factors, phosphate regulatory hormones and receptors, apoptosis, prelamin A, autophagy, and microvesicles or microparticles similar to the matrix vesicles of skeletal bone. Recent work has uncovered fascinating interactions between MGP, vitamin K, warfarin and transport proteins. And, lastly, recent breakthroughs in inherited forms of calcific vasculopathy, have identified the genes responsible as well as an unexpected overlap of phenotypes. PMID:24665125

  20. Low calcification in corals in the Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-10-01

    Reef-building coral communities in the Great Barrier Reef—the world's largest coral reef—may now be calcifying at only about half the rate that they did during the 1970s, even though live coral cover may not have changed over the past 40 years, a new study finds. In recent decades, coral reefs around the world, home to large numbers of fish and other marine species, have been threatened by such human activities as pollution, overfishing, global warming, and ocean acidification; the latter affects ambient water chemistry and availability of calcium ions, which are critical for coral communities to calcify, build, and maintain reefs. Comparing data from reef surveys during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s with present-day (2009) measurements of calcification rates in One Tree Island, a coral reef covering 13 square kilometers in the southern part of the Great Barrier Reef, Silverman et al. show that the total calcification rates (the rate of calcification minus the rate of dissolution) in these coral communities have decreased by 44% over the past 40 years; the decrease appears to stem from a threefold reduction in calcification rates during nighttime.

  1. Msx2 promotes cardiovascular calcification by activating paracrine Wnt signals.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jian-Su; Cheng, Su-Li; Pingsterhaus, Joyce M; Charlton-Kachigian, Nichole; Loewy, Arleen P; Towler, Dwight A

    2005-05-01

    In diabetic LDLR-/- mice, an ectopic BMP2-Msx2 gene regulatory program is upregulated in association with vascular calcification. We verified the procalcific actions of aortic Msx2 expression in vivo. CMV-Msx2 transgenic (CMV-Msx2Tg(+)) mice expressed 3-fold higher levels of aortic Msx2 than nontransgenic littermates. On high-fat diets, CMV-Msx2Tg(+) mice exhibited marked cardiovascular calcification involving aortic and coronary tunica media. This corresponded to regions of Msx2 immunoreactivity in adjacent adventitial myofibroblasts, suggesting a potential paracrine osteogenic signal. To better understand Msx2-regulated calcification, we studied actions in 10T1/2 cells. We found that conditioned media from Msx2-transduced 10T1/2 cells (Msx2-CM) is both pro-osteogenic and adipostatic; these features are characteristic of Wnt signaling. Msx2-CM stimulated Wnt-dependent TCF/LEF transcription, and Msx2-transduced cells exhibited increased nuclear beta-catenin localization with concomitant alkaline phosphatase induction. Msx2 upregulated Wnt3a and Wnt7a but downregulated expression of the canonical inhibitor Dkk1. Dkk1 treatment reversed osteogenic and adipostatic actions of Msx2. Teriparatide, a PTH1R agonist that inhibits murine vascular calcification, suppressed vascular BMP2-Msx2-Wnt signaling. Analyses of CMV-Msx2Tg(+) mice confirmed that Msx2 suppresses aortic Dkk1 and upregulates vascular Wnts; moreover, TOPGAL(+) (Wnt reporter); CMV-Msx2Tg(+) mice exhibited augmented aortic LacZ expression. Thus, Msx2-expressing cells elaborated an osteogenic milieu that promotes vascular calcification in part via paracrine Wnt signals. PMID:15841209

  2. Chronic Hypoparathyroidism Due to Partial Thyroidectomy with Intracranial Calcification.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, Indra

    2016-01-01

    A 57 year old female came with the complaint of recurrent headache, often fatigue, and sometimes feel numbs and rigid in her extremities, no other symptom was noted. Her body weight is stable and she was in menopausal state. She had a history of partial thyroidectomy 20 years ago and continues thiamazole 2.5 mg with seldom regular consult to physician. From the physical examination, the patient had a scar from thyroid surgery and other organs were in the normal condition. From laboratory examination, there was slight normocytic normochromic anemia (Hb: 10.7 gr/dL), normal fT4: 1.21 ng/dL (0.7-1.48 ng/dL), slightly low Calcium: 8.3 mg/dL (8.5-10.2 mg/dL), others were within normal limit but there was no Phosphorus level data. She was currently on medication: thiamazole 2.5 mg once daily, CaCO3 500 mg once daily, and alfacalcidol 1 mcg once daily, to prevent the rigid and numbness that she felt before. For further investigation, we performed a PTH test with result of hypoparathyroidism with parathyroid hormone 7 pg/mL (15-65 pg/mL) and brain CT-scan with result there was a symmetrical bilateral calcification in radiate corona, frontal lobes, temporal lobes, basal ganglia, thalamic, and dentate nuclei of cerebelli. There was no data about the histopathology examination of the thyroid tumor because the patient did not keep the data. The mechanism of intracranial calcification in hypoparathyroidism, more often seen in pseudohypoparathyroidism than in idiopathic hypoparathyroidism, has not been completely elucidated. It may be related more to the duration of hypocalcaemia and hyperphosphataemia than parathyroid hormone itself. Hyperphosphataemia promotes ectopic calcification in brain tissue in hypoparathyroidism. Intracranial calcification is one of the features of chronic hypocalcemia, and the calcifications typically involve basal ganglia, thalami, and the cerebellum. PMID:27241548

  3. Mammographic calcification cluster detection and threshold gold thickness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.; Mackenzie, A.; Cooke, J.; Given-Wilson, R.; Wallis, M. G.; Chakraborty, D. P.; Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.

    2012-03-01

    European Guidelines for quality control in digital mammography specify acceptable and achievable standards of image quality (IQ) in terms of threshold gold thickness using the CDMAM test object. However, there is little evidence relating such measurements to cancer detection. This work investigated the relationship between calcification detection and threshold gold thickness. An observer study was performed using a set of 162 amorphous selenium direct digital (DR) detector images (81 no cancer and 81 with 1-3 inserted calcification clusters). From these images four additional IQs were simulated: different digital detectors (computed radiography (CR) and DR) and dose levels. Seven observers marked and rated the locations of suspicious regions. DBM analysis of variances was performed on the JAFROC figure of merit (FoM) yielding 95% confidence intervals for IQ pairs. Automated threshold gold thickness (Tg) analysis was performed for the 0.25mm gold disc diameter on CDMAM images at the same IQs (16 images per IQ). Tg was plotted against FoM and a power law fitted to the data. There was a significant reduction in FoM for calcification detection for CR images compared with DR; FoM decreased from 0.83 to 0.63 (p<=0.0001). Detection was also sensitive to dose. There was a good correlation between FoM and Tg (R2=0.80, p<0.05), consequently threshold gold thickness was a good predictor of calcification detection at the same IQ. Since the majority of threshold gold thicknesses for the various IQs were above the acceptable standard despite large variations in calcification detection by radiologists, current EU guidelines may need revising.

  4. A gender bias in the calcification response to ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, M.; Cohen, A. L.; McCorkle, D. C.

    2011-08-01

    The effects of nutrients and pCO2 on zooxanthellate and azooxanthellate colonies of the temperate scleractinian coral Astrangia poculata (Ellis and Solander, 1786) were investigated at two different temperatures (16 °C and 24 °C). Corals exposed to elevated pCO2 tended to have lower relative calcification rates, as estimated from changes in buoyant weights. No nutrient effect was observed. At 16 °C, gamete release was not observed, and no gender differences in calcification rate were observed. However, corals grown at 24 °C spawned repeatedly and male and female corals exhibited two different growth rate patterns. Female corals grown at 24 °C and exposed to CO2 had calcification rates 39 % lower than females grown at ambient CO2, while males showed only a 5 % decline in calcification under elevated CO2. At 16 °C, female and male corals showed similar reductions in calcification rates in response to elevated CO2 (15 % and 19 % respectively). At 24 °C, corals spawned repeatedly, while no spawning was observed at 16 °C. The increased sensitivity of females to elevated pCO2 may reflect a greater investment of energy in reproduction (egg production) relative to males (sperm production). These results suggest that both gender and spawning are important factors in determining the sensitivity of corals to ocean acidification and their inclusion in future research may be critical to predicting how the population structures of marine calcifiers will change in response to ocean acidification.

  5. Calcification by juvenile corals under heterotrophy and elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drenkard, E. J.; Cohen, A. L.; McCorkle, D. C.; de Putron, S. J.; Starczak, V. R.; Zicht, A. E.

    2013-09-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) threatens the existence of coral reefs by slowing the rate of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) production of framework-building corals thus reducing the amount of CaCO3 the reef can produce to counteract natural dissolution. Some evidence exists to suggest that elevated levels of dissolved inorganic nutrients can reduce the impact of OA on coral calcification. Here, we investigated the potential for enhanced energetic status of juvenile corals, achieved via heterotrophic feeding, to modulate the negative impact of OA on calcification. Larvae of the common Atlantic golf ball coral, Favia fragum, were collected and reared for 3 weeks under ambient (421 μatm) or significantly elevated (1,311 μatm) CO2 conditions. The metamorphosed, zooxanthellate spat were either fed brine shrimp (i.e., received nutrition from photosynthesis plus heterotrophy) or not fed (i.e., primarily autotrophic). Regardless of CO2 condition, the skeletons of fed corals exhibited accelerated development of septal cycles and were larger than those of unfed corals. At each CO2 level, fed corals accreted more CaCO3 than unfed corals, and fed corals reared under 1,311 μatm CO2 accreted as much CaCO3 as unfed corals reared under ambient CO2. However, feeding did not alter the sensitivity of calcification to increased CO2; ∆ calcification/∆Ω was comparable for fed and unfed corals. Our results suggest that calcification rates of nutritionally replete juvenile corals will decline as OA intensifies over the course of this century. Critically, however, such corals could maintain higher rates of skeletal growth and CaCO3 production under OA than those in nutritionally limited environments.

  6. Evidence for effectiveness of Extracorporal Shock-Wave Therapy (ESWT) to treat calcific and non-calcific rotator cuff tendinosis--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Huisstede, Bionka M A; Gebremariam, Lukas; van der Sande, Renske; Hay, Elaine M; Koes, Bart W

    2011-10-01

    Extracorporeal shock-wave therapy (ESWT) is suggested as a treatment alternative for calcific and non-calcific rotator cuff tendinosis (RC-tendinosis), which may decrease the need for surgery. In this study we assessed the evidence for effectiveness of ESWT for these disorders. The Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, Pedro, and Cinahl were searched for relevant systematic reviews and RCTs. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality. Seventeen RCTs (11 calcific, 6 non-calcific) were included. For calcific RC-tendinosis, strong evidence was found for effectiveness in favour of high-ESWT versus low-ESWT in short-term. Moderate evidence was found in favour of high-ESWT versus placebo in short-, mid- and long-term and versus low-ESWT in mid- and long-term. Moreover, high-ESWT was more effective (moderate evidence) with focus on calcific deposit versus focus on tuberculum major in short- and long-term. RSWT was more effective (moderate evidence) than placebo in mid-term. For non-calcific RC-tendinosis, no strong or moderate evidence was found in favour of low-, mid- or high-ESWT versus placebo, each other, or other treatments. This review shows that only high-ESWT is effective for treating calcific RC-tendinosis. No evidence was found for the effectiveness of ESWT to treat non-calcific RC-tendinosis. PMID:21396877

  7. Detection of Calcifications In Vivo and Ex Vivo After Brain Injury in Rat Using SWIFT

    PubMed Central

    Lehto, Lauri Juhani; Sierra, Alejandra; Corum, Curtis Andrew; Zhang, Jinjin; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Pitkänen, Asla; Garwood, Michael; Gröhn, Olli

    2012-01-01

    Calcifications represent one component of pathology in many brain diseases. With MRI, they are most often detected by exploiting negative contrast in magnitude images. Calcifications are more diamagnetic than tissue, leading to a magnetic field disturbance that can be seen in phase MR images. Most phase imaging studies use gradient recalled echo based pulse sequences. Here, the phase component of SWIFT, a virtually zero acquisition delay sequence, was used to detect calcifications ex vivo and in vivo in rat models of status epilepticus and traumatic brain injury. Calcifications were detected in phase and imaginary SWIFT images based on their dipole like magnetic field disturbances. In magnitude SWIFT images, calcifications were distinguished as hypointense and hyperintense. Hypointense calcifications showed large crystallized granules with few surrounding inflammatory cells, while hyperintense calcifications contained small granules with the presence of more inflammatory cells. The size of the calcifications in SWIFT magnitude images correlated with that in Alizarin stained histological sections. Our data indicate that SWIFT is likely to better preserve signal in the proximity of a calcification or other field perturber in comparison to gradient echo due to its short acquisition delay and broad excitation bandwidth. Furthermore, a quantitative description for the phase contrast near dipole magnetic field inhomogeneities for the SWIFT pulse sequence is given. In vivo detection of calcifications provides a tool to probe the progression of pathology in neurodegenerative diseases. In particular, it appears to provide a surrogate marker for inflammatory cells around the calcifications after brain injury. PMID:22425671

  8. Atypical Alpha Asymmetry in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, T. Sigi; Smalley, Susan L.; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: A growing body of literature suggests atypical cerebral asymmetry and interhemispheric interaction in ADHD. A common means of assessing lateralized brain function in clinical populations has been to examine the relative proportion of EEG alpha activity (8-12 Hz) in each hemisphere (i.e., alpha asymmetry). Increased rightward alpha…

  9. Atypical Pyoderma Gangrenosum Mimicking an Infectious Process

    PubMed Central

    To, Derek; Wong, Aaron; Montessori, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG), which involved the patient's arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics. PMID:25024856

  10. Atypical pyoderma gangrenosum mimicking an infectious process.

    PubMed

    To, Derek; Wong, Aaron; Montessori, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG), which involved the patient's arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics. PMID:25024856

  11. Infant Perception of Atypical Speech Signals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vouloumanos, Athena; Gelfand, Hanna M.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to decode atypical and degraded speech signals as intelligible is a hallmark of speech perception. Human adults can perceive sounds as speech even when they are generated by a variety of nonhuman sources including computers and parrots. We examined how infants perceive the speech-like vocalizations of a parrot. Further, we examined how…

  12. Identification of atypical scrapie in Canadian sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scrapie, a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of sheep and goats, exists in most small ruminant producing countries of the world. An atypical form of this disease, originally termed Nor98, was discovered in large abattoir surveillance of clinically normal, predominantly older sheep and rarely ...

  13. Atypical and Typical Antipsychotics in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noggle, Chad A.; Dean, Raymond S.

    2009-01-01

    The use of antipsychotic medications within the school-age population is rapidly increasing. Although typical antipsychotics may be used in rare cases, this influx is largely secondary to the availability of the atypical antipsychotics. Reduction of possible adverse effects and increased efficacy represent the primary basis for the atypical…

  14. Human Poisoning Through Atypical Routes of Exposure.

    PubMed

    Behal, Niharika; Wong, Alan; Mantara, Ruzly; Cantrell, F Lee

    2016-02-01

    There are over 2 million human exposure cases reported to United States poison centers annually. Much of the data involves exposure through ingestion, dermal contact, inhalation, ocular, or parenteral routes. There is limited data characterizing exposure via atypical routes. We conducted a retrospective review of the California Poison Control System Database for a 24-month period from January 2012 to December 2013 for poison exposure that occurred through the otic, vaginal, or rectal route. There were a total of 634 cases involving single-route and single-substance atypical poison exposure. There were 287 (45%) cases of otic exposure, 190 (30.0%) cases of vaginal exposure, and 157 (25%) cases of rectal exposure. Five hundred forty (85%) of the cases were unintentional. Gasoline exposure through the otic route occurred in 83 (13.1%) cases, followed by hydrogen peroxide (4.7%), acetaminophen (3.8%), and miconazole (2.7%). Adverse effects occurred in 336 (53%) cases. No deaths were reported. The most common treatment was observation only, occurring in 396 (62.4%) cases. The majority of the cases did not warrant hospital evaluation (73.5%). This is the first retrospective characterization study of atypical routes of poison exposure. These results may provide education to providers and the public regarding risks of exposure to substances through atypical routes. PMID:26250476

  15. Atypical Gifted Learners and Their Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diket, Read M., Ed.; Abel, Trudy, Ed.

    This collection of 12 handouts focuses on different categories of atypical gifted learners and their characteristics. The handouts are generally two pages long and present a summary of the literature on the topic, some practical teaching suggestions, and references. The handouts include: (1) "Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Gifted Students" (Pam…

  16. Atypical Neural Self-Representation in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardo, Michael V.; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Bullmore, Edward T.; Sadek, Susan A.; Pasco, Greg; Wheelwright, Sally J.; Suckling, John; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The "self" is a complex multidimensional construct deeply embedded and in many ways defined by our relations with the social world. Individuals with autism are impaired in both self-referential and other-referential social cognitive processing. Atypical neural representation of the self may be a key to understanding the nature of such impairments.…

  17. Atypical Ligon Lintless-2 Phenotype in Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mutant Li2 is reported to be a dominant single gene mutation in cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L. It has normal vegetative phenotypic morphology and the phenotype of the seed cotton is reported to be fuzzy seed with short fibers. The objective of this research was to report on atypical phenotypes ob...

  18. Observing Behavior and Atypically Restricted Stimulus Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dube, William V.; Dickson, Chata A.; Balsamo, Lyn M.; O'Donnell, Kristin Lombard; Tomanari, Gerson Y.; Farren, Kevin M.; Wheeler, Emily E.; McIlvane, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Restricted stimulus control refers to discrimination learning with atypical limitations in the range of controlling stimuli or stimulus features. In the study reported here, 4 normally capable individuals and 10 individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) performed two-sample delayed matching to sample. Sample-stimulus observing was recorded…

  19. Cohort study of atypical pressure ulcers development.

    PubMed

    Jaul, Efraim

    2014-12-01

    Atypical pressure ulcers (APU) are distinguished from common pressure ulcers (PU) with both unusual location and different aetiology. The occurrence and attempts to characterise APU remain unrecognised. The purpose of this cohort study was to analyse the occurrence of atypical location and the circumstances of the causation, and draw attention to the prevention and treatment by a multidisciplinary team. The cohort study spanned three and a half years totalling 174 patients. The unit incorporates two weekly combined staff meetings. One concentrates on wound assessment with treatment decisions made by the physician and nurse, and the other, a multidisciplinary team reviewing all patients and coordinating treatment. The main finding of this study identified APU occurrence rate of 21% within acquired PU over a three and a half year period. Severe spasticity constituted the largest group in this study and the most difficult to cure wounds, located in medial aspects of knees, elbows and palms. Medical devices caused the second largest occurrence of atypical wounds, located in the nape of the neck, penis and nostrils. Bony deformities were the third recognisable atypical wound group located in shoulder blades and upper spine. These three categories are definable and time observable. APU are important to be recognisable, and can be healed as well as being prevented. The prominent role of the multidisciplinary team is primary in identification, prevention and treatment. PMID:23374746

  20. Atypical Visuomotor Performance in Children with PDD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlooz, Wim A. J. M.; Hulstijn, Wouter

    2012-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) frequently encounter difficulties in visuomotor tasks, which are possibly caused by atypical visuoperceptual processing. This was tested in children (aged 9-12 years) with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD; including PDD-NOS and Asperger syndrome), and two same-age control groups (Tourette syndrome…

  1. Differential Effects of Ocean Acidification on Coral Calcification: Insights from Geochemistry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, M.; Decarlo, T. M.; Venn, A.; Tambutte, E.; Gaetani, G. A.; Tambutte, S.; Allemand, D.; McCulloch, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Although ocean acidification is expected to negatively impact calcifying animals due to the formation of CaCO3 becoming less favorable, experimental evidence is mixed. Corals have received considerable attention in this regard; laboratory culture experiments show there to be a wide array of calcification responses to acidification. Here we will show how relationships for the incorporation of various trace elements and boron isotopes into synthetic aragonite can be used to reconstruct carbonate chemistry at the site of calcification. In turn the chemistry at the site of calcification can be determined under different ocean acidification scenarios and differences in the chemistry at the site of calcification linked to different calcification responses to acidification. Importantly we will show that the pH of the calcifying fluid alone is insufficient to estimate calcification responses, thus a multi-proxy approach using multiple trace elements and isotopes is required to understand how the site of calcification is affected by ocean acidification.

  2. Rates and characteristics of radiographically detected intracerebral cavernous malformations after cranial radiation therapy in pediatric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gastelum, Erica; Sear, Katherine; Hills, Nancy; Roddy, Erika; Randazzo, Dominica; Chettout, Nassim; Hess, Christopher; Cotter, Jennifer; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A; Fullerton, Heather; Mueller, Sabine

    2015-06-01

    Rates and characteristics of intracerebral cavernous malformations after cranial radiation therapy remain poorly understood. Herein we report on intracerebral cavernous malformations detected on follow-up imaging in pediatric cancer patients who received cranial radiation therapy at age ≤18 years from 1980 to 2009. Through chart reviews (n = 362) and phone interviews (n = 104) of a retrospective cohort, we identified 10 patients with intracerebral cavernous malformations. The median latency time for detection of intracerebral cavernous malformations after cranial radiation therapy was 12 years (range 1-24 years) at a median age of 21.4 years (interquartile range = 15-28). The cumulative incidence was 3% (95% confidence interval 1%-8%) at 10 years post cranial radiation therapy and 14% (95% confidence interval 7%-26%) at 15 years. Three patients underwent surgical resection. Two surgical specimens were pathologically similar to sporadically occurring intracerebral cavernous malformations; one was consistent with capillary telangiectasia. Intracerebral cavernous malformations are common after cranial radiation therapy and can show a spectrum of histologic features. PMID:25122111

  3. The Sensitivity of Marine Calcification to carbonate ion concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langdon, C.

    2006-12-01

    It is now well established that the rate of calcification of biogenic calcification is a function of the carbonate ion concentration. This relationship has been best established in the case of corals. Data is now available for twelve species. For the purpose of comparison it is convenient to normalize the calcification rates to the rate achieved at the pre-industrial carbonate ion concentration of the surface tropical ocean taken for the purposes of this analysis to be 255 μmol kg-1. If the rates from all the available studies are processed in this way and then regressed against the carbonate ion concentration one obtains that the normalized calcification = -24.5+0.47[CO32-], r#2=0.74. From this relationship one can calculate that at the present time the rate of coral calcification may have declined by 19% relative to the pre-industrial rate and by the end of the century, if pCO2 reaches 700 μatm, it could decline by 54%. This assumes that any rise in sea surface temperature does not have a significant effect on coral calcification. At the present time this is a major source of uncertainty. Several studies show that corals are adapted to the mean annual temperature that they experience and the rate of calcification during the summer is depressed relative to the maximal rates observed during the spring and fall. In this scenario any increase in the mean annual temperature will result in a reduced annual rate of calcification. These studies show that the rate of calcification falls off at the rate of 24±17 % per °C once the temperature exceeds the species thermal optimum. Other studies based on long-lived massive corals widely used in paleo-climate reconstructions exhibit a linear relationship with temperature that shows no sign of tapering off at the highest temperatures for which data are available. At this time we do not know which pattern is more representative of the aggregate response of corals on a typical coral reef. It should not be forgotten that

  4. Protective effect of picolinic acid on mice intracerebrally infected with lethal doses of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Blasi, E; Mazzolla, R; Pitzurra, L; Barluzzi, R; Bistoni, F

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the effects of picolinic acid (PLA), a product of tryptophan degradation, on mouse susceptibility to intracerebral infection with Candida albicans. We show that intraperitoneal administration of PLA significantly enhances the median survival time of mice inoculated with the lethal challenge. Furthermore, intracerebral administration of this agent induces a protective state against the local lethal infection, the phenomenon depending upon the administration schedule and doses of PLA employed. According to survival data, yeast growth in the brain as well as yeast colonization of the kidneys are drastically reduced in PLA-treated mice compared with those for untreated controls. Northern (RNA) blot analysis of brain tissues demonstrates that mRNA levels specific for tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 are augmented and induced, respectively, after inoculation of PLA. These results indicate that PLA has a protective effect likely involving elicitation of a cytokine response in vivo against fungal infections. Images PMID:7506894

  5. A case of dural arteriovenous fistula draining to the diploic vein presenting with intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yako, Rie; Masuo, Osamu; Kubo, Kenji; Nishimura, Yasuhiko; Nakao, Naoyuki

    2016-03-01

    The authors report an unusual case of a dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) draining only to the diploic vein and causing intracerebral hemorrhage. A 62-year-old woman presented with disturbance of consciousness and left hemiparesis. Brain CT scanning on admission showed a right frontal subcortical hemorrhage. Digital subtraction angiography revealed an arteriovenous shunt located in the region around the pterion, which connected the frontal branch of the right middle meningeal artery with the anterior temporal diploic vein and drained into cortical veins in a retrograde manner through the falcine vein. The dAVF was successfully obliterated by percutaneous transarterial embolization with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. The mechanism of retrograde cortical venous reflux causing intracerebral hemorrhage is discussed. PMID:26295918

  6. Benign Sphenoid Wing Meningioma Presenting with an Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Frič, Radek; Hald, John K.; Antal, Ellen-Ann

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY OBJECT We report an unusual case of a benign lateral sphenoid wing meningioma that presented with, and was masked by, an acute intracerebral hemorrhage. CASE REPORT A 68-year-old woman was admitted after sudden onset of coma. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an intracerebral hemorrhage, without any underlying vascular pathology on CT angiography. During the surgery, we found a lateral sphenoid wing meningioma with intratumoral bleeding that extended into the surrounding brain parenchyma. RESULTS We removed the hematoma and resected the tumor completely in the same session. The histopathological classification of the tumor was a WHO grade I meningothelial meningioma. The patient recovered very well after surgery, without significant neurological sequelae. CONCLUSIONS: Having reviewed the relevant references from the medical literature, we consider this event as an extremely rare presentation of a benign sphenoid wing meningioma in a patient without any predisposing medical factors. The possible mechanisms of bleeding from this tumor type are discussed. PMID:27127413

  7. Natural and synthetic retinoids afford therapeutic effects on intracerebral hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Hideaki; Hijioka, Masanori; Hisatsune, Akinori; Isohama, Yoichiro; Shudo, Koichi; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2012-05-15

    We have recently proposed that retinoic acid receptor (NR1B) is a promising target of neuroprotective therapy for intracerebral hemorrhage, since pretreatment of mice with an NR1B1/NR1B2 agonist Am80 attenuated various pathological and neurological abnormalities associated with the disease. In the present study we further addressed the effects of retinoids as potential therapeutic drugs, using a collagenase-induced model of intracerebral hemorrhage. Daily oral administration of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA; 5 and 15 mg/kg), a naturally occurring NR1B agonist, from 1 day before collagenase injection significantly inhibited loss of neurons within the hematoma. ATRA in the same treatment regimen also decreased the number of activated microglia/macrophages around the hematoma but did not affect the hematoma volume. ATRA (15 mg/kg) as well as Am80 (5mg/kg) rescued neurons in the central region of hematoma, even when drug administration was started from 6h after induction of intracerebral hemorrhage. However, in this post-treatment regimen, only Am80 significantly decreased the number of activated microglia/macrophages. With regard to neurological deficits, both ATRA (15 mg/kg) and Am80 (5mg/kg) given in the post-treatment regimen improved performance of mice in the beam-walking test and the modified limb-placing test. ATRA and Am80 also significantly attenuated damage of axon tracts as revealed by amyloid precursor protein immunohistochemistry. These results underscore potential therapeutic values of NR1B agonists for intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:22465180

  8. Prolonged intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery of topotecan with a subcutaneously implantable infusion pump.

    PubMed

    Sonabend, Adam M; Stuart, R Morgan; Yun, Jonathan; Yanagihara, Ted; Mohajed, Hamed; Dashnaw, Steven; Bruce, Samuel S; Brown, Truman; Romanov, Alex; Sebastian, Manu; Arias-Mendoza, Fernando; Bagiella, Emilia; Canoll, Peter; Bruce, Jeffrey N

    2011-08-01

    Intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of chemotherapeutic agents currently requires an externalized catheter and infusion system, which limits its duration because of the need for hospitalization and the risk of infection. To evaluate the feasibility of prolonged topotecan administration by CED in a large animal brain with the use of a subcutaneous implantable pump. Medtronic Synchromed-II pumps were implanted subcutaneously for intracerebral CED in pigs. Gadodiamide (28.7 mg/mL), with or without topotecan (136 μM), was infused at 0.7 mL/24 h for 3 or 10 days. Pigs underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and at 6 times points after surgery. Enhancement and FLAIR+ volumes were calculated in a semi-automated fashion. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy-based topotecan signature was also investigated. Brain histology was analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining and with immunoperoxidase for a microglial antigen. CED of topotecan/gadolinium was well tolerated in all cases (n = 6). Maximum enhancement volume was reached at day 3 and remained stable if CED was continued for 10 days, but it decreased if CED was stopped at day 3. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed a decrease in parenchymal metabolites in the presence of topotecan. Similarly, the combination of topotecan and gadolinium infusion led to a FLAIR+ volume that tended to be larger than that seen after the infusion of gadolinium alone. Histological analysis of the brains showed an area of macrophage infiltrate in the ipsilateral white matter upon infusion with topotecan/gadolinium. Intracerebral topotecan CED is well tolerated in a large animal brain for up to 10 days. Intracerebral long-term CED can be achieved with a subcutaneously implanted pump and provides a stable volume of distribution. This work constitutes a proof of principle for the safety and feasibility for prolonged CED, providing a means of continuous local drug delivery that is accessible to the practicing neuro-oncologist. PMID

  9. Prolonged intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery of topotecan with a subcutaneously implantable infusion pump

    PubMed Central

    Sonabend, Adam M.; Stuart, R. Morgan; Yun, Jonathan; Yanagihara, Ted; Mohajed, Hamed; Dashnaw, Steven; Bruce, Samuel S.; Brown, Truman; Romanov, Alex; Sebastian, Manu; Arias-Mendoza, Fernando; Bagiella, Emilia; Canoll, Peter; Bruce, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    Intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of chemotherapeutic agents currently requires an externalized catheter and infusion system, which limits its duration because of the need for hospitalization and the risk of infection. To evaluate the feasibility of prolonged topotecan administration by CED in a large animal brain with the use of a subcutaneous implantable pump. Medtronic Synchromed-II pumps were implanted subcutaneously for intracerebral CED in pigs. Gadodiamide (28.7 mg/mL), with or without topotecan (136 μM), was infused at 0.7 mL/24 h for 3 or 10 days. Pigs underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and at 6 times points after surgery. Enhancement and FLAIR+ volumes were calculated in a semi-automated fashion. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy-based topotecan signature was also investigated. Brain histology was analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining and with immunoperoxidase for a microglial antigen. CED of topotecan/gadolinium was well tolerated in all cases (n = 6). Maximum enhancement volume was reached at day 3 and remained stable if CED was continued for 10 days, but it decreased if CED was stopped at day 3. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed a decrease in parenchymal metabolites in the presence of topotecan. Similarly, the combination of topotecan and gadolinium infusion led to a FLAIR+ volume that tended to be larger than that seen after the infusion of gadolinium alone. Histological analysis of the brains showed an area of macrophage infiltrate in the ipsilateral white matter upon infusion with topotecan/gadolinium. Intracerebral topotecan CED is well tolerated in a large animal brain for up to 10 days. Intracerebral long-term CED can be achieved with a subcutaneously implanted pump and provides a stable volume of distribution. This work constitutes a proof of principle for the safety and feasibility for prolonged CED, providing a means of continuous local drug delivery that is accessible to the practicing neuro-oncologist. PMID

  10. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting with intracerebral hemorrhage in a patient with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Gentle Sunder; Poudyal, Bishesh Sharma; Sedain, Gopal; Mahmud, Khandokar Imran; Acharya, Niranja

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare type of hemolytic anemia, frequently associated with thrombophilia. PNH may rarely present with CVT. Approximately, one-third of the patients with CVT develop cerebral hemorrhage. Here, we present a rare combination of CVT presenting with intracerebral hemorrhage in a patient with PNH. High index of suspicion is needed to avoid misdiagnosis. Patient was successfully managed with anticoagulation therapy. PMID:27076714

  11. Relationship between atypical depression and social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Koyuncu, Ahmet; Ertekin, Erhan; Ertekin, Banu Aslantaş; Binbay, Zerrin; Yüksel, Cağrı; Deveci, Erdem; Tükel, Raşit

    2015-01-30

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of atypical and non-atypical depression comorbidity on the clinical characteristics and course of social anxiety disorder (SAD). A total of 247 patients with SAD were enrolled: 145 patients with a current depressive episode (unipolar or bipolar) with atypical features, 43 patients with a current depressive episode with non-atypical features and 25 patients without a lifetime history of depressive episodes were compared regarding sociodemographic and clinical features, comorbidity rates, and severity of SAD, depression and functional impairment. Thirty four patients with a past but not current history of major depressive episodes were excluded from the comparisons. 77.1% of current depressive episodes were associated with atypical features. Age at onset of SAD and age at initial major depressive episode were lower in the group with atypical depression than in the group with non-atypical depression. History of suicide attempts and bipolar disorder comorbidity was more common in the atypical depression group as well. Atypical depression group has higher SAD and depression severity and lower functionality than group with non-atypical depression. Our results indicate that the presence of atypical depression is associated with more severe symptoms and more impairment in functioning in patients with SAD. PMID:25454116

  12. Dipole localization using beamforming and RAP-MUSIC on simulated intracerebral recordings.

    PubMed

    Chang, N; Gotman, J; Gulrajani, R

    2004-01-01

    Interpreting intracerebral recordings in the search of an epileptic focus can be difficult because the amplitude of the potentials are misleading. Small generators located near the electrode site generate large potentials, which could swamp the signal of a nearby epileptic focus. In order to address this problem, two inverse problem algorithms, beamforming and recursively applied and projected multiple signal classification (RAP-MUSIC), were used with simulated intracerebral potentials to calculate equivalent dipole positions. Three dipoles were positioned in an infinite plane medium near three intracerebral electrodes. The potentials generated by the dipoles were simulated and contaminated with white noise. Initial localization simulations showed that both methods detected the sources accurately with RAP-MUSIC reporting lower orientation errors. A spatial resolution analysis for both methods was undertaken in which two dipoles were placed on a plane with the same orientation and overlapping time-courses. Beamforming was able to adequately distinguish the sources for separation distances of 1.2 cm, whereas RAP-MUSIC managed to separate the sources for dipoles as close as 0.4-0.6 cm. PMID:17271852

  13. An intra-cerebral abscess in a patient with Eisenmenger syndrome: An unusual case

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Allan; White, Mark A.J.; Gallo, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We present an unusual case where a large intra-cerebral abscess with severe complications was treated successfully with medical management alone in a patient with Eisenmenger syndrome. Presentation of case A 40 year old patient with Eisenmenger syndrome presented with a seven day history of headache, neck pain and intermittent vomiting and fever. The only neurological examination finding was blurred vision. MRI revealed a large left occipital lobe abscess, which subsequently ruptured into the lateral ventricle with associated ventriculitis and hydrocephalus. This complicated abscess was successfully treated with intravenous antibiotics alone, with complete resolution of the abscess and hydrocephalus on MRI at 13 months post-diagnosis. Discussion Patients with congenital cyanotic heart conditions, like Eisenmenger syndrome, are at increased risk of developing intra-cerebral abscesses. Effectively managing large abscesses with associated intra-ventricular rupture and hydrocephalus in these patients without any form of surgical intervention, including aspiration, is extremely rare. Conclusion Patients with congenital cyanotic heart disease who develop large intra-cerebral abscesses with severe complications, which would normally warrant surgical intervention, have the potential to be successfully treated with antibiotics alone with excellent outcome. PMID:26859871

  14. Application of intracerebral microdialysis to study regional distribution kinetics of drugs in rat brain.

    PubMed

    de Lange, E C; Bouw, M R; Mandema, J W; Danhof, M; de Boer, A G; Breimer, D D

    1995-11-01

    1. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether intracerebral microdialysis can be used for the assessment of local differences in drug concentrations within the brain. 2. Two transversal microdialysis probes were implanted in parallel into the frontal cortex of male Wistar rats, and used as a local infusion and detection device respectively. Within one rat, three different concentrations of atenolol or acetaminophen were infused in randomized order. By means of the detection probe, concentration-time profiles of the drug in the brain were measured at interprobe distances between 1 and 2 mm. 3. Drug concentrations were found to be dependent on the drug as well as on the interprobe distance. It was found that the outflow concentration from the detection probe decreased with increasing lateral spacing between the probes and this decay was much steeper for acetaminophen than for atenolol. A model was developed which allows estimation of kbp/Deff (transfer coefficient from brain to blood/effective diffusion coefficient in brain extracellular fluid), which was considerably larger for the more lipohilic drug, acetaminophen. In addition, in vivo recovery values for both drugs were determined. 4. The results show that intracerebral microdialysis is able to detect local differences in drug concentrations following infusion into the brain. Furthermore, the potential use of intracerebral microdialysis to obtain pharmacokinetic parameters of drug distribution in brain by means of monitoring local concentrations of drugs in time is demonstrated. PMID:8581296

  15. Comparison of the x-ray attenuation properties of breast calcifications, aluminium, hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.; Mackenzie, A.; Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.

    2013-04-01

    Aluminium is often used as a substitute material for calcifications in phantom measurements in mammography. Additionally, calcium oxalate, hydroxyapatite and aluminium are used in simulation studies. This assumes that these materials have similar attenuation properties to calcification, and this assumption is examined in this work. Sliced mastectomy samples containing calcification were imaged at ×5 magnification using a digital specimen cabinet. Images of the individual calcifications were extracted, and the diameter and contrast of each calculated. The thicknesses of aluminium required to achieve the same contrast as each calcification when imaged under the same conditions were calculated using measurements of the contrast of aluminium foils. As hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate are also used to simulate calcifications, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses of these materials were also calculated using tabulated attenuation coefficients. On average the equivalent aluminium thickness was 0.85 times the calcification diameter. For calcium oxalate and hydroxyapatite, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses were 1.01 and 2.19 times the thickness of these materials respectively. Aluminium and calcium oxalate are suitable substitute materials for calcifications. Hydroxyapatite is much more attenuating than the calcifications and aluminium. Using solid hydroxyapatite as a substitute for calcification of the same size would lead to excessive contrast in the mammographic image.

  16. Comparison of the x-ray attenuation properties of breast calcifications, aluminium, hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate.

    PubMed

    Warren, L M; Mackenzie, A; Dance, D R; Young, K C

    2013-04-01

    Aluminium is often used as a substitute material for calcifications in phantom measurements in mammography. Additionally, calcium oxalate, hydroxyapatite and aluminium are used in simulation studies. This assumes that these materials have similar attenuation properties to calcification, and this assumption is examined in this work. Sliced mastectomy samples containing calcification were imaged at ×5 magnification using a digital specimen cabinet. Images of the individual calcifications were extracted, and the diameter and contrast of each calculated. The thicknesses of aluminium required to achieve the same contrast as each calcification when imaged under the same conditions were calculated using measurements of the contrast of aluminium foils. As hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate are also used to simulate calcifications, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses of these materials were also calculated using tabulated attenuation coefficients. On average the equivalent aluminium thickness was 0.85 times the calcification diameter. For calcium oxalate and hydroxyapatite, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses were 1.01 and 2.19 times the thickness of these materials respectively. Aluminium and calcium oxalate are suitable substitute materials for calcifications. Hydroxyapatite is much more attenuating than the calcifications and aluminium. Using solid hydroxyapatite as a substitute for calcification of the same size would lead to excessive contrast in the mammographic image. PMID:23470559

  17. Atherosclerotic Calcification Detection: A Comparative Study of Carotid Ultrasound and Cone Beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Jashari, Fisnik; Ibrahimi, Pranvera; Johansson, Elias; Ahlqvist, Jan; Arnerlöv, Conny; Garoff, Maria; Levring Jäghagen, Eva; Wester, Per; Henein, Michael Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: Arterial calcification is often detected on ultrasound examination but its diagnostic accuracy is not well validated. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of carotid ultrasound B mode findings in detecting atherosclerotic calcification quantified by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods: We analyzed 94 carotid arteries, from 88 patients (mean age 70 ± 7 years, 33% females), who underwent pre-endarterectomy ultrasound examination. Plaques with high echogenic nodules and posterior shadowing were considered calcified. After surgery, the excised plaques were examined using CBCT, from which the calcification volume (mm3) was calculated. In cases with multiple calcifications the largest calcification nodule volume was used to represent the plaque. Carotid artery calcification by the two imaging techniques was compared using conventional correlations. Results: Carotid ultrasound was highly accurate in detecting the presence of calcification; with a sensitivity of 88.2%. Based on the quartile ranges of calcification volumes measured by CBCT we have divided plaque calcification into four groups: <8; 8–35; 36–70 and >70 mm3. Calcification volumes ≥8 were accurately detectable by ultrasound with a sensitivity of 96%. Of the 21 plaques with <8 mm3 calcification volume; only 13 were detected by ultrasound; resulting in a sensitivity of 62%. There was no difference in the volume of calcification between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Conclusion: Carotid ultrasound is highly accurate in detecting the presence of calcified atherosclerotic lesions of volume ≥8 mm3; but less accurate in detecting smaller volume calcified plaques. Further development of ultrasound techniques should allow better detection of early arterial calcification. PMID:26307978

  18. Coccolithophore calcification response to past ocean acidification and climate change

    PubMed Central

    O’Dea, Sarah A.; Gibbs, Samantha J.; Bown, Paul R.; Young, Jeremy R.; Poulton, Alex J.; Newsam, Cherry; Wilson, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions are forcing rapid ocean chemistry changes and causing ocean acidification (OA), which is of particular significance for calcifying organisms, including planktonic coccolithophores. Detailed analysis of coccolithophore skeletons enables comparison of calcite production in modern and fossil cells in order to investigate biomineralization response of ancient coccolithophores to climate change. Here we show that the two dominant coccolithophore taxa across the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) OA global warming event (~56 million years ago) exhibited morphological response to environmental change and both showed reduced calcification rates. However, only Coccolithus pelagicus exhibits a transient thinning of coccoliths, immediately before the PETM, that may have been OA-induced. Changing coccolith thickness may affect calcite production more significantly in the dominant modern species Emiliania huxleyi, but, overall, these PETM records indicate that the environmental factors that govern taxonomic composition and growth rate will most strongly influence coccolithophore calcification response to anthropogenic change. PMID:25399967

  19. [The secret of the pyramids ... or calcifications in Meckel's diverticulum].

    PubMed

    Desmonts, F; Convard, J P; Capdeville, R; Berthelot, G

    1987-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 59 year-old patient with numerous stratified stercoliths within a large Meckel's diverticulum. An abdominal X-ray without contrast material, done while the patient was in acute abdominal pain showed a liquid-density mass. The diagnosis was considered because of the presence, within the mass, of a fluid level and several unusual calcifications. Ultrasound ruled out a gall-bladder or urinary origin. Surgical excision of the mass confirmed the diagnosis; the X-ray of the specimen allowed a comparison with the previous abdominal X-rays. The authors review the literature on the subject and suggest a gamut for the differential diagnosis of stratified calcifications of the abdomen. PMID:3612618

  20. Toward automated detection and segmentation of aortic calcifications from radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauze, François; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2007-03-01

    This paper aims at automatically measuring the extent of calcified plaques in the lumbar aorta from standard radiographs. Calcifications in the abdominal aorta are an important predictor for future cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Accurate and reproducible measurement of the amount of calcified deposit in the aorta is therefore of great value in disease diagnosis and prognosis, treatment planning, and the study of drug effects. We propose a two-step approach in which first the calcifications are detected by an iterative statistical pixel classification scheme combined with aorta shape model optimization. Subsequently, the detected calcified pixels are used as the initialization for an inpainting based segmentation. We present results on synthetic images from the inpainting based segmentation as well as results on several X-ray images based on the two-steps approach.

  1. Prenatal ultrasonographic diagnosis of generalized arterial calcification of infancy.

    PubMed

    Corbacioglu Esmer, Aytul; Kalelioglu, Ibrahim; Omeroglu, Rukiye Eker; Kayserili, Hulya; Gulluoglu, Mine; Has, Recep; Yuksel, Atıl

    2015-01-01

    A healthy 19-year-old nulliparous pregnant woman was referred to our clinic because of fetal pericardial effusion and ascites. The sonographic examination performed at 28 weeks' gestation revealed scalp edema, severe skin edema, bilateral hydrocele, ascites, and pleural and pericardial effusion. Fetal echocardiographic examination showed that both ventricles were dilated with severely depressed contractility. The aortic annulus, ascending aorta, aortic arch, descending aorta, common iliac arteries, main pulmonary artery, tricuspid valve, and mitral chordae tendinae were hyperechogenic. Right ventricular outflow tract was narrow with decreased blood flow. There was tricuspid and mitral valve regurgitation and tricuspid valve stenosis. On the basis of these findings, we made the diagnosis of generalized arterial calcification, which is characterized by extensive calcification of internal elastic lamina and intimal proliferation of medium-sized and large arteries. This diagnosis was confirmed histologically after the termination of pregnancy. PMID:24420383

  2. Coccolithophore calcification response to past ocean acidification and climate change.

    PubMed

    O'Dea, Sarah A; Gibbs, Samantha J; Bown, Paul R; Young, Jeremy R; Poulton, Alex J; Newsam, Cherry; Wilson, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions are forcing rapid ocean chemistry changes and causing ocean acidification (OA), which is of particular significance for calcifying organisms, including planktonic coccolithophores. Detailed analysis of coccolithophore skeletons enables comparison of calcite production in modern and fossil cells in order to investigate biomineralization response of ancient coccolithophores to climate change. Here we show that the two dominant coccolithophore taxa across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) OA global warming event (~56 million years ago) exhibited morphological response to environmental change and both showed reduced calcification rates. However, only Coccolithus pelagicus exhibits a transient thinning of coccoliths, immediately before the PETM, that may have been OA-induced. Changing coccolith thickness may affect calcite production more significantly in the dominant modern species Emiliania huxleyi, but, overall, these PETM records indicate that the environmental factors that govern taxonomic composition and growth rate will most strongly influence coccolithophore calcification response to anthropogenic change. PMID:25399967

  3. Low Florida coral calcification rates in the Plio-Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachert, T. C.; Reuter, M.; Krüger, S.; Klaus, J. S.; Helmle, K.; Lough, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    In geological outcrops and drill cores from reef frameworks, the skeletons of scleractinian corals are usually leached and more or less completely transformed into sparry calcite because the highly porous skeletons formed of metastable aragonite (CaCO3) undergo rapid diagenetic alteration. Upon alteration, ghost structures of the distinct annual growth bands may be retained allowing for reconstructions of annual extension (= growth) rates, but information on skeletal density needed for reconstructions of calcification rates is invariably lost. Here we report the first data of calcification rates of fossil reef corals which escaped diagenetic alteration. The corals derive from unlithified shallow water carbonates of the Florida platform (southeastern USA), which formed during four interglacial sea level highstands dated 3.2, 2.9, 1.8, and 1.2 Ma in the mid Pliocene to early Pleistocene. With regard to the preservation, the coral skeletons display smooth growth surfaces with minor volumes of marine aragonite cement within intra-skeletal porosity. Within the skeletal structures, dissolution is minor along centers of calcification. Mean extension rates were 0.44 ± 0.19 cm yr-1 (range 0.16 to 0.86 cm yr-1) and mean bulk density was 0.86 ± 0.36 g cm-3 (range 0.55 to 1.22 g cm-3). Correspondingly, calcification rates ranged from 0.18 to 0.82 g cm-2 yr-1 (mean 0.38 ± 0.16 g cm-2 yr-1), values which are 50 % of modern shallow-water reef corals. To understand the possible mechanisms behind these low calcification rates, we compared the fossil calcification with modern zooxanthellate-coral (z-coral) rates from the Western Atlantic (WA) and Indo-Pacific (IP) calibrated against sea surface temperature (SST). In the fossil data, we found an analogous relationship with SST in z-corals from the WA, i.e. density increases and extension rate decreases with increasing SST, but over a significantly larger temperature window during the Plio-Pleistocene. With regard to the

  4. Low Florida coral calcification rates in the Plio-Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachert, Thomas C.; Reuter, Markus; Krüger, Stefan; Klaus, James S.; Helmle, Kevin; Lough, Janice M.

    2016-08-01

    In geological outcrops and drill cores from reef frameworks, the skeletons of scleractinian corals are usually leached and more or less completely transformed into sparry calcite because the highly porous skeletons formed of metastable aragonite (CaCO3) undergo rapid diagenetic alteration. Upon alteration, ghost structures of the distinct annual growth bands often allow for reconstructions of annual extension ( = growth) rates, but information on skeletal density needed for reconstructions of calcification rates is invariably lost. This report presents the bulk density, extension rates and calcification rates of fossil reef corals which underwent minor diagenetic alteration only. The corals derive from unlithified shallow water carbonates of the Florida platform (south-eastern USA), which formed during four interglacial sea level highstands dated approximately 3.2, 2.9, 1.8, and 1.2 Ma in the mid-Pliocene to early Pleistocene. With regard to the preservation, the coral skeletons display smooth growth surfaces with minor volumes of marine aragonite cement within intra-skeletal porosity. Within the skeletal structures, voids are commonly present along centres of calcification which lack secondary cements. Mean extension rates were 0.44 ± 0.19 cm yr-1 (range 0.16 to 0.86 cm yr-1), mean bulk density was 0.96 ± 0.36 g cm-3 (range 0.55 to 1.83 g cm-3) and calcification rates ranged from 0.18 to 0.82 g cm-2 yr-1 (mean 0.38 ± 0.16 g cm-2 yr-1), values which are 50 % of modern shallow-water reef corals. To understand the possible mechanisms behind these low calcification rates, we compared the fossil calcification rates with those of modern zooxanthellate corals (z corals) from the Western Atlantic (WA) and Indo-Pacific calibrated against sea surface temperature (SST). In the fossil data, we found a widely analogous relationship with SST in z corals from the WA, i.e. density increases and extension rate decreases with increasing SST, but over a significantly larger

  5. Stone formation and calcification by nanobacteria in the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftcioglu, Neva; Bjorklund, Michael; Kajander, E. Olavi

    1998-07-01

    The formation of discrete and organized inorganic crystalline structures within macromolecular extracellular matrices is a widespread biological phenomenon generally referred to as biomineralization. Recently, bacteria have been implicated as factors in biogeochemical cycles for formation of many minerals in aqueous sediments. We have found nanobacterial culture systems that allow for reproducible production of apatite calcification in vitro. Depending on the culture conditions, tiny nanocolloid-sized particles covered with apatite, forming various size of aggregates and stones were observed. In this study, we detected the presence of nanobacteria in demineralized trilobit fossil, geode, apatite, and calcite stones by immunofluorescence staining. Amethyst and other quartz stones, and chalk gave negative results. Microorganisms are capable of depositing apatite outside the thermodynamic equilibrium in sea water. We bring now evidence that this occurs in the human body as well. Previously, only struvite kidney stones composed of magnesium ammonium phosphate and small amounts of apatite have been regarded as bacteria related. 90 percent of demineralized human kidney stones now screened, contained nanobacteria. At least three different distribution patterns of nanobacteria were conditions, and human kidney stones that are formed from small apatite units. Prerequisites for the formation of kidney stones are the supersaturation of urine and presence of nidi for crystallization. Nanobacteria are important nidi and their presence might be of special interest in space flights where supersaturation of urine is present due to the loss of bone. Furthermore, we bring evidence that nanobacteria may act as crystallization nidi for the formation of biogenic apatite structures in tissue calcification found in e.g., atherosclerotic plaques, extensive metastatic and tumoral calcification, acute periarthritis, malacoplakia, and malignant diseases. In nanaobacteria-infected fibroblasts

  6. Vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease: Pathogenesis and clinical implication

    PubMed Central

    Disthabanchong, Sinee

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Vascular calcification (VC) is one of the independent risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular mortality in both the general population and CKD patients. Earlier evidence revealed substantially higher prevalence of VC in young adults on chronic hemodialysis compared to the general population in the same age range, indicating the influence of CKD-related risk factors on the development of VC. Pathogenesis of VC involves an active, highly organized cellular transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells to bone forming cells evidenced by the presence of bone matrix proteins in the calcified arterial wall. VC occurs in both the intima and the media of arterial wall with medial calcification being more prevalent in CKD. In addition to traditional cardiovascular risks, risk factors specific to CKD such as phosphate retention, excess of calcium, history of dialysis, active vitamin D therapy in high doses and deficiency of calcification inhibitors play important roles in promoting the development of VC. Non-contrast multi-slice computed tomography has often been used to detect coronary artery calcification. Simple plain radiographs of the lateral lumbar spine and pelvis can also detect VC in the abdominal aorta and femoral and iliac arteries. Currently, there is no specific therapy to reverse VC. Reduction of calcium load, lowering phosphate retention using non-calcium containing phosphate binders, and moderate doses of active vitamin D may attenuate progression. Parenteral sodium thiosulfate has also been shown to delay VC progression. PMID:24175241

  7. Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia Secondary to Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Niwant, Premeshwar; Motwani, Mukta; Naik, Sushil

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a disorder of the fifth cranial nerve that causes episodes of intense, stabbing, electric shock-like pain that lasts from few seconds to few minutes in the areas of the face where the branches of the nerve are distributed. More than one nerve branch can be affected by the disorder. We report an unusual case of trigeminal neuralgia affecting right side of face presenting atypical features of neuralgia and not responding to the usual course of treatment. The magnetic resonance imaging study of brain revealed a large extra-axial mass involving right cerebellopontine angle region causing moderate pressure effect on trigeminal nerve and brain stem. The aim of this case report is to show a tumor of cerebellopontine angle, presenting clinically as atypical trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:26664753

  8. Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia Secondary to Meningioma.

    PubMed

    Niwant, Premeshwar; Motwani, Mukta; Naik, Sushil

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a disorder of the fifth cranial nerve that causes episodes of intense, stabbing, electric shock-like pain that lasts from few seconds to few minutes in the areas of the face where the branches of the nerve are distributed. More than one nerve branch can be affected by the disorder. We report an unusual case of trigeminal neuralgia affecting right side of face presenting atypical features of neuralgia and not responding to the usual course of treatment. The magnetic resonance imaging study of brain revealed a large extra-axial mass involving right cerebellopontine angle region causing moderate pressure effect on trigeminal nerve and brain stem. The aim of this case report is to show a tumor of cerebellopontine angle, presenting clinically as atypical trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:26664753

  9. Consideration of coastal carbonate chemistry in understanding biological calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbender, Andrea J.; Sabine, Christopher L.; Feifel, Kirsten M.

    2016-05-01

    Correlations between aragonite saturation state (ΩAr) and calcification have been identified in many laboratory manipulation experiments aiming to assess biological responses to ocean acidification (OA). These relationships have been used with projections of ΩAr under continued OA to evaluate potential impacts on marine calcifiers. Recent work suggests, however, that calcification in some species may be controlled by the ratio of bicarbonate to hydrogen ion, or the substrate-to-inhibitor ratio (SIR), rather than ΩAr. SIR and ΩAr are not always positively correlated in the natural environment, which means that ΩAr can be a poor indicator of the calcifying environment when ΩAr->1. Highly variable carbonate chemistry in the coastal zone challenges our ability to monitor fluctuations in ΩAr, SIR, and the ΩAr-SIR relationship making it difficult to assess biological OA exposures and vulnerability. Careful consideration of natural variability throughout ocean environments is required to accurately determine the influence of OA on biological calcification.

  10. An Integrative Predictive Model of Coronary Artery Calcification in Arteriosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    McGeachie, Michael; Ramoni, Rachel L Badovinac; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Furie, Karen L; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M.; Liu, Yongmei; Herrington, David; Guo, Xiuqing; Lima, João A.; Post, Wendy; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rich, Stephen; Sale, Michèle; Ramoni, Marco F.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many different genetic and clinical factors have been identified as causes or contributors to atherosclerosis. We present a model of preclinical atherosclerosis based on genetic and clinical data that predicts the presence of coronary artery calcification in healthy Americans of European descent aged 45 to 84 in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Methods and Results: We assessed 712 individuals for the presence or absence of coronary artery calcification, and their genotypes for 2882 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Using these SNPs and relevant clinical data, a Bayesian network that predicts the presence of coronary calcification was constructed. The model contains 13 SNPs (from genes AGTR1, ALOX15, INSR, PRKAB1, IL1R2, ESR2, KCNK1, FBLN5, PPARA, VEGFA, PON1, TDRD6, PLA2G7, and one ancestry informative marker) and 5 clinical variables (sex, age, weight, smoking, and diabetes) and achieves 85% predictive accuracy, as measured by area under the ROC curve (AUC). This is a significant (p < 0.001) improvement upon models using just the SNP data or using just the clinical variables. Conclusions: We present an investigation of joint genetic and clinical factors associated with atherosclerosis that shows predictive results for both cases, and enhanced performance for the combination. PMID:19948975

  11. [Pathogenesis and treatment of vascular calcification in CKD].

    PubMed

    Brancaccio, D; Gallieni, M; Pasho, S; Fallabrino, G; Olivi, L; Volpi, E; Ciceri, P; Missaglia, E; Ronga, C; Brambilla, C; Butti, A; Rocca-Rey, L; Chiarelli, G; Cozzolino, M

    2009-01-01

    Increased vascular calcification is a major cause of cardiovascular events in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is the result of an active ossification process counteracted by ''bone'' proteins such as osteopontin, alkaline phosphatase, osteoprotegerin, and osteocalcin. Chronic kidney disease - mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is a systemic disorder of mineral and bone metabolism that occurs in CKD. In addition to abnormalities in the serum calcium and phosphate profile, CKD-MBD is characterized by abnormalities of bone turnover, mineralization, volume and growth as well as vascular calcification. Considering that the presence and extent of vascular calcification in CKD portend a poor prognosis, many efforts have been made to shed light on this complicated phenomenon to prevent vascular calcium deposition and its progression. Indeed, careful control of calcium load, serum phosphate and parathyroid hormone along with the use of calcium-free phosphate binders and vitamin D receptor activators represent a new therapeutic armamentarium to improve quality of life and reduce mortality in CKD. PMID:19382090

  12. Peripheral arterial calcification: Prevalence, mechanism, detection, and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Singh, Krishna J; Zeller, Thomas; Jaff, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC), particularly medial (Mönckeberg's medial sclerosis) arterial calcification, is common in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms and genetic pathways of VC are not fully known, hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and the suppression of parathyroid hormone activity are central to the development of vessel mineralization and, consequently, bone demineralization. In addition to preventive measures, such as the modification of atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk factors, current treatment strategies include the use of calcium-free phosphate binders, vitamin D analogs, and calcium mimetics that have shown promising results, albeit in small patient cohorts. The impact of intimal and medial VC on the safety and effectiveness of endovascular devices to treat symptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remains poorly defined. The absence of a generally accepted, validated vascular calcium grading scale hampers clinical progress in assessing the safety and utility of various endovascular devices (e.g., atherectomy) in treating calcified vessels. Accordingly, we propose the peripheral arterial calcium scoring system (PACSS) and a method for its clinical validation. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of vascular calcification and the development of optimal medical and endovascular treatment strategies are crucial as the population ages and presents with more chronic comorbidities. PMID:24402839

  13. In vitro Models of Aortic Valve Calcification: Solidifying a System

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, Meghan A.; Merryman, W. David

    2014-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) affects 25% of people over 65, and the late-stage stenotic state can only be treated with total valve replacement, requiring 85,000 surgeries annually in the US alone [1]. As CAVD is an age-related disease, many of the affected patients are unable to undergo the open-chest surgery that is its only current cure. This challenge motivates the elucidation of the mechanisms involved in calcification, with the eventual goal of alternative preventative and therapeutic strategies. There is no sufficient animal model of CAVD, so we turn to potential in vitro models. In general, in vitro models have the advantages of shortened experiment time and better control over multiple variables compared to in vivo models. As with all models, the hypothesis being tested dictates the most important characteristics of the in vivo physiology to recapitulate. Here, we collate the relevant pieces of designing and evaluating aortic valve calcification so that investigators can more effectively draw significant conclusions from their results. PMID:25249188

  14. ARTHROSCOPY FOR TREATMENT OF REFRACTORY CALCIFIC TENDONITIS OF THE SHOULDER

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marcos Rassi; Fernandes, Rui José

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results from arthroscopic treatment in patients with calcific tendonitis of the shoulder. Methods: Between September 2001 and June 2006, 55 patients with calcific tendonitis of the shoulder that was resistant to conservative treatment were evaluated, with follow-up of 12 to 70 months. The mean age was 42 years, ranging from 30 to 64 years; 44 patients were female (80%). There were 37 right shoulders, and 63.63% of the cases were on the dominant side. Pain was the main symptom, and the mean time between onset of symptoms and arthroscopy was 38 months (range: five to 120 months). The tendon affected was the supraspinatus in 42 cases, the infraspinatus in 11 cases and an association between these in two cases. Acromioplasty was carried out in 12 patients (21.82%) and subacromial bursectomy was performed in all cases. Results: According to the UCLA criteria, 46 cases were excellent and six were good, making a total of 52 satisfactory results (94.54%). Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment of calcific tendonitis of the shoulder appears to be an effective method, with high rates of satisfactory results. Associated acromioplasty is not necessary. PMID:27019839

  15. Osteoprotegerin and Vascular Calcification: Clinical and Prognostic Relevance.

    PubMed

    Makarović, Sandra; Makarović, Zorin; Steiner, Robert; Mihaljević, Ivan; Milas-Ahić, Jasminka

    2015-06-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a key regulator in bone metabolism, that also has effect in vascular system. Studies suggest that osteoprotegerin is a critical arterial calcification inhibitor, and is released by endothelial cells as a protective mechanism for their survival in certain pathological conditions, such as diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and other metabolic disorders. That has been shown in studies in vitro and in animal models. The discovery that OPG deficient mice (OPG -/- mice) develop severe osteoporosis and arterial calcification, has led to conclusion that osteoprotegerin might be mulecule linking vascular and bone system. Paradoxically however, clinical trials have shown recently that OPG serum levels is increased in coronary artery disease and correlates with its severity, ischemic cardial decompensation, and future cardiovascular events. Therefore it is possible that osteoprotegerin could have a new function as a potential biomarker in early identification and monitoring patients with cardiovascular disease. Amongst that osteoprotegerin is in association with well known atherosclerosis risc factors: undoubtedly it is proven its relationship with age, smoking and diabetes mellitus. There is evidence regarding presence of hyperlipoproteinemia and increased serum levels of osteoprotegerin. Also the researches have been directed in genetic level, linking certain single nucleotid genetic polymorphisms of osteoprotegerin and vascular calcification appearance. This review emphasises multifactorial role of OPG, presenting numerous clinical and experimental studies regarding its role in vascular pathology, suggesting a novel biomarker in cardiovascular diseases, showing latest conclusions about this interesting topic that needs to be further explored. PMID:26753467

  16. Calcification provides mechanical reinforcement to whale baleen α-keratin

    PubMed Central

    Szewciw, L. J.; de Kerckhove, D. G.; Grime, G. W.; Fudge, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    Hard α-keratins such as hair, nail, wool and horn are stiff epidermal appendages used by mammals in a variety of functions including thermoregulation, feeding and intraspecific competition. Hard α-keratins are fibre-reinforced structures consisting of cytoskeletal elements known as ‘intermediate filaments’ embedded in an amorphous protein matrix. Recent research has shown that intermediate filaments are soft and extensible in living keratinocytes but become far stiffer and less extensible in keratinized cells, and this stiffening may be mediated by air-drying. Baleen, the keratinous plates used by baleen whales during filter feeding, is an unusual mammalian keratin in that it never air dries, and in some species, it represents the most heavily calcified of all the hard α-keratins. We therefore tested the hypothesis that whale baleen is stiffened by calcification. Here, we provide, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive description of baleen material properties and show that calcification contributes to overcoming the shortcomings of stiffening this hard α-keratin without the benefit of air-drying. We also demonstrate striking interspecies differences in the calcification patterns among three species of baleen whales and provide novel insights into the function and evolution of this unusual biomaterial. PMID:20392736

  17. Reduced calcification in modern Southern Ocean planktonic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Andrew D.; Howard, William R.; Bray, Stephen G.; Trull, Thomas W.

    2009-04-01

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide has been accumulating in the oceans, lowering both the concentration of carbonate ions and the pH (ref. 1), resulting in the acidification of sea water. Previous laboratory experiments have shown that decreased carbonate ion concentrations cause many marine calcareous organisms to show reduced calcification rates. If these results are widely applicable to ocean settings, ocean acidification could lead to ecosystem shifts. Planktonic foraminifera are single-celled calcite-secreting organisms that represent between 25 and 50% of the total open-ocean marine carbonate flux and influence the transport of organic carbon to the ocean interior. Here we compare the shell weights of the modern foraminifer Globigerina bulloides collected from sediment traps in the Southern Ocean with the weights of shells preserved in the underlying Holocene-aged sediments. We find that modern shell weights are 30-35% lower than those from the sediments, consistent with reduced calcification today induced by ocean acidification. We also find a link between higher atmospheric carbon dioxide and low shell weights in a 50,000-year-long record obtained from a Southern Ocean marine sediment core. It is unclear whether reduced calcification will affect the survival of this and other species, but a decline in the abundance of foraminifera caused by acidification could affect both marine ecosystems and the oceanic uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  18. In vitro models of aortic valve calcification: solidifying a system.

    PubMed

    Bowler, Meghan A; Merryman, W David

    2015-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) affects 25% of people over 65, and the late-stage stenotic state can only be treated with total valve replacement, requiring 85,000 surgeries annually in the US alone (University of Maryland Medical Center, 2013, http://umm.edu/programs/services/heart-center-programs/cardiothoracic-surgery/valve-surgery/facts). As CAVD is an age-related disease, many of the affected patients are unable to undergo the open-chest surgery that is its only current cure. This challenge motivates the elucidation of the mechanisms involved in calcification, with the eventual goal of alternative preventative and therapeutic strategies. There is no sufficient animal model of CAVD, so we turn to potential in vitro models. In general, in vitro models have the advantages of shortened experiment time and better control over multiple variables compared to in vivo models. As with all models, the hypothesis being tested dictates the most important characteristics of the in vivo physiology to recapitulate. Here, we collate the relevant pieces of designing and evaluating aortic valve calcification so that investigators can more effectively draw significant conclusions from their results. PMID:25249188

  19. Atypical ductal hyperplasia: interobserver and intraobserver variability.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rohit K; Mehta, Rutika; Dimitrov, Rosen; Larsson, Lisbeth G; Musto, Paul M; Hodges, Kurt B; Ulbright, Thomas M; Hattab, Eyas M; Agaram, Narasimhan; Idrees, Muhammad T; Badve, Sunil

    2011-07-01

    Interobserver reproducibility in the diagnosis of benign intraductal proliferative lesions has been poor. The aims of the study were to investigate the inter- and intraobserver variability and the impact of the addition of an immunostain for high- and low-molecular weight keratins on the variability. Nine pathologists reviewed 81 cases of breast proliferative lesions in three stages and assigned each of the lesions to one of the following three diagnoses: usual ductal hyperplasia, atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ. Hematoxylin and eosin slides and corresponding slides stained with ADH-5 cocktail (cytokeratins (CK) 5, 14. 7, 18 and p63) by immunohistochemistry were evaluated. Concordance was evaluated at each stage of the study. The interobserver agreement among the nine pathologists for diagnosing the 81 proliferative breast lesions was fair (κ-value=0.34). The intraobserver κ-value ranged from 0.56 to 0.88 (moderate to strong). Complete agreement among nine pathologists was achieved in only nine (11%) cases, at least eight agreed in 20 (25%) cases and seven or more agreed in 38 (47%) cases. Following immunohistochemical stain, a significant improvement in the interobserver concordance (overall κ-value=0.50) was observed (P=0.015). There was a significant reduction in the total number of atypical ductal hyperplasia diagnosis made by nine pathologists after the use of ADH-5 immunostain. Atypical ductal hyperplasia still remains a diagnostic dilemma with wide variation in both inter- and intraobserver reproducibility among pathologists. The addition of an immunohistochemical stain led to a significant improvement in the concordance rate. More importantly, there was an 8% decrease in the number of lesions classified as atypical ductal hyperplasia in favor of usual hyperplasia; in clinical practice, this could lead to a decrease in the number of surgeries carried out for intraductal proliferative lesions. PMID:21532546

  20. Atypical cases of Dowling-Degos disease.

    PubMed

    Naveen, Kikkeri Narayanshetty; Athaniker, Sharatchandra B; Hegde, Spandana P; Shetty, Rahul; Radha, Hanumanthayya; Parinitha, Sadashivappa Sangam

    2016-01-01

    Dowling-Degos disease (DDD) is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterized by multiple, small, round pigmented macules usually arranged in reticular pattern, chiefly distributed in axillae and groins. Here we are reporting three atypical cases of DDD in a family. They had hypopigmented macules with typical features of DDD indicating generalized DDD. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis. We present these three cases to stress the existence of generalized DDD phenotype in the Indian population. PMID:27057490

  1. [Persistent idiopathic facial pain and atypical odontalgia].

    PubMed

    Gaul, Charly; Ettlin, Dominik; Pfau, Doreen B

    2013-01-01

    The terms 'persistent idiopathic facial pain' (PIFP) and 'atypical odontalgia' (AO) are currently used as exclusion diagnoses for chronic toothache and chronic facial pain. Knowledge about these pain conditions in medical and dental practices is of crucial importance for the prevention of iatrogenic tissue damage by not-indicated invasive interventions, such as endodontic treatment and tooth extraction. In the present paper, etiology and pathogenesis, differential diagnostic criteria, and diagnostic approaches will be explained and relevant therapeutic principles will be outlined. PMID:23916270

  2. Aggressive papillary adenocarcinoma on atypical localization

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Mecdi Gurhan; Tayfur, Mahir; Deger, Ayse Nur; Cimen, Orhan; Eken, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Aggressive digital papillary adenocarcinoma (ADPA) is a rare sweat gland tumor that is found on the fingers, toes, and the digits. To date, <100 cases have been reported in the literature. Apart from 1 case reported in the thigh, all of them were on digital or nondigital acral skin. Case presentation: A 67-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to the hospital due to a mass on the scalp. This lesion was present for almost a year. It was a semimobile cyctic mass that elevated the scalp. There was no change in the skin color. Its dimensions were 1.5 × 1 × 0.6 cm. The laboratory, clinic, and radiologic findings (head x-ray) of the patient were normal. It was evaluated as a benign lesion such as lipoma or epidermal cyst by a surgeon due to a small semimobile mass and no erosion of the skull. It was excised by a local surgery excision. The result of the pathologic examination was aggressive papillary adenocarcinoma. This diagnosis is synonymous with ADPA. Conclusion: In our case, localization was scalp. This localization is the first for this tumor in the literature. In addition, another atypical localization of this tumor (ADPA) is thigh in the literature. This case was presented due to both the rare and atypical localizations. That is why, in our opinion, revision of “digital” term in ADPA is necessary due to seem in atypical localizations like thigh and scalp. PMID:27428196

  3. Massive Diffuse Calcification of the Ascending Aorta and Minimal Focal Calcification of the Abdominal Aorta in Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Roberts, William C; Won, Vera S; Weissenborn, Matthew R; Khalid, Adnan; Lima, Brian

    2016-04-15

    A 41-year-old woman, the mother of 3 offspring, with likely heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, had been asymptomatic until age 38 when angina pectoris and exertional dyspnea appeared leading to the discovery of severe multivessel coronary artery disease and a massively calcified ascending aorta. Coronary bypass grafting using the right and left internal mammary arteries did not alleviate the symptoms. Evidence of overt heart failure subsequently appeared and that led to heart transplantation at age 41. She died 22 days later. The occurrence of massive diffuse calcification of the ascending aorta and minimal focal calcification of the abdominal aorta is rare and in the patient described it appears to be the consequence of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26920080

  4. Decrease in coccolithophore calcification and CO2 since the middle Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Clara T.; Hernández-Sánchez, María T.; Fuertes, Miguel-Ángel; González-Lemos, Saúl; Abrevaya, Lorena; Mendez-Vicente, Ana; Flores, José-Abel; Probert, Ian; Giosan, Liviu; Johnson, Joel; Stoll, Heather M.

    2016-01-01

    Marine algae are instrumental in carbon cycling and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) regulation. One group, coccolithophores, uses carbon to photosynthesize and to calcify, covering their cells with chalk platelets (coccoliths). How ocean acidification influences coccolithophore calcification is strongly debated, and the effects of carbonate chemistry changes in the geological past are poorly understood. This paper relates degree of coccolith calcification to cellular calcification, and presents the first records of size-normalized coccolith thickness spanning the last 14 Myr from tropical oceans. Degree of calcification was highest in the low-pH, high-CO2 Miocene ocean, but decreased significantly between 6 and 4 Myr ago. Based on this and concurrent trends in a new alkenone εp record, we propose that decreasing CO2 partly drove the observed trend via reduced cellular bicarbonate allocation to calcification. This trend reversed in the late Pleistocene despite low CO2, suggesting an additional regulator of calcification such as alkalinity.

  5. Diffuse Hepatic Calcifications in a Transfusion-Dependent Patient with Beta-Thalassemia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Saki, Forough; Bordbar, Mohammad Reza; Imanieh, Mohammad Hadi; Karimi, Mehran

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic calcification is usually associated with infectious, vascular, or neoplastic processes in the liver. We report the first case of beta-thalassemia major with isolated diffuse hepatic calcification in a 23 year old woman, who had been transfusion-dependent since the age of 6 months. She was referred to our center with a chief complaint of abdominal pain. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed diffuse hepatic calcification in the right, left, and caudate lobes of the liver. Her medical history disclosed hypoparathyroidism as well as chronic hepatitis C virus infection, which was successfully treated but led to early micronodular cirrhosis on liver biopsy. Other studies done to search for the cause of hepatic calcification failed to reveal any abnormalities. We suspect that hypoparathyroidism caused liver calcification, and should be, therefore, considered in the differential diagnosis of hepatic calcification if other causative factors have been ruled out. PMID:24174700

  6. Metastatic pulmonary calcification misdiagnosed as a fungal infection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, ZHIXIN; QIU, TIAN; ZHAO, ZHIGANG; CHEN, LIANG'AN; SHE, DANYANG

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic pulmonary calcification is a rare lesion, characterized by calcium salt depositing in normal lung tissue. The clinical profile of a case of metastatic pulmonary calcification following renal transplantation was described. A computed tomography scan of the chest revealed ground-glass opacities in bilateral lungs and a node exhibiting a halo in the right upper lobe, which were suspected aspergillus infection. Following examination and therapy, the results of lung biopsy revealed metastatic pulmonary calcification. Although metastatic pulmonary calcification was reported in renal failure patients previously, metastatic pulmonary calcification with cavity lesions has never, to the best of our knowledge, been previously reported. The aim of the present report was to improve the understanding of metastatic pulmonary calcification. PMID:26998293

  7. Decrease in coccolithophore calcification and CO2 since the middle Miocene

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Clara T.; Hernández-Sánchez, María T.; Fuertes, Miguel-Ángel; González-Lemos, Saúl; Abrevaya, Lorena; Mendez-Vicente, Ana; Flores, José-Abel; Probert, Ian; Giosan, Liviu; Johnson, Joel; Stoll, Heather M.

    2016-01-01

    Marine algae are instrumental in carbon cycling and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) regulation. One group, coccolithophores, uses carbon to photosynthesize and to calcify, covering their cells with chalk platelets (coccoliths). How ocean acidification influences coccolithophore calcification is strongly debated, and the effects of carbonate chemistry changes in the geological past are poorly understood. This paper relates degree of coccolith calcification to cellular calcification, and presents the first records of size-normalized coccolith thickness spanning the last 14 Myr from tropical oceans. Degree of calcification was highest in the low-pH, high-CO2 Miocene ocean, but decreased significantly between 6 and 4 Myr ago. Based on this and concurrent trends in a new alkenone ɛp record, we propose that decreasing CO2 partly drove the observed trend via reduced cellular bicarbonate allocation to calcification. This trend reversed in the late Pleistocene despite low CO2, suggesting an additional regulator of calcification such as alkalinity. PMID:26762469

  8. Decrease in coccolithophore calcification and CO2 since the middle Miocene.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Clara T; Hernández-Sánchez, María T; Fuertes, Miguel-Ángel; González-Lemos, Saúl; Abrevaya, Lorena; Mendez-Vicente, Ana; Flores, José-Abel; Probert, Ian; Giosan, Liviu; Johnson, Joel; Stoll, Heather M

    2016-01-01

    Marine algae are instrumental in carbon cycling and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) regulation. One group, coccolithophores, uses carbon to photosynthesize and to calcify, covering their cells with chalk platelets (coccoliths). How ocean acidification influences coccolithophore calcification is strongly debated, and the effects of carbonate chemistry changes in the geological past are poorly understood. This paper relates degree of coccolith calcification to cellular calcification, and presents the first records of size-normalized coccolith thickness spanning the last 14 Myr from tropical oceans. Degree of calcification was highest in the low-pH, high-CO2 Miocene ocean, but decreased significantly between 6 and 4 Myr ago. Based on this and concurrent trends in a new alkenone ɛp record, we propose that decreasing CO2 partly drove the observed trend via reduced cellular bicarbonate allocation to calcification. This trend reversed in the late Pleistocene despite low CO2, suggesting an additional regulator of calcification such as alkalinity. PMID:26762469

  9. Experience produces the atypicality bias in object perception.

    PubMed

    Kantne, Justin; Tanaka, James W

    2012-01-01

    When a morph face is produced with equal physical contributions from a typical parent face and an atypical parent face, the morph is judged to be more similar to the atypical parent. This discontinuity between physical and perceptual distance relationships, called the "atypicality bias" (Tanaka et al 1998, Cognition 68 199-220), has also been demonstrated with non-face objects (birds and cars; Tanaka and Corneille 2007 Perception & Psychophysics 69 619-627). We tested whether the atypicality bias can be induced for a novel set of artificial objects. Two categories of "blob" stimuli were generated, each composed of typical and atypical members. Morphs averaged from typical and atypical parent exemplars were used to test the presence of an atypicality bias before and after participants were familiarized with blob items. In experiment 1, participants were trained to discriminate between the two blob categories. An atypicality bias was evident after, but not prior to, category training. In experiment 2, participants rated the pleasantness of the blobs instead of learning to categorize them; an atypicality bias was present only after the ratings task. This finding suggests that relatively passive exposure to exemplars is sufficient to influence perceptions of similarity, and that the atypicality bias is a manifestation of this influence. PMID:23025159

  10. Effect of image quality on calcification detection in digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Lucy M.; Mackenzie, Alistair; Cooke, Julie; Given-Wilson, Rosalind M.; Wallis, Matthew G.; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Dance, David R.; Bosmans, Hilde; Young, Kenneth C.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate if microcalcification detection varies significantly when mammographic images are acquired using different image qualities, including: different detectors, dose levels, and different image processing algorithms. An additional aim was to determine how the standard European method of measuring image quality using threshold gold thickness measured with a CDMAM phantom and the associated limits in current EU guidelines relate to calcification detection. Methods: One hundred and sixty two normal breast images were acquired on an amorphous selenium direct digital (DR) system. Microcalcification clusters extracted from magnified images of slices of mastectomies were electronically inserted into half of the images. The calcification clusters had a subtle appearance. All images were adjusted using a validated mathematical method to simulate the appearance of images from a computed radiography (CR) imaging system at the same dose, from both systems at half this dose, and from the DR system at quarter this dose. The original 162 images were processed with both Hologic and Agfa (Musica-2) image processing. All other image qualities were processed with Agfa (Musica-2) image processing only. Seven experienced observers marked and rated any identified suspicious regions. Free response operating characteristic (FROC) and ROC analyses were performed on the data. The lesion sensitivity at a nonlesion localization fraction (NLF) of 0.1 was also calculated. Images of the CDMAM mammographic test phantom were acquired using the automatic setting on the DR system. These images were modified to the additional image qualities used in the observer study. The images were analyzed using automated software. In order to assess the relationship between threshold gold thickness and calcification detection a power law was fitted to the data. Results: There was a significant reduction in calcification detection using CR compared with DR: the alternative FROC

  11. Effect of image quality on calcification detection in digital mammography

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Lucy M.; Mackenzie, Alistair; Cooke, Julie; Given-Wilson, Rosalind M.; Wallis, Matthew G.; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Dance, David R.; Bosmans, Hilde; Young, Kenneth C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate if microcalcification detection varies significantly when mammographic images are acquired using different image qualities, including: different detectors, dose levels, and different image processing algorithms. An additional aim was to determine how the standard European method of measuring image quality using threshold gold thickness measured with a CDMAM phantom and the associated limits in current EU guidelines relate to calcification detection. Methods: One hundred and sixty two normal breast images were acquired on an amorphous selenium direct digital (DR) system. Microcalcification clusters extracted from magnified images of slices of mastectomies were electronically inserted into half of the images. The calcification clusters had a subtle appearance. All images were adjusted using a validated mathematical method to simulate the appearance of images from a computed radiography (CR) imaging system at the same dose, from both systems at half this dose, and from the DR system at quarter this dose. The original 162 images were processed with both Hologic and Agfa (Musica-2) image processing. All other image qualities were processed with Agfa (Musica-2) image processing only. Seven experienced observers marked and rated any identified suspicious regions. Free response operating characteristic (FROC) and ROC analyses were performed on the data. The lesion sensitivity at a nonlesion localization fraction (NLF) of 0.1 was also calculated. Images of the CDMAM mammographic test phantom were acquired using the automatic setting on the DR system. These images were modified to the additional image qualities used in the observer study. The images were analyzed using automated software. In order to assess the relationship between threshold gold thickness and calcification detection a power law was fitted to the data. Results: There was a significant reduction in calcification detection using CR compared with DR: the alternative FROC

  12. Magnesium Intake Is Inversely Associated With Coronary Artery Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Hruby, Adela; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Jacques, Paul F.; Meigs, James B.; Hoffmann, Udo; McKeown, Nicola M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to examine whether magnesium intake is associated with coronary artery calcification (CAC) and abdominal aortic calcification (AAC). BACKGROUND Animal and cell studies suggest that magnesium may prevent calcification within atherosclerotic plaques underlying cardiovascular disease. Little is known about the association of magnesium intake and atherosclerotic calcification in humans. METHODS We examined cross-sectional associations of self-reported total (dietary and supplemental) magnesium intake estimated by food frequency questionnaire with CAC and AAC in participants of the Framingham Heart Study who were free of cardiovascular disease and underwent Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) of the heart and abdomen (n = 2,695; age: 53 ± 11 years), using multivariate-adjusted Tobit regression. CAC and AAC were quantified using modified Agatston scores (AS). Models were adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, systolic blood pressure, fasting insulin, total-to-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, use of hormone replacement therapy (women only), menopausal status (women only), treatment for hyperlipidemia, hypertension, cardiovascular disease prevention, or diabetes, as well as self-reported intake of calcium, vitamins D and K, saturated fat, fiber, alcohol, and energy. Secondary analyses included logistic regressions of CAC and AAC outcomes as cut-points (AS >0 and AS ≥90th percentile for age and sex), as well as sex-stratified analyses. RESULTS In fully adjusted models, a 50-mg/day increment in self-reported total magnesium intake was associated with 22% lower CAC (p < 0.001) and 12% lower AAC (p = 0.07). Consistent with these observations, the odds of having any CAC were 58% lower (p trend: <0.001) and any AAC were 34% lower (p trend: 0.01), in those with the highest compared to those with the lowest magnesium intake. Stronger inverse associations were observed in women than in men. CONCLUSIONS In

  13. Age-related incidence of pineal calcification detected by computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1982-03-01

    The age-related incidence of detectable pineal calcification in 725 patients (age range, newborn-20 yrs) suggests that there is a relationship between calcification and the hormonal role played by the pineal gland in the regulation of sexual development. Pineal calcification (demonstrated by computed tomography (CT) on 8-mm-thick sections) in patients less than 6 years old should be looked upon with suspicion, and follow-up CT should be considered to exclude the possible development of a pineal neoplasm.

  14. Dual-energy digital mammography for calcification imaging: Scatter and nonuniformity corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Kappadath, S. Cheenu; Shaw, Chris C.

    2005-11-15

    Mammographic images of small calcifications, which are often the earliest signs of breast cancer, can be obscured by overlapping fibroglandular tissue. We have developed and implemented a dual-energy digital mammography (DEDM) technique for calcification imaging under full-field imaging conditions using a commercially available aSi:H/CsI:Tl flat-panel based digital mammography system. The low- and high-energy images were combined using a nonlinear mapping function to cancel the tissue structures and generate the dual-energy (DE) calcification images. The total entrance-skin exposure and mean-glandular dose from the low- and high-energy images were constrained so that they were similar to screening-examination levels. To evaluate the DE calcification image, we designed a phantom using calcium carbonate crystals to simulate calcifications of various sizes (212-425 {mu}m) overlaid with breast-tissue-equivalent material 5 cm thick with a continuously varying glandular-tissue ratio from 0% to 100%. We report on the effects of scatter radiation and nonuniformity in x-ray intensity and detector response on the DE calcification images. The nonuniformity was corrected by normalizing the low- and high-energy images with full-field reference images. Correction of scatter in the low- and high-energy images significantly reduced the background signal in the DE calcification image. Under the current implementation of DEDM, utilizing the mammography system and dose level tested, calcifications in the 300-355 {mu}m size range were clearly visible in DE calcification images. Calcification threshold sizes decreased to the 250-280 {mu}m size range when the visibility criteria were lowered to barely visible. Calcifications smaller than {approx}250 {mu}m were usually not visible in most cases. The visibility of calcifications with our DEDM imaging technique was limited by quantum noise, not system noise.

  15. Spontaneous resorption of calcification at the long head of the biceps tendon

    PubMed Central

    Amri, Adriansyah; Nakai, Sho; Hara, Michiharu; Yamanaka, Issei; Hamawaki, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Calcific tendinitis of the long head of the biceps tendon is a rare cause of shoulder pain. Calcium deposits are often spontaneously resorbed or reduced in size in the rotator cuff tendons, which represent the most common sites of calcific tendinitis around the shoulder. To our knowledge, no case of spontaneous resorption of calcification in the long head of the biceps tendon has been reported in the literature. Here, we report one such case and describe its successful treatment using a conservative approach.

  16. Globular adiponectin reduces vascular calcification via inhibition of ER-stress-mediated smooth muscle cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Bian, Yunfei; Wang, Yueru; Bai, Rui; Wang, Jiapu; Xiao, Chuanshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to explore the mechanism of globular adiponectin inhibiting vascular calcification. Methods: We established drug-induced rat vascular calcification model, globular adiponectin was given to observe the effect of globular Adiponectin on the degree of calcification. The markers of vascular calcification and apoptosis were also investigated. Meanwhile, the in vitro effect of globular Adiponectin on vascular calcification was also evaluated using primary cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Results: We found that globular adiponectin could inhibit drug-induced rat vascular calcification significantly in vivo. The apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells was also reduced. The possible mechanism could be the down-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress by globular adiponectin. Experiments in primary cultured vascular smooth muscle cells also confirmed that globular adiponectin could reduce cell apoptosis to suppress vascular calcification via inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Conclusions: This study confirmed that globular adiponectin could suppress vascular calcification; one of the mechanisms could be inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress to reduce cell apoptosis. It could provide an effective method in the therapy of vascular calcification-associated diseases. PMID:26045760

  17. Imaging of diffuse metastatic and dystrophic pulmonary calcification in children after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Guermazi, A; Espérou, H; Selimi, F; Gluckman, E

    2005-08-01

    The authors describe three cases of diffuse pulmonary calcification; two metastatic in children with acute transitory renal failure and the other dystrophic in a child with leukaemia. All three patients underwent haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Chest radiographs disclosed diffuse calcification within the lungs. The distribution of this calcification was bilateral but asymmetric. Diagnosis was made in two cases by high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and in one case by HRCT and bone scan. Radiological characteristics, scintigraphic features, pathological mechanism and clinical outcome of such pulmonary calcification are discussed. PMID:16046422

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Vascular Calcification in Chronic Kidney Disease: The Link between Bone and the Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Byon, Chang Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Vascular calcification is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and increases mortality in those patients. Impaired calcium and phosphate homeostasis, increased oxidative stress, and loss of calcification inhibitors have been linked to vascular calcification in CKD. Additionally, impaired bone may perturb serum calcium/phosphate and their key regulator, parathyroid hormone, thus contributing to increased vascular calcification in CKD. Therapeutic approaches for CKD, such as phosphate binders and bisphosphonates, have been shown to ameliorate bone loss as well as vascular calcification. The precise mechanisms responsible for vascular calcification in CKD and the contribution of bone metabolism to vascular calcification have not been elucidated. This review discusses the role of systemic uremic factors and impaired bone metabolism in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification in CKD. The regulation of the key osteogenic transcription factor Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and the emerging role of Runx2-dependent receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) in vascular calcification of CKD are emphasized. PMID:25947259

  19. Warfarin-induced artery calcification is accelerated by growth and vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Price, P A; Faus, S A; Williamson, M K

    2000-02-01

    The present studies demonstrate that growth and vitamin D treatment enhance the extent of artery calcification in rats given sufficient doses of Warfarin to inhibit gamma-carboxylation of matrix Gla protein, a calcification inhibitor known to be expressed by smooth muscle cells and macrophages in the artery wall. The first series of experiments examined the influence of age and growth status on artery calcification in Warfarin-treated rats. Treatment for 2 weeks with Warfarin caused massive focal calcification of the artery media in 20-day-old rats and less extensive focal calcification in 42-day-old rats. In contrast, no artery calcification could be detected in 10-month-old adult rats even after 4 weeks of Warfarin treatment. To directly examine the importance of growth to Warfarin-induced artery calcification in animals of the same age, 20-day-old rats were fed for 2 weeks either an ad libitum diet or a 6-g/d restricted diet that maintains weight but prevents growth. Concurrent treatment of both dietary groups with Warfarin produced massive focal calcification of the artery media in the ad libitum-fed rats but no detectable artery calcification in the restricted-diet, growth-inhibited group. Although the explanation for the association between artery calcification and growth status cannot be determined from the present study, there was a relationship between higher serum phosphate and susceptibility to artery calcification, with 30% higher levels of serum phosphate in young, ad libitum-fed rats compared with either of the groups that was resistant to Warfarin-induced artery calcification, ie, the 10-month-old rats and the restricted-diet, growth-inhibited young rats. This observation suggests that increased susceptibility to Warfarin-induced artery calcification could be related to higher serum phosphate levels. The second set of experiments examined the possible synergy between vitamin D and Warfarin in artery calcification. High doses of vitamin D are known to

  20. Characterization of the atypical lymphocytes in African swine fever

    PubMed Central

    Karalyan, Z. A.; Ter-Pogossyan, Z. R.; Abroyan, L. O.; Hakobyan, L. H.; Avetisyan, A. S.; Karalyan, N. Yu; Karalova, E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Atypical lymphocytes usually described as lymphocytes with altered shape, increased DNA amount, and larger size. For analysis of cause of genesis and source of atypical lymphocytes during African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection, bone marrow, peripheral blood, and in vitro model were investigated. Materials and Methods: Atypical lymphocytes under the influence of ASFV were studied for morphologic, cytophotometric, and membrane surface marker characteristics and were used in vivo and in vitro models. Results: This study indicated the increased size, high metabolic activity, and the presence of additional DNA amount in atypical lymphocytes caused by ASFV infection. Furthermore, in atypical lymphocytes, nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio usually decreased, compared to normal lymphocytes. In morphology, they looking like lymphocytes transformed into blasts by exposure to mitogens or antigens in vitro. They vary in morphologic detail, but most of them are CD2 positive. Conclusions: Our data suggest that atypical lymphocytes may represent an unusual and specific cellular response to ASFV infection. PMID:27536044

  1. Protection of Momordica charantia polysaccharide against intracerebral hemorrhage-induced brain injury through JNK3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhen-Zhen; Zhou, Xiao-Ling; Li, Yi-Hang; Zhang, Feng; Li, Feng-Ying; Su-Hua, Qi

    2015-01-01

    It has been well documented that Momordica charantia polysaccharide (MCP) has multiple biological effects such as immune enhancement, anti-oxidation and anti-cancer. However, the potential protective effects of MCP on stroke damage and its relative mechanisms remain unclear. Our present study demonstrated that MCP could scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) in intra-cerebral hemorrhage damage, significantly attenuating the neuronal death induced by thrombin in primary hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we found that MCP prevented the activation of the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK3), c-Jun and caspase-3, which was caused by the intra-cerebral hemorrhage injury. Taken together, our study demonstrated that MCP had a neuroprotective effect in response to intra-cerebral hemorrhage and its mechanisms involved the inhibition of JNK3 signaling pathway. PMID:25264226

  2. Management of Typical and Atypical Hangman's Fractures.

    PubMed

    Al-Mahfoudh, Rafid; Beagrie, Christopher; Woolley, Ele; Zakaria, Rasheed; Radon, Mark; Clark, Simon; Pillay, Robin; Wilby, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Retrospective study of a prospectively maintained database. Objective Our aim was to retrospectively review management and outcomes of patients with low-grade hangman's fractures, specifically looking at differences in outcomes between collars and halo immobilization. We also studied fracture patterns and their treatment outcomes. Methods Forty-one patients with hangman's fractures were identified from 105 patients with axis fractures between 2007 and 2013. Typical hangman's fractures were defined as traumatic spondylolisthesis of the axis causing a bilateral pars interarticularis fracture. Fractures involving the posterior cortex of C2 on one or both sides or an asymmetrical pattern were defined as atypical. Results There were 41 patients with a mean age of 59 years, with 13 (31.7%) typical and 28 (68.2%) atypical fractures. There were 22 (53.6%) type 1 fractures, 7 (41.4%) type 2 fractures, and 2 (4.9%) type 2a fractures in this series. Cervical collars were used to manage 11 patients (27% of all patients with hangman's fractures) and halo orthosis was used in 27 (65.8%). Three (7.3%) patients underwent surgical fixation of the fracture. Bony union was achieved in all patients on radiologic follow-up. Permanent neurologic deficit occurred in one patient due to associated injuries. Neck pain and stiffness were reported more commonly in the atypical group, but this finding was not statistically significant. Conclusions The majority of hangman type fractures can be treated nonoperatively. We found no difference in outcomes between a rigid collar or halo immobilization for treatment of low-grade fractures. Radiologic follow-up is essential to identify cases of nonunion. PMID:27099816

  3. Management of Typical and Atypical Hangman's Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mahfoudh, Rafid; Beagrie, Christopher; Woolley, Ele; Zakaria, Rasheed; Radon, Mark; Clark, Simon; Pillay, Robin; Wilby, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study of a prospectively maintained database. Objective Our aim was to retrospectively review management and outcomes of patients with low-grade hangman's fractures, specifically looking at differences in outcomes between collars and halo immobilization. We also studied fracture patterns and their treatment outcomes. Methods Forty-one patients with hangman's fractures were identified from 105 patients with axis fractures between 2007 and 2013. Typical hangman's fractures were defined as traumatic spondylolisthesis of the axis causing a bilateral pars interarticularis fracture. Fractures involving the posterior cortex of C2 on one or both sides or an asymmetrical pattern were defined as atypical. Results There were 41 patients with a mean age of 59 years, with 13 (31.7%) typical and 28 (68.2%) atypical fractures. There were 22 (53.6%) type 1 fractures, 7 (41.4%) type 2 fractures, and 2 (4.9%) type 2a fractures in this series. Cervical collars were used to manage 11 patients (27% of all patients with hangman's fractures) and halo orthosis was used in 27 (65.8%). Three (7.3%) patients underwent surgical fixation of the fracture. Bony union was achieved in all patients on radiologic follow-up. Permanent neurologic deficit occurred in one patient due to associated injuries. Neck pain and stiffness were reported more commonly in the atypical group, but this finding was not statistically significant. Conclusions The majority of hangman type fractures can be treated nonoperatively. We found no difference in outcomes between a rigid collar or halo immobilization for treatment of low-grade fractures. Radiologic follow-up is essential to identify cases of nonunion. PMID:27099816

  4. Intracerebral Hemorrhage Associated with Oral Phenylephrine Use: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Tark, Brian E; Messe, Steven R; Balucani, Clotilde; Levine, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    Background Prior reports have linked both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke to use of sympathomimetic drugs including phenylephrine. Objective To describe the first case, to our knowledge, of intracerebral hemorrhage following oral use of phenylephrine and to systematically review the literature on phenylephrine and acute stroke. Methods A case report and review of the literature. Results A 59-year-old female presented with thunderclap headache, right hemiparesis, aphasia, and left gaze deviation. Head CT showed a left frontal intracerebral hemorrhage with intraventricular and subarachnoid extension. She had no significant past medical history. For the previous thirty days, the patient was taking multiple common cold remedies containing phenylephrine to treat sinusitis. CT and MR angiography showed no causative vascular abnormality. Catheter cerebral angiography supported reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. Phenylephrine was determined to be the most likely etiology for her hemorrhage. A review of the literature, found 7 cases describing phenylephrine use with acute stroke occurrence: female 5/7 (71%); route of administration: nasal (n=3); ophthalmic (n=2); intravenous (n=1); intracorporeal injection (n=1). Stroke types were: subarachnoid hemorrhage (n=5); ICH (n=4); ischemic (n=1). One case reported reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome after phenylephrine use. Conclusion It is scientifically plausible that phenylephrine may cause strokes, consistent with the pharmacological properties and adverse event profiles of similar amphetamine-like sympathomimetics. As reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome has been well-described in association with over-the-counter sympathomimetics, a likely, although not definitive, causal relationship between phenylephrine and intracerebral hemorrhage is proposed. PMID:25156786

  5. Recurring episodes of spreading depression are spontaneously elicited by an intracerebral hemorrhage in the swine.

    PubMed

    Mun-Bryce, S; Wilkerson, A C; Papuashvili, N; Okada, Y C

    2001-01-12

    Intracranial bleeding damages the surrounding tissue in a complex fashion that involves contamination by blood-borne products and loss of ionic homeostasis. We used electrophysiological techniques to examine the functional changes in the developing intracerebral bleed and in surrounding regions using an in vivo swine model. Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) was induced by collagenase injection into the primary somatosensory cortex (SI). Somatic evoked potential (SEP) elicited by electrical stimulation of the contralateral snout as well as changes in DC-coupled potential were monitored in the SI from the time of collagenase injection in order to measure the effects of ICH. The SEP decreased in amplitude within minutes of the intracerebral injection. Its short-latency component was abolished within the first hour after collagenase injection without any sign of recovery for the duration of the experiment. As the SEP started decreasing in amplitude, we observed spontaneous, recurring episodes of cortical spreading depression (SD) as early as 20 min post-injection. The timing of SDs in SI is consistent with our interpretation that SDs were initially generated at multiple sites adjacent to the lesion core and propagated into the surrounding area. With time, SD became less frequent near the injection site, shifting to more distant electrodes in the surrounding area. Our results indicate that ICH leads to the reduction in SEP amplitude and induces spontaneous episodes of SD. Loss of ionic homeostasis is most likely the physiological basis for the SEP change and for the induction of SD. Recurring SD spontaneously generated in experimental ICH needs further study in humans with ICH. PMID:11150481

  6. Effect of Decompressive Craniectomy on Perihematomal Edema in Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Klinger-Gratz, Pascal P.; Fiechter, Michael; Z’Graggen, Werner J.; Gautschi, Oliver P.; El-Koussy, Marwan; Gralla, Jan; Schaller, Karl; Zbinden, Martin; Arnold, Marcel; Fischer, Urs; Mattle, Heinrich P.; Raabe, Andreas; Beck, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Background Perihematomal edema contributes to secondary brain injury in the course of intracerebral hemorrhage. The effect of decompressive surgery on perihematomal edema after intracerebral hemorrhage is unknown. This study analyzed the course of PHE in patients who were or were not treated with decompressive craniectomy. Methods More than 100 computed tomography images from our published cohort of 25 patients were evaluated retrospectively at two university hospitals in Switzerland. Computed tomography scans covered the time from admission until day 100. Eleven patients were treated by decompressive craniectomy and 14 were treated conservatively. Absolute edema and hematoma volumes were assessed using 3-dimensional volumetric measurements. Relative edema volumes were calculated based on maximal hematoma volume. Results Absolute perihematomal edema increased from 42.9 ml to 125.6 ml (192.8%) after 21 days in the decompressive craniectomy group, versus 50.4 ml to 67.2 ml (33.3%) in the control group (Δ at day 21 = 58.4 ml, p = 0.031). Peak edema developed on days 25 and 35 in patients with decompressive craniectomy and controls respectively, and it took about 60 days for the edema to decline to baseline in both groups. Eight patients (73%) in the decompressive craniectomy group and 6 patients (43%) in the control group had a good outcome (modified Rankin Scale score 0 to 4) at 6 months (P = 0.23). Conclusions Decompressive craniectomy is associated with a significant increase in perihematomal edema compared to patients who have been treated conservatively. Perihematomal edema itself lasts about 60 days if it is not treated, but decompressive craniectomy ameliorates the mass effect exerted by the intracerebral hemorrhage plus the perihematomal edema, as reflected by the reduced midline shift. PMID:26872068

  7. Higher mortality due to intracerebral hemorrhage in dialysis patients: a comparison with the general population in Japan.

    PubMed

    Wakasugi, Minako; Matsuo, Koji; Kazama, Junichiro James; Narita, Ichiei

    2015-02-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases, including intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, and subarachnoid hemorrhage, remain prevalent causes of morbidity and mortality among dialysis patients. Their mortality rate for cerebrovascular diseases is roughly three times higher than that in the general population. However, whether mortality rates for all subtypes of cerebrovascular diseases are equally higher has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to determine the mortality rate for each stroke subtype, comparing dialysis patients and the general population in Japan. We used mortality data reported by the Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy and national Vital Statistics data between 2008 and 2009. We calculated standardized mortality ratios and compared the mortality rates for stroke subtypes including intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. During the 2-year study period, 51 994 and 933 deaths from intracerebral hemorrhage, 79 124 and 511 deaths from cerebral infarction, and 24 957 and 147 deaths from subarachnoid hemorrhage were recorded per 252 million person-years and per 546 474 dialysis patient-years, respectively. Standardized mortality ratios among dialysis patients relative to the general population were 3.8 (95% confidence interval, 3.6-4.1), 1.3 (1.2-1.4), and 1.3 (1.1-1.6) for intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, and subarachnoid hemorrhage, respectively. Intracerebral hemorrhage was the highest cause of mortality in the dialysis population, although cerebral infarction was the highest in the general population. Relative to the general population in Japan, Japanese dialysis patients had higher mortality rates, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:25196294

  8. Positron emission tomography in the newborn: extensive impairment of regional cerebral blood flow with intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, J.J.; Herscovitch, P.; Perlman, J.M.; Raichle, M.E.

    1983-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) now provides the capability of measuring regional cerebral blood flow with high resolution and little risk. In this study, we utilized PET in six premature infants (920 to 1,200 g) with major intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement to measure regional cerebral blood flow during the acute period (5 to 17 days of age). Cerebral blood flow was determined after intravenous injection of H/sub 2/O, labeled with the positron-emitting isotope, /sup 15/O. Findings were similar and dramatic in all six infants. In the area of hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement, little or no cerebral blood flow was detected. However, in addition, surprisingly, a marked two- to fourfold reduction in cerebral blood flow was observed throughout the affected hemisphere, well posterior and lateral to the intracerebral hematoma, including cerebral white matter and, to a lesser extent, frontal, temporal, and parietal cortex. In the one infant studied a second time, ie, at 3 months of age, the extent and severity of the decreased cerebral blood flows in the affected hemisphere were similar to those observed on the study during the neonatal period. At the three autopsies, the affected left hemisphere showed extensive infarction, corroborating the PET scans. These observations, the first demonstration of the use of PET in the determination of regional cerebral blood flow in the newborn, show marked impairments in regional cerebral blood flow in the hemisphere containing an apparently restricted intracerebral hematoma, indicating that the hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement is only a component of a much larger lesion, ischemic in basic nature, ie, an infarction. This large ischemic lesion explains the poor neurologic outcome in infants with intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement.

  9. Atypical neuroimaging in Wilson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Patell, Rushad; Dosi, Rupal; Joshi, Harshal K; Storz, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Wilson's disease is a rare metabolic disease involving copper metabolism. Neuroimaging plays an important part in evaluation of patients with a neuropsychiatric presentation. We present a case of a 14-year-old girl with atypical confluent white matter disease and cystic degeneration on MRI, with a rapidly progressive course, who succumbed to complications despite treatment with trientine. Wilson's disease should be considered as a differential for leucoencephalopathy in young patients with progressive neurological disease for its early recognition and optimum outcome. PMID:24907221

  10. Atypical odontalgia--a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Thorburn, D N; Polonowita, A D

    2012-06-01

    Atypical odontalgia (AO) is a chronic orofacial pain condition of unclear pathophysiology, often presenting as toothache or pain at an extraction site. Idiopathic, psychogenic, vascular, and neuropathic causes have been proposed. In view of demonstrable somatosensory changes, and responses to management proposed for other forms of neuropathic pain, the best current evidence supports a neuropathic hypothesis. It is proposed that certain individuals with as-yet-undefined genetic vulnerability can develop AO when exposed to certain risk factors, including invasive dental treatment. The diagnosis and treatment of AO can be challenging, but can be aided by a multidisciplinary approach. Two cases of differing complexity are presented in this paper. PMID:22788051

  11. Management of Atypical and Anaplastic Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Buttrick, Simon; Shah, Ashish H; Komotar, Ricardo J; Ivan, Michael E

    2016-04-01

    Meningiomas are the most prevalent primary tumor of central nervous system origin and, although most neoplasms are benign, a small proportion exemplifies an aggressive profile characterized by high recurrence rates, pleomorphic histology, and overall resistance to standard treatment. Standard initial therapy for malignant meningiomas includes maximal safe surgical resection followed by focal radiation in certain cases. The role for chemotherapy during recurrence of these aggressive meningiomas is less clear. Prognosis is poor and recurrence of malignant meningiomas is high. This article provides an overview of atypical and anaplastic malignant meningiomas, their treatment, and ongoing research for more effective treatments. PMID:27012388

  12. Trisomy 18 with unilateral atypical ectrodactyly

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Becerra et al. recently reported on an infant with multiple congenital anomalies who had trisomy 18. This preterm infant presented with bilateral ectrodactyly of feet, small cleft palate, esophageal atresia with associated tracheoesophageal fistula, congenital heart disease and other anomalies. The authors referenced article by Castle and Bernstein, in which they reported a male with trisomy 18 and cleft foot as well as a review of the literature which showed 2 other infants with trisomy 18 and ectrodactyly of the feet. An additional case of trisomy 18 associated with multiple congenital anomalies, including unilaterial, atypical ectrodactyly of the left foot.

  13. Atypical Bronchial Carcinoid Masquerading as Bronchial Asthma.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, V; Iqbal; Kumar, Vinod

    2015-11-01

    A case study of 35-year-old woman with persistent breathlessness and wheezing that had been unsuccessfully treated with inhaled beta 2-agonists and steroids for about two years. Patient developed dry cough and haemoptysis, so investigated further. Spirometry demonstrated a restrictive pattern. Chest CT demonstrated well defined hyperdense lesion in right middle lobe. Biopsy taken from the mass during bronchoscopy demonstrated the picture of atypical bronchial carcinoid. In this case, due to the lack of awareness, diagnosis of carcinoid was delayed by two years. PMID:27608788

  14. Sensitivity of Calcification to Thermal Stress Varies among Genera of Massive Reef-Building Corals

    PubMed Central

    Carricart-Ganivet, Juan P.; Cabanillas-Terán, Nancy; Cruz-Ortega, Israel; Blanchon, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Reductions in calcification in reef-building corals occur when thermal conditions are suboptimal, but it is unclear how they vary between genera in response to the same thermal stress event. Using densitometry techniques, we investigate reductions in the calcification rate of massive Porites spp. from the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), and P. astreoides, Montastraea faveolata, and M. franksi from the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef (MBR), and correlate them to thermal stress associated with ocean warming. Results show that Porites spp. are more sensitive to increasing temperature than Montastraea, with calcification rates decreasing by 0.40 g cm−2 year−1 in Porites spp. and 0.12 g cm−2 year−1 in Montastraea spp. for each 1°C increase. Under similar warming trends, the predicted calcification rates at 2100 are close to zero in Porites spp. and reduced by 40% in Montastraea spp. However, these predictions do not account for ocean acidification. Although yearly mean aragonite saturation (Ωar) at MBR sites has recently decreased, only P. astreoides at Chinchorro showed a reduction in calcification. In corals at the other sites calcification did not change, indicating there was no widespread effect of Ωar changes on coral calcification rate in the MBR. Even in the absence of ocean acidification, differential reductions in calcification between Porites spp. and Montastraea spp. associated with warming might be expected to have significant ecological repercussions. For instance, Porites spp. invest increased calcification in extension, and under warming scenarios it may reduce their ability to compete for space. As a consequence, shifts in taxonomic composition would be expected in Indo-Pacific reefs with uncertain repercussions for biodiversity. By contrast, Montastraea spp. use their increased calcification resources to construct denser skeletons. Reductions in calcification would therefore make them more susceptible to both physical and biological breakdown, seriously

  15. Spatial and seasonal reef calcification in corals and calcareous crusts in the central Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roik, Anna; Roder, Cornelia; Röthig, Till; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2016-06-01

    The existence of coral reef ecosystems critically relies on the reef carbonate framework produced by scleractinian corals and calcareous crusts (i.e., crustose coralline algae). While the Red Sea harbors one of the longest connected reef systems in the world, detailed calcification data are only available from the northernmost part. To fill this knowledge gap, we measured in situ calcification rates of primary and secondary reef builders in the central Red Sea. We collected data on the major habitat-forming coral genera Porites, Acropora, and Pocillopora and also on calcareous crusts (CC) in a spatio-seasonal framework. The scope of the study comprised sheltered and exposed sites of three reefs along a cross-shelf gradient and over four seasons of the year. Calcification of all coral genera was consistent across the shelf and highest in spring. In addition, Pocillopora showed increased calcification at exposed reef sites. In contrast, CC calcification increased from nearshore, sheltered to offshore, exposed reef sites, but also varied over seasons. Comparing our data to other reef locations, calcification in the Red Sea was in the range of data collected from reefs in the Caribbean and Indo-Pacific; however, Acropora calcification estimates were at the lower end of worldwide rates. Our study shows that the increasing coral cover from nearshore to offshore environments aligned with CC calcification but not coral calcification, highlighting the potentially important role of CC in structuring reef cover and habitats. While coral calcification maxima have been typically observed during summer in many reef locations worldwide, calcification maxima during spring in the central Red Sea indicate that summer temperatures exceed the optima of reef calcifiers in this region. This study provides a foundation for comparative efforts and sets a baseline to quantify impact of future environmental change in the central Red Sea.

  16. Sensitivity of calcification to thermal stress varies among genera of massive reef-building corals.

    PubMed

    Carricart-Ganivet, Juan P; Cabanillas-Terán, Nancy; Cruz-Ortega, Israel; Blanchon, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Reductions in calcification in reef-building corals occur when thermal conditions are suboptimal, but it is unclear how they vary between genera in response to the same thermal stress event. Using densitometry techniques, we investigate reductions in the calcification rate of massive Porites spp. from the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), and P. astreoides, Montastraea faveolata, and M. franksi from the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef (MBR), and correlate them to thermal stress associated with ocean warming. Results show that Porites spp. are more sensitive to increasing temperature than Montastraea, with calcification rates decreasing by 0.40 g cm(-2) year(-1) in Porites spp. and 0.12 g cm(-2) year(-1) in Montastraea spp. for each 1°C increase. Under similar warming trends, the predicted calcification rates at 2100 are close to zero in Porites spp. and reduced by 40% in Montastraea spp. However, these predictions do not account for ocean acidification. Although yearly mean aragonite saturation (Ω(ar)) at MBR sites has recently decreased, only P. astreoides at Chinchorro showed a reduction in calcification. In corals at the other sites calcification did not change, indicating there was no widespread effect of Ω(ar) changes on coral calcification rate in the MBR. Even in the absence of ocean acidification, differential reductions in calcification between Porites spp. and Montastraea spp. associated with warming might be expected to have significant ecological repercussions. For instance, Porites spp. invest increased calcification in extension, and under warming scenarios it may reduce their ability to compete for space. As a consequence, shifts in taxonomic composition would be expected in Indo-Pacific reefs with uncertain repercussions for biodiversity. By contrast, Montastraea spp. use their increased calcification resources to construct denser skeletons. Reductions in calcification would therefore make them more susceptible to both physical and biological breakdown

  17. Impact of seawater carbonate chemistry on the calcification of marine bivalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, J.; Haynert, K.; Wegner, K. M.; Melzner, F.

    2015-07-01

    Bivalve calcification, particularly of the early larval stages, is highly sensitive to the change in ocean carbonate chemistry resulting from atmospheric CO2 uptake. Earlier studies suggested that declining seawater [CO32-] and thereby lowered carbonate saturation affect shell production. However, disturbances of physiological processes such as acid-base regulation by adverse seawater pCO2 and pH can affect calcification in a secondary fashion. In order to determine the exact carbonate system component by which growth and calcification are affected it is necessary to utilize more complex carbonate chemistry manipulations. As single factors, pCO2 had no effects and [HCO3-] and pH had only limited effects on shell growth, while lowered [CO32-] strongly impacted calcification. Dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) limiting conditions led to strong reductions in calcification, despite high [CO32-], indicating that [HCO3-] rather than [CO32-] is the inorganic carbon source utilized for calcification by mytilid mussels. However, as the ratio [HCO3-] / [H+] is linearly correlated with [CO32-] it is not possible to differentiate between these under natural seawater conditions. An equivalent of about 80 μmol kg-1 [CO32-] is required to saturate inorganic carbon supply for calcification in bivalves. Below this threshold biomineralization rates rapidly decline. A comparison of literature data available for larvae and juvenile mussels and oysters originating from habitats differing substantially with respect to prevailing carbonate chemistry conditions revealed similar response curves. This suggests that the mechanisms which determine sensitivity of calcification in this group are highly conserved. The higher sensitivity of larval calcification seems to primarily result from the much higher relative calcification rates in early life stages. In order to reveal and understand the mechanisms that limit or facilitate adaptation to future ocean acidification, it is necessary to better

  18. Quantification of breast arterial calcification using full field digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Molloi, Sabee; Xu Tong; Ducote, Justin; Iribarren, Carlos

    2008-04-15

    Breast arterial calcification is commonly detected on some mammograms. Previous studies indicate that breast arterial calcification is evidence of general atherosclerotic vascular disease and it may be a useful marker of coronary artery disease. It can potentially be a useful tool for assessment of coronary artery disease in women since mammography is widely used as a screening tool for early detection of breast cancer. However, there are currently no available techniques for quantification of calcium mass using mammography. The purpose of this study was to determine whether it is possible to quantify breast arterial calcium mass using standard digital mammography. An anthropomorphic breast phantom along with a vessel calcification phantom was imaged using a full field digital mammography system. Densitometry was used to quantify calcium mass. A calcium calibration measurement was performed at each phantom thickness and beam energy. The known (K) and measured (M) calcium mass on 5 and 9 cm thickness phantoms were related by M=0.964K-0.288 mg (r=0.997 and SEE=0.878 mg) and M=1.004K+0.324 mg (r=0.994 and SEE=1.32 mg), respectively. The results indicate that accurate calcium mass measurements can be made without correction for scatter glare as long as careful calcium calibration is made for each breast thickness. The results also indicate that composition variations and differences of approximately 1 cm between calibration phantom and breast thickness introduce only minimal error in calcium measurement. The uncertainty in magnification is expected to cause up to 5% and 15% error in calcium mass for 5 and 9 cm breast thicknesses, respectively. In conclusion, a densitometry technique for quantification of breast arterial calcium mass was validated using standard full field digital mammography. The results demonstrated the feasibility and potential utility of the densitometry technique for accurate quantification of breast arterial calcium mass using standard digital

  19. A nude rat model for neutron capture therapy of human intracerebral melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, R.F.; Matalka, K.Z.; Bailey, M.Q.; Staubus, A.E.; Soloway, A.H.; Moeschberger, M.L. ); Coderre, J.A. ); Rofstad, E.K. )

    1994-03-30

    The present study was carried out to determine the efficacy of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for intracerebral melanoma using nude rats, the human melanoma cell line MRA 27, and boronophenylalanine as the capture agent. MRA 27 cells (2 [times] 10[sup 5]) were implanted intracerebrally, and 30 days later, 120 mg of [sup 10]B-L-BPA were injected intraperitoneally into nude rats. Thirty days following implantation, tumor bearing rats were irradiated at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor. Six hours following administration of BPA, tumor, blood, and normal brain boron-10 levels were 23.7, 9.4, and 8.4 [mu]g/g respectively. Median survival time of untreated rats was 44 days compared to 76 days and 93 days for those receiving physical doses of 2.73 Gy and 3.64 Gy, respectively. Rats that have received both [sup 10]B-BPA and physical doses of 1.82, 2.73, or 3.64 Gy had median survival times of 170, 182, and 262 days, respectively. Forty percent of rats that had received the highest tumor dose (10.1 Gy) survived for > 300 days and in a replicate experiment 21% of the rats were longterm survivors (>220 days). Animals that received 12 Gy in a single dose or 18 Gy fractionated (2 Gy [times] 9) of gamma photons from a [sup 137]Cs source had median survival times of 86 and 79 days, respectively, compared to 47 days for untreated animals. Histopathologic examination of the brains of longterm surviving rats, euthanized at 8 or 16 months following BNCT, showed no residual tumor, but dense accumulations of melanin laden macrophages and minimal gliosis were observed. Significant prolongations in median survival time were noted in nude rats with intracerebral human melanoma that had received BNCT, thereby suggesting therapeutic efficacy. Large animal studies should be carried out to further assess BNCT of intracerebral melanoma before any human trials are contemplated. 49 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. [Fortuitous discovery of intracerebral foreign body leads to the diagnosis of Munchausen syndrome by proxy].

    PubMed

    Bouaziz Abed, A; Mustapha, R; Chiha, M

    2011-11-01

    An intracerebral foreign body is a rare situation in childhood. It often occurs accidentally with transorbital or more rarely transnasal penetration. We report the case of a child who had been followed since the age of 2.5 months for chronic vomiting without failure to thrive. The fortuitous discovery at 22 months of age of a 4.5-cm-long sewing needle in his brain probably introduced via the fontanel led us to the diagnosis of Munchausen syndrome by proxy. PMID:21920715

  1. Predictors of 30-day mortality in patients with spontaneous primary intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Safatli, Diaa A.; Günther, Albrecht; Schlattmann, Peter; Schwarz, Falko; Kalff, Rolf; Ewald, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a life threatening entity, and an early outcome assessment is mandatory for optimizing therapeutic efforts. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 342 patients with spontaneous primary ICH to evaluate possible predictors of 30-day mortality considering clinical, radiological, and therapeutical parameters. We also applied three widely accepted outcome grading scoring systems [(ICH score, FUNC score and intracerebral hemorrhage grading scale (ICH-GS)] on our population to evaluate the correlation of these scores with the 30-day mortality in our study. We also applied three widely accepted outcome grading scoring systems [(ICH score, FUNC score and intracerebral hemorrhage grading scale (ICH-GS)] on our population to evaluate the correlation of these scores with the 30-day mortality in our study. Results: From 342 patients (mean age: 67 years, mean Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] on admission: 9, mean ICH volume: 62.19 ml, most common hematoma location: basal ganglia [43.9%]), 102 received surgical and 240 conservative treatment. The 30-day mortality was 25.15%. In a multivariate analysis, GCS (Odds ratio [OR] =0.726, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.661–0.796, P < 0.001), bleeding volume (OR = 1.012 per ml, 95% CI = 1.007 – 1.017, P < 0.001), and infratentorial hematoma location (OR = 5.381, 95% CI = 2.166-13.356, P = 0.009) were significant predictors for the 30-day mortality. After receiver operating characteristics analysis, we defined a “high-risk group” for an unfavorable short-term outcome with GCS <11 and ICH volume >32 ml supratentorially or 21 ml infratentorially. Using Pearson correlation, we found a correlation of 0.986 between ICH score and 30-day mortality (P < 0.001), 0.853 between FUNC score and 30-day mortality (P = 0.001), and 0.924 between ICH-GS and 30-day mortality (P = 0.001). Conclusions: GCS score on admission together with the baseline volume and localization of the hemorrhage are strong

  2. Absence of gallium-67 avidity in diffuse pulmonary calcification

    SciTech Connect

    Lecklitner, M.L.; Foster, R.W.

    1985-09-01

    Diffuse pulmonary uptake by bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals has been reported previously but, in the same patient, would pulmonary uptake of Ga-67 citrate yield clinically meaningful results. A patient with hypercalcemia and renal failure in whom bone scintigraphy demonstrated striking diffuse bilateral pulmonary uptake, but subsequent gallium imaging demonstrated no evidence of pulmonary uptake greater than body background, is discussed. We conclude that pulmonary uptake of gallium cannot be attributed to calcium deposition and should carry the same clinical significance in regard to inflammatory and malignant lesions as would be assigned to patients without pulmonary calcific deposits.

  3. Aortic Root Calcification: A Possible Imaging Biomarker of Coronary Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nafakhi, Hussein; Al-Nafakh, Hasan A; Al-Mosawi, Abdulameer A

    2016-04-01

    It has been reported that coronary atherosclerosis risk assessment using coronary artery calcium and thoracic aorta calcium quantification may improve risk stratification as it can lead to the reclassification of persons at increased risk. The aortic root has been characterized by its close anatomical proximity to the ostial origins of the right and left coronary arteries, and it can be evaluated using multi-detector computed tomography without additional radiation exposure and the use of contrast. The correlations between aortic root calcification and coronary atherosclerotic markers as well as cardiac risk factors have been analyzed. PMID:27195236

  4. Percutaneous tattoo pigment simulating calcific deposits in axillary lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Yactor, Amy R; Michell, Michael N; Koch, Meghan S; Leete, Tyler G; Shah, Zeeshan A; Carter, Brett W

    2013-01-01

    The isolated finding of calcific deposits within axillary lymph nodes on mammography suggests a broad range of differential diagnoses, from benign causes such as granulomatous reaction secondary to previous histoplasmosis infection to malignancies such as breast cancer and metastatic disease from extramammary primary malignancies. Therefore, the isolated finding of intranodal calcium may warrant biopsy for a definitive diagnosis when a benign etiology is not apparent. We present a patient with isolated axillary lymph node densities on mammography and chest computed tomography, which were subsequently proven to represent deposition of tattoo pigment. PMID:23382606

  5. Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Transfer for Calcific Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Howell, Michael A; Catanzariti, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Calcific insertional Achilles tendinopathy can result in significant pain and disability. Although some patients respond to nonoperative therapy, many patients are at risk for long-term morbidity and unpredictable clinical outcomes. There is no evidence-based data to support the timing of operative invention, choice of procedures, or whether equinus requires treatment. This article suggests the need for a classification system based on physical examination and imaging to help guide treatment. There is an obvious need for evidence-based studies evaluating outcomes and for properly conducted scientific research to establish appropriate treatment protocols. PMID:26590729

  6. Aortic Root Calcification: A Possible Imaging Biomarker of Coronary Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nafakhi, Hussein; Al-Nafakh, Hasan A.; Al-Mosawi, Abdulameer A.

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that coronary atherosclerosis risk assessment using coronary artery calcium and thoracic aorta calcium quantification may improve risk stratification as it can lead to the reclassification of persons at increased risk. The aortic root has been characterized by its close anatomical proximity to the ostial origins of the right and left coronary arteries, and it can be evaluated using multi-detector computed tomography without additional radiation exposure and the use of contrast. The correlations between aortic root calcification and coronary atherosclerotic markers as well as cardiac risk factors have been analyzed. PMID:27195236

  7. Treatment of severe metastatic calcification and calciphylaxis in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Goel, Saurabh K; Bellovich, Keith; McCullough, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Metastatic calcification is a frequent complication encountered in patients undergoing maintenance dialysis and has a complex pathogenesis. It is often difficult to treat and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Early recognition and prompt initiation of treatment is vital. Local wound care and aggressive metabolic control remain the cornerstones of the therapy. Various novel treatment strategies including sodium thiosulfate and hyperbaric oxygen therapy have been utilized and reviewed in this paper. The response rate to treatment is poor and prevention is the best approach. PMID:21423552

  8. Pontine Infarct Presenting with Atypical Dental Pain: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Rajat; Kumar, Sanjeev; Panwar, Ajay; Singh, Abhishek B

    2015-01-01

    Orofacial pain’ most commonly occurs due to dental causes like caries, gingivitis or periodontitis. Other common causes of ‘orofacial pain’ are sinusitis, temporomandibular joint(TMJ) dysfunction, otitis externa, tension headache and migraine. In some patients, the etiology of ‘orofacial pain’ remains undetected despite optimal evaluation. A few patients in the practice of clinical dentistry presents with dental pain without any identifiable dental etiology. Such patients are classified under the category of ‘atypical odontalgia’. ‘Atypical odontalgia’ is reported to be prevalent in 2.1% of the individuals. ‘Atypical orofacial pain’ and ‘atypical odontalgia’ can result from the neurological diseases like multiple sclerosis, trigeminal neuralgia and herpes infection. Trigeminal neuralgia has been frequently documented as a cause of ‘atypical orofacial pain’ and ‘atypical odontalgia’. There are a few isolated case reports of acute pontine stroke resulting in ‘atypical orofacial pain’ and ‘atypical odontalgia’. However, pontine stroke as a cause of atypical odontalgia is limited to only a few cases, hence prevalence is not established. This case is one, where a patient presented with acute onset atypical dental pain with no identifiable dental etiology, further diagnosed as an acute pontine infarct on neuroimaging. A 40 years old male presented with acute onset, diffuse teeth pain on right side. Dental examination was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) of the brain had an acute infarct in right pons near the trigeminal root entry zone(REZ). Pontine infarct presenting with dental pain as a manifestation of trigeminal neuropathy, has rarely been reported previously. This stresses on the importance of neuroradiology in evaluation of atypical cases of dental pain. PMID:26464604

  9. Pontine Infarct Presenting with Atypical Dental Pain: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Goel, Rajat; Kumar, Sanjeev; Panwar, Ajay; Singh, Abhishek B

    2015-01-01

    Orofacial pain' most commonly occurs due to dental causes like caries, gingivitis or periodontitis. Other common causes of 'orofacial pain' are sinusitis, temporomandibular joint(TMJ) dysfunction, otitis externa, tension headache and migraine. In some patients, the etiology of 'orofacial pain' remains undetected despite optimal evaluation. A few patients in the practice of clinical dentistry presents with dental pain without any identifiable dental etiology. Such patients are classified under the category of 'atypical odontalgia'. 'Atypical odontalgia' is reported to be prevalent in 2.1% of the individuals. 'Atypical orofacial pain' and 'atypical odontalgia' can result from the neurological diseases like multiple sclerosis, trigeminal neuralgia and herpes infection. Trigeminal neuralgia has been frequently documented as a cause of 'atypical orofacial pain' and 'atypical odontalgia'. There are a few isolated case reports of acute pontine stroke resulting in 'atypical orofacial pain' and 'atypical odontalgia'. However, pontine stroke as a cause of atypical odontalgia is limited to only a few cases, hence prevalence is not established. This case is one, where a patient presented with acute onset atypical dental pain with no identifiable dental etiology, further diagnosed as an acute pontine infarct on neuroimaging. A 40 years old male presented with acute onset, diffuse teeth pain on right side. Dental examination was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) of the brain had an acute infarct in right pons near the trigeminal root entry zone(REZ). Pontine infarct presenting with dental pain as a manifestation of trigeminal neuropathy, has rarely been reported previously. This stresses on the importance of neuroradiology in evaluation of atypical cases of dental pain. PMID:26464604

  10. Regulation of chemotactic networks by 'atypical' receptors.

    PubMed

    Comerford, Iain; Litchfield, Wendel; Harata-Lee, Yuka; Nibbs, Robert J B; McColl, Shaun R

    2007-03-01

    Directed cell migration is a fundamental component of numerous biological systems and is critical to the pathology of many diseases. Although the importance of secreted chemoattractant factors in providing navigational cues to migrating cells bearing specific chemoattractant receptors is now well-established, how the function of these factors is regulated is not so well understood and may be of key importance to the design of new therapeutics for numerous human diseases. While regulation of migration clearly takes place on a number of different levels, it is becoming clear that so-called 'atypical' receptors play a role in scavenging, or altering the localisation of, chemoattractant molecules such as chemokines and complement components. These receptors do this through binding and/or internalising their chemoattractant ligands without activating signal transduction cascades leading to cell migration. The atypical chemokine receptor family currently comprises the receptors D6, DARC and CCX-CKR. In this review, we discuss the evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies that these receptors play a role in regulating cell migration, and speculate that other orphan receptors may also belong to this family. Furthermore, with the advent of gene therapy on the horizon, the therapeutic potential of these receptors in human disease is also considered. PMID:17295321

  11. Chemokine sequestration by atypical chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Hansell, C A H; Simpson, C V; Nibbs, R J B

    2006-12-01

    Leucocyte migration is essential for robust immune and inflammatory responses, and plays a critical role in many human diseases. Chemokines, a family of small secreted protein chemoattractants, are of fundamental importance in this process, directing leucocyte trafficking by signalling through heptahelical G-protein-coupled receptors expressed by the migrating cells. However, several mammalian chemokine receptors, including D6 and CCX-CKR (ChemoCentryx chemokine receptor), do not fit existing models of chemokine receptor function, and do not even appear to signal in response to chemokine binding. Instead, these 'atypical' chemokine receptors are biochemically specialized for chemokine sequestration, acting to regulate chemokine bioavailability and thereby influence responses through signalling-competent chemokine receptors. This is of critical importance in vivo, as mice lacking D6 show exaggerated cutaneous inflammatory responses and an increased susceptibility to the development of skin cancer. CCX-CKR, on the other hand, is predicted to modulate homoeostatic lymphocyte and dendritic cell trafficking, key migratory events in acquired immune responses that are directed by CCX-CKR-binding chemokines. Thus studies on 'atypical' chemokine receptors are revealing functional and biochemical diversity within the chemokine receptor family and providing insights into novel mechanisms of chemokine regulation. PMID:17073739

  12. Atypical Yersinia enterocolitica: clinical and epidemiological parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Bottone, E J

    1978-01-01

    Infections due to biochemically typical Yersinia enterocolitica usually present as gastroenteritis, mesenteric lymphadenitis, terminal ileitis, and septicemia often with visceral abscesses. In these instances, the isolates have been biochemically typical and of well-established serotypes, namely 0:3 or 0:9 and, in the United States, 0:5 or 0:8. The recovery, recognition, and significance of biochemically and serologically atypical Y. enterocolitica in human infections has proceeded more slowly. From an analysis of the clinical histories of 20 patients infected with 21 such aberrant Y. enterocolitica, it appears that these strains are of restricted pathogenic potential, producing various clinical entities such as localized skin abscesses, conjunctivitis, self-limiting enteritis, and wound and urinary tract infections in hosts with predisposing factors. Epidemiologically, whereas episodic acquisition of atypical strains by hospitalized patients is indicative of nosocomial transmission, in the present series sporadic isolations over a 4-year period, mainly from ambulatory patients, suggest an occult reservoir in the community serviced by The Mount Sinai Hospital. In contrast to typical Y. enterocolitica, which has become well adapted in animal and human hosts, it appears that environmental strains may be in the evolutionary process of becoming adapted to humans. PMID:670380

  13. Neuromyelitis optica: atypical clinical and neuroradiological presentation.

    PubMed

    Splendiani, Alessandra; Mariani, Silvia; Anselmi, Monica; Catalucci, Alessia; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Gallucci, Massimo

    2015-02-01

    The extreme variability of clinical and MRI findings in the suspicion of Devic's disease always requires the detection of specific antibodies (AQP4). MRI scans were performed with a high-field MRI scanner (1.5T General Electric Signa Horizon): the MRI protocol of the brain employed axial DP, T2, T1, FLAIR and DWI weighted images (wi) and coronal T2-wi. After intravenous administration of contrast medium axial and sagittal T1-weighted images of the brain were repeated. The spine protocol employed after contrast medium included sagittal T2-wi, T2-wi with fat suppression and T1-wi. In May 2004, a 64-year-old healthy Caucasian woman began to suffer loss of motor and thermal sensitivity in the left lower limb. MRI showed non-specific areas of abnormal signal intensity on the deep left frontal and right frontoparietal white matter with no pathological enhancement after contrast medium and a small intramedullary area of altered signal at metameric level C2-C4 with a diagnosis of post-viral transverse myelitis. The patient had two similar episodes years later so the neurologist decided to search for circulating IgG AQP4 with the definitive diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica. In this case, compared to a clinical presentation of atypical deficit neurological involvement, the neuroradiological results of a progressive diffuse involvement of the white matter were atypical. PMID:25924171

  14. Atypical eating disorder in a male patient.

    PubMed

    Bailer, U; De Zwaan, M; Kasper, S

    1999-01-01

    In the literature there is evidence that a substantial proportion of patients with bulimia nervosa can be helped by cognitive behavioural self-help manuals. As there are no specific recommendations or strategies for the treatment of males with eating disorders we were therefore especially interested in the way a man might deal with such a self-help manual. In this case the book Getting better bit(e) by bit(e) by Treasure and Schmidt (also available in German translation) was given to a young man with an atypical eating disorder (atypical anorexia nervosa according to ICD-10). The patient was offered a maximum of 16 short visits and was seen by a first-year psychiatry resident. Treatment with this self-help manual was effective and the patient succeeded in changing his former eating behaviour. The case report provides preliminary evidence that a self-help manual may be a useful addition to the range of possible interventions in the treatment of eating disorders in men. Self-help manuals are less intensive and less costly than other forms of treatment and might be the lowest-step intervention in a stepped-care approach to treatment. PMID:24941097

  15. Neuromyelitis Optica: Atypical Clinical and Neuroradiological Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Silvia; Anselmi, Monica; Catalucci, Alessia; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Gallucci, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The extreme variability of clinical and MRI findings in the suspicion of Devic's disease always requires the detection of specific antibodies (AQP4). MRI scans were performed with a high-field MRI scanner (1.5T General Electric Signa Horizon): the MRI protocol of the brain employed axial DP, T2, T1, FLAIR and DWI weighted images (wi) and coronal T2-wi. After intravenous administration of contrast medium axial and sagittal T1-weighted images of the brain were repeated. The spine protocol employed after contrast medium included sagittal T2-wi, T2-wi with fat suppression and T1-wi. In May 2004, a 64-year-old healthy Caucasian woman began to suffer loss of motor and thermal sensitivity in the left lower limb. MRI showed non-specific areas of abnormal signal intensity on the deep left frontal and right frontoparietal white matter with no pathological enhancement after contrast medium and a small intramedullary area of altered signal at metameric level C2-C4 with a diagnosis of post-viral transverse myelitis. The patient had two similar episodes years later so the neurologist decided to search for circulating IgG AQP4 with the definitive diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica. In this case, compared to a clinical presentation of atypical deficit neurological involvement, the neuroradiological results of a progressive diffuse involvement of the white matter were atypical. PMID:25924171

  16. [The role of calcium ions in the pathomechanism of the artery calcification accompanying atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Małecki, Rafał; Adamiec, Rajmund

    2005-01-01

    Artery calcification occurring in atherosclerosis is connected with a high risk of cardiovascular events. Quantitative calcification evaluation using electron beam tomography indicated a correlation between artery calcification and well-known cardiovascular risk factors, i.e. smoking, obesity, and hyperlipidemia. Elevated calcium scores are especially observed in diabetic patients, which may even explain the higher mortality in this group. Calcification leads to increased blood vessel rigidity and, consequently, elevated arterial vascular resistance and left ventricular hypertrophy. An increased risk of plaque rupture in relation to calcium-rich atherosclerotic lesions was not proved. Plaque rupture and thromboembolitic complications are probably higher in the case of lipid-rich lesions. Atherosclerotic calcification is an active process in which many cells (monocytes/macrophages, vascular smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells) participate. Many substances and transcription factors normally participating in the bone remodeling process are found in calcified atherosclerotic lesions (e.g. Cbfa-1, osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, BMP-2, osteopontin, osteoprotegrin, and RANKL). On monocytes, cells playing an important role in atherosclerosis progression, the presence of a calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) has been demonstrated. Increase in monocyte chemotaxis and increased interleukin 6 secretion in response to extracellular calcium were observed. Monocytes also directly and indirectly enhance vascular calcification. Immune cells and cytokines participating in vascular calcification are connected in one pathogenetic mechanism, i.e. atherosclerosis as an inflammatory disease and calcification. PMID:15761385

  17. Generalized arterial calcification of infancy--Findings at post-mortem computed tomography and autopsy.

    PubMed

    Bolster, Ferdia; Ali, Zabiullah; Southall, Pamela; Fowler, David

    2015-09-01

    Generalized arterial calcification in infancy is a rare genetic disorder characterized by abnormal calcification of large and medium sized arteries and marked myointimal proliferation resulting in arterial stenosis. The condition is often fatal secondary to complications of cardiac ischemia, hypertension and cardiac failure. In this report we describe the findings at post mortem computed tomography, histology and autopsy. PMID:26165490

  18. Advanced glycation endproducts regulate smooth muscle cells calcification in cultured HSMCs

    PubMed Central

    He, Hu-Qiang; Liu, Yong; Zeng, Hong; Sun, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xue-Lin; Liao, Wen-Jun; Zhou, Xiang-Yu; He, Yan-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) promoting the calcification of smooth muscle cells. Methods: The successfully cultured smooth muscle cells were divided into three groups: normal culture group (group A), calcified culture group (group B), calcification + AGEs group (group C); the concentration of intracellular calcium ion was detected in each group; the promotion of AGEs on the calcification of HSMCs was confirmed by VON KOSSA staining; and the expressions of β-catenin, RAGE, β-catenin, OPG and E-cadherin protein were detected by immunofluorescence and western blot. Results: The morphology of the cells in each group showed that the amount of calcified plaques in calcification + AGES group were significantly higher than the calcification group. VON KOSSA staining showed that with increasing concentrations of AGE-BSA, the amount of its calcification gradually increased. Calcium concentration in Calcification + 20 mg/L AGEs group was significantly higher, followed by 40 mg/L AGEs group. The expression of β-catenin increased with the increasing concentrations of AGEs. Conclusion: AGEs can promote the calcification of human femoral artery smooth muscle cells, with a concentration gradient effect. With increasing concentrations of AGEs, the expression of RAGE increased, indicating that AGEs-induced HSMCs proliferation was correlated with RAGE expression. PMID:26722411

  19. Matrix Gla Protein is Associated with Risk Factors for Atherosclerosis but not with Coronary Artery Calcification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: Atherosclerotic coronary artery calcification (CAC) is associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Matrix Gla Protein (MGP) is an inhibitor of calcification in vivo. However, little is known regarding the distribution of circulating MGP, and its associations with CHD...

  20. Compression-induced changes on physical structures and calcification of the aromatic polyether polyurethane composite.

    PubMed

    Tang, Z G; Teoh, S H; McFarlane, W; Poole-Warren, L; Umezu, M

    2003-01-01

    It is generally accepted that stress causes calcification in both bio-prosthetic and polyurethane heart valves. However, simple uni-axially- and bi-axially-stretched samples did not yield a feasible model for the elaboration of the stress-induced calcification. In this study, heat compaction combined with the incorporation of polyethylene has been explored. Specimens of polyurethane were solution cast onto a porous bi-axially-drawn ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene film and then heat compacted under a pressure of 18 MPa at a chosen temperature for 1.5 h. The heat-compaction-induced calcification and physical changes of the polyurethane composite were evaluated using a 28-day in vitro calcification model and Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier Transform-Infrared (ATR-FT-IR) spectroscopy. The calcification results indicated that heat-compaction-induced calcification was double that achieved without heat compaction. Heat-compacted polyurethane composite showed higher affinity to calcium ions than the non-heat compacted sample. The ATR-FT-IR results showed that the heat-compaction-induced physical changes include distortions of polymeric molecules and permanent changes of microstructures. The distortions of polymeric molecules could be deteriorated in contact with different media. The relaxation of the stressed structures of the polyether moiety might serve as a calcium trap and a heterogeneous nucleation site for calcification. The permanent changes of microstructures resulted from high distortions also served as affinity sites attracting calcification. PMID:14661883

  1. Dietary vitamin K and therapeutic warfarin alter susceptibility to vascular calcification in experimental chronic kidney disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is cardiovascular disease (CVD), with vascular calcification (VC) being a key modifier of disease progression. A local regulator of vascular calcification is vitamin K. This gamma-glutamyl carboxylase substrate is an essential ...

  2. Abdominal aortic calcification is not superior over other vascular calcification in predicting mortality in hemodialysis patients: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) guidelines recommend that a lateral abdominal radiograph should be performed to assess vascular calcification (VC) in dialysis patients. However, abdominal aortic calcification is a prevalent finding, and it remains unclear whether other anatomical areas of VC can predict mortality more accurately. Methods A total of 217 maintenance hemodialysis patients were enrolled at the Sichuan Provincial People’s Hospital between July 2010 and March 2011. Radiographs of the abdomen, pelvis and hands were evaluated by a radiologist to evaluate the presence of VC. The correlation between different areas of VC and all-cause or cardiovascular mortality was analyzed using univariate and multivariate models. Results The prevalence of VC was 70.0% (152 patients), and most had abdominal aortic calcification (90.1%). During 26 ± 7 months of follow-up, 37 patients died. The VC score was independently associated with patient mortality. VC observed on abdominal radiographs (abdominal aortic calcification) was associated with all-cause mortality in models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors (HR, 4.69; 95%CI, 1.60-13.69) and dialysis factors (HR, 3.38; 95%CI, 1.18-9.69). VC in the pelvis or hands was associated with all-cause mortality in the model adjusted for dialysis factors. When three combinations of VC in different radiographs were included in models, the presence of abdominal VC was only significantly associated with all-cause mortality in the integrated model. VC in the abdomen and pelvis was associated with all-cause mortality in the model adjusted for cardiovascular factors and the integrated model, but neither was significantly associated with cardiovascular mortality. VC in all radiographs was significantly associated with a more than 6-fold risk of all-cause mortality and a more than 5-fold risk of cardiovascular mortality compared to patients without VC. Conclusions VC in different arteries as shown on

  3. The role of coccolithophore calcification in bioengineering their environment.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Kevin J; Clark, Darren R; Wheeler, Glen

    2016-06-29

    Coccolithophorids are enigmatic plankton that produce calcium carbonate coccoliths, which over geological time have buried atmospheric CO2 into limestone, changing both the atmosphere and geology of the Earth. However, the role of coccoliths for the proliferation of these organisms remains unclear; suggestions include roles in anti-predation, enhanced photosynthesis and sun-screening. Here we test the hypothesis that calcification stabilizes the pH of the seawater proximate to the organisms, providing a level of acidification countering the detrimental basification that occurs during net photosynthesis. Such bioengineering provides a more stable pH environment for growth and fits the empirical evidence for changes in rates of calcification under different environmental conditions. Under this scenario, simulations suggest that the optimal production ratio of inorganic to organic particulate C (PIC : POCprod) will be lower (by approx. 20%) with ocean acidification and that overproduction of coccoliths in a future acidified ocean, where pH buffering is weaker, presents a risk to calcifying cells. PMID:27358373

  4. The role of coccolithophore calcification in bioengineering their environment

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Darren R.; Wheeler, Glen

    2016-01-01

    Coccolithophorids are enigmatic plankton that produce calcium carbonate coccoliths, which over geological time have buried atmospheric CO2 into limestone, changing both the atmosphere and geology of the Earth. However, the role of coccoliths for the proliferation of these organisms remains unclear; suggestions include roles in anti-predation, enhanced photosynthesis and sun-screening. Here we test the hypothesis that calcification stabilizes the pH of the seawater proximate to the organisms, providing a level of acidification countering the detrimental basification that occurs during net photosynthesis. Such bioengineering provides a more stable pH environment for growth and fits the empirical evidence for changes in rates of calcification under different environmental conditions. Under this scenario, simulations suggest that the optimal production ratio of inorganic to organic particulate C (PIC : POCprod) will be lower (by approx. 20%) with ocean acidification and that overproduction of coccoliths in a future acidified ocean, where pH buffering is weaker, presents a risk to calcifying cells. PMID:27358373

  5. Growth and calcification of marine bryozoans in a changing ocean.

    PubMed

    Smith, Abigail M

    2014-06-01

    Bryozoans are colonial benthic marine invertebrate calcifiers, important and especially abundant and diverse in southern hemisphere shelf environments. Large heavily calcified colonies can be up to 50 years old, but most longer-lived bryozoans are limited to 10-20 y. Many smaller species are annual. Radial extension in flat encrusting bryozoans is generally on the order of 1-5 mm/y. Erect calcified species generally grow vertically 2-15 mm/y, though articulated species such as Cellaria may reach rates of 40 mm/y. Corresponding calcification rates are generally 10(1)-10(2) mg/y, but there can be an order of magnitude variation in rate among years in high-latitude bryozoans. Multi-branched bryozoans produce up to 24 g of CaCO3/y. The carbonate produced by bryozoans varies from calcite to aragonite and mixtures of both. Skeletal carbonate mineralogy of bryozoans is complex and appears to be strongly genetically controlled. Global climate change, leading to increasing water temperatures, will generally increase marine bryozoan metabolic rates, and may increase Mg in calcite. On the other hand, decreasing pH (ocean acidification) causes corrosion, changes in mineralogy, and decreased survival. This review of bryozoan growth and calcification allows a general perspective, but also reveals gaps in our knowledge which need to be addressed. PMID:25070865

  6. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff: a review.

    PubMed

    Kachewar, Sushil G; Kulkarni, Devidas S

    2013-07-01

    Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff is a common disorder; its underlying mechanism still remains unknown. Although details of the clinical presentation(s) and pathological changes which are associated with calcific tendinitis are available, conservative management of this condition remains a topic of debate. About 90% of the patients can be treated non - operatively, but as some are resistant to conservative treatment; newer techniques or surgery should be indicated. Rheumatologists and radiologists have often described this shoulder abnormality, leading to its progressive differentiation from other painful shoulder syndromes. The conservative treatment includes the use of non - steroidal anti - inflammatory agents, roentegen therapy, physical modalities for controlling the pain and for preventing loss of joint mobility, local steroid injections, and open or arthroscopic surgeries. Results of non - operative treatments have also been satisfactory. These include heat, cold, range of motion and pendulum exercises, diathermy, short - wave, and radiation therapy. Rest, immobilization with a sling, and oral non - steroidal and steroid anti - inflammatory medications have also been mentioned. This review aimed at looking at calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff with a wide vision in the light of modern advances; while at the same time, not disregarding the past experiences. PMID:23998102

  7. Meningial blood vessel calcification in the brain of the cat.

    PubMed

    Mandara, Maria Teresa

    2003-03-01

    Mineralization in the wall of central nervous system blood vessels is sporadically encountered in aged horses and cattle as in man, generally as an age-related change. This phenomenon has not to date been located in the meninges in dogs or cats. The present study reports a retrospective histological examination of 50 feline brains from 40-day- to 13-year-old cats. Histological examination using routine staining techniques (hematoxylin and eosin, Luxol fast blue-periodic acid-Schiff) and special stains (Von Kossa and Pearl's method) showed substantial blood vessel calcification (BVC) in 29 cases which, except for 1 case, was present only in the leptomeninges. In 72% of cases BVC was not related to nervous tissue lesions. For this reason it was considered an incidental finding, producing no morphological or clinical signs. However, BVC should not be considered merely an age-related finding since it is also quite common in very young animals (35%), suggesting that its pathogenesis needs to be investigated further and compared to BVC observed in children affected by acquired immune deficiency and idiopathic arterial calcification. PMID:12557010

  8. Calcific Tendinitis of the Rotator Cuff: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kachewar, Sushil G; Kulkarni, Devidas S

    2013-01-01

    Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff is a common disorder; its underlying mechanism still remains unknown. Although details of the clinical presentation(s) and pathological changes which are associated with calcific tendinitis are available, conservative management of this condition remains a topic of debate. About 90% of the patients can be treated non – operatively, but as some are resistant to conservative treatment; newer techniques or surgery should be indicated. Rheumatologists and radiologists have often described this shoulder abnormality, leading to its progressive differentiation from other painful shoulder syndromes. The conservative treatment includes the use of non – steroidal anti – inflammatory agents, roentegen therapy, physical modalities for controlling the pain and for preventing loss of joint mobility, local steroid injections, and open or arthroscopic surgeries. Results of non – operative treatments have also been satisfactory. These include heat, cold, range of motion and pendulum exercises, diathermy, short – wave, and radiation therapy. Rest, immobilization with a sling, and oral non – steroidal and steroid anti – inflammatory medications have also been mentioned. This review aimed at looking at calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff with a wide vision in the light of modern advances; while at the same time, not disregarding the past experiences. PMID:23998102

  9. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari; Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito; Imai, Koichi; Tanaka, Akio

    2012-12-01

    Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 μm/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  10. Primary familial brain calcification: update on molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Taglia, Ilaria; Bonifati, Vincenzo; Mignarri, Andrea; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Federico, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Primary familial brain calcification is a neuropsychiatric disorder with calcium deposits in the brain, especially in basal ganglia, cerebellum and subcortical white matter. The disease is characterized by a clinical heterogeneity, with a various combination of symptoms that include movement disorders and psychiatric disturbances; asymptomatic patients have been also reported. To date, three causative genes have been found: SLC20A2, PDGFRB and PDGFB. SLC20A2 gene codes for the 'sodium-dependent phosphate transporter 2' (PiT-2), a cell membrane transporters of inorganic phosphate, involved in Pi uptake by cells and maintenance of Pi body levels. Over 40 pathogenic variants of SLC20A2 have been reported, affecting the regulation of Pi homeostasis. It was hypothesized that SLC20A2 mutations cause brain calcification most likely through haploinsufficiency. PDGFRB encodes for the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFRβ), a cell-surface tyrosine-kinase (RTK) receptor that regulates cell proliferation, migration, survival and differentiation. PDGFB encodes for the 'platelet-derived growth factor beta' (PDGFβ), the ligand of PDGFRβ. The loss of function of PDGFRβ and PDGFβ could lead to the impairment of the pericytes function and blood brain barrier integrity, causing vascular and perivascular calcium accumulation. SLC20A2 accounts for about 40 % of familial form and 14 % of sporadic cases, while PDGFRB and PDGFB mutations are likely rare. However, approximately 50 % of patients are not genetically defined and there should be at least another causative gene. PMID:25686613

  11. Vascular calcification, bone and mineral metabolism after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    D’Marco, Luis; Bellasi, Antonio; Mazzaferro, Sandro; Raggi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The development of end stage renal failure can be seen as a catastrophic health event and patients with this condition are considered at the highest risk of cardiovascular disease among any other patient groups and risk categories. Although kidney transplantation was hailed as an optimal solution to such devastating disease, many issues related to immune-suppressive drugs soon emerged and it became evident that cardiovascular disease would remain a vexing problem. Progression of chronic kidney disease is accompanied by profound alterations of mineral and bone metabolism that are believed to have an impact on the cardiovascular health of patients with advanced degrees of renal failure. Cardiovascular risk factors remain highly prevalent after kidney transplantation, some immune-suppression drugs worsen the risk profile of graft recipients and the alterations of mineral and bone metabolism seen in end stage renal failure are not completely resolved. Whether this complex situation promotes progression of vascular calcification, a hall-mark of advanced chronic kidney disease, and whether vascular calcifications contribute to the poor cardiovascular outcome of post-transplant patients is reviewed in this article. PMID:26722649

  12. Approaches to chronological age assessment based on dental calcification.

    PubMed

    Bolanos, M V; Manrique, M C; Bolanos, M J; Briones, M T

    2000-05-15

    The aim of the present study was to find an accurate estimation of chronological age using a small number of selected teeth. For this purpose, the method devised by Nolla [C. Nolla, The development of the permanent teeth, J. Dent. Child. 27 (1960) 254-266.] was used: the development of each of the teeth was determined according to this method on 374 radiographs, 195 of boys (mean age 8.59) and 179 of girls (mean age 8.75). The 28 variables representing the calcification stages were analyzed using cluster analysis followed by multivariate analysis (multiple linear regression model). Patient age was considered to be a dependent variable. Our study showed that antimere teeth are the most homogeneous as regards stages of development. The prediction was more accurate for boys and girls below 10 years of age, using teeth 21, 43 and 46 from boys and teeth 21, 46 and 47 from girls. These teeth accounted for 80% total variance of chronological age for dental calcification. Standard error was +/-1.4 years for boys and +/-1.2 years for girls. When the age of the children remained completely unknown, the best estimates were provided by teeth 43, 47, 46 and 44 from boys and teeth 44, 47 and 43 from girls. PMID:10808098

  13. Choroid plexus calcification: clinical, neuroimaging and histopathological correlations in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Marinescu, Ileana; Udriştoiu, I; Marinescu, D

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is recognized as a psychiatric disorder that causes the most pronounced disturbances of cognition and social integration. In the etiopathogenesis of the disease, genetic, neurobiological and vascular factors are involved. Functional integrity of the brain can be correlated with the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the dysfunction of this barrier is an indicator that suggests neurodevelopmental abnormalities, injuries of various etiologies and dysfunctions within the small vessels of the brain that disrupt the calcium homeostasis. Neuroimaging shows that in patients with poor evolution, cognitive dysfunction and therapeutic resistance, the presence of choroid plexus calcification associated with hippocampal, frontal, temporoparietal and cerebellar atrophies. Antipsychotics with high capacity to block D2 dopamine receptors (haloperidol model) can aggravate apoptotic mechanisms of the brain areas involved in cognition and disrupts the functional integrity of the BBB due to decreased of choroid plexus blood flow because of the narrowing of cerebral small vessels. Choroid plexus calcification may be a predictive indicator of poor evolution or of a neurodegenerative type. PMID:23771083

  14. Mineral and bone disorder and vascular calcification in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Peres, Luis Alberto Batista; Pércio, Pedro Paulo Verona

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcifications has been associated with bone and mineral disorders. The alterations in the serum level of calcium concentrations and phosphate are importants factors implicated in the arterial calcification in chronic kidney disease. The pathogenesis of vascular calcification is a complex mechanism and not completely clear, being able to correspond to an active process of cellular transformation and heterotopic ossification. Beyond the hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia, they are involved in this process changes in the metabolism of inhibitors and promoters of calcification such as fetuin A, osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, and matrix gla protein. For the diagnosis of the calcified arterial injury are available several complementary methods, a method of estimate of the cardiovascular risk based on plain radiographs of the lumbar column and another method based on simple x-rays of the pelvis and hands. Below, we will present a review approching the link between vascular calcifications and mineral disorders. PMID:25055361

  15. Nano-analytical electron microscopy reveals fundamental insights into human cardiovascular tissue calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertazzo, Sergio; Gentleman, Eileen; Cloyd, Kristy L.; Chester, Adrian H.; Yacoub, Magdi H.; Stevens, Molly M.

    2013-06-01

    The accumulation of calcified material in cardiovascular tissue is thought to involve cytochemical, extracellular matrix and systemic signals; however, its precise composition and nanoscale architecture remain largely unexplored. Using nano-analytical electron microscopy techniques, we examined valves, aortae and coronary arteries from patients with and without calcific cardiovascular disease and detected spherical calcium phosphate particles, regardless of the presence of calcific lesions. We also examined lesions after sectioning with a focused ion beam and found that the spherical particles are composed of highly crystalline hydroxyapatite that crystallographically and structurally differs from bone mineral. Taken together, these data suggest that mineralized spherical particles may play a fundamental role in calcific lesion formation. Their ubiquitous presence in varied cardiovascular tissues and from patients with a spectrum of diseases further suggests that lesion formation may follow a common process. Indeed, applying materials science techniques to ectopic and orthotopic calcification has great potential to lend critical insights into pathophysiological processes underlying calcific cardiovascular disease.

  16. [Serpiginous calcifications in breast filariasis: A descriptor not included in the BI-RADS classification system].

    PubMed

    Mora-Encinas, J P; Martín-Martín, B; Martín-Martín, L; Mora-Monago, R

    2015-01-01

    Filariasis is a parasitic disease with a benign course caused by nematodes. Filariasis is endemic in some tropical regions, and immigration has made it increasingly common in some centers in Spain. The death of the parasites can lead to calcifications that are visible in mammograms; these calcifications have specific characteristics and should not be confused with those arising in other diseases. However, the appearance of calcifications due to filariasis is not included in the most common systems used for the classification of calcifications on mammograms (BI-RADS), and this can lead to confusion. In this article, we discuss the need to update classification systems and warn radiologists about the appearance of these calcifications to ensure their correct diagnosis and avoid confusion with other diseases. PMID:25682995

  17. PPARγ COUNTERACTS LRP1-INDUCED VASCULAR CALCIFICATION BY INHIBITING A WNT5A SIGNALING PATHWAY

    PubMed Central

    Woldt, Estelle; Terrand, Jérome; Mlih, Mohamed; Matz, Rachel L.; Bruban, Véronique; Coudane, Fanny; Foppolo, Sophie; El Asmar, Zeina; Chollet, Maria Eugenia; Ninio, Ewa; Bednarczyk, Audrey; Thiersé, Danièle; Schaeffer, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Boudier, Christian; Wahli, Walter; Chambon, Pierre; Metzger, Daniel; Herz, Joachim; Boucher, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a hallmark of advanced atherosclerosis, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show that deletion of the nuclear receptor PPARγ in vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) of Low Density Lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) deficient mice fed an atherogenic high-cholesterol diet results in accelerated vascular calcification with chondrogenic metaplasia within the lesions. We demonstrate that vascular calcification in the absence of PPARγ requires the transmembrane receptor Low Density Lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1). LRP1 promotes a previously unknown Wnt5a dependent prochondrogenic pathway that activates the chondrogenic program. PPARγ protects against vascular calcification by activating sFRP2, which we show functions as a Wnt5a antagonist. Thus, targeting this signaling pathway has important clinical implications, impacting on common complications of atherosclerosis including coronary artery calcification and valvular sclerosis. PMID:23011131

  18. Young Peoples' Representations of "Atypical" Work in English Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crafter, Sarah; O'Dell, Lindsay; de Abreu, Guida; Cline, Tony

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we explore young peoples' normative representations of work. In particular, we are interested in the ways young people view work roles which could be considered "atypical" such as young caring or language brokering. Interviewed were 46 young people (15-18 years) some who did, and some who did not engage in the "atypical" work roles…

  19. Atypical chest discomfort in a 36-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Lisa Mustone; Robie, Stephen; Baute, Scott

    2016-07-01

    This article focuses on aortic aneurysms and the evaluation of patients with atypical chest pain. A complete and accurate family history is essential. Clinicians should pay close attention to persistence of symptoms and age in patients with atypical chest discomfort who do not have routine confirmatory cardiac findings. PMID:27351640

  20. Association of a bovine prion gene haplotype with atypical BSE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), also known as prion diseases, are a class of fatal neurodegenerative disorders that occur in humans, ruminants, cats, and mink. Three distinct TSEs afflict cattle: classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), atypical H-type BSE, and atypical ...

  1. Keloidal Atypical Fibroxanthoma: Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Tongdee, Emily; Touloei, Khasha; Shitabata, Paul K.; Shareef, Shahjahan; Maranda, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    Keloidal atypical fibroxanthoma (KAF) has recently been categorized as a variant of atypical fibroxanthoma. This paper will emphasize the importance of including KAF in both clinical and histological differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lesions which exhibit keloidal collagen and will also review the current literature on epidemiology, pathogenesis, histology, immunochemistry and treatments. PMID:27462224

  2. Typical and Atypical Dementia Family Caregivers: Systematic and Objective Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Linda O.; Martindale-Adams, Jennifer; Burns, Robert; Graney, Marshall J.; Zuber, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    This systematic, objective comparison of typical (spouse, children) and atypical (in-law, sibling, nephew/niece, grandchild) dementia family caregivers examined demographic, caregiving and clinical variables. Analysis was of 1,476 caregivers, of whom 125 were atypical, from the Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer's Caregivers Health (REACH I and II)…

  3. Prediction of the incidence of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage from meteorological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaguchi, Hiroshi; Matsuno, Akira; Teraoka, Akira

    2008-03-01

    We analyzed the relationship between the incidence of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and various meteorological data (daily atmospheric air pressure, air temperature, precipitation, humidity, presence of typhoons, occurrence of the rainy season, wind velocity, and wind direction) for patients at Teraoka Memorial Hospital in Shin-ichi Town, Japan, from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2003. All data were analyzed by contingency table analysis and multivariate regression analysis. From January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2003, we identified high-risk ICH days as those days for which the preceding 3 days mean recorded air pressure of 1,015 hPa or more and then conducted a statistical comparison of the incidence of ICH on high-risk ICH days with that on the other days. Our subjects were 164 patients with ICH. The relative risk of high-risk ICH days is 1.46 (Fisher’s exact test, p = 0.04). Mann-Whitney’s U-tests indicate ICH tends to occur on days with lower maximum air temperature. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that 3 incidences influence the occurrence of intracerebral hemorrhage ( p < 0.01 each): (1) days associated with 4-day periods of mean air pressure in excess of 1,015 hPa; (2) days during which a typhoon was approaching; and (3) days with west or southwest wind . Detailed examination of meteorological data indicates a relationship with the incident rate of ICH.

  4. Right hemispheric dominance of visual phenomena evoked by intracerebral stimulation of the human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Jacques; Frismand, Solène; Vignal, Jean-Pierre; Colnat-Coulbois, Sophie; Koessler, Laurent; Vespignani, Hervé; Rossion, Bruno; Maillard, Louis

    2014-07-01

    Electrical brain stimulation can provide important information about the functional organization of the human visual cortex. Here, we report the visual phenomena evoked by a large number (562) of intracerebral electrical stimulations performed at low-intensity with depth electrodes implanted in the occipito-parieto-temporal cortex of 22 epileptic patients. Focal electrical stimulation evoked primarily visual hallucinations with various complexities: simple (spot or blob), intermediary (geometric forms), or complex meaningful shapes (faces); visual illusions and impairments of visual recognition were more rarely observed. With the exception of the most posterior cortical sites, the probability of evoking a visual phenomenon was significantly higher in the right than the left hemisphere. Intermediary and complex hallucinations, illusions, and visual recognition impairments were almost exclusively evoked by stimulation in the right hemisphere. The probability of evoking a visual phenomenon decreased substantially from the occipital pole to the most anterior sites of the temporal lobe, and this decrease was more pronounced in the left hemisphere. The greater sensitivity of the right occipito-parieto-temporal regions to intracerebral electrical stimulation to evoke visual phenomena supports a predominant role of right hemispheric visual areas from perception to recognition of visual forms, regardless of visuospatial and attentional factors. PMID:24733699

  5. Longitudinal quantification and visualization of intracerebral hemorrhage using multimodal magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Goh, S.Y. Matthew; Irimia, Andrei; Torgerson, Carinna M.; Tubi, Meral A.; Real, Courtney R.; Hanley, Daniel F.; Martin, Neil A.; Vespa, Paul M.; Van Horn, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate a set of approaches using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography whereby pathology-affected white matter (WM) fibers in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) can be selectively visualized. Methods Using structural neuroimaging and DTI volumes acquired longitudinally from three representative ICH patients, the spatial configuration of ICH-related trauma is delineated and the WM fiber bundles intersecting each ICH lesion are identified and visualized. Both the extent of ICH lesions as well as the proportion of WM fibers intersecting the ICH pathology are quantified and compared across subjects. Results Our method successfully demonstrates longitudinal volumetric differences in ICH lesion load and differences across time in percentage of fibers which intersect the primary injury. Conclusions Because neurological conditions such as intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) frequently exhibit pathology-related effects which lead to the exertion of mechanical pressure upon surrounding tissues, and thereby to the deformation and/or displacement of WM fibers, DTI fiber tractography is highly suitable for assessing longitudinal changes in WM fiber integrity and mechanical displacement. PMID:25518865

  6. Intracerebral hemorrhage and meteorological factors in Chongqing, in the southwest of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhang, John H; Qin, Xinyue

    2011-01-01

    Studies have reported the relationship between intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and meteorological factors. However, few of those study analyses were dependent on daily meteorological factors. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between various meteorological data and ICH cases from Chongqing, in the southwest of China. One thousand nineteen intracerebral hemorrhage events registered in our hospital were recorded from 1 January 2006 to 30 August 2009. Meteorological parameters were analyzed, including season, month, air temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, visibility, presence of fog, and wind velocity. The chi-square test for goodness of fit was used for statistical evaluations. Significant differences in seasonal and monthly patterns of ICH onset were observed. The incidence of ICH attack was highest in winter and lowest in summer (p<0.0001). The monthly variation was consistent with the above pattern (p=0.002). Daily air temperature (p<0.0001), humidity (p=0.002), and atmospheric pressure (p<0.0001) were associated with the admission rate. However, no significant relationships were found between visibility (p=0.62), presence of fog (p=0.32), or wind velocity (P=0.5) and the risk of ICH. Our study demonstrates that the incidence of ICH is closely related to some meteorological factors, such as season, daily air temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure. PMID:21725775

  7. Markerless registration for intracerebral hemorrhage surgical system using weighted Iterative Closest Point (ICP).

    PubMed

    Shin, Sangkyun; Lee, Deukhee; Kim, Youngjun; Park, Sehyung

    2012-01-01

    It is required to use a stereotactic frame on a patient's crainial surface to access an intracerebral hematoma in conventional ICH (Intracerebral Hemorrhage) removal surgery. Since ICH using a stereotactic frame is an invasive procedure and also takes a long time, we attempt to develop a robotic ICH removal procedure with a markerless registration system using an optical 3-D scanner. Preoperative planning is performed using a patient's CT (Computed Tomography) images, which include the patient's 3-D geometrical information on the hematoma and internal structures of brain. To register the preplanned data and the intraoperative patient's data, the patient's facial surface is scanned by an optical 3-D scanner on the bed in the operating room. The intraoperatively scanned facial surface is registered to the pose of the patient's preoperative facial surface. The conventional ICP (Iterative Closest Point) algorithm can be used for the registration. In this paper, we propose a weighted ICP in order to improve the accuracy of the registration results. We investigated facial regions that can be used as anatomical landmarks. The facial regions for the landmarks in the preoperative 3-D model are weighted for more accurate registration. We increase weights at the relatively undeformed facial regions, and decrease weights at the other regions. As a result, more accurate and robust registration can be achieved from the preoperative data even with local facial shape changes. PMID:23367127

  8. Administration of S-methyl-L-thiocitrulline protects against brain injuries after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lu, A; Wagner, K R; Broderick, J P; Clark, J F

    2014-06-13

    Although intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) increases the level of glutamate in the perihematomal area and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) in the ICH acute phase, it is unclear whether elevated glutamate activates neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the ICH brain and whether nNOS is an important target for ICH treatment. Here, we assessed the role of the nNOS inhibitor S-methyl-l-thiocitrulline (SMTC) in the activity of NADPH-d and ICH-induced brain injuries. An autologous blood intracerebral infusion model in male rats was used. All of the rats were sacrificed 24h after ICH. ICH increased NADPH-d activity in the striatum. Administering SMTC 3h after ICH decreased the activity of NADH-d (p<0.05 vs. the ICH group). The activation of gelatinolytic enzymes in the perihematomal region of the striatum was reduced by SMTC treatment (p<0.01, vs. the ICH group). The loss of laminin- and occludin-stained vessels was significant in perihematomal regions after 24h of ICH and was significantly attenuated by the administration of SMTC (p<0.01 for laminin, p<0.05 for occluding, compared with the ICH group). Neuronal death and neurological deficits after ICH were also decreased in SMTC treatment rats (p<0.01, vs. the ICH group). The results suggest that the administration of the nNOS inhibitor SMTC after ICH protects against ICH-induced brain injuries and improves neurological function. PMID:24726981

  9. Pre-operative radionuclide localization of intracerebral lesions: a five-year experience.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, J G; Coakham, H B; Russell, T; Smith, P A

    1987-06-01

    Intracerebral lesions demonstrated by computerized tomography usually require histological confirmation to determine subsequent management. Tissue samples are generally obtained by craniotomy or burr hole biopsy; either procedure can prove negative if a lesion is small, deep, or very superficial. Pre-operative imaging and localization reduce biopsy failures. Before the introduction of this straight forward radionuclide technique, our biopsy success rate using conventional localization methods was 88%. In a 5-year period, 200 patients underwent pre-operative radionuclide localization, with an improvement in the overall biopsy success rate to 92.7% (95.5% for lesions which took up radionuclide). Patients have benefitted from reduced operating time and improved post-operative recovery rates. About 85% of all intracerebral lesions may be expected to accumulate radionuclide. However in our series, 93.2% were sufficiently well visualized for a siting marker to be placed with confidence. Within this group, low grade astrocytomas (Kernohan Grades I and II) showed a predictably low incidence of imaging (30.8%). For the majority of lesions which present difficulties in biopsy due to size or site, the radionuclide method is a simple procedure which increases the chance of obtaining positive tissue with the minimum of surgical intervention. PMID:3696626

  10. [Malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumours: Two case reports and complete review of the literature cases].

    PubMed

    Le Fèvre, C; Castelli, J; Perrin, C; Hénaux, P L; Noël, G

    2016-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours are extremely rare and can be associated with neurofibramatosis type 1. Their prognosis is poor and surgery remains the mainstay of therapy and should be the first line of treatment. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are second line treatment and their effectiveness remains to demonstrate. The diagnosis is clinical, radiological, histological and immunohistochemical. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours have a potential of local tumour recurrence very high and can metastasize. They often occur in extremity of the members but also rarely into brain. We report two cases of intracerebral nerve sheath tumour. The first was a 68-year-old woman who was admitted with progressive symptoms of headache and diplopia. A left frontotemporal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours was diagnosed and was treated by surgery and irradiation. Ten months later, she presented a local recurrence and spine bone's metastases were treated by vertebroplasty and irradiation. The patient died 15 months after the diagnosis. The second case was a 47-year-old woman who was referred because headache and vomiting symptoms. A right frontal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours was diagnosed and treated by surgery and irradiation. After that, the patient had three local recurrence operated and pulmonary and cranial bone's metastases. She was still alive after 20 months. We propose a literature review with 25 cases of intracerebral nerve sheath tumour identified, including the two current cases. PMID:26934901

  11. Endothelial depletion of murine SRF/MRTF provokes intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Weinl, Christine; Castaneda Vega, Salvador; Riehle, Heidemarie; Stritt, Christine; Calaminus, Carsten; Wolburg, Hartwig; Mauel, Susanne; Breithaupt, Angele; Gruber, Achim D.; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Olson, Eric N.; Adams, Ralf H.; Pichler, Bernd J.; Nordheim, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke and vascular dementia are age- and hypertension-associated manifestations of human cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). Cerebral microvessels are formed by endothelial cells (ECs), which are connected through tight junctions, adherens junctions, and stabilizing basement membrane structures. These endothelial connections ensure both vessel stability and blood–brain barrier (BBB) functions, the latter enabling selective exchange of ions, bioactive molecules, and cells between the bloodstream and brain tissue. SrfiECKO mice, permitting conditional EC-specific depletion of the transcription factor Serum Response Factor (SRF), suffer from loss of BBB integrity and intracerebral hemorrhaging. Cerebral microbleeds and larger hemorrhages developed upon postnatal and adult depletion of either SRF or its cofactors Myocardin Related Transcription Factor (MRTF-A/-B), revealing essential requirements of ongoing SRF/MRTF activity for maintenance of cerebral small vessel integrity. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging allowed detection, localization, and time-resolved quantification of BBB permeability and hemorrhage formation in SrfiECKO brains. At the molecular level, direct and indirect SRF/MRTF target genes, encoding structural components of tight junctions (Claudins and ZO proteins), adherens junctions (VE-cadherin, α-Actinin), and the basement membrane (Collagen IV), were down-regulated upon SRF depletion. These results identify SRF and its MRTF cofactors as major transcriptional regulators of EC junctional stability, guaranteeing physiological functions of the cerebral microvasculature. We hypothesize that impairments in SRF/MRTF activity contribute to human SVD pathology. PMID:26221020

  12. Intracerebral vascular changes induced by cold pressor test: a model of sympathetic activation.

    PubMed

    Micieli, G; Tassorelli, C; Bosone, D; Cavallini, A; Viotti, E; Nappi, G

    1994-06-01

    Cerebral vascular changes seem to play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of various functional disturbances, (i.e. those suggested for migraine pathogenesis). However the exact role of single regulatory aspects (metabolic-neuronal-mechanic) are not completely understood and easily investigated in man. In particular, the role of autonomic nervous system is widely debated and recently the stimulation of tegmental noradrenergic nuclei (locus coeruleus in particular) has proved capable of inducing, in the animal, both the reduction and the increase of extracerebral blood flow. In order to evaluate the vascular effect of locus coeruleus stimulation in man, we investigated intracerebral vascular changes induced by the cold pressor test (CPT) (a well standardized method for activating both nociceptive and sympathetic pathways) by means of transcranial Doppler sonography. The examinations were performed in 14 healthy controls. CPT induced a constant and evident reduction in mean arterial velocity of the middle cerebral artery. The response was triggered during the first minute following hand immersion in ice water and reached its maximum level by the 3rd minute. Pretreatment with the alfa2-agonist clonidine caused a marked reduction of the cerebrovascular response. These data suggest that: a) intracerebral vascular response induced by CPT may be attributed to a central noradrenergic mechanism (possibly modulated at the locus coeruleus level) and b) transcranial Doppler monitoring of CPT effect is a potential tool for investigating peculiar patterns of functional disturbances of cerebral circulation. PMID:7936082

  13. Update on the Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II): statistical analysis plan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies had suggested that the outcome for patients with spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) and no intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) might be improved with early evacuation of the haematoma. The Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II) set out to establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients with spontaneous lobar ICH would improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. It is an international, multi-centre, prospective randomised parallel group trial of early surgery in patients with spontaneous lobar ICH. Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire. Results Recruitment to the study began on 27 November 2006 and closed on 15 August 2012 by which time 601 patients had been recruited. The protocol was published in Trials (http://www.trialsjournal.com/content/12/1/124/). This update presents the analysis plan for the study without reference to the unblinded data. The trial data will not be unblinded until after follow-up is completed in early 2013. The main trial results will be presented in spring 2013 with the aim to publish in a peer-reviewed journal at the same time. Conclusion The data from the trial will provide evidence on the benefits and risks of early surgery in patients with lobar ICH. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN22153967 PMID:23171588

  14. Early treatment of hypertension in acute ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke: progress achieved, challenges, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Carlos A

    2014-03-01

    Hypertension is the leading risk factor for ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic subtypes of stroke. Additionally, high blood pressure (BP) in the acute cerebrovascular event is associated with poor outcome, and a high percentage of stroke survivors have inadequate control of hypertension. The present is a systematic review of prospective, randomized, and controlled trials carried out on safety and efficacy of antihypertensive treatment of both subtypes of acute stroke. Six trials involving 7512 patients were included, which revealed controversies on the speed and the goals of treatment. These controversies could be due at least in part, from the fact that some studies analyzed the results of antihypertensive treatment in ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic subtypes of acute stroke together, and from a different prevalence of past-stroke in the randomized groups. Further research is necessary to establish whether standard antihypertensive treatment provides greater benefit than simple observation in patients with ischemic acute stroke and Stage 2 hypertension of JNC 7, albeit they were not candidates for acute reperfusion. In that case, the target reduction in BP could be 10% to 15% within 24 hours. The recently published INTERACT 2 has provided evidence that patients with hemorrhagic stroke may receive intensive antihypertensive treatment safely with the goal of reducing systolic BP to levels no lower than 130 mm Hg. It is important to take into account that marked BP lowering in acute stroke increases the risk of poor outcome by worsening cerebral ischemia from deterioration of cerebral blood flow autoregulation. PMID:24220549

  15. Mouse intracerebral hemorrhage models produce different degrees of initial and delayed damage, axonal sprouting, and recovery.

    PubMed

    Barratt, Harriet E; Lanman, Tyler A; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The mechanisms of delayed damage and recovery after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) remain poorly defined. Two rodent models of ICH are commonly used: injection of the enzyme collagenase (cICH) and injection of autologous blood (bICH). In mice, we compared the effects of these two models on initial and delayed tissue damage, motor system connections, and behavioral recovery. There is no difference in lesion size between models. Injection of autologous blood causes greater mass effect and early mortality. However, cICH produces greater edema, inflammation, and cell death. Injection of the enzyme collagenase causes greater loss of cortical connections and secondary shrinkage of the striatum. Intracerebral hemorrhage occurs within the motor system connections of the striatum. Mapping of the projections of the forelimb motor area shows a significant sprouting in motor cortex projections only in cICH. Both models of ICH produce deficits in forelimb motor control. Behavioral recovery occurs by 5 weeks in cICH and 9 weeks in bICH. In summary, cICH and bICH differ in almost every facet of initial and delayed stroke pathophysiology, with cICH producing greater initial and secondary tissue damage and greater motor system axonal sprouting than bICH. Motor recovery occurs in both models, suggesting that motor system axonal sprouting in cICH is not causally associated with recovery. PMID:24917041

  16. Toxicity, distribution, and elimination of thiol complexes of methylmercury after intracerebral injection

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, P.H.; Balthrop, J.E.; Wade, J.L.; Braddon-Galloway, S.

    1986-01-01

    Intracerebral injection of CH/sub 3/Hg and CH/sub 3/Hg complexed with glutathione (GSH), cysteine (cys), cysteinylglycine (cys-gly), and homocysteine (homocys) resulted in differences in toxicity. Criteria based on neurological indices, mortality, and weight loss indicated that the cys-gly complex of CH/sub 3/Hg was significantly less toxic than CH/sub 3/Hg or the other complexes. The other complexes of CH/sub 3/Hg (GSH, homocys, and cys) were also found to be less toxic than CH/sub 3/Hg. The selenium status of the animal did not seem to significantly influence the toxicity of CH/sub 3/Hg and the complexes. While CH/sub 3/Hg complexed to cys-gly was significantly less toxic than CH/sub 3/Hg alone, there were no differences observed in the CH/sub 3/Hg half-life values or in the distribution of these compounds in the kidneys, brain, liver, and blood. It was observed, however, that the CH/sub 3/Hg-cys-gly complex had higher fecal excretion on d 3 and 4 following intracerebral injection.

  17. Interaction between Warfarin and the Herbal Product Shengmai-Yin: A Case Report of Intracerebral Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qun

    2010-01-01

    A 71-year-old man was stable on warfarin (2.25 mg daily) therapy with an international normalized ratio (INR) of 1.8-2.2 after a heart valve replacement surgery. Recently, he consumed the liquid-like herbal product called shengmai-yin (10 mL daily) against medical advice. Seven days after the daily consumption of shengmai-yin, he was admitted to the intensive care unit because of consciousness disturbance [Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score 7] with an INR of 5.08. Head computed topography revealed intracerebral hematoma in the left temporoparietal region. Both warfarin therapy and the herbal product were withdrawn. At the same time, therapy with intravenous vitamin K1 40 mg was started. On the second day of admission, craniectomy was performed to remove the intacerebral hematoma under general anesthesia. He remained confused and restless for 2 days, but then showed progressive recovery in the consciousness level as well as motor and verbal functions. Shengmai-yin contains herbal ingredients that can interact with warfarin. The Drug Interaction Probability Scale (DIPS) indicated that warfarin and shengmai-yin were highly probable causes of intracerebral hematoma. Patients on warfarin therapy should be discouraged from taking herbal medicines, especially preparations that are already known to have antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects. PMID:20635460

  18. BMP-2 promotes phosphate uptake, phenotypic modulation, and calcification of human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianwu; Yang, Hsueh-Ying; Giachelli, Cecilia M

    2008-08-01

    Vascular calcification is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events that are the most common cause of death in patients with end-stage renal disease. Clinical and experimental studies indicate that hyperphosphatemia is a risk factor for vascular calcification and cardiovascular mortality in these patients. Our previous studies demonstrated that phosphate transport through the type III sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter, Pit-1, was necessary for phosphate-induced calcification and osteochondrogenic phenotypic change in cultured human smooth muscle cells (SMC). BMP-2 is a potent osteogenic protein required for osteoblast differentiation and bone formation that has been implicated in vascular calcification. In the present study, we have examined the effects of BMP-2 on human SMC calcification in vitro. We found that treatment of SMC with BMP-2 enhanced elevated phosphate-induced calcification, but did not induce calcification under normal phosphate conditions. mRNAs for BMP receptors, including ALK2, ALK3, ALK6, BMPR-II, ActR-IIA and ActR-IIB were all detected in human SMCs. Mechanistically, BMP-2 dose-dependently stimulated phosphate uptake in SMC (200 ng/ml BMP-2 vs. vehicle: 13.94 vs. 7.09 nmol/30 min/mg protein, respectively). Real-time PCR and Western blot revealed the upregulation of Pit-1 mRNA and protein levels, respectively, by BMP-2. More importantly, inhibition of phosphate uptake by a competitive inhibitor of sodium-dependent phosphate cotransport, phosphonoformic acid, abrogated BMP-2-induced calcification. These results indicate that phosphate transport via Pit-1 is crucial in BMP-2-regulated SMC calcification. In addition, BMP-2-induced Runx2 and inhibited SM22 expression, indicating that it promotes osteogenic phenotype transition in these cells. Thus, BMP-2 may promote vascular calcification via increased phosphate uptake and induction of osteogenic phenotype modulation in SMC. PMID:18179800

  19. Calcifications Are Potential Surrogates for Prostate Localization in Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Grace G. McGowan, Tom S.; Larsen, Tessa M.; Bruce, Lisa M.; Moran, Natasha K.; Tsao, Jonathan R.; MacPherson, Miller S.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using calcifications as surrogates for the prostate position during cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The twice-weekly CBCT images taken during the treatment course of 4 patients were retrospectively studied for the stability of the calcifications. The geometric center of three fiducial markers was used as the reference. The planning CT images of 131 prostate patients recently treated with external beam radiotherapy at our center were reviewed to estimate the calcification occurrence rate. Analysis was conducted using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system. Two patients were treated using prostate calcifications as the landmark in on-line registration. Both the Varian standard and the low-dose CBCT modes were used for imaging. Results: The calcifications were found to be stable during the treatment course. At the 95% confidence interval, the difference between the distance from an identified calcification to the fiducial markers on CBCT and the distance on the planning CT scans was 0.2 {+-} 2.0 mm, 0.8 {+-} 2.2 mm, and 0.4 {+-} 2.4 mm in the left-right, anteroposterior, and superoinferior direction, respectively. Of the 131 patients, 46 (35%) had well-defined calcifications either inside the prostate or near the borders. Our experience in treating the first 2 patients demonstrated that the calcifications are easily distinguished on low-dose scans and that calcification registration can be precisely performed. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that calcifications can be reliable markers of prostate position and allow for precise image guidance with a low-imaging dose. With this approach, potentially about one-third of prostate patients could benefit from precise image guidance without the invasive use of markers.

  20. Gelatinases promote calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells by up-regulating bone morphogenetic protein-2.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong-Gang; Meng, Fan-Xing; Li, Bing-Wei; Sheng, You-Ming; Liu, Ming-Ming; Wang, Bing; Li, Hong-Wei; Xiu, Rui-Juan

    2016-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), also known as gelatinase A, is involved in vascular calcification. Another member of gelatinases is MMP-9 (gelatinase B). However, the role of gelatinases in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification is not well understood. The current study aims to clarify the relationship between gelatinases and vascular calcification and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Beta-glycerophosphate (β-GP) was used to induce calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) with or without 2-[[(4-Phenoxyphenyl)sulfonyl]methyl]-thiirane (SB-3CT), a specific gelatinases inhibitor. Levels of calcification were determined by assessing calcium content and calcification area of VSMCs. Phenotype transition of VSMCs was observed by assessing expressions of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), smooth muscle α-actin (SM-α-actin) and desmin. Gelatin zymography was applied to determine the activities of gelatinases, and western blot was applied to determine expressions of gelatinases, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and msh homeobox homolog 2 (Msx-2). Gelatinases inhibition by SB-3CT alleviated calcification and phenotype transition of VSMCs induced by β-GP. Increased gelatinases expression and active MMP-2 were observed in calcifying VSMCs. Gelatinases inhibition reduced expression of RUNX2, Msx-2 and BMP-2. BMP-2 treatment increased expressions of RUNX2 and Msx-2, while noggin, an antagonist of BMP-2, decreased expressions of RUNX2 and Msx-2. Gelatinases promote vascular calcification by upregulating BMP-2 which induces expression of RUNX2 and Msx-2, two proteins associated with phenotype transition of VSMCs in vascular calcification. Interventions targeting gelatinases inhibition might be a proper candidate for ameliorating vascular calcification. PMID:26797522