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  1. [Intracranial hemorrhage in an infant due to vitamin K deficiency --successful management of spontaneous intracerebral and subjural hematoma].

    PubMed

    Shirai, S; Owada, M; Fujita, Y; Akimoto, M; Hayashi, M

    1976-12-01

    A one-month-old male infant with spontaneous intracerebral and subdural hematomas due to vitamin K deficiency was described. He was breastfed. Loose stools continued and began to contain blood. He had fever, vomiting and convulsion, and became drowsy. The blood studies showed anemia and hypoprothrombinemia. Left carotid angiograms revealed intracerebral and subdural hematomas. He was treated successfully by immediate operation and administration of vitamin K. 2) Vitamin K deficient hemorrhage beyond the immediate newborn period was discussed with reference in the literature. Three etiologic factors included, decreased vitamin K intake, decreased intestinal absorption of vitamin K and decreased production of vitamin K by colon bacteria. The most important factor of the three seemed to be low vitamin K intake. Intracranial hemorrhage was recognized in about one third of the cases in the literature. It was emphasized that vitamin K deficiency occurring beyond the immediate newborn period was very important as a cause of intracranial hemorrhage in infancy. PMID:1036036

  2. Surgical management of intracerebral hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Tsementzis, S.A.

    1985-04-01

    Traditional and recent developments in the management of spontaneous intracranial hematomas are reviewed. A comprehensive account of the epidemiological characteristics worldwide with an etiological analysis including prevention and prophylaxis introduce the size and clinical significance of this neurological problem. The usefulness and limitations of the available diagnostic methods are described. Most of the emphasis, however, is placed on the management and medicosurgical treatment of intracranial hematomas in correlation with their clinical presentation and localization. 80 references.

  3. Hematoma expansion following acute intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Brouwers, H Bart; Greenberg, Steven M

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), the most devastating form of stroke, has no specific therapy proven to improve outcome by randomized controlled trial. Location and baseline hematoma volume are strong predictors of mortality, but are nonmodifiable by the time of diagnosis. Expansion of the initial hematoma is a further marker of poor prognosis that may be at least partly preventable. Several risk factors for hematoma expansion have been identified, including baseline ICH volume, early presentation after symptom onset, anticoagulation, and the CT angiography spot sign. Although the biological mechanisms of hematoma expansion remain unclear, accumulating evidence supports a model of ongoing secondary bleeding from ruptured adjacent vessels surrounding the initial bleeding site. Several large clinical trials testing therapies aimed at preventing hematoma expansion are in progress, including aggressive blood pressure reduction, treatment with recombinant factor VIIa guided by CT angiography findings, and surgical intervention for superficial hematomas without intraventricular extension. Hematoma expansion is so far the only marker of outcome that is amenable to treatment and thus a potentially important therapeutic target. PMID:23466430

  4. Language recovery after acute intracerebral hematoma in temporoparietal region.

    PubMed

    Kolundžić, Zdravko; Klarić, Andrea Šimić; Krip, Marija; Gotovac, Nikola; Banožić, Ljerka; Vodanović, Dinah

    2015-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations are the most common cause of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages in older children. Intracerebral hematoma can cause serious lasting neurologic, cognitive, and language deficits, or even possible death. We present the case of a 16-year-old boy who had language impairments after suffering a large hemorrhagic stroke in the left temporoparietal region. All language components, verbal and nonverbal communication, reading, and writing, were found to be affected. These impairments were expected as they are characteristic of the location of the hematoma. After a year of speech language rehabilitation, there was an almost complete recovery of language skills. Quick diagnosis and adequate therapeutic interventions are important to diminish the influence of intracerebral hemorrhage on cognitive and language functions in children. PMID:24532808

  5. Intracerebral hematoma extends via perivascular spaces and perineurium.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia; Lü, Tian-Ming; Qiu, Guang; Huang, Rui-Yu; Fang, Min; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Xiao, Duan; Liu, Xiao-Jia

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating disorder associated with high morbidity and mortality. ICH results in the formation of hematoma that affects not only the primary site of injury but also the remote regions. In fact, hematoma can extend via perivascular spaces (also called Virchow-Robin spaces, VRS) and perineurium in an animal model of ICH. In the present study, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to investigate the characteristics of the perivascular and perineural extensions of hematomas in patients with ICH. A total of 20 ICH patients without secondary subarachnoid and secondary intraventricular hemorrhages were recruited. Brain MRI scans, including SWI, T1, and T2-weighted images, were performed between 17 h to 7 days after the onset of ICH. MRI with SWI revealed that paramagnetic substances spread along the VRS or the perineurium. Such distribution could cause the formation of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs). However, the distribution of remote hemorrhagic lesions varied, depending on the size and location of the original hematoma. The unenhanced CT scans of the 20 patients did not show any hyperdensity around the blood vessels and nerve tracts outside the hematoma. These results indicate the perivascular and perineural extensions of hematomas in patients with ICH, which is formed by the leakage of the original hematoma via the VRS or perineurium. We also provide a new explanation for the series of pathological processes involved in ICH, including the remote effects of hematoma and the formation of CMBs in patients with ICH. PMID:23812162

  6. Influence of hematoma location on acute mortality after intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Yong; King, Caroline; Stradling, Dana; Warren, Michael; Nguyen, Dennis; Lee, Johnny; Riola, Mark A.; Montoya, Ricardo; Patel, Dipika; Le, Vu H.; Welbourne, Susan J.; Cramer, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose The current study aimed to identify predictors of acute mortality after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), including voxel-wise analysis of hematoma location. Methods In 282 consecutive patients with acute ICH, clinical and radiological predictors of acute mortality were identified. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping examined spatial correlates of acute mortality, contrasting results in basal ganglia ICH and lobar ICH. Results Acute mortality was 47.9%. In bivariate analyses, one clinical (serum glucose) and two radiological (hematoma volume and intraventricular extension) measures significantly predicted mortality. The relationship was strongest for hematoma volume. Multivariable modeling identified four significant predictors of mortality (ICH volume, intraventricular extension, serum glucose, and serum hemoglobin), although this model only minimally improved the predictive value provided by ICH volume alone. Voxel-wise analysis found that for patients with lobar ICH, brain regions where acute hematoma was significantly associated with higher acute mortality included inferior parietal lobule and posterior insula; for patients with basal ganglia ICH, a large region extending from cortex to brainstem. Conclusions For patients with lobar ICH, acute mortality is related to both hematoma size and location, with findings potentially useful for therapeutic decision-making. The current findings also underscore differences between the syndromes of acute deep and lobar ICH. PMID:23279617

  7. Does the volume and localization of intracerebral hematoma affect short-term prognosis of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage?

    PubMed

    Salihović, Denisa; Smajlović, Dževdet; Ibrahimagić, Omer Ć

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether volume and localization of intracerebral hematoma affects the six-month prognosis of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Patients and Methods. The study included 75 patients with ICH of both sex and all age groups. ICH, based on CT scan findings, was divided in the following groups: lobar, subcortical, infratentorial, intraventricular haemorrhage and multiple hematomas. Volume of intracerebral hematoma was calculated according to formula V = 0.5 × a × b × c. Intracerebral hematomas, according to the volume, are divided in three groups (0-29 mL, 30-60 mL, and >60 mL). Results. The highest mortality rate was recorded in the group with multiple hematomas (41%), while the lowest in infratentorial (12.8%). The best six-month survival was in patients with a volume up to 29 mL, 30 of them (64%) survived. The highest mortality rate was recorded in patients with the hematoma volume >60 mL (85%). Kaplan-Meier's analysis showed that there was statistical significance between the size of the hematoma and the six-month survival (P < 0.0001). More than half of patients (61.1%) who survived 6 months after ICH were functionally independent (Rankin scale ≤2). Conclusion The volume of hematoma significantly affects six-month prognosis in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, while localization does not. PMID:24967309

  8. Does the Volume and Localization of Intracerebral Hematoma Affect Short-Term Prognosis of Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage?

    PubMed Central

    Salihović, Denisa; Smajlović, Dževdet; Ibrahimagić, Omer Ć.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether volume and localization of intracerebral hematoma affects the six-month prognosis of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Patients and Methods. The study included 75 patients with ICH of both sex and all age groups. ICH, based on CT scan findings, was divided in the following groups: lobar, subcortical, infratentorial, intraventricular haemorrhage and multiple hematomas. Volume of intracerebral hematoma was calculated according to formula V = 0.5 × a × b × c. Intracerebral hematomas, according to the volume, are divided in three groups (0–29 mL, 30–60 mL, and >60 mL). Results. The highest mortality rate was recorded in the group with multiple hematomas (41%), while the lowest in infratentorial (12.8%). The best six-month survival was in patients with a volume up to 29 mL, 30 of them (64%) survived. The highest mortality rate was recorded in patients with the hematoma volume >60 mL (85%). Kaplan-Meier's analysis showed that there was statistical significance between the size of the hematoma and the six-month survival (P < 0.0001). More than half of patients (61.1%) who survived 6 months after ICH were functionally independent (Rankin scale ≤2). Conclusion The volume of hematoma significantly affects six-month prognosis in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, while localization does not. PMID:24967309

  9. CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and improves neurological functions in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen-jing; Yu, Hong-quan; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qun; Meng, Hong-mei

    2016-01-01

    Clinical outcomes are positively associated with hematoma absorption. The monocyte-macrophage scavenger receptor, CD163, plays an important role in the metabolism of hemoglobin, and a soluble form of CD163 is present in plasma and other tissue fluids; therefore, we speculated that serum CD163 affects hematoma absorption after intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage were divided into high- and low-level groups according to the average CD163 level (1,977.79 ± 832.91 ng/mL). Compared with the high-level group, the low-level group had a significantly slower hematoma absorption rate, and significantly increased National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores and modified Rankin Scale scores. These results suggest that CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and the recovery of neurological function in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

  10. Characterization of intraventricular and intracerebral hematomas in non-contrast CT.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Gomolka, Ryszard S; Qian, Guoyu; Gupta, Varsha; Ullman, Natalie L; Hanley, Daniel F

    2014-06-01

    Characterization of hematomas is essential in scan reading, manual delineation, and designing automatic segmentation algorithms. Our purpose is to characterize the distribution of intraventricular (IVH) and intracerebral hematomas (ICH) in NCCT scans, study their relationship to gray matter (GM), and to introduce a new tool for quantitative hematoma delineation. We used 289 serial retrospective scans of 51 patients. Hematomas were manually delineated in a two-stage process. Hematoma contours generated in the first stage were quantified and enhanced in the second stage. Delineation was based on new quantitative rules and hematoma profiling, and assisted by a dedicated tool superimposing quantitative information on scans with 3D hematoma display. The tool provides: density maps (40-85HU), contrast maps (8/15HU), mean horizontal/vertical contrasts for hematoma contours, and hematoma contours below a specified mean contrast (8HU). White matter (WM) and GM were segmented automatically. IVH/ICH on serial NCCT is characterized by 59.0HU mean, 60.0HU median, 11.6HU standard deviation, 23.9HU mean contrast, -0.99HU/day slope, and -0.24 skewness (changing over time from negative to positive). Its 0.1(st)-99.9(th) percentile range corresponds to 25-88HU range. WM and GM are highly correlated (R (2)=0.88; p<10(-10)) whereas the GM-GS correlation is weak (R (2)=0.14; p<10(-10)). The intersection point of mean GM-hematoma density distributions is at 55.6±5.8HU with the corresponding GM/hematoma percentiles of 88(th)/40(th). Objective characterization of IVH/ICH and stating the rules quantitatively will aid raters to delineate hematomas more robustly and facilitate designing algorithms for automatic hematoma segmentation. Our two-stage process is general and potentially applicable to delineate other pathologies on various modalities more robustly and quantitatively. PMID:24976197

  11. [A multi-factorial approach in the vital prognosis of spontaneous intracerebral hematoma].

    PubMed

    Senant, J; Samson, M; Proust, B; Szeibert, J; Onnient, Y

    1988-01-01

    The prognostic assessment of a patient with intra-cerebral hemorrhage (IH) requires simultaneous appraisal of several parameters. We have attempted this with a multivariate method: discriminant analysis. We studied retrospectively 142 patients with non-operated IH, not due to vascular malformation, distributed two months after the initial event in two groups: 92 living patients and 50 dead. Discriminant analysis of 21 parameters from the initial examination and CT scan, selected five factors which best separate the two groups, since 89% of the patients were well classified. These five parameters (age, consciousness impairment, temperature, volume of the hematoma and ventricular hemorrhage) combined, give a prognostic score which gives for each patient his probability of survival or death. The validity of the proposed model was controlled on a test-sample of 66 patients from another department. The possibility of giving a trustworthy spontaneous prognosis on the first day can enable the evaluation of the possible benefit from surgery, which we illustrated with a group of 23 operated patients. PMID:3047834

  12. Interaction between Warfarin and the Herbal Product Shengmai-Yin: A Case Report of Intracerebral Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qun

    2010-01-01

    A 71-year-old man was stable on warfarin (2.25 mg daily) therapy with an international normalized ratio (INR) of 1.8-2.2 after a heart valve replacement surgery. Recently, he consumed the liquid-like herbal product called shengmai-yin (10 mL daily) against medical advice. Seven days after the daily consumption of shengmai-yin, he was admitted to the intensive care unit because of consciousness disturbance [Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score 7] with an INR of 5.08. Head computed topography revealed intracerebral hematoma in the left temporoparietal region. Both warfarin therapy and the herbal product were withdrawn. At the same time, therapy with intravenous vitamin K1 40 mg was started. On the second day of admission, craniectomy was performed to remove the intacerebral hematoma under general anesthesia. He remained confused and restless for 2 days, but then showed progressive recovery in the consciousness level as well as motor and verbal functions. Shengmai-yin contains herbal ingredients that can interact with warfarin. The Drug Interaction Probability Scale (DIPS) indicated that warfarin and shengmai-yin were highly probable causes of intracerebral hematoma. Patients on warfarin therapy should be discouraged from taking herbal medicines, especially preparations that are already known to have antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects. PMID:20635460

  13. Intracerebral hemorrhage due to developmental venous anomalies.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaodi; Wang, Yuzhou; Chen, Wenming; Wang, Wensheng; Chen, Kaizhe; Liao, Huayin; Lu, Jianjun; Li, Zhigang

    2016-04-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVA) and cavernous malformations (CM) are a common form of mixed vascular malformation. The relationship between DVA, CM and hemorrhage is complicated. It is important to differentiate hemorrhagic CM and hemorrhagic DVA. A retrospective review of all patients with acute spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH) between 1 May 2008 and 1 May 2013 was performed. ICH due to DVA or CM were identified and compared for demographic features, clinical symptoms, neurological deficits, and radiological findings. A total of 1706 patients with acute spontaneous ICH were admitted to our hospital during the study period. Among these, 10 (0.59%) were caused by DVA and 42 (2.47%) were caused by CM. No significant differences were found in age (p=0.252) or sex ratio (p=1.000) between the two groups. Compared with CM-induced ICH, DVA-induced ICH were characterized by cerebellar predominance (p=0.000) and less severe neurological deficits (p=0.008). Infratentorial hemorrhagic DVA are characterized by cerebellar predominance and benign clinical course. Infratentorial hemorrhagic CM are mainly located in the brainstem. DVA should be given suspected rather than CM when considering the etiology of a cerebellar hemorrhage, especially in young adults. PMID:26803466

  14. Gene expression profiles of patients with cerebral hematoma following spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    YANG, TAO; GU, JIANWEN; KONG, BIN; KUANG, YONGQIN; CHENG, LIN; CHENG, JINGMIN; XIA, XUN; MA, YUAN; ZHANG, JUNHAI

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the gene functions and expression profiles in perihematomal (PH) brain regions following spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. The gene expression profiles were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database under accession number GSE24265, which includes 11 brain samples from different regions, including four samples from PH areas, four from contralateral grey matter (CG) and three from contralateral white matter (CW). The gene expression profiles were pre-processed and the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between PH and CG tissue, and PH and CW tissue were identified using R packages. The expression of genes in different tissues was analyzed by hierarchical clustering. Then, the interaction network between the DEGs was constructed using String software. Finally, Gene Ontology was performed and pathway analysis was conducted using FuncAssociate and Expression Analysis Systematic Explorer to identify the gene function. As a result, 399 DEGs were obtained between PH and CG, and 756 DEGs were identified between PH and CW. There were 35 common DEGs between the two groups. These DEGs may be involved in PH edema by regulating the calcium signaling pathway [calcium channel, voltage-dependent, T-type, α1I subunit, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (CAMK2A), ryanodine receptor 2 (RYR2) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, type 1 (ITPR1)], cell proliferation (sphingosine kinase 1), neuron differentiation (Ephrin-A5) or extracellular matrix-receptor interaction [collagen, type I, α 2, laminin B1 (LAMB1), syndecan 2, fibronectin 1 and integrin α5 (ITGA5)]. A number of genes may cooperate to participate in the same pathway, such as ITPR1-RYR2, CAMK2A-RYR2 and ITGA5-LAMB1 interaction pairs. The present study provides several potential targets to decrease hematoma expansion and alleviate neuronal cell death following spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:25069764

  15. Intracerebral Hematoma Occurring During Warfarin Versus Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Haruhiko; Jimbo, Yasushi; Takano, Hiroki; Abe, Hiroshi; Sato, Masahito; Fujii, Yukihiko; Aizawa, Yoshifusa

    2016-07-15

    The neuroradiological findings and its outcomes of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) were compared between the non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC) therapy and warfarin therapy. In the latest 3 years, 13 cases of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation on NOAC therapy were admitted for ICH. For comparison, 65 age- and gender-comparable patients with ICH on warfarin therapy were recruited. Three NOACs had been prescribed: dabigatran (n = 4), rivaroxaban (n = 2), and apixaban (n = 7). The average ages were 76 ± 9 and 78 ± 8 years in the warfarin (n = 65) and NOAC groups (n = 13), respectively. There was no difference in the clinical features, including the CHADS2 score or HAS-BLED score: 2.62 ± 1.31 versus 2.62 ± 1.33, or 1.09 ± 0.43 versus 1.00 ± 0.41, for the warfarin and NOAC groups, respectively. The volume of ICH <30 ml was found in 84.6% of the patients on NOACs, but it was found in 53.8% of the patients on warfarin (p = 0.0106). The expansion of hematoma was limited to 7 patients (10.8%) of the warfarin group. A lower hospital mortality and better modified Rankin Scale were observed in the NOAC group than in the warfarin group: 1 (7.7%) versus 27 (41.5%; p = 0.0105) and 3.2 ± 1.4 versus 4.5 ± 1.6 (p = 0.0057), respectively. In conclusion, ICH on NOAC therapy had smaller volume of hematoma with reduced rate of expansion and decreased mortality compared with its occurrence on warfarin. PMID:27289294

  16. Day-night variability of hematoma expansion in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaoying; Wu, Bo; Xu, Ye; Siwila-Sackman, Erica; Selim, Magdy

    2015-06-01

    The levels of several coagulation factors, able to influence hemostatic balance, display circadian variations. We hypothesized that the onset and extent of hematoma expansion (HE) following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) also display diurnal patterns. We reviewed clinical, laboratory, and radiological data from 111 consecutive patients with spontaneous ICH who had baseline head computed tomography (CT) scans within 3 h of ICH onset and follow-up CT during the following 72 h. We defined any HE (AHE) as any increase in hematoma volume from baseline to follow-up CT and significant HE (SHE) as an absolute increase in hematoma volume >6 mL or relative increase >33%. We categorized the patients into 2 groups based on the timing of the initial CT scans--day group (from 0800 to 2000 h) and night group (from 2000 to 0800 h)--and performed logistic regression analyses. We also analyzed the differences in the rates of HE between the groups during six 4-h periods spanning 24 h, using χ(2) tests. We found that the rates of AHE and SHE were higher in the day versus night group (75% vs. 48%; p = 0.009 for AHE and 47.6% vs. 25.9%; p = 0.047 for SHE). On multivariable logistic regression, day group assignment was independently associated with AHE (adjusted odds ratio = 3.53; p = 0.008) but not with SHE. Both AHE and SHE peaked in the early afternoon (1200-1600 h) and reached a nadir during the 2000 to 2400 h time period, and they were significantly different between the time periods (0000-0400, 0400-0800, 0800-1200, 1200-1600, 1600-2000, and 2000-2400 h); p = 0.002 and 0.029, respectively. These exploratory findings support the presence of a daily pattern in the occurrence of HE, with a higher risk during the day hours. Our results could have implications for future therapeutic efforts targeting HE in ICH and for the triage of ICH patients. They require further validation. PMID:25994102

  17. Thrombelastography detects possible coagulation disturbance in intracerebral hemorrhage patients with hematoma enlargement

    PubMed Central

    Kawano-Castillo, Jorge; Ward, Eric; Elliott, Andrea; Wetzel, Jeremy; Hassler, Amanda; McDonald, Mark; Parker, Stephanie A; Archeval-Lao, Joancy; Tremont, Chad; Cai, Chunyan; Pivalizza, Evan; Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Grotta, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has high morbidity and hematoma enlargement (HE) causes worse outcome. Thrombelastography (TEG™) measures the dynamics of clot formation and dissolution, and might be useful for assessing bleeding risk. We used TEG™ to detect changes in clotting in patients with and without HE after ICH. Methods This prospective study included 64 patients with spontaneous ICH admitted from 2009 to 2013. TEG™ was performed within 6 hours of symptom onset and after 36 hours. Brain imaging was obtained at baseline and 36 ± 12 hours, and HE defined as total volume increase > 6cc or >33%. TEG™ was also obtained from 57 controls. Results Compared to controls, ICH patients demonstrated faster and stronger clot formation; shorter R and delta (p<0.0001) at baseline; and higher MA and G (p < 0.0001) at 36 hours. 11 patients had HE. After controlling for potential confounders, baseline K and delta were longer in HE + compared to HE − patients, indicating that HE+ patients had slower clot formation (p<0.05). TEG™ was not different between HE + and HE − patients at 36 hours. Conclusions TEG™ may detect important coagulation changes in patients with ICH. Clotting may be faster and stronger in immediate response to ICH and a less robust response may be associated with HE. These findings deserve further investigation. PMID:24425123

  18. Effects of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with minimally invasive hematoma aspiration on intracerebral hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinghua; Shang, Xiao; Hao, Maolin; Zheng, Maoyong; Li, Yanxia; Liang, Zhigang; Cui, Yuanxiao; Liu, Zhenhua

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the effects of human umbilical cord-mesenchymal stem cells (HUC-MSCs) transplantation combined with minimally invasive hematoma aspiration on neural functional recovery and p53 gene expression in rats with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Collagenase type-IV was injected to the caudate nucleus of the rats to make ICH models. One hundred and twenty Sprague-Dawley rats with successful modeling were randomly divided into 4 groups, including the ICH group, hematoma aspiration group, HUC-MSCs transplantation group and HUC-MSCs transplantation combined with hematoma aspiration group (combination group). Neural functional status of the rats was assessed by modified neurological severity score (mNSS). Expression of p53 in the cerebral tissues surrounding ICH was detected by immunohistochemical assays. The scores of mNSS and the expression of p53 gene in the hematoma aspiration group, the HUC-MSCs transplantation group and the combination group were significantly lower than those in the ICH group at each indicated time point (p < 0.05). Intriguingly, mNSS scores and p53 expression in the combination group were significantly lower than those in the hematoma aspiration group on day 7, 14 and 30 (p < 0.05), and significantly lower than those in the HUC-MSCs transplantation group on day 14 and 30 (p < 0.05). HUC-MSCs transplantation combined with minimally invasive hematoma aspiration is more effective than either therapy alone in rats with ICH and could distinctly reduce the damage of nerve cells. PMID:26807166

  19. Sensitivity and specificity of fluid-blood levels for coagulopathy in acute intracerebral hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Pfleger, M.J.; Hardee, E.P.; Hayman, L.A.; Contant, C.F. Jr. )

    1994-02-01

    To characterize the imaging features of intracerebral hemorrhages in patients with coagulopathies that alter prothrombin time or partial thromboplastin time. A fluid-blood level was defined as a horizontal interface between hypodense bloody serum layered above hyperdense settled blood. The prevalence of fluid-blood levels in acute intracerebral hemorrhages was determined on third-generation CT scans in 32 patients with elevation in prothrombin time or partial thromboplastin time. This was compared with the frequency of fluid-blood levels in 185 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage in which there was no laboratory evidence of coagulopathy. The probability of finding a fluid-blood level in an intracerebral hemorrhage of a patient with abnormal prothrombin time or partial thromboplastin time was 59% (sensitivity). The probability that there will be no fluid-blood level in a patient with a normal prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time was 98% (specificity). Fluid-blood levels in acute intracerebral hemorrhage are moderately sensitive to the presence of coagulopathy (i.e., abnormal prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time) and highly specific for this condition. Thus, an intracerebral hemorrhage with a fluid-blood level should prompt a thorough search for coagulopathy because early treatment of this condition may improve the 40% mortality in these patients. Caution should be used to distinguish the horizontal interface of a fluid-blood level from a clot with a flat top. A decubitus CT is useful in these rare instances. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. [Features of memantine action profile in cholinergic deficit and intracerebral posttraumatic hematoma (hemorrhagic stroke) models in rats].

    PubMed

    Garibova, T L; Voronina, T A; Litvinova, S A; Kuznetsova, A L; Kul'chikov, A E; Alesenko, A V

    2008-01-01

    Memantine, a low-affinity non-competitive antagonist of glutamatergic NMDA-subtype receptors, was used at a daily dose of 1 mg/kg over 10 days for the treatment of rats with cholinergic deficit induced by the chronic administration of scopolamine (1 mg/kg, 20 days). The drug prevented violation of the learning of conditioned active and passive avoidance reflexes and produced no significant effect on the emotional state of animals in elevated plus maze (EPM) test. In animals with intracerebral posttraumatic hematoma (hemorrhagic stroke), memantine (2 mg/kg, for 3 days after operation) completely prevented the loss of animals, reduced the neurological deficit, improved conditioned passive avoidance reflex performance, and decreased emotional stress in the EPM test. PMID:18488899

  1. Anticoagulation with the oral direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran does not enlarge hematoma volume in experimental intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, Arne; Cianchetti, Flor A.; Van Cott, Elizabeth M.; Schlunk, Frieder; Schulz, Elena; Pfeilschifter, Waltraud; Steinmetz, Helmuth; Schaffer, Chris B.; Lo, Eng H.; Foerch, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background The direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran etexilate (DE) may constitute a future replacement of vitamin K antagonists for long-term anticoagulation. Whereas warfarin pre-treatment is associated with greater hematoma expansion following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), it remains unclear what effect direct thrombin inhibitors would have. Using different experimental models of ICH, this study compared hematoma volume between DE treated mice, warfarin treated mice and controls. Methods and Results CD-1 mice were fed with DE or warfarin. Sham-treated mice served as controls. At the time point of ICH induction, DE mice revealed an increased activated partial thromboplastin time as compared to controls (46.1±5.0 vs. 18.0±1.5sec; p=0.022), whereas warfarin pre-treatment resulted in a prothrombin time prolongation (51.4±17.9 vs. 10.4±0.3sec; p<0.001). Twenty-four hours after collagenase-induced ICH formation, hematoma volume was 3.8±2.9μL in controls, 4.8±2.7μL in DE mice, and 14.5±11.8μL in warfarin mice (n=16; Welch's ANOVA between group differences p=0.007, post-hoc analysis with Dunnett's method: DE vs. controls, p=0.899; warfarin vs. controls, p<0.001; DE vs. warfarin, p=0.001). In addition, a model of laser-induced cerebral microhemorrhage was applied, and the distances which red blood cells and blood plasma were pushed into the brain were quantified. Warfarin mice showed enlarged red blood cell- and blood plasma diameters as compared to controls, but no difference was found between DE mice and controls. Conclusions In contrast to warfarin, pretreatment with DE did not increase hematoma volume in two different experimental models of ICH. In terms of safety, this observation may represent a potential advantage of anticoagulation with DE over warfarin. PMID:21911784

  2. The Effect of Minimally Invasive Hematoma Aspiration on the JNK Signal Transduction Pathway after Experimental Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Haitao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Guofang; Li, Zhaoxing; Luo, Kai; An, Jingjiao; Li, Guangcheng; Guo, Yunliang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of minimally invasive hematoma aspiration (MIHA) on the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signal transduction pathway after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: In this experiment, 300 adult male Wistar rats were randomly and averagely divided into sham-operated group, ICH group and MIHA group. In each group, 60 rats were used in the detection of indexes in this experiment, while the other 40 rats were used to replace rats which reached the exclusion criteria (accidental death or operation failure). In ICH group and MIHA group, ICH was induced by injection of 70 µL of autologous arterial blood into rat brain, while only the rats in MIHA group were treated by MIHA 6 h after ICH. Rats in sham-operated group were injected nothing into brains, and they were not treated either, like rats in ICH group. In each group, six rats were randomly selected to observe their Bederson’s scales persistently (6, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120 h after ICH). According to the time they were sacrificed, the remaining rats in each group were divided into 3 subgroups (24, 72, 120 h). The change of brain water content (BWC) was measured by the wet weight to dry weight ratio method. The morphology of neurons in cortex was observed by the hematoxylin–eosin (HE) staining. The expressions of phospho-c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (pJNK) and JNK in peri-hematomal brain tissue were determined by the immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting (WB). Results: At all time points, compared with the ICH groups, the expression of pJNK decreased obviously in MIHA groups (p < 0.05), while their Bederson’s scales and BWC declined, and neuron injury in the cortex was relieved. The expression level of JNK was not altered at different groups. The data obtained by IHC and WB indicated a high-level of consistency, which provided a certain dependability of the test results. Conclusion: The JNK signal transduction pathway could be activated after intracerebral hemorrhage, with the

  3. Ultra-early microsurgical treatment within 24 h of SAH improves prognosis of poor-grade aneurysm combined with intracerebral hematoma

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JUNHUI; ZHU, JUN; HE, JIANQING; WANG, YUHAI; CHEN, LEI; ZHANG, CHUNLEI; ZHOU, JINGXU; YANG, LIKUN

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is the most common cerebrovascular disease. The conventional treatment for SAH is usually associated with high mortality. The present study aims to assess the prognosis of microsurgical treatment for patients with poor-grade aneurysm (Hunt and Hess grades IV–V) associated with intracerebral hematoma. A total of 18 consecutive patients who were diagnosed with poor-grade aneurysm accompanied with intracerebral hematoma were retrospectively recruited. All patients underwent microsurgical treatment between April 2010 and June 2013 at The 101st Hospital of Chinese People's Liberation Army (Wuxi, China). Among them, 15 cases underwent microsurgery within 24 h of SAH, and 3 cases underwent microsurgery 24 h following SAH. All 18 cases were examined by computed tomography angiography (CTA). The outcome was assessed during a follow-up time of 6–36 months. According to the Glasgow Outcome Scale, 4 patients experienced a good recovery, 6 were dissatisfied with the outcome, 4 were in vegetative state and 4 succumbed to disease. Poor outcome occurred in patients with an aneurysm diameter >10 mm, exhibited >50 ml volume of intracerebral hematoma or presented cerebral hernia prior to the surgical operation. The outcome of ultra-early surgery (within 24 h of SAH) was improved, compared with that of surgery following 24 h of SAH (P=0.005). Among 7 patients who accepted extraventricular drainage, good outcomes were achieved in 4 of them, whereas dissatisfaction and mortality occurred in 2 and 1 patients, respectively. Therefore, ultra-early microsurgery (within 24 h of SAH) combined with extraventricular drainage may improve the prognosis of patients with poor-grade aneurysm. PMID:27123084

  4. Spontaneous epidural hematoma due to cervico-thoracic angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Eap, C; Bannwarth, M; Jazeron, J-F; Kleber, J-C; Theret, É; Duntze, J; Litre, C-F

    2015-12-01

    Epidural angiolipomas are uncommon benign tumors of the spine. Their clinical presentation is usually a progressive spinal cord compression. We report the case of a 22-year-old patient who presented with an acute paraparesis and a spontaneous epidural hematoma, which revealed a epidural angiolipoma which extended from C7 to T3. The patient underwent a C7-T3 laminectomy, in emergency, with evacuation of the hematoma and extradural complete resection of a fibrous epidural tumor bleeding. The postoperative course was favorable with regression of neurological symptoms. Epidural angiolipomas can be revealed by spontaneous intratumoral hemorrhage without traumatism. The standard treatment is total removal by surgery. PMID:26597606

  5. Blood glutamate grabbing does not reduce the hematoma in an intracerebral hemorrhage model but it is a safe excitotoxic treatment modality.

    PubMed

    da Silva-Candal, Andrés; Vieites-Prado, Alba; Gutiérrez-Fernández, María; Rey, Ramón I; Argibay, Bárbara; Mirelman, David; Sobrino, Tomás; Rodríguez-Frutos, Berta; Castillo, José; Campos, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that blood glutamate grabbing is an effective strategy to reduce the excitotoxic effect of extracellular glutamate released during ischemic brain injury. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of two of the most efficient blood glutamate grabbers (oxaloacetate and recombinant glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase 1: rGOT1) in a rat model of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Intracerebral hemorrhage was produced by injecting collagenase into the basal ganglia. Three treatment groups were developed: a control group treated with saline, a group treated with oxaloacetate, and a final group treated with human rGOT1. Treatments were given 1 hour after hemorrhage. Hematoma volume (analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)), neurologic deficit, and blood glutamate and GOT levels were quantified over a period of 14 days after surgery. The results observed showed that the treatments used induced a significant reduction of blood glutamate levels; however, they did not reduce the hematoma, nor did they improve the neurologic deficit. In the present experimental study, we have shown that this novel therapeutic strategy is not effective in case of ICH pathology. More importantly, these findings suggest that blood glutamate grabbers are a safe treatment modality that can be given in cases of suspected ischemic stroke without previous neuroimaging. PMID:25735920

  6. Treatment of thoracic hemorrhage due to rupture of traumatic mediastinal hematoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-Jie; Zhang, Ling-Fang; Cao, Wei-Zhong

    2016-02-01

    Patients in traffic accidents are usually presented with pain and bleeding due to fractures or soft tissue injury. On some occasions, more severe complications may be triggered by the trauma. A review of the published English language literature reveals no survival case once the traumatic mediastinal hematoma is ruptured. In our case, a 54-year-old man suffering motorcycle accident was admitted to emergency department. Computed tomography scan revealed subdural hematoma combined with posterior mediastinal hematoma. The patient was saved and discharged with a satisfactory outcome. Here we hope to share our treatment experience in dealing with the patient with severe multiple trauma. PMID:27033275

  7. Acute Onset of Intracerebral Hemorrhage due to Autonomic Dysreflexia.

    PubMed

    Eker, Amber; Yigitoglu, Pembe Hare; Ipekdal, H Ilker; Tosun, Aliye

    2014-05-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is a clinical emergency syndrome of uncontrolled sympathetic output that can occur in patients who have a history of spinal cord injury. Despite its frequency in spinal cord injury patients, central nervous system complications are very rare. We report a man with traumatic high level incomplete spinal cord injury who suffered hypertensive right thalamic hemorrhage secondary to an episode of autonomic dysreflexia. Prompt recognition and removal of the triggering factor, the suprapubic catheter obstruction which led to hypertensive attack, the patient had a favorable functional outcome after the resorption of the hematoma and effective rehabilitation programme. PMID:25132935

  8. Acute Onset of Intracerebral Hemorrhage due to Autonomic Dysreflexia

    PubMed Central

    Yigitoglu, Pembe Hare; Ipekdal, H. Ilker; Tosun, Aliye

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is a clinical emergency syndrome of uncontrolled sympathetic output that can occur in patients who have a history of spinal cord injury. Despite its frequency in spinal cord injury patients, central nervous system complications are very rare. We report a man with traumatic high level incomplete spinal cord injury who suffered hypertensive right thalamic hemorrhage secondary to an episode of autonomic dysreflexia. Prompt recognition and removal of the triggering factor, the suprapubic catheter obstruction which led to hypertensive attack, the patient had a favorable functional outcome after the resorption of the hematoma and effective rehabilitation programme. PMID:25132935

  9. Concurrent Spontaneous Sublingual and Intramural Small Bowel Hematoma due to Warfarin Use

    PubMed Central

    Pamukçu Günaydın, Gül; Çiftçi Sivri, Hatice Duygu; Sivri, Serkan; Otal, Yavuz; Özhasenekler, Ayhan; Kurtoğlu Çelik, Gülhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. We present a case of concurrent spontaneous sublingual and intramural small bowel hematoma due to warfarin anticoagulation. Case. A 71-year-old man presented to the emergency department complaining of a swollen, painful tongue. He was on warfarin therapy. Physical examination revealed sublingual hematoma. His international normalized ratio was 11.9. The computed tomography scan of the neck demonstrated sublingual hematoma. He was admitted to emergency department observation unit, monitored closely; anticoagulation was reversed with fresh frozen plasma and vitamin K. 26 hours after his arrival to the emergency department, his abdominal pain and melena started. His abdomen tomography demonstrated intestinal submucosal hemorrhage in the ileum. He was admitted to surgical floor, monitored closely, and discharged on day 4. Conclusion. Since the patient did not have airway compromise holding anticoagulant, reversing anticoagulation, close monitoring and observation were enough for management of both sublingual and spontaneous intramural small bowel hematoma. PMID:26649210

  10. Atraumatic multifocal intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Fetcko, Kaleigh M; Hendricks, Benjamin K; Scott, John; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2016-09-01

    This article describes a patient with atraumatic multifocal intracerebral, subarachnoid, and bilateral frontal convexity acute subdural hematomas. The patient is a 46-year-old Caucasian man who presented with a spontaneous severe progressive headache. Following a description of the case, this article reviews the reported incidence, proposed etiology, and current management strategies for multifocal spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27234608

  11. 17β-Estradiol Attenuates Hematoma Expansion through ERα/Sirt1/NF-κB Pathway in Hyperglycemic Intracerebral Hemorrhage Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yun; Hu, Qin; Manaenko, Anatol; Zhang, Yang; Peng, Yan; Xu, Liang; Tang, Junjia; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose 17β-estradiol (E2) has been reported to reduce bleeding and brain injury in experimental intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) model. However, it is not clear if E2 can prevent early hematoma expansion (HE) induced by hyperglycemia in acute ICH. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of E2 on HE and its potential mechanisms in hyperglycemic ICH mice. Methods Two hundred, 8-week-old male CD1 mice were used. Intracerebral hemorrhage was performed by collagenase injection. 50% Dextrose (8 ml/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 3 hours after ICH to induce acute HE (normal saline was used as control). The time course of HE was measured 6 hours, 24 hours, and 72 hours after ICH. Two dosages (100 µg/kg and 300 µg/kg) of E2 were administrated 1 hour after ICH intraperitoneally. Neurobehavioral deficits, hemorrhage volume, blood glucose level and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption were measured. To study the mechanisms of E2, estrogen receptor α (ERα) inhibitor MPP, Sirt1 siRNA was administered respectively. Protein expression of ERα, Sirt1, and acetylated NF-κB, and activity of MMP-9 were detected. Results Hyperglycemia enhanced HE and deteriorated neurological deficits after ICH from 6 hours after ICH. E2 treatment prevented BBB disruption and improved neurological deficits 24 hours and 72 hours after ICH. E2 reduced HE by activating its receptor ERα, decreasing the expression Sirt1, deacelylation of NF-κB and inhibiting the activity of MMP-9. ERα inhibitor MPP and Sirt1 siRNA removed these effects of E2. Conclusions E2 treatment prevented hyperglycemia enhanced HE and improved neurological deficits in ICH mice mediated by ERα/Sirt1/NF-κB pathway. E2 may serve as an alternative treatment to decrease early HE after ICH. PMID:25523052

  12. A case of acute subdural hematoma due to ruptured aneurysm detected by postmortem angiography.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Go; Makino, Yohsuke; Yajima, Daisuke; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Torimitsu, Suguru; Hoshioka, Yumi; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-03-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) is mostly caused by head trauma, but intrinsic causes also exist such as aneurysm rupture. We describe here a case involving a man in his 70s who was found lying on the bedroom floor by his family. CT performed at the hospital showed ASDH and a forensic autopsy was requested. Postmortem cerebral angiography showed dilatation of the bifurcation of the middle cerebral artery, which coincided with the dilated part of the Sylvian fissure. Extravasation of contrast medium into the subdural hematoma from this site was suggestive of a ruptured aneurysm. Autopsy revealed a fleshy hematoma (total weight 110 g) in the right subdural space and findings of brain herniation. As indicated on angiography, a ruptured saccular aneurysm was confirmed at the bifurcation of the middle cerebral artery. Obvious injuries to the head or face could not be detected on either external or internal examination, and intrinsic ASDH due to a ruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysm was determined as the cause of death. One of the key points of forensic diagnosis is the strict differentiation between intrinsic and extrinsic onset for conditions leading to death. Although most subdural hematomas (SDH) are caused by extrinsic factors, forensic pathologists should consider the possibility of intrinsic SDH. In addition, postmortem angiography can be useful for identifying vascular lesions in such cases. PMID:26362305

  13. Intracranial Vasospasm without Intracranial Hemorrhage due to Acute Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jwa, Seung-Joo; Yang, Tae Ki; Lee, Chang Sub; Oh, Kyungmi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is very rare. Furthermore, intracranial vasospasm (ICVS) associated with spinal hemorrhage has been very rarely reported. We present an ICVS case without intracranial hemorrhage following SDH. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of severe headache. Multiple intracranial vasospasms were noted on a brain CT angiogram and transfemoral cerebral angiography. However, intracranial hemorrhage was not revealed by brain MRI or CT. On day 3 after admission, weakness of both legs and urinary incontinence developed. Spine MRI showed C7~T6 spinal cord compression due to hyperacute stage of SDH. After hematoma evacuation, her symptoms gradually improved. We suggest that spinal cord evaluation should be considered in patients with headache who have ICVS, although intracranial hemorrhage would not be visible in brain images. PMID:26713084

  14. Delayed supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage following posterior fossa surgery

    PubMed Central

    Salunke, Pravin; Malik, Vinod; Kovai, Priyamvadha; Aggarwal, Ashish; Khandelwal, Niranjan K.

    2016-01-01

    Delayed supratentorial intracerebral hematoma after posterior fossa surgery is uncommon. Only few cases have been reported in the past. The cause has been attributed to sitting position leading to changes in intracranial arterial and venous pressures. We report two cases of delayed intracerebral hematoma following posterior fossa surgery, none of which were operated in sitting position. MR venogram done in one patient showed venous sinus thrombosis. Intracererbal hematoma following infratentorial surgery is uncommon and is possibly due to venous sinus thrombosis leading to venous hypertension. Control of bleeding from venous sinuses due to avulsion of emissary veins during craniotomy/craniectomy possibly induces sinus thrombosis that may propagate antegrade or retrograde, leading to venous hypertension and parenchymal bleed. PMID:27366274

  15. Increased airway pressure due to superior mediastinal hematoma during endovascular coiling by transcarotid approach.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Priyanka; Rath, Girija Prasad; Banik, Sujoy; Mahajan, Charu

    2016-05-01

    An elderly woman with subarachanoid hemorrhage presented to our interventional neuroradiology suite for coil embolization of multiple intracranial aneurysms. The patient had difficult vascular access for the passage of microcatheter; hence, the embolization procedure was carried out with direct puncture of the left common carotid artery. During the procedure, the patient developed thromboembolism which was treated by administration of an antiplatelet agent, abciximab. At the end of procedure, she developed airway compromise due to extension of a local neck hematoma into the superior mediastinum. The management issues in such a scenario have been discussed. PMID:27041267

  16. Ultrasound follow-up in a patient with intestinal obstruction due to post-traumatic intramural duodenal hematoma.

    PubMed

    Homma, Yukako; Mori, Kazuhiro; Ohnishi, Yasuhiro; Fujioka, Keisuke; Terada, Tomomasa; Sasaki, Ayumi; Nagai, Takashi; Inoue, Miki

    2016-07-01

    We report the case of a 7-year-old girl with intestinal obstruction due to post-traumatic intramural duodenal hematoma. She had fallen from the monkey bars the day before presenting to our hospital, and was admitted with signs of abdominal pain, vomiting, and nausea. Abdominal ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a heterogeneous solid mass located within the duodenal wall, compressing the descending part of the duodenum. The inferior vena cava was also compressed by the mass lesion, although no associated symptoms were evident. Based on these findings, the mass lesion was considered to represent intramural hematoma causing intestinal obstruction. She was managed conservatively with total parenteral nutrition. Although CT and MRI are useful for differentiating hematoma from other intestinal tumors, ultrasonography is minimally invasive and easier to perform repeatedly. In case of duodenal hematoma, ultrasonography may be quite helpful for diagnosis and follow-up by monitoring tumor size and characteristics, and the degree of duodenal compression during conservative treatment. PMID:27194436

  17. Spontaneous acute epidural hematoma developed due to skull metastasis of hepatocelluar carcinoma: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    KIM, YOU-SUB; MOON, KYUNG-SUB; LEE, KYUNG-HWA; JUNG, TAE-YOUNG; JANG, WOO-YOUL; KIM, IN-YOUNG; JUNG, SHIN

    2016-01-01

    Acute epidural hematoma (AEDH) is one of the most common pathological types of head trauma, and may develop without an accidental event, although this is uncommon. The present study reports the case of a 41-year-old male patient that developed spontaneous AEDH due to skull metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The man was admitted to Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital and Medical School due to drowsiness and right-sided hemiparesis. A computed tomography scan of the head revealed the presence of a large AEDH and a lytic bone lesion in the left posterior fossa and parieto-occipital region, which exhibited heterogeneous enhancement. The perioperative findings revealed a large amount of mixed-stage epidural hematoma and a soft hemorrhagic mass that exhibited lytic change on the occipital bone. No evidence of head trauma, such as skull fracture or scalp contusion, was detected. The pathological diagnosis was hematoma with metastatic HCC. The current study reports the rare case of a patient with a metastatic tumor located in the skull that resulted in the development of spontaneous AEDH. Once a sudden and unpredicted neurological deficit occurs in a patient with HCC that is also diagnosed with skull metastasis, the possibility of spontaneous AEDH developing from the metastasis should be considered. PMID:26870277

  18. Subdural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... hematoma is usually the result of a serious head injury. When it occurs this way, it is called ... subdural hematomas are among the deadliest of all head injuries. The bleeding fills the brain area very rapidly, ...

  19. Epidural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... hematoma is bleeding between the inside of the skull and the outer covering of the brain (called ... An epidural hematoma is often caused by a skull fracture during childhood or adolescence. This type of ...

  20. Right paracardiac mass due to organized pericardial hematoma around retained epicardial pacing wires following aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Aditya; Syal, Sanjiv; Gupta, Nirmal; Gupta, Archana

    2011-07-01

    The use of temporary epicardial pacing wires during cardiac surgery is a routine procedure and has been associated with low morbidity. We describe a rare case of right paracardiac mass due to organized pericardial hematoma with right atrial compression around the epicardial pacing wires left in-situ, presenting three months following aortic valve replacement surgery. The case highlights the fact that such delayed complications can rarely occur around retained epicardial pacing wires following open heart surgery especially in patients on oral anticoagulants. The clinician should be alert to such an occurrence and during follow-up echocardiography always pay attention not only to the valve and ventricular function, but also to the pericardial and extra-pericardial space. PMID:21362730

  1. Epidural hematomas. An unusual complication of minor blunt force injury due to seizures in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Wong, S W; Gardner, V; Sanger, J S

    1993-12-01

    Multiple subacute epidural hematomas in a patient with sickle cell disease (HbSS) are reported. The patient was a 22-year-old Black man with a history of strokes and seizures, who was unexpectedly found dead at his foster home. Scene investigation disclosed no foul play or any indication of violent activities. Autopsy findings included subgaleal contusions and bilateral epidural hematomas, but no calvarial fractures. The epidural hematomas were subacute and closely patterned to the headboard knots of the bed in which the decedent had slept. The etiology of the hematomas is minor blunt force injury secondary to the head striking against the headboard during seizures. The immediate cause of death was determined to be pneumonia and sepsis secondary to HbSS. PMID:8116593

  2. Higher mortality due to intracerebral hemorrhage in dialysis patients: a comparison with the general population in Japan.

    PubMed

    Wakasugi, Minako; Matsuo, Koji; Kazama, Junichiro James; Narita, Ichiei

    2015-02-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases, including intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, and subarachnoid hemorrhage, remain prevalent causes of morbidity and mortality among dialysis patients. Their mortality rate for cerebrovascular diseases is roughly three times higher than that in the general population. However, whether mortality rates for all subtypes of cerebrovascular diseases are equally higher has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to determine the mortality rate for each stroke subtype, comparing dialysis patients and the general population in Japan. We used mortality data reported by the Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy and national Vital Statistics data between 2008 and 2009. We calculated standardized mortality ratios and compared the mortality rates for stroke subtypes including intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. During the 2-year study period, 51 994 and 933 deaths from intracerebral hemorrhage, 79 124 and 511 deaths from cerebral infarction, and 24 957 and 147 deaths from subarachnoid hemorrhage were recorded per 252 million person-years and per 546 474 dialysis patient-years, respectively. Standardized mortality ratios among dialysis patients relative to the general population were 3.8 (95% confidence interval, 3.6-4.1), 1.3 (1.2-1.4), and 1.3 (1.1-1.6) for intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, and subarachnoid hemorrhage, respectively. Intracerebral hemorrhage was the highest cause of mortality in the dialysis population, although cerebral infarction was the highest in the general population. Relative to the general population in Japan, Japanese dialysis patients had higher mortality rates, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:25196294

  3. Intracerebral haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Mendelow, A David; Hanley, Daniel F

    2011-01-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage is an important public health problem leading to high rates of death and disability in adults. Although the number of hospital admissions for intracerebral haemorrhage has increased worldwide in the past 10 years, mortality has not fallen. Results of clinical trials and observational studies suggest that coordinated primary and specialty care is associated with lower mortality than is typical community practice. Development of treatment goals for critical care, and new sequences of care and specialty practice can improve outcome after intracerebral haemorrhage. Specific treatment approaches include early diagnosis and haemostasis, aggressive management of blood pressure, open surgical and minimally invasive surgical techniques to remove clot, techniques to remove intraventricular blood, and management of intracranial pressure. These approaches improve clinical management of patients with intracerebral haemorrhage and promise to reduce mortality and increase functional survival. PMID:19427958

  4. Intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Mendelow, A David; Hanley, Daniel F

    2009-05-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage is an important public health problem leading to high rates of death and disability in adults. Although the number of hospital admissions for intracerebral haemorrhage has increased worldwide in the past 10 years, mortality has not fallen. Results of clinical trials and observational studies suggest that coordinated primary and specialty care is associated with lower mortality than is typical community practice. Development of treatment goals for critical care, and new sequences of care and specialty practice can improve outcome after intracerebral haemorrhage. Specific treatment approaches include early diagnosis and haemostasis, aggressive management of blood pressure, open surgical and minimally invasive surgical techniques to remove clot, techniques to remove intraventricular blood, and management of intracranial pressure. These approaches improve clinical management of patients with intracerebral haemorrhage and promise to reduce mortality and increase functional survival. PMID:19427958

  5. A New Method To Image Heme-Fe, Total Fe, and Aggregated Protein Levels after Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Mark J.; DeSouza, Mauren; Caine, Sally; Bewer, Brian; Nichol, Helen; Paterson, Phyllis G.; Colbourne, Frederick

    2015-01-01

    An intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating stroke that results in high mortality and significant disability in survivors. Unfortunately, the underlying mechanisms of this injury are not yet fully understood. After the primary (mechanical) trauma, secondary degenerative events contribute to ongoing cell death in the peri-hematoma region. Oxidative stress is thought to be a key reason for this delayed injury, which is likely due to free-Fe-catalyzed free radical reactions. Unfortunately, this is difficult to prove with conventional biochemical assays that fail to differentiate between alterations that occur within the hematoma and peri-hematoma zone. This is a critical limitation, as the hematoma contains tissue severely damaged by the initial hemorrhage and is unsalvageable, whereas the peri-hematoma region is less damaged but at risk from secondary degenerative events. Such events include oxidative stress mediated by free Fe presumed to originate from hemoglobin breakdown. Therefore, minimizing the damage caused by oxidative stress following hemoglobin breakdown and Fe release is a major therapeutic target. However, the extent to which free Fe contributes to the pathogenesis of ICH remains unknown. This investigation used a novel imaging approach that employed resonance Raman spectroscopic mapping of hemoglobin, X-ray fluorescence microscopic mapping of total Fe, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging of aggregated protein following ICH in rats. This multimodal spectroscopic approach was used to accurately define the hematoma/peri-hematoma boundary and quantify the Fe concentration and the relative aggregated protein content, as a marker of oxidative stress, within each region. The results revealed total Fe is substantially increased in the hematoma (0.90 μg cm−2), and a subtle but significant increase in Fe that is not in the chemical form of hemoglobin is present within the peri-hematoma zone (0.32 μg cm−2) within 1 day of ICH

  6. Image Guided Endoscopic Evacuation of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chad M; Vespa, Paul; Saver, Jeffrey L; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Carmichael, Stanley T.; Alger, Jeffry; Frazee, John; Starkman, Sid; Liebeskind, David; Nenov, Valeriy; Elashoff, Robert; Martin, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality. ICH lacks an effective medical or surgical treatment despite the acknowledged pathophysiological benefits of achieved hemostasis and clot removal. Image guided stereotactic endoscopic hematoma evacuation is a promising minimally invasive approach designed to limit operative injury and maximize hematoma removal. Methods A single center randomized controlled trial was designed to assess the safety and efficacy of stereotactic hematoma evacuation compared to best medical management. Patients were randomized within 24 hours of hemorrhage in a 3:2 fashion to best medical management plus endoscopic hematoma evacuation or best medical management alone. Data was collected to assess efficacy and safety of hematoma evacuation and to identify procedural components requiring technical improvement. Results 10 patients have been enrolled and randomized to treatment. Six patients underwent endoscopic evacuation with a hematoma volume reduction of 80% +/−13 at 24 hours post procedure. The medical arm demonstrated a hematoma enlargement of 78% +/−142 during this same period. Rehemorrhage rates and deterioration rates were similar in the two groups. Mortality was 20% in the endoscopic group and 50% in the medical treatment cohort. The endoscopic technique was shown to be effective in identification and evacuation of hematomas while reduction in the number of endoscopic passes and maintenance of hemostasis require further study. Conclusion Image guided stereotactic endoscopic hematoma removal is a promising minimally invasive technique that is effective in immediate hematoma evacuation. This technique deserves further investigation to determine its role in ICH management. PMID:18424298

  7. Leakage Sign for Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hirohata, Masaru; Nakamura, Yukihiko; Takeshige, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Takachika; Hattori, Gousuke; Sakata, Kiyohiko; Abe, Toshi; Uchiyama, Yuusuke; Sakamoto, Teruo; Morioka, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Recent studies of intracerebral hemorrhage treatments have highlighted the need to identify reliable predictors of hematoma expansion. Several studies have suggested that the spot sign on computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is a sensitive radiological predictor of hematoma expansion in the acute phase. However, the spot sign has low sensitivity for hematoma expansion. In this study, we evaluated the usefulness of a novel predictive method, called the leakage sign. Methods— We performed CTA for 80 consecutive patients presenting with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Two scans were completed: CTA phase and delayed phase (5 minutes after the CTA phase). By comparing the CTA phase images, we set a region of interest with a 10-mm diameter and calculated the Hounsfield units. We defined a positive leakage sign as a >10% increase in Hounsfield units in the region of interest. Additionally, hematoma expansion was determined on plain computed tomography at 24 hours in patients who did not undergo emergent surgery. Results— Positive spot signs and leakage signs were present in 18 (22%) patients and 35 (43%) patients, respectively. The leakage sign had higher sensitivity (93.3%) and specificity (88.9%) for hematoma expansion than the spot sign. The leakage sign, but not the spot sign, was significantly related with poor outcomes (severely disabled, vegetative state, and death) in all of the patients (P=0.03) and in patients with a hemorrhage in the putamen (P=0.0016). Conclusions— The results indicate that the leakage sign is a useful and sensitive method to predict hematoma expansion. PMID:26931155

  8. Pulmonary hypoplasia on preterm infant associated with diffuse chorioamniotic hemosiderosis caused by intrauterine hemorrhage due to massive subchorial hematoma: report of a neonatal autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Sohsuke; Marutani, Takamitsu; Hisaoka, Masanori; Tasaki, Takashi; Nabeshima, Atsunori; Shiraishi, Mika; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki

    2012-08-01

    A male infant born prematurely at 31 weeks of gestation weighed 789 g and had mildly brown-colored oral/tracheal aspirates at delivery. The amniotic fluid was also discolored, and its index was below 5. The patient died of hypoxemic respiratory and cardiac failure 2 hours after birth. The maternal profiles showed placenta previa and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) at 22 weeks of gestation, and revealed recurrent episodes of antenatal and substantial vaginal bleeding and oligohydramnios, indicating chronic abruption-oligohydramnios sequence. The thickened placenta, weighing 275 g, grossly displayed unevenness and diffuse opacity with green to brown discoloration in the chorioamniotic surface, and revealed chronic massive subchorial hematomas (Breus' mole) with old peripheral blood clot, circumvallation, and infarction. Microscopically, diffuse Berlin-blue staining-positive hemosiderin deposits were readily encountered in the chorioamniotic layers of the chorionic plate, consistent with diffuse chorioamniotic hemosiderosis (DCH) due to Breus' mole, accompanied by diffuse amniotic necrosis. At autopsy, an external examination showed several surface anomalies and marked pulmonary hypoplasia, 0.006 (less 0.012) of lung:body weight ratio. Since Breus' mole has a close relationship with intrauterine hemorrhage, resulting in DCH, IUGR, and/or pulmonary hypoplasia of the newborn, the present features might be typical. PMID:22827763

  9. Noninvasive detection of intracerebral hemorrhage using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennes, Hans-Juergen; Lott, Carsten; Windirsch, Michael; Hanley, Daniel F.; Boor, Stephan; Brambrink, Ansgar; Dick, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    Intracerebral Hemorrhage (IH) is an important cause of secondary brain injury in neurosurgical patients. Early identification and treatment improve neurologic outcome. We have tested Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) as an alternative noninvasive diagnostic tool compared to CT-Scans to detect IH. We prospectively studied 212 patients with neurologic symptoms associated with intracranial pathology before performing a CT-scan. NIRS signals indicated pathologies in 181 cases (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.29). In a subgroup of subdural hematomas NIRS detected 45 of 46 hematomas (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.79). Identification of intracerebral hemorrhage using NIRS has the potential to allow early treatment, thus possibly avoiding further injury.

  10. Noninvasive detection of intracerebral hemorrhage using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennes, Hans J.; Lott, C.; Windirsch, Michael; Hanley, Daniel F.; Boor, Stephan; Brambrink, Ansgar; Dick, Wolfgang

    1997-12-01

    Intracerebral Hemorrhage (IH) is an important cause of secondary brain injury in neurosurgical patients. Early identification and treatment improve neurologic outcome. We have tested Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) as an alternative noninvasive diagnostic tool compared to CT-Scans to detect IH. We prospectively studied 212 patients with neurologic symptoms associated with intracranial pathology before performing a CT-scan. NIRS signals indicated pathologies in 181 cases (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.29). In a subgroup of subdural hematomas NIRS detected 45 of 46 hematomas (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.79). Identification of intracerebral hemorrhage using NIRS has the potential to allow early treatment, thus possibly avoiding further injury.

  11. Whole Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyeong-Wook; Song, Jae Gyok; Ryu, Jae-Wook

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old male who had no underlying disease, including coagulopathy, underwent thoracotomy and bleeding control due to hemothorax. On the fifth postoperative day, paralysis of both lower limbs occurred. Urgent spine magnetic resonance imaging showed a massive anterior spinal epidural hematoma from C2 to L1 level with different signal intensities, which was suspected to be staged hemorrhage. Hematoma evacuation with decompressive laminectomy was performed. The patient's neurologic deterioration was recovered immediately, and he was discharged without neurological deficits. A drug history of naftazone, which could induce a drug-induced platelet dysfunction, was revealed retrospectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of whole spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a young patient, with a history of hemorrhoid medication. PMID:24967052

  12. What are the next breakthroughs in the management of acute intracerebral hemorrhage?

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Kazunori; Koga, Masatoshi; Sato, Shoichiro

    2016-06-01

    The impact of acute therapy for intracerebral hemorrhage is far behind that for acute ischemic stroke. Potential breakthroughs in the management of acute intracerebral hemorrhage are presented. To prevent early hematoma growth, acute blood pressure lowering, emergent hemostatic therapy, and minimally invasive surgery with topical thrombolysis have been attempted. Anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective pharmacotherapies may attenuate perihematomal edema as a surrogate marker for the inflammatory response and improve clinical outcomes after intracerebral hemorrhage. Hyperacute modification of vital parameters, early seizure control, early rehabilitation, and neuroregenerative therapy are other promising strategies in the foreseeable future. PMID:26912534

  13. Subacute Subdural Hematoma in a Patient with Bilateral DBS Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Pahapill, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Subdural hematomas (SDH) in patients with implanted deep brain stimulating (DBS) electrodes are rare. Only a handful of cases have been reported in the literature. No clear management guidelines exist regarding the management of the hematoma and the existing electrodes. We describe a 68-year-old female with bilateral DBS electrodes, who presented with acute, severe hemiparesis due to a large subacute SDH with associated electrode displacement. Urgent hematoma evacuation reversed the hemiparesis; the electrodes were left undisturbed. Brain reexpansion occurred promptly. The patient was able to benefit from stable DBS therapies within 3 weeks of hematoma evacuation, maintained at 1.5-year follow-up. The case highlights that despite relative electrode migration due to a subdural hematoma, the electrodes may not require revision during initial hematoma evacuation or in a delayed fashion. Timely hematoma evacuation, coupled with brain reexpansion, may be adequate for the electrode to travel back to its original position and effect reasonable DBS therapies. PMID:26779357

  14. Tranexamic Acid as Antifibrinolytic Agent in Non Traumatic Intracerebral Hemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    ARUMUGAM, Ananda; A RAHMAN, Noor Azman; THEOPHILUS, Sharon Casilda; SHARIFFUDIN, Ashraf; ABDULLAH, Jafri Malin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mortality and morbidity associated with intracerebral hemorrhage is still high. Up to now, there are no evidence-based effective treatments for acute ICH. This study is to assess the effect of tranexamic acid (TXA) on hematoma growth of patients with spontaneous ICH compared to a placebo. Methods: We performed a single-blinded, randomised placebo-controlled trial of TXA (intravenous 1g bolus, followed by infusion TXA 1 g/hour for 8 hours) in acute (< 8 hours) primary ICH. Strict blood pressure control (target SBP 140-160 mmHg). A repeat Computed Tomography brain was done after 24 hours to reassess hematoma growth. The primary objective is to test the effect of TXA on hematoma growth. Other objective was to test the feasibility, tolerability, and adverse events of TXA in primary ICH. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant hematoma growth in control group after 24 hours compared to baseline (14.3300 vs 17.9940, P = 0.001) whereas the treatment group there is no significant hematoma size expansion between baseline and after 24 hours (P = 0.313). Conclusions: This study showed a significant hematoma volume expansion in the control group compared to the treatment group. PMID:27006639

  15. Tin-mesoporphyrin, a potent heme oxygenase inhibitor, for treatment of intracerebral hemorrhage: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Wagner, K R; Hua, Y; de Courten-Myers, G M; Broderick, J P; Nishimura, R N; Lu, S Y; Dwyer, B E

    2000-05-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the stroke subtype with highest mortality and morbidity. ICH can also occur following traumatic brain injury and thrombolysis for ischemic stroke and myocardial infarction. Development of ICH-induced hemispheric edema can elevate intracranial pressure and cause death. In survivors, edema-related white matter injury can lead to life-long neurological deficits. At present, there are no scientifically proven treatments for ICH. Heme oxygenase products, particularly iron and bilirubin, can be toxic to cells. In cerebral ischemia models, metalloporphyrins that are potent heme oxygenase inhibitors, reduce edema and infarct size. Tin-mesoporphyrin (SnMP) is a neuroprotectant that has also been used clinically to treat hyperbilirubinemia. Presently, we tested the hypothesis that SnMP treatment would reduce edema development following experimental ICH. We produced hematomas in pentobarbital-anesthetized pigs (9-11 kg) by infusing autologous blood into the frontal white matter. To maximize tissue concentrations, SnMP (87.5 microM in DMSO) or DMSO (vehicle controls) was included in the infused blood. Pig brains were frozen in situ at 24 hrs. following ICH and hematoma and edema volumes were determined on coronal sections by computer-assisted image analysis. We also examined the effects of SnMP in vitro on ferritin iron release, the formation of iron-induced thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and initial clot formation and hemolysis. SnMP treatment significantly reduced intracerebral mass following ICH. This was due to significant decreases in hematoma (0.68+/-0.08 vs. 1.39+/-0.30 cc, vehicle controls p<0.025) and edema volumes (edema = 1. 16+/-0.33 vs. 1.77+/-0.31 cc, p<0.05). In vitro, SnMP did not stabilize ferritin iron against reductive release nor did it decrease iron-induced TBARS formation in brain homogenates. SnMP or DMSO added to pig blood did not alter clot weights. In conclusion, SnMP reduced intracerebral

  16. Study of near infrared technology for intracranial hematoma detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Quan; Ma, Hong Y.; Nioka, Shoko; Chance, Britton

    2000-04-01

    Although intracranial hematoma detection only requires the continuous wave technique of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), previous studies have shown that there are still some problems in obtaining very accurate, reliable hematoma detection. Several of the most important limitations of NIR technology for hematoma detection such as the dynamic range of detection, hair absorption, optical contact, layered structure of the head, and depth of detection are reported in this article. A pulsed light source of variable intensity was designed and studied in order to overcome hair absorption and to increase the dynamic range and depth of detection. An adaptive elastic optical probe was made to improve the optical contact and decrease contact noise. A new microcontroller operated portable hematoma detector was developed. Due to the layered structure of the human head, simulation on a layered medium was analyzed experimentally. Model inhomogeneity tests and animal hematoma tests showed the effectiveness of the improved hematoma detector for intracranial hematoma detection.

  17. Non-traumatic subdural hematoma secondary to septic brain embolism: A rare cause of unexpected death in a drug addict suffering from undiagnosed bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Geisenberger, D; Huppertz, L M; Büchsel, M; Kramer, L; Pollak, S; Grosse Perdekamp, M

    2015-12-01

    Acute subdural hematomas are mostly due to blunt traumatization of the head. In rare instances, subdural bleeding occurs without evidence of a previous trauma following spontaneous hemorrhage, e.g. from a ruptured aneurysm or an intracerebral hematoma perforating the brain surface and the arachnoid. The paper presents the morphological, microbiological and toxicological findings in a 38-year-old drug addict who was found by his partner in a dazed state. When brought to a hospital, he underwent trepanation to empty a right-sided subdural hematoma, but he died already 4h after admission. Autopsy revealed previously undiagnosed infective endocarditis of the aortic valve as well as multiple infarctions of brain, spleen and kidneys obviously caused by septic emboli. The subdural hematoma originated from a subcortical brain hemorrhage which had perforated into the subdural space. Microbiological investigation of the polypous vegetations adhering to the aortic valve revealed colonization by Streptococcus mitis and Klebsiella oxytoca. According to the toxicological analysis, no psychotropic substances had contributed to the lethal outcome. The case reported underlines that all deaths of drug addicts should be subjected to complete forensic autopsy, as apart from intoxications also natural and traumatic causes of death have to be taken into consideration. PMID:26296471

  18. A Knowledge Discovery Approach to Diagnosing Intracranial Hematomas on Brain CT: Recognition, Measurement and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chun-Chih; Xiao, Furen; Wong, Jau-Min; Chiang, I.-Jen

    Computed tomography (CT) of the brain is preferred study on neurological emergencies. Physicians use CT to diagnose various types of intracranial hematomas, including epidural, subdural and intracerebral hematomas according to their locations and shapes. We propose a novel method that can automatically diagnose intracranial hematomas by combining machine vision and knowledge discovery techniques. The skull on the CT slice is located and the depth of each intracranial pixel is labeled. After normalization of the pixel intensities by their depth, the hyperdense area of intracranial hematoma is segmented with multi-resolution thresholding and region-growing. We then apply C4.5 algorithm to construct a decision tree using the features of the segmented hematoma and the diagnoses made by physicians. The algorithm was evaluated on 48 pathological images treated in a single institute. The two discovered rules closely resemble those used by human experts, and are able to make correct diagnoses in all cases.

  19. Targeting heme oxygenase after intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Roetling, Jing; Lu, Xiangping; Regan, Raymond F.

    2015-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the primary event in approximately 10% of strokes, and has higher rates of morbidity and mortality than ischemic stroke. Experimental evidence suggests that the toxicity of hemoglobin and its degradation products contributes to secondary injury that may be amenable to therapeutic intervention. Hemin, the oxidized form of heme, accumulates in intracranial hematomas to cytotoxic levels. The rate limiting step of its breakdown is catalyzed by the heme oxygenase (HO) enzymes, which consist of inducible HO-1 and constitutively-expressed HO-2. The effect of these enzymes on perihematomal injury and neurological outcome has been investigated in ICH models using both genetic and pharmacological approaches to alter their expression, with variable results reported. These findings are summarized and reconciled in this review; therapeutic strategies that may optimize HO expression and activity after ICH are described. PMID:25642455

  20. Surgical Strategies for Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ziai, Wendy; Nyquist, Paul; Hanley, Daniel F

    2016-06-01

    In recent decades, the surgical treatment of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has become a focus of scientific inquest. This effort has been led by an international group of neurologists and neurosurgeons with the goal of studying functional recovery and developing new surgical techniques to facilitate improved clinical outcomes. Currently, the two most pressing ICH investigational goals are (1) early blood pressure control, and (2) safe hematoma volume reduction. Achieving these goals would support decision-making, level-of-care choices, and the global research strategy of developing biologically informed treatments. Herein the authors review conventional and minimally invasive surgical approaches to spontaneous ICH, articulating the scope of the problem, recent clinical trials, management issues, and relevant questions for future research. The authors propose that strategies using minimally invasive techniques including clot aspiration with stereotactic guidance may give better results with improved clinical outcomes compared with standard open surgical approaches. PMID:27214701

  1. Chronic subdural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    Subdural hemorrhage - chronic; Subdural hematoma - chronic; Subdural hygroma ... Ling GSF. Traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  2. Coronary Intramural Hematoma Presenting as Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Takenobu; Kadota, Kazushige; Kubo, Shunsuke; Habara, Seiji; Mitsudo, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of intramural hematoma without ongoing myocardial ischemia that healed spontaneously with conservative treatment. A 37-year-old woman was admitted due to chest pain. Acute coronary syndrome was diagnosed by electrocardiography and echocardiography. Coronary angiography showed 90% stenosis in the distal portion of the left anterior descending coronary artery, where intravascular ultrasound showed a hematoma, but optical coherence tomography could not detect the entry point. Therefore, we identified the intramural hematoma as the etiology. Because the coronary flow was maintained and chest pain disappeared, we chose conservative treatment. Fifteen days after admission, coronary computed tomography showed an improvement in the intramural hematoma. PMID:27477409

  3. [Chronic subdural hematoma presenting visual disturbance: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, S; Manabe, H; Shimizu, T; Itoh, C; Suzuki, S

    2001-03-01

    The authors reported a rare case of chronic subdural hematoma presenting bilateral visual impairment caused by papilledema. A 49-year-old man was admitted to our department due to left blurred vision. On admission, ophthalmological examination revealed visual acuity disturbance on the left eye, bilateral nasal visual field defect and papilledema. CT scan and MRI demonstrated bilateral subdural hematoma. No remarkable findings were detected on cerebral angiography. After evacuation of bilateral subdural hematomas, his visual symptoms recovered. In this report, we discuss the mechanism of visual impairment caused by chronic subdural hematoma. PMID:11296405

  4. Adverse reaction to ceftriaxone in a 28-day-old infant undergoing urgent craniotomy due to epidural hematoma: review of neonatal biliary pseudolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Bartkowska-Śniatkowska, Alicja; Jończyk-Potoczna, Katarzyna; Zielińska, Marzena; Rosada-Kurasińska, Jowita

    2015-01-01

    The debate as to whether to administer ceftriaxone to neonates is likely to continue. Ceftriaxone has numerous advantages for critically ill pediatric patients. However, it is also known to contribute substantially to the development of biliary pseudolithiasis. Although pediatric patients rarely develop gallbladder disorders, this complication may lead to adverse events in high-risk patients with predisposing factors, particularly in neonates and infants treated with ceftriaxone. In this paper we present an interesting case report of a 28-day-old neonate with spontaneous severe epidural hematoma who developed biliary pseudolithiasis related to the use of ceftriaxone. We also discuss the efficacy of ceftriaxone in neonates and infants. Neonatologists and pediatric intensivists should be aware of the higher risk of co-existence of hyperbilirubinemia and gallbladder disorders while using ceftriaxone in pediatric settings. PMID:26170682

  5. Markerless surgical robotic system for intracerebral hemorrhage surgery.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sangkyun; Cho, Hyunchul; Yoon, Siyeop; Park, Kyusic; Kim, Youngjun; Park, Sehyung; Kim, Laehyun; Lee, Deukhee

    2015-01-01

    Conventional intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) surgery uses a stereotactic frame to access an intracerebral hematoma. Using a stereotactic frame for ICH surgery requires a long preparation time. In order to resolve this problem, we propose a markerless surgical robotic system. This system uses weighted iterative closest point technology for surface registration, hand-eye calibration for needle insertion, and 3D surface scanning for registration. We need calibration to integrate the technologies: calibration of robot and needle coordinates and calibration of 3D surface scanning and needle coordinates. These calibrations are essential elements of the markerless surgical robotic system. This system has the advantages of being non-invasive, a short total operation time, and low radiation exposure compared to conventional ICH surgery. PMID:26737481

  6. Subchorionic hematoma: a review.

    PubMed

    Pearlstone, M; Baxi, L

    1993-02-01

    A review of the English literature on subchorionic hematoma (SCH) is presented. Fourteen studies are reviewed. The incidence of SCH varied greatly among studies from 4 to 48 per cent. Small SCH tend to be more common in the first trimester and appear to pose no added risk to the ongoing pregnancy. Conversely, SCH in the second trimester often are larger and may be associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery. The etiology of these hematomas remains unclear. Pathological changes that might contribute to their formation are reviewed. Larger studies with controls, including data on the incidence of SCH in a population of normal obstetric patients are needed. PMID:8437776

  7. Rectus sheath hematoma: three case reports

    PubMed Central

    Kapan, Selin; Turhan, Ahmet N; Alis, Halil; Kalayci, Mustafa U; Hatipoglu, Sinan; Yigitbas, Hakan; Aygun, Ersan

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is an accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear. It could occur spontaneously or after trauma. They are usually located infraumblically and often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen, inflammatory diseases or tumours of the abdomen. Case presentation We reported three cases of rectus sheath hematoma presenting with a mass in the abdomen and diagnosed by computerized tomography. The patients recovered uneventfully after bed rest, intravenous fluid replacement, blood transfusion and analgesic treatment. Conclusion Rectus sheath hematoma is a rarely seen pathology often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen that may lead to unnecessary laparotomies. Computerized tomography must be chosen for definitive diagnosis since ultrasonography is subject to error due to misinterpretation of the images. Main therapy is conservative management. PMID:18221529

  8. Recurrent subdural hematoma secondary to headbanging: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Jito, Junya; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: “Headbanging” is the slang term used to denote violent shaking of one's head in time with the music. This abrupt flexion-extension movement of the head to rock music extremely rarely causes a subdural hematoma. Case Description: A 24-year-old female was admitted to our department because of right sided partial seizure and acute or subacute subdural hematoma over the left cerebral convexity. She had no history of recent head trauma but performed headbanging at a punk rock concert at 3 days before admission. Since, she had a previous acute subdural hematoma on the same side after an accidental fall from a baby buggy when she was 11 months old, the present was recurrent subdural hematoma probably due to headbanging. Conclusions: Headbanging has the hazardous potential to cause a subdural hematoma. PMID:26664766

  9. Neuroinflammation after intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mracsko, Eva; Veltkamp, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a particularly severe type of stroke for which no specific treatment has been established yet. Although preclinical models of ICH have substantial methodological limitations, important insight into the pathophysiology has been gained. Mounting evidence suggests an important contribution of inflammatory mechanisms to brain damage and potential repair. Neuroinflammation evoked by intracerebral blood involves the activation of resident microglia, the infiltration of systemic immune cells and the production of cytokines, chemokines, extracellular proteases and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous studies focused on innate immunity including microglia, monocytes and granulocytes. More recently, the role of adaptive immune cells has received increasing attention. Little is currently known about the interactions among different immune cell populations in the setting of ICH. Nevertheless, immunomodulatory strategies are already being explored in ICH. To improve the chances of translation from preclinical models to patients, a better characterization of the neuroinflammation in patients is desirable. PMID:25477782

  10. Natural and synthetic retinoids afford therapeutic effects on intracerebral hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Hideaki; Hijioka, Masanori; Hisatsune, Akinori; Isohama, Yoichiro; Shudo, Koichi; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2012-05-15

    We have recently proposed that retinoic acid receptor (NR1B) is a promising target of neuroprotective therapy for intracerebral hemorrhage, since pretreatment of mice with an NR1B1/NR1B2 agonist Am80 attenuated various pathological and neurological abnormalities associated with the disease. In the present study we further addressed the effects of retinoids as potential therapeutic drugs, using a collagenase-induced model of intracerebral hemorrhage. Daily oral administration of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA; 5 and 15 mg/kg), a naturally occurring NR1B agonist, from 1 day before collagenase injection significantly inhibited loss of neurons within the hematoma. ATRA in the same treatment regimen also decreased the number of activated microglia/macrophages around the hematoma but did not affect the hematoma volume. ATRA (15 mg/kg) as well as Am80 (5mg/kg) rescued neurons in the central region of hematoma, even when drug administration was started from 6h after induction of intracerebral hemorrhage. However, in this post-treatment regimen, only Am80 significantly decreased the number of activated microglia/macrophages. With regard to neurological deficits, both ATRA (15 mg/kg) and Am80 (5mg/kg) given in the post-treatment regimen improved performance of mice in the beam-walking test and the modified limb-placing test. ATRA and Am80 also significantly attenuated damage of axon tracts as revealed by amyloid precursor protein immunohistochemistry. These results underscore potential therapeutic values of NR1B agonists for intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:22465180

  11. Spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage: Does surgery benefit comatose patients?

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Cem; Kabatas, Serdar; Gulsen, Salih; Cansever, Tufan; Gurkanlar, Doga; Caner, Hakan; Altinors, Nur

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Treatment of spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH) is still controversial. We therefore analyzed the comatose patients diagnosed as having spontaneous SICH and treated by surgery. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the collected data of 25 comatose patients with initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) ≤ 8 diagnosed as having spontaneous SICH and they had been treated by surgical evacuation between 1996 and 2008. The outcome was assessed using Glasgow outcome scale (GOS). The side and location of the hematoma and ventricular extension of the hematoma were recorded. The hematoma volume was graded as mild (<30 cc), moderate (30–60 cc) and massive (>60 cc). Results: Age of the patients ranged from 25 to 78 years (mean: 59.6 ± 15.14 years). Among the 25 patients studied, 11 (44%) were females and 14 (56%) were males. GCS before surgery was <5 in 8 (32%) patients and between 5 and 8 in 17 (68%) patients. The hematoma volume was less than 30 cc in 2 patients, between 30 and 60 cc in 9 patients and more than 60 cc in 14 patients. Fourteen of the patients had no ventricular connection and 11 of the hematomas were connected to ventricle. All the 25 patients were treated with craniotomy and evacuation of the hematoma was done within an average of 2 hours on admission to the emergency department. Postoperatively, no rebleeding occurred in our patients. The most important complication was infection in 14 of the patients. The mortality of our surgical series was 56%. GCS before surgery was one of the strongest factors affecting outcome GCS (oGCS) (P = 0.017). Income GCS (iGCS), however, did not affect GOS (P = 0.64). The volume of the hematoma also affected the outcome (P = 0.037). Ventricular extension of the hematoma did affect the oGCS and GOS (P = 0.002), but not the iGCS of the patients (P = 0.139). Conclusion: Our data suggest that being surgically oriented is very important to achieve successful outcomes in a select group

  12. Early prediction of death in acute hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, GUOFANG; PING, LEI; ZHOU, SHENGKUI; LIU, WEIWEI; LIU, LEIJING; ZHANG, DONGMEI; LI, ZAILI; TIAN, YONGFANG; CHEN, ZHEN

    2016-01-01

    Hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage (HICH) has been on the decline. However, mortality at long-term follow up is on the increase. The aim of the present study was to investigate early warning signals of death in patients with acute HICH. The medical records of 128 patients with acute HICH within 6 h of onset were retrospectively analyzed. For these patients, systolic blood pressure (BP) was recorded at different time points (emergency, admission, every 6 h within 24 h and twice daily after 24 h) within 1 week. Computed tomography scanning was performed at emergency and the following 24±3 h to assess the hematoma volume. Neurological impairment was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Scale and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Outcomes were death, defined as a modified Rankin scale score 6, at 90 days. The results showed that at 90 days, 15 HICH patients succumbed (mortality of 11.7%). Of the 15 patients, 1 patient (6.7%) sucumbed within 24 h and 6 patients (40%) within 1 week. HICH mortality was closely associated with age (P<0.001) but not with gender. A significant association was detected between mortality and high BP taken at 30 min, 45 min and 6 h after admission (P=0.003), albeit not at emergency and admission (P>0.05). Death was also correlated with hematoma volume at 24 h but not with the site. Results from the multivariate binary logistic regression analysis showed that age and hematoma volume were independent risk factors of death of HICH. In conclusion, age and hematoma volume may be important early predictors of death in HICH. Proactive control and management of hematoma may reduce the mortality of HICH. PMID:26889222

  13. Intracerebral infusion of a second-generation ciliary neurotrophic factor reduces neuronal loss in rat striatum following experimental intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Del Bigio, M R; Yan, H J; Xue, M

    2001-11-15

    Neuronal and glial cell death in the striatum of a rat model of collagenase-induced intracerebral hemorrhage begins at 1 day and continues for at least 3 weeks. We hypothesized that administration of a neurotrophic agent would reduce neuronal loss in this experimental model. Because it has been shown to protect striatal neurons against excitotoxic injury, a second-generation ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) (AXOKINE) was administered by continuous intracerebral infusion (2 microg/day) beginning 28 h after hemorrhage and continuing for 2 weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the hematoma size was comparable in control and treated rats prior to treatment. Counts of medium-sized striatal neurons within 320 microm of the hematoma 8 weeks after the hemorrhage revealed a slight but statistically significant benefit with a 42.5% loss in treated rats compared to 51.7% loss in controls. The results suggest that AXOKINE might be protective of striatal neurons in the vicinity of a hemorrhagic lesion. PMID:11701153

  14. Microwave hematoma detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2001-01-01

    The Microwave Hematoma Detector is a non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots near the outer surface of the body. While being geared towards finding sub-dural and epi-dural hematomas, the device can be used to detect blood pooling anywhere near the surface of the body. Modified versions of the device can also detect pneumothorax, organ hemorrhage, atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid arteries, evaluate perfusion (blood flow) at or near the body surface, body tissue damage at or near the surface (especially for burn assessment) and be used in a number of NDE applications. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with a specialized antenna, signal processing/recognition algorithms and a disposable cap worn by the patient which will facilitate accurate mapping of the brain and proper function of the instrument. The invention may be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of sub-dural or epi-dural hematoma in human or animal patients, detection of hemorrhage within approximately 5 cm of the outer surface anywhere on a patient's body.

  15. High doses of methylprednisolone are required for the treatment of collagenase-induced intracerebral hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Methylprednisolone (MP) was evaluated for the treatment of intracerebral hemorrhage in a Sprague-Dawley rat model of cerebral hematoma induced by subcortical injection of collagenase. At 1 and 24 h after the injection, MP was administered intraperitoneally (IP) at a concentration of 10, 35, or 100 mg/kg. Control groups received saline IP at 1 and 24 h after the intracerebral injection of collagenase (positive controls) or saline (negative controls). Motor behaviour 24 h before and 24 h and 48 h after the intracerebral injection was evaluated by means of a neurologic exam and a rotarod treadmill test. The animals were euthanized at 48 h; brain water content was determined in half of the rats, and histopathological studies were done in the other half. Compared with the positive controls, the animals with collagenase-induced hematoma performed significantly better on the neurologic exam after treatment with 100 mg/kg of MP and on the rotarod test after treatment with 35 or 100 mg/kg of MP. The hematoma volume was significantly smaller (P < 0.002) after all doses of MP; however, the smallest volume was seen with 100 mg/kg. There were significantly fewer neutrophils (P < 0.01) within the hematoma in the MP-treated animals (maximum reduction with 100 mg/kg) than in the positive controls, but the numbers of reactive astrocytes did not differ significantly between the treatment groups. The number of necrotic neurons in the penumbra did not differ between the treatment groups; however, there were significantly fewer (P < 0.005) in the cerebral cortex in the group treated with 100 mg/kg of MP compared with the positive controls. These results suggest that high doses of MP administered shortly after occurrence of a cerebral hematoma are beneficial for the treatment of intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:16479722

  16. Brain Injury After Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gang; Bao, Xuhui; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard; Thompson, B. Gregory; Hua, Ya

    2011-01-01

    Object Hypertension is the main cause of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH), but the effects of hypertension on ICH-induced brain injury have not been well studied. In this study, we examined ICH-induced brain injury in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Methods This two-part study was performed on 12 weeks old male SHR and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. First, rats received an intracaudate injection of 0.3 units collagenase and hematoma sizes were determined at 24 hours. Second, rats were injected with 100-μL autologous whole blood into the right basal ganglia. Brain edema, neuronal death, ferritin expression, microglia activation, and neurological deficits were examined. Results Hematoma sizes were the same in SHR and WKY rats 24 hours after collagenase injection. SHR had greater neuronal death and neurological deficits after blood injection. ICH also resulted in higher brain ferritin levels and stronger activation of microglia in SHR. However, perihematomal brain edema was same in the SHR and WKY rats. Conclusion Moderate chronic hypertension resulted in more severe ICH-induced neuronal death and neurological deficits, but did not exaggerate hematoma enlargement and perihematomal brain edema in the rat ICH models. PMID:21294617

  17. Infrequent Hemorrhagic Complications Following Surgical Drainage of Chronic Subdural Hematomas.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Angelo; Sangiorgi, Simone; Bifone, Lidia; Balbi, Sergio

    2015-05-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas mainly occur amongst elderly people and usually develop after minor head injuries. In younger patients, subdural collections may be related to hypertension, coagulopathies, vascular abnormalities, and substance abuse. Different techniques can be used for the surgical treatment of symptomatic chronic subdural hematomas : single or double burr-hole evacuation, with or without subdural drainage, twist-drill craniostomies and classical craniotomies. Failure of the brain to re-expand, pneumocephalus, incomplete evacuation, and recurrence of the fluid collection are common complications following these procedures. Acute subdural hematomas may also occur. Rarely reported hemorrhagic complications include subarachnoid, intracerebral, intraventricular, and remote cerebellar hemorrhages. The causes of such uncommon complications are difficult to explain and remain poorly understood. Overdrainage and intracranial hypotension, rapid brain decompression and shift of the intracranial contents, cerebrospinal fluid loss, vascular dysregulation and impairment of venous outflow are the main mechanisms discussed in the literature. In this article we report three cases of different post-operative intracranial bleeding and review the related literature. PMID:26113968

  18. Infrequent Hemorrhagic Complications Following Surgical Drainage of Chronic Subdural Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    Sangiorgi, Simone; Bifone, Lidia; Balbi, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas mainly occur amongst elderly people and usually develop after minor head injuries. In younger patients, subdural collections may be related to hypertension, coagulopathies, vascular abnormalities, and substance abuse. Different techniques can be used for the surgical treatment of symptomatic chronic subdural hematomas : single or double burr-hole evacuation, with or without subdural drainage, twist-drill craniostomies and classical craniotomies. Failure of the brain to re-expand, pneumocephalus, incomplete evacuation, and recurrence of the fluid collection are common complications following these procedures. Acute subdural hematomas may also occur. Rarely reported hemorrhagic complications include subarachnoid, intracerebral, intraventricular, and remote cerebellar hemorrhages. The causes of such uncommon complications are difficult to explain and remain poorly understood. Overdrainage and intracranial hypotension, rapid brain decompression and shift of the intracranial contents, cerebrospinal fluid loss, vascular dysregulation and impairment of venous outflow are the main mechanisms discussed in the literature. In this article we report three cases of different post-operative intracranial bleeding and review the related literature. PMID:26113968

  19. History of preclinical models of intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingyi; Khatibi, Nikan H; Chen, Hank; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand a disease process, effective modeling is required that can assist scientists in understanding the pathophysiological processes that take place. Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), a devastating disease representing 15% of all stroke cases, is just one example of how scientists have developed models that can effectively mimic human clinical scenarios. Currently there are three models of hematoma injections that are being used to induce an ICH in subjects. They include the microballoon model introduced in 1987 by Dr. David Mendelow, the bacterial collagenase injection model introduced in 1990 by Dr. Gary Rosenberg, and the autologous blood injection model introduced by Dr. Guo-Yuan Yang in 1994. These models have been applied on various animal models beginning in 1963 with canines, followed by rats and rabbits in 1982, pigs in 1996, and mice just recently in 2003. In this review, we will explore in detail the various injection models and animal subjects that have been used to study the ICH process while comparing and analyzing the benefits and disadvantages of each. PMID:21725723

  20. History of Preclinical Models of Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qingyi; Khatibi, Nikan; Chen, Hank; Zhang, John H.

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand a disease process, effective modeling is required that can assist scientists in understanding the pathophysiological processes that take place. Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), a devastating disease representing 15% of all stroke cases, is just one example of how scientists have developed models that can effectively mimic human clinical scenarios. Currently there are three models of hematoma injections that are being used to induce an ICH in subjects. They include the microballoon model introduced in 1987 by Dr. David Mendelow, the bacterial collagenase injection model introduced in 1990 by Dr. Gary Rosenberg, and the autologous blood injection model introduced by Dr. Guo-Yuan Yang in 1994. These models have been applied on various animal models beginning in 1963 with canines, followed by rats and rabbits in 1982, pigs in 1996, and mice just recently in 2003. In this review, we will explore in detail the various injection models and animal subjects that have been used to study the ICH process while comparing and analyzing the benefits and disadvantages of each. PMID:21725723

  1. Prevention of intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Patrick; Mitra, Dipayan; Gregson, Barbara A; Mendelow, A David

    2007-07-01

    Nontraumatic intracerebral haemorrhages arise from a wide range of causes falling into two broad groups: discreet vascular "ictohaemorrhagic" lesions such as aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, cavernomas, tumours, and dural fistulae; and more generalised amyloid or hypertension related conditions. It is now possible using family history, associated risk factors and gradient echo MRI to predict cases at high risk of hypertensive or amyloid related haemorrhage. There is considerable potential for prevention of hypertensive haemorrhages by treatment of high risk cases with antihypertensive medication. As yet no effective preventative treatment for amyloid angiopathy related ICH has emerged although a variety of drugs are under investigation. Prevention of haemorrhage from ictohaemorrhagic lesions revolves around removal or obliteration of the lesion. Although there is a wide range of such lesions available treatments come down to three modalities. These are surgical excision, stereotactic radiosurgery and endovascular embolisation. PMID:17630936

  2. Protective Effect of Pyrroloquinoline Quinone (PQQ) in Rat Model of Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongjian; Shen, Jiabing; Song, Xinjian; Ge, Jianbin; Cai, Rixin; Dai, Aihua; Jiang, Zhongli

    2015-10-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) has invoked considerable interest because of its presence in foods, antioxidant properties, cofactor of dehydrogenase, and amine oxidase. Protective roles of PQQ in central nervous system diseases, such as experimental stroke and spinal cord injury models have been emerged. However, it is unclear whether intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), as an acute devastating disease, can also benefit from PQQ in experimental conditions. Herein, we examined the possible effect of PQQ on neuronal functions following ICH in the adult rats. The results showed that rats pretreated with PQQ at 10 mg/kg effectively improved the locomotor functions, alleviated the hematoma volumes, and reduced the expansion of brain edema after ICH. Also, pretreated rats with PQQ obviously reduced the production of reactive oxygen species after ICH, probably due to its antioxidant properties. Further, we found that, Bcl-2/Bax, the important indicator of oxidative stress insult in mitochondria after ICH, exhibited increasing ratio in PQQ-pretreated groups. Moreover, activated caspase-3, the apoptotic executor, showed coincident alleviation in PQQ groups after ICH. Collectively, we speculated that PQQ might be an effective and potential neuroprotectant in clinical therapy for ICH. PMID:25820784

  3. Chronic subdural hematoma infected by propionibacterium acnes: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shusuke; Asahi, Takashi; Akioka, Naoki; Kashiwazaki, Daina; Kuwayama, Naoya; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We present a very rare case of a patient with an infected subdural hematoma due to Propionibacterium acnes. A 63-year-old male complained of dizziness and was admitted to our hospital. He had a history of left chronic subdural hematoma due to a traffic accident, which had been conservatively treated. Physical, neurological and laboratory examinations revealed no definite abnormality. Plain CT scan demonstrated a hypodense crescentic fluid collection over the surface of the left cerebral hemisphere. The patient was diagnosed with chronic subdural hematoma and underwent burr hole surgery three times and selective embolization of the middle meningeal artery, but the lesion easily recurred. Repeated culture examinations of white sedimentation detected P. acnes. Therefore, he underwent craniotomy surgery followed by intravenous administration of antibiotics. The infected subdural hematoma was covered with a thick, yellowish outer membrane, and the large volume of pus and hematoma was removed. However, the lesion recurred again and a low-density area developed in the left frontal lobe. Craniotomy surgery was performed a second time, and two Penrose drainages were put in both the epidural and subdural spaces. Subsequently, the lesions completely resolved and he was discharged without any neurological deficits. Infected subdural hematoma may be refractory to burr hole surgery or craniotomy alone, in which case aggressive treatment with craniotomy and continuous drainage should be indicated before the brain parenchyma suffers irreversible damage. PMID:25759659

  4. Neuroprotection and Sensorimotor Functional Improvement by Curcumin after Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuhao; Dai, Minchao; Wang, Yongting; Wang, Wenjing; Sun, Qingfang; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies revealed that curcumin is neuroprotective in diseases of the central nervous system such as cerebral ischemia and traumatic brain injury. However, the effect of curcumin on intracerebral hemorrhage remains unclear. We, therefore, investigated the pre-clinical effect of curcumin treatment on neurological outcomes following intracerebral hemorrhage, using a mouse model. Intracerebral hemorrhage was induced by autologous blood injection into the right basal ganglia. Curcumin (150 mg/kg) was administered 15 min after intracerebral hemorrhage. Grid walk and neurological scores were evaluated at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days post-injury. Mice were killed at 24 h or 28 days following injury, for histological examination. Evans Blue and water content in the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres were measured to evaluate the extent of blood–brain barrier disruption and brain edema. Zonula occludens-1 was detected by immunostaining. In situ zymography was used to measure the localization and focal enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase. Our results demonstrated that curcumin reduced brain edema, measured by alleviated water content and Evans Blue leakage at 24 h (p<0.05). Lateral ventricle measurements indicated that curcumin reduced brain tissue loss in the ipsilateral hemisphere (p<0.05). The same dose of curcumin also significantly attenuated neurological deficits at 1 and 3 days of intracerebral hemorrhage (p<0.05). Immunostaining showed that tight junction continuity around the hematoma was better sustained in curcumin-treated mice than in vehicle-treated mice. At 24 h, the number of matrix metalloproteinase-positive cells was significantly reduced by curcumin (p<0.05). Our study suggests that curcumin ameliorates intracerebral hemorrhage damage by preventing matrix metalloproteinase-mediated blood–brain barrier damage and brain edema, which might provide therapeutic potential for intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:21770745

  5. Neuroprotection and sensorimotor functional improvement by curcumin after intracerebral hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuhao; Dai, Minchao; Wang, Yongting; Wang, Wenjing; Sun, Qingfang; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Bian, Liuguan

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies revealed that curcumin is neuroprotective in diseases of the central nervous system such as cerebral ischemia and traumatic brain injury. However, the effect of curcumin on intracerebral hemorrhage remains unclear. We, therefore, investigated the pre-clinical effect of curcumin treatment on neurological outcomes following intracerebral hemorrhage, using a mouse model. Intracerebral hemorrhage was induced by autologous blood injection into the right basal ganglia. Curcumin (150 mg/kg) was administered 15 min after intracerebral hemorrhage. Grid walk and neurological scores were evaluated at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days post-injury. Mice were killed at 24 h or 28 days following injury, for histological examination. Evans Blue and water content in the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres were measured to evaluate the extent of blood-brain barrier disruption and brain edema. Zonula occludens-1 was detected by immunostaining. In situ zymography was used to measure the localization and focal enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase. Our results demonstrated that curcumin reduced brain edema, measured by alleviated water content and Evans Blue leakage at 24 h (p<0.05). Lateral ventricle measurements indicated that curcumin reduced brain tissue loss in the ipsilateral hemisphere (p<0.05). The same dose of curcumin also significantly attenuated neurological deficits at 1 and 3 days of intracerebral hemorrhage (p<0.05). Immunostaining showed that tight junction continuity around the hematoma was better sustained in curcumin-treated mice than in vehicle-treated mice. At 24 h, the number of matrix metalloproteinase-positive cells was significantly reduced by curcumin (p<0.05). Our study suggests that curcumin ameliorates intracerebral hemorrhage damage by preventing matrix metalloproteinase-mediated blood-brain barrier damage and brain edema, which might provide therapeutic potential for intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:21770745

  6. Perirenal hematoma in a patient treated with bevacizumab for metastatic colon cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LEE, MIN SUNG; SHIN, IL SANG; KWUN, DO HYUNG; KIM, SE HYUNG; KIM, HYUN JUNG; KIM, CHAN KYU; PARK, SEONG KYU; HONG, DAE SIK; YUN, JINA

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the case of a patient that developed spontaneous perirenal hematoma during treatment with bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy. A 44-year-old woman with metastatic sigmoid colon cancer, who was being treated with bevacizumab (5 mg/kg, intravenous, 90 min biweekly), was admitted to hospital following 3 cycles of chemotherapy, with a sudden onset of dyspnea and oliguria. An emergency hemodialysis was performed and a large right perirenal hematoma was diagnosed using computed tomography. The patient was immediately instructed to discontinue chemotherapy, including bevacizumab. However, the right perirenal hematoma increased in size and a left perirenal hematoma developed 3 weeks later. The two perirenal hematomas stabilized 7 weeks subsequent to the termination of bevacizumab treatment. Spontaneous perirenal hematoma due to bevacizumab treatment is an extremely rare occurrence. However, physicians should be aware of this potential complication associated with bevacizumab treatment. PMID:27123092

  7. Positron emission tomography in the newborn: extensive impairment of regional cerebral blood flow with intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, J.J.; Herscovitch, P.; Perlman, J.M.; Raichle, M.E.

    1983-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) now provides the capability of measuring regional cerebral blood flow with high resolution and little risk. In this study, we utilized PET in six premature infants (920 to 1,200 g) with major intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement to measure regional cerebral blood flow during the acute period (5 to 17 days of age). Cerebral blood flow was determined after intravenous injection of H/sub 2/O, labeled with the positron-emitting isotope, /sup 15/O. Findings were similar and dramatic in all six infants. In the area of hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement, little or no cerebral blood flow was detected. However, in addition, surprisingly, a marked two- to fourfold reduction in cerebral blood flow was observed throughout the affected hemisphere, well posterior and lateral to the intracerebral hematoma, including cerebral white matter and, to a lesser extent, frontal, temporal, and parietal cortex. In the one infant studied a second time, ie, at 3 months of age, the extent and severity of the decreased cerebral blood flows in the affected hemisphere were similar to those observed on the study during the neonatal period. At the three autopsies, the affected left hemisphere showed extensive infarction, corroborating the PET scans. These observations, the first demonstration of the use of PET in the determination of regional cerebral blood flow in the newborn, show marked impairments in regional cerebral blood flow in the hemisphere containing an apparently restricted intracerebral hematoma, indicating that the hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement is only a component of a much larger lesion, ischemic in basic nature, ie, an infarction. This large ischemic lesion explains the poor neurologic outcome in infants with intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement.

  8. The Evaluation and Management of Adult Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xuemei; Rosand, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the most disabling and deadly form of stroke. Although mortality remains high, new data suggest that outcomes can be improved with standardized medical care. In this review, the authors outline the most up-to-date knowledge, including the results of the latest phase III clinical trials on the specialized care needed to treat patients with ICH. They provide an overview on how to achieve rapid diagnosis and the initial steps of intervention to reduce hematoma volume or prevent expansion by modifying potentially treatable conditions, such as underlying vascular etiologies, blood pressure control, and coagulopathies. Grading scales can help identify patients at risk for hematoma expansion and functional disabilities and guide clinical decision making. Other medical management topics important to recovery and prevention of secondary brain injury include seizure prevention and treatment, glycemic control, temperature control, and deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis and treatment. Treatment options in surgery are also possible in select patients; there are emerging studies regarding minimally invasive surgery for the management of ICH. These aggressive therapies are essential to lower the morbidity and mortality of patients presenting with ICH. PMID:26595864

  9. Benign Sphenoid Wing Meningioma Presenting with an Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Frič, Radek; Hald, John K.; Antal, Ellen-Ann

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY OBJECT We report an unusual case of a benign lateral sphenoid wing meningioma that presented with, and was masked by, an acute intracerebral hemorrhage. CASE REPORT A 68-year-old woman was admitted after sudden onset of coma. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an intracerebral hemorrhage, without any underlying vascular pathology on CT angiography. During the surgery, we found a lateral sphenoid wing meningioma with intratumoral bleeding that extended into the surrounding brain parenchyma. RESULTS We removed the hematoma and resected the tumor completely in the same session. The histopathological classification of the tumor was a WHO grade I meningothelial meningioma. The patient recovered very well after surgery, without significant neurological sequelae. CONCLUSIONS: Having reviewed the relevant references from the medical literature, we consider this event as an extremely rare presentation of a benign sphenoid wing meningioma in a patient without any predisposing medical factors. The possible mechanisms of bleeding from this tumor type are discussed. PMID:27127413

  10. Perihematoma cerebral blood flow is unaffected by statin use in acute intracerebral hemorrhage patients.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Laura C; Kate, Mahesh; McCourt, Rebecca; Gould, Bronwen; Coutts, Shelagh B; Dowlatshahi, Dariush; Asdaghi, Negar; Jeerakathil, Thomas; Hill, Michael D; Demchuk, Andrew M; Buck, Brian; Emery, Derek; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Butcher, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Statin therapy has been associated with improved cerebral blood flow (CBF) and decreased perihematoma edema in animal models of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We aimed to assess the relationship between statin use and cerebral hemodynamics in ICH patients. A post hoc analysis of 73 ICH patients enrolled in the Intracerebral Hemorrhage Acutely Decreasing Arterial Pressure Trial (ICH ADAPT). Patients presenting <24 hours from ICH onset were randomized to a systolic blood pressure target <150 or <180 mm Hg with computed tomography perfusion imaging 2 hours after randomization. Cerebral blood flow maps were calculated. Hematoma and edema volumes were measured planimetrically. Regression models were used to assess the relationship between statin use, perihematoma edema and cerebral hemodynamics. Fourteen patients (19%) were taking statins at the time of ICH. Statin-treated patients had similar median (IQR Q25 to 75) hematoma volumes (21.1 (9.5 to 38.3) mL versus 14.5 (5.6 to 27.7) mL, P=0.25), but larger median (IQR Q25 to 75) perihematoma edema volumes (2.9 (1.7 to 9.0) mL versus 2.2 (0.8 to 3.5) mL, P=0.02) compared with nontreated patients. Perihematoma and ipsilateral hemispheric CBF were similar in both groups. A multivariate linear regression model revealed that statin use and hematoma volumes were independent predictors of acute edema volumes. Statin use does not affect CBF in ICH patients. Statin use, along with hematoma volume, are independently associated with increased perihematoma edema volume. PMID:25757757

  11. Perihematoma cerebral blood flow is unaffected by statin use in acute intracerebral hemorrhage patients

    PubMed Central

    Gioia, Laura C; Kate, Mahesh; McCourt, Rebecca; Gould, Bronwen; Coutts, Shelagh B; Dowlatshahi, Dariush; Asdaghi, Negar; Jeerakathil, Thomas; Hill, Michael D; Demchuk, Andrew M; Buck, Brian; Emery, Derek; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Butcher, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Statin therapy has been associated with improved cerebral blood flow (CBF) and decreased perihematoma edema in animal models of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We aimed to assess the relationship between statin use and cerebral hemodynamics in ICH patients. A post hoc analysis of 73 ICH patients enrolled in the Intracerebral Hemorrhage Acutely Decreasing Arterial Pressure Trial (ICH ADAPT). Patients presenting <24 hours from ICH onset were randomized to a systolic blood pressure target <150 or <180 mm Hg with computed tomography perfusion imaging 2 hours after randomization. Cerebral blood flow maps were calculated. Hematoma and edema volumes were measured planimetrically. Regression models were used to assess the relationship between statin use, perihematoma edema and cerebral hemodynamics. Fourteen patients (19%) were taking statins at the time of ICH. Statin-treated patients had similar median (IQR Q25 to 75) hematoma volumes (21.1 (9.5 to 38.3) mL versus 14.5 (5.6 to 27.7) mL, P=0.25), but larger median (IQR Q25 to 75) perihematoma edema volumes (2.9 (1.7 to 9.0) mL versus 2.2 (0.8 to 3.5) mL, P=0.02) compared with nontreated patients. Perihematoma and ipsilateral hemispheric CBF were similar in both groups. A multivariate linear regression model revealed that statin use and hematoma volumes were independent predictors of acute edema volumes. Statin use does not affect CBF in ICH patients. Statin use, along with hematoma volume, are independently associated with increased perihematoma edema volume. PMID:25757757

  12. A combination of serum iron, ferritin and transferrin predicts outcome in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Hu, Rong; Zhang, Chao; Qian, Christopher; Luo, Qian-Qian; Yung, Wing-Ho; Ke, Ya; Feng, Hua; Qian, Zhong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Association of a high-serum ferritin with poor outcome showed that iron might play a detrimental role in the brain after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Here, we investigated changes in serum iron, ferritin, transferrin (Tf) and ceruloplasmin (CP) in patients with ICH (n = 100) at day 1 (admission), 3, 7, 14 and 21 and those in control subjects (n = 75). The hematoma and edema volumes were also determined in ICH-patients on admission and at day 3. The Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) of 59 patients was ≥3 (poor outcome) and 41 < 3 (good outcome) at day 90. Serum ferritin was significantly higher and serum iron and Tf markedly lower in patients with poor-outcome than the corresponding values in patients with good-outcome at day 1 to 7 and those in the controls. There was a significant positive correlation between serum ferritin and relative edema volume or ratio at day 1 and 3 and hematoma volume at day 1 (n = 28), and a negative correlation between serum iron or Tf and hematoma volume at day 1 (n = 100). We concluded that not only increased serum ferritin but also reduced serum iron and Tf are associated with outcome as well as hematoma volume. PMID:26898550

  13. [Clinical criteria of acute epidural hematoma].

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, W P; Grössing, N

    1992-08-01

    In a retrospective study 368 epidural hematomas are presented, treated from 1970 until August 1991. The clinical course and manifestation of acute epidural hematomas is commented on by means of own cases. Assessing the success of treatment, it could be demonstrated that the prompter diagnosis reduced the lethal outcome of epidural hematoma to 6.6%. PMID:1413279

  14. Optoacoustic detection and monitoring of blast-induced intracranial hematomas in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Wynne, Karon E.; Prough, Donald S.; Dewitt, Douglas S.; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Parsley, Margaret A.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2014-03-01

    Patients with acute intracranial hematomas often require surgical drainage within the first four hours after traumatic brain injury (TBI) to avoid death or severe neurologic disability. CT and MRI permit rapid, noninvasive diagnosis of hematomas, but can be used only at a major health-care facility. At present, there is no device for noninvasive detection and characterization of hematomas in pre-hospital settings. We proposed to use an optoacoustic technique for rapid, noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring of hematomas, including intracranial hematomas. Unlike bulky CT and MR equipment, an optoacoustic system can be small and easily transported in an emergency vehicle. In this study we used a specially-designed blast device to inflict TBI in rats. A near-infrared OPO-based optoacoustic system developed for hematoma diagnosis and for blood oxygenation monitoring in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) in small animals was used in the study. Optoacoustic signals recorded simultaneously from the SSS and hematomas allowed for measurements of their oxygenations. The presence of hematomas was confirmed after the experiment in gross pictures of the exposed brains. After blast the hematoma signal and oxygenation increased, while SSS oxygenation decreased due to the blastinduced TBI. The increase of the oxygenation in fresh hematomas may be explained by the leakage of blood from arteries which have higher blood pressure compared to that of veins. These results indicate that the optoacoustic technique can be used for early diagnosis of hematomas and may provide important information for improving outcomes in patients with TBI or stroke (both hemorrhagic and ischemic).

  15. [Chronic subdural hematoma infected by Campylobacter fetus: case report].

    PubMed

    Dost, L; Denes, E; Hidri, N; Ploy, M-C; Barraud, O; Moreau, J-J; Caire, F

    2012-02-01

    We report here a rare case of chronic subdural hematoma infected by Campylobacter fetus in a 86-year-old woman. She was admitted for confusion and disorientation in a context of high fever and diarrhoea. After two surgeries, the evolution was finally good with a combination of antibiotics (amoxicillin and clindamycin). Chronic subdural hematoma is a potential site for bacterial infection. Our case suggests that C. fetus infection should be suspected in elderly patients presenting with fever and enteritis. The frequency of such cases may be underestimated, due to the difficult diagnosis of C. fetus. It is also suspected that C. fetus could play a role in the recurrence of hematoma, because of its vessel tropism. PMID:22154423

  16. Noninvasive, optoacoustic detection and characterization of intra- and extracranial hematomas and cerebral hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Robertson, Claudia S.; Asokan, Vasantha; Agbor, Adaeze; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2015-03-01

    Early diagnosis of intracranial hematomas is necessary to improve outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). CT and MRI can diagnose intracranial hematomas, but cannot be used until the patient arrives at a major healthcare facility, resulting in delayed diagnosis. Near infrared spectroscopy may suggest the presence of unilateral intracranial hematomas, but provides minimal information on hematoma type and location due to limitations associated with strong light scattering. We have used optoacoustics (which combines high endogenous optical contrast with the resolution of ultrasound) to diagnose hematomas and monitor cerebral oxygenation. We performed animal and clinical studies on detection and characterization of hematomas and on monitoring cerebral hypoxia by probing the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). Recently, we built a medical grade, multi-wavelength, OPO-based optoacoustic system tunable in the near infrared spectral range. We developed new patient interfaces for noninvasive, transcranial measurements in the transmission mode in the presence of dense hair and used it in patients with TBI. The optoacoustic system was capable of detecting and characterizing intra- and extracranial hematomas. SSS blood oxygenation was measured as well with the new interface. The obtained results indicate that the optoacoustic system in the transmission mode provides detection and characterization of hematomas in TBI patients, as well as cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring. The transmission mode approach can be used for optoacoustic brain imaging, tomography, and mapping in humans.

  17. Primary Intracerebral Haematoma Evacuation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Velnar, Tomaz; Bunc, Gorazd

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage is one of the most devastating types of stroke, leading to disability and high mortality rate. Besides blood pressure reduction and intensive medical and surgical treatment, immediate coagulopathy reversal is vital. On the other hand, the haemostatic disturbances may contribute to improve the recovery. We describe the evacuation of intracerebral hemorrhage with the insertion of external ventricular drainage in a patient suffering from deep hypertensive intracerebral haemorrhage and haematocephalus. PMID:27066398

  18. Predictors of outcome in childhood intracerebral hemorrhage: a prospective consecutive cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Beslow, Lauren A; Licht, Daniel J; Smith, Sabrina E; Storm, Phillip B; Heuer, Gregory G; Zimmerman, Robert A; Feiler, Alana M; Kasner, Scott E; Ichord, Rebecca N; Jordan, Lori C

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose To describe features of children with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and to determine predictors of short-term outcome in a single-center prospective cohort study. Methods Single-center prospective consecutive cohort study of spontaneous ICH in children age 1-18 years from January 2006 to June 2008. Exclusion criteria were inciting trauma; intracranial tumor; isolated epidural, subdural, intraventricular, or subarachnoid hemorrhage; hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic stroke; and cerebral sinovenous thrombosis. Hospitalization records were abstracted. Follow-up assessments included outcome scores using the Pediatric Stroke Outcome Measure (PSOM) and King's Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury (KOSCHI). ICH volumes and total brain volumes (TBV) were measured by manual tracing. Results Twenty-two patients, median age of 10.3 years (range 4.2-16.6 years), had presenting symptoms of headache in 77%, focal deficits 50%, altered mental status 50%, and seizures 41%. Vascular malformations caused hemorrhage in 91%. Surgical treatment (hematoma evacuation, lesion embolization or excision) was performed during acute hospitalization in 50%. One patient died acutely. At median follow-up of 3.5 months (range 0.3-7.5 months), 71% of survivors had neurological deficits; 55% had clinically significant disability. Outcome based on PSOM and KOSCHI scores was worse in patients with ICH volume >2% of TBV (p=0.023) and altered mental status at presentation (p = 0.005). Conclusions Spontaneous childhood ICH was due mostly to vascular malformations. Acute surgical intervention was commonly performed. Although death was rare, 71% of survivors had persisting neurological deficits. Larger ICH volume and altered mental status predicted clinically significant disability. PMID:20019325

  19. Markerless registration for intracerebral hemorrhage surgical system using weighted Iterative Closest Point (ICP).

    PubMed

    Shin, Sangkyun; Lee, Deukhee; Kim, Youngjun; Park, Sehyung

    2012-01-01

    It is required to use a stereotactic frame on a patient's crainial surface to access an intracerebral hematoma in conventional ICH (Intracerebral Hemorrhage) removal surgery. Since ICH using a stereotactic frame is an invasive procedure and also takes a long time, we attempt to develop a robotic ICH removal procedure with a markerless registration system using an optical 3-D scanner. Preoperative planning is performed using a patient's CT (Computed Tomography) images, which include the patient's 3-D geometrical information on the hematoma and internal structures of brain. To register the preplanned data and the intraoperative patient's data, the patient's facial surface is scanned by an optical 3-D scanner on the bed in the operating room. The intraoperatively scanned facial surface is registered to the pose of the patient's preoperative facial surface. The conventional ICP (Iterative Closest Point) algorithm can be used for the registration. In this paper, we propose a weighted ICP in order to improve the accuracy of the registration results. We investigated facial regions that can be used as anatomical landmarks. The facial regions for the landmarks in the preoperative 3-D model are weighted for more accurate registration. We increase weights at the relatively undeformed facial regions, and decrease weights at the other regions. As a result, more accurate and robust registration can be achieved from the preoperative data even with local facial shape changes. PMID:23367127

  20. Spontaneous subperiosteal hematoma precipitated by anxiety attack.

    PubMed

    Swanenberg, Irene M; Rizzuti, Allison E; Shinder, Roman

    2013-12-01

    A 60-year-old woman presented with diplopia and left periorbital edema and pressure, which developed during an anxiety attack the previous day. Examination revealed left inferotemporal globe dystopia, periorbital edema, ecchymosis, and limitation in supraduction. Orbital MRI confirmed the diagnosis of a superior subperiosteal orbital hematoma. The patient's signs and symptoms rapidly resolved with administration of oral corticosteroids. The patient remains asymptomatic with complete resolution of orbital signs at 3-month follow-up. Subperiosteal orbital hematoma (SOH) is a rare condition in which blood accumulates between the bony orbit and separated periosteum, and is often due to blunt head trauma. Non-traumatic SOH (NTSOH) is exceedingly rare and usually associated with known coagulopathies or tendency to bleed. However, few cases of spontaneous NTSOH have been reported without any such predisposition and are thought to be caused by sudden elevations in intrathoracic and intracranial venous pressure such as vomiting, coughing, SCUBA diving, weight lifting and labor. We herein describe the presentation, radiography and outcome of a unique case of spontaneous NTSOH following an anxiety attack. PMID:24063522

  1. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Report.

    PubMed

    Kukreja, Sunil; Nanda, Anil

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a 12-year-old female, who presented with significant upper and lower extremities weakness preceded by pain around the neck and shoulder girdle. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed epidural hematoma extending from C6-T2 with characteristic heterogeneously hyperintensity on T2 and homogenously isointensity on T1. Emergent spinal decompression was performed. However, the patient remained substantially weak in her lower extremities and was wheelchair bound at 3 months postoperatively. We have discussed clinical features, predisposing events, pathogenesis and treatment guidelines described in the literature. We also aim to reinforce the notion of keeping a high degree of clinical suspicion to identify and intervene at the earliest stage to prevent the physically and socially challenging consequences of SSEH. PMID:27598898

  2. [Anticoagulants after intracerebral haemorrhage in frail elderly].

    PubMed

    Olde Rikkert, Marcel; Claassen, Jurgen

    2015-01-01

    Restarting anticoagulants in frail older patients who have had an intracerebral haemorrhage as an adverse reaction to anticoagulant therapy is a major dilemma, and one which is not specifically addressed in the state-of-the-art paper on restarting anticoagulants elsewhere in this issue. Frail older persons have the highest risk of recurrent bleeding, but, in theory, also have the most benefit from anticoagulants due to the high absolute risk for ischemic events in atrial fibrillation, which is the major indication. However, frail older persons are largely excluded from trials with anticoagulants, which makes it impossible to solve this dilemma in an evidence-based way. Therefore, we argue that sound decision making cannot only be based on neurological or cardiological expertise, as proposed by others, but should include an overall comprehensive geriatric assessment, and, most importantly, patients and caregivers should be included in shared goal setting and shared decision making. PMID:25873225

  3. Surgery for Patients With Spontaneous Deep Supratentorial Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Li, Hao; Zhao, He-Xiang; Guo, Rui; Lin, Sen; Dong, Wei; Ma, Lu; Fang, Yuan; Tian, Meng; Liu, Ming; You, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) is one of the most dangerous cerebrovascular diseases, especially when in deep brain. The treatment of spontaneous deep supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage is still controversial. We conducted a retrospective case-control study using propensity score matching to compare the efficacy of surgery and conservative treatment for patients with deep surpatentorial hemorrhage. We observed the outcomes of consecutive patients with spontaneous deep supratentorial hemorrhage retrospectively from December 2008 to July 2013. Clinical outcomes of surgery and conservative treatments were compared in patients with deep sICH using propensity score matching method. The primary outcome was neurological function status at 6 months post ictus. The second outcomes included mortality at 30 days and 6 months, and the incidence of complications. Subgroup analyses of 6-month outcome were conducted. Sixty-three (22.66%) of the 278 patients who received surgery had a favorable neurological function status at 6 months, whereas in the conservative group, 66 of 278 (23.74%) had the same result (P = 0.763). The 30-day mortality in the surgical group was 19.06%, whereas 30.58% in the conservative group (P = 0.002). There was significant difference in the mortality at 6 months after ictus as well (23.38% vs 36.33%, P = 0.001). The subgroup analyses showed significantly better outcomes for the surgical group when hematoma was >40 mL (13.33% vs 0%, P = 0.005) or complicated with intraventricular hemorrhage (16.67% vs 7.27%, P = 0.034). For complications, the risk of pulmonary infection, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, urinary infection, pulmonary embolus, and need for tracheostomy/long term ventilation in the surgical group was higher than the conservative group (31.29% vs 15.47%, P < 0.001; 6.83% vs 3.96%, P = 0.133; 2.88% vs 1.80%, P = 0.400; 1.80% vs 1.08%, P = 0.476; 32.73% vs 23.38%, P = 0

  4. Effect of Decompressive Craniectomy on Perihematomal Edema in Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Klinger-Gratz, Pascal P.; Fiechter, Michael; Z’Graggen, Werner J.; Gautschi, Oliver P.; El-Koussy, Marwan; Gralla, Jan; Schaller, Karl; Zbinden, Martin; Arnold, Marcel; Fischer, Urs; Mattle, Heinrich P.; Raabe, Andreas; Beck, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Background Perihematomal edema contributes to secondary brain injury in the course of intracerebral hemorrhage. The effect of decompressive surgery on perihematomal edema after intracerebral hemorrhage is unknown. This study analyzed the course of PHE in patients who were or were not treated with decompressive craniectomy. Methods More than 100 computed tomography images from our published cohort of 25 patients were evaluated retrospectively at two university hospitals in Switzerland. Computed tomography scans covered the time from admission until day 100. Eleven patients were treated by decompressive craniectomy and 14 were treated conservatively. Absolute edema and hematoma volumes were assessed using 3-dimensional volumetric measurements. Relative edema volumes were calculated based on maximal hematoma volume. Results Absolute perihematomal edema increased from 42.9 ml to 125.6 ml (192.8%) after 21 days in the decompressive craniectomy group, versus 50.4 ml to 67.2 ml (33.3%) in the control group (Δ at day 21 = 58.4 ml, p = 0.031). Peak edema developed on days 25 and 35 in patients with decompressive craniectomy and controls respectively, and it took about 60 days for the edema to decline to baseline in both groups. Eight patients (73%) in the decompressive craniectomy group and 6 patients (43%) in the control group had a good outcome (modified Rankin Scale score 0 to 4) at 6 months (P = 0.23). Conclusions Decompressive craniectomy is associated with a significant increase in perihematomal edema compared to patients who have been treated conservatively. Perihematomal edema itself lasts about 60 days if it is not treated, but decompressive craniectomy ameliorates the mass effect exerted by the intracerebral hemorrhage plus the perihematomal edema, as reflected by the reduced midline shift. PMID:26872068

  5. Histotripsy Liquefaction of Large Hematomas.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Monsky, Wayne L; Haider, Yasser A; Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Yak-Nam; Matula, Thomas J

    2016-07-01

    Intra- and extra-muscular hematomas result from repetitive injury as well as sharp and blunt limb trauma. The clinical consequences can be serious, including debilitating pain and functional deficit. There are currently no short-term treatment options for large hematomas, only lengthy conservative treatment. The goal of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-based technique, termed histotripsy, for rapid (within a clinically relevant timeframe of 15-20 min) liquefaction of large volume (up to 20 mL) extra-vascular hematomas for subsequent fine-needle aspiration. Experiments were performed using in vitro extravascular hematoma phantoms-fresh bovine blood poured into 50 mL molds and allowed to clot. The resulting phantoms were treated by boiling histotripsy (BH), cavitation histotripsy (CH) or a combination in a degassed water tank under ultrasound guidance. Two different transducers operating at 1 MHz and 1.5 MHz with f-number = 1 were used. The liquefied lysate was aspirated and analyzed by histology and sized in a Coulter Counter. The peak instantaneous power to achieve BH was lower than (at 1.5 MHz) or equal to (at 1 MHz) that which was required to initiate CH. Under the same exposure duration, BH-induced cavities were one and a half to two times larger than the CH-induced cavities, but the CH-induced cavities were more regularly shaped, facilitating easier aspiration. The lysates contained a small amount of debris larger than 70 μm, and 99% of particulates were smaller than 10 μm. A combination treatment of BH (for initial debulking) and CH (for liquefaction of small residual fragments) yielded 20 mL of lysate within 17.5 minutes of treatment and was found to be most optimal for liquefaction of large extravascular hematomas. PMID:27126244

  6. Intra-uterine hematoma in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Glavind, K; Nøhr, S; Nielsen, P H; Ipsen, L

    1991-06-01

    In 60 patients with a live fetus and an intra-uterine hematoma (IUH) proven by ultrasonic scanning the outcome of pregnancy was spontaneous abortion in 12% and premature delivery in 10%. No correlation between the outcome of the pregnancy and the maximum size of the hematoma or the week of detection was found. A subplacentar localization of the hematoma was associated with a higher, but not statistically significant, incidence of spontaneous abortion than a subchorionic localization. Spontaneous abortion most often occurred in the first weeks after the formation of the hematoma. PMID:1855608

  7. Quantitative intracerebral brain hemorrhage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loncaric, Sven; Dhawan, Atam P.; Cosic, Dubravko; Kovacevic, Domagoj; Broderick, Joseph; Brott, Thomas

    1999-05-01

    In this paper a system for 3-D quantitative analysis of human spontaneous intracerebral brain hemorrhage (ICH) is described. The purpose of the developed system is to perform quantitative 3-D measurements of the parameters of ICH region and from computed tomography (CT) images. The measured parameter in this phase of the system development is volume of the hemorrhage region. The goal of the project is to measure parameters for a large number of patients having ICH and to correlate measured parameters to patient morbidity and mortality.

  8. Intra-Abdominal Hematoma Following Enoxaparin Injection

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kin Tong

    2016-01-01

    An elderly patient, who was being treated for therapeutic enoxaparin for a couple of days due to suspected deep vein thrombosis, was admitted to hospital following a collapse and severe abdominal pain. She was in hypovolemic shock and was fluid resuscitated. Ultrasound scan and computed tomography (CT) scan showed a large pelvic hematoma. Radiologists also suspected a possibility of bleeding from inferior epigastric artery following a CT angiogram. The patient was stabilized and transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) for further hemodynamic supports and close monitoring. The patient was then transferred back to the general ward when she was stable. She was managed conservatively as there were no more signs of active bleeding. Unfortunately, she died of recurrent bleeding three days after ICU discharge. PMID:27158226

  9. Intra-Abdominal Hematoma Following Enoxaparin Injection.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kin Tong

    2016-01-01

    An elderly patient, who was being treated for therapeutic enoxaparin for a couple of days due to suspected deep vein thrombosis, was admitted to hospital following a collapse and severe abdominal pain. She was in hypovolemic shock and was fluid resuscitated. Ultrasound scan and computed tomography (CT) scan showed a large pelvic hematoma. Radiologists also suspected a possibility of bleeding from inferior epigastric artery following a CT angiogram. The patient was stabilized and transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) for further hemodynamic supports and close monitoring. The patient was then transferred back to the general ward when she was stable. She was managed conservatively as there were no more signs of active bleeding. Unfortunately, she died of recurrent bleeding three days after ICU discharge. PMID:27158226

  10. Subchorionic hematomas and the presence of autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Baxi, L V; Pearlstone, M M

    1991-11-01

    Five cases of subchorionic hematoma detected by ultrasonography in patients with threatened abortion are presented. Three of these subjects had antinuclear antibodies, and the remaining two subjects had anticardiolipin antibodies. We recommend that patients with subchorionic hematomas be tested for autoantibodies regardless of their obstetric history. PMID:1957874

  11. After Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oligodendrocyte Precursors Proliferate and Differentiate Inside White-Matter Tracts in the Rat Striatum.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Michael J E; Caliaperumal, Jayalakshmi; Schlichter, Lyanne C

    2016-06-01

    Damage to myelinated axons contributes to neurological deficits after acute CNS injury, including ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Potential treatments to promote re-myelination will require fully differentiated oligodendrocytes, but almost nothing is known about their fate following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Using a rat model of ICH in the striatum, we quantified survival, proliferation, and differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) (at 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days) in the peri-hematoma region, surrounding striatum, and contralateral striatum. In the peri-hematoma, the density of Olig2(+) cells increased dramatically over the first 7 days, and this coincided with disorganization and fragmentation of myelinated axon bundles. Very little proliferation (Ki67(+)) of Olig2(+) cells was seen in the anterior subventricular zone from 1 to 28 days. However, by 3 days, many were proliferating in the peri-hematoma region, suggesting that local proliferation expands their population. By 14 days, the density of Olig2(+) cells declined in the peri-hematoma region, and, by 28 days, it reached the low level seen in the contralateral striatum. At these later times, many surviving axons were aligned into white-matter bundles, which appeared less swollen or fragmented. Oligodendrocyte cell maturation was prevalent over the 28-day period. Densities of immature OPCs (NG2(+)Olig2(+)) and mature (CC-1(+)Olig2(+)) oligodendrocytes in the peri-hematoma increased dramatically over the first week. Regardless of the maturation state, they increased preferentially inside the white-matter bundles. These results provide evidence that endogenous oligodendrocyte precursors proliferate and differentiate in the peri-hematoma region and have the potential to re-myelinate axon tracts after hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:26743212

  12. Diagnosis and Management of Coagulopathy-Related Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    VanDerWerf, Joshua; Kumar, Monisha A

    2016-06-01

    Coagulopathy, defined as impaired clot formation, is common in intensive care units (ICUs). Many physiological derangements lead to dysfunctional hemostasis in the ICU; most of these are acquired rather than congenital. Coagulopathies in the ICU are often related to systemic diseases, autoimmune dysfunction, acute infection, organ dysfunction, therapeutic medications, and/or other medical treatments. A significant complication of coagulopathy in the critically ill is major bleeding, defined as fatal hemorrhage, hemodynamic instability, transfusion requirement, or intracranial hematomas. Coagulopathy in the ICU often poses complex management dilemmas, especially when coagulopathy coexists with a thrombotic state. Coagulopathy associated with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) bears directly on neurologic prognosis and functional outcome. There is a paucity of high-quality evidence for the management of coagulopathies in neurocritical care; however, data derived from studies of patients with ICH may inform treatment decisions. This article focuses on acquired conditions such as pharmacological therapies, organ failure, and platelet dysfunction that are often associated with defective clot formation in the ICU that result in or exacerbate ICH. PMID:27214703

  13. Decompressive craniectomy for arteriovenous malformation-related intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Takasato, Yoshio; Masaoka, Hiroyuki; Nagatani, Kimihiro; Otani, Naoki; Wada, Kojiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2015-03-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM)-related intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the cause of approximately 2-3% of ICH and is an important factor in the significant morbidity and mortality in patients with AVM. Decompressive craniectomy (DC) is a surgical procedure to relieve malignant elevation of intracranial pressure. The use of DC to treat patients with AVM-ICH has been much less common. The present study describes our experience with DC for AVM-ICH and discusses the safety of this procedure. The present retrospective analysis compared 12 consecutive patients treated with DC for AVM-ICH with 23 patients treated with DC for hypertensive ICH. Nine patients were male and three were female, aged from 11 to 53 years (mean, 31.7 years). Hematoma volumes ranged from 50 to 106 ml (mean, 75.8 ml). The outcomes were good recovery in one patient, moderate disability in three, severe disability in seven, and vegetative state in one. Complications after DC included subdural hygroma in four patients, hydrocephalus in one, intracranial infection in two, and intracranial hemorrhage in one. No significant difference was found in the incidence of complications between DC for large AVM-ICH and DC for hypertensive ICH. In conclusion, the present study found no significant difference in the incidence of complications between DC for large AVM-ICH and DC for hypertensive ICH. Further investigations including a prospective randomized trial are needed to confirm the safety and efficacy of DC for the treatment of large AVM-ICH. PMID:25564272

  14. Robot-assisted intracerebral hemorrhage evacuation: an experimental evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgner, Jessica; Swaney, Philip J.; Lathrop, Ray A.; Weaver, Kyle D.; Webster, Robert J.

    2013-03-01

    We present a novel robotic approach for the rapid, minimally invasive treatment of Intracerebral Hemorrhage (ICH), in which a hematoma or blood clot arises in the brain parenchyma. We present a custom image-guided robot system that delivers a steerable cannula into the lesion and aspirates it from the inside. The steerable cannula consists of an initial straight tube delivered in a manner similar to image-guided biopsy (and which uses a commercial image guidance system), followed by the sequential deployment of multiple individual precurved elastic tubes. Rather than deploying the tubes simultaneously, as has been done in nearly all prior studies, we deploy the tubes one at a time, using a compilation of their individual workspaces to reach desired points inside the lesion. This represents a new paradigm in active cannula research, defining a novel procedure-planning problem. A design that solves this problem can potentially save many lives by enabling brain decompression both more rapidly and less invasively than is possible through the traditional open surgery approach. Experimental results include a comparison of the simulated and actual workspaces of the prototype robot, and an accuracy evaluation of the system.

  15. A novel simple measure correlates to the outcome in 57 patients with intracerebellar hematomas. Results of a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Doukas, Alexandros; Maslehaty, Homajoun; Barth, Harald; Hedderich, Jürgen; Petridis, Athanasios K.; Mehdorn, H. Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    Background: The incidence of intracerebellar hemorrhages approaches 5–10% of all intracerebral hematomas. The clinical presentation varies from headaches and dizziness to rapid deterioration of consciousness to the point of coma in severe cases. In order to find some concrete criteria that could influence the prognosis of these patients, we performed this retrospective study. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the factors influencing the outcome of 57 patients with intracerebellar hematomas treated in our clinic in the last 7 years. The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) on admission, as well as other parameters as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, presence of malign tumors in the medical history, or the intake of anticoagulants were assessed as independent factors influencing the outcome of the patients. On the other hand, various computed tomography parameters on admission were also correlated with the clinical outcome such as, tight posterior fossa (TPF), volume of the hematoma, hydrocephalus, compression of the fourth ventricle, intraventricular bleeding, as well as the ratio of the maximal width of the hematoma in comparison to the width of the PF were taken into consideration. Results: The results of the study showed that patients with poor GCS on admission had also a poor Glasgow Outcome Score. Interestingly there was a statistically significant correlation between the maximal width of the hematoma in comparison to the width of the PF and the outcome of the patients. It could be also shown that the patients with intraventricular hemorrhage, hydrocephalus, compression of the fourth ventricle over 50% of its maximal width and TPF, had a poor clinical outcome. Moreover, there was a statistically significant correlation of the volume of the hematoma and a poor clinical outcome. Conclusions: We introduced as a new factor that is, the cerebellar hemorrhage/PF ratio and found out that the value >35% was associated to an unfavorable outcome. PMID:26673852

  16. Clinical significance of dynamic monitoring by transcranial doppler ultrasound and intracranial pressure monitor after surgery of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zaiming; Chen, Qianxue; Tian, Daofeng; Wang, Long; Liu, Baohui; Zhang, Shenqi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the surgical method of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage (HIH) and how to control the postoperative blood pressure. 96 HIH patients were performed the craniotomic hematoma dissection (CHD) and the hematoma-cavity drilling drainage (HCDD), respectively. Meanwhile, the intracranial pressure and mean arterial pressure of each patient were continuously monitored for 7 days, the postoperative 1st, 3rd, 7th and 14th-day average flow velocities and pulsatility indexes of the bilateral middle cerebral arteries were monitored. CHD exhibited the significant difference in the long-term quality of life (ADL classification 6 months later) of patients with hematoma >50 ml than HCDD; furthermore, the postoperative 1st, 3rd, 7th and 14th-day TCD parameter analysis revealed that CHD exhibited better results in relieving the intracranial pressure and improving the cerebral blood flow than HCDD, and the postoperative ICP and MAP monitoring towards all patients could effectively control the blood pressure and prevent the further bleeding. The patients with hematoma >50 ml should choose CHD, and all HIH patients should be routinely performed the ICP and MAP monitoring. PMID:26379963

  17. A Standardized Classification for Subdural Hematomas- I.

    PubMed

    Alves, José Luís; Santiago, João Gonçalo; Costa, Guerreiro; Mota Pinto, Anabela

    2016-09-01

    Subdural hematomas are a frequent and highly heterogeneous traumatic disorder, with significant clinical and socioeconomic consequences. In clinical and medicolegal practice, subdural hematomas are classified according to its apparent age, which significantly influences its intrinsic pathogenic behavior, forensic implications, clinical management, and outcome. Although practical, this empirical classification is somewhat arbitrary and scarcely informative, considering the remarkable heterogeneity of this entity. The current research project aims at implementing a comprehensive multifactorial classification of subdural hematomas, allowing a more standardized and coherent assessment and management of this condition. This new method of classification of subdural hematomas takes into account its intrinsic and extrinsic features, using imaging data and histopathological elements, to provide an easily apprehensible and intuitive nomenclature. The proposed classification unifies and organizes all relevant details concerning subdural hematomas, hopefully improving surgical care and forensic systematization. PMID:27428027

  18. Race against the clock: overcoming challenges in the management of anticoagulant-associated intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Peter; Pollack, Charles V; Milan, Melissa; Schaefer, Alisa

    2014-08-01

    Patients receiving anticoagulation therapy who present with any type of intracranial hemorrhage--including subdural hematoma, epidural hematoma, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)--require urgent correction of their coagulopathy to prevent hemorrhage expansion, limit tissue damage, and facilitate surgical intervention as necessary. The focus of this review is acute ICH, but the principles of management for anticoagulation-associated ICH (AAICH) apply to patients with all types of intracranial hemorrhage, whether acute or chronic. A number of therapies--including fresh frozen plasma (FFP), intravenous vitamin K, activated and inactivated prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs), and recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa)--have been used alone or in combination to treat AAICH to reverse anticoagulation, help achieve hemodynamic stability, limit hematoma expansion, and prepare the patient for possible surgical intervention. However, there is a paucity of high-quality data to direct such therapy. The use of 3-factor PCC (activated and inactivated) and rFVIIa to treat AAICH constitutes off-label use of these therapies in the United States. However, in April 2013, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Kcentra (a 4-factor PCC) for the urgent reversal of vitamin K antagonist (VKA) anticoagulation in adults with acute major bleeding. Plasma is the only other product approved for this use in the United States. (1) Inconsistent recommendations, significant barriers (e.g., clinician-, therapy-, or logistics-based barriers), and a lack of approved treatment pathways in some institutions can be potential impediments to timely and evidence-based management of AAICH with available therapies. Patient assessment, therapy selection, whether to use a reversal or factor repletion agent alone or in combination with other agents, determination of site-of-care management, eligibility for neurosurgery, and potential hematoma evacuation are the

  19. A blackhole over brain: Interdural hematoma - A challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Babayev, Rasim; Ekşi, Murat Şakir

    2015-01-01

    Hematoma in between two dura leaves, named as 'interdural hematoma', is a very rare entity in adulthood. Interdural hematoma may emerge spontaneously or secondary to coagulopathies. A 61-year-old male patient, who had a medical history of alcoholic cirrhosis, presented with interdural hematoma. The case has been discussed with a literature review about diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in this pathology. PMID:26048608

  20. Predictors of 30-day mortality in patients with spontaneous primary intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Safatli, Diaa A.; Günther, Albrecht; Schlattmann, Peter; Schwarz, Falko; Kalff, Rolf; Ewald, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a life threatening entity, and an early outcome assessment is mandatory for optimizing therapeutic efforts. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 342 patients with spontaneous primary ICH to evaluate possible predictors of 30-day mortality considering clinical, radiological, and therapeutical parameters. We also applied three widely accepted outcome grading scoring systems [(ICH score, FUNC score and intracerebral hemorrhage grading scale (ICH-GS)] on our population to evaluate the correlation of these scores with the 30-day mortality in our study. We also applied three widely accepted outcome grading scoring systems [(ICH score, FUNC score and intracerebral hemorrhage grading scale (ICH-GS)] on our population to evaluate the correlation of these scores with the 30-day mortality in our study. Results: From 342 patients (mean age: 67 years, mean Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] on admission: 9, mean ICH volume: 62.19 ml, most common hematoma location: basal ganglia [43.9%]), 102 received surgical and 240 conservative treatment. The 30-day mortality was 25.15%. In a multivariate analysis, GCS (Odds ratio [OR] =0.726, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.661–0.796, P < 0.001), bleeding volume (OR = 1.012 per ml, 95% CI = 1.007 – 1.017, P < 0.001), and infratentorial hematoma location (OR = 5.381, 95% CI = 2.166-13.356, P = 0.009) were significant predictors for the 30-day mortality. After receiver operating characteristics analysis, we defined a “high-risk group” for an unfavorable short-term outcome with GCS <11 and ICH volume >32 ml supratentorially or 21 ml infratentorially. Using Pearson correlation, we found a correlation of 0.986 between ICH score and 30-day mortality (P < 0.001), 0.853 between FUNC score and 30-day mortality (P = 0.001), and 0.924 between ICH-GS and 30-day mortality (P = 0.001). Conclusions: GCS score on admission together with the baseline volume and localization of the hemorrhage are strong

  1. Age determination of soft tissue hematomas.

    PubMed

    Neumayer, Bernhard; Hassler, Eva; Petrovic, Andreas; Widek, Thomas; Ogris, Kathrin; Scheurer, Eva

    2014-11-01

    In clinical forensic medicine, the estimation of the age of injuries such as externally visible subcutaneous hematomas is important for the reconstruction of violent events, particularly to include or exclude potential suspects. Since the estimation of the time of origin based on external inspection is unreliable, the aim of this study was to use contrast in MRI to develop an easy-to-use model for hematoma age estimation. In a longitudinal study, artificially created subcutaneous hematomas were repetitively imaged using MRI over a period of two weeks. The hemorrhages were created by injecting autologous blood into the subcutaneous tissue of the thigh in 20 healthy volunteers. For MRI, standard commercially available sequences, namely proton-density-weighted, T2 -weighted and inversion recovery sequences, were used. The hematomas' MRI data were analyzed regarding their contrast behavior using the most suitable sequences to derive a model allowing an objective estimation of the age of soft tissue hematomas. The Michelson contrast between hematoma and muscle in the proton-density-weighted sequence showed an exponentially decreasing behavior with a dynamic range of 0.6 and a maximum standard deviation of 0.1. The contrast of the inversion recovery sequences showed increasing characteristics and was hypointense for TI = 200ms and hyperintense for TI =1000ms. These sequences were used to create a contrast model. The cross-validation of the model finally yielded limits of agreement for hematoma age determination (corresponding to ±1.96 SD) of ±38.7h during the first three days and ±54 h for the entire investigation period. The developed model provides lookup tables which allow for the estimation of a hematoma's age given a single contrast measurement applicable by a radiologist or a forensic physician. This is a first step towards an accurate and objective dating method for subcutaneous hematomas, which will be particularly useful in child abuse. PMID:25208978

  2. Epidural hematoma after routine epidural steroid injection

    PubMed Central

    Alkhudari, Azzam M.; Malk, Craig S.; Rahman, Abed; Penmetcha, Taruna; Torres, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are few reported cases of an epidural spinal hematoma following interventional pain procedures. Case Description: We report a case of a spinal epidural hematoma in a patient with no known risk factors (e.g. coagulopathy), who underwent an epidural steroid injection (ESI) in the same anatomic location as two previously successful ESI procedures. Conclusion: Early detection was the key to our case, and avoiding sedation allowed the patient to recognize the onset of a new neurological deficit, and lead to prompt diagnosis as well as surgical decompression of the resultant hematoma. PMID:27213109

  3. Current Treatment Options for Auricular Hematomas.

    PubMed

    MacPhail, Catriona

    2016-07-01

    Ear disease, such as otitis externa, resulting in aggressive head shaking or ear scratching, is the most common cause of the development of aural hematomas in dogs and cats. An underlying immunologic cause has also been proposed to explain cartilage and blood vessel fragility. Numerous options exist for management of aural hematomas, from medical management alone with corticosteroids, to simple hematoma centesis, to surgical intervention. Because this condition is usually secondary to another disease process, regardless of mode of treatment, likelihood of recurrence is low if the underlying condition is managed properly. PMID:27012935

  4. Laparoscopic drainage of an intramural duodenal hematoma.

    PubMed

    Maemura, T; Yamaguchi, Y; Yukioka, T; Matsuda, H; Shimazaki, S

    1999-02-01

    A 21-year-old man was admitted with vomiting and abdominal pain 3 days after sustaining blunt abdominal trauma by being tackled in a game of American football. A diagnosis of intramural hematoma of the duodenum was made using computed tomography and upper gastrointestinal tract contrast radiography. The hematoma caused obstructive jaundice by compressing the common bile duct. The contents of the hematoma were laparoscopically drained. A small perforation was then found in the duodenal wall. The patient underwent laparotomy and repair of the injury. Laparoscopic surgery can be used as definitive therapy in this type of abdominal trauma. PMID:10204621

  5. Subperiosteal Hematoma of the Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Hui, S H; Lui, T H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Periosteal reaction has a long list of differential diagnoses ranging from trauma, infection, metabolic disease to malignancy. The morphology of periosteal reaction shown in imaging studies helps to narrow down the list of differential diagnoses. Case report: A 25 year old gentleman had an inversion injury to his left ankle. He complained of lateral ankle and posterior heel pain and swelling after the injury. Radiograph of his left ankle revealed solid, smooth periosteal reaction at posterior aspect of left distal tibia. MRI showed periosteal reaction at the corresponding site, which was better demonstrated in CT scan. Follow up MRI and CT showed maturation of the new bone formation at the site of periosteal reaction. Findings were compatible with subperiosteal hematoma formation from injury, which ossified with time. Conclusion: Smooth, thick periosteal reaction favours benign process, while interrupted pattern is an alarming feature for more aggressive causes. PMID:27299131

  6. Endoscopic surgery versus conservative treatment for the moderate-volume hematoma in spontaneous basal ganglia hemorrhage (ECMOH): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage is a disease with high morbidity, high disability rate, high mortality, and high economic burden. Whether patients can benefit from surgical evacuation of hematomas is still controversial, especially for those with moderate-volume hematomas in the basal ganglia. This study is designed to compare the efficacy of endoscopic surgery and conservative treatment for the moderate-volume hematoma in spontaneous basal ganglia hemorrhage. Methods Patients meet the criteria will be randomized into the endoscopic surgery group (endoscopic surgery for hematoma evacuation and the best medical treatment) or the conservative treatment group (the best medical treatment). Patients will be followed up at 1, 3, and 6 months after initial treatment. The primary outcomes include the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale and the Modified Rankin Scale. The secondary outcomes consist of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and the mortality. The Barthel Index(BI) will also be evaluated. The sample size is 100 patients. Discussion The ECMOH trial is a randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate if endoscopic surgery is better than conservative treatment for patients with moderate-volume hematomas in the basal ganglia. Trial registration Chinese Clinical Trial Registry: ChiCTR-TRC-11001614 (http://www.chictr.org/en/proj/show.aspx?proj=1618) PMID:22676908

  7. Expanding Hematoma's Life-Threatening Neck and Face Emergency Management of Ballistic Injuries.

    PubMed

    Shuker, Sabri T

    2016-07-01

    This article aims to bring attention to the morbidity and fatality of hemorrhage, how expanding hematoma and air compromise neck/face N/F injuries and present challenges. Large neck vessel ballistic injuries may lead to hemorrhage and expanding hematoma, resulting in airway compromise, due to injuries to the internal and/or external carotid arteries, internal jugular veins "internal carotid artery, external carotid artery, internal jugular vein," and the external carotid artery deep branches. This also leads to injuries to the cervical fascial layers (barriers of deep spaces) that facilitate pooling blood and hematoma into compartmental and large potential space which effects the pharynx, larynx, esophagus, and trachea.The expanding hematomas distort neck anatomical landmarks so "no neck zones" classifications are applicable. As the spectrum of injuries continues to evolve, the clinical characterization needs a new categorization based on compartmental hematoma and potential space anatomical location like retropharyngeal, parapharyngeal, sublingual, submandibular spaces, retrobulbar, and cheek compartment space hematomas.Presence of symptoms and location of the hematoma generally dictate what type of procedure is needed and how urgently it needs to be appropriately performed.Two unusual patients of pseudoaneurysms facial artery injuries with extravasation of blood producing a pulsating hematoma are referred to. Another patient considers large internal carotid artery injuries pseudoaneurysms revealed in angiography.The immediate management of life-saving patients requires aggressive airway maintenance at the scene, conscious victim will often obtain a posture that clears his airway and the semiconscious or unconscious put him in prone position. Air compromise may need emergency intubation, large bore cannula cricothyroidotomy, cricothyrotomy and at medical facilities tracheostomy. PMID:27315316

  8. Non-traumatic Bilateral Orbital Subperiosteal Hematoma in a Person Who Attempted Suicide by Hanging.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Keiji; Morita, Seiji; Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Mariko; Taira, Takayuki; Nakagawa, Yoshihide; Inokuchi, Sadaki

    2014-09-01

    Orbital subperiosteal hematomas are rare and most often result from facial trauma; however, occurrence of these hematomas due to non-traumatic causes is extremely rare. Herein, we present the case of a 38-year-old man who was transferred to our emergency department because he became comatose after attempting suicide by hanging. He underwent computed tomography (CT) of the head and neck. CT findings revealed a bilateral orbital subperiosteal hematoma. We then performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head for definite diagnosis of hematoma. There is no consensus regarding if this condition should be treated conservatively or surgically. Conservative management was selected for this patient because he was in deep coma. Some non-traumatic causes of orbital subperiosteal hematoma include weight lifting, coughing, vomiting, Valsalva maneuver, labor, and scuba diving. Sudden elevations in cranial pressure may be the mechanism underlying this condition. Although suicide attempt by hanging could have caused a sudden elevation in cranial pressure, this is the first report of the occurrence of this condition. Patients with orbital subperiosteal hematomas generally complain of blurred vision, eye pain, or exophthalmos. However, identifying this sign may be difficult in patients with disturbed consciousness. PMID:25248423

  9. Intracerebral haemorrhage in primary and metastatic brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Salmaggi, Andrea; Erbetta, Alessandra; Silvani, Antonio; Maderna, Emanuela; Pollo, Bianca

    2008-09-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage may both be a presenting manifestation in unrecognised brain tumour or--more frequently--take place in the disease course of known/suspected brain tumour due to diagnostic/therapeutic procedures, including biopsy, locoregional treatments and anti-angiogenic therapies. Apart from the difficulties inherent to accurate neuroradiological diagnosis in selected cases with small tumour volume, the main clinical problem that neurologists face is represented by decision making in prophylaxis/treatment of venous thromboembolism in these patients. These points are briefly discussed and available evidence on the last point is commented on. PMID:18690513

  10. History of Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2015-10-01

    Trephination or trepanation is an intentional surgical procedure performed from the Stone Age. It looks like escaping a black evil from the head. This technique is still used for treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). Now, we know the origin, pathogenesis and natural history of this lesion. The author try to explore the history of trephination and modern discovery of chronic SDH. The author performed a detailed electronic search of PubMed. By the key word of chronic SDH, 2,593 articles were found without language restriction in May 2015. The author reviewed the fact and way, discovering the present knowledge on the chronic SDH. The first authentic report of chronic SDH was that of Wepfer in 1657. Chronic SDH was regarded as a stroke in 17th century. It was changed as an inflammatory disease in 19th century by Virchow, and became a traumatic lesion in 20th century. However, trauma is not necessary in many cases of chronic SDHs. The more important prerequisite is sufficient potential subdural space, degeneration of the brain. Modifying Virchow's description, chronic SDH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by severe degeneration of the brain. From Wepfer's first description, nearly 350 years passed to explore the origin, pathogenesis, and fate of chronic SDH. The nature of the black evil in the head of the Stone Age is uncovering by many authors riding the giant's shoulder. Chronic SDH should be categorized as a degenerative lesion instead of a traumatic lesion. PMID:27169062

  11. History of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Trephination or trepanation is an intentional surgical procedure performed from the Stone Age. It looks like escaping a black evil from the head. This technique is still used for treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). Now, we know the origin, pathogenesis and natural history of this lesion. The author try to explore the history of trephination and modern discovery of chronic SDH. The author performed a detailed electronic search of PubMed. By the key word of chronic SDH, 2,593 articles were found without language restriction in May 2015. The author reviewed the fact and way, discovering the present knowledge on the chronic SDH. The first authentic report of chronic SDH was that of Wepfer in 1657. Chronic SDH was regarded as a stroke in 17th century. It was changed as an inflammatory disease in 19th century by Virchow, and became a traumatic lesion in 20th century. However, trauma is not necessary in many cases of chronic SDHs. The more important prerequisite is sufficient potential subdural space, degeneration of the brain. Modifying Virchow's description, chronic SDH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by severe degeneration of the brain. From Wepfer's first description, nearly 350 years passed to explore the origin, pathogenesis, and fate of chronic SDH. The nature of the black evil in the head of the Stone Age is uncovering by many authors riding the giant's shoulder. Chronic SDH should be categorized as a degenerative lesion instead of a traumatic lesion. PMID:27169062

  12. Development in intracerebral stem cell grafts

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Stephanny; Tajiri, Naoki; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2015-01-01

    The field of stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising research area for brain repair. Optimizing the safety and efficacy of the therapy for clinical trials will require revisiting transplantation protocols. The cell delivery route stands as a key translational item that warrants careful consideration in facilitating the success of stem cell therapy in the clinic. Intracerebral administration, compared to peripheral route, requires an invasive procedure to directly implant stem cells into injured brain. Although invasive, intracerebral transplantation circumvents the prohibitive blood brain barrier in allowing grafted cells when delivered peripherally to penetrate the brain and reach the discreet damaged brain tissues. This review will highlight milestone discoveries in cell therapy for neurological disorders, with emphasis on intracerebral transplantation in relevant animal models and provide insights necessary to optimize the safety and efficacy of cell therapy for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, stroke, and traumatic brain injury. PMID:25739415

  13. Developments in intracerebral stem cell grafts.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Stephanny; Tajiri, Naoki; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-04-01

    The field of stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising research area for brain repair. Optimizing the safety and efficacy of the therapy for clinical trials will require revisiting transplantation protocols. The cell delivery route stands as a key translational item that warrants careful consideration in facilitating the success of stem cell therapy in the clinic. Intracerebral administration, compared to peripheral route, requires an invasive procedure to directly implant stem cells into injured brain. Although invasive, intracerebral transplantation circumvents the prohibitive blood brain barrier in allowing grafted cells when delivered peripherally to penetrate the brain and reach the discreet damaged brain tissues. This review will highlight milestone discoveries in cell therapy for neurological disorders, with emphasis on intracerebral transplantation in relevant animal models and provide insights necessary to optimize the safety and efficacy of cell therapy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, stroke and traumatic brain injury. PMID:25739415

  14. Emergency Imaging of Intracerebral Haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Alobeidi, Farah; Aviv, Richard I

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating condition with high mortality and morbidity despite advances in neurocritical care. Early deterioration is common in the first few hours after ICH onset, secondary to rapid haematoma expansion and growth. Rapid diagnosis and aggressive early management of these patients are therefore crucial. Imaging plays a key role in establishing the diagnosis and the underlying aetiology of ICH, identifying complications and predicting patients who are at high risk for haematoma expansion. In this chapter, we present an evidence-based imaging framework for the management of spontaneous ICH in the acute setting. Non-enhanced computed tomography is long established as the gold standard for ICH diagnosis but has limitations in demonstrating the underlying aetiology in cases of secondary ICH. There is now growing evidence for the ability of non-invasive angiography to establish the underlying aetiology and to predict further haematoma expansion. The presence of small enhancing foci within the haematoma on computed tomography angiography (CTA), the CTA Spot Sign, has been prospectively validated as a predictor of haematoma expansion. Early identification of patients at risk of haematoma expansion allows for the appropriate escalation of care to a neurosurgical team, admission to a neurocritical care unit, appropriate supportive therapy and targeted novel medical and surgical interventions. Catheter angiography, which remains the gold standard for identifying underlying secondary vascular lesions, should be used in selected cases. However, non-invasive vascular imaging should be considered as an important step in the diagnosis and early management of secondary ICH patients. Previous concerns related to the radiation dose, contrast-induced nephropathy and cost are addressed in this chapter. Recently, animal models have enabled the qualitative assessment of haematoma expansion, and our increased understanding of ICH may

  15. Surgical Craniotomy for Intracerebral Haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mendelow, A David

    2015-01-01

    Craniotomy is probably indicated for patients with superficial spontaneous lobar supratentorial intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) when the level of consciousness drops below 13 within the first 8 h of the onset of the haemorrhage. Once the level drops below 9, it is probably too late to consider craniotomy for these patients, so clinical vigilance is paramount. While this statement is only backed up by evidence that is moderately strong, meta-analysis of available data suggests that it is true in the rather limited number of patients with ICH. Meta-analyses like this can often predict the results of future prospective randomised controlled trials a decade or more before the trials are completed and published. Countless such examples exist in the literature, as is the case for thrombolysis in patients with myocardial infarction in the last millennium: meta-analysis determined the efficacy more than a decade BEFORE the last trial (ISIS-2) confirmed the benefit of thrombolysis for myocardial infarction. Careful examination of the meta-analysis' Forest plots in this chapter will demonstrate why this statement is made at the outset. Other meta-analyses of surgery for ICH have also indicated that minimal interventional techniques using topical thrombolysis or endoscopy via burrholes or even twist drill aspiration may be particularly successful for the treatment of supratentorial ICH, especially when the clot is deep seated. Ongoing clinical trials (CLEAR III and MISTIE III) should confirm this in the fullness of time. There are 2 exceptions to these generalisations. First, based on trial evidence, aneurysmal ICH is best treated with surgery. Second, cerebellar ICH represents a special case because of the development of hydrocephalus, which may require expeditious drainage as the intracranial pressure rises. The cerebellar clot will then require evacuation, usually via posterior fossa craniectomy, rather than craniotomy. Technical advances suggest that image-guided surgery

  16. Scutellaria baicalensis attenuates blood-brain barrier disruption after intracerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-Won; Kang, Ho-Chang; Shim, Jaewon; Sohn, Nak-Won

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) contributes to the inflammatory response and edema formation in the brain, exacerbating brain damage. The present study evaluated the effects of Scutellaria baicalensis (SR) water extracts on BBB disruption after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in rats. ICH was induced by stereotaxic intrastriatal injection of bacterial type VII collagenase, and SR was administrated orally three times (50 mg/ml/kg) during the 48 h after ICH onset. SR treatment significantly reduced the degree of (1) hemorrhage volume and edema percentage of the ipsilateral hemisphere, (2) brain water content, (3) MPO-positive neutrophil infiltration in the peri-hematoma, and (4) BBB permeability measured by Evans blue leakage. In addition, expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-12, and tissue inhibitor of MMPs (TIMP)-1 were investigated with immunohistochemistry. SR treatment reduced MMP-9 and MMP-12 expression in the peri-hematoma after ICH. These results indicate that SR attenuates the BBB disruption through anti-inflammatory effects and suppression of MMP expression. These findings provide a pharmacological basis for the use of SR in the treatment of the BBB disruption following stroke and trauma. PMID:22298450

  17. Intracerebral hemorrhage during treatment with oral anticoagulants. Risk factors, therapy and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Ernestus, R I; Speder, B; Pakos, P; Hildebrandt, G; Klug, N

    1994-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) during oral anticoagulation is a serious complication, which is mostly fatal for the multimorbid patient. In the present retrospective study of 53 patients with ICH during treatment with a cumarin derivative (Phenoprocoumon, Marcumar), we investigated the relationship between therapy and preexisting parameters such as age, location, level of consciousness, additional bleeding risks, and the degree of anticoagulation, which were assumed to be of prognostic relevance. The therapeutic management of ICH during treatment with anticoagulants was determined predominantly by location of the hematoma, patient's age, and additional bleeding risks, but less by level of consciousness and initial thromboplastin time (Quick's test). As a consequence of the individual analysis of these 5 parameters, age over 60 years, location of hematoma in the midline or ventricles, coma, additional bleeding risks such as arterial hypertension and trauma, and Quick's test below 15% at the time of bleeding were supposed to be responsible for poor prognosis. Mortality increased with a rising number of poor prognostic factors, independently of surgical or conservative treatment. In consequence, prognosis of ICH during oral anticoagulation is predominantly influenced by the number of such disadvantageous indicators and only little by therapy. PMID:8053274

  18. Moyamoya disease manifested as multiple simultaneous intracerebral hemorrhages: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jinlu; Yuan, Yongjie; Li, Wei; Xu, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Multiple simultaneous intracerebral hemorrhages (MSIH) caused by Moyamoya disease (MMD) is extremely rare. To date, the clinical manifestations, imaging characteristics and mechanism of MMD-induced MSIH have not yet been elucidated. In order to improve the understanding on such cases, the present study described a rare case of MSIH caused by MMD. A 40-year-old female patient with no history of hypertension or diabetes mellitus experienced a sudden headache followed by coma. Cranial computed tomography (CT) examination revealed MSIH in the left frontal area, temporal lobe and basal ganglia. CT angiography and digital subtraction angiography examinations revealed typical characteristics of MMD. Subsequent to excluding disorders of the blood system and blood coagulation, we concluded that the present case of MSIH was caused by MMD. Hematoma evacuation and decompressive craniectomy were performed with satisfactory results. In addition, after reviewing previous MSIH cases in the literature, potential mechanisms of MMD-mediated MSIH were considered. In conclusion, MMD should be considered as a possible cause of MSIH during diagnosis and treatment. MMD can lead to pathological changes in the fragility of small arteries; therefore, rupture and hemorrhage at one site may induce a transient increase in blood pressure, causing the rupture of small arteries at other sites, and thus leading to MSIH. Hematoma evacuation and decompression should be conducted in selective cases of MMD-induced MSIH in order to achieve a good prognosis.

  19. Intraventricular hemorrhage expansion in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Witsch, Jens; Bruce, Eliza; Meyers, Emma; Velazquez, Angela; Schmidt, J. Michael; Suwatcharangkoon, Sureerat; Agarwal, Sachin; Park, Soojin; Falo, M. Cristina; Connolly, E. Sander

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether delayed appearance of intraventricular hemorrhage (dIVH) represents an independent entity from intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) present on admission CT or is primarily related to the time interval between symptom onset and admission CT. Methods: A total of 282 spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) patients, admitted February 2009–March 2014 to the neurological intensive care unit of a tertiary care university hospital, were prospectively enrolled in the ICH Outcomes Project. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine associations with acute mortality and functional long-term outcome (modified Rankin Scale). Results: A cohort of 282 ICH patients was retrospectively studied: 151 (53.5%) had intraventricular hemorrhage on initial CT scan (iIVH). Of the remaining 131 patients, 19 (14.5%) developed IVH after the initial CT scan (dIVH). The median times from symptom onset to admission CT were 1.1, 6.0, and 7.4 hours for the dIVH, iIVH, and no IVH groups (Mann-Whitney U test, dIVH vs iIVH, p < 0.001) and median time from onset to dIVH detection was 7.2 hours. The increase in ICH volume following hospital admission was larger in dIVH than in iIVH and no IVH patients (mean 17.6, 0.2, and 0.4 mL). After controlling for components of the ICH score and hematoma expansion, presence of IVH on initial CT was associated with discharge mortality and poor outcome at 3, 6, and 12 months, but dIVH was not associated with any of the outcome measures. Conclusions: In ICH patients, associated IVH on admission imaging is commonly encountered and is associated with poor long-term outcome. In contrast, dIVH on subsequent scans is far less common and does not appear to portend worse outcome. PMID:25663233

  20. An atypical case of intracerebral schwannoma.

    PubMed

    AlBatly, Abdulrahman Abdullah; Zakzouk, Reem Seraj; Alhaidey, Ali Khalaf

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of intracerebral cystic schwannoma in the temporal fossa manifested as a gradually worsening headache in a 49-years-old woman. Computed Tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a left temporal partly cystic, partly solid mass. The preoperative diagnosis was astrocytoma or glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), but microscopic examination of the mass showed the characteristic pattern with cellular Antony A component. Immunohistochemically, the tumor was positive for S-100 protein. These findings are consistent with a schwannoma. Intracerebral schwannomas not related to cranial nerves are rare and most reported cases involved young patients. PMID:25574318

  1. An atypical case of intracerebral schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    AlBatly, Abdulrahman Abdullah; Zakzouk, Reem Seraj; Alhaidey, Ali Khalaf

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of intracerebral cystic schwannoma in the temporal fossa manifested as a gradually worsening headache in a 49-years-old woman. Computed Tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a left temporal partly cystic, partly solid mass. The preoperative diagnosis was astrocytoma or glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), but microscopic examination of the mass showed the characteristic pattern with cellular Antony A component. Immunohistochemically, the tumor was positive for S-100 protein. These findings are consistent with a schwannoma. Intracerebral schwannomas not related to cranial nerves are rare and most reported cases involved young patients. PMID:25574318

  2. The relationship between the serum levels of ferritin and the radiological brain injury indices in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Aghaei, Iraj; Bakhshayesh, Babak; Ramezani, Hamed; Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Shabani, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Preclinical studies show that iron plays a key role in mediating neuronal injury. This study was performed in order to identify the relationship between the serum level of ferritin and severity of the brain injury which occur after an Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Materials and Methods: This was a cross sectional descriptive - analytic study, which was conducted on those patients who had suffered from an ICH and had attended Poursina Hospital. The Serum levels of ferritin were measured at admittance. A Cranial CT scan was performed at admission and also 72 hr afterward. Hematoma and edema surrounding the hematoma volumes were also measured at entrance and 72 hr afterward. Data analysis was carried out by a descriptive - analytic statistics approach and calculated later on by the Spss-20 software. Results: In this investigation, 63 patients were studied, from which 34 (54%) were male and 29 (46%) female. The average age of the patients was 69.7± 11.9 (Min 43 and Max 94 years old). A significant relationship was observed between the level of ferritin and the edema volume surrounding the hematoma at first and next 72 hr after the patients were admitted. Conclusion: These results delineated the effective role of iron on the edema volume elevation. More studies are essentially urged to ascertain the clinical evaluation of the curing effect of iron chelators in those patients who suffer from ICH. PMID:25729539

  3. Blood Pressure Reduction, Decreased Diffusion on MRI, and Outcomes After Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Rajeev K; Liebling, Storm M; Maas, Matthew B; Nemeth, Alexander J; Russell, Eric J; Naidech, Andrew M

    2011-01-01

    Background Decreased diffusion (DD) consistent with acute ischemia may be detected on MRI after acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), but its risk factors and impact on functional outcomes are not well defined. We tested the hypotheses that DD after ICH is related to acute blood pressure (BP) reduction and lower hemoglobin (HGB) and presages worse functional outcomes. Methods Patients who underwent MRI were prospectively evaluated for DD by certified neuroradiologists blinded to outcomes. HGB and BP data were obtained via electronic queries. Outcomes were obtained at 14 days and 3 months with the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), a functional scale scored from 0 (no symptoms) to 6 (dead). We used logistic regression for dependence or death (mRS 4 to 6). Results DD distinct from the hematoma was found on MRI in 36 of 95 patients (38%). DD was associated with greater BP reductions from baseline, and a higher risk of dependence or death at 3 months (OR 4.8, 95% CI 1.7 – 13.9, P=0.004) after correction for ICH Score (1.8 per point, 95%CI 1.2–3.1, P=0.01). Lower HGB was associated with worse ICH score, larger hematoma volume and worse outcomes, but not DD. Conclusions DD is common after ICH, associated with greater acute BP reductions, and associated with disability and death at 3 months in multivariate analysis. The potential benefits of acute BP reduction to reduce hematoma growth may be limited by DD. The prevention and treatment of cerebral ischemia manifested as DD is a potential method to improve outcomes. PMID:21980211

  4. Acute subdural hematoma secondary to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Hanish; Chaudhary, Ashwani; Mahajan, Anuj; Paul, Birinder

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare type of stroke primarily affecting young women. Diagnosis is generally delayed or overlooked due to a wide spectrum of clinical symptoms. Subdural hematoma secondary to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is very rare. We report a case of 40-year-old female with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis who presented to us with an acute subdural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage besides venous infarct. Management of such patients is complicated due to the rarity of the condition and contraindication for the use of anticoagulation. We conducted a thorough literature search through PubMed and could find only nine cases of spontaneous subdural hematoma secondary to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. PMID:27057237

  5. Pathology of ear hematomas in swine.

    PubMed

    Drolet, Richard; Hélie, Pierre; D'Allaire, Sylvie

    2016-05-01

    The objectives of our study were to describe the pathology of ear hematomas in swine and to add to the comprehension of the pathogenesis of this condition. The pathogenesis of aural hematomas has been studied mainly in dogs; however, disagreements exist about the precise anatomic location of the hemorrhage. Sixteen pigs with ear hematoma at various stages of development were included in this study. The pigs were submitted for routine autopsy for various and unrelated reasons over a period of several years. Based on gross examination, the 16 cases of aural hematomas were subjectively classified as acute (n = 6), subacute (n = 3), and chronic (n = 7). The age of the animals at the time of autopsy ranged from 2 weeks to adulthood, with all acute cases being <7 weeks of age. Morphologic examination of all acute cases revealed that the hematoma developed predominantly in a subperichondral location on both sides of the cartilaginous plate simultaneously. Within these same cases, there were also some areas in which blood-filled clefts had formed within the cartilage itself. Besides fibroplasia, neoformation of cartilage was found to represent a significant part of the repair process. All chronic cases were characterized on cross-section of the ear by the presence of at least 2 distinct, wavy, focally folded, and roughly parallel plates of cartilage separated from each other by fibrous tissue. PMID:27034341

  6. Synchronous intrauterine and tubal pregnancies with subchorionic hematoma.

    PubMed

    Gemer, O; Zohav, E; Calman, D; Sassoon, E; Segal, S

    1993-08-01

    A case of a heterotopic pregnancy is presented. Clinical manifestations included vaginal bleeding, and on ultrasonography a subchorionic hematoma was demonstrated. The subchorionic hematoma may be regarded as blood draining from the tubal pregnancy through the uterus. PMID:8394632

  7. Spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in two dogs.

    PubMed

    Boulineau, Theresa Marie; Andrews-Jones, Lydia; Van Alstine, William

    2005-09-01

    This report describes 2 cases of spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in young Border Collie and Border Collie crossbred dogs. Histology was performed in one of the cases involving an unusual splitting of the elastin present within the wall of the aorta, consistent with elastin dysplasia as described in Marfan syndrome in humans. The first case involved a young purebred Border Collie that died suddenly and the second case involved a Border Collie crossbred dog that died after a 1-month history of seizures. Gross lesions included pericardial tamponade with dissection of the ascending aorta in the former case and thoracic cavity hemorrhage, mediastinal hematoma, and aortic dissection in the latter. Histologic lesions in the case of the Border Collie crossbred dog included a dissecting hematoma of the ascending aorta with elastin dysplasia and right axillary arterial intimal proliferation. PMID:16312247

  8. Chronic subdural hematoma: demonstration by magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Sipponen, J.T.; Sepponen, R.E.; Sivula, A.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of magnetic resonance (MR) to identify intracranial hematomas was tested in five patients with clinical and computed tomographic signs of chronic subdural hematoma. The extracerebral collections were displayed as a zone of bright intensity using the T1-weighted inversion recovery (IR 1500/400) sequence, reflecting the lesions' short T1 relaxation times. The collections also showed high intensity using the spin echo (SE) sequence, with a longer delay of 100ms and 160ms, reflecting the long T2 relaxation time. The spin echo sequence with a repetition time of 500ms and an echo delay of 160ms (SE 500/160) almost effaced other structures in the image, thus increasing the specificity of this pulse scheme for detection of chronic blood collections. Although in two of the five patients the subdural hematomas were in the isodense CT phase, all were easily visualized with MR.

  9. Acute diquat poisoning with intracerebral bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, S; Wilks, M; Coupe, M

    2001-01-01

    A case of severe diquat poisoning complicated by the development of aggressive behaviour, oliguric renal failure, and intracerebral bleeding is described. The patient was successfully managed and made a complete recovery. In this paper special attention has been given to the major clinical differences between diquat and paraquat intoxication.


Keywords: poisoning; diquat; paraquat PMID:11320278

  10. Macrovascular Lesions Underlying Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jacky; Cord, Branden J; O'Rourke, Timothy K; Maina, Renee M; Sommaruga, Samuel; Matouk, Charles C

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a morbid disease with a high case fatality rate. Prognosis, rehemorrhage rates, and acute, clinical decision making are greatly affected by the underlying etiology of hemorrhage. This review focuses on the evaluation, diagnosis, and management of structural, macrovascular lesions presenting with ICH, including ruptured aneurysms, brain arteriovenous malformations, cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas, and cerebral cavernous malformations. PMID:27214699

  11. Spontaneous intramural hematoma of the colon.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Samuel; Gonçalves, Ana Rita; Araújo Correia, Luís

    2016-08-01

    A 73-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with sudden left quadrant abdominal pain and hematochezia. There was no history of trauma. He denied other symptoms or taking off-the-counter medication. His medical history was relevant for ischemic and aortic-mitral valve disease with prosthetic valves for which he was medicated with aspirin and warfarin. On physical examination the patient presented normal vital signs with tenderness on palpation of the left side of the abdomen. Laboratory tests revealed moderate anemia (10.8 g/dl) and thrombocytopenia (135.000x10^9 U/L) with therapeutic international normalized ratio (2.53). Colonoscopy revealed an extensive area of erythematous and bluish mucosa with an apparent torsion of the proximal descending colon around a volumous hematoma measuring 6.5x3 cm (Figure 1 A-C). Urgent abdominal CT confirmed the presence of a large intramural hematoma of the descending colon (Figure 2 A-B). A conservative approach was adopted with temporary suspension of anticoagulation. Given the high thrombotic risk, abdominal ultrasound was performed after 72 hours showing considerable reduction in the size of the hematoma. Anti-coagulation was then resumed without complications. One month later, colonoscopy was repeated showing complete healing of the mucosa. The increasing use of anti-aggregating and anti-coagulant therapy, especially in elderly patients, explains the increasing incidence of bleeding events seen in this population. However, gastrointestinal hematomas are estimated to occur in only 1 for every 250.000 anti-coagulated patients. Diagnosis is based on characteristic radiologic findings. While most parietal hematomas can be approached conservatively, surgery is indicated in the presence of complications or persistence of the hematoma. PMID:27554386

  12. The effects of subchorionic hematoma on pregnancy outcome in patients with threatened abortion

    PubMed Central

    Şükür, Yavuz Emre; Göç, Göksu; Köse, Osman; Açmaz, Gökhan; Özmen, Batuhan; Atabekoğlu, Cem Somer; Koç, Acar; Söylemez, Feride

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of ultrasonographically detected subchorionic hematomas on pregnancy outcomes in patients with vaginal bleeding within the first half of pregnancy. Material and Methods Patients diagnosed with threatened abortion due to painless vaginal bleeding and who were followed up in an in-patient service during the first vaginal bleeding between January 2009 and December 2010 were included in this retrospective cohort study. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of subchorionic hematoma. Miscarriage rates and pregnancy outcomes of ongoing pregnancies were compared between the groups. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the groups regarding demographic parameters, including age, parity, previous miscarriage history, and gestational age at first vaginal bleeding. While 13 of 44 pregnancies (29.5%) with subchorionic hematoma resulted in miscarriage, 25 of 198 pregnancies (12.6%) without subchorionic hematoma resulted in miscarriage (p=.010). The gestational age at miscarriage and the duration between first vaginal bleeding and miscarriage were similar between the groups. The outcome measures of ongoing pregnancies, such as gestational week at delivery, birth weight, and delivery route, were also similar between the groups. Conclusion Ultrasonographically detected subchorionic hematoma increases the risk of miscarriage in patients with vaginal bleeding and threatened abortion during the first 20 weeks of gestation. However, it does not affect the pregnancy outcome measures of ongoing pregnancies. PMID:25584033

  13. Ligamentum flavum hematoma in the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hida, Kazutoshi; Akino, Minoru; Seki, Toshitaka; Yano, Shunsuke; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    2005-05-01

    A 62-year-old male presented with a rare case of ligamentum flavum hematoma manifesting as low back pain and gait difficulty beginning 1 month before consulting our institute. He had no history of lumbar spine surgery or lumbar puncture. However, he might have suffered forgotten back injury while practicing martial arts. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a heterogeneous intensity mass lesion with a cystic component at the L3-4 levels. The lesion was totally removed through a hemilaminectomy. Intraoperative and histological findings confirmed the diagnosis of old hematoma with granulomatous change in the ligamentum flavum. Postoperatively, his low back pain and gait difficulty resolved within a few days. PMID:15914970

  14. [Chronic subdural hematoma--recurrence and prevention].

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Fumihiro; Tsuzuki, Nobusuke; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Shima, Katsuji

    2011-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma is one of the most common disorders observed in routine neurosurgical care. In the vast majority of cases, this disorder is treated by surgical evacuation, which usually yields a good prognosis. However, the recurrence rates after this initial procedure range from approximately 5% to 30%. In this study, we focused on the recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematoma and its prevention. We reviewed the risk factors for recurrence, surgical procedures used, perioperative management, timing of operation, and medical treatment. PMID:21228450

  15. Simultaneous Spinal and Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Cured by Craniotomy and Laminectomy: A Video Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kanamaru, Hideki; Kanamaru, Kenji; Araki, Tomohiro; Hamada, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous spinal and intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare entity. A 67-year-old man visited our hospital due to headache after diving into a river 2 weeks before. Non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral intracranial CSDH. The bilateral CSDH was evacuated and his symptoms improved. Three days after craniotomy, he complained of sensory disturbance on his buttocks. Lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion behind the thecal sac at L5. CT with myelography showed a subdural mass lesion; there was no communication with the subarachnoid space. Fourteen days after craniotomy, L5 laminectomy was performed and the dura mater was incised carefully. The video shows that a liquid hematoma similar to the intracranial CSDH flowed out, followed by cerebrospinal fluid. His symptoms improved after the operation and the hematoma did not recur. This is a rare condition of spinal CSDH demonstrated by neuroimaging and intraoperative video. PMID:27194987

  16. Simultaneous Spinal and Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Cured by Craniotomy and Laminectomy: A Video Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Hideki; Kanamaru, Kenji; Araki, Tomohiro; Hamada, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous spinal and intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare entity. A 67-year-old man visited our hospital due to headache after diving into a river 2 weeks before. Non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral intracranial CSDH. The bilateral CSDH was evacuated and his symptoms improved. Three days after craniotomy, he complained of sensory disturbance on his buttocks. Lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion behind the thecal sac at L5. CT with myelography showed a subdural mass lesion; there was no communication with the subarachnoid space. Fourteen days after craniotomy, L5 laminectomy was performed and the dura mater was incised carefully. The video shows that a liquid hematoma similar to the intracranial CSDH flowed out, followed by cerebrospinal fluid. His symptoms improved after the operation and the hematoma did not recur. This is a rare condition of spinal CSDH demonstrated by neuroimaging and intraoperative video. PMID:27194987

  17. Pure tentorial subdural hematoma from rupture of aneurysm along the transmastoid branches of the occipital artery

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Zaidat, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pure subdural hematoma (without subarachnoid, intraventricular, or intraparenchymal hemorrhage) due to a ruptured intracranial aneurysm is rare. Most reported cases involve an aneurysm along the internal carotid artery, posterior communicating artery, or middle cerebral artery. No reports have described an aneurysm along the transmastoid branches of the occipital artery. Case Description: A 70-year-old female presented with sudden-onset, excruciating headaches, associated with dizziness, nausea, and emesis. There was no history of trauma. Computed tomography (CT) head demonstrated a pure tentorial subdural hematoma. Vascular imaging revealed bilateral aneurysms along the transmastoid branches of the intracranial portion of both the occipital arteries. Consequently, these branches were embolized, with no residual filling of the aneurysms. After the procedure, the patient remained neurologically well. The patient was monitored appropriately for vasospasm, and was discharged home 10 days after presentation. Conclusion: Rupture of aneurysms along intracranial branches of the occipital artery can lead to pure subdural hematoma along the tentorium. PMID:27583173

  18. Spontaneous hematoma in the setting of dual anti-platelet therapy with ticagrelor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    FENG, CHUNGUANG; WANG, LINGUANG; WANG, LULU

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old male patient was admitted to hospital because a lump was discovered, accompanied with pain lasting 5 h under his right scapula. Two months earlier, he had undergone a double-stent insertion operation due to lesions on the end of the left main coronary artery, the opening of left circumflex artery, and the opening of the anterior descending branch. After the operation, he was administered with dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT) with aspirin and ticagrelor and was diagnosed with hematoma under his right scapula through ultrasonic inspection. It was established that no other factor, except DAPT, was responsible for his spontaneous hematoma. PMID:27347115

  19. Contralateral acute subdural hematoma occurring after evacuation of subdural hematoma with coexistent contralateral subdural hygroma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hsiao-Lun; Chang, Chih-Ju; Hsieh, Cheng-Ta

    2014-07-01

    Burr-hole craniostomy with closed-system drainage is a safe and effective method for the management of chronic subdural hematoma. However, contralateral acute subdural hematoma has been reported to be a rare and devastating complication. Only 3 cases have been described in the literature. Herein, we reported an 80-year-old male with chronic subdural hematoma and contralateral subdural hygroma. The burr-hole craniostomy with closed-system drainage was initially performed to treat the chronic subdural hematoma. Three days after surgery, weakness of the extremities developed, and contralateral acute subdural bleeding within the previous subdural hygroma was diagnosed by CT scan of the brain. The pathophysiological mechanism of this rare complication was discussed, and the relevant literature was also reviewed. PMID:24983286

  20. Contralateral acute subdural hematoma occurring after evacuation of subdural hematoma with coexistent contralateral subdural hygroma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hsiao-Lun; Chang, Chih-Ju; Hsieh, Cheng-Ta

    2014-01-01

    Burr-hole craniostomy with closed-system drainage is a safe and effective method for the management of chronic subdural hematoma. However, contralateral acute subdural hematoma has been reported to be a rare and devastating complication. Only 3 cases have been described in the literature. Herein, we reported an 80-year-old male with chronic subdural hematoma and contralateral subdural hygroma. The burr-hole craniostomy with closed-system drainage was initially performed to treat the chronic subdural hematoma. Three days after surgery, weakness of the extremities developed, and contralateral acute subdural bleeding within the previous subdural hygroma was diagnosed by CT scan of the brain. The pathophysiological mechanism of this rare complication was discussed, and the relevant literature was also reviewed. PMID:24983286

  1. Intracerebral fibroma: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Stephen E.; McGinity, Michael J.; Henry, James M.; Vecil, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral fibromas are among the most rare neoplasms found in the central nervous system. Ten previously reported cases have been documented in the literature including only two reported cases since 1985. As a result, little is known about these uncommon intracerebral fibrous tumors. We report a case of an intracerebral fibroma without dural or leptomeningeal attachment, discuss the pertinent diagnostic findings and briefly review all prior reports of this entity. PMID:27194681

  2. Intracerebral fibroma: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Stephen E; McGinity, Michael J; Henry, James M; Vecil, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral fibromas are among the most rare neoplasms found in the central nervous system. Ten previously reported cases have been documented in the literature including only two reported cases since 1985. As a result, little is known about these uncommon intracerebral fibrous tumors. We report a case of an intracerebral fibroma without dural or leptomeningeal attachment, discuss the pertinent diagnostic findings and briefly review all prior reports of this entity. PMID:27194681

  3. European research priorities for intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Thorsten; Petersson, Jesper; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Christensen, Hanne; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Csiba, Laszlo; Harnof, Sagi; Krieger, Derk; Mendelow, David; Molina, Carlos; Montaner, Joan; Overgaard, Karsten; Roine, Risto O; Schmutzhard, Erich; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Toni, Danilo; Stapf, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Over 2 million people are affected by intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) worldwide every year, one third of them dying within 1 month, and many survivors being left with permanent disability. Unlike most other stroke types, the incidence, morbidity and mortality of ICH have not declined over time. No standardised diagnostic workup for the detection of the various underlying causes of ICH currently exists, and the evidence for medical or surgical therapeutic interventions remains limited. A dedicated European research programme for ICH is needed to identify ways to reduce the burden of ICH-related death and disability. The European Research Network on Intracerebral Haemorrhage EURONICH is a multidisciplinary academic research collaboration that has been established to define current research priorities and to conduct large clinical studies on all aspects of ICH. PMID:21986448

  4. Critical Care Management of Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Morawo, Adeolu O; Gilmore, Emily J

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), the most devastating and debilitating form of stroke, remains a major healthcare concern all over the world. Intracerebral hemorrhage is frequently managed in critical care settings where intensive monitoring and treatment are employed to prevent and address primary and secondary brain injury as well as other medical complications that may arise. Although there has been increasing data guiding the management of ICH in the past decade, prognosis remains dismal. In this article, the authors discuss the risk factors for ICH, the role of imaging, the major targets of neurocritical care management, the etiology and management of raised intracranial pressure, as well as prevention of and prompt response to the emergence of medical complications. They also discuss the effect of early withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy on prognosis. Finally, we outline several clinical trials that hold promise in improving our management of ICH in the near future. PMID:27214697

  5. European Research Priorities for Intracerebral Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Thorsten; Petersson, Jesper; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Christensen, Hanne; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Csiba, Laszlo; Harnof, Sagi; Krieger, Derk; Mendelow, David; Molina, Carlos; Montaner, Joan; Overgaard, Karsten; Roine, Risto O.; Schmutzhard, Erich; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Toni, Danilo; Stapf, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Over 2 million people are affected by intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) worldwide every year, one third of them dying within 1 month, and many survivors being left with permanent disability. Unlike most other stroke types, the incidence, morbidity and mortality of ICH have not declined over time. No standardised diagnostic workup for the detection of the various underlying causes of ICH currently exists, and the evidence for medical or surgical therapeutic interventions remains limited. A dedicated European research programme for ICH is needed to identify ways to reduce the burden of ICH-related death and disability. The European Research Network on Intracerebral Haemorrhage EURONICH is a multidisciplinary academic research collaboration that has been established to define current research priorities and to conduct large clinical studies on all aspects of ICH. PMID:21986448

  6. [Complications of superficial venous surgery of the legs: thigh hematomas and abscess].

    PubMed

    Millien, J P; Coget, J M

    1993-01-01

    A series of 1,000 patients has been studied. I. HEMATOMAE: They are nearly continuous during internal saphena stripping but depend on various parameters. 1) Anatomical: a) Varicose veins topography. Perforating veins. Perforating veins of the thigh cause haemorrhage but reactions of venous construction are quite important and precocious not to observe subcutaneous bleedings. More or less "soft" stripping creates a reaction of reflex vasoconstriction. Fore saphenous vein of the thigh Hematomae are more and more numerous and important because the fore saphenous vein is a vein whose wall is thinner, more fragile and almost more superficial. b) Type of patient. In an obese patient, hematoma seems to be more spectacular. In the thin patient, it appears faster, if hematic expression is too late. 2) Stripping techniques: It is possible to propose different techniques of stripping, but none of them can lower specifically post-surgical hematomae. 3) Anaesthesiae: a) General anaesthesia. A bilateral surgery under general anaesthesia was helpful to observe in some cases a less important hematoma at the level of the second operated leg. b) Rachi-anaesthesia. Physiological vasoconstriction requires a latent period for this kind of anaethesia which causes a vasomotor paralysis due to a blockade of the sympathetic nerve. c) Local anaesthesia. It is obtained by crural block in association with injection of Xylocaine Adrenalina at the level of perforating veins of the thigh. This technique causes less hematomae. II. ABSCESSES: Only 4 cases out of 1,000 operated legs have been reported. No related pathology have been observed particularly about lymphatic disorders (erysipelas or lymphoedema), no previous infection known which could not have explained such complications. Therapy was simple: incision at mid-thigh and draining by lamina. The patient recovered within two weeks. PMID:8115469

  7. Intracerebral lymphoma deposits: investigation and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Plowman, P.N.; Wise, R.J.S.

    1984-06-01

    In a recently studied series of 12 patients with intracerebral lymphoma deposits, the following are noteworthy: Although most intracerebral lymphoma deposits are dramatically and homogenously enhanced on CT brain scan, this is not always the case; two patients with apparently necrotic centers are presented. Subtraction of enhanced CT brain scanning cuts before and after radiotherapy allow a quantitation of tumor response. The apparent paradox of deficient lymphoma deposit angiogenesis on angiography and good enhancement on CT scan was probed by positron emission topmography (ECAT) in the only patient who did not have a confounding prior craniotomy. ECAT and histopathological examination suggest that the microvasculature of intracerebral lymphoma deposits is rich. The ECAT data demonstrated that regional tumor blood flow was comparable to that in grey matter, but tumor oxygen metabolism was intermediate between grey and white matter. The interesting observation of coupled depression of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the cerebrum overlying the tumor and its surrounding edema is discussed. A protracted radiotherapy prescription (with daily fractions of 175 cGY) is favored.

  8. Factors Associated With Neck Hematoma After Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Sayaka; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Saito, Yuki; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To identify risk factors for post-thyroidectomy hematoma requiring airway intervention or surgery (“wound hematoma”) and determine post-thyroidectomy time to intervention. Post-thyroidectomy hematoma is rare but potentially lethal. Information on wound hematoma in a nationwide clinical setting is scarce. Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, we extracted data from records of patients undergoing thyroidectomy from July 2010 to March 2014. Patients with clinical stage IV cancer or those with bilateral neck dissection were excluded because they could have undergone planned tracheotomy on the day of thyroidectomy. We assessed the association between background characteristics and wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy, using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Among 51,968 patients from 880 hospitals, wound hematoma occurred in 920 (1.8%) ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy and in 203 (0.4%) ≥3 days post-thyroidectomy (in-hospital mortality = 0.05%). Factors significantly associated with wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy were male sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30–1.77); higher age (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00–1.02); overweight or obese (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.04–1.44); type of surgery (partial thyroidectomy for benign tumor compared with: total thyroidectomy, benign tumor [OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.45–2.63]; partial thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.00–1.46]; total thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.82–3.49]; and thyroidectomy for Graves disease [OR 3.88, 95% CI 2.59–5.82]); neck dissection (OR, 1.53, 95% CI 1.05–2.23); antithrombotic agents (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.15–2.17); and blood transfusion (OR 5.33, 95% CI 2.39–11.91). Closer monitoring of airway and neck is recommended for patients with risk factors, and further cautious monitoring beyond 3 days post-thyroidectomy. PMID:26886632

  9. Upregulated Expression of Karyopherin α2 is Involved in Neuronal Apoptosis Following Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Jianping; Shi, Jiansheng; Zhao, Jianmei; Wang, Jun; Ji, Yuhong; Han, Lijian; Zhu, Liang; Li, Xiaohong; Zhang, Dongmei

    2016-07-01

    Karyopherin α2 (KPNA2) plays a central role in nucleocytoplasmic transport. It is involved in controlling the flow of genetic information and the modulation of diverse cellular activities. Here we explored the KPNA2's roles during the pathophysiological processes of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). An ICH rat model was built and evaluated according to behavioral testing. Using Western blot, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence, significant upregulation of KPNA2 was found in neurons in brain areas surrounding the hematoma following ICH. Increasing KPNA2 level was found to be accompanied by the upregulation of active caspase-3, Bax, and decreased expression of Bcl-2. Besides, KPNA2 co-localized well with active caspase-3 in neurons, indicating its potential role in neuronal apoptosis. What's more, knocking down KPNA2 by RNA-interference in PC12 cells reduced active caspase-3 expression. Thus, KPNA2 may play a role in promoting the brain secondary damage following ICH. PMID:26340948

  10. Age determination of subdural hematomas: survey among radiologists.

    PubMed

    Postema, F A M; Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Majoie, C B L M; van Rijn, R R

    2014-08-01

    Abusive head trauma is a severe form of child abuse. One important diagnostic finding is the presence of a subdural hematoma. Age determination of subdural hematomas is important to relate radiological findings to the clinical history presented by the caregivers. In court this topic is relevant as dating subdural hematomas can lead to identification of a suspect. The aim of our study is to describe the current practice among radiologists in the Netherlands regarding the age determination of subdural hematomas in children. This is a cross-sectional study, describing the results of an online questionnaire regarding dating subdural hematomas among pediatric and neuro-radiologists in the Netherlands. The questionnaire consisted of sociodemographic questions, theoretical questions and eight pediatric cases in which the participants were asked to date subdural hematomas based on imaging findings. Fifty-one out of 172 radiologists (30 %) filled out the questionnaire. The percentage of participants that reported it was possible to date the subdural hematoma varied between 58 and 90 % for the eight different cases. In four of eight cases (50 %), the age of the subdural hematoma as known from clinical history fell within the range reported by the participants. None of the participants was "very certain" of their age determination. The results demonstrate that there is a considerable practice variation among Dutch radiologists regarding the age determination of subdural hematomas. This implicates that dating of subdural hematomas is not suitable to use in court, as no uniformity among experts exists. PMID:24553773

  11. Evaluation of Risk Factors for Rectus Sheath Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Heena S; Kumar, Rohit; DiNella, Jeannine; Janov, Cheryl; Kaldas, Hoda; Smith, Roy E

    2016-04-01

    Rectus sheath hematoma (RSH) develops due to rupture of epigastric arteries or the rectus muscle. Although RSH incidence rate is low, it poses a significant diagnostic dilemma. We evaluated the risk factors for RSH, its presentation, management, and outcomes for 115 patients hospitalized with confirmed RSH by computed tomography scan between January 2005 and June 2009. More than three-fourth (77.4%) of the patients were on anticoagulation therapy, 58.3% patients had chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage ≥3, 51.3% had abdominal injections, 41.7% were on steroids/immunosuppressant therapy, 37.4% had abdominal surgery/trauma, 33.9% had cough, femoral puncture was performed in 31.3% of patients, and 29.5% were on antiplatelet therapy. Rectus sheath hematoma was not an attributable cause in any of the 17 deaths. Mortality was significantly higher in patients with CKD stage ≥3 (P = .03) or who required transfusion (P = .007). Better understanding of RSH risk factors will facilitate early diagnoses and improve management. PMID:25294636

  12. Intracranial subdural hematomas with elevated rivaroxaban concentration and subsequently detected spinal subdural hematoma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Koga, Masatoshi; Matsuki, Takayuki; Hino, Tenyu; Yokota, Chiaki; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2016-07-01

    A 79-year-old lean man with a height of 157cm and weight of 42kg (body mass index, 17.2kg/m(2)) receiving rivaroxaban developed an intracranial subdural hematoma and was treated conservatively. Because he had a reduced creatinine clearance of 44mL/min, his dosage of rivaroxaban was reduced from 15 to 10mg daily according to official Japanese prescribing information. However, he developed bilateral intracranial subdural hematomas 2weeks later. Plasma rivaroxaban concentration on anti-factor Xa chromogenic assay was elevated at 301ng/mL, suggesting excessive accumulation. He underwent burr hole drainage and resumed anticoagulation with warfarin. Subsequently, he developed a lumbosacral hematoma. He was treated conservatively and discharged without neurological sequelae. The main cause of the increased concentration of rivaroxaban was believed to be his older age and low body weight. The etiology of the spinal hematoma was suspected to be the migration of intracranial hematoma to the spinal subdural space. PMID:27240110

  13. [Diagnostic and treatment of hypertensive cerebellar hematomas].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V V; Dash'ian, V G; Murashko, A A; Burov, S A

    2009-01-01

    Authors analyzed the results of treatment of 56 patients with hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhages (volume 0,5-41 cm3). Brain stem symptoms were found in 45 (80%) of patients. The dislocation of brain stem was observed in 38 (68%) cases, occlusive hydrocephaly - in 22 (39%), intraventricular hemorrhage - in 26 (46%). Severity of state depended on character of disease course, presence of stem symptoms, awakening level, volume and localization of cerebellar hematoma, development of intraventricular hemorrhage, occlusive hydrocephaly and dislocation of brain stem. Thirty-six patients were operated. After the neurosurgical intervention, 22 (61%) patients were discharged without or with the minimal neurological deficit, 1 (3%) with marked disability and 13 (36%) patients died. In conclusion, the removal of hematoma is recommended in dislocation of brain stem and disturbance of consiousnes: the ventricular drainage - in occlusive hydrocephaly developed as a consequence of hemotamponade of IV ventricular. The surgical treatment is not recommended to patients with cerebellar hematomas with the volume less than 7 cm3. PMID:19491806

  14. Spontaneous intrathyroidal hematoma causing airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Best, Corliss A.E.; Dhaliwal, Sandeep; Tam, Samantha; Low, T. Hubert; Hughes, Brian; Fung, Kevin; MacNeil, S. Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Spontaneous thyroid hemorrhage is a rare occurrence that results in pain, discomfort, and occasionally compressive symptoms. Infrequently, extensive thyroid hemorrhage can result in a rapidly expanding hematoma resulting in airway compromise. This is a case of an otherwise healthy young woman, 3 months postpartum, with a slowly expanding spontaneous thyroid hemorrhage that measured at 7 × 5.5 × 5 cm by computed tomography. She ultimately required intubation to manage respiratory distress and subsequently a hemithyroidectomy for definitive treatment. The case presentation is followed by a literature review where known etiologies of thyroid hematoma including traumatic and nontraumatic causes, precipitating anticoagulation, and spontaneous rupture of branches of the external carotid artery are outlined. The potential links to pregnancy are explored. The roles of bedside thyroid ultrasound in the emergency department and lateral neck roentgenogram in diagnosis are explored. The importance of airway management and indications for conservative versus surgical treatments are discussed. Conclusions: This is a case of a spontaneous intrathyroidal hemorrhage, which progressed over days to ultimately cause airway compromise. It is imperative that physicians are educated on the appropriate detection and management of the potentially life-threatening spontaneous thyroid hematoma. PMID:27583841

  15. New observations in scintigraphy of subdural and extradural hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Smoak, W.M.; Gilson, A.J.; Janowitz, W.; Zusmer, N.; Maturo, V.

    1980-11-01

    Static radionuclide images of subacute subdural hematomas demonstrate significant variations in findings over a 3-hr period in the same patient. The lesion can appear, disappear, and reconstitute in an entirely different pattern. This transformation has not appeared in extradural hematomas, and may provide a differential diagnostic sign. In patients with a clinical history or physical findings suspicious for these intracranial hematomas, immediate and sequential delayed static imaging is recommended.

  16. Minimally Invasive Surgical Treatment of Acute Epidural Hematoma: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective. Although minimally invasive surgical treatment of acute epidural hematoma attracts increasing attention, no generalized indications for the surgery have been adopted. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of minimally invasive surgery in acute epidural hematoma with various hematoma volumes. Methods. Minimally invasive puncture and aspiration surgery were performed in 59 cases of acute epidural hematoma with various hematoma volumes (13–145 mL); postoperative follow-up was 3 months. Clinical data, including surgical trauma, surgery time, complications, and outcome of hematoma drainage, recovery, and Barthel index scores, were assessed, as well as treatment outcome. Results. Surgical trauma was minimal and surgery time was short (10–20 minutes); no anesthesia accidents or surgical complications occurred. Two patients died. Drainage was completed within 7 days in the remaining 57 cases. Barthel index scores of ADL were ≤40 (n = 1), 41–60 (n = 1), and >60 (n = 55); scores of 100 were obtained in 48 cases, with no dysfunctions. Conclusion. Satisfactory results can be achieved with minimally invasive surgery in treating acute epidural hematoma with hematoma volumes ranging from 13 to 145 mL. For patients with hematoma volume >50 mL and even cerebral herniation, flexible application of minimally invasive surgery would help improve treatment efficacy. PMID:27144170

  17. Bilateral Rectus Sheath Hematoma in Kidney Transplant Patient: Case Study and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Feizzadeh Kerigh, Behzad; Maddah, Ghodratolah

    2013-01-01

    Rectus sheath hematoma usually occurs unilateral but rare cases of bilateral hematoma have been reported. Herein we report the first case of spontaneous bilateral Rectus Sheath Hematoma in the kidney transplanted patient. PMID:24350093

  18. A Life-Threatening Mediastinal Hematoma After Central Venous Port System Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Sarach, Janine; Zschokke, Irin; Melcher, Gian A.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 68 Final Diagnosis: Mediastinal hematoma Symptoms: Agitation • severe hemodynamic instability • severe respiratory distress Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation • reintubation • thoracic drain Specialty: Surgery Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: We report a case of surgical central venous port system implantation using Seldinger’s technique with a life-threatening mediastinal hematoma due to the perforation of the superior vena cava. Case Report: A 68-year-old woman was admitted to our institution for port implantation. Open access to the cephalic vein and 2 punctures of the right subclavian vein were unsuccessful. Finally, the port catheter could be placed into the superior vena cava using Seldinger’s technique. As blood aspiration via the port catheter was not possible, fluoroscopy was performed, revealing mediastinal contrast extravasation without contrasting the venous system. A new port system could be placed in the correct position without difficulties. After extubation, the patient presented with severe respiratory distress and required consecutive cardiopulmonary resuscitation and reintubation. The CT scan showed a significant hematoma in the lower neck and posterior mediastinum with tracheal compression. We assumed a perforation of the superior vena cava with the tip of the guidewire using Seldinger’s technique. Long-term intensive treatment with prolonged ventilation and tracheotomy was necessary. The port system had to be subsequently explanted due to infection. Conclusions: Mediastinal hematoma is a rare but life-threatening complication associated with central venous catheterization using Seldinger’s technique. Perforation occurs most often during central venous catheterization in critical care. Mediastinal hematoma is an example of a mechanical complication occurring after central venous catheterization, which has been described only a few times in the literature to

  19. Prognostic factors in patients with intracerebral haematoma.

    PubMed Central

    Franke, C L; van Swieten, J C; Algra, A; van Gijn, J

    1992-01-01

    In a prospective study, the prognostic value of clinical characteristics in 157 consecutive patients with spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral haemorrhage were examined by means of multivariate analysis. Two days after the event 37 (24%) patients had died. Factors independently contributing to the prediction of two day mortality were pineal gland displacement on CT of 3 mm or more (p less than 0.001), blood glucose level on admission of 8.0 mmol/l or more (p = 0.01), eye and motor score on the Glasgow Coma Scale of eight out of 10 or less (p = 0.022) and haematoma volume of 40 cm3 or more (p = 0.037). Between the third day and one year after the event another 46 of the 120 two day survivors had died; the independent prognostic indicators for death during that period were: age 70 years or more (p less than 0.001) and severe handicap (Rankin grade five) on the third day (p less than 0.001). Functional independence (Rankin grade two or less) at one year was most common not only with the converse features of age less than 70 years (p less than 0.01) and Rankin grade four or less on the third day (p = 0.002), but also with an eye and motor score on the Glasgow Coma Scale of nine or 10 on the third day (p less than 0.001). The 120 patients with intracerebral haemorrhage who were still alive two days after the event were matched with 120 patients with cerebral infarction, according to age, level of consciousness on the third day after stroke (Glasgow Coma Scale) and handicap (Rankin grade). Survival and handicap after one year did not differ between these two groups. The conclusion drawn is that it is not the cause (intracerebral haemorrhage or cerebral infarction) but the extent of the brain lesion that determines the outcome in patients who survive the first two days. PMID:1527534

  20. Intracerebral pneumatoceles following facial trauma: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, D.B.; Hertzanu, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Three patients with delayed frontal intracerebral pneumatoceles following facial injury are presented. In one patient an unusual appearance of bilateral and symmetrical frontal lobe pneumatoceles was demonstrated. While diagnosis is not difficult on routine radiographs, CT is valuable for determining effects on the brain and clearly delineating the fracture site; CT shows the location of the pneumatocele and may show an associated air-fluid level, mass effect or surrounding edema, or rim enhancement following administration of contrast material. The radiological appearances in conjunction with the clinical findings are highly characteristic and should not be mistaken for gas-forming cerebral abscesses.

  1. Shunt site chronic calcified extradural hematoma: An avoidable complication

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sudhansu Sekhar; Satapathy, Mani Charan; Senapati, Satya Bhusan

    2014-01-01

    Extradural hematoma (EDH) after ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt procedure is a rare, dangerous but easily avoidable and manageable complication. It is more common in children and young adults presumably due to relatively lax adhesion of dura to calvarium. We report a case of an 18-year-old male with acqueductal stenosis who underwent VP shunt procedure. Three months later, a computed tomography (CT) scan was done for the complaints of intractable headache and altered sensorium which showed chronic calcified EDH near shunt site. The ventricular catheter was in position and the ventricles were decompressed. After surgical decompression of EDH his symptoms improved. We discuss the factors leading to formation of EDH, with stress on proper technique to prevent or minimize such an avoidable complication. PMID:25250078

  2. Subdural actinomycoma presenting as recurrent chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, N. J.; Bot, G. M.; Sahabi, S.; Aliu, S.; Usman, B.; Shilong, D. J.; Obande, J. O.; Shehu, B. B.

    2015-01-01

    Actimomycosis is a rare chronic bacterial infection of the central nervous system, and subdural actinomycoma is extremely rare. This case report brings to bear an uncommon association between subdural actinomycosis with chronic subdural hematoma. Subdural actinomycoma may present as a diagnostic conundrum and could be mistaken radiologically for either a subdural hematoma or an empyaema. PMID:25972947

  3. EP3, Prostaglandin E2 Receptor Subtype 3, Associated with Neuronal Apoptosis Following Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ni, Haidan; Shen, Jiabing; Song, Yan; Cao, Maohong; Liu, Xiaorong; Huang, Jie; Zhang, Weidong; Xie, Lili; Ning, Xiaojin; Ke, Kaifu

    2016-08-01

    EP3 is prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 3 and mediates the activation of several signaling pathways, changing in cAMP levels, calcium mobilization, and activation of phospholipase C. Previous studies demonstrated a direct role for EP3 in various neurodegenerative disorders, such as stroke and Alzheimer disease. However, the distribution and function of EP3 in ICH diseases remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that EP3 may be involved in neuronal apoptosis in the processes of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). From the results of Western blot and immunohistochemistry, we obtained a significant up-regulation of EP3 in neurons adjacent to the hematoma following ICH. Up-regulation of EP3 was found to be accompanied by the increased expression of active caspase-3 and pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and decreased expression of anti-apoptotic protein B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) in vivo and vitro studies. Furthermore, the expression of these three proteins reduced active caspase-3 and Bax expression, while increased Bcl-2 were changed after knocking down EP3 by RNA interference in PC12 cells, further confirmed that EP3 might exert its pro-apoptotic function on neuronal apoptosis. Thus, EP3 may play a role in promoting the neuronal apoptosis following ICH. PMID:26718710

  4. History and Mechanism for Treatment of Intracerebral Hemorrhage with Scalp Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhe; Guan, Ling; Wang, Yan; Xie, Cheng-Long; Lin, Xian-Ming; Zheng, Guo-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is an important public health problem with high rates of mortality, morbidity, and disability, but no clinically proven treatment strategy is available to date. Scalp acupuncture (SA) refers to a therapy for treating diseases by needling and stimulating the specific areas of the scalp. The evidence from clinical studies suggested that SA therapy may produce significant benefits for patients with acute ICH. However, the therapeutic mechanisms are yet not well addressed. Therefore, in this paper, we provide a comprehensive overview on the history and mechanisms of SA therapy on acute ICH. Although SA has been practiced for thousands of years in China and could date back to 5 BC, SA therapy for acute ICH develops only in the recent 30 years. The possible mechanisms associated with the therapeutic effects of SA on ICH include the influence on hematoma, brain edema, and blood brain barrier, the products released from haematoma, the immune and inflammatory reaction, focal perihemorrhagic hypoperfusion and hemorheology, neuroelectrophysiology, and so on. At last, the existence of instant effect of SA on acute ICH and its possible mechanisms are presented. PMID:22474527

  5. Subperiosteal hematoma of the orbit associated with sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Woo, K I; Kim, Y D

    1997-12-01

    Subperiosteal hematoma of the orbit is a rare but well-recognized entity, usually caused by trauma. Two cases of subperiosteal hematoma associated with sinusitis are presented. A 44-year-old woman experienced the sudden onset of proptosis, and decreased visual acuity. Computed tomographic scanning and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a frontoethmoidal mucocele and a biconvex mass in the upper part of the left orbit. The mucocele was drained during nasal endoscopic surgery and the subperiosteal hematoma was evacuated during superior orbitotomy. A 42-year-old man had a headache and proptosis. Computed tomographic scan revealed sinusitis and subperiosteal orbital hematoma of the left orbit. Subperiosteal orbital hematoma associated with sinusitis is extremely rare but should be suspected in a patient with acute onset of proptosis in whom computed tomographic scanning reveals paranasal sinusitis. PMID:9510655

  6. Subchorionic hematoma in threatened abortion: Sonographic evaluation and significance.

    PubMed

    Al Nuaim, L; Chowdhury, N; Adelusi, B

    1996-11-01

    In a study of 92 women with subchorionic hematoma evaluated with sonographic scan in King Khalid University Hospital, it was found that the mean ages and live births of patients who carried their pregnancies to viability were higher when compared with the patients who aborted. There was a statistically significant association between the gestational age at diagnosis of subchorionic hematoma and the size of the hematoma. There was, however, no statistically significant association found between the gestational age at diagnosis, size and site of the hematoma and the outcome of pregnancy. It was concluded that subchorionic hematoma which appear either in the second trimester, or are larger, or located in the lower uterine segment, may be associated with higher rates of abortion or preterm deliveries. Nevertheless, there is no statistically significant impact of these on the outcome of pregnancy. PMID:17429250

  7. Intramural duodenal hematoma after endoscopic therapy for a bleeding duodenal ulcer in a patient with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Kyoko; Kajiwara, Eiji; Mochizuki, Yuichi; Noma, Eijiro; Nakashima, Jo; Uchimura, Koutaro; Sadoshima, Seizou

    2005-09-01

    We report a case of intestinal obstruction due to intramural hematoma of the duodenum following therapeutic endoscopy for a bleeding duodenal ulcer in a patient with liver cirrhosis. A 44-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with severe epigastralgia, nausea and tarry stool. Two years previously he had undergone endoscopic sclerotherapy for esophageal varices caused by alcoholic liver cirrhosis. Endoscopy revealed an open ulcer with a bleeding vessel in the duodenal bulb, and sclerotherapy was performed by clipping the vessel and injecting 20 ml of 0.2% epinephrine. His platelet count was 3.5x10(4)/mul. Twelve hours later, he again developed epigastralgia and hypotension. Emergency computed tomography and ultrasonography revealed an intramural hematoma, 15x18 cm in diameter, at the dorsal and lateral duodenum. Endoscopy and upper gastrointestinal series revealed severe stenosis of the duodenal lumen caused by intramural hematoma. He received parenteral feeding for 22 days and within 8 weeks the hematoma was gradually absorbed using conservative management. Intramural duodenal hematoma may be diagnosed as a complication of the endoscopic procedure in a patient with a bleeding tendency, such as liver cirrhosis. PMID:16258210

  8. A case of interhemispheric subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Koumtchev, Y; Petkov, S; Gozmanov, G

    1994-01-01

    The interhemispheric subdural hematoma is a rare condition. We present a case of interhemispheric subdural hematoma in a patient aged 65 years. A day prior to admission he was struck with a water-pipe on the head. He went to sleep the same evening complaining of a slight headache. At about two o'clock in the morning the headache increased in intensity. By the morning he lost consciousness. On examination by a neurosurgeon the patient was found to be comatose. The physical examination revealed blue eyelids of the left eye, paraplegia of the right leg, paresis of the left leg and arms. Bilateral Babinski's reflex was present, the abdominal reflexes were absent, the tendon and periosteal reflexes were hyperactive. The pupils were equal in size and slowly reactive to light. The patient exhibited symptoms of meningoradicular irritation. An emergency CT scan revealed high-density area in the interhemispheric sulcus extending frontally to parietally. The patients was operated on in an emergency. At operation, extensive rupture of the sagittal sinus was identified. Later the patient died. The presented case was interesting with the extensive rupture of the sagittal sinus and the relatively long lucid interval until clear manifestation of the clinical picture becomes evident. PMID:7867995

  9. Spontaneous Hematoma of Posterior Mediastinum with an Uncommon Cause: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Leilei; Cao, Dianbo; Sun, Yutian

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous mediastinal hematoma is exceedingly rare. We described such a case of a 61-year-old male with a posterior mediastinal hematoma from ruptured small aneurysm, which was ascertained via contrast-enhanced computed tomography examination. Subsequent super-selective angiography of left gastric artery revealed a ruptured aneurysm with contrast medium leakage, feeding vessels respectively from caudal and cranial artery. The left gastric artery branch caudally feeding aneurysm was successfully occluded, while cranially feeding artery from the branch of left bronchial artery failed to embolize due to complex anatomic factor. Our management still yields to a satisfactory outcome. PMID:27162607

  10. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaochun; Wen, Zunjia; Shen, Haitao; Shen, Meifen

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI) following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches. PMID:27190572

  11. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaochun; Wen, Zunjia; Shen, Haitao; Shen, Meifen; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI) following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches. PMID:27190572

  12. Hematoma-Directed Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, LaNette F.; Henry-Tillman, Ronda; Harms, Steve; Hronas, Theodore; Mancino, Anne T.; Westbrook, Kent C.; Korourian, Sohelia; Jones, Mary P.; Klimberg, V. Suzanne

    2001-01-01

    Objective and Summary Background Data The standard technique for removal of nonpalpable breast lesions is needle localization breast biopsy. Because traumatic hematomas can often be seen with ultrasound, the authors hypothesized that iatrogenically induced hematomas could be used to guide the excision of nonpalpable lesions using ultrasound. Methods Twenty patients with nonpalpable breast lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging only were enrolled in this single-institution trial, approved by the institutional review board. A hematoma consisting of 2 to 5 mL of the patient’s own blood was injected into the breast to target the nonpalpable lesion. Intraoperative ultrasound of the hematoma was used to direct the excisional biopsy. Results The average age of women was 53.8 ± 10 years. Ninety-five percent of lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging were localized by hematoma injection. All the hematomas used to recognize targeted lesions were identified at surgery by ultrasound and removed without complication. Eight (40%) of the lesions were malignant, with an average tumor size of 12 ± 6 mm (range 4–25). The remaining 12 lesions (60%) comprised papillomas, sclerosing adenosis, radial scar, fibroadenoma, and areas of atypical ductal hyperplasia. Conclusion The results of this pilot study show the effectiveness of hematoma-directed ultrasound-guided breast biopsy for nonpalpable lesions seen by magnetic resonance imaging. This new procedure is potentially more comfortable for the patient because no wire or needle is left in the breast. It is technically faster and easier because ultrasound is used to visualize directly the location of the hematoma at surgery and to confirm lesion removal in the operating room by specimen ultrasound. The hematoma can be placed several days before biopsy, easing scheduling, and without fear of the migration that may occur with needle localization. This method may have ready application to mammographically detected

  13. Post-traumatic intracerebral pneumatocele: case report.

    PubMed

    Orebaugh, S L; Margolis, J H

    1990-12-01

    Pneumocephalus occurs in 0.5 to 1.0% of head trauma, but may also occur after neurologic surgery, or as a result of eroding infection or neoplasm. The pathophysiology involves the presence of craniodural fistula allowing ingress of air. A ball-valve mechanism may allow air to enter but not exit the cranium, or CSF leak permits air entrance as fluid leaves the intracranial space. While a "succession splash" is considered diagnostic of pneumocephalus, most patients have nonspecific signs and symptoms such as headache. Therefore, a high index of suspicion in a patient with recent head trauma is necessary. The diagnosis is made radiographically by CT scan. This is generally performed to rule out intracranial hematoma or cerebral contusion in head trauma, but will reveal even very small quantities of air to the unsuspecting physician. Therapy is often noninvasive, allowing the craniodural defect to heal spontaneously. Selected situations require immediate operative repair of the fistula. PMID:2258975

  14. Low pressure traumatic epidural hematoma in a child with a prior hemispherectomy: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Mesfin, Fassil B.; Riccio, Alexander R.; Kuo, Yu-Hung

    2015-01-01

    A 2½-year-old male child with a prior history of a left anatomic hemispherectomy to treat refractory epilepsy fell down two steps, striking his head on the ipsilateral side of the hemispherectomy. He presented with non-consolable crying and emesis. CT scan of the head demonstrated a left frontal epidural hematoma beneath the site of his prior craniectomy. The patient was initially treated by close observation. However, due to an increase in the hematoma from 29.5 to 49.3 ml over a 12-hour period along with the patient's lack of clinical improvement, surgical evacuation was performed. Intraoperatively, the source of the hemorrhage was found to be the skull fracture. Postoperatively, he returned to his neurologic baseline and was discharged home on postoperative day 3. PMID:25949043

  15. Supraspinatus Intramuscular Calcified Hematoma or Necrosis Associated with Tendon Tear

    PubMed Central

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Genevay, Muriel; Abrassart, Sophie; Schwitzguébel, Adrien Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Rotator cuff intramuscular calcification is a rare condition usually caused by heterotopic ossification and myositis ossificans. Case Presentation. We describe a patient with voluminous calcified mass entrapped in supraspinatus muscle associated with corresponding tendon tear. Histological examination corresponded to a calcified hematoma or necrosis. Patient was surgically managed with open excision of the calcified hematoma and rotator cuff arthroscopic repair. At 6 months, supraspinatus muscle was healed, and functional outcome was good. Discussion and Conclusion. We hypothesized that supraspinatus intramuscular calcified hematoma was responsible for mechanical stress on the tendon. This association has never been described. PMID:26380138

  16. Spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma in a patient treated with apixaban

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Halil; Inci, Sinan; Dogan, Pinar; Izgu, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Summary Apixaban, a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants, is a Factor Xa inhibitor that is prescribed for the treatment of non valvular atrial fibrillation. Rectus sheath hematoma is a rare but significant complication of oral anticoagulant treatment. The important causes of rectus sheath hematoma include treatment with anticoagulants, hematologic diseases, trauma, intense physical activity, coughing, sneezing and pregnancy. In this report, we describe case of a 71-year-old woman undergoing apixaban treatment for non valvular atrial fibrillation who presented with spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma. PMID:26989650

  17. Conservative Management of Left Atrial Intramural Hematoma after Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Oraii, Saeed; Roshanali, Farideh; Ghorbanisharif, Alireza; Mikaeili, Javad; Tahraei, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Left atrial intramural hematoma is a very rare complication of radiofrequency ablation procedures. A patient with tachyarrhythmia underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation. Echocardiography performed the following morning showed a large mass in the left atrium, suggestive of intramural hematoma formation. The patient was in a stable condition; therefore, it was decided that follow-up should be conservative and her anticoagulation therapy was continued. The size of the hematoma decreased significantly over the following 50 days. This case highlights a rare complication of a complex catheter ablation procedure in the left atrium that was managed via a noninvasive approach, with which all interventionists should be familiar. PMID:27482270

  18. Microsurgical excision of hematoma of the lumbar ligamentum flavum.

    PubMed

    Takeno, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Yayama, Takafumi; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2010-07-01

    Hematoma of the lumbar ligamentum flavum is a very rare cause of sciatica. A 72-year-old man presented with left-sided sciatica and paresthesia of the lateral aspect of his left foot. From CT and MRI findings, he was diagnosed as having a hematoma embedded in the ligamentum flavum, which compressed the dura mater at the L5/S1 disc level. After an adequate surgical field was obtained with a microscope and a Casper retractor, the hematoma of the ligamentum flavum could be excised via a unilateral approach and satisfactory decompression of the cauda equina and nerve roots were obtained. PMID:20537575

  19. First report of hepatic hematoma after presumed Bothrops envenomation.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Fernanda Cristina; Heerdt, Maike; Torrez, Pasesa Pascuala Quispe; França, Francisco Oscar de Siqueira; Molin, Graziela Zibetti Dal; Battisti, Rúbia; Zannin, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    In Latin America, Bothrops envenomation is responsible for the majority of accidents caused by venomous snakes. Patients usually present local edema, bleeding and coagulopathy. Visceral hemorrhage is extremely rare and considered a challenge for diagnosis and management. We report the first case of hepatic hematoma owing to the bothropic envenomation in a 66-year-old man who was bitten in the left leg. He presented local edema, coagulopathy, and acute kidney injury. Radiological findings suggested hepatic hematoma, with a volume of almost 3 liters. The hepatic hematoma was gradually absorbed without the need for surgical intervention with complete resolution in 8 months. PMID:26516980

  20. Spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma in a patient treated with apixaban.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Halil; Inci, Sinan; Dogan, Pinar; Izgu, Ibrahim

    2016-02-01

    Apixaban, a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants, is a Factor Xa inhibitor that is prescribed for the treatment of non valvular atrial fibrillation. Rectus sheath hematoma is a rare but significant complication of oral anticoagulant treatment. The important causes of rectus sheath hematoma include treatment with anticoagulants, hematologic diseases, trauma, intense physical activity, coughing, sneezing and pregnancy. In this report, we describe case of a 71-year-old woman undergoing apixaban treatment for non valvular atrial fibrillation who presented with spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma. PMID:26989650

  1. Spontaneous Rectus Sheath Hematoma in the Elderly: An Unusual Case and Update on Proper Management

    PubMed Central

    Galyfos, George; Karantzikos, Georgios; Palogos, Konstantinos; Sianou, Argiri; Filis, Konstantinos; Kavouras, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma (SRSH) is an uncommon medical emergency in the elderly. We present a case of SRSH with an atypical clinical presentation and discuss literature regarding diagnosis and proper management. A 75-year-old female patient was transferred to the emergency department due to acute dyspnoea and confusion. Her medical history revealed a viral infection of the upper respiratory tract, and no coughing or use of anticoagulants. The clinical examination showed tenderness of the left lower abdomen, although palpation was misleading due to patient's obesity. Laboratory investigations showed light anaemia. Ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed a large rectus sheath hematoma of the left abdominal wall. Despite further deterioration of the patient, conservative management including bed rest, fluid replacement, blood products transfusion, and proper analgesia was successful. No surgical intervention was needed. Prompt diagnosis and management of SRSH plays significant role in the prognosis, especially in elder patients. Independently of size and severity, conservative management remains the first therapeutic choice. Only by failure of supportive management, progressive and large hematoma or uncontrollable hemodynamic patients, interventional management including surgery or less invasive newer techniques is indicated. PMID:24839570

  2. Warfarin-associated fetal intracranial subdural hematoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Kana; Aoki, Shigeru; Kurasawa, Kentaro; Okuda, Mika; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We present a case in which to of fetal subdural hematoma developing despite that the maternal the prothrombin time by international normalized ratio (PT/INR) during pregnancy was within the normal range. PMID:25356261

  3. Hand-held instrument should relieve hematoma pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raggio, L. J.; Robertson, T. L.

    1967-01-01

    Portable instrument relieves hematomas beneath fingernails and toenails without surgery. This device simplifies the operative procedure with an instant variable heating tip, adjustable depth settings and interchangeable tip sizes for cauterizing small areas and relieving pressurized clots.

  4. Threatened miscarriage and intrauterine hematomas. Sonographic and biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Stabile, I; Campbell, S; Grudzinskas, J G

    1989-06-01

    In a prospective study of 406 women with threatened miscarriage (TMC), 22 (5.4%) had an intrauterine hematoma (less than 16 mL) noted ultrasonically, decreasing in size as the patients experienced repeated episodes of bleeding. Twenty (91%) of the hematomas visualized were subchorionic and two (9%) were retroplacental. None of these women subsequently miscarried. Human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), Schwangerschafts protein 1 (SP1), and pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) levels measured in these patients were not significantly different in women with or without hematomas. We conclude that the presence of small intrauterine hematomas in women with TMC does not increase the risk of miscarriage. PMID:2472492

  5. Animal Stroke Model: Ischemia-Reperfusion and Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ren, Changhong; Sy, Christopher; Gao, Jinhuan; Ding, Yuchuan; Ji, Xunming

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a major health issue worldwide-one with serious financial and public health implications. As a result, ongoing clinical research on novel and improved stroke therapies is not only pertinent but also paramount. Due to the complexity of a stroke-like event and its many sequelae, devising usable methods and experimental models are necessary to study and better understand the pathophysiological processes that ensue. As it stands, animal models that simulate stroke-like events have proven to be the most logical and effective options in regards to experimental studies. A number of animal stroke models exist and have been demonstrated in previous studies on ischemic as well as hemorrhagic stroke. Considering the efficiency and reproducibility of animal models, here, we introduce an ischemic stroke model induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and an intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke model induced by collagenase injection. The models outlined here have been proven to demonstrate the clinical relevance desired for use in continued research on stroke pathophysiology and the study of future therapeutic options. PMID:27604729

  6. Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage Image Analysis Methods: A Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Noel; Valdés, Jose; Guevara, Miguel; Silva, Augusto

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH) account for 10-30% of all strokes and are a result of acute bleeding into the brain due to ruptures of small penetrating arteries. Despite major advancements in the management of ischemic strokes and other causes of hemorrhagic strokes, such as ruptured aneurysm, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), or cavernous angioma, during the past several decades, limited progress has been made in the treatment of ICH, and the prognosis for patients who suffer them remains poor. The societal impact of these hemorrhagic strokes is magnified by the fact that affected patients typically are a decade younger than those afflicted with ischemic strokes. The ICH continues to kill or disable most of their victims. Some studies show that those who suffer ICH have a 30-day mortality rate of 35-44% and a 6-month mortality rate approaching 50%. Approximately 700,000 new strokes occur in the United States annually and approximately 15% are hem-orrhagic strokes related to ICH. The poor outcome associated with ICH is related to the extent of brain damage. ICH produces direct destruction and compression of surrounding brain tissue. Direct compression causes poor perfusion and venous drainage to surrounding penumbra at risk, resulting in ischemia to the tissues that most need perfusion [16].

  7. Intracerebral haemorrhage in Down syndrome: protected or predisposed?

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Lewis; Fisher, Elizabeth; Hardy, John; Nizetic, Dean; Groet, Jurgen; Pulford, Laura; Strydom, André

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), which arises from trisomy of chromosome 21, is associated with deposition of large amounts of amyloid within the central nervous system. Amyloid accumulates in two compartments: as plaques within the brain parenchyma and in vessel walls of the cerebral microvasculature. The parenchymal plaque amyloid is thought to result in an early onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia, a phenomenon so common amongst people with DS that it could be considered a defining feature of the condition. The amyloid precursor protein ( APP) gene lies on chromosome 21 and its presence in three copies in DS is thought to largely drive the early onset AD. In contrast, intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH), the main clinical consequence of vascular amyloidosis, is a more poorly defined feature of DS. We review recent epidemiological data on stroke (including haemorrhagic stroke) in order to make comparisons with a rare form of familial AD due to duplication (i.e. having three copies) of the APP region on chromosome 21, here called ‘dup-APP’, which is associated with more frequent and severe ICH. We conclude that although people with DS are at increased risk of ICH, this is less common than in dup-APP, suggesting the presence of mechanisms that act protectively. We review these mechanisms and consider comparative research into DS and dup-APP that may yield further pathophysiological insight. PMID:27239286

  8. [Cervicodorsal subdural hematoma caused by coumarinic rodenticide poisoning].

    PubMed

    Nighoghossian, N; Ruel, J H; Ffrench, P; Froment, J C; Trouillas, P

    1990-01-01

    A 59-year old man developed subacute tetraparesis following severe sudden neck pain. MRI showed a subdural cervical hematoma. Prothrombin complex activity was low. An unusual coagulopathy after rodenticides exposure was found. Diphenacoum, an effective antagonist of vitamin K1, was present in the patients plasma. Specific medical management led to a complete recovery. Follow-up MRI seventy days later confirmed the complete disappearance of the hematoma. PMID:2330467

  9. Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Presenting with Intractable Headache after Cervical Epidural Steroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungsoo; Park, Ki-Su

    2015-08-01

    Postdural punctural headache (PDPH) following spinal anesthesia is due to intracranial hypotension caused by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, and it is occasionally accompanied by an intracranial hematoma. To the best of our knowledge, an intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) presenting with an intractable headache after a cervical epidural steroid injection (ESI) has not been reported. A 39-year-old woman without any history of trauma underwent a cervical ESI for a herniated nucleus pulposus at the C5-6 level. One month later, she presented with a severe headache that was not relieved by analgesic medication, which changed in character from being positional to non-positional during the preceding month. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a CSDH along the left convexity. Emergency burr-hole drainage was performed and the headache abated. This report indicates that an intracranial CSDH should be considered a possible complication after ESI. In addition, the event of an intractable and changing PDPH after ESI suggests further evaluation for diagnosis of an intracranial hematoma. PMID:26361532

  10. Non-traumatic spontaneous acute epidural hematoma in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Serarslan, Yurdal; Aras, Mustafa; Altaş, Murat; Kaya, Hasan; Urfalı, Boran

    2014-01-01

    A 19-year-old female with sickle cell anemia (SCD) was referred to our hospital after two days of hospitalization at another hospital for a headache crisis. This headache crisis was due to a raised intracranial pressure; these symptoms were noted and included in her comprehensive list of symptoms. There was an acute drop in the hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. The cranial CT scan demonstrated a left fronto-parietal acute epidural hematoma (AEH) and a calvarial bone expansion, which was suggestive of medullary hematopoiesis. The patient underwent emergent craniotomy and evacuation of the hematoma. There were no abnormal findings intra-operatively apart from the AEH, except skull thickening and active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries. Repeated CT scan showed a complete evacuation of the hematoma. The possible underlying pathophysiological mechanisms were discussed. In addition to the factors mentioned in the relevant literature, any active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries on the separated surface of the dura from the skull could have contributed to the expanding of the AEH in our patient. Neurosurgeons and other health care providers should be aware of spontaneous AEH in patients with SCD. PMID:24447643

  11. Spontaneous thoracic epidural hematoma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Babayev, Rasim; Ekşi, Murat Şakir

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma is a rare neurosurgical emergency in respect of motor and sensory loss. Identifiable reasons for spontaneous hemorrhage are vascular malformations and hemophilias. We presented a case of spontaneous epidural hematoma in an 18-year-old female patient who had motor and sensory deficits that had been present for 1 day. On MRI, there was spinal epidural hematoma posterior to the T2-T3 spinal cord. The hematoma was evacuated with T2 hemilaminectomy and T3 laminectomy. Patient recovered immediately after the surgery. Literature review depicted 112 pediatric cases (including the presented one) of spinal epidural hematoma. The female/male ratio is 1.1:2. Average age at presentation is 7.09 years. Clinical presentations include loss of strength, sensory disturbance, bowel and bladder disturbances, neck pain, back pain, leg pain, abdominal pain, meningismus, respiratory difficulty, irritability, gait instability, and torticollis. Most common spinal level was cervicothoracic spine. Time interval from symptom onset to clinical diagnosis varied from immediate to 18 months. Spinal epidural hematoma happened spontaneously in 71.8 % of the cases, and hemophilia was the leading disorder (58 %) in the cases with a definable disorder. Partial or complete recovery is possible after surgical interventions and factor supplementations. PMID:26033378

  12. Primary Enlarged Craniotomy in Organized Chronic Subdural Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    CALLOVINI, Giorgio Maria; BOLOGNINI, Andrea; CALLOVINI, Gemma; GAMMONE, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of craniotomy and membranectomy as initial treatment of organized chronic subdural hematoma (OCSH). We retrospectively reviewed a series of 34 consecutive patients suffering from OCSH, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or contrast computer tomography (CCT) in order to establish the degree of organization and determine the intrahematomal architecture. The indication to perform a primary enlarged craniotomy as initial treatment for non-liquefied chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) with multilayer loculations was based on the hematoma MRI appearance—mostly hyperintense in both T1- and T2-weighted images with a hypointense web- or net-like structure within the hematoma cavity. The reason why some hematomas evolve towards a complex and organized architecture remains unclear; the most common aspect to come to light was the “long standing” of the CSDHs which, in our series, had an average interval of 10 weeks between head injury and initial scan. Recurrence was found to have occurred in 2 patients (6% of cases) in the form of acute subdural hematoma. One patient died as the result of an intraventricular and subarachnoid haemorrhage, while 2 patients (6%) suffered an haemorrhagic stroke ipsilateral to the OCSH. Eighty-nine percent of cases had a good recovery, while 11% remained unchanged or worsened. In select cases, based on the MRI appearance, primary enlarged craniotomy seems to be the treatment of choice for achieving a complete recovery and a reduced recurrence rate in OCSH. PMID:24305027

  13. Delayed Onset of Subdural Hematoma following Epidural Catheter Breakage

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Gotoh, Momokazu; Nishiwaki, Kimitoshi; Nagao, Yoshimasa; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objectives To describe a case of delayed-onset spinal hematoma following the breakage of a spinal epidural catheter. Methods The authors describe the clinical case review. Results A 64-year-old woman had undergone epidural anesthesia 18 years before she was referred to our hospital because of lower-back pain and lower neurologic deficit with leg pain. The clinical examination showed the presence of a fragment of an epidural catheter in the thoracolumbar canal, as assessed by computed tomography, and a spinal hematoma that compressed the spinal cord at the same spinal level, as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Surgical removal of the epidural catheter and decompression surgery were performed. The patient exhibited substantial clinical improvement 1 month after surgery; she achieved a steady gait without the need for a cane and had no leg pain. Conclusion This is the first report of delayed onset of spinal hematoma following the breakage of an epidural catheter. Generally, when the breakage of an epidural catheter occurs without symptoms, follow-up alone is recommended. However, because spinal hematoma might exhibit a late onset, the possibility of this complication should be considered when deciding whether to remove the catheter fragment. We believe that in our patient, there could be a relationship between the catheter fragment and subdural hematoma, and catheter breakage could have been a risk factor for the spinal hematoma. PMID:26835209

  14. Blood Pressure Management in Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Yousef; Qureshi, Adnan

    2016-06-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with devastating outcomes. Admission to the intensive care unit has been the only proven course to improve outcomes. All other treatment modalities have failed so far. The majority of patients presenting with ICH have an elevated blood pressure (BP). Initial data on the safety and efficacy of BP treatment in acute ICH have been conflicting. This has led to large prospective and randomized clinical trials to assess the safety and efficacy of early BP lowering in acute ICH. These trials showed safety and a tendency toward improved functional outcomes. In fact, the results of three subsequent meta-analyses also showed safety and possible efficacy of early lowering of BP in ICH. Based on the results of the published clinical trials and meta-analyses, the American Heart Association and the European Stroke Association concluded that early intensive treatment of BP in acute ICH is safe and might improve functional outcome. The authors advocate that-pending additional data from ongoing trials-health care professionals should maintain the SBp < 140 mm Hg in patients presenting with acute ICH. PMID:27214702

  15. Surgery for Patients With Spontaneous Deep Supratentorial Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Retrospective Case-Control Study Using Propensity Score Matching.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Li, Hao; Zhao, He-Xiang; Guo, Rui; Lin, Sen; Dong, Wei; Ma, Lu; Fang, Yuan; Tian, Meng; Liu, Ming; You, Chao

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) is one of the most dangerous cerebrovascular diseases, especially when in deep brain. The treatment of spontaneous deep supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage is still controversial. We conducted a retrospective case-control study using propensity score matching to compare the efficacy of surgery and conservative treatment for patients with deep surpatentorial hemorrhage. We observed the outcomes of consecutive patients with spontaneous deep supratentorial hemorrhage retrospectively from December 2008 to July 2013. Clinical outcomes of surgery and conservative treatments were compared in patients with deep sICH using propensity score matching method. The primary outcome was neurological function status at 6 months post ictus. The second outcomes included mortality at 30 days and 6 months, and the incidence of complications. Subgroup analyses of 6-month outcome were conducted. Sixty-three (22.66%) of the 278 patients who received surgery had a favorable neurological function status at 6 months, whereas in the conservative group, 66 of 278 (23.74%) had the same result (P = 0.763). The 30-day mortality in the surgical group was 19.06%, whereas 30.58% in the conservative group (P = 0.002). There was significant difference in the mortality at 6 months after ictus as well (23.38% vs 36.33%, P = 0.001). The subgroup analyses showed significantly better outcomes for the surgical group when hematoma was >40 mL (13.33% vs 0%, P = 0.005) or complicated with intraventricular hemorrhage (16.67% vs 7.27%, P = 0.034). For complications, the risk of pulmonary infection, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, urinary infection, pulmonary embolus, and need for tracheostomy/long term ventilation in the surgical group was higher than the conservative group (31.29% vs 15.47%, P < 0.001; 6.83% vs 3.96%, P = 0.133; 2.88% vs 1.80%, P = 0.400; 1.80% vs 1.08%, P = 0.476; 32.73% vs 23.38%, P = 0.014). Surgery could

  16. Mouse Models of Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Ventricle, Cortex, and Hippocampus by Injections of Autologous Blood or Collagenase

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Gao, Yufeng; Chang, Che-Feng; Wan, Jie-ru; Zhu, Shan-shan; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating condition. Existing preclinical ICH models focus largely on striatum but neglect other brain areas such as ventricle, cortex, and hippocampus. Clinically, however, hemorrhagic strokes do occur in these other brain regions. In this study, we established mouse hemorrhagic models that utilize stereotactic injections of autologous whole blood or collagenase to produce ventricular, cortical, and hippocampal injury. We validated and characterized these models by histology, immunohistochemistry, and neurobehavioral tests. In the intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) model, C57BL/6 mice that received unilateral ventricular injections of whole blood demonstrated bilateral ventricular hematomas, ventricular enlargement, and brain edema in the ipsilateral cortex and basal ganglia at 72 h. Unilateral injections of collagenase (150 U/ml) caused reproducible hematomas and brain edema in the frontal cortex in the cortical ICH (c-ICH) model and in the hippocampus in the hippocampal ICH (h-ICH) model. Immunostaining revealed cellular inflammation and neuronal death in the periventricular regions in the IVH brain and in the perihematomal regions in the c-ICH and h-ICH brains. Locomotor abnormalities measured with a 24-point scoring system were present in all three models, especially on days 1, 3, and 7 post-ICH. Locomotor deficits measured by the wire-hanging test were present in models of IVH and c-ICH, but not h-ICH. Interestingly, mice in the c-ICH model demonstrated emotional abnormality, as measured by the tail suspension test and forced swim test, whereas h-ICH mice exhibited memory abnormality, as measured by the novel object recognition test. All three ICH models generated reproducible brain damage, brain edema, inflammation, and consistent locomotor deficits. Additionally, the c-ICH model produced emotional deficits and the h-ICH model produced cognitive deficits. These three models closely mimic human ICH and should be useful for

  17. Emerging Concepts in Intramural Hematoma Imaging.

    PubMed

    Gutschow, Susan E; Walker, Christopher M; Martínez-Jiménez, Santiago; Rosado-de-Christenson, Melissa L; Stowell, Justin; Kunin, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    Intramural hematoma (IMH) is included in the spectrum of acute aortic syndrome and appears as an area of hyperattenuating crescentic thickening in the aortic wall that is best seen at nonenhanced computed tomography. IMH is historically believed to originate from ruptured vasa vasorum in the aortic media without an intimal tear, but there are reports of small intimomedial tears identified prospectively at imaging or found at surgery in some cases of IMH. These reports have blurred the distinction between aortic dissection and IMH and raise questions about what truly distinguishes the entities that compose acute aortic syndrome. The pathophysiology of these subgroups and the controversies surrounding their differentiation are discussed. The natural history of IMH is highly variable; it may resolve or progress to aneurysm, dissection, or rupture. The authors review various imaging prognostic factors that should be reported by the radiologist, including Stanford classification, maximum aortic diameter, maximum IMH thickness, focal contrast enhancement (including ulcerlike projection and intramural blood pool), and pleural or pericardial effusion. Medical (nonsurgical) versus surgical treatment strategies depend primarily on the Stanford classification, although more recent studies of Asian cohorts report success of initial medical treatment in patients with Stanford type A IMH, with timed (delayed) surgery for patients who develop complications. Understanding the imaging appearance and prognostic factors of IMH helps the radiologist and surgeon identify patients at greatest risk for complications to ensure appropriate treatment and improve patient outcomes. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27163587

  18. Spontaneous bacterial seeding of a biceps hematoma.

    PubMed

    Frye, Benjamin; Prud'homme, Joseph; Daney, Blake

    2010-11-01

    A 19-year-old male construction worker presented with an injury to his left upper arm after lifting a heavy pipe. He reported an acute onset of sharp pain followed by swelling, warmth, and weakness with elbow flexion. The diagnosis of a distal biceps tendon rupture was made and elective repair was scheduled. Seventy-two hours later, the patient presented with a spontaneous draining wound on his anterior distal humerus. The wound was draining thick purulent material. The patient underwent surgery for irrigation and debridement of his abscess. Nearly 500 cc of hematoma and purulent fluid were evacuated. A large tear of both the biceps and brachialis muscle bellies were found. Cultures were obtained that revealed the infecting organism to be Streptococcus intermedius. Human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis-C virus testing were negative, and no history, signs, or symptoms of any cause of underlying immunodeficiency were detected. No signs or history of drug use were present. He was discharged home on culture-specific oral antibiotics. At 4-month postoperative follow-up, the patient reported no pain or limitations. He has returned to full duty at his job. Elbow range of motion was measured from 7° to 150° of flexion. Strength of elbow flexion and extension was symmetric to the uninjured side. Pronation and supination of the forearm was symmetric on both sides. He has been released from scheduled follow-up and will be seen again on an as-needed basis. PMID:21053873

  19. Surgical Treatment of a Life-Threatening Large Retropharyngeal Hematoma after Minor Trauma : Two Case Reports and a Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hoon; Jeong, Eui-Kyun; Kang, Dong-Ho; Jeon, Sang Ryong

    2015-09-01

    Only a few cases of anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL) injury related with retropharyngeal hematoma without fracture have previously been reported. The treatment of choice for retropharyngeal hematoma is generally considered to be conservative care, but we believe that early surgery of this pathology would be better in certain situations. Here, we describe two cases with life-threatening large retropharyngeal hematomas related with ALL injuries and operated on at an early stage. Two previously healthy patients visited the emergency room with neck pain and dyspnea after falling. Serious neck swelling was observed and lateral neck X-ray showed severe widening of the prevertebral space. Due to dyspnea progression, emergency endotracheal intubation was performed. Although there was no primary cause of the retropharyngeal hematoma on preoperative examination, ALL tearing was intraoperatively confirmed during early surgery. The in-hospital evolutions of the patients were favorable after surgery. We should bear in mind the possibility of ALL injury and perform early surgery where possible given the earlier convalescence and good prognosis. PMID:26539280

  20. Delayed Onset Intracranial Subdural Hematoma Following Spinal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Işik, Semra; Yilmaz, Baran; Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Özcan-Ekşi, Emel Ece; Akakin, Akin; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Konya, Deniz

    2016-06-01

    In this case-based review, the authors analyzed relevant literature with an illustrative patient of theirs about subdural hematoma secondary to dural tear at spinal surgery. Intracranial hypotension is a condition of decreased cerebrospinal fluid volume and pressure. Even though intracranial hypotension is temporary and can be managed conservatively, it may progress and result in subdural fluid collections, hematoma formations, "brain sagging or slumping" states, syringohydromyelia, encephalopathy, coma, and even death. The authors present an 81-year-old man admitted with subdural hematoma 50 days following previous spinal surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis. In his previous spinal surgery he had had dural tear, which had been closed primarily. To the literature, only 21 patients have been reported to develop subdural hematoma following spinal surgery. In patients with subdural hematoma following spinal surgery, the female:male ratio was 3:4 and the median age was 55 years. Surgical diagnoses for previous spinal surgeries were intervertebral disc herniation (5), spinal canal stenosis and spondylolisthesis (6), failed back syndrome (2), tethered cord syndrome and myelodysplastic spine (2), spinal cord tumor, spinal epidural hematoma, vertebral dislocation, vertebral fracture, vertebral tumor, and inflammatory spine. Patients presented with signs and symptoms of subdural hematoma within 6 hours to 50 days following the spinal surgery. Source of cerebrospinal fluid leak was most commonly from lumbar region (13 patients, 62%). Ten of 21 (48%) patients were treated conservatively. Late-onset neurological findings should not prevent the evaluation of cranial vault with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Spinal dural tear should be more aggressively treated instead of suture alone approach, when recognized in older patients during the spinal surgery. PMID:27192649

  1. Efficacy and safety of intravenous nimodipine administration for treatment of hypertension in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuqian; Fang, Wei; Tao, Lei; Li, Min; Yang, Yanlong; Gao, Yafei; Ge, Shunnan; Gao, Li; Zhang, Bin; Li, Zhihong; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Boliang; Li, Lihong

    2015-01-01

    Background Nicardipine (NC) is the most commonly used antihypertensive drug in neurological patients with hypertension. Although nimodipine (NM) is widely used to treat cerebral vasospasm in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, trials exploring its antihypertensive effect after intravenous administration in subjects with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) are scarce. Methods A retrospective study was carried out to compare the safety and efficacy of NC and NM administered intravenously in patients with ICH. Therapeutic responses were assessed by achievement of goal blood pressure (BP); use of additional medications for BP control; proportion of time spent within goal; variability in BP; time to goal BP; number of dose adjustments; variability in ICH volume, Glasgow Coma Scale score, and intracranial pressure; and drug-related complications. Results A total of 87 patients were eligible for analysis (n=46 [NC]; n=41 [NM]), and baseline characteristics between groups were similar. Both agents were effective in achieving goal BP during infusion, with 93.5% and 87.8% patients in the NC and NM groups achieving goal, respectively. Fewer additional medications were needed to control BP in the NC group. BP variability was similar and no differences were observed in the mean time to goal BP and mean numbers of dose adjustments between both groups. Interestingly, intracranial pressure declined (P=0.048) during NC administration but increased (P=0.066) after NM treatment. Finally, the incidences of hematoma expansion, neurological deterioration, and adverse drug events were similar in both groups. Conclusion NM is effective and safe for BP control in patients with ICH. PMID:26056454

  2. The MTHFR C677T Polymorphism and Risk of Intracerebral Hemorrhage in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin; Tao, Chuanyuan; Xie, Zhiyi; Li, Yunke; Zheng, Jun; Fang, Yuan; Lin, Sen; Li, Hao; You, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism has been speculated to be and extensively investigated as a risk factor for various vascular diseases, including intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, results from published studies regarding the role of C677T polymorphism in ICH risk in Chinese populations were contradictory rather than conclusive. Material/Methods In this study, a total of 180 ICH patients and 180 matched controls of Chinese Han ethnicity were enrolled. The MTHFR C677T polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-ligation detection reaction (PCR-LDR). A meta-analysis was conducted by combining our data with previous relevant studies in Chinese populations. Results In our case-control study, similar allele frequency (p=0.492) and genotype distribution (p=0.748) of MTHFR C677T polymorphism were detected between ICH patients and controls. Further analysis based on hematoma location did not show a significant association. When combined with previous studies, however, C677T polymorphism was found to be significantly associated with an increased risk for ICH in Chinese populations (recessive model: OR=1.57, 95%CI=1.29–1.91). When focusing on the Han ethnicity, carriers of the TT genotype had an increased risk of ICH (recessive model: OR=1.36, 95%CI=1.05–1.75). Conclusions In this case-control study we did not observe that the MTHFR C677T polymorphism was associated with ICH risk in people of Chinese Han ethnicity. However, when combined with previous published studies, a significant association of C677T polymorphism with an increased risk of ICH was detected in Chinese populations, and also in the subgroup analysis focusing on Han ethnicity. PMID:26757363

  3. Fucoidan from Fucus vesiculosus Fails to Improve Outcomes Following Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Mice.

    PubMed

    Burchell, Sherrefa R; Iniaghe, Loretta O; Zhang, John H; Tang, Jiping

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the most fatal stroke subtype, with no effective therapies. Hematoma expansion and inflammation play major roles in the pathophysiology of ICH, contributing to primary and secondary brain injury, respectively. Fucoidan, a polysaccharide from the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus, has been reported to activate a platelet receptor that may function in limiting bleeding, and to exhibit anti-inflammatory effects. As such, the aim of the present study was to examine the effects of fucoidan on hemorrhaging and neurological outcomes after ICH. Male CD-1 mice were subjected to experimental ICH by infusion of bacterial collagenase. Animals were randomly divided into the following groups: sham, ICH + vehicle, ICH + 25 mg/kg fucoidan, ICH + 75 mg/kg fucoidan, and ICH + 100 mg/kg fucoidan. Brain water content, neurobehavioral outcomes, and hemoglobin content were evaluated at 24 h post ICH. Our findings show that fucoidan failed to attenuate the ICH-induced increase in BWC. The neurological deficits that result from ICH also did not differ in the treatment groups at all three doses. Finally, we found that fucoidan had no effect on the hemoglobin content after ICH. We postulate that fucoidan treatment did not improve the measured outcomes after ICH because we used crude fucoidan, which has a high molecular weight, in our study. High-molecular-weight fucoidans are reported to have less therapeutic potential than low molecular weight fucoidans. They have been shown to exhibit anti-coagulant and pro-apoptotic properties, which seem to outweigh their anti-inflammatory and potential procoagulant abilities. We propose that using a low-molecular-weight fucoidan, or fractionating the crude polysaccharide, may be effective in treating ICH. Future studies are needed to confirm this. PMID:26463947

  4. Contrecoup Traumatic Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Geometric Study of the Impact Site and Association with Hemorrhagic Progression.

    PubMed

    Cepeda, Santiago; Gómez, Pedro A; Castaño-Leon, Ana María; Munarriz, Pablo M; Paredes, Igor; Lagares, Alfonso

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (TICH) represents 13-48% of the lesions after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). The frequency of TICH-hemorrhagic progression (TICH-HP) is estimated to be approximately 38-63%. The relationship between the impact site and TICH location has been described in many autopsy-based series. This association, however, has not been consistently demonstrated since the introduction of computed tomography (CT) for studying TBI. This study aimed to determine the association between the impact site and TICH location in patients with moderate and severe TBI. We also analyzed the associations between the TICH location, the impact site, the production mechanism (coup or contrecoup), and hemorrhagic progression. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 408 patients after a moderate or severe TBI between January 2010 and November 2014. We identified 177 patients with a total of 369 TICHs. We found a statistically significant association between frontal TICHs and impact sites located on the anterior area of the head (OR 5.8, p < 0.001). The temporal TICH location was significantly associated with impact sites located on the posterior head area (OR 4.9, p < 0.001). Anterior and lateral TICHs were associated with impact sites located at less than 90 degrees (coup) (OR 1.64, p = 0.03) and more than 90 degrees (contrecoup), respectively. Factors independently associated with TICH-HP obtained through logistic regression included an initial volume of <1 cc, cisternal compression, falls, acute subdural hematoma, multiple TICHs, and contrecoup TICHs. We demonstrated a significant association between the TICH location and impact site. The contrecoup represents a risk factor independently associated with hemorrhagic progression. PMID:26391755

  5. Natural History and Prognostic Value of Corticospinal Tract Wallerian Degeneration in Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Venkatasubramanian, Chitra; Kleinman, Jonathan T.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Olivot, Jean‐Marc; Gean, Alisa D.; Eyngorn, Irina; Snider, Ryan W.; Mlynash, Michael; Wijman, Christine A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to define the incidence, imaging characteristics, natural history, and prognostic implication of corticospinal tract Wallerian degeneration (CST‐WD) in spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) using serial MR imaging. Methods and Results Consecutive ICH patients with supratentorial ICH prospectively underwent serial MRIs at 2, 7, 14, and 21 days. MRIs were analyzed by independent raters for the presence and topographical distribution of CST‐WD on diffusion‐weighted imaging (DWI). Baseline demographics, hematoma characteristics, ICH score, and admission National Institute of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) were systematically recorded. Functional outcome at 3 months was assessed by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and the motor‐NIHSS. Twenty‐seven patients underwent 93 MRIs; 88 of these were serially obtained in the first month. In 13 patients (48%), all with deep ICH, CST‐WD changes were observed after a median of 7 days (interquartile range, 7 to 8) as reduced diffusion on DWI and progressed rostrocaudally along the CST. CST‐WD changes evolved into T2‐hyperintense areas after a median of 11 days (interquartile range, 6 to 14) and became atrophic on MRIs obtained after 3 months. In univariate analyses, the presence of CST‐WD was associated with poor functional outcome (ie, mRS 4 to 6; P=0.046) and worse motor‐NIHSS (5 versus 1, P=0.001) at 3 months. Conclusions Wallerian degeneration along the CST is common in spontaneous supratentorial ICH, particularly in deep ICH. It can be detected 1 week after ICH on DWI and progresses rostrocaudally along the CST over time. The presence of CST‐WD is associated with poor motor and functional recovery after ICH. PMID:23913508

  6. Association of Altered Serum MicroRNAs with Perihematomal Edema after Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ying; Wang, Jia-Lu; He, Zhi-Yi; Jin, Feng; Tang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Perihematomal edema (PHE) contributes to secondary brain damage and aggravates patient outcomes after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are stable in circulation, and their unique expression profiles have fundamental roles in modulating vascular disease. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that altered miRNA levels are associated with PHE in ICH patients. Methods Hematoma and PHE volumes of ICH patients were measured on admission and in follow-up computed tomography scans. Whole-genome miRNA profiles of ICH patients and healthy controls were determined using the Exiqon miRCURY LNA Array, and validated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Bioinformatics analysis investigated dysregulated miRNA target genes and the signaling pathways involved. Results We identified 55 miRNAs that were differentially expressed in ICH patients compared with normal controls, of which 54 were down-regulated and one was up-regulated. qRT-PCR confirmation showed decreases in miR-126 (0.63-fold), miR-146a (0.64-fold), miR-let-7a (0.50-fold), and miR-26a (0.54-fold) in ICH patients relative to controls. Serum miR-126, but not miR-146a, miR-let-7a or miR-26a, levels were significantly correlated with relative PHE volume on days 3–4 (r = −0.714; P<0.001) in patients with ICH. Conclusions ICH patients appear to have a specific miRNA expression profile. Low expression of miR-126 was positively correlated with the extent of PHE, suggesting it may have a pathogenic role in the development of PHE after ICH. PMID:26207814

  7. Encapsulated Unresolved Subdural Hematoma Mimicking Acute Epidural Hematoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Soo; Kim, Hyo-Joon; Kwon, Chang-Young

    2014-01-01

    Encapsulated acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) has been uncommonly reported. To our knowledge, a few cases of lentiform ASDH have been reported. The mechanism of encapsulated ASDH has been studied but not completely clarified. Encapsulated lentiform ASDH on a computed tomography (CT) scan mimics acute epidural hematoma (AEDH). Misinterpretation of biconvex-shaped ASDH on CT scan as AEDH often occurs and is usually identified by neurosurgical intervention. We report a case of an 85-year-old man presenting with a 2-day history of mental deterioration and right-sided weakness. CT scan revealed a biconvex-shaped hyperdense mass mixed with various densities of blood along the left temporoparietal cerebral convexity, which was misinterpreted as AEDH preoperatively. Emergency craniectomy was performed, but no AEDH was found beneath the skull. In the subdural space, encapsulated ASDH was located. En block resection of encapsulated ASDH was done. Emergency craniectomy confirmed that the preoperatively diagnosed AEDH was an encapsulated ASDH postoperatively. Radiologic studies of AEDH-like SDH allow us to establish an easy differential diagnosis between AEDH and ASDH by distinct features. More histological studies will provide us information on the mechanism underlying encapsulated ASDH. PMID:27169052

  8. A new NOTCH3 mutation presenting as primary intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pradotto, Luca; Orsi, Laura; Daniele, Dino; Caroppo, Paola; Lauro, Danilo; Milesi, Alessandra; Sellitti, Luigi; Mauro, Alessandro

    2012-04-15

    Primary intracerebral haemorrhages (PICH) are defined as haemorrhages within the brain parenchyma in the absence of readily identifiable causes. CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy) is a hereditary vascular disease and its mainly clinical manifestations are early-onset infarcts. Spontaneous lobar haematomas are a rare occurrence. We report a very unusual presentation of CADASIL in a 65 year-old man carrying a new NOTCH3 mutation. The clinical onset of the disease was related to an intracerebral haematoma following colon surgery and causing a delirium. In brief, our report suggests that CADASIL must be considered in patient with PICH. PMID:22206696

  9. Parkinsonism and dementia are negative prognostic factors for the outcome of subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Arca, Roberta; Ricchi, Valeria; Murgia, Daniela; Melis, Marta; Floris, Francesco; Mereu, Alessandra; Contu, Paolo; Marrosu, Francesco; Melis, Maurizio; Cossu, Giovanni

    2016-08-01

    To determine, among a population with subdural hematoma (SH), whether patients affected by neurodegenerative disorders (parkinsonism and dementia) have a worse clinical outcome. We reviewed the data of patients diagnosed with fall-related SH discharged from the Departments of Neurology/Stroke unit, Neurosurgery, Intensive Care Unit at Brotzu General Hospital (Cagliari, Italy) between January 2010 and December 2013. Patients with severe traumatisms, evidence of spontaneous intracerebral bleeding or aged less than 50 were excluded. 332 patients were selected: 69 with a neurodegenerative parkinsonism or dementia (N-group), 217 with history of chronic non-neurological medical conditions with significant disability, previous falls and/or balance problems (NND-group) and 46 with a history of "minor" chronic non-neurological disorder. (NN-group). The clinical status at admission and discharge was assessed by modified Rankin Scale (mRS). The time-span between trauma and hospital admission was also calculated. At hospital admission we found a significantly longer delay in SH's diagnosis (χ (2) test p < 0.001) and a worse mRS score (Kruskal Wallis p < 0.001) in the N-group compared to both NN and NND-groups. During hospital stay we observed the lack of significant variation in mRS score in N-group (Wilcoxon test p = 0.86), in contrast with NN and NND-groups who significantly improved (Wilcoxon test p < 0.001). Our results demonstrate that the consequences of SH are more severe in the N-group compared to NN and NND-groups. The longer interval between trauma and hospital admittance plays a critical role in worsening the outcome of patients with parkinsonism and dementia compared to subjects without neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27120071

  10. Evaluation of the hematoma consequences, neurobehavioral profiles, and histopathology in a rat model of pontine hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lekic, Tim; Rolland, William; Manaenko, Anatol; Krafft, Paul R.; Kamper, Joel E.; Suzuki, Hidenori; Hartman, Richard E.; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Object Primary pontine hemorrhage (PPH) represents approximately 7% of all intracerebral hemorrhages (ICHs) and is a clinical condition of which little is known. The aim of this study was to characterize the early brain injury, neurobehavioral outcome, and long-term histopathology in a novel preclinical rat model of PPH. Methods The authors stereotactically infused collagenase (Type VII) into the ventral pontine tegmentum of the rats, in accordance with the most commonly affected clinical region. Measures of cerebrovascular permeability (brain water content, hemoglobin assay, Evans blue, collagen Type IV, ZO-1, and MMP-2 and MMP-9) and neurological deficit were quantified at 24 hours postinfusion (Experiment 1). Functional outcome was measured over a 30-day period using a vertebrobasilar scale (the modified Voetsch score), open field, wire suspension, beam balance, and inclined-plane tests (Experiment 2). Neurocognitive ability was determined at Week 3 using the rotarod (motor learning), T-maze (working memory), and water maze (spatial learning and memory) (Experiment 3), followed by histopathological analysis 1 week later (Experiment 4). Results Stereotactic collagenase infusion caused dose-dependent elevations in hematoma volume, brain edema, neurological deficit, and blood-brain barrier rupture, while physiological variables remained stable. Functional outcomes mostly normalized by Week 3, whereas neurocognitive deficits paralleled the cystic cavitary lesion at 30 days. Obstructive hydrocephalus did not develop despite a clinically relevant 30-day mortality rate (approximately 54%). Conclusions These results suggest that the model can mimic several translational aspects of pontine hemorrhage in humans and can be used in the evaluation of potential preclinical therapeutic interventions. PMID:23198805

  11. [Case of renal subcapsular hematoma caused by flexible transurethral lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ryuta; Inada, Kouji; Azuma, Kouji; Yamashita, Yokihiko; Oka, Akihiro

    2013-09-01

    A 39-year-old man with macroscopic hematuria was admitted to our hospital. A stone, 5 mm in diameter was detected in the right ureteropelvic junction after abdominal computed tomography and plain abdominal radiography. We performed flexible transurethral lithotripsy (f-TUL) and crushed the stone and extracted almost all stone fragments without any complications. However, almost immediately after the operation, the patient began to complain about pain in the right back. In the results of abdominal plain computed tomography right renal subcapsular hematoma was detected. Because active bleeding was not observed in the results of enhanced computed tomography, only conservative treatment was performed. The patient was discharged from the hospital on day 11 of hospitalization. One month after the operation, plain computed tomography was performed and diminished subcapsular hematoma was detected. Renal subcapsular hematoma is assumed to be a unique complication of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. This is the first report of a case of renal subcapsular hematoma caused by f-TUL. The onset of renal subcapsular hematoma following f-TUL could have been caused either because the laser fiber thrust into the renal lithiasis unintentionally or because the internal pressure of the renal pelvis increased substantially during the operation. PMID:24113753

  12. Atorvastatin May Attenuate Recurrence of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua; Luo, Zhengxiang; Liu, Zhongkun; Yang, Jian; Kan, Shifeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common form of intracranial hemorrhage with a substantial recurrence rate. Atorvastatin may reduce CSDH via its anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenesis effects, but its effectiveness for preventing recurrent CSDH has never been explored. We hypothesized that atorvastatin is effective in reducing recurrence of CSDH after surgery and identified determining factors predictive of hematoma recurrence. Methods: A prospective study was conducted in 168 surgical cases of CSDH.All patients were randomly assigned to the group treated with atorvastatin or control group. Clinically relevant data were compared between two groups, and subsequently between the recurrence and non-recurrence patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis of the relationship between atorvastatin treatment and the recurrence using brain atrophy, septated and bilateral hematoma was performed. Results: Atorvastatin group conferred an advantage by significantly decreasing the recurrence rate (P = 0.023), and patients managed with atorvastatin also had a longer time-to-recurrence (P = 0.038). Admission brain atrophy and bilateral hematoma differed significantly between the recurrence and non-recurrence patients (P = 0.047 and P = 0.045). The results of logistic regression analysis showed that atorvastatin significantly reduced the probability of recurrence; severe brain atrophy and bilateral hematoma were independent risk factors for recurrent CSDH. Conclusions: Atorvastatin administration may decrease the risks of recurrence.Patients with severe brain atrophy and bilateral CSDH are prone to the recurrence. PMID:27445673

  13. A tale of two acute extradural hematomas

    PubMed Central

    Adeleye, Amos Olufemi; Jite, Ikechi E.; Smith, Omolara A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In much of the Western hemisphere, mortality from traumatic acute extradural hematomas (AEDH) has been drastically brought down toward 0%. This is still not the case however in most developing countries. Case Description: This report represents a tragi-comic tale of two cases of traumatic AEDH managed by an academic neurosurgeon in a neurosurgically ill-resourced private health facility during a nationwide industrial strike action preventing clinical-surgical care in the principal author's University Teaching Hospital. A young man presented with altered consciousness, Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) 14/15, following a road accident. The cranial computed tomography (CT) scan was obtained only 9 h after its request, long after the man had actually deteriorated to GCS 7/15 with pupillary changes. The neurosurgeon, summoned from the nearby University Teaching Hospital for the operative care of this man, arrived on-site and was about moving the patient into the operative room when he took the final breaths and died, all within 2 h of the belated neuroimaging. This scenario repeated itself in the same health facility just 24 h later with another young man who presented GCS 7/15 and another identical CT evidence of traumatic AEDH. With more financially able relations, the diagnostic/surgical care of this second patient was much more prompt. He made a very brisk recovery from neurosurgical operative intervention. He is alive and well, 5-month postoperative. Conclusions: In most low-resourced health systems of the developing countries, a significant proportion of potentially salvageable cases of AEDH still perish from this disease condition. PMID:27213108

  14. Non-Traumatic Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma in a Patient with Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation During Treatment with Rivaroxaban

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Jessica M.; Afanador, Hayley F.; Manjarrez, Efren; Morales, Ximena A.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 69 Final Diagnosis: Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma Symptoms: Paraplegia Medication: Rivaroxaban Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: General Internal Medicine • Hospital Medicine • Cardiology • Hematology • Neurology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH) is a rare but disabling condition, accounting for only 4.1% of all intraspinal hematomas. Risk factors include arteriovenous malformations, coagulopathy, therapeutic anticoagulation, underlying neoplasms, or following spinal puncture. Vitamin K antagonists, antiplatelet agents, and heparinoids have been associated with SSDHs in prior reports. To the best of our knowledge, no cases have reported this association with the factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban, and SSDHs. Case Report: We report the case of a 69-year-old Honduran man with a 5-year history of symptomatic palpitations due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation. He was initially refractory to pharmacologic therapy. He underwent cardioversion in February 2014. After cardioversion, he remained asymptomatic on flecainide. He was anticoagulated on rivaroxaban 20 mg daily without incident since early 2013 until presentation in August 2014. He presented with sudden onset of excruciating upper and lower back pain after minimal movement. This was immediately followed by bilateral lower extremity paresis rapidly progressing to paraplegia with bowel and bladder dysfunction over 15 minutes. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an acute spinal subdural hematoma extending from T3 inferiorly to the conus medullaris. Six months after undergoing cervical and lumbar drainage procedures, he has not recovered bowel, bladder, or lower extremity neurologic function. Conclusions: Non-traumatic spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma is a rare neurological emergency that may occur during the use of rivaroxaban in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Physicians should suspect SSDH in

  15. Ruptured pseudoaneurysm of the middle meningeal artery presenting with a temporal lobe hematoma and a contralateral subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Marvin, Eric; Laws, Lindsay Hilken; Coppens, Jeroen Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the middle meningeal artery (MMA) are rare, associated with skull fractures, and have a high mortality rate. When they rupture, MMA pseudoaneurysms frequently cause epidural hematomas and occasionally ipsilateral subdural or subarachnoid hemorrhage. Isolated intraparenchymal hemorrhage has also been reported. Case Description: A 54-year-old female who suffered a loss of consciousness resulting in a fall presented with a Glasgow Coma Scale of 7t. Imaging demonstrated a right subdural hematoma (SDH) with midline shift, left skull fracture overlying the left MMA, and left temporal lobe intraparenchymal hematoma extending to the surface. The patient underwent a right craniectomy with evacuation of the SDH, and the preoperative computed tomographic angiography revealed abnormal dilation of the left MMA consistent with a pseudoaneurysm. The pseudoaneurysm was treated with endovascular treatment, and the intraparenchymal hematoma was treated conservatively. Her recovery was uneventful, and she received a cranioplasty 3 months after the decompression. Conclusions: The presence of a fracture over the MMA and intraparenchymal hematoma should prompt suspicion for a traumatic pseudoaneurysm. Pseudoaneurysms of the MMA can cause catastrophic bleeding, and prompt treatment is necessary. Endovascular embolization is an effective method that decreases the hemorrhage risk of MMA pseudoaneurysms. PMID:26862457

  16. [Aortic intramural hematoma fissuration: atypical presentation in an aircraft pilot].

    PubMed

    Fozzato, Francesca; Prioli, Maria Antonia; Santini, Francesco; Menini, Fabio; Pavan, Michela; Guarise, Paola; Vassanelli, Corrado

    2010-02-01

    Aortic intramural hematoma is a life-threatening thoracic aortic pathology. In this report we describe a case of fissuration of an aortic intramural hematoma with atypical clinical presentation, which occurred in an aircraft pilot. The patient was admitted to our emergency room with transient chest pain developed during a flight landing, followed only by persistent abdominal pain. The ECG and cardiac enzymes were normal. A portable two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiogram showed aortic root dilation and pericardial effusion. Transesophageal echocardiography showed aortic intramural hematoma with fissuration into the pericardial space. The angio-computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis. Two hours after admission the patient, with signs of cardiac tamponade, underwent Bentall surgical intervention without complications. PMID:20408481

  17. High-Grade Sarcomas Mimicking Traumatic Intramuscular Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Pablo; Morcuende, Jose

    2004-01-01

    We reported on three patients with high-grade soft-tissue sarcomas mimicking traumatic intramuscular hematomas. Patients had an episode of trauma to the extremity, and after initial clinical and imaging evaluations they were considered to have muscular hematomas. The lesions increased in size over time, leading to further evaluations that demonstrated the actual diagnosis. We conducted a retrospective review of the clinical findings, magnetic resonance images, and computed tomography scans to assess characteristics that will help in the differential diagnosis. We conclude that intramuscular hematomas following trauma should be approached with a high degree of clinical suspicion. MRI analysis can be used as an important diagnostic tool, but the results must be seen in the context of the clinical history. MRI is not sensitive or specific enough to rule out malignancy. The diagnosis of a high-grade sarcoma must be considered in these patients and any doubt should be resolved with a biopsy. PMID:15296215

  18. Renal Subcapsular Hematoma after Intravenous Thrombolysis in a Patient with Acute Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    La, Yun Kyung; Kim, Ji Hwa; Lee, Kyung-Yul

    2016-09-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute cerebral infarction was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Subsequent percutaneous transfemoral angiography and mechanical thrombectomy were performed due to a right middle cerebral artery occlusion, which was successfully recanalized. Two days after treatment, the patient complained of vague right abdominal pain and a laboratory test showed anemia. Abdominal computed tomography showed a right renal subcapsular hematoma. After conservative management, the patient was discharged without complications. We report a rare complication after intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with acute cerebral infarction. PMID:27621950

  19. Renal Subcapsular Hematoma after Intravenous Thrombolysis in a Patient with Acute Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    La, Yun Kyung; Kim, Ji Hwa

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute cerebral infarction was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Subsequent percutaneous transfemoral angiography and mechanical thrombectomy were performed due to a right middle cerebral artery occlusion, which was successfully recanalized. Two days after treatment, the patient complained of vague right abdominal pain and a laboratory test showed anemia. Abdominal computed tomography showed a right renal subcapsular hematoma. After conservative management, the patient was discharged without complications. We report a rare complication after intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with acute cerebral infarction. PMID:27621950

  20. Intracerebral hemorrhage caused by varicella-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Lizarazo, Jairo; Castellanos, María Fernanda; Omaña, Claudia Rosa; Chaín, Miguel; Villamizar, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a previously healthy 44-years-old man with chickenpox, severe thrombocytopenia, mucosal hemorrhage, and intracerebral hemorrhage in the right hemisphere. The patient was treated with platelets and high doses of steroids. He recovered although with persistent left homonymous hemianopsia and epilepsy, which were controlled with medication. PMID:27622799

  1. Combined neuroradiological and neurosurgical treatment of intracerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Adelt, D; Brückmann, H; Krenkel, W; Hacke, W; Zeumer, H

    1988-07-01

    Four patients with intracerebral vascular malformations underwent preoperative butylcyanoacrylate embolization via a calibrated leak catheter, in order to reduce the risks of surgery alone. In three cases the malformation was removed without causing neurological deficits. One patient died later from recurrent bleeding. PMID:3171616

  2. Mesenteric Hematoma: Is there a Role for Selective Management?

    PubMed

    Corzo, Camila; Murdock, Alan; Alarcon, Louis; Puyana, Juan C

    2016-04-01

    Mesenteric hematomas may present as a radiologic finding after blunt abdominal trauma that may be associated with surgically significant mesenteric and/or bowel injury. The question of whether to operate or not to operate on patients with mesenteric hematoma remains a topic of debate, especially with the improved imaging technology. This study sought to identify clinical and radiological characteristics for patient selection for operative management (OM) of mesenteric hematoma. A retrospective review of 33 adults with blunt abdominal trauma and mesenteric hematoma on CT scan (2009-2012) was performed. Patients with other intra-abdominal injuries, penetrating trauma, isolated gastric hematoma, contrast extravasation, extraluminal air, and Glasgow Coma Scale < 14 were excluded. Patients requiring surgical treatment within 24 hours of admission were compared with those who did not using chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test, and t test. Parameters included age, gender, race, Glasgow Coma Scale, vital signs, pain, tenderness, ecchymosis, Injury Severity Score, length of stay, and inhospital mortality. Logistic regression was used to determine positive associations with OM. Of the 33 patients, 19 underwent OM and 14 did not. Both groups were similar at baseline. Regression analysis revealed association for pain [odds ratio (OR) = 9.6, confidence interval (CI) = 1.8-49.9, P < 0.01], tenderness (OR = 32, CI = 4.6-222.2, P < 0.01), and free fluid (OR = 10.3, CI = 1.8-60, P < 0.01) with need for operative intervention. Nonoperative management patients had 100 per cent success rate. Of the OM patients, 100 per cent underwent therapeutic laparotomies. Findings of mesenteric hematoma on CT scan in examinable patients with no abdominal pain, tenderness, or free fluid predict successful nonoperative management. PMID:27097623

  3. Preventing graft loss caused by hematoma: experimental study.

    PubMed

    Benlier, Erol; Taş, Süleyman; Usta, Ufuk

    2014-01-01

    Hematoma is a common reason for graft loss. This study was intended to investigate the effects of microporous polysaccharide hemospheres (MPH; Arista® AH; Medafor, Inc.) on graft survival, the effect of MPH on graft loss caused by hematoma, and the correlation between neutrophil accumulation and graft survival. A total of 35 adult male Wistar rats were separated into five groups of seven as follows: control 1, saline, MPH, control 2 (hematoma group), and MPH + hematoma. All graft dressing was removed on the fifth postoperative day and graft survival percentage measured. Histopathological and semiquantitative analysis, including inflammatory cell infiltration and subcutaneous inflammation based on neutrophil count, was performed. Graft survival significantly improved in the MPH group (97.86 ± 1.676) compared with the control 1 (91.14 ± 3.671; P = .004) and saline groups (91.57 ± 4.791; P = .014). There was no significant increase in graft survival in the saline group compared with the control 1 group or in the MPH + hematoma group (19.57 ± 14.707) compared with the control 2 group (20.71 ± 16.869; P > .05). The neutrophil count was highest in the control 2 group (177.43 ± 22.464) and significantly decreased in the MPH group (33. 71 ± 8,674) compared with the control 1 group (66.14 ± 5.872; P = .001) and the saline group (65.57 ± 3.309; P= .001). There was no significant decrease in neutrophil count in the MPH + hematoma group (160.00 ± 27.952) compared with the control 2 group (P > .05). It seems that MPH can increase the graft survival, and there is an inverse relationship between graft survival and neutrophil accumulation. PMID:24823329

  4. Association between alpha-1 antichymotrypsin gene A/T polymorphism and primary intracerebral hemorrhage: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zusen; Ye, Qiang; Shao, Bei; He, Jincai; Zhu, Zhenguo; Cheng, Jianhua; Chen, Yanyan; Chen, Siyan; Huang, Xiaoya

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to use meta-analysis to explain the association between alpha-1 antichymotrypsin (ACT) gene A/T polymorphism and the risk of primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH). Relevant studies before 1 June 2015 were identified by searching PubMed, Cochrane database and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE), and the references of retrieved articles. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used to assess the strength of the association. Five independent publications, with 774 PICH cases and 940 controls, were included. There was no statistical evidence of association between ACT polymorphism and PICH risk under all genetic models in overall estimates (allele model: OR = 1.01, 95% CI = 0.80-1.28; heterozygote model: OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.60-1.45; homozygote model: OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.59-1.80; dominant model: OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.65-1.46; recessive model: OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.72-1.57). No association was found in subgroup analysis based on ethnicity, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, location of hematoma and blood pressure. Sensitivity analysis suggested that the combined results were stable and reliable. No significant publication bias was found by Begg's test and Egger's regression test. The results of our meta-analysis indicate that ACT polymorphism is unlikely to contribute to PICH susceptibility. PMID:26885003

  5. Association between alpha-1 antichymotrypsin gene A/T polymorphism and primary intracerebral hemorrhage: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zusen; Ye, Qiang; Shao, Bei; He, Jincai; Zhu, Zhenguo; Cheng, Jianhua; Chen, Yanyan; Chen, Siyan; Huang, Xiaoya

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to use meta-analysis to explain the association between alpha-1 antichymotrypsin (ACT) gene A/T polymorphism and the risk of primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH). Relevant studies before 1 June 2015 were identified by searching PubMed, Cochrane database and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE), and the references of retrieved articles. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used to assess the strength of the association. Five independent publications, with 774 PICH cases and 940 controls, were included. There was no statistical evidence of association between ACT polymorphism and PICH risk under all genetic models in overall estimates (allele model: OR = 1.01, 95% CI = 0.80-1.28; heterozygote model: OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.60-1.45; homozygote model: OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.59-1.80; dominant model: OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.65-1.46; recessive model: OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.72-1.57). No association was found in subgroup analysis based on ethnicity, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, location of hematoma and blood pressure. Sensitivity analysis suggested that the combined results were stable and reliable. No significant publication bias was found by Begg’s test and Egger’s regression test. The results of our meta-analysis indicate that ACT polymorphism is unlikely to contribute to PICH susceptibility. PMID:26885003

  6. Promoting blood circulation for removing blood stasis therapy for acute intracerebral hemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui-qin; Wei, Jing-jing; Xia, Wan; Li, Ji-huang; Liu, Ai-ju; Yin, Su-bing; Wang, Chen; Song, Liang; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Guo-qing; Fan, Ji-ping

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the current evidence available regarding the promoting blood circulation and removing blood stasis (PBCRBS) therapy for Chinese patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: Six databases were searched from their inception to November 2013. The studies assessed in ≥4 domains with 'yes' were selected for detailed assessment and meta-analysis. The herbal compositions for PBCRBS therapy for acute ICH patients were also assessed. Results: From the 6 databases, 292 studies claimed randomized-controlled clinical trials (RCTs). Nine studies with 798 individuals were assessed in ≥4 domains with 'yes' by using the Cochrane RoB tool. Meta-analysis showed that PBCRBS monotherapy and adjuvant therapy for acute ICH could improve the neurological function deficit, reduce the volume of hematoma and perihematomal edema, and lower the mortality rate and dependency. Moreover, there were fewer adverse effects when compared with Western conventional medication controls. Xueshuantong Injection and Fufang Danshen Injection, Buyang Huanwu Decoction and Liangxue Tongyu formula, and three herbs (danshen root, sanqi and leech) were the most commonly used Chinese herbal patent injections, herbal prescriptions and single herbs, respectively. Conclusion: Despite the apparently positive findings, it is premature to conclude that there is sufficient efficacy and safety of PBCRBS for ICH because of the high clinical heterogeneity of the included studies and small number of trials in the meta-analysis. Further large sample-sizes and rigorously designed RCTs are needed. PMID:25960132

  7. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882.1935 Section 882.1935 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma...

  8. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882.1935 Section 882.1935 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma...

  9. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882.1935 Section 882.1935 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma...

  10. [Isolated cheiro-facial formication caused by a thalamic hematoma].

    PubMed

    Awada, A

    1989-01-01

    A 25 year-old Saudi female patient presented with numbness of the left half of the face and the tongue and the left hand. Neurological and neuropsychological examinations were normal. Brain CT showed a small hematoma (5 to 7 mm diameter) of the right thalamus probably destroying or compressing the ventropostero-median and ventropostero-lateral thalamic nuclei. Thalamic hematoma has been reported only twice as a cause of pure sensory stroke. The absence of clinical signs together with the presence of symptoms, and the particular topography of the symptoms are discussed. PMID:2616971