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Sample records for intraconal orbital cavernous

  1. Purely endoscopic trans-nasal management of orbital intraconal cavernous haemangiomas: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Riccardo; Bleier, Benjamin S; Felisati, Giovanni; Muscatello, Luca

    2016-09-01

    The surgical management of medial and inferior orbital lesions is demanding via traditional external approach, since the conic-shaped surgical field is narrow and damage to neural, muscular or vascular structures of the orbit can have serious consequences. In recent years, the evolution of endoscopic endonasal approaches for lesions that goes beyond the nose brought the orbit to the attention of rhinosurgeons. If procedures such as transnasal orbital decompression and lacrimal pathways surgery have been described some decades ago, the last frontier of transnasal orbital surgery, namely intraconal tumor surgery, is a new and rapidly expanding field. Papers describing endoscopic endonasal approaches to the orbit appeared in the international literature, but most of them contain a small number of cases, also because the relatively rarity of intraorbital lesions. We herein report the results of a systematic review of the literature regarding the endoscopic endonasal approach to intraconal cavernous haemangiomas, the most common benign orbital lesion. The endoscopic management of intraconal cavernous haemangiomas results feasible and safe. A critical step of this kind of surgery is the management of the medial rectus muscle, mandatory to expose the intraconal space. PMID:26210157

  2. The role of Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy in the differential diagnosis of orbital cavernous hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Sayit, E; Durak, I; Capakaya, G; Yilmaz, M; Durak, H

    2001-04-01

    The cavernous hemangioma is the most common benign orbital tumor in adults. Its presentation is during the forth to fifth decades with a slowly progressive unilateral proptosis. Intraconal cavernous hemangiomas may be difficult to differentiate from other intraconal lesions such as schwannomas, meningiomas and hemangiopericytomas. We report a case of orbital cavernous hemangioma diagnosed by Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy. Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy revealed a typical scintigraphic pattern in which there is intense focally increased uptake on the delayed image. We conclude that Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy can be a useful method in the differential diagnosis of orbital cavernous hemangioma as in hepatic hemangioma. PMID:11448074

  3. Orbital intraconal abducens nerve schwannoma: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Bhaganagare, Amresh Subhash; Bidkar, Vishakha Chandrakant; Rodrigus, Elvis; Naik, Vikas; Pai, Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Authors report a case of right orbital intraconal abducens nerve schwannoma in a 32-year lady, who presented with a sense of tightness and discomfort in right eye on looking extreme right side since 4 months. The tumor was totally excised with functional preservation of the nerve by superior orbitotomy. The clinical, radiological features and the management are discussed. PMID:25767598

  4. Intraconal amphotericin B for the treatment of rhino-orbital mucormycosis.

    PubMed

    Luna, J D; Ponssa, X S; Rodríguez, S D; Luna, N C; Juárez, C P

    1996-08-01

    Rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis is a disease that is frequently fatal. A 39-year-old man with diabetic ketoacidosis was referred to the authors' ophthalmic service with fever, orbital apex syndrome in the right eye, lethargy, and a black eschar in the palate. He was treated with systemic and local (intraconal) amphotericin B and his ketoacidosis was controlled; exenteration was not performed. Biopsy of the palate proved mucormycosis. Eighteen months later the patient was still alive and had a blind, anatomically preserved right eye with ptosis and intact extraocular muscle function without proptosis or pain. The authors propose this alternative means of treatment to achieve higher doses of the drug at the site of infection and better cosmetic and psychological results. PMID:8858637

  5. Diagnosis of orbital cavernous hemangioma with Tc-99m RBC SPECT.

    PubMed

    Ki, W W; Shin, J W; Won, K S; Ryu, J S; Yang, S O; Lee, H K; Kim, Y J

    1997-08-01

    The authors report two cases of orbital cavernous hemangioma diagnosed by Tc-99m RBC SPECT. Tc-99m RBC SPECT showed a typical scintigraphic pattern commonly seen in hepatic hemangioma in which there is intense focally increased uptake on delayed SPECT images. Tc-99m RBC SPECT in orbital cavernous hemangioma may be as useful a diagnostic modality as in hepatic hemangioma. PMID:9262901

  6. Co-occurrence of a cerebral cavernous malformation and an orbital cavernous hemangioma in a patient with seizures and visual symptoms: Rare crossroads for vascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Choudhri, Omar; Feroze, Abdullah H.; Lad, Eleonora M.; Kim, Jonathan W.; Plowey, Edward D.; Karamchandani, Jason R.; Chang, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are angiographically occult vascular malformations of the central nervous system. As a result of hemorrhage and mass effect, patients may present with focal neurologic deficits, seizures, and other symptoms necessitating treatment. Once symptomatic, most often from hemorrhage, CCMs are treated with microsurgical resection. Orbital cavernous hemangiomas (OCHs) are similar but distinct vascular malformations that present within the orbital cavity. Even though CCMs and OCHs are both marked by dilated endothelial-lined vascular channels, they are infrequently seen in the same patient. Case Description: We provide a brief overview of the two related pathologies in the context of a patient presenting to our care with concomitant lesions, which were both resected in full without complication. Conclusion: This is the first known report that describes a case of concomitant CCM and OCH and explores the origins of two pathologies that are rarely encountered together in neurosurgical practice. Recognition of disparate symptomatologies is important for properly managing these patients. PMID:25071938

  7. Limestone Caverns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Richard L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the origin of limestone caverns, using Mammoth Cave as an example, with particular reference to the importance of groundwater information of caverns, the present condition of groundwater, and how caverns develop within fluctuating groundwater zones. (BR)

  8. A difficult surgical approach for primary orbital hydatid cyst: transconjunctival medial orbitotomy.

    PubMed

    Sendul, Selam Yekta; Ucgul, Cemile; Dirim, Burcu; Demir, Mehmet; Acar, Zeynep; Guven, Dilek

    2015-01-01

    Hydatid cysts rarely appear isolated in the orbital cavity without involvement of other organs. The cysts are usually located in the retrobulbar region, and may be extraconal or intraconal. Herein we present a case of primary orbital cyst hydatid that is adjacent to the medial rectus muscle and optic nerve in the intraconal space and the difficulties during the surgical and medical treatment period. PMID:26655075

  9. A difficult surgical approach for primary orbital hydatid cyst: transconjunctival medial orbitotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sendul, Selam Yekta; Ucgul, Cemile; Dirim, Burcu; Demir, Mehmet; Acar, Zeynep; Guven, Dilek

    2015-01-01

    Hydatid cysts rarely appear isolated in the orbital cavity without involvement of other organs. The cysts are usually located in the retrobulbar region, and may be extraconal or intraconal. Herein we present a case of primary orbital cyst hydatid that is adjacent to the medial rectus muscle and optic nerve in the intraconal space and the difficulties during the surgical and medical treatment period. PMID:26655075

  10. Cavernous sinus gas.

    PubMed

    Chen, S S; Shao, K N; Chiang, J H; Chang, C Y; Luo, C B; Lirng, J F; Teng, M M

    2000-07-01

    Gas within the cavernous sinus is an unusual finding. We report three patients who demonstrated gas in the cavernous sinus on computerized tomography (CT). The clinical information of these patients was reviewed for the possible source of the gas and the symptoms induced by the gas. Cavernous sinus gas was seen in two patients with sphenoid sinus fracture and in one patient after intravenous fluid infusion. None of the patients had symptoms referable to the cavernous sinus gas, but one patient had a grave prognosis due to trauma. Identification of cavernous sinus gas on CT and correlation with the clinical information is mandatory for further management. PMID:10934814

  11. Endoscopic treatment of orbital tumors

    PubMed Central

    Signorelli, Francesco; Anile, Carmelo; Rigante, Mario; Paludetti, Gaetano; Pompucci, Angelo; Mangiola, Annunziato

    2015-01-01

    Different orbital and transcranial approaches are performed in order to manage orbital tumors, depending on the location and size of the lesion within the orbit. These approaches provide a satisfactory view of the superior and lateral aspects of the orbit and the optic canal but involve risks associated with their invasiveness because they require significant displacement of orbital structures. In addition, external approaches to intraconal lesions may also require deinsertion of extraocular muscles, with subsequent impact on extraocular mobility. Recently, minimally invasive techniques have been proposed as valid alternative to external approaches for selected orbital lesions. Among them, transnasal endoscopic approaches, “pure” or combined with external approaches, have been reported, especially for intraconal lesions located inferiorly and medially to the optic nerve. The avoidance of muscle detachment and the shortness of the surgical intraorbital trajectory makes endoscopic approach less invasive, thus minimizing tissue damage. Endoscopic surgery decreases the recovery time and improves the cosmetic outcome not requiring skin incisions. The purpose of this study is to review and discuss the current surgical techniques for orbital tumors removal, focusing on endoscopic approaches to the orbit and outlining the key anatomic principles to follow for safe tumor resection. PMID:25789299

  12. About Cavernous Angioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... and School CCM3 Mutation Resources Our Videos Angioma Alliance Night at the Cincinnati Reds Cavernous Angioma and Children Dr. Issam Awad at the Angioma Alliance Family Conference info@AngiomaAlliance.org | © Angioma Alliance | Disclaimer | ...

  13. Jejunal cavernous lymphangioma

    PubMed Central

    Morris-Stiff, Gareth; Falk, Gavin A; El-Hayek, Kevin; Vargo, John; Bronner, Mary; Vogt, David P

    2011-01-01

    Cavernous lymphangiomas are usually identified in infants and children with the majority of lesions found around the head and neck, trunk or extremities. Tumours affecting the intra-abdominal organs are rare. The authors report a case of small bowel cavernous lymphangioma arising within the jejunum of a 34-year-old woman presenting with dyspnoea and anaemia, and review the existing literature relating to this uncommon tumour. PMID:22696733

  14. Gas intrusion into SPR caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkebein, T.E.; Bauer, S.J.; Ehgartner, B.L.; Linn, J.K.; Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Kuhlman, P.S.; Gniady, C.T.; Giles, H.N.

    1995-12-01

    The conditions and occurrence of gas in crude oil stored in Strategic Petroleum Reserve, SPR, caverns is characterized in this report. Many caverns in the SPR show that gas has intruded into the oil from the surrounding salt dome. Historical evidence and the analyses presented here suggest that gas will continue to intrude into many SPR caverns in the future. In considering why only some caverns contain gas, it is concluded that the naturally occurring spatial variability in salt permeability can explain the range of gas content measured in SPR caverns. Further, it is not possible to make a one-to-one correlation between specific geologic phenomena and the occurrence of gas in salt caverns. However, gas is concluded to be petrogenic in origin. Consequently, attempts have been made to associate the occurrence of gas with salt inhomogeneities including anomalies and other structural features. Two scenarios for actual gas intrusion into caverns were investigated for consistency with existing information. These scenarios are gas release during leaching and gas permeation through salt. Of these mechanisms, the greater consistency comes from the belief that gas permeates to caverns through the salt. A review of historical operating data for five Bryan Mound caverns loosely supports the hypothesis that higher operating pressures reduce gas intrusion into caverns. This conclusion supports a permeability intrusion mechanism. Further, it provides justification for operating the caverns near maximum operating pressure to minimize gas intrusion. Historical gas intrusion rates and estimates of future gas intrusion are given for all caverns.

  15. Bilateral cavernous sinus and superior ophthalmic vein thrombosis in the setting of facial cellulitis

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Bruce; Hise, Joseph; Philip, Joseph; Spak, Cedric; Opatowsky, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a rare, potentially fatal cause of cerebral venous thrombosis. Infectious causes typically arise from the mid face, orbit, or sinonasal region. We present a case of bilateral cavernous sinus and superior ophthalmic thrombosis secondary to an extreme case of facial cellulitis. PMID:26722163

  16. Late intracranial haemorrhage and subsequent carotid-cavernous sinus fistula after fracture of the facial bones.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chien-Ming; Cheng, Chi-Sheng

    2013-12-01

    Carotid-cavernous sinus fistula is an arteriovenous fistula between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus, and is usually caused by a traumatic tear or a ruptured aneurysm of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. We describe a rare case of delayed intracranial haemorrhage and carotid-cavernous sinus fistula that presented 3 weeks after fracture of the facial bones. The patient developed orbital apex syndrome including ptosis of upper eyelid, pulsatile exophthalmos, chemosis, loss of ocular motility, monocular blindness on the right, and numbness of the right infraorbital region. After transcatheter intra-arterial embolisation, the ptosis and chemosis improved. PMID:23958350

  17. Bilateral Persistent Trigeminal Arteries with Unilateral Trigeminal Artery to Cavernous Sinus Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Chen, David; Chen, Chi-Jen; Chen, Jiann-Jy; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Ku, Jan-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Summary A 59-year-old man who denied a history of trauma presented with left pulsatile tinnitus and left orbital swelling for six months. Digital subtraction angiography showed a left persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) with a trigeminal artery to cavernous sinus (trigeminal-cavernous sinus) fistula and a right PTA. Transarterial detachable coil embolization of the left trigeminal-cavernous sinus fistula was performed, and the symptoms subsided. There has been no report of bilateral PTAs with a spontaneous fistula connected from one PTA to the ipsilateral cavernous sinus. This paper reports such a rare circumstance. PMID:24070083

  18. Bilateral persistent trigeminal arteries with unilateral trigeminal artery to cavernous sinus fistula. A case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, David; Chen, Chi-Jen; Chen, Jiann-Jy; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Ku, Jan-Wen

    2013-09-01

    A 59-year-old man who denied a history of trauma presented with left pulsatile tinnitus and left orbital swelling for six months. Digital subtraction angiography showed a left persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) with a trigeminal artery to cavernous sinus (trigeminal-cavernous sinus) fistula and a right PTA. Transarterial detachable coil embolization of the left trigeminal-cavernous sinus fistula was performed, and the symptoms subsided. There has been no report of bilateral PTAs with a spontaneous fistula connected from one PTA to the ipsilateral cavernous sinus. This paper reports such a rare circumstance. PMID:24070083

  19. Cavernous Angioma and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... neurologist to see if there might be an alternative medication. Children with even mild muscle weakness or decreased coordination resulting from a cavernous malformation bleed often have reduced physical stamina. It simply requires more energy to use legs that feel heavy or that ...

  20. Posttraumatic carotid-cavernous fistula: Pathogenetic mechanisms, diagnostic management and proper treatment. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Fernández, Ana-Belén; Román-Ramos, María; Fernandez-Solis, José; Martínez-Lara, Ildefonso

    2016-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistulas are an uncommon diseases characterized by abnormal communications between arteries and veins located in the cavernous sinus. According with Barrow´s classification they could be divided in two groups: direct and indirect. The typical symptoms showed by theses pathologies are: pulsating exophthalmos and orbital blow. The present study describes a case of direct posttraumatic carotid-cavernous fistula in a 26 years old man. Furthermore, we present the images that we used to make the diagnosis. In this light, we decided to treat this case with endovascular approach after considering several therapeutic options. The aim of the present report is twofold. First, we examine the importance of the proper management of the direct posttraumatic carotid-cavernous fistula. Second, we describe this rare syndrome with the goal of proposing suitable treatments. Key words:Carotid cavernous fistulas, pulsating exophthalmos, orbital blow, endovascular approach, Barrow´s classification. PMID:27034767

  1. Cavernous Carotid Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following a Radical Cavernous Sinus Resection

    PubMed Central

    Katzir, Miki; Gil, Ziv; Cohen, José Enrique; Sviri, Gill Efraim

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic cavernous carotid pseudoaneurysms are a special group among other intracranial aneurysms. They can occur during the dissection phase of the surgery if the tumor encases a vessel. Complications of their rupture as hemorrhage or stroke are life threatening. Early recognition and treatment is mandatory to avoid catastrophic sequelae. We present the successful diagnosis and endovascular treatment of a postoperative cavernous carotid pseudoaneurysm following radical cavernous sinus resection. PMID:27330923

  2. Manufactured caverns in carbonate rock

    DOEpatents

    Bruce, David A.; Falta, Ronald W.; Castle, James W.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.

    2007-01-02

    Disclosed is a process for manufacturing underground caverns suitable in one embodiment for storage of large volumes of gaseous or liquid materials. The method is an acid dissolution process that can be utilized to form caverns in carbonate rock formations. The caverns can be used to store large quantities of materials near transportation facilities or destination markets. The caverns can be used for storage of materials including fossil fuels, such as natural gas, refined products formed from fossil fuels, or waste materials, such as hazardous waste materials. The caverns can also be utilized for applications involving human access such as recreation or research. The method can also be utilized to form calcium chloride as a by-product of the cavern formation process.

  3. 3-D Cavern Enlargement Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    EHGARTNER, BRIAN L.; SOBOLIK, STEVEN R.

    2002-03-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses simulate the mechanical response of enlarging existing caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The caverns are located in Gulf Coast salt domes and are enlarged by leaching during oil drawdowns as fresh water is injected to displace the crude oil from the caverns. The current criteria adopted by the SPR limits cavern usage to 5 drawdowns (leaches). As a base case, 5 leaches were modeled over a 25 year period to roughly double the volume of a 19 cavern field. Thirteen additional leaches where then simulated until caverns approached coalescence. The cavern field approximated the geometries and geologic properties found at the West Hackberry site. This enabled comparisons are data collected over nearly 20 years to analysis predictions. The analyses closely predicted the measured surface subsidence and cavern closure rates as inferred from historic well head pressures. This provided the necessary assurance that the model displacements, strains, and stresses are accurate. However, the cavern field has not yet experienced the large scale drawdowns being simulated. Should they occur in the future, code predictions should be validated with actual field behavior at that time. The simulations were performed using JAS3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasi-static solids. The results examine the impacts of leaching and cavern workovers, where internal cavern pressures are reduced, on surface subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The results suggest that the current limit of 5 oil drawdowns may be extended with some mitigative action required on the wells and later on to surface structure due to subsidence strains. The predicted stress state in the salt shows damage to start occurring after 15 drawdowns with significant failure occurring at the 16th drawdown, well beyond the current limit of 5 drawdowns.

  4. Cavernous sinus thrombosis revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Yarington, C T

    1977-01-01

    In summary, cavernous sinus thrombosis is still with us. Patients now survive the disease more often than not, and therapy and diagnosis are reasonably clear cut. An increasing array of antibiotic-resistant bacteria have been balanced by an increasing army of antibiotics. The controversy over anticoagulation has not changed since reviewed by Parsons (1967). Ancillary measures remain more of value in diagnosis than in therapy. It is a disease primarily diagnosed by physical signs and symptoms, which requires prompt treatment. In our modern age of computerization and laboratory-based medical care, cavernous sinus thrombosis demands the diagnostic skill of the clinician, whose prompt ministrations should usually yield a favourable result. PMID:331338

  5. Malignant fungal infection of the cavernous sinus: case report.

    PubMed

    Neil, Jayson A; Orlandi, Richard R; Couldwell, William T

    2016-03-01

    Intracranial spread of fungal infection is a life-threatening condition that usually affects immunocompromised patients. Here the authors present a case of biopsy-proven Aspergillus fumigatus infection of the paranasal sinuses in an immunocompetent patient with documented spread to the orbit, cavernous sinus, and petrous apex despite medical antifungal treatment. As a life-saving treatment, cavernous sinus resection with external carotid artery-middle cerebral artery bypass was performed. The authors discuss the literature regarding the intracranial spread of paranasal sinus fungal infections in immunocompetent patients and management strategies. PMID:26315007

  6. Giant Cardiac Cavernous Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Unger, Eric; Costic, Joseph; Laub, Glenn

    2015-07-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic giant cardiac cavernous hemangioma in a 71-year-old man. The intracardiac mass was discovered incidentally during surveillance for his prostate cancer; however, the patient initially declined intervention. On presentation to our institution 7 years later, the lesion had enlarged significantly, and the patient consented to excision. At surgery, an 8 × 6.5 × 4.8 cm intracardiac mass located on the inferior heart border was excised with an intact capsule through a median sternotomy approach. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. We discuss the diagnostic workup, treatment, and characteristics of this rare cardiac tumor. PMID:26140782

  7. Orbital extension of trigeminal schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shantanu; Das, Debabrata; Varshney, Rahul; Nandy, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomas, also known as neurilemmomas, are benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Trigeminal schwannomas are rare intracranial tumors. Here, we report a 35-year-old female presenting with an axial proptosis of right eyeball with right-sided III, IV and VI cranial nerve palsy. Her best corrected visual acuity in the right eye was perception of light absent and in the left eye was 20/20. MRI scan revealed a large right-sided heterogeneous, extra-axial middle cranial fossa mass that extended to the intraconal space of right orbit. A diagnosis of intracranial trigeminal nerve schwannoma with right orbital extension was made. Successful surgical excision of the mass with preservation of the surrounding tissues and orbital exenteration was done. Post-operative period was uneventful. PMID:25552864

  8. Orbital extension of trigeminal schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Shantanu; Das, Debabrata; Varshney, Rahul; Nandy, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomas, also known as neurilemmomas, are benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Trigeminal schwannomas are rare intracranial tumors. Here, we report a 35-year-old female presenting with an axial proptosis of right eyeball with right-sided III, IV and VI cranial nerve palsy. Her best corrected visual acuity in the right eye was perception of light absent and in the left eye was 20/20. MRI scan revealed a large right-sided heterogeneous, extra-axial middle cranial fossa mass that extended to the intraconal space of right orbit. A diagnosis of intracranial trigeminal nerve schwannoma with right orbital extension was made. Successful surgical excision of the mass with preservation of the surrounding tissues and orbital exenteration was done. Post-operative period was uneventful. PMID:25552864

  9. Imaging of orbital disorders.

    PubMed

    Cunnane, Mary Beth; Curtin, Hugh David

    2016-01-01

    Diseases of the orbit can be categorized in many ways, but in this chapter we shall group them according to etiology. Inflammatory diseases of the orbits may be infectious or noninfectious. Of the infections, orbital cellulitis is the most common and typically arises as a complication of acute sinusitis. Of the noninfectious, inflammatory conditions, thyroid orbitopathy is the most common and results in enlargement of the extraocular muscles and proliferation of the orbital fat. Idiopathic orbital inflammatory syndrome is another cause of inflammation in the orbit, which may mimic thyroid orbitopathy or even neoplasm, but typically presents with pain. Masses in the orbit may be benign or malignant and the differential diagnosis primarily depends on the location of the mass lesion, and on the age of the patient. Lacrimal gland tumors may be lymphomas or epithelial lesions of salivary origin. Extraocular muscle tumors may represent lymphoma or metastases. Tumors of the intraconal fat are often benign, typically hemangiomas or schwannomas. Finally, globe tumors may be retinoblastomas (in children), or choroidal melanomas or metastases in adults. PMID:27432687

  10. Cavernous lymphangioma: Two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Sargunam, Cynthia; Thomas, Jayakar; Raneesha, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    Lymphangiomas are congenital malformation of the lymphatic system that involve the skin and subcutaneous tissues. We are reporting two cases of cavernous lymphangioma. These cases are presented for their rarity. PMID:23984237

  11. Worsening angle closure glaucoma and choroidal detachments subsequent to closure of a carotid cavernous fistula

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Carotid cavernous fistulas are abnormal communications between the cavernous sinus and the external or internal carotid arteries. Although rare, closure of carotid cavernous fistulas can lead to immediate ocular complications. To our knowledge, our case represents the first report of worsening angle closure glaucoma and choroidal detachments over an extended period of two months subsequent to closure of a carotid cavernous fistula. Case presentation A 70-year-old female with a history of primary angle closure glaucoma presented with 4 mm of proptosis, resistance to retropulsion, tortuous corkscrew blood vessels and an orbital bruit of the right eye. Diagnostic cerebral angiogram showed a small indirect Barrow type D right carotid cavernous fistula. Transarterial embolization was planned but repeat cerebral angiography prior to the procedure demonstrated spontaneous partial closure of the carotid cavernous fistula and the procedure was aborted. One month later, our patient was noted to have worsening vision and choroidal detachments of the right eye. She declined further testing and was thus started on self-administered manual carotid jugular compressions. One month later, she developed progressive worsening of her choroidal detachments and angle closure. She eventually opted for surgical intervention but repeat cerebral angiography showed significant thrombosis of the carotid cavernous fistula and no intervention was warranted. Examination two months later showed complete resolution of the choroidal detachments and open angles of both eyes. Conclusions Our patient demonstrated worsening angle closure glaucoma and choroidal detachments after spontaneous closure of her carotid cavernous fistula had been noted. Ocular complications, including acute angle closure, have been reported to occur immediately after closure of carotid cavernous fistulas, but not over months as in our patient. It is imperative that individuals who have undergone apparent closure

  12. Interaction effects of storage caverns in salt

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, P.D.; Tillerson, J.R.; Benzley, S.E.; Gubbels, M.H.

    1980-08-01

    The US Strategic Petroleum Reserve program for crude oil stockpiling utilizes some existing solution mined caverns in Gulf Coast salt domes. Geomechanical analyses are impotant tools used to assess the structural stability of these caverns. This report addresses the ineractions between adjacent caverns which result from maintaining different pressures in the caverns. Finite element models of two adjacent caverns are analyzed for four different cavern spacings. The brine pressure is simulated in one cavern while the pressure in the adjacent cavern ranges from that of the oil head to atmospheric conditions. Stress distributions and deformed profiles of the caverns are plotted for the conditions simulated. Since the tensile strength of salt is low (typically 100 to 300 psi), regions in which tensile stresses occur are considered to have a significant probability of slabbing. A preliminary recommendation is made to maintain similar pressures to adjacent caverns in which the pillar thickness/cavern diameter ratio of the web between caverns is less than 0.5 unless cavern specific assessments indicate that the potential for pillar slabbing is minimal.

  13. Secondary mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the orbit

    PubMed Central

    Siuw, Chin Pei; Tan, Siow W; Abdul Wahid, Adrena B; Vasudevan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with right eye axial proptosis and ophthalmoplegia for 3 months. Imaging study showed a right intraconal mass with the erosion of the orbital floor. Incisional biopsy revealed mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Nasal endoscopy was normal and systemic tumor screening was negative for a primary source. The patient underwent right orbital exenteration, uncinectomy, nasal and maxillary mucosal biopsy. Malignant cells were found present in the mucosa of maxillary sinus roof and uncinate bone. The postoperative positron emission tomography scan showed residual active lesion in right orbital apex and maxilla but no primary lesion elsewhere. The patient subsequently underwent 35 cycles of postoperative radiotherapy. Primary mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the orbit is rare and typically arises from the lacrimal gland or sac. Those tumors not arising from lacrimal apparatus should be presumed metastatic in origin, and the thorough systemic survey should be undertaken in the search for the primary tumor. PMID:27146939

  14. Secondary mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Siuw, Chin Pei; Tan, Siow W; Abdul Wahid, Adrena B; Vasudevan, Suresh

    2016-03-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with right eye axial proptosis and ophthalmoplegia for 3 months. Imaging study showed a right intraconal mass with the erosion of the orbital floor. Incisional biopsy revealed mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Nasal endoscopy was normal and systemic tumor screening was negative for a primary source. The patient underwent right orbital exenteration, uncinectomy, nasal and maxillary mucosal biopsy. Malignant cells were found present in the mucosa of maxillary sinus roof and uncinate bone. The postoperative positron emission tomography scan showed residual active lesion in right orbital apex and maxilla but no primary lesion elsewhere. The patient subsequently underwent 35 cycles of postoperative radiotherapy. Primary mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the orbit is rare and typically arises from the lacrimal gland or sac. Those tumors not arising from lacrimal apparatus should be presumed metastatic in origin, and the thorough systemic survey should be undertaken in the search for the primary tumor. PMID:27146939

  15. Orbital cellulitis.

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Hirsch, D P; Habashi, S; Hinton, A H; Kotecha, B

    1992-01-01

    Orbital cellulitis is an emergency. It may cause blindness and progress to life-threatening sequelae such as brain abscess, meningitis and cavernous sinus thrombosis. Successful management is dependent upon urgent referral and immediate treatment. Although isolated eyelid erythema and swelling usually indicate primary infection anterior to the orbital septum, they may also be the first signs of an underlying frontal or ethmoidal sinusitis. The condition always requires emergency referral to both an ophthalmologist and otorhinolaryngologist. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1388488

  16. Interdural cavernous sinus epidermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Bonde, Vivek; Goel, Atul

    2008-02-01

    We report a patient with an uncommon interdural epidermoid tumor, located within the confines of dural layers of the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus. The tumor was resected by a basal subtemporal extradural-interdural approach. Following the surgery, the 45-year-old female patient recovered completely from her symptoms of atypical neuralgic facial pains. PMID:18083573

  17. Effects of cavern spacing on the performance and stability of gas-filled storage caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.

    1993-04-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses of gas-filled storage caverns in domal salt were performed to investigate the effects of cavern spacing on surface subsidence, storage loss, and cavern stability. The finite element model used for this study models a seven cavern storage field with one center cavern and six hexagonally spaced surrounding caverns. Cavern spacing is described in terms of the P/D ratio which is the pillar thickness (the width between two caverns) divided by the cavern diameter. With the stratigraphy and cavern size held constant, simulations were performed for P/D ratios of 6.0, 3.0, 2.0, 1.0, and 0.5. Ten year simulations were performed modeling a constant 400 psi gas pressure applied to the cavern lining. The calculations were performed using JAC3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasistatic solids. For the range of P/D ratios studied, cavern deformation and storage volume were relatively insensitive to P/D ratio, while subsidence volume increased with increasing P/D ratio. A stability criterion which describes stability in terms of a limiting creep strain was used to investigate cavern stability. The stability criterion indicated that through-pillar instability was possible for the cases of P/D = 0.5 and 1.0.

  18. New public information resources on salt caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.; Veil, J. A.

    1999-08-25

    For the past decade, interest has been growing in using underground salt caverns for disposing of wastes. The Railroad Commission of Texas has permitted a few caverns for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW) and one cavern for disposal of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) from oil field activities. Several salt caverns in Canada have also been permitted for disposal of NOW. In addition, oil and gas agencies in Louisiana and New Mexico are developing cavern disposal regulations. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has funded several studies to evaluate the technical feasibility, legality, economic viability, and risk of disposing of NOW and NORM in caverns. The results of these studies have been disseminated to the scientific and regulatory communities. However, as use of caverns for waste disposal increases, more government and industry representatives and members of the public will become aware of this practice and will need adequate information about how disposal caverns operate and the risks they pose. In anticipation of this need, DOE has fi.mded Argonne National Laboratory to develop a salt cavern public outreach program. Key components of this program are an informational brochure designed for nontechnical persons and a website that provides greater detail on cavern operations and allows downloadable access to the reports on the topic funded by DOE. This paper provides an overview of the public outreach program.

  19. New public information resources on salt caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.; Veil, J. A.

    1999-08-25

    For the past decade, interest has been growing in using underground salt caverns for disposing of wastes. The Railroad Commission of Texas has permitted a few caverns for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW) and one cavern for disposal of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) from oil field activities. Several salt caverns in Canada have also been permitted for disposal of NOW. In addition, oil and gas agencies in Louisiana and New Mexico are developing cavern disposal regulations. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has funded several studies to evaluate the technical feasibility, legality, economic viability, and risk of disposing of NOW and NORM in caverns. The results of these studies have been disseminated to the scientific and regulatory communities. However, as use of caverns for waste disposal increases, more government and industry representatives and members of the public will become aware of this practice and will need adequate information about how disposal caverns operate and the risks they pose. In anticipation of this need, DOE has funded Argonne National Laboratory to develop a salt cavern public outreach program. Key components of this program are an informational brochure designed for nontechnical persons and a website that provides greater detail on cavern operations and allows downloadable access to the reports on the topic funded by DOE. This paper provides an overview of the public outreach program.

  20. Cavernous angioma of the pineal region.

    PubMed

    Donati, P; Maiuri, F; Gangemi, M; Gallicchio, B; Sigona, L

    1992-01-01

    The pineal region is one of the most rare localizations of intracranial cavernous angiomas, with only 8 cases reported up today. The Authors report a case of cavernous angioma of such localization and review the pertinent literature. Magnetic resonance allows the correct diagnosis of cavernous malformations on the basis of their typical aspect, even in the absence of histological verification. We suggest that this imaging technique will allow to identify more frequently pineal cavernomas preoperatively, thus avoiding useless irradiation. PMID:1484302

  1. Salt caverns for oil field waste disposal.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.; Ford, J.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Environmental Assessment; RMC, Consultants, Inc.

    2000-07-01

    Salt caverns used for oil field waste disposal are created in salt formations by solution mining. When created, caverns are filled with brine. Wastes are introduced into the cavern by pumping them under low pressure. Each barrel of waste injected to the cavern displaces a barrel of brine to the surface. The brine is either used for drilling mud or is disposed of in an injection well. Figure 8 shows an injection pump used at disposal cavern facilities in west Texas. Several types of oil field waste may be pumped into caverns for disposal. These include drilling muds, drill cuttings, produced sands, tank bottoms, contaminated soil, and completion and stimulation wastes. Waste blending facilities are constructed at the site of cavern disposal to mix the waste into a brine solution prior to injection. Overall advantages of salt cavern disposal include a medium price range for disposal cost, large capacity and availability of salt caverns, limited surface land requirement, increased safety, and ease of establishment of individual state regulations.

  2. Effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss of oil-filled caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E L

    1992-01-01

    Finite element analyses of oil-filled caverns were performed to investigate the effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss, a primary performance criteria of SPR caverns. The finite element model used for this study was axisymmetric, approximating an infinite array of caverns spaced at 750 ft. The stratigraphy and cavern size were held constant while the cavern depth was varied between 1500 ft and 3000 ft in 500 ft increments. Thirty year simulations, the design life of the typical SPR cavern, were performed with boundary conditions modeling the oil pressure head applied to the cavern lining. A depth dependent temperature gradient of 0.012{degrees}F/ft was also applied to the model. The calculations were performed using ABAQUS, a general purpose of finite element analysis code. The user-defined subroutine option in ABAQUS was used to enter an elastic secondary creep model which includes temperature dependence. The calculations demonstrated that surface subsidence and storage loss rates increase with increasing depth. At lower depths the difference between the lithostatic stress and the oil pressure is greater. Thus, the effective stresses are greater, resulting in higher creep rates. Furthermore, at greater depths the cavern temperatures are higher which also produce higher creep rates. Together, these factors result in faster closure of the cavern. At the end of the 30 year simulations, a 1500 ft-deep cavern exhibited 4 percent storage loss and 4 ft of subsidence while a 3000 ft-deep cavern exhibited 33 percent storage loss and 44 ft of subsidence. The calculations also demonstrated that surface subsidence is directly related to the amount of storage loss. Deeper caverns exhibit more subsidence because the caverns exhibit more storage loss. However, for a given amount of storage loss, nearly the same magnitude of surface subsidence was exhibited, independent of cavern depth.

  3. Carotid Cavernous Fistula Associated with Persistent Trigeminal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Robert W.; Howard, Robert S.; Zager, Eric

    1998-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) associated with persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is a rare but important clinical entity. We present a case treated by microcoil embolization with preservation of internal carotid, PTA, and hasilar artery flow following embolization. A 62-year-old female developed pulsatile tinnitus followed by left eye proptosis and diplopia. Examination revealed a cranial nerve VI palsy and an objective bruit over the left orbit. Angiographic evaluation revealed a carotid cavernous fistula originating from a persistent trigeminal artery. Placement of a detachable balloon across the fistula site while preserving the PTA proved impossible, and the fistula was treated with microcoils following placement of a microcatheter across the fistula into the cavernous sinus. Complete closure of the fistula was followed by resolution of the patient's symptoms. Preservation of all major vessels including the PTA was accomplished through the use of coil embolization. Careful evaluation of the angiogram is necessary to identify PTA associated with a CCF. Previous reports have described treatment of CCF with PTA by surgical or balloon ocolusion, some involving sacrifice of the PTA. Examination of the relevant embryology and anatomy reveals, however, that occlusion of the PTA must be approached with caution due to potential supply to the posterior circulation. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:17171071

  4. Giant Cavernous Haemangioma of the Anterior Mediastinum

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Seyda Ors; Samancılar, Ozgur; Usluer, Ozan; Acar, Tuba; Yener, Ali Galip

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas of the anterior mediastinum is rare. We present a case of a 56-year-old male patient with a giant cavernous hemangioma of the anterior mediastinum, 18 cm in diameters, approached by left posterolateral thoracotomy. To the best of our knowledge, such a unique case has not been previously presented in the literature. PMID:26644773

  5. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral cavernous malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... R, Awad IA, Ginsberg MH. Cerebral cavernous malformations proteins inhibit Rho kinase to stabilize vascular integrity. J Exp Med. 2010 Apr 12;207(4):881-96. doi: 10.1084/jem.20091258. Epub 2010 Mar 22. Citation on ... CCM1 and CCM2 protein interactions in cell signaling: implications for cerebral cavernous ...

  6. A 12-year cavern abandonment test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérest, P.; Brouard, B.; Hévin, G.

    2010-06-01

    In 1997-1998, an abandonment test was performed in a 950-m deep, 8000-m3 salt cavern operated by GDF SUEZ at Etrez, France. In this relatively small brine-filled cavern, which had been kept idle for 15 years before the test, thermal equilibrium was reached. A special system was designed to monitor leaks, which proved to be exceedingly small. In these conditions, brine permeation and cavern creep closure are the only factors to play significant roles in pressure evolution. This test strongly suggested that obtaining an equilibrium pressure such that the effects of these two factors were exactly equal would be reached in the long term. Four years later, pressure monitoring in the closed cavern resumed. Pressure evolution during the 2002-2009 period confirmed that cavern brine pressure will remain constant and significantly smaller than geostatic pressure in the long term, precluding any risk of fracturing and brine seepage to the overburden layers.

  7. Disposal of NORM waste in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Blunt, D.; Williams, G.P.

    1998-07-01

    Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, there are no fatal flaws that would prevent a state regulatory agency from approving cavern disposal of NORM. On the basis of the costs charged by caverns currently used for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal caverns could be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

  8. Transvenous embolization of a dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistula via the inferior ophthalmic vein.

    PubMed

    Michels, Kevin S; Ng, John D; Falardeau, Julie; Roberts, Warren G; Petersen, Bryan; Nesbit, Gary M; Barnwell, Stanley L

    2007-01-01

    A 76-year-old woman presented with an acute onset of right periocular pain, diplopia, ocular injection, progressive proptosis, and periocular swelling. She had an unremarkable past medical history, and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and complete blood count were normal. A carotid-cavernous sinus fistula was suspected, and an MRI demonstrated enlargement of the superior ophthalmic vein posterior to the globe and enlargement of the inferior ophthalmic vein throughout its entire course. Cerebral arteriography demonstrated a dural cavernous sinus fistula. The inferior ophthalmic vein was accessed via the inferonasal orbital space and was catheterized for delivery of multiple platinum coils to the cavernous sinus fistula. Follow-up venograms demonstrated occlusion of the fistula. At 2-month follow-up, there was a residual sixth nerve palsy and resolution of symptoms, including proptosis and periocular swelling. PMID:18030122

  9. Granulomatous orbital inflammation associated with intraorbital titanium-impregnated acetate fiber.

    PubMed

    Chappelow, Aimee V; McMahon, James T; Jones, Curtiss L; Kosmorsky, Greg

    2010-06-01

    Herein we report a 52-year-old man with subacute right-sided proptosis and diffuse intraconal enhancing abnormality on MRI. Orbital biopsy revealed granulomatous inflammation consistent with idiopathic orbital inflammatory syndrome (IOIS), or orbital pseudotumor. However, further examination under polarizing light microscopy also revealed acetate fiber fragments within the orbit. Prominent speckles within the acetate fibers were identified as titanium by Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDXA). Acetate impregnated with titanium (as a delustrant) is a common synthetic fiber used in textile and clothing manufacture. The mechanism for entrance into the orbit in this case is not known. Granulomatous idiopathic orbital inflammatory syndrome without local or systemic cause is an uncommon clinical entity, with less than 50 cases reported in the literature. Predominance of lacrimal gland (and thus superficial) involvement in granulomatous IOIS suggests the possibility of occult foreign body in such cases. PMID:20497088

  10. Interior cavern conditions and salt fall potential

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E.; Molecke, M.A.; Myers, R.E.

    1998-03-01

    A relatively large number of salt caverns are used for fluid hydrocarbon storage, including an extensive set of facilities in the Gulf Coast salt domes for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Attention is focused on the SPR caverns because of available histories that detail events involving loss and damage of the hanging string casing. The total number of events is limited, making the database statistically sparse. The occurrence of the events is not evenly distributed, with some facilities, and some caverns, more susceptible than others. While not all of these events could be attributed to impacts from salt falls, many did show the evidence of such impacts. As a result, a study has been completed to analyze the potential for salt falls in the SPR storage caverns. In this process, it was also possible to deduce some of the cavern interior conditions. Storage caverns are very large systems in which many factors could possibly play a part in casing damage. In this study, all of the potentially important factors such as salt dome geology, operational details, and material characteristics were considered, with all being logically evaluated and most being determined as secondary in nature. As a result of the study, it appears that a principal factor in determining a propensity for casing damage from salt falls is the creep and fracture characteristics of salt in individual caverns. In addition the fracture depends strongly upon the concentration of impurity particles in the salt. Although direct observation of cavern conditions is not possible, the average impurity concentration and the accumulation of salt fall material can be determined. When this is done, there is a reasonable correlation between the propensity for a cavern to show casing damage events and accumulation of salt fall material. The accumulation volumes of salt fall material can be extremely large, indicating that only a few of the salt falls are large enough to cause impact damage.

  11. Multiphase Flow and Cavern Abandonment in Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian; Tidwell, Vince

    2001-02-13

    This report will explore the hypothesis that an underground cavity in gassy salt will eventually be gas filled as is observed on a small scale in some naturally occurring salt inclusions. First, a summary is presented on what is known about gas occurrences, flow mechanisms, and cavern behavior after abandonment. Then, background information is synthesized into theory on how gas can fill a cavern and simultaneously displace cavern fluids into the surrounding salt. Lastly, two-phase (gas and brine) flow visualization experiments are presented that demonstrate some of the associated flow mechanisms and support the theory and hypothesis that a cavity in salt can become gas filled after plugging and abandonment

  12. Management of a complex cavern storage facility for natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The Epe cavern storage facility operated by Ruhrgas AG has developed into one of the largest gas cavern storage facilities in the world. Currently, there are 32 caverns and 18 more are planned in the future. Working gas volume will increase from approximately 1.5 {times} 10{sup 9} to 2 {times} 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}. The stratified salt deposit containing the caverns has a surface area of approximately 7 km{sup 2} and is 250 m thick at the edge and 400 m thick in the center. Caverns are leached by a company that uses the recovered brine in the chlorine industry. Cavern dimensions are determined before leaching. The behavior of each cavern, as well as the thermodynamic properties of natural gas must be considered in cavern management. The full-length paper presents the components of a complex management system covering the design, construction, and operation of the Epe gas-storage caverns.

  13. Bayou Choctaw Caverns 15 and 17 web analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, B.

    1993-01-01

    The relatively thin web of salt that separates Bayou Choctaw Caverns 15 and 17 was evaluated using the finite-element method. The stability calculations provided insight as to whether or not any operationrestrictions or recommendations are necessary. Because of the uncertainty in the exact dimensions of the salt web, various web thicknesses were examined under different operating scenarios that included individual cavern workovers and drawdowns. Cavern workovers were defined by a sudden drop in the oil side pressure at the wellhead to atmospheric. Workovers represent periods of low cavern pressure. Cavern drawdowns were simulated by enlargening the cavern diameters, thus decreasing the thickness of the web. The calculations predict that Cavern 15 dominates the behavior of the web because of its larger diameter. Thus, giventhe choice of caverns, Cavern 17 should be used for oil withdrawal in order to minimize the adverse impacts on web resulting from pressure drops or cavern enlargement. From a stability point of view, maintaining normal pressures in Cavern 15 was found to be more important than operating the caverns as a gallery where both caverns are maintained at the same pressure. However, during a workover, it may be prudent to operate the caverns under similar pressures to avoid the possibility of a sudden pressure surge at the wellhead should the web fail.

  14. Cavernous sinus thrombosis progression from trismus

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jin Yong; Kim, Hyeon Min

    2015-01-01

    In the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, patients with trismus can be easily identified. If the cause of trismus is infection of the masticatory space near the pterygoid plexus, the possibility of cavernous sinus thrombosis should be considered. We report the case of a patient who presented with limited mouth opening and progressed to cavernous sinus thrombosis, along with a review of the relevant literature. PMID:25741468

  15. Cavernous hemangioma of the glans penis

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Soumya; Biswal, Deepak Kumar; Pal, Dilip Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous hemangioma of the glans penis is a very rare lesion, and only a few cases are reported in the literature. Urologists are in a dilemma to treat such lesion with cosmetic and to obtain good functional outcome. Here, we report a case of cavernous hemangioma of the glans penis in a 22-year-old boy with a successful outcome by intralesional sclerotherapy with 3% sodium tetradecyl sulfate with a review of the literature on the subject. PMID:26229337

  16. Unilateral Direct Carotid Cavernous Fistula Causing Bilateral Ocular Manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Demartini Jr., Zeferino; Liebert, Fernando; Gatto, Luana Antunes Maranha; Jung, Thiago Simiano; Rocha Jr., Carlos; Santos, Alex Marques Borges; Koppe, Gelson Luis

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral carotid cavernous fistula presents with ipsilateral ocular findings. Bilateral presentation is only seen in bilateral fistulas, usually associated with indirect (dural) carotid cavernous fistulas. Direct carotid cavernous fistulas are an abnormal communication between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. They typically begin with a traumatic disruption in the artery wall into the cavernous sinus, presenting with a classic triad of unilateral pulsatile exophthalmos, cranial bruit and episcleral venous engorgement. We report the case of a 38-year-old male with traumatic right carotid cavernous sinus fistula and bilateral ocular presentation successfully treated by interventional neuroradiology. PMID:26955353

  17. Analysis of cavern stability at the West Hackberry SPR site.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Sobolik, Steven Ronald

    2009-05-01

    This report presents computational analyses that simulate the structural response of caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) West Hackberry site. The cavern field comprises 22 caverns. Five caverns (6, 7, 8, 9, 11) were acquired from industry and have unusual shapes and a history dating back to 1946. The other 17 caverns (101-117) were leached according to SPR standards in the mid-1980s and have tall cylindrical shapes. The history of the caverns and their shapes are simulated in a three-dimensional geomechanics model of the site that predicts deformations, strains, and stresses. Future leaching scenarios corresponding to oil drawdowns using fresh water are also simulated by increasing the volume of the caverns. Cavern pressures are varied in the model to capture operational practices in the field. The results of the finite element model are interpreted to provide information on the current and future status of subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The most significant results in this report are relevant to Cavern 6. The cavern is shaped like a bowl with a large ceiling span and is in close proximity to Cavern 9. The analyses predict tensile stresses at the edge of the ceiling during repressuization of Cavern 6 following workover conditions. During a workover the cavern is at low pressure to service a well. The wellhead pressures are atmospheric. When the workover is complete, the cavern is repressurized. The resulting elastic stresses are sufficient to cause tension around the edge of the large ceiling span. With time, these stresses relax to a compressive state because of salt creep. However, the potential for salt fracture and propagation exists, particularly towards Cavern 9. With only 200 ft of salt between the caverns, the operational consequences must be examined if the two caverns become connected. A critical time may be during a workover of Cavern 9 in part because of the operational vulnerabilities, but also because dilatant damage is

  18. Experience in testing of a solution mined storage cavern

    SciTech Connect

    Goin, K.L.

    1982-01-01

    Recertification tests were made of the U.S. Department of Energy/Strategic Petroleum Reserve oil storage cavern No. 6 in the West Hackberry, LA, salt dome. The cavern has a volume of 8,600,000 bbl. Tests included hydrostatic tests of the brine filled cavern and nitrogen leak tests of the 3 wells entering the cavern. Test procedures are described and test results are discussed.

  19. Analysis of cavern stability at the Bryan Mound SPR site.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Sobolik, Steven Ronald

    2009-04-01

    This report presents computational analyses that simulate the structural response of caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound site. The cavern field comprises 20 caverns. Five caverns (1, 2, 4, and 5; 3 was later plugged and abandoned) were acquired from industry and have unusual shapes and a history dating back to 1946. The other 16 caverns (101-116) were leached according to SPR standards in the mid-1980s and have tall cylindrical shapes. The history of the caverns and their shapes are simulated in a 3-D geomechanics model of the site that predicts deformations, strains, and stresses. Future leaching scenarios due to oil drawdowns using fresh water are also simulated by increasing the volume of the caverns. Cavern pressures are varied in the model to capture operational practices in the field. The results of the finite element model are interpreted to provide information on the current and future status of subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The most significant result in this report is relevant to caverns 1, 2, and 5. The caverns have non-cylindrical shapes and have potential regions where the surrounding salt may be damaged during workover procedures. During a workover the normal cavern operating pressure is lowered to service a well. At this point the wellhead pressures are atmospheric. When the workover is complete, the cavern is repressurized. The resulting elastic stresses are sufficient to cause tension and large deviatoric stresses at several locations. With time, these stresses relax to a compressive state due to salt creep. However, the potential for salt damage and fracturing exists. The analyses predict tensile stresses at locations with sharp-edges in the wall geometry, or in the case of cavern 5, in the neck region between the upper and lower lobes of the cavern. The effects do not appear to be large-scale, however, so the only major impact is the potential for stress-induced salt falls in cavern 5, potentially leading to

  20. Overfilling of cavern blamed for LPG blasts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-06

    Three explosions and a fire Apr. 7 at an LPG salt dome storage cavern near Brenham, Tex., were triggered when the cavern was overfilled, the Texas Railroad Commission (TRC) has reported. This paper reports that a TRC investigation found that LPG escaped to the surface at the Brenham site through brine injection tubing after excessive fill from an LPG line forced the cavern's water level below the brine tubing's bottom. At the surface, LPG was released into a brine storage pit where it turned into a dense, explosive vapor. At 7:08 a.m., the vapor was ignited by an unknown source. The resulting blast killed three persons and injured 19 and brought operations at the site to a halt.

  1. Analysis of cavern shapes for the strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Sobolik, Steven Ronald

    2006-07-01

    This report presents computational analyses to determine the structural integrity of different salt cavern shapes. Three characteristic shapes for increasing cavern volumes are evaluated and compared to the baseline shape of a cylindrical cavern. Caverns with enlarged tops, bottoms, and mid-sections are modeled. The results address pillar to diameter ratios of some existing caverns in the system and will represent the final shape of other caverns if they are repeatedly drawn down. This deliverable is performed in support of the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Several three-dimensional models using a close-packed arrangement of 19 caverns have been built and analyzed using a simplified symmetry involving a 30-degree wedge portion of the model. This approach has been used previously for West Hackberry (Ehgartner and Sobolik, 2002) and Big Hill (Park et al., 2005) analyses. A stratigraphy based on the Big Hill site has been incorporated into the model. The caverns are modeled without wells and casing to simplify the calculations. These calculations have been made using the power law creep model. The four cavern shapes were evaluated at several different cavern radii against four design factors. These factors included the dilatant damage safety factor in salt, the cavern volume closure, axial well strain in the caprock, and surface subsidence. The relative performance of each of the cavern shapes varies for the different design factors, although it is apparent that the enlarged bottom design provides the worst overall performance. The results of the calculations are put in the context of the history of cavern analyses assuming cylindrical caverns, and how these results affect previous understanding of cavern behavior in a salt dome.

  2. A lymph nodal capillary-cavernous hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Dellachà, A; Fulcheri, E; Campisi, C

    1999-09-01

    A capillary-cavernous hemangioma in an obturator lymph node was found incidentally in a 64 year-old woman who had undergone unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and lymphadenectomy for an ovarian neoplasm. Vascular tumors of lymph nodes are briefly reviewed including eight previously described nodal capillary-cavernous hemangiomas. The association with other splanchnic hemangiomas is pointed out and the likelihood that the lesion is a hamartoma rather than a true neoplasm is addressed. Despite its rarity, this entity needs to be recognized by lymphologists who image lymph nodes by lymphangiography as well as by lymph nodal pathologists. PMID:10494525

  3. 3-D Finite Element Analyses of the Egan Cavern Field

    SciTech Connect

    Klamerus, E.W.; Ehgartner, B.L.

    1999-02-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed for the two gas-filled storage caverns at the Egan field, Jennings dome, Louisiana. The effects of cavern enlargement on surface subsidence, storage loss, and cavern stability were investigated. The finite element model simulated the leaching of caverns to 6 and 8 billion cubic feet (BCF) and examined their performance at various operating conditions. Operating pressures varied from 0.15 psi/ft to 0.9 psi/ft at the bottom of the lowest cemented casing. The analysis also examined the stability of the web or pillar of salt between the caverns under differential pressure loadings. The 50-year simulations were performed using JAC3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasistatic solids. A damage criterion based on onset of dilatancy was used to evaluate cavern instability. Dilation results from the development of microfractures in salt and, hence, potential increases in permeability onset occurs well before large scale failure. The analyses predicted stable caverns throughout the 50-year period for the range of pressures investigated. Some localized salt damage was predicted near the bottom walls of the caverns if the caverns are operated at minimum pressure for long periods of time. Volumetric cavern closures over time due to creep were moderate to excessive depending on the salt creep properties and operating pressures. However, subsidence above the cavern field was small and should pose no problem, to surface facilities.

  4. Sonar surveys used in gas-storage cavern analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crossley, N.G.

    1998-05-04

    Natural-gas storage cavern internal configuration, inspection information, and cavern integrity data can be obtained during high-pressure operations with specialized gas-sonar survey logging techniques. TransGas Ltd., Regina, Sask., has successfully performed these operations on several of its deepest and highest pressurized caverns. The data can determine gas-in-place inventory and assess changes in spatial volumes. These changes can result from cavern creep, shrinkage, or closure or from various downhole abnormalities such as fluid infill or collapse of the sidewall or roof. The paper discusses conventional surveys with sonar, running surveys in pressurized caverns, accuracy of the sonar survey, initial development of Cavern 5, a roof fall, Cavern 4 development, and a damaged string.

  5. Air quality in the Carlsbad cavern

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yung-Seng; Chen, Tou-Rong; Wasiolek, P.T.

    1994-11-01

    The air quality in the Carlsbad Cavern has been investigated, but there are no reports on radon progeny and aerosols. The purpose of this experiment was to determine the activity size distribution of radon progeny and the air exchange rate inside the Cavern. Teams from ITRI and New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMT) conducted the field study in July 1994. The ITRI graded diffusion battery (GDB) was used to determine the activity size distribution, progeny concentration, equilibrium factor, and unattached fraction of the radon progeny. The design, calibration, and performance of the GDB have been described. For this study, each stage of the GDB contained one stainless steel screen, with the mesh sizes arranged in a series of 30, 50, 145, 200, and 635 mesh from the air inlet to the outlet. A 47-nm type A/E glass fiber filter was used to collect all particles that penetrated the screens. The flow rate was 5 L/min. The average ventilation rate in the cavern is 0.0026 V/hr. Our results showed that the cavern atmosphere may be quite different from other underground environments. The atmosphere in the summer is stable and relatively free of airborne particles, partly due to the extremely slow air exchange rate.

  6. Imaging in orbital trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ken Y.; Ngai, Philip; Echegoyen, Julio C.; Tao, Jeremiah P.

    2012-01-01

    Orbital trauma is one of the most common reasons for ophthalmology specialty consultation in the emergency department setting. We survey the literature from 1990 to present to describe the role of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their associated angiography in some of the most commonly encountered orbital trauma conditions. CT orbit can often detect certain types of foreign bodies, lens dislocation, ruptured globe, choroidal or retinal detachments, or cavernous sinus thrombosis and thus complement a bedside ophthalmic exam that can sometimes be limited in the setting of trauma. CT remains the workhorse for acute orbital trauma owing to its rapidity and ability to delineate bony abnormalities; however MRI remains an important modality in special circumstances such as soft tissue assessment or with organic foreign bodies. PMID:23961028

  7. A Rare Cavernous Hemangioma of the Adrenal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Cheng; Wu, Pengjie; Zhu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal cavernous hemangiomas are rare nonfunctioning benign tumors. This case report presents a patient with a huge nonfunctioning adrenal cavernous hemangioma presenting as an adrenal incidentaloma suspicious for adrenal myelolipoma. Although adrenal cavernous hemangiomas are rare, they should be considered as a part of the differential diagnosis of adrenal neoplasms. The proper treatment is surgical excision due the risk of spontaneous tumor rupture and the difficulty of ruling out malignancy. PMID:26793524

  8. Cavernous sinus syndrome: need for early diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Toro, Jaime; Burbano, Lisseth Estefania; Reyes, Saúl; Barreras, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous sinus syndrome (CSS) is a rare condition characterised by ophthalmoplegia, proptosis, ocular and conjunctival congestion, trigeminal sensory loss and Horner's syndrome. These signs and symptoms result from the involvement of the cranial nerves passing through the cavernous sinus. We report the case of a 53-year-old man with a history of daily stabbing headache associated with dizziness, progressive blurred vision, right ocular pain, ptosis and ophthalmoplegia. After working up the patient, a meningioma was identified as the cause of the CSS. Despite advances in neuroimaging techniques, in some cases, the aetiology of CSS remains difficult to determine. We highlight the clinical and radiological features of a meningioma, one of the causes of CSS. Early diagnosis and treatment of CSS play a key role in a better prognosis. PMID:25819816

  9. [Cavernous hemangioma of the liver (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lanuza, A; Olagüe, R; Vallcanera, A; Gracía, A; Páramo, C; Villanueva, A

    1978-02-01

    A three-month old asymptomatic infant was incidentally found to have an abdominal mass. Through standard radiological and vascular procedures it was defined as being of hepatic origin, vascular etiology and of benign prognosis. Differences among cavernous hemangioma, hepatoma, metastasis and hemangio-endothelioma are summarized. The importance of angiography is emphasized as an essential procedure previous to the surgical evaluation and therapy. PMID:566065

  10. Thoracic Cavernous Lymphangioma Provoking Massive Chyloptysis

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Robert; Hodges, Jeffrey; Harness-Brumley, Cayce; Girod, Carlos; Bartolome, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    Chyloptysis is a relatively rare embodiment of disease that encompasses a lengthy differential and provides many diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Presented here is the case of a young woman with massive chyloptysis due to a thoracic cavernous lymphangioma arising in the peripartum period. The severity of her condition mandated the use of cardiopulmonary bypass to resect her lymphangioma. We believe that the extent of her symptoms, etiology of disease, and surgical management represent a unique scenario in the literature. PMID:26425583

  11. Allowable pillar to diameter ratio for strategic petroleum reserve caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2011-05-01

    This report compiles 3-D finite element analyses performed to evaluate the stability of Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns over multiple leach cycles. When oil is withdrawn from a cavern in salt using freshwater, the cavern enlarges. As a result, the pillar separating caverns in the SPR fields is reduced over time due to usage of the reserve. The enlarged cavern diameters and smaller pillars reduce underground stability. Advances in geomechanics modeling enable the allowable pillar to diameter ratio (P/D) to be defined. Prior to such modeling capabilities, the allowable P/D was established as 1.78 based on some very limited experience in other cavern fields. While appropriate for 1980, the ratio conservatively limits the allowable number of oil drawdowns and hence limits the overall utility and life of the SPR cavern field. Analyses from all four cavern fields are evaluated along with operating experience gained over the past 30 years to define a new P/D for the reserve. A new ratio of 1.0 is recommended. This ratio is applicable only to existing SPR caverns.

  12. Strategic petroleum reserve (SPR): oil-storage cavern, Sulphur Mines 6 certification tests and analysis. [Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Beasley, R.R.

    1982-04-01

    Well leak tests and a cavern pressure test were conducted in June and July 1981 and indicated that oil leakage from the cavern is unlikely to exceed the DOE criterion if oil is stored at near atmospheric wellhead brine pressures and higher pressures are only used for short periods of oil fill and withdrawal. The data indicate that cavern structural failure during oil storage is unlikely and that there was no leakage from cavern 6 to the adjacent cavern 7. Because of the proximity of cavern 6 to cavern 7, it is recommended that a similar type of oil be stored in these two caverns.

  13. Balloon-Assisted Coiling of the Cavernous Sinus to Treat Direct Carotid Cavernous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    De Renzis, Alioscia.; Nappini, Sergio.; Consoli, Arturo; Renieri, Leonardo; Limbucci, Nicola; Rosi, Andrea; Vignoli, Chiara; Pellicanò, Giannantonio; Mangiafico, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Summary This study evaluated clinical and neuroradiological results in 13 consecutive patients with spontaneous and traumatic direct carotid cavernous fistulas treated at our center between January 2006 and September 2012. All patients were treated by coiling of the cavernous sinus. Coiling was always performed while a semi-compliant non-detachable balloon was temporarily inflated in the internal carotid artery. This technique (balloon-assisted coiling) permitted a clear visualization of the fistula, facilitated coil positioning and protected the patency of the artery. All patients’ clinical data and radiological examinations were reviewed; nine patients underwent radiological and clinical follow-up, with a mean duration of 3.8 years (range: six months-six years). Overall results at discharge showed a complete occlusion of the fistula in seven patients (7/13, 54%) and a resolution of symptoms in eight patients (8/12, 67%). Radiological follow-up showed complete occlusion of the fistula in all patients (9/9, 100%) and clinical follow-up showed a resolution of symptoms in eight patients (8/9, 89%) and persistent symptoms in one (1/9, 11%). No procedure-related complications occurred. Balloon-assisted coiling of the cavernous sinus for the treatment of direct carotid cavernous fistulas proved an effective and safe technique, both in angiographic and clinical terms, and may be considered a technical improvement. PMID:24070084

  14. Salt caverns show promise for nonhazardous oil field waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.

    1996-11-18

    Salt caverns show promise for the disposal of non-hazardous oil field wastes, and there are no apparent regulatory barriers to this application. Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. Argonne National laboratory has reviewed the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicates that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied (Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and Texas). The paper discusses the two types of salt deposits in the US, regulatory concerns, wastes, cavern design, disposal operations, closure and remediation, and results of the feasibility study.

  15. Endovascular treatment of carotid cavernous sinus fistula: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Korkmazer, Bora; Kocak, Burak; Tureci, Ercan; Islak, Civan; Kocer, Naci; Kizilkilic, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Carotid cavernous sinus fistulas are abnormal communications between the carotid system and the cavernous sinus. Several classification schemes have described carotid cavernous sinus fistulas according to etiology, hemodynamic features, or the angiographic arterial architecture. Increased pressure within the cavernous sinus appears to be the main factor in pathophysiology. The clinical features are related to size, exact location, and duration of the fistula, adequacy and route of venous drainage and the presence of arterial/venous collaterals. Noninvasive imaging (computed tomography, magnetic resonance, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, Doppler) is often used in the initial work-up of a possible carotid cavernous sinus fistulas. Cerebral angiography is the gold standard for the definitive diagnosis, classification, and planning of treatment for these lesions. The endovascular approach has evolved as the mainstay therapy for definitive treatment in situations including clinical emergencies. Conservative treatment, surgery and radiosurgery constitute other management options for these lesions. PMID:23671750

  16. Primary Intraosseous Cavernous Hemangioma in the Skull.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Guan, Jian; Ma, Wenbin; Li, Yongning; Xing, Bing; Ren, Zuyuan; Su, Changbao; Wang, Renzhi

    2016-03-01

    Primary intraosseous cavernous hemangiomas (PICHs) are benign vascular tumors that may involve any part of the body. PICH occurs more frequently in the spine and less commonly in skull. The earliest description in the English literature was in 1845 by Toynbee, who reported a vascular tumor arising in the confines of the parietal bone. Skull PICHs do not always have typical radiologic features and should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of malignant skull lesions. We now reviewed and analyzed related literatures in detail with reporting a rare case of PICH in the left front bone that was surgically resected. PMID:26986133

  17. Primary Intraosseous Cavernous Hemangioma in the Skull

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Guan, Jian; Ma, Wenbin; Li, Yongning; Xing, Bing; Ren, Zuyuan; Su, Changbao; Wang, Renzhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary intraosseous cavernous hemangiomas (PICHs) are benign vascular tumors that may involve any part of the body. PICH occurs more frequently in the spine and less commonly in skull. The earliest description in the English literature was in 1845 by Toynbee, who reported a vascular tumor arising in the confines of the parietal bone. Skull PICHs do not always have typical radiologic features and should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of malignant skull lesions. We now reviewed and analyzed related literatures in detail with reporting a rare case of PICH in the left front bone that was surgically resected. PMID:26986133

  18. [A case of mediastinal cavernous hemangioma].

    PubMed

    Maebeya, S; Nishimura, O; Yokoi, H; Shimizu, T; Yoshimasu, T; Naito, Y

    1990-03-01

    A 6-year-old boy had an abnormal shadow on the chest X-ray film. It showed a tumor shadow with calcification on the right hilum. The plain CT scan showed an anterior mediastinal mass and its density was similar to that of large vessels. On the angio CT scan the lesion displayed a much lower enhancement than large vessels. The tumor was resected completely by median sternotomy. It was 5.6 X 3.6 X 3.0 cm in size and contained a phlebolith 5 mm in diameter. The histological diagnosis was cavernous hemangioma. PMID:2348129

  19. Disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns: Feasibility, legality, risk, and costs

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    Salt caverns can be formed through solution mining in the bedded or domal salt formations that are found in many states. Salt caverns have traditionally been used for hydrocarbon storage, but caverns have also been used to dispose of some types of wastes. This paper provides an overview of several years of research by Argonne National Laboratory on the feasibility and legality of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field wastes, the risks to human populations from this disposal method, and the cost of cavern disposal. Costs are compared between the four operating US disposal caverns and other commercial disposal options located in the same geographic area as the caverns. Argonne`s research indicates that disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns is feasible and legal. The risk from cavern disposal of oil field wastes appears to be below accepted safe risk thresholds. Disposal caverns are economically competitive with other disposal options.

  20. Glaucoma Management in Carotid Cavernous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Calafiore, Silvia; Perdicchi, Andrea; Scuderi, Gianluca; Contestabile, Maria Teresa; Abdolrahimzadeh, Solmaz; Recupero, Santi Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carotid cavernous fistulas (CCF) are vascular communications between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. Ophthalmologists are called to diagnose and manage the condition in cases that present with ocular features. A 73-year-old female was referred to our glaucoma center clinic. Eight years before, she had started receiving medication for glaucoma and had undergone laser iridotomy, but a satisfactory management of intraocular pressure (IOP) had not been achieved. The patient was complaining of intermittent diplopia, bilateral proptosis, and conjunctival chemosis over the past 6 months. Best-corrected visual acuity in the right (OD) and left eye (OS) was 9/10 and 10/10, respectively. Visual field testing showed slight paracentral field defects mostly in OS. IOP was 20 mm Hg in OD and 34 mm Hg in OS. We referred the patient to neuroradiology, and MRI angiography revealed a CCF with angiographic classification of Cognard grade 2. Closure of the CCF by transarterial embolization was performed in the neuroradiology department. One week following the procedure, the clinical signs of diplopia, proptosis, and conjunctival chemosis had greatly improved, and IOP was reduced to 12 mm Hg OD and 19 mm Hg in OS. Glaucoma treatment was maintained with topical brimatoprost, brinzolamide, and timolol. Owing to the risk of vision loss associated with vascular stasis, retinal ischemia, and high IOP, ophthalmologists must be aware of the clinical features of CCF and should request appropriate imaging studies such as MRI angiography in order to confirm the diagnosis and plan multidisciplinary treatment. PMID:27462258

  1. Glaucoma Management in Carotid Cavernous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Calafiore, Silvia; Perdicchi, Andrea; Scuderi, Gianluca; Contestabile, Maria Teresa; Abdolrahimzadeh, Solmaz; Recupero, Santi Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carotid cavernous fistulas (CCF) are vascular communications between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. Ophthalmologists are called to diagnose and manage the condition in cases that present with ocular features. A 73-year-old female was referred to our glaucoma center clinic. Eight years before, she had started receiving medication for glaucoma and had undergone laser iridotomy, but a satisfactory management of intraocular pressure (IOP) had not been achieved. The patient was complaining of intermittent diplopia, bilateral proptosis, and conjunctival chemosis over the past 6 months. Best-corrected visual acuity in the right (OD) and left eye (OS) was 9/10 and 10/10, respectively. Visual field testing showed slight paracentral field defects mostly in OS. IOP was 20 mm Hg in OD and 34 mm Hg in OS. We referred the patient to neuroradiology, and MRI angiography revealed a CCF with angiographic classification of Cognard grade 2. Closure of the CCF by transarterial embolization was performed in the neuroradiology department. One week following the procedure, the clinical signs of diplopia, proptosis, and conjunctival chemosis had greatly improved, and IOP was reduced to 12 mm Hg OD and 19 mm Hg in OS. Glaucoma treatment was maintained with topical brimatoprost, brinzolamide, and timolol. Owing to the risk of vision loss associated with vascular stasis, retinal ischemia, and high IOP, ophthalmologists must be aware of the clinical features of CCF and should request appropriate imaging studies such as MRI angiography in order to confirm the diagnosis and plan multidisciplinary treatment. PMID:27462258

  2. Evaluating the effects of the number of caverns on the performance of underground oil storage facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ehgartner, B.L.

    1992-01-01

    Three dimensional finite element calculations were performed to investigate the effect field size, in terms of the number of caverns, on the performance of SPR oil storage caverns leached in domal salt (interms of surface subsidence, storage losses, and cavern integrity). The calculations were performed for cavern fields containing 1, 7, 19, and an infinite number of caverns. The magnitude and volume of subsidence was significantly affected by increasing the number of caverns (nearly an order of magnitude increase was predicted for each increase in field size), while the extent of subsidence (approximately 2000 m fromthe center of the field) and storage loss were not. Furthermore, the percentage of storage loss volume manifested as surface subsidence increased as the cavern field was enlarged. This was attributed to elasticvolumetric dilatation of overlying strata. The multiple cavern calculations demonstrate that storage losses are greater for caverns farther from the center of the caverns field. Based on an accumulated strain stability criteria, the larger cavern fields are predicted to have a shorter life. This criteria also indicates that caverns on the periphery of a field may show signs of instability before the inner caverns. The West Hackberry site (containing 22 caverns) subsidence data closely agrees with the 19 cavern model subsidence predictions, providing confidence in the calculations. Even a 19 cavern field, substantially large by SPR standards, does not approach the behavior predicted by infinite cavern models (which are frequently used because they are economical). This demonstrates that 3D modeling is required to accurately investigate the performance of a multi-cavern array. Although based on a typical SPR cavern design, the results of this study describe mechanics common to all multi-cavern fields and should, in general, be useful tocavern engineers and architects.

  3. CaveMan Version 3.0: A Software System for SPR Cavern Pressure Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    BALLARD,SANFORD; EHGARTNER,BRIAN L.

    2000-07-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve currently has approximately 500 million barrels of crude oil stored in 62 caverns solution-mined in salt domes along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana and Texas. One of the challenges of operating these caverns is ensuring that none of the fluids in the caverns are leaking into the environment. The current approach is to test the mechanical integrity of all the wells entering each cavern approximately once every five years. An alternative approach to detecting cavern leaks is to monitor the cavern pressure, since leaking fluid would act to reduce cavern pressure. Leak detection by pressure monitoring is complicated by other factors that influence cavern pressure, the most important of which are thermal expansion and contraction of the fluids in the cavern as they come into thermal equilibrium with the host salt, and cavern volume reduction due to salt creep. Cavern pressure is also influenced by cavern enlargement resulting from salt dissolution following introduction of raw water or unsaturated brine into the cavern. However, this effect only lasts for a month or two following a fluid injection. In order to implement a cavern pressure monitoring program, a software program called CaveMan has been developed. It includes thermal, creep and salt dissolution models and is able to predict the cavern pressurization rate based on the operational history of the cavern. Many of the numerous thermal and mechanical parameters in the model have been optimized to produce the best match between the historical data and the model predictions. Future measurements of cavern pressure are compared to the model predictions, and significant differences in cavern pressure set program flags that notify cavern operators of a potential problem. Measured cavern pressures that are significantly less than those predicted by the model may indicate the existence of a leak.

  4. Strategic petroleum reserve caverns casing damage update 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E.; Molecke, M.A.; Neal, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    Hanging casing strings are used for oil and brine transfer in the domal salt storage caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Damage to these casings is of concern because hanging string replacement is costly and because of implications on cavern stability. Although the causes of casing damage are not always well defined, many events leading to damage are assumed to be the result of salt falls impacting the hanging strings. However, in some cases, operational aspects may be suspected. The history of damage to hanging strings is updated in this study to include the most recent events. Potential general domal and local operational and material factors that could influence the tendency for caverns to have salt falls are examined in detail. As a result of this examination, general factors, such as salt dome anomalies and crude type, and most of the operational factors, such as geometry, location and depressurizations, are not believed to be primary causes of casing damage. Further analysis is presented of the accumulation of insolubles during cavern solutioning and accumulation of salt fall material on the cavern floor. Inaccuracies in sump geometry probably make relative cavern insolubles contents uncertain. However, determination of the salt fall accumulations, which are more accurate, suggest that the caverns with the largest salt fall accumulations show the greatest number of hanging string events. There is good correlation between the accumulation rate and the number of events when the event numbers are corrected to an equivalent number for a single hanging string in a quiescent, operating cavern. The principal factor that determines the propensity for a cavern to exhibit this behavior is thought to be the effect of impurity content on the fracture behavior of salt.

  5. Disposal of nonhazardous oil field wastes into salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.; Elcock, D.; Raivel, M.; Caudle, D.

    1996-12-31

    Bedded and domal salt deposits occur in many states. If salt deposits are thick enough, salt caverns can be formed through solution mining. These caverns are created either incidentally as a result of salt recovery or intentionally to create an underground chamber that can be used for storing hydrocarbon products or disposing of wastes. This paper evaluates the legality, feasibility, and suitability of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration, development, and production wastes (hereafter referred to as oil field wastes, unless otherwise noted) in salt caverns.

  6. No more fear of the cavernous sinuses!

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, F; Williams, M; Lafitte, F; Héran, F

    2013-10-01

    After a review of the anatomy of the cavernous sinuses (CS), this work presents the clinical picture and imaging protocol of lesions which occur in this area. It outlines extension and imaging features of these lesions. It emphasises MRI appearance, such as T1, T2 and diffusion signal, type of contrast medium uptake. A complementary CT scan is performed if an associated abnormality of the base of the skull is suspected on MRI (lysis, condensation). This paper proposes a straightforward classification system depending on imaging and sets out the principal symptoms of the main aetiologies of CS lesions which are represented by various diseases such as tumours, inflammations, vascular abnormalities. Complementary to imaging, their diagnosis is based on clinical data i.e. known cancer, signs suggesting inflammation. Its rich iconography allows this article to be used as a reference in current clinical practice. PMID:24099909

  7. Cerebral cavernous malformation proteins at a glance.

    PubMed

    Draheim, Kyle M; Fisher, Oriana S; Boggon, Titus J; Calderwood, David A

    2014-02-15

    Loss-of-function mutations in genes encoding KRIT1 (also known as CCM1), CCM2 (also known as OSM and malcavernin) or PDCD10 (also known as CCM3) cause cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). These abnormalities are characterized by dilated leaky blood vessels, especially in the neurovasculature, that result in increased risk of stroke, focal neurological defects and seizures. The three CCM proteins can exist in a trimeric complex, and each of these essential multi-domain adaptor proteins also interacts with a range of signaling, cytoskeletal and adaptor proteins, presumably accounting for their roles in a range of basic cellular processes including cell adhesion, migration, polarity and apoptosis. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we provide an overview of current models of CCM protein function focusing on how known protein-protein interactions might contribute to cellular phenotypes and highlighting gaps in our current understanding. PMID:24481819

  8. [Cavernous hemangioma confined to the tongue].

    PubMed

    Galletti, C

    1988-12-01

    The authors relate on a case of an isolated cavernous haemangioma of the body of the tongue characterized by considerable size. Such neoplasms, usually described within the more extensive chapter of the more common angiomatous lesion of the oral cavity, are relatively rare. The authors describe a personal case discussing the diagnostic spects of such lesion and emphasizing the importance of the arteriography of the carotid artery and the of the selective arteriography of the lingual arteries, especially in considering surgery. Biopsies are not recommended. After discussing the histopathological and clinical aspects of such lesions the Authors emphasize the therapeutic ones. Even though radiotherapy, cryotherapy, laser therapy, medical treatment, injection of sclerosing substances and the selective embolization, of the lingual artery seem to have some efficacy, the authors conclude that surgery in the therapy of choice in the isolated vascular lesions of the body of the tongue. PMID:3274631

  9. Reference value developed for mechanical integrity of storage caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Crotogino, F.

    1996-10-28

    A reference value to verify the mechanical integrity of salt-cavern wells used in hydrocarbon storage has been developed. Salt caverns play important roles in large-scale storage of hydrocarbon gases and liquids. Required for safe and economical operation of these storage caverns is verification of the external mechanical integrity of the access (injection and withdrawal) wells. This study had the following goals: Provision of an overview of current practice; and Development of a reference for external well mechanical-integrity testing with respect to performance, data evaluation, and assessment. The storage cavern operators expected to gain the following: Comparability between method and assessments; Aid in influencing the movement towards standardization by regulators; and A firm technical base for use in litigation between the operator and other parties.

  10. Optic chiasmal cavernous angioma: A rare suprasellar vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Al-Shaar, Hussam; Bahatheq, Ayman; Takroni, Radwan; Al-Thubaiti, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Suprasellar cavernous malformation in the optic pathway is not commonly encountered. To date, there are only few reports present in the literature. Case Description: The authors report a rare case of suprasellar optic pathway cavernous malformation in a 33-year-old female who presented with progressive visual loss. Her imaging revealed a large heterogeneous, hyperintense, hemorrhagic right suprasellar extra-axial complex cystic structure, causing mass effect on the adjacent hypothalamus and third ventricle displacing these structures. Gross total resection of the lesion was achieved utilizing a right frontal craniotomy approach. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of suprasellar chiasmal cavernous malformation. Conclusion: Although visual pathway cavernous malformation is a rare event, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of lesions occurring suprasellarly in the visual pathway and hypothalamus. PMID:27583178

  11. Urethral cavernous hemangioma in a female patient: a rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Bolat, Mustafa Suat; Yüzüncü, Kubilay; Akdeniz, Ekrem; Demirdoven, Ayse Nurten

    2015-01-01

    Genitourinary hemangiomas are rare entities of the urinary system. We reported a female patient who suffered dyspareunia and intermitant hematuria that was proved as urethral cavernous hemangioma. Despite its benign nature, hemangiomas may recur due to incomplet excision. PMID:26985270

  12. Orbital apex disorders: a case series.

    PubMed

    Warburton, R E; Brookes, C C D; Golden, B A; Turvey, T A

    2016-04-01

    Orbital apex syndrome is an uncommon disorder characterized by ophthalmoplegia, proptosis, ptosis, hypoesthesia of the forehead, and vision loss. It may be classified as part of a group of orbital apex disorders that includes superior orbital fissure syndrome and cavernous sinus syndrome. Superior orbital fissure syndrome presents similarly to orbital apex syndrome without optic nerve impairment. Cavernous sinus syndrome includes hypoesthesia of the cheek and lower eyelid in addition to the signs seen in orbital apex syndrome. While historically described separately, these three disorders share similar causes, diagnostic course, and management strategies. The purpose of this study was to report three cases of orbital apex disorders treated recently and to review the literature related to these conditions. Inflammatory and vascular disorders, neoplasm, infection, and trauma are potential causes of orbital apex disorders. Management is directed at the causative process. The cases described represent a rare but important group of conditions seen by the maxillofacial surgeon. A review of the clinical presentation, etiology, and management of these conditions may prompt timely recognition and treatment. PMID:26725107

  13. Burkitt leukemia with numb chin syndrome and cavernous sinus involvement.

    PubMed

    Seixas, Daniela Vasconcelos; Lobo, Ana Luísa; Farinha, Nuno Jorge; Cavadas, Laurentina; Campos, Maria Manuel; Ayres-Basto, Margarida; Pimenta, Maria Teresa Lavandeira

    2006-05-01

    Cavernous sinus syndrome is a rare event. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas, are one possible cause. Neurological presentation of these lymphomas is also exceptional. We report the case of an 11-year-old boy that developed a right third cranial nerve palsy and numbness in the distribution of the right mental nerve, with normal CSF, and enlargement of cavernous sinus on the same side, who was diagnosed Burkitt leukemia. PMID:16621630

  14. Giant cystic cerebral cavernous malformation with multiple calcification - case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Chun; Kwon, Ki-Young; Rhee, Jong-Joo; Lee, Jong-Won; Hur, Jin-Woo; Lee, Hyun-Koo

    2013-09-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation with giant cysts is rare and literature descriptions of its clinical features are few. In this case study, the authors describe the clinical symptoms, radiological findings, and pathological diagnosis of cerebral cavernous malformations with giant cysts, reviewing the relevant literature to clearly differentiate this from other disease entities. The authors present a case of a 19-year-old male with a giant cystic cavernous malformation, who was referred to the division of neurosurgery due to right sided motor weakness (grade II/II). Imaging revealed a large homogenous cystic mass, 7.2×4.6×6 cm in size, in the left fronto-parietal lobe and basal ganglia. The mass had an intra-cystic lesion, abutting the basal portion of the mass. The initial diagnosis considered this mass a glioma or infection. A left frontal craniotomy was performed, followed by a transcortical approach to resect the mass. Total removal was accomplished without post-operative complications. An open biopsy and a histopathological exam diagnosed the mass as a giant cystic cavernous malformation. Imaging appearances of giant cavernous malformations may vary. The clinical features, radiological features, and management of giant cavernous malformations are described based on pertinent literature review. PMID:24167810

  15. Oil field waste disposal in salt caverns: An information website

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.; Veil, J. A.

    1999-12-10

    Argonne National Laboratory has completed the construction of a Website for the US Department of Energy (DOE) that provides detailed information on salt caverns and their use for disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). Specific topics in the Website include the following: descriptions of salt deposits and salt caverns within the US, salt cavern construction methods, potential types of wastes, waste emplacement, regulatory issues, costs, carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic human health risks associated with postulated cavern release scenarios, new information on cavern disposal (e.g., upcoming meetings, regulatory issues, etc.), other studies supported by the National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO) (e.g., considerations of site location, cavern stability, development issues, and bedded salt characterization in the Midland Basin), and links to other associated Web sites. In addition, the Website allows downloadable access to reports prepared on the topic that were funded by DOE. Because of the large quantities of NOW and NORM wastes generated annually by the oil industry, information presented on this Website is particularly interesting and valuable to project managers, regulators, and concerned citizens.

  16. Recurrent proptotic diplopia due to congestive expansion of cavernous haemangioma with relapsing right-sided cardiac failure

    PubMed Central

    O'Mahony, D.; O'Neill, E.

    1999-01-01

    A 75-year-old man with a recent history of pulmonary embolism, presented with collapse followed by a gran mal seizure and right-sided non-pulsatile proptosis. On recovery, he had diplopia on lateral and upward gaze and signs of congestive cardiac failure. Further pulmonary embolism was proven by lung scintigraphy. Computed tomography of his orbits confirmed a contrast-enhancing space-occupying lesion of the medial wall of the right orbit, with no intracranial abnormality. The patient was investigated for metastatic tumour as a possible cause of the space-occupying lesion and the unprovoked thromboembolic event, but no evidence of malignancy was found. The orbital lesion was not biopsied because of the risk of bleeding from anticoagulation. Three weeks later, the patient re-presented with recurrent cardiac failure, proptosis, and diplopia. A transorbital ultrasound confirmed an encapsulated, well-defined vascular lesion, with typical appearances and Doppler flow characteristics of a cavernous haemangioma. Diuretic therapy abolished the proptosis and diplopia in tandem with relief of the cardiac failure. This is the first description of recurrent proptosis with diplopia due to recurrent congestive expansion of an orbital cavernous haemangioma.


Keywords: haemangioma; proptosis; diplopia; cardiac failure PMID:10621902

  17. Barotraumatic orbital emphysema of rhinogenic origin in a breath-hold diver: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bolognini, A; Delehaye, E; Cau, M; Cosso, L

    2008-01-01

    Orbital emphysema is a well-recognized complication of fractures involving the orbit. Commonly, it occurs when high pressure develops in nasal cavity as during nose blowing, coughing or Valsalva's maneuver and usually occurs in the subcutaneous tissues. We report the case of a young breath-hold diver who developed spontaneous, non compressive orbital emphysema during underwater fishing, with a maximal depth of 25-30 meters in the Sardinian sea. He was otherwise healthy, without previous cranio-facial trauma and nasosinusal diseases or surgery were not present in the history. When he was referred to our attention the patient presented right eyelid ptosis but diplopia and vision impairment were absent. Computer tomography scans showed subcutaneous air in the right upper eyelid and around the eyeball, particularly near the orbit's roof but optic nerve area, intraconal, was free of air. A dehiscence in lamina papyracea was evident. In our opinion, this has been the point of air entry into the orbit. A supportive therapy was advised and two weeks later the emphysema was recovered completely and the subject was symptoms free. The literature has been revised and to our knowledge no previous cases of barotraumatic orbital emphysema, in a breath-hold diver, are referred. PMID:18619111

  18. ADVANCED UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill-withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. Five regions of the U.S.A. were studied for underground storage development and PB-KBB reviewed the literature to determine if the geology of these regions was suitable for siting hard rock storage caverns. Area gas market conditions in these regions were also studied to determine the need for such storage. Based on an analysis of many factors, a possible site was determined to be in Howard and Montgomery Counties, Maryland. The area has compatible geology and a gas industry infrastructure for the nearby market populous of Baltimore and Washington D.C.. As Gas temperature is lowered, the compressibility of the gas reaches an optimum value. The compressibility of the gas, and the resultant gas density, is a function of temperature and pressure. This relationship can be used to commercial advantage by reducing the size of a storage cavern for a given working volume of natural gas. This study looks at this relationship and and the potential for commercialization of the process in a storage application. A conceptual process design, and cavern design were developed for various operating conditions. Potential site locations were considered

  19. Features of Bayou Choctaw SPR caverns and internal structure of the salt dome.

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, Darrell E.

    2007-07-01

    The intent of this study is to examine the internal structure of the Bayou Choctaw salt dome utilizing the information obtained from graphical representations of sonar survey data of the internal cavern surfaces. Many of the Bayou Choctaw caverns have been abandoned. Some existing caverns were purchased by the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program and have rather convoluted histories and complex cavern geometries. In fact, these caverns are typically poorly documented and are not particularly constructive to this study. Only two Bayou Choctaw caverns, 101 and 102, which were constructed using well-controlled solutioning methods, are well documented. One of these was constructed by the SPR for their use while the other was constructed and traded for another existing cavern. Consequently, compared to the SPR caverns of the West Hackberry and Big Hill domes, it is more difficult to obtain a general impression of the stratigraphy of the dome. Indeed, caverns of Bayou Choctaw show features significantly different than those encountered in the other two SPR facilities. In the number of abandoned caverns, and some of those existing caverns purchased by the SPR, extremely irregular solutioning has occurred. The two SPR constructed caverns suggest that some sections of the caverns may have undergone very regular solutioning to form uniform cylindrical shapes. Although it is not usually productive to speculate, some suggestions that point to the behavior of the Bayou Choctaw dome are examined. Also the primary differences in the Bayou Choctaw dome and the other SPR domes are noted.

  20. Evidence for remotely triggered microearthquakes during salt cavern collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Rohmer, Jérémy

    2012-10-01

    Microseismicity is a good indicator of spatio-temporal evolution of physical properties of rocks prior to catastrophic events like volcanic eruptions or landslides and may be triggered by a number of causes including dynamic characteristics of processes in play or/and external forces. We show evidence of triggered microseismicity observed in the vicinity of an underground salt cavern prone to collapse by a remote M˜ 7.2 earthquake, which occurred ˜12 000 km away. High-dynamic range broad-band records reveal the strong time-correlation between a dramatic change in the rate of local high-frequency microseismicity and the passage of low-frequency seismic waves, including body, Love and Rayleigh surface waves. Pressure was lowered in the cavern by pumping operations of brine out of the cavern. We demonstrate the near critical state of the cavern before the collapse by means of 2-D axisymmetric elastic finite-element simulations. On this basis, we show that the increment of stress necessary for the failure of the Dolomite layer, which ensures the stability of the whole system, is of the same order of magnitude as the maximum dynamic stress magnitude observed during the passage of the earthquakes waves. This suggests that the stress oscillations due to the seismic waves correlated with the recorded microearthquakes induced damage of the overburden, which eventually led to the collapse of the salt cavern. We show that the contribution of Rayleigh waves is the most efficient to trigger microseismicity at periods close to the natural fundamental frequency of the cavern system found at about 10-20 s by investigating the impulse response of the cavern + overburden + brine system.

  1. Evidence for remotely triggered microearthquakes during salt cavern collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Rohmer, Jérémy

    2016-04-01

    Microseismicity is a good indicator of spatio-temporal evolution of physical properties of rocks prior to catastrophic events like volcanic eruptions or landslides and may be triggered by a number of causes including dynamic characteristics of processes in play or/and external forces. We show evidence of triggered microseismicity observed in the vicinity of an underground salt cavern prone to collapse by a remote M ˜ 7.2 earthquake, which occurred ˜12 000 km away. High-dynamic range broad-band records reveal the strong time-correlation between a dramatic change in the rate of local high-frequency microseismicity and the passage of low-frequency seismic waves, including body, Love and Rayleigh surface waves. Pressure was lowered in the cavern by pumping operations of brine out of the cavern. We demonstrate the near critical state of the cavern before the collapse by means of 2-D axisymmetric elastic finite-element simulations. On this basis, we show that the increment of stress necessary for the failure of the Dolomite layer, which ensures the stability of the whole system, is of the same order of magnitude as the maximum dynamic stress magnitude observed during the passage of the earthquakes waves. This suggests that the stress oscillations due to the seismic waves correlated with the recorded microearthquakes induced damage of the overburden, which eventually led to the collapse of the salt cavern. We show that the contribution of Rayleigh waves is the most efficient to trigger microseismicity at periods close to the natural fundamental frequency of the cavern system found at about 10-20 s by investigating the impulse response of the cavern + overburden + brine system.

  2. Lunar Holes and Their Associating Subsurface Caverns: From SELENE (Kaguya) to UZUME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, J.; Kawano, I.; Nishibori, T.; Iwata, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Shimada, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Hasenaka, T.; Morota, T.; Nishino, M. N.; Hashizume, K.; Shirao, M.; Komatsu, G.; Hasebe, N.; Shimizu, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Yokobori, S.; Miyake, Y.; Michikawa, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Shinoda, R.

    2016-05-01

    We present a summary of lunar holes and associated caverns. Furthermore, we also introduce the project Unprecedented Zipangu Underworld of the Moon/Mars Exploration (UZUME) to explore the holes and caverns.

  3. Treatment of Traumatic Carotid-Cavernous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, C.; YANG, X.; Li, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Summary From 1986 to the end of 1998, 482 cases of traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula (TCCF) were treated by means of intravascular embolisation technique. The experience is overviewed in this article. Many kinds of detachable balloon catheters (including Chinese made detachable balloon catheters), coils and cyano aery late were used as embolic materials. Transcervical, transfemoral, anterior communicating artery, posterior communicating artery approach, or transvenous approach were selected according to conditions. A combination of different approaches or materials was used for complex TCCF. We found that the special sign, named “bileakage sign”, indicated multileakage of TCCF and was not mentioned before. All 482 cases of TCCF were embolised successfully, of which 405 cases maintained the patency of internal carotid artery (ICA). No death related to the treatment occurred in our group and the symptoms or signs in 462 cases were relieved after embolisation. Emergency embolisation was needed in some conditions such as serious epistaxis, delayed or repeatedly subdural haematoma and rapid visual impairment. Endovascular treatment of TCCF is a safe and efficient method. The time of operation, approach, and materials for embolisation must be carefully selected in order to obtain the best result. PMID:20667206

  4. Unusual Presentation of Cerebral Cavernous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Hyung; Lim, Dong-Jun; Choi, Jong-Il; Ha, Sung-Kon; Kim, Sang-Dae; Kim, Se-Hoon

    2015-09-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CMs) are vascular malformations of the central nervous system, which can be detected in the absence of any clinical symptoms. Nodules and cysts with mixed signal intensity and a peripheral hemosiderin rim are considered brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings typical of CMs. A 48-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of abnormal MRI findings without significant neurological symptoms. A cyst with an internal fluid-fluid level was found in the left basal ganglia on the initial brain MRI. We decided to observe the natural course of the asymptomatic lesion with serial MRI follow-up. On MRI at the 5-month follow-up, the cystic mass was enlarged and showed findings consistent with those of cystic CM. Surgical resection was performed and the pathological diagnosis was CM. Our experience suggests that the initial presentation of a CM can be a pure cyst and neurosurgeons should consider the likelihood of CMs in cases of cystic cerebral lesions with intracystic hemorrhage. PMID:26523262

  5. Unusual Presentation of Cerebral Cavernous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Hyung; Choi, Jong-Il; Ha, Sung-Kon; Kim, Sang-Dae; Kim, Se-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CMs) are vascular malformations of the central nervous system, which can be detected in the absence of any clinical symptoms. Nodules and cysts with mixed signal intensity and a peripheral hemosiderin rim are considered brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings typical of CMs. A 48-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of abnormal MRI findings without significant neurological symptoms. A cyst with an internal fluid-fluid level was found in the left basal ganglia on the initial brain MRI. We decided to observe the natural course of the asymptomatic lesion with serial MRI follow-up. On MRI at the 5-month follow-up, the cystic mass was enlarged and showed findings consistent with those of cystic CM. Surgical resection was performed and the pathological diagnosis was CM. Our experience suggests that the initial presentation of a CM can be a pure cyst and neurosurgeons should consider the likelihood of CMs in cases of cystic cerebral lesions with intracystic hemorrhage. PMID:26523262

  6. Spontaneous closure of posttraumatic high-flow carotid-cavernous fistula following cerebral angiography.

    PubMed

    Meena, Ugan Singh; Gupta, Pankaj; Shrivastava, Trilochan; Purohit, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula (TCCF) is a direct communication between cavernous portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and cavernous sinus due to tear in ICA. Most of the cases are treated by endovascular embolization. Spontaneous resolution of high-flow TCCFs is extremely rare. We report a case of posttraumatic, direct, high-flow carotid cavernous fistula (Barrow type A) that resolved spontaneously after cerebral angiography. PMID:27057229

  7. Spontaneous closure of posttraumatic high-flow carotid-cavernous fistula following cerebral angiography

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Ugan Singh; Gupta, Pankaj; Shrivastava, Trilochan; Purohit, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula (TCCF) is a direct communication between cavernous portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and cavernous sinus due to tear in ICA. Most of the cases are treated by endovascular embolization. Spontaneous resolution of high-flow TCCFs is extremely rare. We report a case of posttraumatic, direct, high-flow carotid cavernous fistula (Barrow type A) that resolved spontaneously after cerebral angiography. PMID:27057229

  8. Cavernous angioma of the optic chiasm--case report.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Y; Yamanaka, K; Nakajima, H; Miyaura, T

    1999-08-01

    A 31-year-old female presented with cavernous angioma originating from the optic chiasm manifesting as sudden onset of right retroorbital pain and right visual disturbance. She had a psychomotor seizure 10 years ago. Cavernous angioma at the right basal ganglia had been partially removed at that time. After the operation, the patient had left hemiparesis, but gradually improved. Neurological examination revealed decreased right visual acuity, left homonymous hemianopsia, and left hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mixed signal intensity mass at the right optic nerve to the optic chiasm with a low signal intensity rim on T2-weighted imaging, situated at the right basal ganglia where the cavernous angioma had been partially resected. Right frontotemporal craniotomy was performed by the pterional approach. A subpial hematoma was situated at the right optic nerve to the optic chiasm. The hematoma with an angiomatous component was completely resected from the surrounding structure. Histological examination of the specimens confirmed cavernous angioma. Postoperatively, her right visual acuity was slightly improved, but the visual field defect was unchanged. We emphasize the importance of correct diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent resection for preserving and improving the visual function of patients with cavernous angiomas of the optic chiasm. PMID:10487042

  9. CAVERN ROOF STABILITY FOR NATURAL GAS STORAGE IN BEDDED SALT

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, Kerry L; Mellegard, Kirby D; Callahan, Gary D; Goodman, William M

    2005-06-01

    This report documents research performed to develop a new stress-based criterion for predicting the onset of damage in salt formations surrounding natural gas storage caverns. Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the effects of shear stress, mean stress, pore pressure, temperature, and Lode angle on the strength and creep characteristics of salt. The laboratory test data were used in the development of the new criterion. The laboratory results indicate that the strength of salt strongly depends on the mean stress and Lode angle. The strength of the salt does not appear to be sensitive to temperature. Pore pressure effects were not readily apparent until a significant level of damage was induced and the permeability was increased to allow penetration of the liquid permeant. Utilizing the new criterion, numerical simulations were used to estimate the minimum allowable gas pressure for hypothetical storage caverns located in a bedded salt formation. The simulations performed illustrate the influence that cavern roof span, depth, roof salt thickness, shale thickness, and shale stiffness have on the allowable operating pressure range. Interestingly, comparison of predictions using the new criterion with that of a commonly used criterion indicate that lower minimum gas pressures may be allowed for caverns at shallow depths. However, as cavern depth is increased, less conservative estimates for minimum gas pressure were determined by the new criterion.

  10. [Trigeminal-cavernous fistula. Report of a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Santos Franco, Jorge; Sánchez Olivera, Carlos; Saavedra Andrade, Rafael; Sandoval Balanzario, Miguel Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Persistent primitive trigeminal artery is a rare anatomical variant resulting from the absence of obliteration of the embryonic trigeminal artery. The shunt between the persistent primitive trigeminal artery and the cavernous sinus is called trigeminal-cavernous fistula. We report the case of a woman with a trigeminal-cavernous fistula secondary to head trauma who was treated by transarterial embolization. PMID:24108341

  11. Threat of a sinkhole: A reevaluation of Cavern 4, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Linn, J.K.; Magorian, T.R.

    1993-09-01

    Cavern Lake at Bayou Choctaw salt dome resulted from the failure of Cavern 7 in 1954. Uncontrolled solutioning of this cavern through the thin caprock had set the stage for overburden to collapse into the cavern below. A similar situation developed with nearby Cavern 4, but with less dissolutioning of the caprock. Because pressure loss was already a problem and because another 800 ft diameter lake would have endangered surface operations, solutioning of Cavern 4 was stopped and the cavern abandoned in 1957 in order to protect the already-small site. In 1978 the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) acquired a number of caverns at Bayou Choctaw, including Cavern 4, and the possible repeat of the Cavern 7 failure and formation of another lake thus became an issue. The cavern dimensions were re-sonared in 1980 for comparison with 1963 and 1977 surveys. Annual surface leveling between 1982--1992 showed less subsidence occurring than the site average, and a cavern monitoring system, installed in 1984, has revealed no anomalous motion. Repeat sonar surveys in 1992 showed very little, if any, change occurred since 1980 although a small amount of uncertainty exists as a result of changing sonar techniques. We conclude that significant additional solutioning or erosion of the caprock has not occurred and that there is no increased threat to SPR operations.

  12. Scanning electron microscopy of a liver cavernous hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Itoshima, T; Ito, T; Ukida, M; Ogawa, H; Kitadai, M; Hattori, S; Mizutani, S; Nagashima, H

    1983-02-01

    A 39-year-old female with a large cavernous hemangioma of the liver was successfully treated by ligation of the left hepatic artery. A wedge biopsy specimen of the hemangioma was obtained after the ligation and was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The hemangioma was demarcated from the surrounding normal liver parenchyma and had a labyrinth of caves 50-150 microns in diameter. The caves were separated by fibrous septa 20-40 microns in width. Endothelial cells of the caves were spindle-shaped and arranged in parallel. The surface property of the caves resembled that of the hepatic artery and differed from that of the portal vein or hepatic vein. These findings support that the cavernous hemangioma of the liver was supplied by the hepatic artery. The labyrinthine structure of the cavernous hemangioma may explain the long standing contrast enhancement of the hemangioma after hepatic arteriography. PMID:6832546

  13. Optical stimulation of the cavernous nerves in the rat prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Nathaniel M.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Scott, Nicholas J.; Su, Li-Ming; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2008-02-01

    Laser nerve stimulation has recently been studied as an alternative to electrical stimulation in neuroscience. Advantages include non-contact stimulation, improved spatial selectivity, and elimination of electrical stimulation artifacts. This study explores laser stimulation of the rat cavernous nerves, as a potential alternative to electrical nerve mapping during nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy. The cavernous nerves were surgically exposed in a total of 10 male rats. A Thulium fiber laser stimulated the nerves, with a wavelength of 1870 nm, pulse energy of 7.5 mJ, radiant exposure of 1 J/cm2, pulse duration of 2.5 ms, pulse rate of 10 Hz, and 1-mm laser spot diameter, for a stimulation time of 60 s. A significant increase in the intracavernosal pressure was detected upon laser stimulation, with pressure returning to baseline levels after stimulation. This study demonstrates the feasibility of non-contact laser stimulation of the cavernous nerves using near-infrared laser radiation.

  14. Tolerance of cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus to radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tishler, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III; Kooy, H.M. ); Lunsford, L.D.; Duma, C.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1993-09-20

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is becoming a more accepted treatment option for benign, deep seated intracranial lesions. However, little is known about the effects of large single fractions of radiation on cranial nerves. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of radiosurgery on the cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus. The authors examined the tolerance of cranial nerves (II-VI) following radiosurgery for 62 patients (42/62 with meningiomas) treated for lesions within or near the cavernous sinus. Twenty-nine patients were treated with a modified 6 MV linear accelerator (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy) and 33 were treated with the Gamma Knife (University of Pittsburgh). Three-dimensional treatment plans were retrospectively reviewed and maximum doses were calculated for the cavernous sinus and the optic nerve and chiasm. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-49). New cranial neuropathies developed in 12 patients from 3-41 months following radiosurgery. Four of these complications involved injury to the optic system and 8 (3/8 transient) were the result of injury to the sensory or motor nerves of the cavernous sinus. There was no clear relationship between the maximum dose to the cavernous sinus and the development of complications for cranial nerves III-VI over the dose range used (1000-4000 cGy). For the optic apparatus, there was a significantly increased incidence of complications with dose. Four of 17 patients (24%) receiving greater than 800 cGy to any part of the optic apparatus developed visual complications compared with 0/35 who received less than 800 cGy (p = 0.009). Radiosurgery using tumor-controlling doses of up to 4000 cGy appears to be a relatively safe technique in treating lesions within or near the sensory and motor nerves (III-VI) of the cavernous sinus. The dose to the optic apparatus should be limited to under 800 cGy. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  15. Endonasal Endoscopic Management of Parasellar and Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Bjorn; Zhang, Xin; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Griffiths, Chester F; Kelly, Daniel F

    2015-07-01

    The management of cavernous sinus and invasive parasellar meningiomas often requires a multimodality treatment approach. Early attempts at complete or near-complete removal of parasellar meningiomas involving the cavernous sinus, Meckel cave, clivus, and sella using anterolateral or lateral skull base approaches were typically unsuccessful and yielded high rates of new cranial neuropathy and other complications. This article presents a strategy of endonasal endoscopic parasellar skull base bony decompression and limited tumor removal followed by stereotactic radiotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, or observation. Patient selection, technical nuances, potential complications, and initial outcomes in a small series of patients are discussed. PMID:26141358

  16. [Ovarian torsion revealing an ovarian cavernous hemangioma in a child].

    PubMed

    M'pemba Loufoua-Lemay, A-B; Peko, J-F; Mbongo, J-A; Mokoko, J-C; Nzingoula, S

    2003-11-01

    The authors report one case of cavernous hemangioma of the left ovary, which was revealed by ovarian torsion. Such benign tumors of the blood vessels are rare in ovaries during childhood. This hemangioma was observed in a 13-year-old patient, who presented with abdominal and pelvic pain and vomiting. The pelvic mass was noted and sonography revealed a cystic tumor. An annexectomia was realized. Histology showed narcotized ovary cells, with an increased number of vascular channels composed of thin walled vessels, whose wall consisted of an endothelium. This aspect evoked a cavernous hemangioma of the ovary. PMID:14613693

  17. Ovarian cavernous hemangioma in an 8-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Mirilas, P; Georgiou, G; Zevgolis, G

    1999-04-01

    The case of an ovarian cavernous hemangioma with torsion in an 8-year-old girl is described. Current literature records less than 50 cases of which only 8 are in children. The presenting symptoms of acute abdomen and the ultrasonographic study led to the preoperative diagnosis of torsion of an ovarian tumor. Salpingo-oophorectomy and appendicectomy were performed with an uneventful postoperative course. The histological pattern of the tumor was that of an entirely cavernous hemangioma. The case is reported in view of its rarity. PMID:10342121

  18. [Pericardial Cavernous Hemangioma;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Marui, Tsutomu; Azuma, Kenichirou; Arakawa, Yuki; Murakami, Eiji; Murakawa, Shinji

    2016-03-01

    A case of pericardial cavernous hemangioma is presented. A 62-year-old man had a chest pain and was referred to our hospital because of an abnormal shadow in the mediastinum. Chest computed tomography showed a hypervascular tumor of 2.0 cm in size at the left side of pulmonary artery. Magnetic resonance imaging findings suggested the mucinous part of the tumor, suggesting liposarcoma, thymoma, and neurinoma etc. At surgery, the tumor was found to be in the pericardial cavity. After pericardotomy, the tumor was resected. The diagnosis of the tumor was cavernous hemangioma. There was no evidence of recurrence 2 years after the operation. PMID:27075295

  19. Cavernous Sinus Dural Fistula Treated by Transvenous Facial Vein Approach

    PubMed Central

    Prochazka, V.; Cizek, V.; Kacirova, R.

    2004-01-01

    Summary We report on the endovascular treatment of the spontaneous indirect dural carotid cavernous sinus type D fistula in a 60-year-old woman, in whom ipsilateral facial, angular and superior ophthalmic veins catheterization was performed to get access to the fistula site for embolization treatment. Approach via the facial vein is helpful after inferior petrosal sinus treatment failure. Although this technique requires caution in the angular vein region it allows a safe and effective treatment of these lesions. 3D rotational digital angiography can obtain more information of the angioarchitecture of the cavernous plexus and venous outflow for the catheter navigation. PMID:20587267

  20. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus presenting as orbital abscess along with superior orbital fissure syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lavaju, Poonam; Badhu, Badri Prasad; Shah, Sangeeta

    2015-01-01

    Orbital abscess and superior orbital fissure syndrome (SOFS) are rare manifestations of herpes zoster ophthalmicus. Herein, we report a case of orbital abscess along with SOFS in a 2.5-year-old-male child secondary to herpes zoster infection. He presented with a 5-day history of proptosis and ptosis of the right eye that had been preceded by vesicular eruptions on the right forehead and scalp. Computed tomography scan of the head and orbit showed orbital abscess and right cavernous sinus thrombosis. A diagnosis of orbital abscess with SOFS secondary to herpes infection was made. The condition subsequently improved following antiviral therapy, intravenous vancomycin and amikacin, and oral corticosteroids. PMID:26632131

  1. Endoscopic transnasal approach for orbital tumors: A report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yasuhiro; Kawahara, Nobutaka; Yokoyama, Takaakira; Oridate, Nobuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Endoscopic transnasal approach is an excellent technique for resecting orbital tumors located inferiorly and/or medially to the optic nerve. The aim of this study was to present four cases of orbital tumor which were, at least in part, resected by an endoscopic transnasal approach and to discuss both indications and limitations of this approach through a comparison of the location and tumor status, including the pathology, of these cases. In two cases with orbital tumor located in a medial-inferior quadrant, we were able to resect it only by an endoscopic transnasal approach. Because we experienced transient diplopia and dyschromatopsia after resecting intraconal tumors, a careful choice for the best approach is suggested in view of the location, size and properties of the tumor. In the third case, with tumor located in an inferior-lateral quadrant, it was eventually resected using a frontal-zygomatic approach because the medial and inferior borders of the tumor could not be identified and the lateral border was beyond the limits of manipulation by an endoscopic transnasal approach. In the last case with possible malignant tumor adhered to the lateral vital, the tumor was resected using a transantral approach. Based on these experiences, we introduce the indications for an endoscopic transnasal resection of orbital tumors. PMID:26642943

  2. A singular case of cavernous internal carotid artery aneurysm in patient with cavernous sinus syndrome and bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Federico; Stagni, Silvia; Spinardi, Luca; Raumer, Luigi; Dentale, Nicola; Cirillo, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    We report the uncommon case of an acute cavernous sinus syndrome in a patient who was consequently discovered to have both a cavernous internal carotid artery aneurysm and bacterial meningitis. Which came first, the chicken or the egg? Which of the two, the aneurysm or the meningitis, gave rise to the patient's symptoms? We briefly reviewed the literature of similar cases and tried to analyze the possible pathophysiological relationship between these findings. Moreover, this case highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary management of these patients to better decide between a medical and a surgical and/or endovascular treatment. PMID:27594955

  3. Disposal of oil field wastes and NORM wastes into salt caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.

    1999-01-27

    Salt caverns can be formed through solution mining in the bedded or domal salt formations that are found in many states. Salt caverns have traditionally been used for hydrocarbon storage, but caverns have also been used to dispose of some types of wastes. This paper provides an overview of several years of research by Argonne National Laboratory on the feasibility and legality of using salt caverns for disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), the risk to human populations from this disposal method, and the cost of cavern disposal. Costs are compared between the four operating US disposal caverns and other commercial disposal options located in the same geographic area as the caverns. Argonne's research indicates that disposal of NOW into salt caverns is feasible and, in most cases, would not be prohibited by state agencies (although those agencies may need to revise their wastes management regulations). A risk analysis of several cavern leakage scenarios suggests that the risk from cavern disposal of NOW and NORM wastes is below accepted safe risk thresholds. Disposal caverns are economically competitive with other disposal options.

  4. Converting LPG caverns to natural-gas storage permits fast response to market

    SciTech Connect

    Crossley, N.G.

    1996-02-19

    Deregulation of Canada`s natural-gas industry in the late 1980s led to a very competitive North American natural-gas storage market. TransGas Ltd., Regina, Sask., began looking for method for developing cost-effective storage while at the same time responding to new market-development opportunities and incentives. Conversion of existing LPG-storage salt caverns to natural-gas storage is one method of providing new storage. To supply SaskEnergy Inc., the province`s local distribution company, and Saskatchewan customers, TransGas previously had developed solution-mined salt storage caverns from start to finish. Two Regina North case histories illustrate TransGas` experiences with conversion of LPG salt caverns to gas storage. This paper provides the testing procedures for the various caverns, cross-sectional diagrams of each cavern, and outlines for cavern conversion. It also lists storage capacities of these caverns.

  5. 36 CFR 7.47 - Carlsbad Caverns National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Cave entry. (1) With the exception of the regular trips into Carlsbad Caverns under the guidance or supervision of employees of the National Park Service, no person shall enter any cave or undeveloped part or passage of any cave without a permit. (2) Permits. The Superintendent may issue written permits for...

  6. 36 CFR 7.47 - Carlsbad Caverns National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Cave entry. (1) With the exception of the regular trips into Carlsbad Caverns under the guidance or supervision of employees of the National Park Service, no person shall enter any cave or undeveloped part or passage of any cave without a permit. (2) Permits. The Superintendent may issue written permits for...

  7. 36 CFR 7.47 - Carlsbad Caverns National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Cave entry. (1) With the exception of the regular trips into Carlsbad Caverns under the guidance or supervision of employees of the National Park Service, no person shall enter any cave or undeveloped part or passage of any cave without a permit. (2) Permits. The Superintendent may issue written permits for...

  8. 36 CFR 7.47 - Carlsbad Caverns National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Cave entry. (1) With the exception of the regular trips into Carlsbad Caverns under the guidance or supervision of employees of the National Park Service, no person shall enter any cave or undeveloped part or passage of any cave without a permit. (2) Permits. The Superintendent may issue written permits for...

  9. 36 CFR 7.47 - Carlsbad Caverns National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Cave entry. (1) With the exception of the regular trips into Carlsbad Caverns under the guidance or supervision of employees of the National Park Service, no person shall enter any cave or undeveloped part or passage of any cave without a permit. (2) Permits. The Superintendent may issue written permits for...

  10. Simulation of Cavern Formation and Karst Development Using Salt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Douglas C.; Ross, Alex R.

    1975-01-01

    A salt model was developed as a teaching tool to demonstrate the development of caverns and karst topography. Salt slabs are placed in a watertight box to represent fractured limestone. Erosion resulting from water flow can be photographed in time-lapse sequence or demonstrated in the laboratory. (Author/CP)

  11. Horizontal natural gas storage caverns and methods for producing same

    DOEpatents

    Russo, Anthony

    1995-01-01

    The invention provides caverns and methods for producing caverns in bedded salt deposits for the storage of materials that are not solvents for salt. The contemplated salt deposits are of the bedded, non-domed variety, more particularly salt found in layered formations that are sufficiently thick to enable the production of commercially usefully sized caverns completely encompassed by walls of salt of the formation. In a preferred method, a first bore hole is drilled into the salt formation and a cavity for receiving insolubles is leached from the salt formation. Thereafter, at a predetermined distance away from the first bore hole, a second bore hole is drilled towards the salt formation. As this drill approaches the salt, the drill assumes a slant approach and enters the salt and drills through it in a horizontal direction until it intersects the cavity for receiving insolubles. This produces a substantially horizontal conduit from which solvent is controlledly supplied to the surrounding salt formation, leaching the salt and producing a concentrated brine which is removed through the first bore hole. Insolubles are collected in the cavity for receiving insolubles. By controlledly supplying solvent, a horizontal cavern is produced with two bore holes extending therefrom.

  12. Intracranial Pseudoaneurysms, Fusiform Aneurysms and Carotid-Cavernous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xianli; Jiang, Chuhan; Li, Youxiang; Lv, Ming; Zhang, Jingbo; Wu, Zhongxue

    2008-01-01

    Summary The study assessed the effectiveness and safety of endovascular covered stents in the management of intracranial pseudoaneurysms, fusiform aneurysms and direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Fourteen endovascular covered stents were used to repair three pseudoaneurysms, six fu-siform aneurysms and six direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Aneurysms were in the carotid artery in seven cases, in the vertebral artery two cases. It was not possible to treat two additional cases transcutaneously for technical reasons
2/15. Percutaneous closure of the lesions with an endovascular covered stent was successful in 13 of 15 cases. Initial follow-up showed good stent patency. No complications were observed after stent implantation. During follow-up, stent thromboses were detected in two of nine patients with follow-up digital subtracted angiography. One carotid-cavernous fistula of Barrow Type A transformed into Barrow Type D at nine month follow-up study was cured with a procudure of Onyx-18 injection. Endovascular covered stents may be an option for percutaneous closure of intracranial pseudoaneurysms, fusiform aneurysms and direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Endoluminal vascular repair with covered stents offers an alternative therapeutic approach to conventional modalities. PMID:20557743

  13. Spontaneous carotid cavernous fistula in Ehlers Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, R; Pope, F M; Narcisi, P; Nicholls, A C; Kendall, B E; Hourihan, M D; Compston, D A

    1988-01-01

    A patient is described with Ehlers Danlos syndrome presenting with spontaneous carotid cavernous fistula, in whom there was biochemical evidence for defective type III collagen synthesis. Despite the risks associated with arterial manipulation, the fistula was successfully closed by interventional neuroradiology and the patient has since remained well. This outcome is in contrast with the results in previous reports. Images PMID:3204406

  14. Analysis of SPR salt cavern remedial leach program 2013.

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Paula D.; Gutierrez, Karen A.; Lord, David L.; Rudeen, David Keith

    2013-09-01

    The storage caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) exhibit creep behavior resulting in reduction of storage capacity over time. Maintenance of oil storage capacity requires periodic controlled leaching named remedial leach. The 30 MMB sale in summer 2011 provided space available to facilitate leaching operations. The objective of this report is to present the results and analyses of remedial leach activity at the SPR following the 2011 sale until mid-January 2013. This report focuses on caverns BH101, BH104, WH105 and WH106. Three of the four hanging strings were damaged resulting in deviations from normal leach patterns; however, the deviations did not affect the immediate geomechanical stability of the caverns. Significant leaching occurred in the toes of the caverns likely decreasing the number of available drawdowns until P/D ratio criteria are met. SANSMIC shows good agreement with sonar data and reasonably predicted the location and size of the enhanced leaching region resulting from string breakage.

  15. Analogue of Caldera Dynamics: the Controlled Salt Cavern Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, P. G.; Rohmer, J.

    2012-12-01

    Caldera collapse (or pit-crater) dynamics are inferred from geological observations and laboratory experiments. Here, we present an analogue of caldera collapse at field scale and possible analogy with large scale caldera dynamics. Through an original exploitation technique in sedimentary environment, a salt layer is emptied, leaving a brine-filled cavern, which eventually collapses after overburden falls into the cavern. Such a collapse was monitored in East France by many instruments (including GPS, extensometers, geophones, broadband seismological sensors, tiltmeter, gravity meter, … ), which allowed us to describe mechanisms of the collapse. Micro-seismicity is a good indicator of spatio-temporal evolution of physical properties of rocks prior to catastrophic events like volcanic eruptions or landslides and may be triggered by a number of causes including dynamic characteristics of processes in play or/and external forces. We show evidence of triggered micro-seismicity observed in the vicinity of this underground salt cavern prone to collapse by a remote M~7.2 earthquake, which occurred ~12000 kilometres away. High-dynamic broadband records reveal the strong time-correlation between a dramatic change in the rate of local high-frequency micro-seismicity and the passage of low-frequency seismic waves, including body, Love and Rayleigh surface waves. Pressure was lowered in the cavern by pumping operations of brine out of the cavern. We demonstrate the near critical state of the cavern before the collapse by means of 2D axisymmetric elastic finite-element simulations. Stress oscillations due to the seismic waves may have exceeded the strength required for the rupture of the complex media made of brine and rock triggering micro-earthquakes and leading to damage of the overburden and eventually collapse of the salt cavern. The increment of stress necessary for the failure of a Dolomite layer is of the same order or magnitude as the maximum dynamic stress magnitude

  16. Numerical Simulations of Leakage from Underground LPG Storage Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Hajime; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-09-01

    To secure a stable supply of petroleum gas, underground storage caverns for liquified petroleum gas (LPG) are commonly used in many countries worldwide. Storing LPG in underground caverns requires that the surrounding rock mass remain saturated with groundwater and that the water pressure be higher than the liquid pressure inside the cavern. In previous studies, gas containment criteria for underground gas storage based on hydraulic gradient and pressure have been discussed, but these studies do not consider the physicochemical characteristics and behavior of LPG such as vaporization and dissolution in groundwater. Therefore, while these studies are very useful for designing storage caverns, they do not provide better understanding of the either the environmental effects of gas contamination or the behavior of vaporized LPG. In this study, we have performed three-phase fluid flow simulations of gas leakage from underground LPG storage caverns, using the multiphase multicomponent nonisothermal simulator TMVOC (Pruess and Battistelli, 2002), which is capable of solving the three-phase nonisothermal flow of water, gas, and a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. A two-dimensional cross-sectional model resembling an actual underground LPG facility in Japan was developed, and gas leakage phenomena were simulated for three different permeability models: (1) a homogeneous model, (2) a single-fault model, and (3) a heterogeneous model. In addition, the behavior of stored LPG was studied for the special case of a water curtain suddenly losing its function because of operational problems, or because of long-term effects such as clogging of boreholes. The results of the study indicate the following: (1) The water curtain system is a very powerful means for preventing gas leakage from underground storage facilities. By operating with appropriate pressure and layout, gas containment can be ensured. (2

  17. Fracture and Healing of Rock Salt Related to Salt Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Fossum, A.F.; Munson, D.E.

    1999-03-01

    In recent years, serious investigations of potential extension of the useful life of older caverns or of the use of abandoned caverns for waste disposal have been of interest to the technical community. All of the potential applications depend upon understanding the reamer in which older caverns and sealing systems can fail. Such an understanding will require a more detailed knowledge of the fracture of salt than has been necessary to date. Fortunately, the knowledge of the fracture and healing of salt has made significant advances in the last decade, and is in a position to yield meaningful insights to older cavern behavior. In particular, micromechanical mechanisms of fracture and the concept of a fracture mechanism map have been essential guides, as has the utilization of continuum damage mechanics. The Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which is summarized extensively in this work was developed specifically to treat both the creep and fracture of salt, and was later extended to incorporate the fracture healing process known to occur in rock salt. Fracture in salt is based on the formation and evolution of microfractures, which may take the form of wing tip cracks, either in the body or the boundary of the grain. This type of crack deforms under shear to produce a strain, and furthermore, the opening of the wing cracks produce volume strain or dilatancy. In the presence of a confining pressure, microcrack formation may be suppressed, as is often the case for triaxial compression tests or natural underground stress situations. However, if the confining pressure is insufficient to suppress fracture, then the fractures will evolve with time to give the characteristic tertiary creep response. Two first order kinetics processes, closure of cracks and healing of cracks, control the healing process. Significantly, volume strain produced by microfractures may lead to changes in the permeability of the salt, which can become a major concern in

  18. Traumatic carotid-cavernous sinus fistula accompanying abducens nerve (VI) palsy in blowout fractures: missed diagnosis of 'white-eyed shunt'.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Kim, Sun-Jong; Kim, Myung-Rae

    2013-04-01

    We report the case of a 32-year-old woman with bilateral blowout fractures. She presented with diplopia showing impaired abduction of the left eye soon after trauma. No other orbito-ocular signs, such as exophthalmos, ptosis, or chemosis, were found. Orbital reconstruction was performed, but no improvement in her ophthalmoplegia was observed after surgery. A carotid angiography showed that she was suffering from a posteriorly draining carotid-cavernous sinus fistula with isolated abducens nerve palsy. Coil embolization was conducted under the consultation of a neurosurgeon, after which her ophthalmoplegia resolved fully. This is a rare case of posteriorly draining carotid-cavernous sinus fistula without classic orbito-ocular signs, the absence of which may cause diagnostic confusion. PMID:23415244

  19. Long-term sealing analyses for US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, B.

    1994-02-01

    It is inevitable that sealing and abandonment will someday occur in a SPR cavern or caverns. To gain insight into the long-term behavior of a typical SPR cavern following sealing and abandonment, a suite of mechanical finite-element calculations was performed. The initial analyses predict how quickly and to what extent a cavern pressurizes after it is plugged. The analyses also examine the stability of the cavern as it changes shape due to the excessive pressures generated as the salt creeps and the brine in the cavern thermally expands. These large-scale analyses do not include the details of the plug but assume a good seal is established in the cavern wells. In another series of analyses, the potential for forming a leak at the plug is evaluated. A cement plug, emplaced in the casing seat of a cavern well, is loaded using the predicted brine pressures from the cavern analyses. The plugged casing analyses examine the potential for forming a leak path in and along the interfaces of salt, casing, and cement plug. In the last set of analysis, the dimensional scale of the problem is further reduced to examine a preexisting crack along a casing/salt interface. The cracked interface is assumed to be fluid filled and fully pressurized by the cavern fluids. The analyses address the potential for the fluid path to extend upwards along a plugged casing should an open microannulus surround the casing after it is plugged.

  20. Preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste into salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.; Elcock, D.; Raivel, M.; Caudle, D.; Ayers, R.C. Jr.; Grunewald, B.

    1996-06-01

    Caverns can be readily formed in salt formations through solution mining. The caverns may be formed incidentally, as a result of salt recovery, or intentionally to create an underground chamber that can be used for storing hydrocarbon products or compressed air or disposing of wastes. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the feasibility, suitability, and legality of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration, development, and production wastes (hereafter referred to as oil field wastes, unless otherwise noted) in salt caverns. Chapter 2 provides background information on: types and locations of US subsurface salt deposits; basic solution mining techniques used to create caverns; and ways in which salt caverns are used. Later chapters provide discussion of: federal and state regulatory requirements concerning disposal of oil field waste, including which wastes are considered eligible for cavern disposal; waste streams that are considered to be oil field waste; and an evaluation of technical issues concerning the suitability of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field waste. Separate chapters present: types of oil field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location; disposal operations; and closure and remediation. This report does not suggest specific numerical limits for such factors or variables as distance to neighboring activities, depths for casings, pressure testing, or size and shape of cavern. The intent is to raise issues and general approaches that will contribute to the growing body of information on this subject.

  1. Beta electron fluxes inside a magnetic plasma cavern: Calculation and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupitskii, E. L.; Smirnov, E. V.; Kulikova, N. A.

    2010-12-01

    We study the possibility of electrostatic blanking of beta electrons in the expanding spherical blob of a radioactive plasma in a rarefied ionosphere. From numerical studies on the dynamics of beta electrons departing a cavern, we obtain the form of a function that determines the portion of departing electrons and calculate the flux density of beta electrons inside the cavern in relation to the Starfish Prime nuclear blast. We show that the flux density of electrons in geomagnetic flux tubes and inside the cavern depend on a correct allowance for the quantity of beta electrons returning to the cavern. On the basis of a physical analysis, we determine the approximate criterion for the return of electrons from a geomagnetic flux tube to the cavern. We compare calculation results in terms of the flux density of beta electrons inside the cavern with the recently published experimental results from operation Starfish Prime.

  2. Regulatory, technical pressures prompt more U. S. salt-cavern gas storage

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, T.F. )

    1994-09-12

    Natural-gas storage in US salt caverns is meeting the need for flexible, high delivery and injection storage following implementation Nov. 1, 1993, of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Order 636. This ruling has opened the US underground natural-gas storage market to more participants and created a demand for a variety of storage previously provided by pipelines as part of their bundled sales services. Many of these new services such as no-notice and supply balancing center on use of high-delivery natural gas storage from salt caverns. Unlike reservoir storage, nothing restricts flow in a cavern. The paper discusses the unique properties of salt that make it ideal for gas storage, choosing a location for the storage facility, cavern depth and shape, cavern size, spacing, pressures, construction, conversion or brine or LPG storage caverns to natural gas, and operation.

  3. Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon; Herrick, Courtney Grant

    2010-06-01

    A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes in strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of a storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

  4. Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2009-03-01

    A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes for strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

  5. Multidetector computed tomography evaluation of cavernous haemangioma of the azygous vein

    PubMed Central

    Das, Karuna Moy; Ahmed, Ali M.; Aljubab, Abdulwahab; Alzoum, Mohammed A.

    2013-01-01

    Giant cavernous haemangioma of azygous arch is extremely rare. We present the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) features of a mediastinal cavernous haemangioma in an asymptomatic child detected in a follow-up examination. MDCT features with multiple venous lakes filling from the periphery, focal specks of calcification, low-density soft tissue mass along with tortuous varicose veins and large feeding veins from the abdomen are suggestive of cavernous haemangioma. PMID:23660735

  6. Cavernous hemangioma of the submandibular gland with parapharyngeal extension in an adult: Case report.

    PubMed

    Azadarmaki, Roya; Then, Matthew T; Walia, Rohit; Lango, Miriam N

    2016-02-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas of the submandibular gland are rare. Signs and symptoms typically resemble those of sialolithiasis and chronic sialadenitis. If a lesion extends into the parapharyngeal space, otalgia and sore throat can result. Spontaneous regression is not a characteristic of cavernous hemangiomas. Surgical excision is a management option. We report the case of an adult with a submandibular gland cavernous hemangioma with parapharyngeal extension. PMID:26930336

  7. Red blood cell scan in cavernous hemangioma of the larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, D.M.; Noyek, A.M.; Kirsh, J.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Cavernous hemangioma of the larynx is an uncommon, difficult-to-diagnose vascular tumor for which there is no significant imaging literature to date. The possibility of improved diagnosis through RBC scanning might obviate injudicious biopsy and potential hemorrhage within the airway. Utilizing the radionuclide RBC scan, which labels the patient's own RBCs initially with cold pyrophosphate, and subsequently with technetium 99m as pertechnetate, we have identified successfully four patients with cavernous hemangioma of the larynx. All presented with a supraglottic mass involving at least the aryepiglottic fold and arytenoid region unilaterally. This report describes our satisfactory diagnostic imaging experience with the radionuclide RBC scan and suggests both its imaging specificity and its role in the management of this lesion.

  8. Fiber optic remote inspecting technique for caverned large oil tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weilai; Jiang, Desheng; Cao, He

    2000-12-01

    In the management of caverned fuel oil inventory, a strict rule of fire control has always been the first priority due to the special conditions. It is always a challenge to perform automatic measurement by means of conventional electrical devices for inspecting oil tank level there. Introduced in this paper is a fiber optic gauging technique with millimeter precision for automatic measurement in caverned tanks. Instead of using any electrical device, it uses optical encoders and optical fibers for converting and transmitting signals. Its principle, specifications, installation and applications are discussed in detail. Theoretical analysis of the factors affecting its accuracy, stability, and special procedures adopted in the installation of the fiber optic gauge are also discussed.

  9. A giant frontal cavernous malformation with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arvind; Mittal, Radhey Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Cavernous malformations (CMs) are vascular anomalies with dilated spaces called caverns. These spaces are lined by endothelial cells and collage and devoid of smooth muscle or intervening neural tissue, and filled with blood at various stages of stasis, thrombosis, organization, and calcification. Most CMs are relatively small in size but when they are large enough they can produce sing of mass effect and may simulate neoplastic, vascular, inflammatory pathology. Giant CM (size >6 cm) are very rare lesions and very few cases are reported in world literature. We are reporting such a rare case of a 16 year male. Our case is also unique in the sense that it is the largest reported CM in Indian population. PMID:27114662

  10. STORAGE OF CHILLED NATURAL GAS IN BEDDED SALT STORAGE CAVERNS

    SciTech Connect

    JOel D. Dieland; Kirby D. Mellegard

    2001-11-01

    This report provides the results of a two-phase study that examines the economic and technical feasibility of converting a conventional natural gas storage facility in bedded salt into a refrigerated natural gas storage facility for the purpose of increasing the working gas capacity of the facility. The conceptual design used to evaluate this conversion is based on the design that was developed for the planned Avoca facility in Steuben County, New York. By decreasing the cavern storage temperature from 43 C to -29 C (110 F to -20 F), the working gas capacity of the facility can be increased by about 70 percent (from 1.2 x 10{sup 8} Nm{sup 3} or 4.4 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 2.0 x 10{sup 8} Nm{sup 3} or 7.5 Bcf) while maintaining the original design minimum and maximum cavern pressures. In Phase I of the study, laboratory tests were conducted to determine the thermal conductivity of salt at low temperatures. Finite element heat transfer calculations were then made to determine the refrigeration loads required to maintain the caverns at a temperature of -29 C (-20 F). This was followed by a preliminary equipment design and a cost analysis for the converted facility. The capital cost of additional equipment and its installation required for refrigerated storage is estimated to be about $13,310,000 or $160 per thousand Nm{sup 3} ($4.29 per thousand cubic feet (Mcf)) of additional working gas capacity. The additional operating costs include maintenance refrigeration costs to maintain the cavern at -29 C (-20 F) and processing costs to condition the gas during injection and withdrawal. The maintenance refrigeration cost, based on the current energy cost of about $13.65 per megawatt-hour (MW-hr) ($4 per million British thermal units (MMBtu)), is expected to be about $316,000 after the first year and to decrease as the rock surrounding the cavern is cooled. After 10 years, the cost of maintenance refrigeration based on the $13.65 per MW-hr ($4 per MMBtu) energy cost is

  11. Cataract surgery in a case of carotid cavernous fistula

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Praveen, Smita Vittal; Noronha, Veena Olma

    2014-01-01

    A carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) is an abnormal communication between the cavernous sinus and the carotid arterial system. The ocular manifestations include conjunctival chemosis, proptosis, globe displacement, raised intraocular pressure and optic neuropathy. Although management of CCF in these patients is necessary, the ophthalmologist may also have to treat other ocular morbidities such as cataract. Cataract surgery in patients with CCF may be associated with many possible complications, including suprachoroidal hemorrhage. We describe cataract extraction surgery in 60-year-old female with bilateral spontaneous low-flow CCF. She underwent phacoemulsification via a clear corneal route under topical anesthesia and had an uneventful postoperative phase and recovered successfully. Given the various possible ocular changes in CCF, one must proceed with an intraocular surgery with caution. In this communication, we wish to describe the surgical precautions and the possible pitfalls in cataract surgery in patients with CCF. PMID:25370401

  12. [Post-traumatic carotid cavernous fistula: report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Pons, Y; Ukkola-Pons, E; Hunkemöller, I; Raynal, M; Lepage, P; Blondet, E; Rigal-Sastourne, J C; Héran, F; Kossowski, M

    2010-01-01

    Carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) is an abnormal communication between the cavernous sinus and the carotid arterial system. The authors reported the clinical presentation and therapeutic procedure of two cases. The physician has to be aware of this diagnosis when a patient is referred for a posttraumatic exophthalmia. The medical behaviour is multidisciplinary (ENT, ophthalmologist, radiologist and neurosurgeon). The imaging of choice is the angiography but angio-MRI and angio-CT can help to confirm the diagnosis. The endovascular embolization is the treatment of choice. It presents an acceptable risk of complication and a low risk of failure. In this paper the authors report 2 posttraumatic CCF cases treated with success by endovascular embolization. PMID:21491776

  13. Relative Evaluation of the Independent Volume Measures of Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    MUNSON,DARRELL E.

    2000-08-01

    Throughout the construction and operation of the caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), three types of cavern volume measurements have been maintained. These are: (1) the calculated solution volume determined during initial construction by solution mining and any subsequent solutioning during oil transfers, (2) the calculated sonar volume determined through sonar surveys of the cavern dimensions, and (3) the direct metering of oil to determine the volume of the cavern occupied by the oil. The objective of this study is to compare these measurements to each other and determine, if possible, the uncertainties associated with a given type of measurement. Over time, each type of measurement has acquired a customary, or an industry accepted, stated uncertainty. This uncertainty is not necessarily the result of a technical analysis. Ultimately there is one definitive quantity, the oil volume measure by the oil custody transfer meters, taken by all parties to the transfer as the correct ledger amount and for which the SPR Project is accountable. However, subsequent transfers within a site may not be with meters of the same accuracy. In this study, a very simple theory of the perfect relationship is used to evaluate the correlation (deviation) of the various measures. This theory permits separation of uncertainty and bias. Each of the four SPR sites are examined, first with comparisons between the calculated solution volumes and the sonar volumes determined during construction, then with comparisons of the oil inventories and the sonar volumes obtained either by surveying through brine prior to oil filling or through the oil directly.

  14. Cavernous angioma with olivary hypertrophy and contralateral cerebellar diaschisis.

    PubMed

    Komaba, Y; Nomoto, T; Kitamura, S; Terashi, A

    1997-07-01

    We describe a 66-year-old man with a 20-year history of ataxic gait who suddenly developed diplopia on rightward gaze. Neurologic examination revealed right hemi-ataxia and hemi-hypesthesia, and left internuclear ophthalmoplegia. MRI showed a cavernous angioma in the left tectum, mild right cerebellar atrophy, and left interior olivary hypertrophy. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging demonstrated contralateral cerebellar diaschisis. We discuss the findings and review the literature concerning contralateral cerebellar diaschisis. PMID:9240502

  15. Configuration of Fibrous and Adipose Tissues in the Cavernous Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Liang; Gao, Fei; Xu, Qunyuan; Zhang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Objective Three-dimensional anatomical appreciation of the matrix of the cavernous sinus is one of the crucial necessities for a better understanding of tissue patterning and various disorders in the sinus. The purpose of this study was to reveal configuration of fibrous and adipose components in the cavernous sinus and their relationship with the cranial nerves and vessels in the sinus and meningeal sinus wall. Materials and Methods Nineteen cadavers (8 females and 11 males; age range, 54–89 years; mean age, 75 years) were prepared as transverse (6 sets), coronal (3 sets) and sagittal (10 sets) plastinated sections that were examined at both macroscopic and microscopic levels. Results Two types of the web-like fibrous networks were identified and localized in the cavernous sinus. A dural trabecular network constituted a skeleton-frame in the sinus and contributed to the sleeves of intracavernous cranial nerves III, IV, V1, V2 and VI. A fine trabecular network, or adipose tissue, was the matrix of the sinus and was mainly distributed along the medial side of the intracavernous cranial nerves, forming a dumbbell-shaped adipose zone in the sinus. Conclusions This study revealed the nature, fine architecture and localization of the fine and dural trabecular networks in the cavernous sinus and their relationship with intracavernous cranial nerves and vessels. The results may be valuable for better understanding of tissue patterning in the cranial base and better evaluation of intracavernous disorders, e.g. the growth direction and extent of intracavernous tumors. PMID:24586578

  16. The depth of the oil/brine interface and crude oil leaks in SPR caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Heffelfinger, G.S.

    1991-06-01

    Monitoring wellhead pressure evolution is the best method of detecting crude oil leaks in SPR caverns while oil/brine interface depth measurements provide additional insight. However, to fully utilize the information provided by these interface depth measurements, a thorough understanding of how the interface movement corresponds to cavern phenomena, such as salt creep, crude oil leakage, and temperature equilibration, as well as to wellhead pressure, is required. The time evolution of the oil/brine interface depth is a function of several opposing factors. Cavern closure due to salt creep and crude oil leakage, if present, move the interface upward. Brine removal and temperature equilibration of the oil/brine system move the interface downward. Therefore, the relative magnitudes of these factors determine the net direction of interface movement. Using a mass balance on the cavern fluids, coupled with a simplified salt creep model for closure in SPR caverns, the movement of the oil/brine interface has been predicted for varying cavern configurations, including both right-cylindrical and carrot-shaped caverns. Three different cavern depths and operating pressures have been investigated. In addition, the caverns were investigated at four different points in time, allowing for varying extents of temperature equilibration. Time dependent interface depth changes of a few inches to a few feet were found to be characteristic of the range of cases studied. 5 refs, 19 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Can nonhazardous oil field wastes be disposed of in salt caverns?

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. This paper summarizes an Argonne National Laboratory report that reviews the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicated that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal -of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied. There is no actual field experience on the long-term impacts that might arise following closure of waste disposal caverns. Although research has found that pressures will build up in a closed cavern, none has specifically addressed caverns filled with oil field wastes. More field research on pressure build up in closed caverns is needed. On the basis of preliminary investigations, we believe that disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns is legal and feasible. The technical suitability of the practice depends on whether the caverns are well-sited and well-designed, carefully operated, properly closed, and routinely monitored.

  18. New information on disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. This paper summarizes an Argonne National Laboratory report that reviews the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicated that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied. There is no actual field experience on the long-term impacts that might arise following closure of waste disposal caverns. Although research has found that pressures will build-up in a closed cavern, none has specifically addressed caverns filled with oil field wastes. More field research on pressure build-up in closed caverns is needed. On the basis of preliminary investigations, we believe that disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns is legal and feasible. The technical suitability of the practice depends on whether the caverns are well-sited and well-designed, carefully operated, properly closed, and routinely monitored.

  19. Structural analysis of the West Hackbery No. 6 SPR storage cavern

    SciTech Connect

    Benzley, S.E.

    1980-08-01

    Four separate structural analyses of the West Hackberry No. 6 SPR storage cavern are presented. One analysis covers the creep response of the cavern beginning shortly before the time when an accidental fire occurred and proceeding through the cavern recertification pressure test. The second analysis models the surface uplife that is expected during the same pressure test. The third and fourth numerical studies investigate the structural response of West Hackberry No. 6 to slabbing and a rapid pressure drop. All analyses indicate that this cavern should be structurally stable for the conditions assumed.

  20. Update on cavern disposal of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.

    1998-09-22

    Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. Argonne National Laboratory has previously evaluated the feasibility, legality, risk and economics of disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes, other than NORM waste, in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste, other than NORM waste, is occurring at four Texas facilities, in several Canadian facilities, and reportedly in Europe. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns as well. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, a review of federal regulations and regulations from several states indicated that there are no outright prohibitions against NORM disposal in salt caverns or other Class II wells, except for Louisiana which prohibits disposal of radioactive wastes or other radioactive materials in salt domes. Currently, however, only Texas and New Mexico are working on disposal cavern regulations, and no states have issued permits to allow cavern disposal of NORM waste. On the basis of the costs currently charged for cavern disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal in caverns is likely to be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

  1. Geotechnical issues and guidelines for storage of compressed air in excavated hard rock caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Fossum, A.F.

    1982-04-01

    The results of a literature survey on the stability of excavated hard rock caverns are presented. The objective of the study was to develop geotechnical criteria for the design of compressed air energy storage (CAES) caverns in hard rock formations. These criteria involve geologic, hydrological, geochemical, geothermal, and in situ stress state characteristics of generic rock masses. Their relevance to CAES caverns, and the identification of required research areas, are identified throughout the text. This literature survey and analysis strongly suggests that the chief geotechnical issues for the development and operation of CAES caverns in hard rock are impermeability for containment, stability for sound openings, and hydrostatic balance.

  2. Transarterial and Transvenous Embolization for Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistulae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J.; Lv, X.; Jiang, C.; Li, Y.; Yang, X.; Wu, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Summary We report on the safety and efficacy of transarterial and transvenous Onyx embolization in the treatment of dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVFs) of the cavernous sinus. We reviewed the findings from a retrospectively database for 22 patients with cavernous sinus DAVFs who were treated with either transarterial Onyx embolization alone (n = 8) or transarterial and transvenous Onyx embolization (n = 14) over a four year period. The mean follow-up period after endovascular treatment was 21.6 months (range 3-42 mths). Total number of embolizations was 27 for 22 patients. Two patients were treated transvenously after transarterial embolization. All 22 patients (100%) experienced improvement of their clinical symptoms. All 22 patients (100%) experienced total obliteration of their DAVFs, as documented by angiography performed at a mean follow-up of 5.8 months after the last treatment. No patient experienced a recurrence of symptoms after angiography showed DAVF obliteration. One patient exhibited temporary deterioration of ocular symptoms secondary to venous hypertension after near total obliteration; one had transient V cranial nerve deficit related to transarterial embolization, and two patients exhibited transient III and VI cranial nerve weakness related to transvenous embolization. Two patients experienced recurrent symptoms after incomplete transarterial embolization and underwent transvenous embolization at three and four months. Both patients achieved clinical and angiographic cures. Transarterial and transvenous embolization with Onyx, whenever possible, proved to be a safe and effective management for patients with cavernous sinus DAVFs. PMID:20977859

  3. Bryan Mound SPR cavern 113 remedial leach stage 1 analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Rudeen, David Keith; Weber, Paula D.; Lord, David L.

    2013-08-01

    The U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve implemented the first stage of a leach plan in 2011-2012 to expand storage volume in the existing Bryan Mound 113 cavern from a starting volume of 7.4 million barrels (MMB) to its design volume of 11.2 MMB. The first stage was terminated several months earlier than expected in August, 2012, as the upper section of the leach zone expanded outward more quickly than design. The oil-brine interface was then re-positioned with the intent to resume leaching in the second stage configuration. This report evaluates the as-built configuration of the cavern at the end of the first stage, and recommends changes to the second stage plan in order to accommodate for the variance between the first stage plan and the as-built cavern. SANSMIC leach code simulations are presented and compared with sonar surveys in order to aid in the analysis and offer projections of likely outcomes from the revised plan for the second stage leach.

  4. Sclerosed Hemangioma Accompanied by Multiple Cavernous Hemangiomas of the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Yuki, Michiko; Emoto, Yuko; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Yuri, Takashi; Tsubura, Airo

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 81 Final Diagnosis: Sclerosed hemangioma Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Autopsy Specialty: Diagnostics, Laboratory Objective: Rare disease Background: A sclerosed hemangioma of the liver, an extremely rare type of benign hepatic tumor, was found at autopsy. Case Report: An 81-year-old Japanese man was admitted to our hospital for surgical resection of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin in his left forearm. At admission, serological tests for hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis C antibody were negative with no evidence of cirrhosis. At 2, 3, and 5 months after the removal of the forearm tumor, skin grafting was performed because of unhealed skin ulceration. Although anti-bacterial drugs were prescribed, the patient died after the 3rd skin graft (5 months after the surgery) because of pneumonia. During the treatment course, the patient was diagnosed as having multiple liver masses suspected to be cysts of the liver based on non-contrasted computed tomography results. Autopsy revealed a sclerosed hemangioma occupying the entire left lobe accompanied by multiple small cavernous hemangiomas in the right lobe of the liver. Conclusions: Sclerosed hemangioma, a rare benign disease, occurred in association with degeneration and sclerosis of cavernous hemangiomas of the liver. The VEGF pathway may be involved in the genesis of cavernous and sclerosed hemangioma of the liver. PMID:26116763

  5. Fractionated Proton Radiotherapy for Benign Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Jerry D.; Loredo, Lilia N.; Chung, Arthur; Bush, David A.; Patyal, Baldev; Johnson, Walter D.; Hsu, Frank P.K.; Slater, James M.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of fractionated proton radiotherapy for a population of patients with benign cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2002, 72 patients were treated at Loma Linda University Medical Center with proton therapy for cavernous sinus meningiomas. Fifty-one patients had biopsy or subtotal resection; 47 had World Health Organization grade 1 pathology. Twenty-one patients had no histologic verification. Twenty-two patients received primary proton therapy; 30 had 1 previous surgery; 20 had more than 1 surgery. The mean gross tumor volume was 27.6 cm{sup 3}; mean clinical target volume was 52.9 cm{sup 3}. Median total doses for patients with and without histologic verification were 59 and 57 Gy, respectively. Mean and median follow-up periods were 74 months. Results: The overall 5-year actuarial control rate was 96%; the control rate was 99% in patients with grade 1 or absent histologic findings and 50% for those with atypical histology. All 21 patients who did not have histologic verification and 46 of 47 patients with histologic confirmation of grade 1 tumor demonstrated disease control at 5 years. Control rates for patients without previous surgery, 1 surgery, and 2 or more surgeries were 95%, 96%, and 95%, respectively. Conclusions: Fractionated proton radiotherapy for grade 1 cavernous sinus meningiomas achieves excellent control rates with minimal toxicities, regardless of surgical intervention or use of histologic diagnosis. Disease control for large lesions can be achieved by primary fractionated proton therapy.

  6. [Case of invasive sino-orbital aspergillosis developing orbital apex syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kamoshima, Yuuta; Sawamura, Yutaka; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hamada, Shinsuke; Izumi, Naoto; Okugawa, Shu

    2007-10-01

    Sino-orbital invasive aspergillosis has been regarded as a lethal disease. The authors report a case with a successful treatment result. A 65 year-old woman, with mild diabetes mellitus, presented progressive right visual disturbance, diplopia, ptosis, and severe periorbital pain over a period of 2 weeks. MR images with gadolinium contrast showed a heterogeneously enhanced mass extending from the right orbital apex to the cavernous sinus. Despite steroid pulse therapy, her symptoms progressed. An open biopsy revealed invasive sino-orbital aspergillosis. Intravenous and oral antifungal agents were administered, but the aspergilloma gradually expanded. Her general status deteriorated due to intractable periorbital pain that was resistant to narcotic analgesics. By a craniotomy, the aspergilloma involving the orbit and cavernous sinus was radically removed leaving the internal carotid artery intact and simultaneously rhizotomy of the trigeminal nerve was carried out. The postoperative course was uneventful and the pain was remarkably ameliorated. Three years after the surgery, she has been well, receiving voriconazole and experiencing no relapse of the disease. PMID:17969338

  7. Geomechanical Analysis and Design Considerations for Thin-Bedded Salt Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-06-15

    The bedded salt formations located throughout the United States are layered and interspersed with non-salt materials such as anhydrite, shale, dolomite and limestone. The salt layers often contain significant impurities. GRI and DOE have initialized this research proposal in order to increase the gas storage capabilities by providing operators with improved geotechnical design and operating guidelines for thin bedded salt caverns. Terralog has summarized the geologic conditions, pressure conditions, and critical design factors that may lead to: (1) Fracture in heterogeneous materials; (2) Differential deformation and bedding plane slip; (3) Propagation of damage around single and multiple cavern; and (4) Improved design recommendations for single and multiple cavern configurations in various bedded salt environments. The existing caverns within both the Permian Basin Complex and the Michigan and Appalachian Basins are normally found between 300 m to 1,000 m (1,000 ft to 3,300 ft) depth depending on local geology and salt dissolution depth. Currently, active cavern operations are found in the Midland and Anadarko Basins within the Permian Basin Complex and in the Appalachian and Michigan Basins. The Palo Duro and Delaware Basins within the Permian Basin Complex also offer salt cavern development potential. Terralog developed a number of numerical models for caverns located in thin bedded salt. A modified creep viscoplastic model has been developed and implemented in Flac3D to simulate the response of salt at the Permian, Michigan and Appalachian Basins. The formulation of the viscoplastic salt model, which is based on an empirical creep law developed for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Program, is combined with the Drucker-Prager model to include the formation of damage and failure. The Permian salt lab test data provided by Pfeifle et al. 1983, are used to validate the assumptions made in the material model development. For the actual cavern simulations two

  8. Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.

    1998-03-05

    In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. Argonne determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, Argonne subsequently conducted a preliminary evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in domal salt caverns. Steps used in this evaluation included the following: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing contaminant toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and calculating human cancer and noncancer risk estimates. Five postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (referring to noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results led to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

  9. Analysis of cavern and well stability at the West Hackberry SPR site using a full-dome model.

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolik, Steven R.

    2015-08-01

    This report presents computational analyses that simulate the structural response of caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) West Hackberry site. The cavern field comprises 22 caverns. Five caverns (6, 7, 8, 9, 11) were acquired from industry and have unusual shapes and a history dating back to 1946. The other 17 caverns (101-117) were leached according to SPR standards in the mid-1980s and have tall cylindrical shapes. The history of the caverns and their shapes are simulated in a three-dimensional geomechanics model of the site that predicts deformations, strains, and stresses. Future leaching scenarios corresponding to oil drawdowns using fresh water are also simulated by increasing the volume of the caverns. Cavern pressures are varied in the model to capture operational practices in the field. The results of the finite element model are interpreted to provide information on the current and future status of subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The most significant results in this report are relevant to Cavern 6. The cavern is shaped like a bowl with a large ceiling span and is in close proximity to Cavern 9. The analyses predict tensile stresses at the edge of the ceiling during repressurization of Cavern 6 following workover conditions. During a workover the cavern is at low pressure to service a well. The wellhead pressures are atmospheric. When the workover is complete, the cavern is repressurized. The resulting elastic stresses are sufficient to cause tension around the edge of the large ceiling span. With time, these stresses relax to a compressive state because of salt creep. However, the potential for salt fracture and propagation exists, particularly towards Cavern 9. With only 200 feet of salt between the caverns, the operational consequences must be examined if the two caverns become connected. A critical time may be during a workover of Cavern 9 in part because of the operational vulnerabilities, but also because dilatant damage

  10. Increased Number of White Matter Lesions in Patients with Familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Michael J.; Morrison, Leslie A.; Kim, Helen; Hart, Blaine L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGKROUND AND PURPOSE Familial cerebral cavernous malformations, an autosomal dominant disorder, result in excess morbidity and mortality in affected patients. The disorder is most prevalent in the Southwest United States, where the affected families are most often carriers of the CCM1-KRIT1 Common Hispanic Mutation. The brain and spinal cord parenchyma in these individuals is usually affected by multiple cavernous malformations. Previous studies have shown abnormalities of endothelial cell junctions and the blood-brain barrier in cerebral cavernous malformations. Endothelial cell abnormalities have also been described in pathologic studies of white matter hyperintensities. We compared the prevalence of white matter hyperintensities in a population with known familial cerebral cavernous malformations. MATERIALS AND METHODS We examined 191 subjects with familial cerebral cavernous malformations who were enrolled into an institutional review board-approved study. All carry the same Common Hispanic Mutation in the CCM1 gene. Each subject underwent 3TMR imaging, including gradient recalled-echo, SWI, and FLAIR sequences. The number of cavernous malformations and the number of nonhemorrhagic white matter hyperintensities were counted. Subjects older than 60 yearsof age were excluded due to the high prevalence of white matter lesions in this population, and children younger than 6 were excluded due to potential sedation requirements. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the prevalence of abnormal white matter hyperintensities in those with familial cerebral cavernous malformations compared with healthy controls or those with sporadic cerebral cavernous malformation within the familial cerebral cavernous malformations group; it was also performed to evaluate the associations between abnormal white matter hyperintensities and age, sex, headaches, thyroid disease, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, seizure history, or modified Rankin Scale score

  11. Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cavernous internal carotid artery aneurysm after medical prolactinoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Khalsa, Siri Sahib; Hollon, Todd C; Shastri, Ravi; Trobe, Jonathan D; Gemmete, Joseph J; Pandey, Aditya S

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) are believed to have a low risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), given the confines of the dural rings and the anterior clinoid process. The risk may be greater when the bony and dural protection has been eroded. We report a case of spontaneous SAH from rupture of a cavernous ICA aneurysm in a patient whose large prolactinoma had markedly decreased in size as the result of cabergoline treatment. After passing a balloon test occlusion, the patient underwent successful endovascular vessel deconstruction. This case suggests that an eroding skull base lesion may distort normal anterior cranial base anatomy and allow communication between the cavernous ICA and subarachnoid space. The potential for SAH due to cavernous ICA aneurysm rupture should be recognised in patients with previous pituitary or other skull base lesions adjacent to the cavernous sinus. PMID:27277584

  12. Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.

    1998-03-10

    Salt caverns can be formed in underground salt formations incidentally as a result of mining or intentionally to create underground chambers for product storage or waste disposal. For more than 50 years, salt caverns have been used to store hydrocarbon products. Recently, concerns over the costs and environmental effects of land disposal and incineration have sparked interest in using salt caverns for waste disposal. Countries using or considering using salt caverns for waste disposal include Canada (oil-production wastes), Mexico (purged sulfates from salt evaporators), Germany (contaminated soils and ashes), the United Kingdom (organic residues), and the Netherlands (brine purification wastes). In the US, industry and the regulatory community are pursuing the use of salt caverns for disposal of oil-field wastes. In 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a regulatory determination exempting wastes generated during oil and gas exploration and production (oil-field wastes) from federal hazardous waste regulations--even though such wastes may contain hazardous constituents. At the same time, EPA urged states to tighten their oil-field waste management regulations. The resulting restrictions have generated industry interest in the use of salt caverns for potentially economical and environmentally safe oil-field waste disposal. Before the practice can be implemented commercially, however, regulators need assurance that disposing of oil-field wastes in salt caverns is technically and legally feasible and that potential health effects associated with the practice are acceptable. In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. It investigated regulatory issues; the types of oil-field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location considerations; and disposal operations, closure and remediation issues. It determined

  13. Cavernous angioma of the cauda equina: a case report and systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Nie, Q-B; Chen, Z; Jian, F-Z; Wu, H; Ling, F

    2012-01-01

    Cavernous angioma is an uncommon vascular malformation of the central nervous system with a tumoural aspect. Spinal cavernous angioma mainly occurs within vertebral bodies; only 3-5% of tumours are located entirely in the vertebral canal. This case report describes a case of cavernous angioma, originating from the nerve roots of the cauda equina at the L1 level, in a 57-year-old woman presenting with acute lower back pain. The lesion was surgically resected 6 months after symptom onset and the structural integrity of the nerve root was maintained. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of cavernous angioma. The patient experienced no postoperative neurological deficit or recurrence. The diagnosis, histopathological features and surgical treatment of this case are presented, together with a literature review of clinical details and surgical procedures undertaken in cases of cavernous angioma of the cauda equina. PMID:23206484

  14. Mechanical Behavior of Salt Caverns: Closed-Form Solutions vs Numerical Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linlin; Bérest, Pierre; Brouard, Benoît

    2015-11-01

    Creep closure and structural stability of a cylindrical elongated cavern leached out from a salt formation are discussed. The Norton-Hoff creep law, or "power law", is used to capture the main features of salt rheological behavior. Two failure criteria are considered: (1) shear stresses must not be larger than a certain fraction of the mean stress (dilation criterion); and (2) the effective stress at the cavern wall (actual stress plus cavern fluid pressure) must not be tensile. The case of a brine-filled cavern whose pressure is kept constant is discussed first. It is proved that creep closure reaches a steady state such that stresses in the rock mass remain constant. However, decades are needed to reach such a state. During the transient phase that results from the slow redistribution of stresses in the rock mass, deviatoric stresses decrease at the vicinity of the cavern wall, and onset of dilation is less and less likely. At this point, the case of a rapid brine pressure increase, typical of a tightness test, is considered. It is proved that during such a swift pressure increase, cavern behavior is almost perfectly elastic; there is no risk of dilation onset. However, even when cavern pressure remains significantly smaller than geostatic, the effective stress at cavern wall can become tensile. These results, obtained through numerical computations, are confirmed by closed-form solutions obtained in the case of an idealized perfectly cylindrical cavern; these solutions provide a better insight into the main structural features of the behavior of the cavern.

  15. Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts: Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-30

    Over the past 40 years, cavern storage of LPG's, petrochemicals, such as ethylene and propylene, and other petroleum products has increased dramatically. In 1991, the Gas Processors Association (GPA) lists the total U.S. underground storage capacity for LPG's and related products of approximately 519 million barrels (82.5 million cubic meters) in 1,122 separate caverns. Of this total, 70 are hard rock caverns and the remaining 1,052 are caverns in salt deposits. However, along the eastern seaboard of the U.S. and the Pacific northwest, salt deposits are not available and therefore, storage in hard rocks is required. Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. Competing methods include LNG facilities and remote underground storage combined with pipeline transportation to the area. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. DOE has identified five regions, that have not had favorable geological conditions for underground storage development: New England, Mid-Atlantic (NY/NJ), South Atlantic (DL/MD/VA), South Atlantic (NC/SC/GA), and the Pacific Northwest (WA/OR). PB-KBB reviewed published literature and in-house databases of the geology of these regions to determine suitability of hard rock formations for siting storage

  16. Cavernous Hemangioma of the Skull and Meningioma: Association or Coincidence?

    PubMed Central

    Kilani, M.; Darmoul, M.; Hammedi, F.; Ben Nsir, A.; Hattab, M. N.

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous cavernous hemangiomas of the skull are rare. Meningiomas are quite frequently encountered in a neurosurgical practice. The association between these two entities is nevertheless very uncommon. The authors present a case of a 72-year-old woman suffering from headache. The MRI showed a parietal meningioma with adjacent thick bone. The meningioma and the bone were removed. The histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of meningioma and revealed a cavernoma of the skull. The relationship between the lesions suggests more than a coincidental association. Several hypotheses are proposed to explain common causal connections. PMID:25960899

  17. The anterior interhemispheric approach to a third ventricular cavernous malformation.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Kalani, M Yashar S; Nakaji, Peter; Spetzler, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    The anterior interhemispheric approach is a workhorse for treatment of lesions in the third ventricle. In this case, we demonstrate the utility of this approach for resecting a complex third ventricular cavernous malformation. We discuss patient positioning, optimal location of the craniotomy, and surgical resection techniques for safe removal of these lesions. We also demonstrate the importance of gravity retraction using the falx to prevent injury to the dominant frontal lobe. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/38woc28er7M . PMID:26722693

  18. Cavernous hemangioma with large phlebolith of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hwan Jun; Lee, Joo Chul; Kim, Jun Hyuk; Lee, Young Man; Lee, Hyun Joo

    2013-11-01

    Hemangiomas are vascular anomalies characterized by increased proliferation and turnover of endothelial cells. Hemangiomas of the parotid region are relatively uncommon in adult population, and there are a few reports of hemangioma with large phlebolith within the parotid gland. We herein report a case of it. Sialography may be a useful investigation method in the evaluation of radiopaque lesions localized intraglandularly in the parotid area to rule out the sialolith. Cavernous hemangioma with phleboliths should be included in the differential diagnosis of a swelling in the mandibular area. PMID:24220486

  19. The 'Pinocchio' nasal deformity due to cavernous lymphangioma.

    PubMed Central

    Hobby, J L; Tiernan, E; Mayou, B J

    1995-01-01

    The 'Pinocchio' or 'Cyrano' nose is a rare condition in which deformity of the nasal tip is produced by an underlying soft tissue tumour. Previously reported cases have been due to either capillary or cavernous haemangiomas (angiolipomas). The deformity is the cause of much teasing in children. There has been debate as to whether surgical intervention is indicated, as a proportion of cases will regress spontaneously. We report a case of 'Pinocchio' nose with a lymphangioma of the nasal tip which is previously undescribed and review the options for management. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7562857

  20. Orbit to orbit transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergeron, R. P.

    1980-01-01

    Orbital transfer vehicle propulsion options for SPS include both chemical (COTV) and electrical (EOTV) options. The proposed EOTV construction method is similar to that of the SPS and, by the addition of a transmitting antenna, may serve as a demonstration or precursor satellite option. The results of the studies led to the selection of a single stage COTV for crew and priority cargo transfer. An EOTV concept is favored for cargo transfer because of the more favorable orbital burden factor over chemical systems. The gallium arsenide solar array is favored over the silicon array because of its self annealing characteristics of radiation damage encountered during multiple transitions through the Van Allen radiation belt. Transportation system operations are depicted. A heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) delivers cargo and propellants to LEO, which are transferred to a dedicated EOTV by means of an intraorbit transfer vehicle (IOTV) for subsequent transfer to GEO. The space shuttle is used for crew transfer from Earth to LEO. At the LEO base, the crew module is removed from the shuttle cargo bay and mated to a COTV for transfer to GEO. Upon arrival at GEO, the SPS construction cargo is transferred from the EOTV to the SPS construction base by IOTV. Crew consumables and resupply propellants are transported to GEO by the EOTV. Transportation requirements are dominated by the vast quantity of materials to be transported to LEO and GEO.

  1. Orbital pseudotumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Idiopathic orbital inflammatory syndrome (IOIS) Images Skull anatomy References Goodlick TA, Kay MD, Glaser JS, Tse DT, Chang WJ. Orbital disease and neuro-ophthalmology. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duane’s ...

  2. Kepler's Orbit

    NASA Video Gallery

    Kepler does not orbit the Earth, rather it orbits the Sun in concert with the Earth, slowly drifting away from Earth. Every 61 Earth years, Kepler and Earth will pass by each other. Throughout the ...

  3. Orbital cellulitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Haemophilus influenzae B) vaccine. The bacteria Staphylococcus aureus , Streptococcus pneumoniae , and beta-hemolytic streptococci may also cause orbital cellulitis. Orbital cellulitis infections in children may get worse very quickly and can lead ...

  4. Effects of cavern spacing and pressure on subsidence and storage losses for the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, B.

    1992-03-01

    The effects of cavern spacing and operating pressure on surface subsidence and cavern storage losses were evaluated using the finite- element method. The base case for the two sensitivity studies was a typical SPR cavern. The predicted responses of the base case and those from the pressurization study compared quite closely to measured surface subsidence and oil pressurization rates. This provided credibility for the analyses and constitutive models used. Subsidence and cavern storage losses were found to be strongly influenced by cavern spacing and pressurization. The relationship between subsidence volume and losses in storage volume varied as cavern spacing and operating pressure deviated from the base case. However, for a typical SPR cavern subsidence volume is proportional to storage loss and when expressed in ft., subsidence is equal to the percentage of storage loss.

  5. Cerebral cavernous malformations: from genes to proteins to disease.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Daniel D; Kalani, M Yashar S; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Eales, Justin; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2012-01-01

    Over the past half century molecular biology has led to great advances in our understanding of angio- and vasculogenesis and in the treatment of malformations resulting from these processes gone awry. Given their sporadic and familial distribution, their developmental and pathological link to capillary telangiectasias, and their observed chromosomal abnormalities, cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are regarded as akin to cancerous growths. Although the exact pathological mechanisms involved in the formation of CCMs are still not well understood, the identification of 3 genetic loci has begun to shed light on key developmental pathways involved in CCM pathogenesis. Cavernous malformations can occur sporadically or in an autosomal dominant fashion. Familial forms of CCMs have been attributed to mutations at 3 different loci implicated in regulating important processes such as proliferation and differentiation of angiogenic precursors and members of the apoptotic machinery. These processes are important for the generation, maintenance, and pruning of every vessel in the body. In this review the authors highlight the latest discoveries pertaining to the molecular genetics of CCMs, highlighting potential new therapeutic targets for the treatment of these lesions. PMID:21962164

  6. Retroperitoneal cavernous hemangioma resected by a pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hanaoka, Marie; Hashimoto, Masaji; Sasaki, Kazunari; Matsuda, Masamichi; Fujii, Takeshi; Ohashi, Kenichi; Watanabe, Goro

    2013-01-01

    A retroperitoneal hemangioma is a rare disease. We report on the diagnosis and treatment of a retroperitoneal hemangioma which had uncommonly invaded into both the pancreas and duodenum, thus requiring a pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PpPD). A 36-year-old man presented to our hospital with abdominal pain. An enhanced computed tomography scan without contrast enhancement revealed a 12 cm × 9 cm mass between the pancreas head and right kidney. Given the high rate of malignancy associated with retroperitoneal tumors, surgical resection was performed. Intraoperatively, the tumor was inseparable from both the duodenum and pancreas and PpPD was performed due to the invasive behavior. Although malignancy was suspected, pathological diagnosis identified the tumor as a retroperitoneal cavernous hemangioma for which surgical resection was the proper diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. Reteoperitoneal cavernous hemangioma is unique in that it is typically separated from the surrounding organs. However, clinicians need to be aware of the possibility of a case, such as this, which has invaded into the surrounding organs despite its benign etiology. From this case, we recommend that combined resection of inseparable organs should be performed if the mass has invaded into other tissues due to the hazardous nature of local recurrence. In summary, this report is the first to describe a case of retroperitoneal hemangioma that had uniquely invaded into surrounding organs and was treated with PpPD. PMID:23901241

  7. Cavernous hemangioma of the parotid gland in adults

    PubMed Central

    Peral-Cagigal, Beatriz; Madrigal-Rubiales, Beatriz; Verrier-Hernández, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Hemangiomas account for 0.4-0.6% of all tumors of the parotid gland and most of them occur in children, nevertheless in adults hemangiomas are very rare. We report the case of a 62 year old woman with a mass in the parotid right tail associated with fluctuating swelling episodes unrelated to meals and with a slowly progressive growth. The provisional diagnosis was a pleomorphic adenoma, so a right superficial parotidectomy was performed. During surgery, the macroscopic appearance makes suspect a vascular lesion. The histopathological result was a cavernous hemangioma. The classic clinical presentation of a parotid hemangioma is an intraglandular mass associated or not with skin lesions characterized by reddish macules and/or papules, and a vibration or pulsation when palpating the parotid region. In imaging tests, phleboliths could be observed which are very suggestive of a hemangioma or a vascular malformation. In the absence of these signs, the diagnosis could be difficult, particularly in an adult due to its low prevalence, with about 50 cases reported worldwide. However a hemangioma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of parotid tumors in adults. Key words:Cavernous hemangioma, parotid gland, superficial parotidectomy, pleomorphic adenoma. PMID:25674332

  8. Cavernous hemangioma in the thymus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ose, Naoko; Kobori, Yuko; Takeuchi, Yukiyasu; Susaki, Yoshiyuki; Taniguchi, Seiji; Maeda, Hajime

    2016-12-01

    Cavernous hemangioma is not a neoplasm, but rather a congenital venous malformation with the potential to develop in all parts of the body, though it is very rarely seen in the thymus. We report a case of cavernous hemangioma in the thymus partially resected. A 71-year-old woman presented with pericardial discomfort, and chest computed tomography (CT) showed a left lateral mediastinal mass which was 2.0 × 1.2 × 1.8 cm in size, with border regularity and without calcification. Its interior was partially enhanced. Three-dimensional chest computed tomography image showed a tortuous vessel connecting to the tumor. Surgical resection was performed for the purpose of providing a definitive diagnosis and treatment because a mediastinal tumor such as thymoma or teratoma was suspected. Partial resection of the thymus including the mass was done by utilizing a three-port, left-sided video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) approach with hoisting of the third rib with the patient in a spinal position. A wine-colored mass bulging from the surface of the left lobe of the thymus was identified along with the communicating vessel which could only be cut with an energy device. It is considered that thymic partial resection using VATS is a better option for small and non-infiltrative lesions. PMID:26943686

  9. PDCD10 Gene Mutations in Multiple Cerebral Cavernous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Cigoli, Maria Sole; Avemaria, Francesca; De Benedetti, Stefano; Gesu, Giovanni P.; Accorsi, Lucio Giordano; Parmigiani, Stefano; Corona, Maria Franca; Capra, Valeria; Mosca, Andrea; Giovannini, Simona; Notturno, Francesca; Ciccocioppo, Fausta; Volpi, Lilia; Estienne, Margherita; De Michele, Giuseppe; Antenora, Antonella; Bilo, Leda; Tavoni, Antonietta; Zamponi, Nelia; Alfei, Enrico; Baranello, Giovanni; Riva, Daria; Penco, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular abnormalities that may cause seizures, intracerebral haemorrhages, and focal neurological deficits. Familial form shows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with incomplete penetrance and variable clinical expression. Three genes have been identified causing familial CCM: KRIT1/CCM1, MGC4607/CCM2, and PDCD10/CCM3. Aim of this study is to report additional PDCD10/CCM3 families poorly described so far which account for 10-15% of hereditary cerebral cavernous malformations. Our group investigated 87 consecutive Italian affected individuals (i.e. positive Magnetic Resonance Imaging) with multiple/familial CCM through direct sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) analysis. We identified mutations in over 97.7% of cases, and PDCD10/CCM3 accounts for 13.1%. PDCD10/CCM3 molecular screening revealed four already known mutations and four novel ones. The mutated patients show an earlier onset of clinical manifestations as compared to CCM1/CCM2 mutated patients. The study of further families carrying mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 may help define a possible correlation between genotype and phenotype; an accurate clinical follow up of the subjects would help define more precisely whether mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 lead to a characteristic phenotype. PMID:25354366

  10. Nitrogen Monitoring of West Hackberry 117 Cavern Wells.

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, Giorgia; Lord, David

    2015-02-01

    U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) oil storage cavern West Hackberry 117 was tested under extended nitrogen monitoring following a successful mechanical integrity test in order to validate a newly developed hydrostatic column model to be used to differentiate between normal "tight" well behavior and small-leak behavior under nitrogen. High resolution wireline pressure and temperature data were collected during the test period and used in conjunction with the hydrostatic column model to predict the nitrogen/oil interface and the pressure along the entire fluid column from the bradenhead flange nominally at ground surface to bottom of brine pool. Results here and for other SPR caverns have shown that wells under long term nitrogen monitoring do not necessarily pressurize with a relative rate (P N2 /P brine) of 1. The theoretical relative pressure rate depends on the well configuration, pressure and the location of the nitrogen-oil interface and varies from well to well. For the case of WH117 the predicted rates were 0.73 for well A and 0.92 for well B. The measured relative pressurization rate for well B was consistent with the model prediction, while well A rate was found to be between 0.58-0.68. A number of possible reasons for the discrepancy between the model and measured rates of well A are possible. These include modeling inaccuracy, measurement inaccuracy or the possibility of the presence of a very small leak (below the latest calculated minimum detectable leak rate).

  11. Simulation of production and injection performance of gas storage caverns in salt formations

    SciTech Connect

    Hagoort, J. )

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents a simple yet comprehensive mathematical model for simulation of injection and production performance of gas storage caverns in salt formations. The model predicts the pressure and temperature of the gas in the cavern and at the wellhead for an arbitrary sequence of production and injection cycles. The model incorporates nonideal gas properties, thermodynamic heat effects associated with gas expansion and compression in the cavern and tubing, heat exchange with the surrounding salt formation, and non-uniform initial temperatures but does not include rock-mechanical effects. The model is based on a mass and energy balance for the gas-filled cavern and on the Bernoulli equation and energy balance for flow in the wellbore. Cavern equations are solved iteratively at successive timesteps, and wellbore equations are solved within an iteration cycle of the cavern equations. Gas properties are calculated internally with generally accepted correlations and basic thermodynamic relations. Example calculations show that the initial temperature distribution has a strong effect on production performance of a typical gas storage cavern. The primary application of the model is in the design, planning, and operation of gas storage projects.

  12. Literature Survey Concerning the Feasibility of Remedial Leach for Select Phase I Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Paula D.; Flores, Karen A.; Lord, David L.

    2015-09-01

    Bryan Mound 5 ( BM5 ) and West Hackberry 9 ( WH9 ) have the potential to create a significant amount of new storage space should the caverns be deemed "leach - ready". This study discusses the original drilling history of the caverns, surrounding geology, current stability, and, based on this culmination of data, makes a preliminary assessment of the leach potential for the cavern. The risks associated with leaching BM5 present substantial problems for the SPR . The odd shape and large amount of insoluble material make it difficult to de termine whether a targeted leach would have the desired effect and create useable ullage or further distort the shape with preferential leaching . T he likelihood of salt falls and damaged or severed casing string is significant . In addition, a targeted le ach would require the relocation of approximately 27 MMB of oil . Due to the abundance of unknown factors associated with this cavern, a targeted leach of BM5 is not recommended. A targeted leaching of the neck of WH 9 could potentially eliminate or diminis h the mid - cavern ledge result ing in a more stable cavern with a more favorable shape. A better understanding of the composition of the surrounding salt and a less complicated leaching history yields more confidence in the ability to successfully leach this region. A targeted leach of WH9 can be recommended upon the completion of a full leach plan with consideration of the impacts upon nearby caverns .

  13. [Plea for a unifying concept of the cavernous sinus and the trigeminal cavity].

    PubMed

    Bataille, B; Sakka, M; Lapierre, F

    The object of this study is a scientific research in human and compared anatomy of the cavernous sinus and Meckel's cave. The observations made in the foetus and human adult are compared to these made in non human primates and domestic mammals, the cavernous sinus and the Meckel's cave contribute to realize a entirety that we call "a morphological and functional anatomical system". The human cavernous sinus and Meckel's cave are described as an indissociable parasellar space representing a heavy traffic area for vascular and nervous structures. In the human and non human primates, the authors observe a parasellar space which agreed with the concept of "trigeminal-cavernous anatomical system". In the cat, the same observations are made and an osseous outline closing the roof of the parasellar space is observed; this is the evidence of a more ancient osseous or cartilaginous wall. The authors demonstrate in the last part of this study that the morphogenesis of this trigeminal-cavernous system is in relation with the phylogenic development of its morphological and functional environment, that we call the "externation". This study is of interest: to a best understanding of the tumors involving the cavernous sinus, to a semantic point of view: an attempt to a review of the terminology applied to the cavernous sinus and Meckel's cave. PMID:7729219

  14. Risk analyses for disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

    1997-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed of in domal salt caverns. In this assessment, several steps were used to evaluate potential human health risks: identifying potential contaminants of concern; determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants; assessing the contaminants` toxicities; estimating contaminant intakes; and, finally, calculating human cancer and noncancer risks. Potential human health risks associated with hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) in NOW were assessed under four postclosure cavern release scenarios: inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks or leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. To estimate potential human health risks for these scenarios, contaminant concentrations at the receptor were calculated using a one-dimensional solution to an advection/dispersion equation that included first order degradation. Even under worst-case conditions, the risks have been found to be within the US EPA target range for acceptable exposure levels. From a human health risk perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for NOW.

  15. Hydrogeologic factors affecting cavern morphology within rocks of Mississippian age in northwestern Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, B.J. . Dept. of Geology); Brahana, J.V. . Geological Survey)

    1993-02-01

    Cavern development within rocks of Mississippian age in northwestern Arkansas is associated with two Pleistocene erosional features, the Boston Mountains Plateau and the Springfield Plateau. Each plateau is characterized by a distinct stratigraphic sequence with unique lithologies. Cavern morphology (both cross-sectional and planimetric) in each plateau is the result of the complex interaction of numerous hydrogeologic factors. Four of the most dominant factors which affect cavern morphology appear to be: (1) composition and continuity of the confining units; (2) percentage of noncarbonate components in rocks of the cavern-forming interval; (3) nature and distribution of ground-water recharge to the cavern-forming interval; and (4) nature and distribution of fractures within the cavern-forming interval. Network maze patterns typically develop in the Pitkin Limestone, the formation in which most caverns form beneath the Boston Mountains Plateau. The Pitkin, a bioclastic limestone, is confined above by siltstones of the Cane Hill member of the Hale Formation and below by shales of the Fayetteville Formation. The maze pattern indicates that these caverns probably were formed by dissolution of the rock matrix by diffuse recharge moving vertically through leaky confining units. Single rooms are the dominant cavern morphology in the chert-dominated Boone Formation of the Springfield Plateau. Where the concentration of chert is greater than 50 percent, the Boone lacks structural integrity and fails to develop well-integrated conduit networks. Point recharge features in outcrop areas of the Boone Formation are not visible in most of the Springfield Plateau because the insoluble residuum masks the upper bedrock surface. Where the Boone Formation is less than 7 meters thick, surface karst features are more prevalent.

  16. Estimate of the risks of disposing nonhazardous oil field wastes into salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

    1997-12-31

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed in domal salt caverns. Potential human health risks associated with hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) in NOW were assessed under four postclosure cavern release scenarios: inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks or leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. To estimate potential human health risks for these scenarios, contaminant concentrations at the receptor were calculated using a one-dimensional solution to an advection/dispersion equation that included first order degradation. Assuming a single, generic salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, the best-estimate excess cancer risks ranged from 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} to 1.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} and hazard indices (referring to noncancer health effects) ranged from 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} to 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. Under worse-case conditions in which the probability of cavern failure is 1.0, excess cancer risks ranged from 4.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} to 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} and hazard indices ranged from 7.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} to 0.07. Even under worst-case conditions, the risks are within the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) target range for acceptable exposure levels. From a human health risk perspective, salt caverns can, therefore, provide an acceptable disposal method for NOW.

  17. Abducens Nerve Palsy and Ipsilateral Horner Syndrome in a Patient With Carotid-Cavernous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Kal, Ali; Ercan, Zeynep E; Duman, Enes; Arpaci, Enver

    2015-10-01

    The combination of abducens nerve palsy and ipsilateral Horner syndrome was first described by Parkinson and considered as a localizing sign of posterior cavernous sinus lesions. The authors present a case with right abducens nerve palsy with ipsilateral Horner syndrome in a patient with carotid-cavernous fistula because of head trauma. The patient was referred to the ophthalmology clinic with diplopia complaint after suffering a head trauma during a motorcycle accident. Cerebral angiography showed low-flow carotid-cavernous fistula. PMID:26468854

  18. Novel strategy for orbital tumor resection: surgical "displacement" into the maxillary cavity.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Masaaki; Mizoguchi, Takayuki; Matsunaga, Kazuhide; Fu, Rong; Nakao, Yuzo

    2006-11-01

    Surgical intervention consisting of lateral orbitotomy, the indication of which is extremely wide for orbital tumor surgery, has been applied in cases of large, retrobulbar cavernous hemangioma. However, no method exists involving displacement of the tumor from the crowded orbital contents, with the exception of tumor traction toward the outer side. The impact of traction force on the fragile hemangioma is extremely traumatic and dangerous. The authors examined how a tumor might be "displaced" in the absence of traction force effect, into an appropriate cavity neighboring the orbit. The maxillary sinus may afford the most suitable space to shift the laterally situated orbital tumor. Thus, the osteotomy level was extended to the lateral half of the inferior orbital floor and orbital rim in order to displace the tumor through an "escape window" of sufficient size between the orbit and maxilla. This report describes the treatment of two cases with long histories of progressive proptosis associated with retrobulbar large cavernous hemangiomas. This novel procedure resulted in a successful outcome. The current approach and management, which involves displacement of the tumor into the maxillary sinus through the orbital floor escape window, is a novel procedure for orbital tumor surgery. PMID:17119440

  19. Treatment of Nystagmus in Brainstem Cavernous Malformation with Botulinum Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Fredrick, Douglas; Steinberg, Gary K; Liao, Yaping J

    2016-01-01

    We report a long-term eye movement study of a 68-year-old female with pontomedullary junction cavernous malformation whose dysconjugate nystagmus was treated with retrobulbar botulinum toxin A injections. Sequential, bilateral retrobulbar injections of botulinum toxin A were performed. Injections immediately decreased oscillopsia and nystagmus, and improved visual acuities. One to three months following injection, three-dimensional infrared oculography measured a significant 39-100% (P = 0.001) decrease in nystagmus amplitudes at multiple dimensions. This improvement diminished by six months in the right eye but sustained for about one year in the left eye. Over two years, botulinum toxin A injections were performed twice in the left eye and five times in the right eye. Our study supported the safe and effective use of repetitive retrobulbar botulinum toxin A injections in symptomatic nystagmus that failed medical therapy. PMID:27182467

  20. Observations on vapor pressure in SPR caverns : sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, Darrell Eugene

    2010-05-01

    The oil of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) represents a national response to any potential emergency or intentional restriction of crude oil supply to this country, and conforms to International Agreements to maintain such a reserve. As assurance this reserve oil will be available in a timely manner should a restriction in supply occur, the oil of the reserve must meet certain transportation criteria. The transportation criteria require that the oil does not evolve dangerous gas, either explosive or toxic, while in the process of transport to, or storage at, the destination facility. This requirement can be a challenge because the stored oil can acquire dissolved gases while in the SPR. There have been a series of reports analyzing in exceptional detail the reasons for the increases, or regains, in gas content; however, there remains some uncertainty in these explanations and an inability to predict why the regains occur. Where the regains are prohibitive and exceed the criteria, the oil must undergo degasification, where excess portions of the volatile gas are removed. There are only two known sources of gas regain, one is the salt dome formation itself which may contain gas inclusions from which gas can be released during oil processing or storage, and the second is increases of the gases release by the volatile components of the crude oil itself during storage, especially if the stored oil undergoes heating or is subject to biological generation processes. In this work, the earlier analyses are reexamined and significant alterations in conclusions are proposed. The alterations are based on how the fluid exchanges of brine and oil uptake gas released from domal salt during solutioning, and thereafter, during further exchanges of fluids. Transparency of the brine/oil interface and the transfer of gas across this interface remains an important unanswered question. The contribution from creep induced damage releasing gas from the salt surrounding the cavern is

  1. Transcervical excision of intramasseteric cavernous hemangioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, YU-TING; LAI, CHIEN-CHUNG

    2016-01-01

    Intramuscular hemangiomas (IMHs) of the masseter muscle are extremely rare in the head and neck region and, thus, are often misdiagnosed as parotid tumors prior to surgery. Excisional resection remains the standard treatment for IMH. Since these tumors are located on the proximal side of the facial nerve, it is important to preserve the facial nerve during surgery. This study reports the case of a 57-year-old male who presented with a progressive tender swelling on the right side of the face, which had been present for >6 months. Computed tomography of the neck revealed a heterogeneous highly-vascularized mass located in the superficial layer of the masseter muscle. The patient subsequently underwent surgical resection via a collar incision, and pathological examination revealed a cavernous IMH. During the one-year follow-up period, the patient exhibited a good prognosis, and one-year magnetic resonance imaging revealed no local recurrence. PMID:26998058

  2. Brainstem Hemorrhage Caused by Direct Carotid-Cavernous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Fook-How; Shen, Chao-Yu; Liu, Jung-Tung; Li, Cho-Shun

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 34-year-old woman presented with a history of persisting headache for years, and a newly developed dizziness, left facial palsy and right hemiparesis two days prior to this admission. Initial computed tomographic angiography of the head demonstrated an area of increased density in the left middle and posterior fossae. Multiple aneurysmally dilated venous ectasias with contrast enhancement at the left pre-pontine cistern causing a massive mass effect to the brainstem were also noted, suggesting a huge vascular abnormality. Digital subtraction angiography revealed an abnormal vascular lesion surrounding the brainstem, which indicated a left direct carotid-cavernous fistula with posterior drainage. As her consciousness deteriorated the next day, a follow-up computed tomography scan was done which revealed a pontine hemorrhage. Subsequently, endovascular closure of the fistula with sacrifice of the left ICA was performed, which successfully eliminated the imaging abnormalities. PMID:25207913

  3. Intramedullary cavernous malformation of the spinal cord in two dogs.

    PubMed

    MacKillop, E; Olby, N J; Linder, K E; Brown, T T

    2007-07-01

    Intramedullary cavernous malformations (CVMs) of the spinal cord were diagnosed in 2 adult dogs that presented for paraparesis. An intramedullary spinal cord lesion was identified on a myelogram in the first dog, and expansion of the vertebral canal was evident on radiographs in the second. Extensive intraparenchymal hemorrhage was found on gross postmortem examination in both dogs, and a distinct lobulated intramedullary mass was evident in the second dog. Microscopically, both lesions were composed of dilated, thin-walled vascular channels with little-to-no intervening neural parenchyma. Both dogs had evidence of channel thrombosis along with perilesional hemorrhage and hemosiderin accumulation. The second dog had additional degenerative changes, including thickened fibrous channel walls with hyalinization, foci of mineralization, and occasional tongues of entrapped gliotic neuropil. CVMs appear to be an uncommon cause of both acute and chronic spinal cord disease in the dog. PMID:17606517

  4. Cavernous hemangioma of the skull presenting with subdural hematoma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Gottfried, Oren N; Gluf, Wayne M; Schmidt, Meic H

    2004-10-15

    Cavernous hemangioma of the calvaria is a very rare disease, and patients usually present with headaches or a visible skull deformity. Few reports of patients presenting with intradiploic or epidural hemorrhages are found in the literature. No case of an intradural hemorrhage from a cavernous hemangioma of the skull has been reported to date. The authors present the case of a 50-year-old man in whom a symptomatic subdural hematoma (SDH) resulting from a cavernous hemangioma of the calvaria had hemorrhaged and eroded through the inner table of the skull and dura mater. The patient underwent surgery for evacuation of the SDH and resection of the calvarial lesion. Postoperatively, the patient experienced immediate relief of his symptoms and had no clinical or radiological recurrence. Calvarial cavernous hemangiomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nontraumatic SDHs. Additionally, skull lesions that present with intracranial hemorrhages must be identified and resected at the time of hematoma evacuation to prevent recurrences. PMID:15633993

  5. Diagnosis and management of trigemino-cavernous fistulas: case reports and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Miller, Timothy R; Jindal, Gaurav; Mohan, Suyash; Fortes, Manuel; Hurst, Robert; Pukenas, Bryan; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2015-01-01

    Although usually asymptomatic, a persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) can rarely be associated with a direct fistula to the cavernous sinus (ie, trigemino-cavernous fistula). We present three patients with trigemino-cavernous fistulas; two were subsequently treated using modern endovascular techniques while the third initially declined therapy. We then review the literature of reported cases of this unusual entity. The aberrant anatomy associated with a PTA presents unique challenges to the management of these lesions, and must be well delineated prior to treatment. Finally, conservative management of trigemino-cavernous fistulas, either de novo or recurrent, may be considered if they demonstrate no evidence of cortical venous reflux and patient symptoms are tolerable. PMID:24394154

  6. Giant primary ossified cavernous hemangioma of the skull in an adult: A rare calvarial tumor

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Devendra K; Balasubramaniam, Srikant; Sawant, Hemant V

    2011-01-01

    Primary intraosseous cavernous hemangiomas (PICHs) of the cranium are rare benign vascular tumors that account for about 0.2 % of all bone tumors and 10 % of benign skull tumors. They generally present as osteolytic lesions with honeycomb pattern of calcification. Completely ossified cavernous hemangioma of the calvarium in an adult has not been reported previously. A 28-year-old female presented to us with a large right parietal skull mass that had been present since the last 15 years. Total resection of the lesion was performed. Pathological examination was suggestive of cavernous hemangioma of the skull bone. Cavernous hemangioma should be considered as one of the differential diagnosis in any case of bony swelling of the calvarium so that adequate preoperative planning can be made to minimize blood loss and subsequent morbidity. PMID:21897684

  7. [Orbital inflammation].

    PubMed

    Mouriaux, F; Coffin-Pichonnet, S; Robert, P-Y; Abad, S; Martin-Silva, N

    2014-12-01

    Orbital inflammation is a generic term encompassing inflammatory pathologies affecting all structures within the orbit : anterior (involvement up to the posterior aspect of the globe), diffuse (involvement of intra- and/or extraconal fat), apical (involvement of the posterior orbit), myositis (involvement of only the extraocular muscles), dacryoadenitis (involvement of the lacrimal gland). We distinguish between specific inflammation and non-specific inflammation, commonly referred to as idiopathic inflammation. Specific orbital inflammation corresponds to a secondary localization of a "generalized" disease (systemic or auto-immune). Idiopathic orbital inflammation corresponds to uniquely orbital inflammation without generalized disease, and thus an unknown etiology. At the top of the differential diagnosis for specific or idiopathic orbital inflammation are malignant tumors, represented most commonly in the adult by lympho-proliferative syndromes and metastases. Treatment of specific orbital inflammation begins with treatment of the underlying disease. For idiopathic orbital inflammation, treatment (most often corticosteroids) is indicated above all in cases of visual loss due to optic neuropathy, in the presence of pain or oculomotor palsy. PMID:25455557

  8. Defective autophagy is a key feature of cerebral cavernous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Saverio; Corricelli, Mariangela; Trapani, Eliana; Bravi, Luca; Pittaro, Alessandra; Delle Monache, Simona; Ferroni, Letizia; Patergnani, Simone; Missiroli, Sonia; Goitre, Luca; Trabalzini, Lorenza; Rimessi, Alessandro; Giorgi, Carlotta; Zavan, Barbara; Cassoni, Paola; Dejana, Elisabetta; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a major cerebrovascular disease affecting approximately 0.3–0.5% of the population and is characterized by enlarged and leaky capillaries that predispose to seizures, focal neurological deficits, and fatal intracerebral hemorrhages. Cerebral cavernous malformation is a genetic disease that may arise sporadically or be inherited as an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Causative loss-of-function mutations have been identified in three genes, KRIT1 (CCM1), CCM2 (MGC4607), and PDCD10 (CCM3), which occur in both sporadic and familial forms. Autophagy is a bulk degradation process that maintains intracellular homeostasis and that plays essential quality control functions within the cell. Indeed, several studies have identified the association between dysregulated autophagy and different human diseases. Here, we show that the ablation of the KRIT1 gene strongly suppresses autophagy, leading to the aberrant accumulation of the autophagy adaptor p62/SQSTM1, defective quality control systems, and increased intracellular stress. KRIT1 loss-of-function activates the mTOR-ULK1 pathway, which is a master regulator of autophagy, and treatment with mTOR inhibitors rescues some of the mole-cular and cellular phenotypes associated with CCM. Insufficient autophagy is also evident in CCM2-silenced human endothelial cells and in both cells and tissues from an endothelial-specific CCM3-knockout mouse model, as well as in human CCM lesions. Furthermore, defective autophagy is highly correlated to endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a crucial event that contributes to CCM progression. Taken together, our data point to a key role for defective autophagy in CCM disease pathogenesis, thus providing a novel framework for the development of new pharmacological strategies to prevent or reverse adverse clinical outcomes of CCM lesions. PMID:26417067

  9. Ultrasonography guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation for hepatic cavernous hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yan; Zhou, Li-Yan; Dong, Man-Ku; Wang, Ping; Ji, Min; Li, Xiao-Ou; Chen, Chang-Wei; Liu, Zi-Pei; Xu, Yong-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Wen

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Hepatic cavernous hemangioma (HCH) is the most common benign tumor of the liver and its management is still controversial. Recent success in situ radiofrequency ablation of hepatic malignancies has led us to consider using this technique in patients with HCH. This study was to assess the efficacy, safety, and complications of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (PRFA) under ultrasonography guidance in patients with HCH. METHODS: Twelve patients (four men and eight women, age ranged 33-56 years, mean age was 41.7 years) with 15 hepatic cavernous hemangiomas (2.5 cm to 9.5 cm) were treated using the RF-2000 generator and 10-needle LeVeen electrode percutaneously guided by B-ultrasound. Lesions larger than 3 cm were treated by multiple overlapping ablations that encompass the entire lesion as well as a rim of normal liver tissue (approximately 0.5 cm). RESULTS: All the patients who received PRFA therapy had no severe pain, bleeding or bile leakage during and after the procedures. Nine to 34 months’ follow-up (mean, 21 months) by ultrasound and/or spiral CT scan demonstrated that the ablated lesions in this group were shrunk remarkably, and the shrunken range was 38%-79% (mean, 67% per 21 months). The contrast enhancement was disappeared within the tumor or at its periphery in all cases on spiral CT scans obtained 3 to 6 months after treatment. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that PRFA therapy is a mini-invasive, simple, safe, and effective method for the treatment of selected patients with HCH. PMID:12970923

  10. EXAMINE AND EVALUATE A PROCESS TO USE SALT CAVERNS TO RECEIVE SHIP BORNE LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael M. McCall; William M. Bishop; D. Braxton Scherz

    2003-04-24

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy cooperative research project is to define, describe, and validate, a process to utilize salt caverns to receive and store the cargoes of LNG ships. The project defines the process as receiving LNG from a ship, pumping the LNG up to cavern injection pressures, warming it to cavern compatible temperatures, injecting the warmed vapor directly into salt caverns for storage, and distribution to the pipeline network. The performance of work under this agreement is based on U.S. Patent 5,511,905, and other U.S. and Foreign pending patent applications. The cost sharing participants in the research are The National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. Department of Energy), BP America Production Company, Bluewater Offshore Production Systems (U.S.A.), Inc., and HNG Storage, L.P. Initial results indicate that a salt cavern based receiving terminal could be built at about half the capital cost, less than half the operating costs and would have significantly higher delivery capacity, shorter construction time, and be much more secure than a conventional liquid tank based terminal. There is a significant body of knowledge and practice concerning natural gas storage in salt caverns, and there is a considerable body of knowledge and practice in handling LNG, but there has never been any attempt to develop a process whereby the two technologies can be combined. Salt cavern storage is infinitely more secure than surface storage tanks, far less susceptible to accidents or terrorist acts, and much more acceptable to the community. The project team developed conceptual designs of two salt cavern based LNG terminals, one with caverns located in Calcasieu Parish Louisiana, and the second in Vermilion block 179 about 50 miles offshore Louisiana. These conceptual designs were compared to conventional tank based LNG terminals and demonstrate superior security, economy and capacity. The potential for the development of LNG receiving terminals

  11. Numerical evaluation of the groundwater drainage system for underground storage caverns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Eui Seob; Chae, Byung Gon

    2015-04-01

    A novel concept storing cryogenic liquefied natural gas in a hard rock lined cavern has been developed and tested for several years as an alternative. In this concept, groundwater in rock mass around cavern has to be fully drained until the early stage of construction and operation to avoid possible adverse effect of groundwater near cavern. And then rock mass should be re-saturated to form an ice ring, which is the zone around cavern including ice instead of water in several joints within the frozen rock mass. The drainage system is composed of the drainage tunnel excavated beneath the cavern and drain holes drilled on rock surface of the drainage tunnel. In order to de-saturate sufficiently rock mass around the cavern, the position and horizontal spacing of drain holes should be designed efficiently. In this paper, a series of numerical study results related to the drainage system of the full-scale cavern are presented. The rock type in the study area consists mainly of banded gneiss and mica schist. Gneiss is in slightly weathered state and contains a little joint and fractures. Schist contains several well-developed schistosities that mainly stand vertically, so that vertical joints are better developed than the horizontals in the area. Lugeon tests revealed that upper aquifer and bedrock are divided in the depth of 40-50m under the surface. Groundwater level was observed in twenty monitoring wells and interpolated in the whole area. Numerical study using Visual Modflow and Seep/W has been performed to evaluate the efficiency of drainage system for underground liquefied natural gas storage cavern in two hypothetically designed layouts and determine the design parameters. In Modflow analysis, groundwater flow change in an unconfined aquifer was simulated during excavation of cavern and operation of drainage system. In Seep/W analysis, amount of seepage and drainage was also estimated in a representative vertical section of each cavern. From the results

  12. Disposal of NORM-Contaminated Oil Field Wastes in Salt Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Blunt, D.L.; Elcock, D.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Viel, J.A.; and Williams, G.P.

    1999-01-21

    In 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, asked Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to conduct a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW) into salt caverns. That study concluded that disposal of NOW into salt caverns is feasible and legal. If caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they can be a suitable means of disposing of NOW (Veil et al. 1996). Considering these findings and the increased U.S. interest in using salt caverns for NOW disposal, the Office of Fossil Energy asked Argonne to conduct further research on the cost of cavern disposal compared with the cost of more traditional NOW disposal methods and on preliminary identification and investigation of the risks associated with such disposal. The cost study (Veil 1997) found that disposal costs at the four permitted disposal caverns in the United States were comparable to or lower than the costs of other disposal facilities in the same geographic area. The risk study (Tomasko et al. 1997) estimated that both cancer and noncancer human health risks from drinking water that had been contaminated by releases of cavern contents were significantly lower than the accepted risk thresholds. Since 1992, DOE has funded Argonne to conduct a series of studies evaluating issues related to management and disposal of oil field wastes contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). Included among these studies were radiological dose assessments of several different NORM disposal options (Smith et al. 1996). In 1997, DOE asked Argonne to conduct additional analyses on waste disposal in salt caverns, except that this time the wastes to be evaluated would be those types of oil field wastes that are contaminated by NORM. This report describes these analyses. Throughout the remainder of this report, the term ''NORM waste'' is used to mean ''oil field waste

  13. Traumatic Persistent Trigeminal Artery - Cavernous Sinus Fistula Treated by Transcatheter Arterial Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Asai, K.; Hasuo, K.; Hara, T.; Miyagishima, T.; Terano, N.

    2010-01-01

    Summary We describe a rare case of traumatic persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) - cavernous sinus fistula. Cerebral angiography showed direct communication between the right PTA and the cavernous sinus which was treated by transcathether arterial embolization. Although previous reports have indicated the use of more coils to treat this condition, we successfully treated the patient with only two coils placed near the orifice of the fistula after sufficient anatomical evaluation. PMID:20377986

  14. Traumatic persistent trigeminal artery--cavernous sinus fistula treated by transcatheter arterial embolization. A case report.

    PubMed

    Asai, K; Hasuo, K; Hara, T; Miyagishima, T; Terano, N

    2010-03-01

    We describe a rare case of traumatic persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) - cavernous sinus fistula. Cerebral angiography showed direct communication between the right PTA and the cavernous sinus which was treated by transcathether arterial embolization. Although previous reports have indicated the use of more coils to treat this condition, we successfully treated the patient with only two coils placed near the orifice of the fistula after sufficient anatomical evaluation. PMID:20377986

  15. Disposal of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in Salt Caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.; Smith, K. P.; Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Blunt, D.; Williams, G. P.

    1998-08-28

    In 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, asked Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to conduct a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW) into salt caverns. That study concluded that disposal of NOW into salt caverns is feasible and legal. If caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they can be a suitable means of disposing of NOW (Veil et al. 1996). Considering these findings and the increased U.S. interest in using salt caverns for NOW disposal, the Office of Fossil Energy asked Argonne to conduct further research on the cost of cavern disposal compared with the cost of more traditional NOW disposal methods and on preliminary identification and investigation of the risks associated with such disposal. The cost study (Veil 1997) found that disposal costs at the four permitted disposal caverns in the United States were comparable to or lower than the costs of other disposal facilities in the same geographic area. The risk study (Tomasko et al. 1997) estimated that both cancer and noncancer human health risks from drinking water that had been contaminated by releases of cavern contents were significantly lower than the accepted risk thresholds. Since 1992, DOE has funded Argonne to conduct a series of studies evaluating issues related to management and disposal of oil field wastes contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). Included among these studies were radiological dose assessments of several different NORM disposal options (Smith et al. 1996). In 1997, DOE asked Argonne to conduct additional analyses on waste disposal in salt caverns, except that this time the wastes to be evaluated would be those types of oil field wastes that are contaminated by NORM. This report describes these analyses. Throughout the remainder of this report, the term ''NORM waste'' is used to mean ''oil field waste

  16. Risk analyses for disposing nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.; Caudle, D.

    1997-12-01

    Salt caverns have been used for several decades to store various hydrocarbon products. In the past few years, four facilities in the US have been permitted to dispose nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns. Several other disposal caverns have been permitted in Canada and Europe. This report evaluates the possibility that adverse human health effects could result from exposure to contaminants released from the caverns in domal salt formations used for nonhazardous oil field waste disposal. The evaluation assumes normal operations but considers the possibility of leaks in cavern seals and cavern walls during the post-closure phase of operation. In this assessment, several steps were followed to identify possible human health risks. At the broadest level, these steps include identifying a reasonable set of contaminants of possible concern, identifying how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the toxicities of these contaminants, estimating their intakes, and characterizing their associated human health risks. The contaminants of concern for the assessment are benzene, cadmium, arsenic, and chromium. These were selected as being components of oil field waste and having a likelihood to remain in solution for a long enough time to reach a human receptor.

  17. Spindletop salt-cavern points way for future natural-gas storage

    SciTech Connect

    Shotts, S.A.; Neal, J.R.; Solis, R.J. ); Oldham, C. )

    1994-09-12

    Spindletop underground natural-gas storage complex began operating in 1993, providing 1.7 bcf of working-gas capacity in its first cavern. The cavern and related facilities exemplify the importance and advantages of natural-gas storage in leached salt caverns. Development of a second cavern, along with continued leaching of the initial cavern, target 5 bcf of available working-gas capacity in both caverns by the end of this year. The facilities that currently make up the Spindletop complex include two salt dome gas-storage wells and a 24,000-hp compression and dehydration facility owned by Sabine Gas; two salt dome gas-storage wells and a 15,900-hp compression and dehydration facility owned by Centana; a 7,000-hp leaching plant; and three jointly owned brine-disposal wells. The paper discusses the development of the storage facility, design goals, leaching plant and wells, piping and compressors, dehydration and heaters, control systems, safety and monitoring, construction, first years operation, and customer base.

  18. Hazard assessment of the stability of a cavern roof along the coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reina, A.; Lollino, P.

    2009-04-01

    This work concerns the hazard assessment about the stability of a large shallow depth cavern, located along the coastline rocky sector of Polignano town (Apulia, Southern Italy) under an intensely urbanised area. This cavern, which lies at the sea level, has been created by a prolonged process of sea erosion within a rock mass formed of a lower stratified limestone mass and an upper Gravina Calcarenite mass. The thickness of the cavern roof, which has a dome shape, is less than 10 metres in the centre. Important buildings, as hotels and private houses, are located just above the top of the roof. Erosion processes have been observed to be still active along the whole cavern due to climate factors and, in particular, to sea salt weathering and sea spray effects. In 2007 a large calcarenite block, 3 m large, fell down from the cavern roof and consequently a field investigation campaign was carried out for a rational stabilization plan in order to understand the current stability conditions of the roof and the potential failure mechanism. Therefore, a thorough geo-structural survey has firstly been carried out, together with laboratory and in-situ testing for measuring the physical and mechanical properties of the calcarenite rock and of the corresponding joints. A monitoring system has also been planned and installed in order to measure the erosional rate and the block displacements in the cavern.

  19. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC AND ULTRASONOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF CAVERNOUS TRANSFORMATION OF THE OBSTRUCTED PORTAL VEIN IN SMALL ANIMALS.

    PubMed

    Specchi, Swan; Pey, Pascaline; Ledda, Gianluca; Lustgarten, Meghann; Thrall, Donald; Bertolini, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    In humans, the process of development of collateral vessels with hepatopetal flow around the portal vein in order to bypass an obstruction is called "cavernous transformation of the portal vein." The purpose of this retrospective, cross-sectional, multicentric study was to describe presumed cavernous transformation of the portal vein in small animals with portal vein obstruction using ultrasound and multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). Databases from three different institutions were searched for patients with an imaging diagnosis of cavernous transformation of the portal vein secondary to portal vein obstruction of any cause. Images were retrieved and reanalyzed. With MDCT-angiography, two main portoportal collateral pathways were identified: short tortuous portoportal veins around/inside the thrombus and long portoportal collaterals bypassing the site of portal obstruction. Three subtypes of the long collaterals, often coexisting, were identified. Branches of the hepatic artery where involved in collateral circulation in nine cases. Concomitant acquired portosystemic shunts were identified in six patients. With ultrasound, cavernous transformation of the portal vein was suspected in three dogs and one cat based on visualization of multiple and tortuous vascular structures corresponding to periportal collaterals. In conclusion, the current study provided descriptive MDCT and ultrasonographic characteristics of presumed cavernous transformation of the portal vein in a sample of small animals. Cavernous transformation of the portal vein could occur as a single condition or could be concurrent with acquired portosystemic shunts. PMID:25877678

  20. Cavernous sinus syndrome, an atypical presentation of tertiary syphilis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Noel, Colin B; Moeketsi, Khulile; Kies, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Cavernous sinus syndrome is rarely caused by tertiary syphilitic infection. To our knowledge only two other cases of cavernous sinus syndrome caused by syphilis have been reported in the literature. We report a case of a 62-year-old female who presented with a mass in the cavernous sinus, which was initially diagnosed as a meningioma radiologically, necessitating a biopsy for diagnostic confirmation. Clinical features of syphilitic aortitis and subsequent positive neurosyphilis laboratory results lead to the suspicion of a gumma infiltrating the cavernous sinus. Empirical treatment with penicillin in an attempt to defer the need for biopsy led to both significant clinical improvement and radiological resolution. This confirmed the diagnosis of a syphilitic gumma in the cavernous sinus. In this paper we emphasize the rarity of cavernous sinus syndrome as a result of syphilitic infection, highlight the diagnostic difficulties using current serological and radiological measures, and propose treating intracerebral mass lesions in serum positive cases empirically prior to more invasive measures. PMID:20884116

  1. Japan's exploration of vertical holes and subsurface caverns on the Moon and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, J.; Kawano, I.; Kubota, T.; Yoshida, K.; Kawakatsu, Y.; Kato, H.; Otsuki, M.; Watanabe, K.; Nishibori, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Iwata, T.; Ishigami, G.; Yamada, T. T.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, gigantic vertical holes exceeding several tens of meters in diameter and depth were discovered on the Moon and Mars. Based on high-resolution image data, lunar holes and some Martian pits (called 'holes' hereafter) are probably skylights of subsurface caverns such as lava tubes or magma chambers. We are starting preparations for exploring the caverns through the vertical holes. The holes and subsurface caverns have high potential as resources for scientific studies. Various important geological and mineralogical processes could be uniquely and effectively observed inside these holes and subsurface caverns. The exposed fresh lava layers on the vertical walls of the lunar and Martian holes would provide information on volcanic eruption histories. The lava layers may also provide information on past magnetic fields of the celestial bodies. The regolith layers may be sandwiched between lava layers and may preserve volatile elements including solar wind protons that could be a clue to understanding past solar activities. Water molecules from solar winds or cometary/meteorite impacts may be stored inside the caverns because of mild temperatures there. The fresh lava materials forming the walls and floors of caverns might trap endogenic volatiles from magma eruptions that will be key materials for revealing the formation and early evolution of the Moon and Mars. Furthermore, the Martian subsurface caverns are highly expected to be life cradles where the temperatures are probably stable and that are free from ultra-violet and other cosmic rays that break chemical bonds, thus avoiding polymerization of molecules. Discovering extraterrestrial life and its varieties is one of our ultimate scientific purposes for exploring the lunar and Martian subsurface caverns. In addition to scientific interests, lunar and Martian subsurface caverns are excellent candidates for future lunar bases. We expect such caverns to have high potential due to stable temperatures; absence

  2. Acute abducens nerve palsy as a presenting feature in carotid-cavernous fistula in a 6-year-old girl

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Neelam; Ramakrishanan, R.; Maheshwari, Devendra; Ravindran, Meenakshi

    2013-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCF) are abnormal communications between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. Traumatic carotid-cavernous fistulae are rare potential complications of craniofacial trauma. Typical findings of CCF are proptosis, chemosis, headache, oculomotor or abducens nerve palsy, trigeminal pain and pulsating bruit over the temporal skull and the bulb. CCF are reported very rarely in childhood. This report describes the clinical and radiological findings of a pediatric patient presented with CCF.

  3. Construction of the bridge in the cavern in the Vrata tunnel (Croatia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garasic, Mladen; Sasa Kovacevic, Meho; Juric-Kacunic, Danijela

    2010-05-01

    In the Dinaric karst system in Croatia some 11500 speleological objects have been explored so far, more than 1000 of which were discovered during construction works. Such speleological objects without natural entrance on the terrain surface (which are called "caverns") have been discovered on the construction sites of the highways. Over the past twenty years they have been systematically investigated and treated. A special kind of remediation was conducted in the cavern's large hall of the "Vrata" tunnel on the Zagreb - Rijeka highway. Due to size, shape, cavern's position and hydrogeological parameters (fissured and karstified aquifers) within the karst system it was necessary to design and construct a 58 m bridge over the cavern. In addition, the cavern's vault had to be reinforced and stabilized, as the overburden was very thin. The beam-and -stringer grid with special anchors was used. The cavern's rehabilitation in the "Vrata" tunnel was a unique undertaking, and the bridge (without piers) is the cavern's longest bridge in the world. A speleological object of large dimensions was discovered in the "Vrata"tunnel's right tube on the Rijeka-Zagreb highway. Speleological, geotechnical, engineering geological and hydrogeological investigation works were carried out for the purpose of preservation the speleological object (cavern). On the basis of classification results of rock masses and conducted numerical analyses the support system for the cavern's vault stabilization was selected. The support system's elements include the beam-and-stringer grid constructed on the terrain's surface above the cavern, tendons and geotechnical anchors. To ensure stability of the speleological object, and to conduct the backward numerical analyses the measurement of vertical deformations from the terrain's surface along the rock's mass by means of sliding micrometers was undertaken. Backward numerical analyses combined with geotechnical measurements enable safer and more rational

  4. Thermo-mechanical modelling of salt caverns due to fluctuating loading conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, N.

    2015-12-01

    This work summarizes the development and application of a numerical model for the thermo-mechanical behaviour of salt caverns during cyclic gas storage. Artificial salt caverns are used for short term energy storage, such as power-to-gas or compressed air energy storage. Those applications are characterized by highly fluctuating operation pressures due to the unsteady power levels of power plants based on renewable energy. Compression and expansion of the storage gases during loading and unloading stages lead to rapidly changing temperatures in the host rock of the caverns. This affects the material behaviour of the host rock within a zone that extends several meters into the rock mass adjacent to the cavern wall, and induces thermo-mechanical stresses and alters the creep response.The proposed model features the thermodynamic behaviour of the storage medium, conductive heat transport in the host rock, as well as temperature dependent material properties of rock salt using different thermo-viscoplastic material models. The utilized constitutive models are well known and state-of-the-art in various salt mechanics applications. The model has been implemented into the open-source software platform OpenGeoSys. Thermal and mechanical processes are solved using a finite element approach, coupled via a staggered coupling scheme. The simulation results allow the conclusion, that the cavern convergence rate (and thus the efficiency of the cavern) is highly influenced by the loading cycle frequency and the resulting gas temperatures. The model therefore allows to analyse the influence of operation modes on the cavern host rock or on neighbouring facilities.

  5. Operative surgical nuances of modified extradural temporopolar approach with mini-peeling of dura propria based on cadaveric anatomical study of lateral cavernous structures

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Naoki; Wada, Kojiro; Toyooka, Terushige; Fujii, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Mori, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extradural temporopolar approach (ETA) has been modified as less invasive manner and named as trans-superior orbital fissure (SOF) approach with mini-peeling technique. The present study discusses the operative nuances of this modified technique on the basis of cadaveric study of lateral cavernous structures. Methods: In five consecutive cadaveric specimens, we performed an extradural anterior clinoidectomy with mini-peeling of the dura propria to expose the anterior clinoid process entirely. We also investigated the histological characteristics of the lateral cavernous sinus (CS) between the dura propria and periosteal dura at the SOF, foramen rotundum (FR), and foramen ovale (FO) levels, and of each trigeminal nerve division. Results: Coronal histological examination of the lateral wall of the CS showed invagination of the dura propria and periosteal dura into the SOF. In contrast, no such invagination was observed at the levels of the FR and FO. This finding supports the technical rationale of the only skeletonization of the SOF for peeling of the dura propria but not FR. In addition, our modified ETA method needs only minimal dural incision between the SOF and FR where no cranial nerves are present. Conclusion: Our technical modification of ETA may be recommended for surgical treatment of paraclinoid lesions to reduce the risk of intraoperative neurovascular injury. PMID:27500005

  6. Orbiter's Skeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The structure of NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft is constructed from composite panels of carbon layers over aluminum honeycomb, lightweight yet strong. This forms a basic structure or skeleton on which the instruments, electronics, propulsion and power systems can be mounted. The propellant tank is contained in the center of the orbiter's structure. This photo was taken at Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, during construction of the spacecraft.

  7. Magnetic response properties of gaudiene - a cavernous and aromatic carbocage.

    PubMed

    Rauhalahti, M; Muñoz-Castro, A; Sundholm, D

    2016-07-28

    A spherical and cavernous carbocage molecule exhibiting faces with larger ring sizes than regular fullerenes is a suitable species for investigating how molecular magnetic properties depend on the structure of the molecular framework. The studied all-carbon gaudiene (C72) is a highly symmetrical molecule with three- and four-fold faces formed by twelve membered rings. Here, we attempt to unravel the magnetic response properties of C72 by performing magnetic shielding and current density calculations with the external magnetic field applied in different directions. The obtained results indicate that the induced current density flows mainly along the chemical bonds that are largely perpendicular to the magnetic field direction. However, the overall current strength for different directions of the magnetic field is nearly isotropic differing by only 10% indicating that C72 can to some extent be considered to be a spherical aromatic molecule, whose current density and magnetic shielding are ideally completely isotropic. The induced magnetic field is found to exhibit long-range shielding cones in the field direction with a small deshielding region located perpendicularly to the field outside the molecule. The magnetic shielding is isotropic inside the molecular framework of C72, whereas an orientation-dependent magnetic response appears mainly at the exterior of the molecular cage. PMID:27352814

  8. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for the treatment of cavernous sinus hemangiomas

    PubMed Central

    XU, QINGSHENG; SHEN, JIAN; FENG, YIPING; ZHAN, RENYA

    2016-01-01

    The present retrospective study aimed to analyze the outcome of patients with cavernous sinus hemangioma (CSH) treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKS). Between August 2011 and April 2014, 7 patients with CSHs underwent GKS. GKS was performed as the sole treatment option in 5 patients, whilst partial resection had been performed previously in 1 patient and biopsy had been performed in 1 patient. The mean volume of the tumors at the time of GKS was 12.5±10.2 cm3 (range, 5.3–33.2 cm3), and the median prescription of peripheral dose was 14.0 Gy (range, 10.0–15.0 Gy). The mean follow-up period was 20 months (range, 6–40 months). At the last follow-up, the lesion volume had decreased in all patients, and all cranial neuropathies observed prior to GKS had improved. There were no radiation-induced neuropathies or complications during the follow-up period. GKS appears to be an effective and safe treatment modality for the management of CSHs. PMID:26893777

  9. Scintigraphic evaluation of liver masses: cavernous hepatic hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Rubin, R A; Lichtenstein, G R

    1993-05-01

    Hepatic cavernous hemangioma must be included in the differential diagnosis of any hepatic solid mass. It is the second most common neoplasm of the liver, following intrahepatic metastases. With the exception of giant or symptomatic HCH, it does not require specific intervention. The ability to diagnose HCH radiologically (Table 2) has significant clinical importance. When confronted with clinical data and a preliminary radiologic study suggestive of HCH, serial planar blood-pool scintigraphy (with SPECT if the lesion is < 3-4 cm) should probably be the initial diagnostic examination. In comparison to MRI, it is safer, less expensive and easier for some patients to tolerate. For small, deep seated lesions or those adjacent to the heart or large vessels, MRI is the preferred test. Dynamic CT is probably most useful in patients with normal renal function in whom optimal imaging of the extrahepatic abdomen is desired. If the etiology of an incidental hepatic mass suspected to be an HCH is still not evident after these studies, angiography or biopsy are the remaining options. As described, angiography is sensitive and relatively specific for HCH. Although percutaneous biopsy may be associated with increased risk of bleeding, fine-needle biopsy has been shown to be safe for hemangiomas. However, fine-needle biopsy is more useful for confirming a suspected malignancy than for actually diagnosing hemangioma. PMID:8478723

  10. Introduction to cerebral cavernous malformation: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaehong

    2016-05-01

    The disease known as cerebral cavernous malformations mostly occurs in the central nervous system, and their typical histological presentations are multiple lumen formation and vascular leakage at the brain capillary level, resulting in disruption of the blood-brain barrier. These abnormalities result in severe neurological symptoms such as seizures, focal neurological deficits and hemorrhagic strokes. CCM research has identified 'loss of function' mutations of three ccm genes responsible for the disease and also complex regulation of multiple signaling pathways including the WNT/β-catenin pathway, TGF-β and Notch signaling by the ccm genes. Although CCM research is a relatively new and small scientific field, as CCM research has the potential to regulate systemic blood vessel permeability and angiogenesis including that of the blood-brain barrier, this field is growing rapidly. In this review, I will provide a brief overview of CCM pathogenesis and function of ccm genes based on recent progress in CCM research. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 255-262]. PMID:26923303

  11. Chlorophyll f-driven photosynthesis in a cavernous cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Lars; Brejnrod, Asker; Schliep, Martin; Sørensen, Søren J; Larkum, Anthony W D; Kühl, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Chlorophyll (Chl) f is the most recently discovered chlorophyll and has only been found in cyanobacteria from wet environments. Although its structure and biophysical properties are resolved, the importance of Chl f as an accessory pigment in photosynthesis remains unresolved. We found Chl f in a cyanobacterium enriched from a cavernous environment and report the first example of Chl f-supported oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria from such habitats. Pigment extraction, hyperspectral microscopy and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of Chl a and f in unicellular cyanobacteria found in enrichment cultures. Amplicon sequencing indicated that all oxygenic phototrophs were related to KC1, a Chl f-containing cyanobacterium previously isolated from an aquatic environment. Microsensor measurements on aggregates demonstrated oxygenic photosynthesis at 742 nm and less efficient photosynthesis under 768- and 777-nm light probably because of diminished overlap with the absorption spectrum of Chl f and other far-red absorbing pigments. Our findings suggest the importance of Chl f-containing cyanobacteria in terrestrial habitats. PMID:25668158

  12. Induced Seismicity Monitoring of an Underground Salt Cavern Prone to Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercerat, E. D.; Driad-Lebeau, L.; Bernard, P.

    2010-02-01

    Within the framework of a large research project launched to assess the feasibility of microseismic monitoring of growing underground caverns, this specific work focuses on the analysis of the induced seismicity recorded in a salt mine environment. A local seismic network has been installed over an underground salt cavern located in the Lorraine basin (Northeast of France). The microseismic network includes four 3-components and three single component geophones deployed at depths between 30 and 125 m in cemented boreholes drilled in the vicinity of the study area. The underground cavern under monitoring is located within a salt layer at 180 m depth and it presents a rather irregular shape that can be approximated by a cylindrical volume of 50 m height and 180 m diameter. Presently, the cavern is full of saturated brine inducing a significant pressure on its walls (~2.0 MPa) to keep the overburden mechanically stable. Nevertheless some small microseismic events were recorded by the network and analyzed (approximately 2,000 events in 2 years of recording). In October 2005 and April 2007, two controlled pressure transient experiments were carried out in the cavern, in order to analyze the mechanical response of the overburden by tracking the induced microseismicity. The recorded events were mainly grouped in clusters of 3-30 s of signal duration with emergent first arrivals and rather low frequency content (between 20 and 120 Hz). Some of these events have been spatially located by travel-time picking close to the actual cavern and its immediate roof. Preliminary spectral analysis of isolated microearthquakes suggests sources with non-negligible tensile components possibly related to fluid-filled cracks. Rock-debris falling into the cavern from delamination of clay marls in the immediate roof is probably another source of seismic excitation. This was later confirmed when the most important seismic swarms occurred at the site during May 2007, accompanied by the

  13. Visualization of hydraulic connections using Borehole Array around LPG Underground Storage Cavern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimo, M.; Mashimo, H.; Maejima, T.; Aoki, K.

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents a systematic approach to visualize the hydraulic connections within the fractured rock mass around the underground LPG storage caverns using array of water injection boreholes. By taking advantage that water injection boreholes are located so as to cover the storage caverns, a complete sketch of hydraulic conditions around the caverns, such as locations of water conducting fractures, hydraulic conductivity and groundwater pressure can be obtained. Applicability of the proposed techniques have been tested in an on-going construction project operated by JOGMEC, Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation, at Namikata, Western part of Japan. Three 26m x 30m x 485m caverns, located at 150 - 200 m below the ground surface in a granitic rock, are under construction. By systematically monitoring the pressure responses between the neighboring boreholes during drilling of total 387 boreholes around the two propane caverns, a spatial profile of the hydraulic connections and hydraulic conductivity around the caverns has been successfully obtained. Locations of localized depressurized zones created during an arch excavation have been detected by monitoring pressure in each borehole after stopping water supply to that borehole temporarily. Measurement has been conducted using each one of the 302 boreholes, one at a time. Observation shows that there is a clear correlation between total pressure drop and pressure gradient versus time curve on semi-logarithmic plot, dH/log10t, as expected by the numerical prediction. Regions where dH/log10t is larger than a certain criteria, determined by a numerical simulation for flow around a cavern in a rock with uniform hydraulic conductivity, have been evaluated as a depressurized zone caused by insufficient water supply, possibly due to existence of the high permeable zones. Separate pore pressure measurement around the caverns also supports this interpretation that a low pressure is prevailing near the borehole

  14. Heavily T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Landmarks of the Cavernous Sinus and Paracavernous Region

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, M.; Bobek-Billewicz, B.; Sloniewski, P.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnetic resonance anatomy of the cavernous sinus. Heavily T2-weighted submillimetric sequence in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes was performed in 16 healthy patients. The sequence provides high contrast between fluid and other structures of the cavernous sinus. High signal intensity of the venous spaces of the cavernous sinus provides a kind of a background for internal carotid artery, cranial nerves, and meninges, as well as bony and fibrous structures. The study was performed with the help of an anatomic atlas. Different magnetic resonance (MR) landmarks of the cavernous and parasellar region were introduced and demonstrated. MR images, superior to computer tomography, allow a detailed assessment of the cavernous sinus anatomy. Delineation by magnetic resonance of tiny anatomical structures may help the neurosurgeon trace the exact outline of a tumor and help to plan an adequate strategy if complete resection is attempted. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 8 PMID:17171105

  15. EFFECTS OF HYPERGLYCEMIA ON RAT CAVERNOUS NERVE AXONS: A FUNCTIONAL AND ULTRASTRUCTURAL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Zotova, Elena G.; Schaumburg, Herbert H.; Raine, Cedric S.; Cannella, Barbara; Tar, Moses; Melman, Arnold; Arezzo, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    The present study explored parallel changes in the physiology and structure of myelinated (Aδ) and unmyelinated (C) small diameter axons in the cavernous nerve of rats associated with streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia. Damage to these axons is thought to play a key role in diabetic autonomic neuropathy and erectile dysfunction, but their pathophysiology has been poorly studied. Velocities in slow conducting fibers were measured by applying multiple unit procedures; histopathology was evaluated with both light and electron microscopy. To our knowledge, these are the initial studies of slow nerve conduction velocities in the distal segments of the cavernous nerve. We report that hyperglycemia is associated with a substantial reduction in the amplitude of the slow conducting response, as well as a slowing of velocities within this very slow range (<2.5 m/sec). Even with prolonged hyperglycemia (> 4 months), histopathological abnormalities were mild and limited to the distal segments of the cavernous nerve. Structural findings included dystrophic changes in nerve terminals, abnormal accumulations of glycogen granules in unmyelinated and preterminal axons, and necrosis of scattered smooth muscle fibers. The onset of slowing of velocity in the distal cavernous nerve occurred subsequent to slowing in somatic nerves in the same rats. The functional changes in the cavernous nerve anticipated and exceeded the axonal degeneration detected by morphology. The physiologic techniques outlined in these studies are feasible in most electrophysiologic laboratories and could substantially enhance our sensitivity to the onset and progression of small fiber diabetic neuropathy. PMID:18687329

  16. Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, D. J. (Compiler); Su, S. Y. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Earth orbital debris issues and recommended future activities are discussed. The workshop addressed the areas of environment definition, hazards to spacecraft, and space object management. It concluded that orbital debris is a potential problem for future space operations. However, before recommending any major efforts to control the environment, more data are required. The most significant required data are on the population of debris smaller than 4 cm in diameter. New damage criteria are also required. When these data are obtained, they can be combined with hypervelocity data to evaluate the hazards to future spacecraft. After these hazards are understood, then techniques to control the environment can be evaluated.

  17. Rock Cavern Stability Analysis Under Different Hydro-Geological Conditions Using the Coupled Hydro-Mechanical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. M.; Zhao, Z. Y.; Choo, L. Q.; Sun, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Rock cavern stability has a close relationship with the uncertain geological parameters, such as the in situ stress, the joint configurations, and the joint mechanical properties. Therefore, the stability of the rock cavern should be studied with variable geological conditions. In this paper, the coupled hydro-mechanical model, which is under the framework of the discontinuous deformation analysis, is developed to study the underground cavern stability when considering the hydraulic pressure after excavation. Variable geological conditions are taken into account to study their impacts on the seepage rate and the cavern stability, including the in situ stress ratio, joint spacing, and joint dip angle. In addition, the two cases with static hydraulic pressure and without hydraulic pressure are also considered for the comparison. The numerical simulations demonstrate that the coupled approach can capture the cavern behavior better than the other two approaches without the coupling effects.

  18. Disposal of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns -- Legality, technical feasibility, economics, and risk

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Blunt, D.; Williams, G.P.

    1998-07-01

    Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, there are no fatal flaws that would prevent a state regulatory agency from approaching cavern disposal of NORM. On the basis of the costs charged by caverns currently used for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal caverns could be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

  19. Speckle reduction during all-fiber common-path optical coherence tomography of the cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitchian, Shahab; Fiddy, Michael; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2009-02-01

    Improvements in identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery, which are responsible for erectile function, may improve nerve preservation and postoperative sexual potency. In this study, we use a rat prostate, ex vivo, to evaluate the feasibility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a diagnostic tool for real-time imaging and identification of the cavernous nerves. A novel OCT system based on an all single-mode fiber common-path interferometer-based scanning system is used for this purpose. A wavelet shrinkage denoising technique using Stein's unbiased risk estimator (SURE) algorithm to calculate a data-adaptive threshold is implemented for speckle noise reduction in the OCT image. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was improved by 9 dB and the image quality metrics of the cavernous nerves also improved significantly.

  20. Effects of anomalous salt features on caverns in Gulf Coast domes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Early solution miners encountered occasional difficulties with nonsymmetric caverns (including wings'' and chimneys''), gas releases, insoluble stringers, and excessive anhydrite sands.'' Apparently there was no early recognition of trends for these encounters, although certain areas were avoided after problems appeared consistently within them. Solution mining has now matured, and an accumulation of experience indicates that anomalous salt features occur on a number of Gulf Coast domes. Trends incorporating concentrations of anomalous features will be referred to as anomalous zones,'' or AZs (after Kupfer). The main objective of this Project is to determine the effects of AZ encounters on solution-mined caverns and related storage operations in domes. Geological features of salt domes related directly to cavern operations and AZs will be described briefly, but discussions of topics related generally to the evolution of Gulf Coast salt structures are beyond the scope of this Project.

  1. Effects of anomalous salt features on caverns in Gulf Coast domes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Early solution miners encountered occasional difficulties with nonsymmetric caverns (including ``wings`` and ``chimneys``), gas releases, insoluble stringers, and excessive anhydrite ``sands.`` Apparently there was no early recognition of trends for these encounters, although certain areas were avoided after problems appeared consistently within them. Solution mining has now matured, and an accumulation of experience indicates that anomalous salt features occur on a number of Gulf Coast domes. Trends incorporating concentrations of anomalous features will be referred to as ``anomalous zones,`` or AZs (after Kupfer). The main objective of this Project is to determine the effects of AZ encounters on solution-mined caverns and related storage operations in domes. Geological features of salt domes related directly to cavern operations and AZs will be described briefly, but discussions of topics related generally to the evolution of Gulf Coast salt structures are beyond the scope of this Project.

  2. Cavernous sinus thrombosis secondary to aspergillus granuloma: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Brenet, Esteban; Boulagnon-Rombi, Camille; N'guyen, Yohan; Litré, Claude-Fabien

    2016-10-01

    Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a rare but serious complication of sphenoid aspergillosis. The rarity of this pathology makes its diagnostic very difficult on a clinical, biological and radiological sense. The authors present a case of cavernous sinus thrombosis with ipsilateral internal carotid artery thrombosis secondary to a non-invasive sphenoid aspergillosis in an immunocompetent host, responsible of a cavernous syndrome associated to a Claude Bernard Horner syndrome. One year after surgery, the patient is still asymptomatic without recurrence. Diagnostic modalities are detailed and several management of this pathology are compared. Surgery is essential in a diagnostic and therapeutic sense. There is no evidence of the interest of adjuvant therapies such as antibiotic and anticoagulation. Concerning the antifungal treatment, the attitude towards a non-invasive sphenoid aspergillosis in an immunocompetent host is unclear. PMID:26860234

  3. Giant cavernous carotid artery aneurysm mimicking a fungal granuloma and presenting with massive epistaxis

    PubMed Central

    Roopesh Kumar, V R; Madhugiri, Venkatesh S; Sasidharan, Gopalakrishnan M; Gundamaneni, Sudheer K

    2012-01-01

    A 42-year-old man presented with frequent minor nasal bleeds since 1 month. He was undergoing chemotherapy for pulmonary tuberculosis. MRI brain revealed a space occupying lesion in the right cavernous sinus extending to sphenoid sinus, with T2 inversion. An initial diagnosis of fungal granuloma was made and endoscopic trans-nasal biopsy was attempted. During surgery, a pink pulsating mass was seen in the sphenoid sinus and the procedure was abandoned. A cerebral CT-angiography done subsequently revealed a giant right cavernous segment internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm. He was then referred to our centre and upon admission he collapsed secondary to a major bout of epistaxis. An emergency cervical carotid artery ligation resulted in transient control of epistaxis. Owing to recurrence of bleed, trapping of the aneurysm was done resulting in cure. The present case shows that a giant cavernous ICA aneurysm can occasionally be erroneously diagnosed as fungal granuloma. PMID:23010464

  4. Mapping a gene causing cerebral cavernous malformation to 7q11.2-q21.

    PubMed Central

    Günel, M; Awad, I A; Anson, J; Lifton, R P

    1995-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation is a common disease of the brain vasculature of unknown cause characterized by dilated thin-walled sinusoidal vessels (caverns); these lesions cause varying clinical presentations which include headache, seizure, and hemorrhagic stroke. This disorder is frequently familial, with autosomal dominant inheritance. Using a general linkage approach in two extended cavernous malformation kindreds, we have identified linkage of this trait to chromosome 7q11.2-q21. Multipoint linkage analysis yields a peak logarithm of odds (lod) score of 6.88 with zero recombination with locus D7S669 and localizes the gene to a 7-cM region in the interval between loci ELN and D7S802. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7604043

  5. Evaluation of Seawater Intrusion Potential into a Coastal Underground Oil Storage Cavern in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E.; Lim, J.; Moon, H.; Lee, K.

    2010-12-01

    Underground oil storage caverns have been operated in Korea since 1990s, and the facility at Yeosu, south coast of Korea, is one of the largest underground oil storage facilities in Korea. Hydrologic and water quality monitoring of the facility has been performed to find out whether the facility maintains secure containment condition and long-term stability. Recently, seawater intrusion into the base of the storage cavern was suspected based on the long-term monitoring of water levels and chemical analyses of seepage water pumped out from cavern bottom. The sudden decrease of water pressure during the construction of storage tunnel seems to cause the inland movement of saline water. In this study, numerical analysis was performed to estimate the potential of seawater intrusion into underground oil storage cavern using a three dimensional groundwater simulation model, FEFLOW (Diersch, 2005). The geometry of the cavern and water curtain was represented by using the implemented functions. The groundwater flow field and seawater intrusion in response to construction activity was also estimated. The simulation results were validated by comparing EC and salinity of seepage water monitoring data. Sensitivity analyses on hydraulic conductivity and water pressure from the water curtain or injection well were also conducted. Relatively high groundwater level was observed at this site due to the low hydraulic conductivity of base rock and high altitude of the mountains. Therefore, the amount of intruded seawater does not seem to be significant. However, apparent decrease of water level was observed along the main fracture zone and seawater could be intruded along these paths. Simulation results show that the seawater intrusion to the cavern is mainly controlled by the fracture zone, which would be the main channel of groundwater movement. The injection of fresh water to the injection wells along the coast may retard the intrusion of seawater.

  6. Salinization of groundwater around underground LPG storage caverns, Korea : statistical interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Chang, H.

    2001-12-01

    In this research, we investigate the reciprocal influence between groundwater flow and its salinization occurred in two underground cavern sites, using major ion chemistry, PCA for chemical analysis data, and cross-correlation for various hydraulic data. The study areas are two underground LPG storage facilities constructed in South Sea coast, Yosu, and West Sea coastal regions, Pyeongtaek, Korea. Considerably high concentration of major cations and anions of groundwaters at both sites showed brackish or saline water types. In Yosu site, some great chemical difference of groundwater samples between rainy and dry season was caused by temporal intrusion of high-saline water into propane and butane cavern zone, but not in Pyeongtaek site. Cl/Br ratios and δ 18O- δ D distribution for tracing of salinization source water in both sites revealed that two kind of saline water (seawater and halite-dissolved solution) could influence the groundwater salinization in Yosu site, whereas only seawater intrusion could affect the groundwater chemistry of the observation wells in Pyeongtaek site. PCA performed by 8 and 10 chemical ions as statistical variables in both sites showed that intensive intrusion of seawater through butane cavern was occurred at Yosu site while seawater-groundwater mixing was observed at some observation wells located in the marginal part of Pyeongtaek site. Cross-correlation results revealed that the positive relationship between hydraulic head and cavern operating pressure was far more conspicuous at propane cavern zone in both sites (65 ~90% of correlation coefficients). According to the cross-correlation results of Yosu site, small change of head could provoke massive influx of halite-dissolved solution from surface through vertically developed fracture networks. However in Pyeongtaek site, the pressure-sensitive observation wells are not completely consistent with seawater-mixed wells, and the hydraulic change of heads at these wells related to the

  7. Fluctuating nature of an orbital venous-lymphatic anomaly in association with intracranial vascular malformations: a classical presentation.

    PubMed

    Kanagalingam, Sivashakthi; Wyse, Emily; Merbs, Shannath L; Pearl, Monica Smith

    2015-01-01

    Venous-lymphatic anomalies (VLA) are rare and benign congenital lesions of the lymphatic system, composed of endothelial-lined lymphatic cysts. They are most frequently located in the region of the head and neck, and represent 4% of all orbital masses. In those patients with extensive orbital VLAs, a strong association with intracranial vascular anomalies has been reported. Factors known to suddenly increase the size of these lesions include upper respiratory tract infections or intralesional haemorrhage; however, complete spontaneous regression is rare. We report on the classic presentation of a patient with a fluctuating right orbital VLA in association with an intracranial cavernous malformation and intracranial developmental venous anomaly. PMID:26438679

  8. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI evaluation of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Hart, Blaine L; Taheri, Saeid; Rosenberg, Gary A; Morrison, Leslie A

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the behavior of CNS cavernous malformations (CCMs) using a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI) technique sensitive for slow transfer rates of gadolinium. The prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and was HIPPA compliant. Written informed consent was obtained from 14 subjects with familial CCMs (4 men and 10 women, ages 22-76 years, mean 48.1 years). Following routine anatomic MRI of the brain, DCEMRI was performed for six slices, using T1 mapping with partial inversion recovery (TAPIR) to calculate T1 values, following administration of 0.025 mmol/kg gadolinium DTPA. The transfer rate (Ki) was calculated using the Patlak model, and Ki within CCMs was compared to normal-appearing white matter as well as to 17 normal control subjects previously studied. All subjects had typical MRI appearance of CCMs. Thirty-nine CCMs were studied using DCEMRI. Ki was low or normal in 12 lesions and elevated from 1.4 to 12 times higher than background in the remaining 27 lesions. Ki ranged from 2.1E-6 to 9.63E-4 min(-1), mean 3.55E-4. Normal-appearing white matter in the CCM patients had a mean Ki of 1.57E-4, not statistically different from mean WM Ki of 1.47E-4 in controls. TAPIR-based DCEMRI technique permits quantifiable assessment of CCMs in vivo and reveals considerable differences not seen with conventional MRI. Potential applications include correlation with biologic behavior such as lesion growth or hemorrage, and measurement of drug effects. PMID:24323376

  9. Ophthalmologic outcome of direct and indirect carotid cavernous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Grumann, Astor Junior; Boivin-Faure, Laeticia; Chapot, René; Adenis, Jean Paul; Robert, Pierre Yves

    2012-04-01

    Carotid cavernous fistulas (CCFs) can be classified as direct and indirect, depending on their flow rates and their etiology. Both forms can cause the same characteristic ophthalmological symptoms and signs. We analyzed these ocular characteristics and determined the prognostics factors associated with treatment outcome. Forty-seven patients with an angiographically confirmed diagnosis of CCF, a preoperative ophthalmic evaluation and at least one ophthalmic sign or symptom at the initial presentation were retrospectively evaluated. The patients were followed-up ophthalmically until the end of treatment, and the complications and the remaining ophthalmological signs and symptoms were then recorded. The patients' ages ranged from 13 to 89 years, with an average of 55.78 (±20.73) years, and a predominance of 28 female (57.8 %) patients. The patients with a direct CCF had a lower average age (p = 0.02). The most common symptoms were blurred vision in 17 (36.2 %) and proptosis in 37 (78.7 %) patients. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) was more prevalent in patients with an indirect CCF (p = 0.02). Thrill was more prevalent in patients with direct CCF (p = 0.01). The presence of an initial decrease of visual acuity at the first ophthalmic evaluation was significantly associated with the persistence of ocular symptoms after fistula treatment (odds ratio 3.33). In conclusion our study shows a slight difference in ophthalmic symptoms among patients with different types of fistula. Elevated IOP was significantly associated with indirect fistulas, whereas thrill was significantly associated with direct fistulas. The presence of an initial decrease of visual acuity was significantly associated with a worse ophthalmic prognosis. PMID:22447030

  10. A Promising Adjuvant to Detachable Coils for Cavernous Packing: Onyx

    PubMed Central

    Lv, X.; Jiang, C.; Li, Y.; Wu, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Transvenous embolization of cavernous dural arteriovenous fistulae (CDAVFs) with Onyx has recently been reported. This study was undertaken to assess the value of Onyx in transvenous treatment of CDAVFs. We retrospectively reviewed 18 patients who underwent transvenous embolization for CDAVFs of Barrow Type D with detachable coils and Onyx at our institution over five years. Patients were divided into two groups: group A, patients who had been treated with detachable coils; group B, patients who had been treated with a combination of detachable coils and Onyx. The approach routes, angiographic results, complications and clinical outcome were assessed for both groups. Eighteen patients with CDAVFs of Barrow Type D were treated: nine women and nine men; mean age was 41.9 years. Eleven patients treated by 19 procedures of transvenous coiling belonged to group A. Seven patients treated by eight procedures of transvenous Onyx injection belonged to group B. The periprocedural complication rate associated with coiling for both groups was 18.2% vs 16.7% with Onyx. The duration of the procedure in both groups was 6.77±2.49 hours vs 3.75±1.63 hours with coiling vs Onyx, and the cost of Onyx was cheaper than coils. An excellent outcome was achieved in both groups: 90.9% vs 100% (group A vs group B). Our results associated with both modalities of CDAVFs treatment with clinical outcome show that transvenous embolization with Onyx is a safe alternative to detachable coils in the treatment of CDAVFs. However, more cases need to be evaluated. PMID:20465891

  11. Modeling deformation processes of salt caverns for gas storage due to fluctuating operation pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, N.; Nagel, T.; Goerke, U.; Khaledi, K.; Lins, Y.; König, D.; Schanz, T.; Köhn, D.; Attia, S.; Rabbel, W.; Bauer, S.; Kolditz, O.

    2013-12-01

    In the course of the Energy Transition in Germany, the focus of the country's energy sources is shifting from fossil to renewable and sustainable energy carriers. Since renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, are subjected to annual, seasonal, and diurnal fluctuations, the development and extension of energy storage capacities is a priority in German R&D programs. Common methods of energy storage are the utilization of subsurface caverns as a reservoir for natural or artificial fuel gases, such as hydrogen, methane, or the storage of compressed air. The construction of caverns in salt rock is inexpensive in comparison to solid rock formations due to the possibility of solution mining. Another advantage of evaporite as a host material is the self-healing capacity of salt rock. Gas caverns are capable of short-term energy storage (hours to days), so the operating pressures inside the caverns are fluctuating periodically with a high number of cycles. This work investigates the influence of fluctuating operation pressures on the stability of the host rock of gas storage caverns utilizing numerical models. Therefore, we developed a coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) model based on the finite element method utilizing the open-source software platform OpenGeoSys. Our simulations include the thermodynamic behaviour of the gas during the loading/ unloading of the cavern. This provides information on the transient pressure and temperature distribution on the cavern boundary to calculate the deformation of its geometry. Non-linear material models are used for the mechanical analysis, which describe the creep and self-healing behavior of the salt rock under fluctuating loading pressures. In order to identify the necessary material parameters, we perform experimental studies on the mechanical behaviour of salt rock under varying pressure and temperature conditions. Based on the numerical results, we further derive concepts for monitoring THM quantities in the

  12. Analysis of the Massive Salt Fall in Big Hill Cavern 103

    SciTech Connect

    MUNSON, DARRELL E.; BAUER, STEPHEN J.; RAUTMAN, CHRISTOPHER A.; EHGARTNER, BRIAN L.; SATTLER, ALLAN R.

    2003-05-01

    This report summarizes recent reviews, observations, and analyses believed to be imperative to our understanding of the recent two million cubic feet salt fall event in Big Hill Cavern 103, one of the caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The fall was the result of one or more stress driven mechanical instabilities, the origins of which are discussed in the report. The work has lead to important conclusions concerning the engineering and operations of the caverns at Big Hill. Specifically, Big Hill, being the youngest SPR site, was subjected to state-of-the-art solutioning methods to develop nominally well-formed, right-circular cylindrical caverns. Examination of the pressure history records indicate that operationally all Big Hill SPR caverns have been treated similarly. Significantly, new three-dimensional (3-D) imaging methods, applied to old (original) and more recent sonar survey data, have provided much more detailed views of cavern walls, roofs, and floors. This has made possible documentation of the presence of localized deviations from ''smooth'' cylindrical cavern walls. These deviations are now recognized as isolated, linear and/or planar features in the original sonar data (circa early 1990s), which persist to the present time. These elements represent either sites of preferential leaching, localized spalling, or a combination of the two. Understanding the precise origin of these phenomena remains a challenge, especially considering, in a historical sense, the domal salt at Big Hill was believed to be well-characterized. However, significant inhomogeneities in the domal salt that may imply abnormalities in leaching were not noted. Indeed, any inhomogeneities were judged inconsequential to the solution-engineering methods at the time, and, by the same token, to the approaches to modeling the rock mass geomechanical response. The rock mass was treated as isotropic and homogeneous, which in retrospect, appears to have been an over

  13. Simulation of Mechanical Processes in Gas Storage Caverns for Short-Term Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Norbert; Nagel, Thomas; Kolditz, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, Germany's energy management has started to be transferred from fossil fuels to renewable and sustainable energy carriers. Renewable energy sources such as solar and wind power are subjected by fluctuations, thus the development and extension of energy storage capacities is a priority in German R&D programs. This work is a part of the ANGUS+ Project, funded by the federal ministry of education and research, which investigates the influence of subsurface energy storage on the underground. The utilization of subsurface salt caverns as a long-term storage reservoir for fossil fuels is a common method, since the construction of caverns in salt rock is inexpensive in comparison to solid rock formations due to solution mining. Another advantage of evaporate as host material is the self-healing behaviour of salt rock, thus the cavity can be assumed to be impermeable. In the framework of short-term energy storage (hours to days), caverns can be used as gas storage reservoirs for natural or artificial fuel gases, such as hydrogen, methane, or compressed air, where the operation pressures inside the caverns will fluctuate more frequently. This work investigates the influence of changing operation pressures at high frequencies on the stability of the host rock of gas storage caverns utilizing numerical models. Therefore, we developed a coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) model based on the finite element method utilizing the open-source software platform OpenGeoSys. The salt behaviour is described by well-known constitutive material models which are capable of predicting creep, self-healing, and dilatancy processes. Our simulations include the thermodynamic behaviour of gas storage process, temperature development and distribution on the cavern boundary, the deformation of the cavern geometry, and the prediction of the dilatancy zone. Based on the numerical results, optimal operation modes can be found for individual caverns, so the risk of host rock damage

  14. Cavernous sinus thrombosis caused by a dental infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Gi-Sung; Kim, Hyun Young; Kwak, Eun-Jung; Jung, Young-Soo; Park, Hyung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Cavernous sinus thrombosis not only presents with constitutional symptoms including fever, pain and swelling but also with specific findings such as proptosis, chemosis, periorbital swelling, and cranial nerve palsies. It is known to occur secondary to the spread of paranasal sinus infections in the nose, ethmoidal and sphenoidal sinuses. However, paranasal sinus infection of dental origin is rare. The following is a case of cavernous sinus thrombosis due to the spread of an abscess in the buccal and pterygomandibular spaces via buccal mucosal laceration. PMID:25247150

  15. Treatment of a Traumatic Carotid-Cavernous Fistula with a Covered Stent: Some Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, F.J.A.; Van Der Vliet, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary This article discusses some considerations concerning covered stent placement in a patient with a traumatic direct carotid-cavernous fistula. Our case supports recent reports in the literature that covered stent placement can be an acceptable alternative when detachable balloon occlusion or coil occlusion of a direct carotid-cavernous fistula fails or cannot be done. Positioning of a covered stent in the internal carotid artery can be technically challenging. No specific covered stents for neurovascular use have been designed or registered. Because of limited experience with covered stent placement in the carotid artery the optimal preventive and therapeutic strategies for thromboembolic complications are not known. PMID:20465898

  16. Cavernous Hemangioma of the External Canal, Tympanic Membrane, and Middle Ear Cleft: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Odat, Haitham; Al-Qudah, Mohannad; Al-Qudah, Mohammad A

    2016-06-01

    Cavernous hemangioma involving the external canal, tympanic membrane, and middle ear cavity is extremely rare. We present a case of a 45-year-old woman who had progressive right sided decreased hearing, pulsatile tinnitus, and aural fullness of 7 months duration. Microscopic examination, imaging studies, surgical treatment, and histological evaluation are reported. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of cavernous hemangioma with simultaneous involvement of the external ear, tympanic membrane, middle ear, and attic reported in English literature. PMID:26304856

  17. A NOVEL PROCESS TO USE SALT CAVERNS TO RECEIVE SHIP BORNE LNG

    SciTech Connect

    Michael M. McCall; William M. Bishop; Marcus Krekel; James F. Davis; D. Braxton Scherz

    2005-05-31

    This cooperative research project validates use of man made salt caverns to receive and store the cargoes of LNG ships in lieu of large liquid LNG tanks. Salt caverns will not tolerate direct injection of LNG because it is a cryogenic liquid, too cold for contact with salt. This research confirmed the technical processes and the economic benefits of pressuring the LNG up to dense phase, warming it to salt compatible temperatures and then directly injecting the dense phase gas into salt caverns for storage. The use of salt caverns to store natural gas sourced from LNG imports, particularly when located offshore, provides a highly secure, large scale and lower cost import facility as an alternative to tank based LNG import terminals. This design can unload a ship in the same time as unloading at a tank based terminal. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve uses man made salt caverns to securely store large quantities of crude oil. Similarly, this project describes a novel application of salt cavern gas storage technologies used for the first time in conjunction with LNG receiving. The energy industry uses man made salt caverns to store an array of gases and liquids but has never used man made salt caverns directly in the importation of LNG. This project has adapted and expanded the field of salt cavern storage technology and combined it with novel equipment and processes to accommodate LNG importation. The salt cavern based LNG receiving terminal described in the project can be located onshore or offshore, but the focus of the design and cost estimates has been on an offshore location, away from congested channels and ports. The salt cavern based terminal can provide large volumes of gas storage, high deliverability from storage, and is simplified in operation compared to tank based LNG terminals. Phase I of this project included mathematical modeling that proved a salt cavern based receiving terminal could be built at lower capital cost, and would have significantly higher

  18. Dural Venous System in the Cavernous Sinus: A Literature Review and Embryological, Functional, and Endovascular Clinical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    MITSUHASHI, Yutaka; HAYASAKI, Koji; KAWAKAMI, Taichiro; NAGATA, Takashi; KANESHIRO, Yuta; UMABA, Ryoko; OHATA, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The cavernous sinus (CS) is one of the cranial dural venous sinuses. It differs from other dural sinuses due to its many afferent and efferent venous connections with adjacent structures. It is important to know well about its complex venous anatomy to conduct safe and effective endovascular interventions for the CS. Thus, we reviewed previous literatures concerning the morphological and functional venous anatomy and the embryology of the CS. The CS is a complex of venous channels from embryologically different origins. These venous channels have more or less retained their distinct original roles of venous drainage, even after alterations through the embryological developmental process, and can be categorized into three longitudinal venous axes based on their topological and functional features. Venous channels medial to the internal carotid artery “medial venous axis” carry venous drainage from the skull base, chondrocranium and the hypophysis, with no direct participation in cerebral drainage. Venous channels lateral to the cranial nerves “lateral venous axis” are exclusively for cerebral venous drainage. Venous channels between the internal carotid artery and cranial nerves “intermediate venous axis” contribute to all the venous drainage from adjacent structures, directly from the orbit and membranous skull, indirectly through medial and lateral venous axes from the chondrocranium, the hypophysis, and the brain. This concept of longitudinal venous axes in the CS may be useful during endovascular interventions for the CS considering our better understandings of its functions in venous drainage. PMID:27063146

  19. Dural Venous System in the Cavernous Sinus: A Literature Review and Embryological, Functional, and Endovascular Clinical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Yutaka; Hayasaki, Koji; Kawakami, Taichiro; Nagata, Takashi; Kaneshiro, Yuta; Umaba, Ryoko; Ohata, Kenji

    2016-06-15

    The cavernous sinus (CS) is one of the cranial dural venous sinuses. It differs from other dural sinuses due to its many afferent and efferent venous connections with adjacent structures. It is important to know well about its complex venous anatomy to conduct safe and effective endovascular interventions for the CS. Thus, we reviewed previous literatures concerning the morphological and functional venous anatomy and the embryology of the CS. The CS is a complex of venous channels from embryologically different origins. These venous channels have more or less retained their distinct original roles of venous drainage, even after alterations through the embryological developmental process, and can be categorized into three longitudinal venous axes based on their topological and functional features. Venous channels medial to the internal carotid artery "medial venous axis" carry venous drainage from the skull base, chondrocranium and the hypophysis, with no direct participation in cerebral drainage. Venous channels lateral to the cranial nerves "lateral venous axis" are exclusively for cerebral venous drainage. Venous channels between the internal carotid artery and cranial nerves "intermediate venous axis" contribute to all the venous drainage from adjacent structures, directly from the orbit and membranous skull, indirectly through medial and lateral venous axes from the chondrocranium, the hypophysis, and the brain. This concept of longitudinal venous axes in the CS may be useful during endovascular interventions for the CS considering our better understandings of its functions in venous drainage. PMID:27063146

  20. Orbital masses: CT and MRI of common vascular lesions, benign tumors, and malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sarah N.; Sepahdari, Ali R.

    2012-01-01

    A wide variety of space occupying lesions may be encountered in the orbit. CT and MR imaging frequently help confirm the presence of a mass and define its extent. Characteristic imaging features may help distinguish among lesions that have overlapping clinical presentations. This review focuses on some of the common orbital masses. Common vascular lesions that are reviewed include: capillary (infantile) hemangioma, cavernous hemangioma (solitary encapsulated venous-lymphatic malformation), and lymphangioma (venous-lymphatic malformation). Benign tumors that are reviewed include: optic nerve sheath meningioma, schwannoma, and neurofibroma. Malignancies that are reviewed include: lymphoma, metastasis, rhabdomyosarcoma, and optic glioma. Key imaging features that guide radiological diagnosis are discussed and illustrated. PMID:23961022

  1. Computed tomographic findings in orbital Mucor

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, M.R.; Lippman, S.M.; Grinnell, V.S.; Colman, M.F.; Edwards, J.E. Jr.

    1985-07-01

    Mucormycosis is an increasingly important infection in immunocompromised patients; knowledge regarding the variability of its clinical manifestations is expanding steadily. The infection is of paranasal sinus origin and may involve the orbit secondarily via freely communicating foramina and venous channels. Death often ensues when the infection spreads either into the cavernous sinus or the central nervous system. Early diagnosis of rhinocerebral mucormycosis is crucial for a successful outcome. Computed tomographic (CT) scanning is used to visualize many intraorbital pathologic abnormalities. The patient discussed in this paper had extensive orbital Mucor that appeared minimal on a CT scan. This inability of the scan to reflect the severity of infection prompted a review of the literature describing the use of CT scans for detecting this potentially fatal, opportunistic infection. The search showed that a disparity between scan findings and the severity of the disease is the rule rather than the exception. Recognition of this disparity has significant implications for appropriate diagnosis and management of orbital Mucor.

  2. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Echography - eye orbit; Ultrasound - eye orbit; Ocular ultrasonography; Orbital ultrasonography ... ophthalmology department of a hospital or clinic. Your eye is numbed with medicine (anesthetic drops). The ultrasound ...

  3. A large cavernous malformation of the third ventricle floor: A case report.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Sasayama, Takashi; Okamura, Yusuke; Taniguchi, Masaaki; Otani, Kyoko; Yamasaki, Takashi; Itoh, Tomoo; Kohmura, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Suprasellar and third ventricular region cavernous malformations originating from the floor of the third ventricle are extremely rare. We report a case of third ventricular cavernous malformation arising from the ventricle floor in a 24-year-old woman who presented with short-term memory loss and disorientation. Computed tomography revealed a suprasellar mass with calcification in the posterior chiasmatic region. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass with heterogeneous intensity and without hydrocephalus. The mass was slightly enhanced subsequent to gadolinium infusion. Using a basal interhemispheric translamina terminalis approach and a neuroendoscope, we confirmed that the tumor was located at the floor of the third ventricle and removed it. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of cavernous malformation. The postoperative course was uneventful, but the patient's short-term memory loss persisted. Despite its rarity, cavernous malformation should be suspected when a tumor is detected in the vicinity of the third ventricle floor. It is treatable through surgical resection. PMID:26652881

  4. Segmentation of optical coherence tomography images for differentiation of the cavernous nerves from the prostate gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitchian, Shahab; Weldon, Thomas P.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2009-07-01

    The cavernous nerves course along the surface of the prostate and are responsible for erectile function. Improvements in identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery may improve nerve preservation and postoperative sexual potency. Two-dimensional (2-D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the rat prostate were segmented to differentiate the cavernous nerves from the prostate gland. To detect these nerves, three image features were employed: Gabor filter, Daubechies wavelet, and Laws filter. The Gabor feature was applied with different standard deviations in the x and y directions. In the Daubechies wavelet feature, an 8-tap Daubechies orthonormal wavelet was implemented, and the low-pass sub-band was chosen as the filtered image. Last, Laws feature extraction was applied to the images. The features were segmented using a nearest-neighbor classifier. N-ary morphological postprocessing was used to remove small voids. The cavernous nerves were differentiated from the prostate gland with a segmentation error rate of only 0.058+/-0.019. This algorithm may be useful for implementation in clinical endoscopic OCT systems currently being studied for potential intraoperative diagnostic use in laparoscopic and robotic nerve-sparing prostate cancer surgery.

  5. Post-Traumatic Cavernous Fistula Fed by Persistent Trigeminal Artery: Treatment by GDC Embolisation

    PubMed Central

    Deol, P.S.; Mishra, N.K.; Gupta, V.; Gaikwad, S.B.; Garg, A.; Singh, N.

    2001-01-01

    Summary A case of traumatic persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) cavernous sinus fistula treated with GDC embolisation is reported. Because of the small lumen of PPTA, posteriorly directed course and flow contribution from the posterior circulation, balloon embolisation via the carotid system was not considered appropriate. The fistula was successfully closed by GDC embolisation. PMID:20663331

  6. Giant Cavernous Aneurysm Associated with a Persistent Trigeminal Artery and Persistent Otic Artery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chang-wei; Yang, Zhi-gang; Wang, Chao-hua; You, Chao; Mao, Bo-yong; He, Min; Sun, Hong

    2009-01-01

    Primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) and primitive otic artery (POA) is a very rare entity in adult life. We present a case of PTA and POA associated with a giant unruptured cavernous aneurysm in a 54-year-old woman. The PTA and the POA arose from the sac of the aneurysm directly, which greatly complicated endovascular therapy management. PMID:19721839

  7. Multiparameter monitoring of a salt cavern collapse (Cerville-Buissoncourt site, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daupley, Xavier; Fabriol, Robert; Contrucci, Isabelle; Bernardie, Séverine; Cao, Ngoc-Tuyen; Jousset, Philippe; Klein, Emmanuelle; Lebert, François; Behrooz, Bazargan

    2010-05-01

    Since 2004, in the framework of GISOS (Scientific Interest Group on the Impact and Safety of Underground Structures), INERIS and BRGM participated in a monitoring experiment of a salt cavern located in the Lorrain salt basin, few kilometers away from Nancy (France). The site is located in the mining concession of Cerville Buissoncourt, owned by SOLVAY. The mining method used consists in extracting the full salt formation by solution mining until the collapse of the overburden. Thereby, the opportunity offered by this collapse was taken to test various monitoring techniques to detect its early warning signs and to improve scientific and technical knowledge of salt caverns mechanical behavior and evolution. Several geotechnical and geophysical methods have been further implemented on site in addition to the monitoring carried out by the operator, which are : microseismic, hydroacoustic, broadband seismology, surface measurements (tacheometer and RTK GPS), drilling extensometry, hydro-chemistry. In early 2009, after several significant changes in the cavity behavior, and as it had reached its critical dimensions, the operator decided to trigger its collapse. For this, pumping operations in the cavern were carried out to reduce brine level and hydrostatic pressure that contributed previously to the cavern stability. These operations, conducted during 4 days, were monitored in real time. They led to the collapse of the cavity on February 13th, 2009. Comparative analysis of the measurements acquired by the several monitoring techniques allows describing in detail the different evolution stages of the cavity and the early warning signs of its collapse.

  8. Severe narrowing of left cavernous carotid artery associated with Fusobacterium necrophorum infection.

    PubMed

    DeGaffe, Guenet H; Murphy, James R; Butler, Ian J; Shelburne, Julia; Heresi, Gloria P

    2013-08-01

    Severe oropharyngeal infection can result in Lemierre's disease, a syndrome with high mortality secondary to inflammation and thrombosis of cervical and intracranial veins with involvement of contiguous structures; however arterial involvement is rare. We report a case of Lemierre's disease in a 12 year old boy with severe narrowing of the left cavernous carotid artery. PMID:23664903

  9. [A case with both infectious cavernous sinus thrombosis and Lemierre syndrome due to intraoral resident flora].

    PubMed

    Nishida, Akihiro; Ogata, Toshiyasu; Kudo, Masataka; Fukuhara, Kousuke; Fukae, Jiro; Tsuboi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The present report describes a 54-year-old woman with cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) presenting with fever, and marked periorbital swelling. There is a history of untreated periodontal disease. On initial examination, periorbital pain associated with bilateral blephaloptosis, chemosis, and disturbed eye movement was present. The laboratory evaluation showed significant elevations in inflammatory and fibrinolytic markers. Diffusion-weighted MRI revealed high signal intensities in the bilateral superior ophthalmic veins (SOV). Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) of the cranium showed an enlarged right SOV and a non-enhancing lesion within the right SOV and bilateral cavernous sinus, indicating cavernous sinus thrombosis with diffuse SOV thrombosis. Blood culture performed on admission showed bacterial infection by intraoral resident flora; therefore, the CST was attributed to untreated periodontal disease. Contrast-enhanced CT of the case also revealed the presence of thrombosis in the jugular vein associated with micropulmonary embolus, indicating co-occurrence of Lemierre's syndrome. Antibiotic and anticoagulant treatment were initiated, and the tooth decay was treated; all clinical symptoms and signs subsequently improved. Additional neuroimaging showed that the thrombus was absent from both SOV and the cavernous sinus. Infectious CST is life threatening; therefore, laboratory and imaging examination should be performed quickly, and antibiotic and anticoagulant therapy administrated immediately. PMID:26041393

  10. High-Flow Carotid Cavernous Fistula and the Use of a Microvascular Plug System: Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Shwe, Yamin; Paramasivam, Srinivasan; Ortega-Gutierrez, Santiago; Altschul, David; Berenstein, Alejandro; Fifi, Johanna T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We report our initial experience using a detachable microvascular plug system to occlude the internal carotid artery during endovascular treatment of high-flow carotid cavernous fistula. Case and Technique An 87-year-old patient was admitted for acute-onset double vision with associated right-eye ptosis. Exam revealed a pupil-sparing, partial right third cranial nerve palsy. MRI showed a carotid cavernous fistula with high-flow drainage. Digital subtraction angiography showed a high-flow, right-sided, direct carotid cavernous fistula with flow from the proximal right internal carotid artery. The ophthalmic artery, posterior communicating artery and anterior communicating arteries supplied retrograde flow to the fistula through the internal carotid artery. Obliteration of the fistula was achieved through coil embolization in combination with proximal and distal microvascular plugs (Reverse Medical, Irvine, Calif., USA). Conclusion The microvascular plug is a new addition to current endovascular embolization devices for the treatment of high-flow, direct carotid cavernous fistulas. This technique offers easy navigability through tortuous arteries, precise localization and immediate occlusion, which may allow shorter procedure and fluoroscopy times and increased cost-effectiveness. Larger case series are needed to support our observation. PMID:26019711

  11. Thermo-mechanical modelling of cyclic gas storage applications in salt caverns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Norbert; Watanabe, Norihiro; Görke, Uwe-Jens; Kolditz, Olaf; Nagel, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Due to the growing importance of renewable energy sources it becomes more and more necessary to investigate energy storage potentials. One major way to store energy is the power-to-gas concept. Excessive electrical energy can be used either to produce hydrogen or methane by electrolysis or methanation or to compress air, respectively. Those produced gases can then be stored in artificial salt caverns, which are constructed in large salt formations by solution mining. In combination with renewable energy sources, the power-to-gas concept is subjected to fluctuations. Compression and expansion of the storage gases lead to temperature differences within the salt rock. The variations can advance several metres into the host rock, influencing its material behaviour, inducing thermal stresses and altering the creep response. To investigate the temperature influence on the cavern capacity, we have developed a numerical model to simulate the thermo-mechanical behaviour of salt caverns during cyclic gas storage. The model considers the thermodynamic behaviour of the stored gases as well as the heat transport and the temperature dependent material properties of the host rock. Therefore, we utilized well-known constitutive thermo-visco-plastic material models, implemented into the open source-scientific software OpenGeoSys. Both thermal and mechanical processes are solved using a finite element approach, connected via a staggered coupling scheme. The model allows the assessment of the structural safety as well as the convergence of the salt caverns.

  12. Evaluation of cerebral oximetry during endovascular treatment of carotid-cavernous fistula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujovny, Manuel; Misra, Mukesh; Alp, M. Serdar; Debrun, Gerard; Charbel, F. T.; Aletich, Victor; Ausman, James I.

    1997-08-01

    Endovascular treatment of carotid cavernous fistula is done routinely in our institution. We have been monitoring these patients with transcranial cerebral oximetry. The transcranial cerebral oximeter is a reliable, low-cost, non-invasive device that provides real-time evaluation of regional brain oxygen saturation during and after endovascular treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. We used the INVOS 3100A (Somanetics, Troy, MI) in our study. We discuss seven patients with carotid-cavernous fistulas treated by endovascular balloon occlusion, each monitored continuously before, during, and after the procedure with transcranial cerebral oximetry. The cerebral oxygen saturation depicted was directly related to the side of the venous drainage of the fistula, with the brain oxygen saturation 15 - 20% higher on the side of the venous drainage. Following endovascular occlusion of the fistula, oxygen saturation gradually became equal on both sides. In our patients treated for carotid-cavernous fistula, we evaluated the sensitivity and usefulness of cerebral oximetry as an important non-invasive monitoring tool for the endovascular treatment of carotid-cavernous fistula.

  13. Spall formation in solution mined storage caverns based on a creep and fracture analysis

    SciTech Connect

    MUNSON,DARRELL E.

    2000-02-02

    Because of limited direct observation, understanding of the interior conditions of the massive storage caverns constructed in Gulf Coast salt domes is realizable only through predictions of salt response. Determination of the potential for formation of salt spans, leading to eventual salt falls, is based on salt creep and fracture using the Multimechanism-Deformation Coupled Fracture (MCDF) model. This is a continuum model for creep, coupled to continuum damage evolution. The model has been successfully tested against underground results of damage around several test rooms at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Model simulations, here, evaluate observations made in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) storage caverns, namely, the accumulation of material on cavern floors and evidence of salt falls. A simulation of a smooth cavern wall indicates damage is maximum at the surface but diminishes monotonically into the salt, which suggests the source of salt accumulation is surface sluffing. If a protuberance occurs on the wall, fracture damage can form beneath the protuberance, which will eventually cause fracture, and lead to a salt fall.

  14. Preliminary Technical and Legal Evaluation of Disposing of Nonhazardous Oil Field Waste into Salt Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, Robert C.; Caudle, Dan; Elcock, Deborah; Raivel, Mary; Veil, John; and Grunewald, Ben

    1999-01-21

    This report presents an initial evaluation of the suitability, feasibility, and legality of using salt caverns for disposal of nonhazardous oil field wastes. Given the preliminary and general nature of this report, we recognize that some of our findings and conclusions maybe speculative and subject to change upon further research on this topic.

  15. Treatment of Orbital Complications Following Acute Rhinosinusitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yuzhu; Shi, Guanggang; Wang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The orbital complications account for about 80% of all complications secondary to acute rhinosinusitis. If the treatment is not correct and in time, orbital complications could progress rapidly, leading to optic neuritis, cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis or life-threatening intracranial complications. Aims: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of conservative therapy for the patients with orbital cellulitis and endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) performed on patients with subperiosteal abscess (SPA) secondary to acute rhinosinusitis in children. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: The retrospective study included 31 pediatric patients with orbital complications secondary to acute rhinosinusitis. In all cases, intensive treatment was initiated with a combination of oral or intravenous antibiotics, glucocorticoid and gelomyrtol forte after admission. ESS was performed if an improvement in the condition of patients did not occur after 48 hours. However, the patients with orbital SPA, motility disorders of eyeball or decreased vision received ESS immediately within 24 hours. Results: Sixteen patients were cured by conservative therapy and 15 patients by ESS. All of the signs and symptoms disappeared after conservative therapy or ESS. There were no recurrences within the follow-up period of 1 to 8 years. Conclusion: Conservative therapy is an effective method for patients with inflammatory edema and most cases of orbital cellulitis in children. SPA can be cured by ESS. PMID:27606135

  16. Borehole radar investigations for locating ice ring formed by cryogenic condition in an underground cavern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Ho; Park, Sam-Gyu; Yi, Myeong-Jong; Son, Jeong-Sul; Cho, Seong-Jun

    2007-07-01

    A small underground pilot plant was constructed and operated at Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources for investigating the feasibility of a new concept of storing liquefied natural gas (LNG) in a lined hard rock cavern. In the real operation of the pilot plant, liquid nitrogen (LN2) was stored instead of LNG for safety purpose. A drainage system controls the development of an impervious ring of ice formed due to storage of LN2 in extremely low temperature. The ice ring formed around the storage cavern is very important because this can act as the final barrier to secure the LNG storage. We carried out borehole radar surveys to study the applicability of the borehole radar reflection method to locating the ice ring formation. Prior to conducting the fieldwork, we performed numerical experiments of borehole radar reflection survey; through the analysis of the numerical modeled data we obtained the most appropriate interpretation strategies for locating the ice rings. Before and after storing the LN2 in the underground cavern, we conducted borehole radar reflection and crosshole level scanning surveys. The data obtained at the two stages of the surveys were compared in order to identify changes occurring in basement rock after storing the LN2. The interpretation of the borehole radar data clearly showed that the ice rings only developed under and in front of the LNG storage cavern of the pilot plant, but not over it. Through the numerical modeling experiments and field monitoring exercises, we were able to know that borehole radar reflection technique is an effective method for locating ice rings formed in basement rock for storing material of extremely low temperature in an underground cavern.

  17. The Role of Palliative Radiosurgery When Cancer Invades the Cavernous Sinus

    SciTech Connect

    Kano, Hideyuki; Niranjan, Ajay; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Involvement of the cavernous sinus by direct invasion from skull base cancer or from metastatic spread of cancers is a challenging problem. We evaluated the role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the treatment of patients who developed cavernous sinus metastases or direct invasion. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the data from 37 patients who had cavernous sinus metastases or had cavernous sinus invasion from adjacent skull base cancers and who underwent SRS between 1992 and 2006 at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The median patient age was 57.8 years. Previous adjuvant management included fractionated radiotherapy in 8, chemotherapy in 16, and both radiotherapy and chemotherapy in 5. The primary sites of metastases or invasion were nasopharyngeal carcinoma (n = 7), parotid gland carcinoma (n = 7), and metastases from systemic cancer (n = 23). The median target volume was 6.3 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.3-33.6), and the median margin dose was 14 Gy (range, 12-20). Results: At a mean of 12.9 months (range, 0.8-63.9), 32 patients had died and 5 were living. The overall survival rate after SRS was 36.6% and 19.4% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Progression-free survival was related to a greater marginal dose. After SRS, 12 (35.3%) of 34 patients with neurologic symptoms exhibited improvement. SRS early after diagnosis was significantly associated with improvement of cranial nerve dysfunction. Conclusion: SRS is a minimally invasive palliative option for patients whose cancer has invaded the cavernous sinus. The benefits for cranial nerve deficits are best when SRS is performed early.

  18. Evidence for remotely triggered micro-earthquakes during salt cavern collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, P.; Rohmer, J.

    2012-04-01

    Micro-seismicity is a good indicator of spatio-temporal evolution of physical properties of rocks prior to catastrophic events like volcanic eruptions or landslides and may be triggered by a number of causes including dynamic characteristics of processes in play or/and external forces. Micro-earthquake triggering has been in the recent years the subject of intense research and our work contribute to showing further evidence of possible triggering of micro-earthquakes by remote large earthquakes. We show evidence of triggered micro-seismicity in the vicinity of an underground salt cavern prone to collapse by a remote M~7.2 earthquake, which occurred ~12000 kilometres away. We demonstrate the near critical state of the cavern before the collapse by means of 2D axisymmetric elastic finite-element simulations. Pressure was lowered in the cavern by pumping operations of brine out of the cavern. We demonstrate that a very small stress increase would be sufficient to break the overburden. High-dynamic broadband records reveal a remarkable time-correlation between a dramatic increase of the local high-frequency micro-seismicity rate associated with the break of the stiffest layer stabilizing the overburden and the passage of low-frequency remote seismic waves, including body, Love and Rayleigh surface waves. Stress oscillations due to the seismic waves exceeded the strength required for the rupture of the complex media made of brine and rock triggering micro-earthquakes and leading to damage of the overburden and eventually collapse of the salt cavern. The increment of stress necessary for the failure of a Dolomite layer is of the same order or magnitude as the maximum dynamic stress magnitude observed during the passage of the earthquakes waves. On this basis, we discuss the possible contribution of the Love and Rayleigh low-frequency surfaces waves.

  19. Rapid-developed primary malignant myoepithelioma in the cavernous sinus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant myoepithelioma is a relatively rare malignant tumor occurring most frequently in the salivary glands. A few isolated cases have been described in other locations, including soft tissue, bone, lung, bronchus, oral cavity, nasopharynx, larynx, and maxillary sinus. Malignant myoepithelioma, however, is uncommonly involved within the cavernous sinus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of malignant myoepithelioma arising from within the cavernous sinus. Case presentation Herein, we report a case of a 48-year-old woman who presented a 1-month history of diplopia and blepharoptosis as well as radiological evidence of a rapidly developing cavernous sinus tumor. The patient underwent a trans-sphenoidal biopsy and a histological diagnosis indicated a malignant myoepithelioma. After diagnosis, the tumor grew rapidly and her clinical condition deteriorated progressively. Therefore, a pterional craniotomy with partial tumor removal was performed. The patient’s clinical state was worsened, and she died two months after the initial operation. Because the malignant myoepithelioma could not be traced to an organ of origin, other than the cavernous sinus, this case was diagnosed as a primary intracranial malignant myoepithelioma. Conclusion The purpose of presenting this case report is to raise awareness among clinicians to consider malignant myoepithelioma as a differential diagnosis when a cavernous sinus mass is identified. Furthermore, an ideal management strategy for malignant myoepithelioma is not known and the prognosis seems to be unfavorable; therefore, more cases are needed to enhance our knowledge of the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of this rare intracranial lesion. PMID:23642050

  20. Compilation of gas intrusion measurements, variations, and consequence modeling for SPR caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkebein, Thomas E.

    2003-03-01

    The intrusion of gas into oils stored within the SPR has been examined. When oil is stored in domal salts, gases intrude into the stored oil from the surrounding salt. Aspects of the mechanism of gas intrusion have been examined. In all cases, this gas intrusion results in increases in the oil vapor pressure. Data that have been gathered from 1993 to August 2002 are presented to show the resultant increases in bubble-point pressure on a cavern-by-cavern as well as on a stream basis. The measurement techniques are presented with particular emphasis on the TVP 95. Data analysis methods are presented to show the methods required to obtain recombined cavern oil compositions. Gas-oil ratios are also computed from the data and are presented on a cavern-by-cavern and stream basis. The observed increases in bubble-point pressure and gas-oil ratio are further statistically analyzed to allow data interpretation. Emissions plume modeling is used to determine adherence to state air regulations. Gas intrusion is observed to be variable among the sites and within each dome. Gas intrusions at Bryan Mound and Big Hill have resulted in the largest increases in bubble-point pressure for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The streams at Bayou Choctaw and West Hackberry show minimal bubble-point pressure increases. Emissions plume modeling, using the state mandated ISCST code, of oil storage tanks showed that virtually no gas may be released when H2S standards are considered. DOE plans to scavenge H2S to comply with the very tight standards on this gas. With the assumption of scavenging, benzene releases become the next most controlling factor. Model results show that a GOR of 0.6 SCF/BBL may be emissions that are within standards. Employing the benzene gas release standard will significantly improve oil deliverability. New plume modeling using the computational fluid dynamics code, FLUENT, is addressing limitations of the state mandated ISCST model.

  1. An unusual variant of the abducens nerve duplication with two nerve trunks merging within the orbit: a case report with comments on developmental background.

    PubMed

    Wysiadecki, Grzegorz; Polguj, Michał; Topol, Mirosław

    2016-07-01

    This study reports the first case of abducens nerve duplication along its entire intracranial course, ending within the orbit. A distinct abducens nerve duplication reaching the common tendinous ring (annulus of Zinn), as well as another split within the intraconal segment of the nerve have been revealed. Additionally, two groups (superior and inferior) of abducens nerve sub-branches to the lateral rectus muscle were visualised using Sihler's stain. The analysed anatomical variation has never been reported before and it seems to be in the middle of the spectrum between the cases of duplication occurring only within the intracranial segments of the abducens nerve found in the literature and those continuing throughout the whole course of the nerve. Abducens nerve duplication may be treated as a relic of early stages of ontogenesis. Such a variant might result from alternative developmental pathways in which axons of the abducens nerve, specific for a given segment of the lateral rectus muscle, run separately at some stage, instead of forming a single stem. PMID:26501961

  2. Orbit analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Michelotti, L.

    1995-01-01

    The past fifteen years have witnessed a remarkable development of methods for analyzing single particle orbit dynamics in accelerators. Unlike their more classic counterparts, which act upon differential equations, these methods proceed by manipulating Poincare maps directly. This attribute makes them well matched for studying accelerators whose physics is most naturally modelled in terms of maps, an observation that has been championed most vigorously by Forest. In the following sections the author sketchs a little background, explains some of the physics underlying these techniques, and discusses the best computing strategy for implementing them in conjunction with modeling accelerators.

  3. Onyx embolization of dural arteriovenous fistulas of the cavernous sinus through the superior pharyngeal branch of the ascending pharyngeal artery

    PubMed Central

    Pero, Guglielmo; Quilici, Luca; Piano, Mariangela; Valvassori, Luca; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    We report three cases of dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) of the cavernous sinus treated by Onyx injection through the superior pharyngeal branch of the ascending pharyngeal artery. The treatment of choice of DAVFs of the cavernous sinus is endovascular, and it is preferentially done via transvenous occlusion of the cavernous sinus. The cavernous sinus can be reached through either the inferior petrosal sinus or the superior ophthalmic vein. When these venous routes are occluded, the first attempt is to pass through the occluded inferior petrosal sinus, but sometimes this attempt can fail. In some cases there are small transosseous feeders to the fistula arising from the superior pharyngeal branch of the ascending pharyngeal artery. When all of the more conventional approaches are unattainable, this route can be attempted. In our experience, it allowed safe and rapid occlusion of the fistula. PMID:24759156

  4. Orbital Winch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, Robert (Inventor); Slostad, Jeffrey T. (Inventor); Frank, Scott (Inventor); Barnes, Ian M. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Orbital winch having: lower and upper frames; spool having upper and lower flanges with lower flange attached to lower frame; axial tether guide mounted to upper frame; secondary slewing ring coaxial with spool and rotatably mounted to upper frame, wherein secondary slewing ring's outer surface has gearing; upper tether guide mounted to inner surface of secondary slewing ring; linear translation means having upper end mounted to upper frame and lower end mounted on lower frame; primary slewing ring rotatably mounted within linear translation means allowing translation axially between flanges, wherein primary slewing ring's outer surface has gearing; lower tether guide mounted on primary slewing ring's inner surface; pinion rod having upper end mounted to upper frame and lower end mounted to lower frame, wherein pinion rod's teeth engage primary and secondary slewing rings' outer surface teeth; and tether passing through axial, upper, and lower tether guides and winding around spool.

  5. Persistent trigeminal artery arising from the arterial ring/fenestration of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Kurita, Hiroki; Ishihara, Shoichiro

    2012-09-01

    A persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most common carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis, usually arising from the cavernous or precavernous segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and connecting to the distal basilar artery. There are two types of PTA, lateral and medial. We present the first case of a lateral-type PTA arising from the large arterial ring/fenestration of the cavernous segment of the left ICA with findings from both magnetic resonance angiography and selective catheter angiography. PMID:22215430

  6. Commercial potential of natural gas storage in lined rock caverns (LRC)

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    The geologic conditions in many regions of the United States will not permit the development of economical high-deliverability gas storage in salt caverns. These regions include the entire Eastern Seaboard; several northern states, notably Minnesota and Wisconsin; many of the Rocky Mountain States; and most of the Pacific Northwest. In late 1997, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Federal Energy Technology Center engaged Sofregaz US to investigate the commercialization potential of natural gas storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC). Sofregaz US teamed with Gaz de France and Sydkraft, who had formed a consortium, called LRC, to perform the study for the USDOE. Underground storage of natural gas is generally achieved in depleted oil and gas fields, aquifers, and solution-mined salt caverns. These storage technologies require specific geologic conditions. Unlined rock caverns have been used for decades to store hydrocarbons - mostly liquids such as crude oil, butane, and propane. The maximum operating pressure in unlined rock caverns is limited, since the host rock is never entirely impervious. The LRC technology allows a significant increase in the maximum operating pressure over the unlined storage cavern concept, since the gas in storage is completely contained with an impervious liner. The LRC technology has been under development in Sweden by Sydkraft since 1987. The development process has included extensive technical studies, laboratory testing, field tests, and most recently includes a storage facility being constructed in southern Sweden (Skallen). The LRC development effort has shown that the concept is technically and economically viable. The Skallen storage facility will have a rock cover of 115 meters (375 feet), a storage volume of 40,000 cubic meters (250,000 petroleum barrels), and a maximum operating pressure of 20 MPa (2,900 psi). There is a potential for commercialization of the LRC technology in the United States. Two regions were studied

  7. Orbital Metastasis of Breast Cancer Mimicking Invasive Fungal Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Hazboun, Igor Moreira; Sakuma, Emerson Taro Inoue; Sampaio, Marcelo Hamilton

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. A range of traumatic, vascular, inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic processes can affect the orbit and its structures. In the area of otolaryngology, the rhino-orbital-cerebral involvement of invasive fungal rhinosinusitis can affect the orbit, which may look like initially a rhinosinusitis or even mimic malignancy. Case Presentation. Female patient, 32 years old, with headache and ocular proptosis. She was using prednisone in immunosuppressive doses for a year and had breast cancer treated three years earlier. The initial CT scan showed opacification of the sphenoid and ethmoid sinuses, left intraorbital involvement and contrast impregnation in the cavernous sinus. The biopsy resulted positive for invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. Discussion. The initial CT scan of our patient showed both signs of early changes of invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (IFR) and possible metastatic involvement. The intracranial extension and ocular involvement are usually the most common signs of IFR (first hypothesis). Among metastases at the orbit and the eye, breast and lung carcinomas are the most frequent. Conclusion. Although several studies on the differential diagnosis of orbital lesions exist, especially when it concerns the involvement of the nasal cavity, the diagnosis by imaging is still a challenge. PMID:27563478

  8. Orbital Metastasis of Breast Cancer Mimicking Invasive Fungal Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Tabai, Mayara; Hazboun, Igor Moreira; Sakuma, Emerson Taro Inoue; Sampaio, Marcelo Hamilton; Sakano, Eulalia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. A range of traumatic, vascular, inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic processes can affect the orbit and its structures. In the area of otolaryngology, the rhino-orbital-cerebral involvement of invasive fungal rhinosinusitis can affect the orbit, which may look like initially a rhinosinusitis or even mimic malignancy. Case Presentation. Female patient, 32 years old, with headache and ocular proptosis. She was using prednisone in immunosuppressive doses for a year and had breast cancer treated three years earlier. The initial CT scan showed opacification of the sphenoid and ethmoid sinuses, left intraorbital involvement and contrast impregnation in the cavernous sinus. The biopsy resulted positive for invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. Discussion. The initial CT scan of our patient showed both signs of early changes of invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (IFR) and possible metastatic involvement. The intracranial extension and ocular involvement are usually the most common signs of IFR (first hypothesis). Among metastases at the orbit and the eye, breast and lung carcinomas are the most frequent. Conclusion. Although several studies on the differential diagnosis of orbital lesions exist, especially when it concerns the involvement of the nasal cavity, the diagnosis by imaging is still a challenge. PMID:27563478

  9. Rates and characteristics of radiographically detected intracerebral cavernous malformations after cranial radiation therapy in pediatric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gastelum, Erica; Sear, Katherine; Hills, Nancy; Roddy, Erika; Randazzo, Dominica; Chettout, Nassim; Hess, Christopher; Cotter, Jennifer; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A; Fullerton, Heather; Mueller, Sabine

    2015-06-01

    Rates and characteristics of intracerebral cavernous malformations after cranial radiation therapy remain poorly understood. Herein we report on intracerebral cavernous malformations detected on follow-up imaging in pediatric cancer patients who received cranial radiation therapy at age ≤18 years from 1980 to 2009. Through chart reviews (n = 362) and phone interviews (n = 104) of a retrospective cohort, we identified 10 patients with intracerebral cavernous malformations. The median latency time for detection of intracerebral cavernous malformations after cranial radiation therapy was 12 years (range 1-24 years) at a median age of 21.4 years (interquartile range = 15-28). The cumulative incidence was 3% (95% confidence interval 1%-8%) at 10 years post cranial radiation therapy and 14% (95% confidence interval 7%-26%) at 15 years. Three patients underwent surgical resection. Two surgical specimens were pathologically similar to sporadically occurring intracerebral cavernous malformations; one was consistent with capillary telangiectasia. Intracerebral cavernous malformations are common after cranial radiation therapy and can show a spectrum of histologic features. PMID:25122111

  10. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 4, West Hackberry site, Louisiana.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-09-01

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 4 focuses on the West Hackberry SPR site, located in southwestern Louisiana. Volumes 1, 2, and 3, respectively, present images for the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, Louisiana, the Big Hill SPR site, Texas, and the Bryan Mound SPR site, Texas. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  11. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 3, Bryan Mound Site, Texas.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-09-01

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 3 focuses on the Bryan Mound SPR site, located in southeastern Texas. Volumes 1, 2, and 4, respectively, present images for the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, Louisiana, the Big Hill SPR site, Texas, and the West Hackberry SPR site, Louisiana. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  12. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 2, Big Hill Site, Texas.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-08-01

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 2 focuses on the Big Hill SPR site, located in southeastern Texas. Volumes 1, 3, and 4, respectively, present images for the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, Louisiana, the Bryan Mound SPR site, Texas, and the West Hackberry SPR site, Louisiana. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  13. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 1, Bayou Choctaw site, Louisiana.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-10-01

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 1 focuses on the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, located in southern Louisiana. Volumes 2, 3, and 4, respectively, present images for the Big Hill SPR site, Texas, the Bryan Mound SPR site, Texas, and the West Hackberry SPR site, Louisiana. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  14. Phase II Study to Assess the Efficacy of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients With Large Cavernous Sinus Hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xin; Liu Xiaoxia; Mei Guanghai; Dai Jiazhong; Pan Li; Wang Enmin

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Cavernous sinus hemangioma is a rare vascular tumor. The direct microsurgical approach usually results in massive hemorrhage. Although radiosurgery plays an important role in managing cavernous sinus hemangiomas as a treatment alternative to microsurgery, the potential for increased toxicity with single-session treatment of large tumors is a concern. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with large cavernous sinus hemangiomas. Methods: Fourteen patients with large (volume >20 cm{sup 3}) cavernous sinus hemangiomas were enrolled in a prospective Phase II study between December 2007 and December 2010. The hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy dose was 21 Gy delivered in 3 fractions. Results: After a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 6-36 months), the magnetic resonance images showed a mean of 77% tumor volume reduction (range, 44-99%). Among the 6 patients with cranial nerve impairments before hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, 1 achieved symptomatic complete resolution and 5 had improvement. No radiotherapy-related complications were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: Our current experience, though preliminary, substantiates the role of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for large cavernous sinus hemangiomas. Although a longer and more extensive follow-up is needed, hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of 21 Gy delivered in 3 fractions is effective in reducing the tumor volume without causing any new deficits and can be considered as a treatment modality for large cavernous sinus hemangiomas.

  15. Use of laboratory triaxial-creep data and finite-element analysis to predict observed creep behavior of leached salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Preece, D.S.; Stone, C.M.

    1982-08-01

    An increasing interest is being shown worldwide in using leached salt caverns to store oil and natural gas. A critical factor in the use of existing caverns and the design of new ones is the creep behavior of the salt surrounding the caverns. An understanding of this behavior is being gained by using laboratory triaxial creep data as material property input to finite element computer programs designed to calculate displacements and stresses due to creep. An important step in verifying these predictive methods is the comparison of field data from existing caverns with finite element analyses which incorporate the material properties and geometry of each site. This comparison has been made for caverns in the Eminence Dome (Mississippi), West Hackberry Dome (Louisiana), and Bayou Chocktaw Dome (Louisiana) with reasonably good correlation being obtained between measured and predicted volumetric response of the caverns. These comparisons are discussed in this paper.

  16. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) oil storage cavern sulphur mines 2-4-5 certification tests and analysis. Part I: 1981 testing. Part II: 1982 testing

    SciTech Connect

    Beasley, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Well leak tests and a cavern pressure were conducted in June through December 1981, and are described in Part I. The tests did not indicate conclusively that there was no leakage from the cavern, but the data indicate that cavern structural failure during oil storage is unlikely. The test results indicated that retesting and well workover were desirable prior to making a decision on the cavern use. Well leak tests were conducted in March through May 1982, and are described in Part II. The tests indicated that there was no significant leakage from wells 2 and 4 but that the leakage from wells 2A and 5 exceeded the DOE criterion. Because of the proximity of cavern 2-4-5 to the edge of the salt, this cavern should be considered for only one fill/withdrawal cycle prior to extensive reevaluation. 57 figures, 17 tables.

  17. A novel support system for shallow buried caverns based on the mining method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-Qi, Ding; Ya-Fei, Qiao; Yue-Lang, Jin; Qing-Zhao, Zhang

    2016-02-01

    In order to maintain the original appearance of the rocks on a cavern roof and protect the ground environment, a new supporting method for shallow-buried caverns is proposed. This study investigates the design theory and construction process. Based to this method, some crisscross small tunnel sheds are embedded in the overburden layer. Hence a supporting system of interaction between surrounding rocks and supporting structures is formed. By combining the numerical calculation with monitoring measurement, we found that the distribution of calculated deformation generally agreed with the monitoring measurements. The monitoring results revealed that the proportion of rock shelf load-bearing reached 47%. The self-bearing capacity of the surrounding rocks is brought into significantly play.

  18. Prediction of subsidence resulting from creep closure of solutioned-mined caverns in salt domes

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    The prediction of subsidence rates over a range of areal configurations of solution-mined caverns in salt domes is possible, based on some fifty years of history in solution mining. Several approaches contribute to predictions: site-specific observations obtained from subsidence monitoring; numerical modeling, now becoming more practicable and credible; salt-creep data from testing; and rule-of-thumb methods, based on experience. All of these approaches contribute to understanding subsidence but none are totally reliable alone. The example of subsidence occurring at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites demonstrates several principles of cavern creep closure, the main cause of the subsidence, and shows that reliable projections of future subsidence are possible. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Gamma knife surgery for a hemangioma of the cavernous sinus in a child.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Rory K J; Reynolds, Matthew R; Mansur, David B; Smyth, Matthew D

    2013-01-01

    Cavernous sinus (CS) hemangiomas are rare vascular abnormalities that constitute 0.4%-2% of all lesions within the CS. Cavernous sinus hemangiomas are high-flow vascular tumors that tend to hemorrhage profusely during resection, leading to incomplete resection and high morbidity and mortality. While Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) has proven to be an effective treatment of CS hemangiomas in the adult population, few reports of GKS for treatment of CS hemangiomas exist in the pediatric literature. Here, the authors present the first case of a 15-year-old girl with a biopsy-proven CS hemangioma who achieved complete resolution of her symptoms and a complete imaging-defined response following GKS. If suspicion for a CS hemangioma is high in a pediatric patient, GKS may be considered as an effective treatment modality, thus avoiding the morbidities of open resection. PMID:23082966

  20. Cavernous hemangioma of adult pancreas: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Utpal; Henkes, Nichole; Henkes, David; Rosenkranz, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic hemangioma is a rare type of benign vascular tumor. Low clinical suspicion and inability of current cross sectional imaging techniques to differentiate it from other pancreatic lesions, contribute to the difficulty in making the correct diagnosis. Without a definitive diagnosis, and due to concern for malignancy, in many instances, surgery is performed. We report a case of pancreas cavernous hemangioma in an 18-year-old female. The patient presented with three-month history of epigastric pain. Physical examination and routine blood tests were normal. Abdominal Computed Tomography scan revealed a 5 cm × 6 cm complex non-enhancing cystic mass in the head of pancreas. Magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and EUS guided fine needle aspiration cytology were non-diagnostic. Because of uncontrolled symptoms, the patient underwent surgical resection. Histopathology and Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma of pancreas. PMID:26361427

  1. A rare case of abnormal uterine bleeding caused by cavernous hemangioma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Cavernous hemangiomas of the uterus are extremely rare, benign lesions. A survey of the current literature identified fewer than 50 cases of hemangioma of the uterus. Case presentation We report a case of cavernous hemangioma of the uterus in a 27-year-old Malay, para 1 woman who presented at our hospital with torrential vaginal bleeding having been transferred by land ambulance from a district hospital 30 minutes away. 11 weeks previously she had an urgent cesarean section at our hospital. She had to undergo a hysterectomy to control her bleeding after other measures were unsuccessful. A histopathological report confirmed a diffuse ramifying hemangioma of the cervix and uterus with left hematosalpinx. Conclusion Most ramifying hemangioma lesions are asymptomatic and are found incidentally, but sometimes they may cause abnormal vaginal bleeding and hence should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with vaginal bleeding. Hysterectomy is the primary mode of treatment in most symptomatic cases. PMID:20478031

  2. [Recurrent bleeding of thalamic cavernous angioma under hormonal treatment. A case report].

    PubMed

    Gazzaz, M; Sichez, J; Capelle, L; Fohanno, D

    1999-12-01

    A case of recurrent bleeding from a probable left thalamic cavernoma in a 26 year old woman taking hormonal treatment is reported. Four episodes of bleeding were clinically and radiologically documented, prior to her referral to our institution. Interestingly, each episode occurred three weeks after starting hormonal treatment, dydrogesterone, desogestrel ethinylestradiol, chlormadin, nomegestrel acetate). The patient was not operated because of the deep situation of the cavernoma which was remote from the thalamic surface within the third ventricle. There was no recurrent bleeding after the onset hormonal treatment was discontinued. Although no similar case has been found in the literature, we believe that this case gives further argumentation in favor of a role of hormonal factors influencing the biological behavior of cavernous angiomas which has been previously suggested in pregnant females with bleeding cavernous angiomas. PMID:10717593

  3. Cavernous haemangioma of the testis mimicking testicular malignancy in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Naveed, S; Quari, H; Sharma, H

    2013-11-01

    Haemangioma of the testis is a rare condition. This benign vascular neoplasm may arise either within the testicular parenchyma (intratesticular) as in this case or from adnexal structures of the testis (extratesticular). Intratesticular haemangioma is rarer than extratesticular form. Intratesticular vascular neoplasms are extremely rare tumours and mostly seen in children or young adults. There are 21 reported testicular haemangioma cases in the literature as indexed in PubMed. Since 2007, only 19 cases of cavernous haemangioma have been reported in the literature in PubMed and other indexed sites. We report a case of cavernous haemangioma of the testis to attract attention to testicular haemangioma and also to prevent invasive surgery of the testis. PMID:24215057

  4. Surgical management of cavernous malformation of the optic nerve with canalicular extension

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Vítor M.; Gonçalves, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cavernous malformations arising in a single optic nerves paring the chiasm (intracranial prechiasmatic optic nerve) and expanding into the optic canal are extremely rare lesions. Published series or case reports regarding the surgical removal of these vascular malformations within this specific location are scarce. Case Description: We present the first case to be published, of an intracranial optic nerve cavernous malformation with a contiguous canalicular component that was totally and successfully removed through a microsurgical pterional approach with excellent clinical outcome. Conclusion: This pathology should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of optic neuropathy and visual loss. Early detection and surgical proposal are mandatory, warranting the prevention of permanent damage to visual pathways. Radical resection is challenging, but usually curative and associated with favorable visual outcomes. PMID:25422788

  5. Solitary spinal epidural cavernous haemangiomas as a rare cause of myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ying; Shamji, Mohammed F

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous haemangiomas rarely occur in the spinal epidural space. We report the case of a 27-year-old man who presented with myelopathy secondary to spinal cord compression from a purely epidural lesion. The imaging characteristics of cavernous haemangiomas are unique, reflecting a highly vascular lesion. Key differentiating features from intracranial or intramedullary lesions include the lack of a surrounding hemosiderin ring and popcorn appearance. An urgent referral to a neurosurgeon is recommended given the possibility of acute neurological deterioration from intralesional haemorrhage, and good recovery from early surgical resection. Preoperative planning with thorough patient counselling and availability of matched blood is important, and an en bloc resection approach should be taken to minimise blood loss. In this case, the patient experienced complete recovery after surgical resection. No recurrence after complete resection has been reported in the literature. This suggests a good long-term outcome for the patient and that no early adjuvant therapy is necessary. PMID:26409007

  6. Endoscopic approaches to brainstem cavernous malformations: Case series and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Nikhil R.; Thawani, Jayesh P.; Sanborn, Matthew R.; Storm, Phillip B.; Lee, John Y.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Symptomatic cavernous malformations involving the brainstem are frequently difficult to access via traditional methods. Conventional skull-base approaches require significant brain retraction or bone removal to provide an adequate operative corridor. While there has been a trend toward limited employment of the most invasive surgical approaches, recent advances in endoscopic technology may complement existing methods to access these difficult to reach areas. Case Descriptions: Four consecutive patients were treated for symptomatic, hemorrhagic brainstem cavernous malformations via fully endoscopic approaches (endonasal, transclival; retrosigmoid; lateral supracerebellar, infratentorial; endonasal, transclival). Together, these lesions encompassed all three segments of the brainstem. Three of the patients had complete resection of the cavernous malformation, while one patient had stable residual at long-term follow up. Associated developmental venous anomalies were preserved in the two patients where one was identified preoperatively. Three of the four patients maintained stable or improved neurological examinations following surgery, while one patient experienced ipsilateral palsies of cranial nerves VII and VIII. The first transclival approach resulted in a symptomatic cerebrospinal fluid leak requiring re-operation, but the second did not. Although there are challenges associated with endoscopic approaches, relative to our prior microsurgical experience with similar cases, visualization and illumination of the surgical corridors were superior without significant limitations on operative mobility. Conclusion: The endoscope is a promising adjunct to the neurosurgeon's ability to approach difficult to access brainstem cavernous malformations. It allows the surgeon to achieve well-illuminated, panoramic views, and by combining approaches, can provide minimally invasive access to most regions of the brainstem. PMID:25984383

  7. Medial portion of the cavernous sinus: quantitative analysis of the medial wall.

    PubMed

    Yilmazlar, Selcuk; Kocaeli, Hasan; Aydiner, Fatma; Korfali, Ender

    2005-09-01

    Pituitary tumors invade the cavernous sinus via the medial wall. Researchers have speculated that this wall is composed of dura and that substances secreted by tumors might damage this barrier. In contrast to the lateral wall, little is known about the structure of the medial wall of the cavernous sinus (MWCS). This study provides the first detailed quantitative (thickness) and qualitative (histological) assessment of the MWCS. Eighteen sellar-parasellar tissue blocks were obtained from adult human autopsies. Ten specimens were used for microsurgical dissection and macroscopic anatomical description. Eight specimens were used for histopathological study and for recording computer measurements of MWCS thickness. Each of these eight specimens was divided into three approximately equal-sized pieces, with cuts made in the coronal plane from posterior to anterior starting at the anterior level of the pituitary stalk. Wall thicknesses were compared in the three different regions (posterior, middle, anterior), and also on the left vs. the right sides. The investigations showed that the MWCS is a distinct dural layer that forms a barrier between the medial venous space of the cavernous sinus and the pituitary gland. The mean thickness of the 48 total (left and right) MWCS observed in the 24 sections examined was 0.195 +/- 0.066 mm (range = 0.080-0.387 mm). This wall is composed of loosely arranged collagen fibers that comprise a specific layer known as "meningeal dura." The posterior third of the MWCS was significantly thinner than the middle third (P = 0.0014) or anterior third (P = 0.0001). No macro- or microscopic defects were observed in any of the MWCS in the 18 specimens. The thinness of the posterior MWCS suggests that this is the most likely path for extension of pituitary tumors into the cavernous sinus. PMID:16015624

  8. Carotid artery stenoses and thrombosis secondary to cavernous sinus thromboses in Fusobacterium necrophorum meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, T. H.; Bergvall, V.; Bradshaw, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    We report the case of a young man with Fusobacterium necrophorum meningitis who developed bilateral carotid artery stenosis associated with thrombosis of the cavernous sinuses. Intraluminal clot was present in the region of the stenoses for which he was anticoagulated. The clinical presentation, problems with diagnosis, the use of anticoagulation and the need for prolonged treatment with metronidazole are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2235810

  9. Results of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Bruce E. . E-mail: pollock.bruce@mayo.edu; Stafford, Scott L.

    2005-08-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery as primary management for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods: Between 1992 and 2001, 49 patients had radiosurgery for dural-based masses of the cavernous sinus presumed to be meningiomas. The mean patient age was 55.5 years. The mean tumor volume was 10.2 mL; the mean tumor margin dose was 15.9 Gy. The mean follow-up was 58 months (range, 16-144 months). Results: No tumor enlarged after radiosurgery. Twelve of 38 patients (26%) with preexisting diplopia or facial numbness/pain had improvement in cranial nerve function. Five patients (10%) had new (n = 3) or worsened (n = 2) trigeminal dysfunction; 2 of these patients (4%) underwent surgery at 20 and 25 months after radiosurgery despite no evidence of tumor progression. Neither patient improved after partial tumor resection. One patient (2%) developed an oculomotor nerve injury. One patient (2%) had an ischemic stroke related to occlusion of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. Event-free survival was 98%, 85%, and 80% at 1, 3, and 7 years after radiosurgery, respectively. Univariate analysis of patient and dosimetric factors found no analyzed factor correlated with postradiosurgical morbidity. Conclusions: Radiosurgery was an effective primary management strategy for patients with an imaging defined cavernous sinus meningioma. Except in situations of symptomatic mass effect, unusual clinical presentation, or atypical imaging features, surgery to confirm the histologic diagnosis is unlikely to provide clinical benefit.

  10. Estimated human health risks of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

    1997-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed in domal salt caverns. In this assessment, several steps were used to evaluate potential human health risks: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the contaminants` toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and, finally, calculating human cancer and noncancer risks.

  11. Diffuse cavernous hemangioma of the penis, scrotum, perineum, and rectum--a rare tumor.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Rajul

    2008-07-01

    Hemangiomas are benign lesions that occur in any part of the body. Genital hemangioma involving the entire penis and scrotum are extremely rare. More rarely they can extend in to the pelvis making preoperative imaging imperative and decisive in treatment. Very few cases have been reported in the medical literature. Hereby, a rare cavernous hemangioma that involves the entire penis, scrotum and extends into perineum and rectum in an 18-year-old male is presented with review of literature. PMID:18580022

  12. Spontaneous resolution of ophthalmologic symptoms following bilateral traumatic carotid cavernous fistulae

    PubMed Central

    Gapsis, Briana C.; Ranjit, Roshni U.; Malavade, Sharad; Carey, Andrew; Murtagh, Reed; Drucker, Mitchell D.; Pavan, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A 38-year-old woman developed bilateral carotid cavernous fistulae (CCF) following a motor vehicle collision. Her initial ophthalmologic findings included periorbital edema, palsies of the left oculomotor and abducens nerves, and residual dilated pupils. She subsequently developed significant optic disc edema and retinal vascular dilation bilaterally. Patients with similar injuries typically require neurosurgical or vascular intervention. In this case, the patient’s signs resolved spontaneously by 21 months after onset, leaving no residual ocular deficits. PMID:24109248

  13. Evaluation of Computational Method of High Reynolds Number Slurry Flow for Caverns Backfilling

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, Giorgia

    2015-05-01

    The abandonment of salt caverns used for brining or product storage poses a significant environmental and economic risk. Risk mitigation can in part be address ed by the process of backfilling which can improve the cavern geomechanical stability and reduce the risk o f fluid loss to the environment. This study evaluate s a currently available computational tool , Barracuda, to simulate such process es as slurry flow at high Reynolds number with high particle loading . Using Barracuda software, a parametric sequence of simu lations evaluated slurry flow at Re ynolds number up to 15000 and loading up to 25%. Li mitations come into the long time required to run these simulation s due in particular to the mesh size requirement at the jet nozzle. This study has found that slurry - jet width and centerline velocities are functions of Re ynold s number and volume fractio n The solid phase was found to spread less than the water - phase with a spreading rate smaller than 1 , dependent on the volume fraction. Particle size distribution does seem to have a large influence on the jet flow development. This study constitutes a first step to understand the behavior of highly loaded slurries and their ultimate application to cavern backfilling.

  14. Continuous-wave vs. pulsed infrared laser stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Cilip, Christopher M.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-03-01

    Optical nerve stimulation has recently been developed as an alternative to electrical nerve stimulation. However, recent studies have focused primarily on pulsed delivery of the laser radiation and at relatively low pulse rates. The objective of this study is to demonstrate faster optical stimulation of the prostate cavernous nerves using continuouswave (CW) infrared laser radiation, for potential diagnostic applications. A Thulium fiber laser (λ = 1870 nm) was used for non-contact optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves, in vivo. Optical nerve stimulation, as measured by an intracavernous pressure (ICP) response in the penis, was achieved with the laser operating in either CW mode, or with a 5-ms pulse duration at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 100 Hz. Successful optical stimulation was observed to be primarily dependent on a threshold nerve temperature (42-45 °C), not an incident fluence, as previously reported. CW optical nerve stimulation provides a significantly faster ICP response time using a laser with lower power output than pulsed stimulation. CW optical nerve stimulation may therefore represent an alternative mode of stimulation for intra-operative diagnostic applications where a rapid response is critical, such as identification of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery.

  15. A Novel MGC4607/CCM2 Gene Mutation Associated with Cerebral Spinal and Cutaneous Cavernous Angiomas.

    PubMed

    Cigoli, M S; De Benedetti, S; Marocchi, A; Bacigaluppi, S; Primignani, P; Gesu, G; Citterio, A; Tassi, L; Mecarelli, O; Pulitano, P; Penco, S

    2015-07-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular abnormalities that may cause seizures, headaches, intracerebral hemorrhages, and focal neurological deficits; they can also be clinically silent and occur as a sporadic or an autosomal dominant condition. Three genes have been identified as causing familial CCM: KRIT1/CCM1, MGC4607/CCM2, and PDCD10/CCM3, mapping, respectively, on chromosomes 7q, 7p, and 3q. Here, we report an Italian family affected by CCM due to a MGC4607 gene mutation, on exon 4. All the affected subjects suffered from seizures, and some of them underwent surgery for removal of a cavernous angioma. Brain MRI showed multiple lesions consistent with CCMs in all patients. Spinal and cutaneous cavernous angiomas were present too. This report underlines the need for a careful interdisciplinarity among neurologists, neuroradiologists, neurosurgeons, geneticists, ophthalmologists, and dermatologists for a total evaluation of the different manifestations of familial CCM. This points out that only referral centers are organized to offer a multidisciplinary management of this disease. PMID:25869611

  16. Micro-Macro Analysis and Phenomenological Modelling of Salt Viscous Damage and Application to Salt Caverns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Cheng; Pouya, Ahmad; Arson, Chloé

    2015-11-01

    This paper aims to gain fundamental understanding of the microscopic mechanisms that control the transition between secondary and tertiary creep around salt caverns in typical geological storage conditions. We use a self-consistent inclusion-matrix model to homogenize the viscoplastic deformation of halite polycrystals and predict the number of broken grains in a Representative Elementary Volume of salt. We use this micro-macro modeling framework to simulate creep tests under various axial stresses, which gives us the critical viscoplastic strain at which grain breakage (i.e., tertiary creep) is expected to occur. The comparison of simulation results for short-term and long-term creep indicates that the initiation of tertiary creep depends on the stress and the viscoplastic strain. We use the critical viscoplastic deformation as a yield criterion to control the transition between secondary and tertiary creep in a phenomenological viscoplastic model, which we implement into the Finite Element Method program POROFIS. We model a 850-m-deep salt cavern of irregular shape, in axis-symmetric conditions. Simulations of cavern depressurization indicate that a strain-dependent damage evolution law is more suitable than a stress-dependent damage evolution law, because it avoids high damage concentrations and allows capturing the formation of a damaged zone around the cavity. The modeling framework explained in this paper is expected to provide new insights to link grain breakage to phenomenological damage variables used in Continuum Damage Mechanics.

  17. Failure Monitoring and Leakage Detection for Underground Storage of Compressed Air Energy in Lined Rock Caverns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung-Mok; Rutqvist, Jonny; Kim, Hyunwoo; Park, Dohyun; Ryu, Dong-Woo; Park, Eui-Seob

    2016-02-01

    Underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns (LRCs) provides a promising solution for storing energy on a large scale. One of the essential issues facing underground CAES implementation is the risk of air leakage from the storage caverns. Compressed air may leak through an initial defect in the inner containment liner, such as imperfect welds and construction joints, or through structurally damaged points of the liner during CAES operation for repeated compression and decompression cycles. Detection of the air leakage and identification of the leakage location around the underground storage cavern are required. In this study, we analyzed the displacement (or strain) monitoring method to detect the mechanical failure of liners that provides major pathways of air leakage using a previously developed numerical technique simulating the coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical behavior of underground CAES in LRCs. We analyzed the use of pressure monitoring to detect air leakage and characterize the leakage location. From the simulation results, we demonstrated that tangential strain monitoring at the inner face of sealing liners could enable one to detect failure. We also demonstrated that the use of the cross-correlation method between pressure history data measured at various sensors could identify the air leak location. These results may help in the overall design of a monitoring and alarm system for the successful implementation and operation of CAES in LRCs.

  18. Transvenous approach for the treatment of direct carotid cavernous fistula following Pipeline embolization of cavernous carotid aneurysm: a report of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Mei; Colby, Geoffrey P; Jiang, Bowen; Pero, Guglielmo; Boccardi, Edoardo; Coon, Alexander L

    2014-01-01

    Flow diverters are increasingly used for the endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms. A rare complication from flow diversion is delayed aneurysm rupture, which can lead to carotid–cavernous fistula (CCF) in the setting of cavernous carotid aneurysms (CCAs). Direct CCFs pose unique management challenges, given the lack of transarterial access to the fistula. We present two cases of direct CCFs following treatment of CCAs with the Pipeline embolization device (PED). Case 1 was a middle-aged patient with a symptomatic 10 mm wide-necked left CCA. Six weeks after PED treatment the patient developed diplopia secondary to direct CCF. Case 2 was a middle-aged patient with a symptomatic 17 mm left CCA treated with PED. One-month follow-up angiography demonstrated a direct CCF. Both patients underwent successful coil embolization of the CCF through a transvenous approach. Direct CCF formation following PED deployment for CCA is a rare complication. Parent vessel sacrifice may be avoided with transvenous occlusion of the fistula. PMID:25073525

  19. Analysis of the evolution of the instability process of a coastal cavern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lollino, P.; Reina, A.

    2012-04-01

    This work concerns the study performed for the interpretation of the potential failure mechanism of a large natural cavern, which is located along the rocky cliffs of Polignano a Mare town (Apulia, Southern Italy) under an intensely urbanised area. This cavern, which is located at the sea level, was formed due to an intense process of salt and wave erosion, mainly acting during sea storms, within a rock mass formed of a lower stratified limestone mass and an upper soft calcarenite mass. Therefore, the influence of the climatic factors and of the upward erosion process within the cavern has been specifically investigated. At present, the thickness of the cave roof, which has a dome shape, is less than 10 metres in the centre and several buildings are founded on the ground surface above. In 2006 a large calcarenite block, of about 1.5 m diameter, fell down from the roof of the cavern and afterwards field and laboratory investigations as well as both simple analytical methods and elasto-plastic numerical modelling were carried out in order to assess the current state of the roof and to interpret the effects of the potential evolution of the inner erosion and of the local failure processes of the cave. As such, a detailed geo-structural survey has firstly been carried out, together with laboratory and in-situ testing for the geomechanical characterisation of the rock materials and of the corresponding joints. An analysis of the sea storms occurred within the observation period has also been performed by considering daily rainfall and wind data. The rate of erosion has been measured by means of special nets installed at the sea level to collect the material falling down from the roof and the corresponding measurements, which lasted for about one year, indicate an erosion rate of at least 0.005 m3/month. A structural monitoring system, including extensometers and joint-meters, was also installed in several points of the cave in order to measure eventual block

  20. Analysis of the evolution of the instability process of a coastal cavern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lollino, P.; Reina, A.

    2010-09-01

    This work concerns the study for the interpretation of the potential failure mechanism of a large natural cavern, which is located along the rocky cliffs of Polignano a Mare town (Apulia, Southern Italy) under an intensely urbanised area. This cavern, which is located at the sea level, was formed due to an intense process of salt and wave erosion, mainly acting during sea storms, within a rock mass formed of a lower stratified limestone mass and an upper soft calcarenite mass. Therefore, the influence of the climatic factors and of the upward erosion process within the cavern has been specifically investigated. At present, the thickness of the cave roof, which has a dome shape, is slightly less than 10 metres in the centre and several buildings are founded on the ground surface above. In 2006 a large calcarenite block, of about 1.5 m diameter, fell down from the roof of the cavern and afterwards field and laboratory investigations as well as both simple analytical methods and more sophisticated numerical modelling were carried out in order to assess the current state of the roof and to interpret the effects of the potential evolution of the inner erosion and of the local failure processes of the cave. As such, a detailed geo-structural survey has firstly been carried out, together with laboratory and in-situ testing for the geomechanical characterisation of the rock materials and of the corresponding joints. An analysis of the sea storms occurred within the observation period has also been performed by considering daily rainfall and wind data. The rate of erosion has been measured by means of special nets installed at the sea level to collect the material falling down from the roof and the corresponding measurements, which lasted for about one year, indicate an erosion rate of about 0.005 m3/month. A structural monitoring system, including extensometers and joint-meters, was also installed in several points of the cave in order to measure eventual block

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of cavernous hemangioma of the internal auditory canal.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei Dong; Huang, Qi; Li, Xi Ye; Chen, Hong Sai; Wang, Zhao Yan; Wu, Hao

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Cavernous hemangioma of the internal auditory canal (IAC) is an extremely rare type of tumor, and only 50 cases have been reported in the literature prior to this study. The aim in this study was to describe the symptomatology, radiological features, and surgical outcomes for patients with cavernous hemangioma of the IAC and to discuss the diagnostic criteria and treatment strategy for the disease. METHODS The study included 6 patients with cavernous hemangioma of the IAC. All patients presented with sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus, and 2 also suffered from vertigo. Five patients reported a history of facial symptoms with hemispasm or palsy: 3 had progressive facial weakness, 1 had a hemispasm, and 1 had a history of recovery from sudden facial paresis. All patients underwent CT and MRI to rule out intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas and facial nerve neuromas. Five patients had their tumors surgically removed, while 1 patient, who did not have facial problems, was followed up with a wait-and-scan approach. RESULTS All patients had a presurgical diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma of the IAC, which was confirmed pathologically in the 5 patients who underwent surgical removal of the tumor. The translabyrinthine approach was used to remove the tumor in 4 patients, while the middle cranial fossa approach was used in the 1 patient who still had functional hearing. Tumors adhered to cranial nerves VII and/or VIII and were difficult to dissect from nerve sheaths during surgeries. Complete hearing loss occurred in all 5 patients. In 3 patients, the facial nerve could not be separated from the tumor, and primary end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Intact facial nerve preservation was achieved in 2 patients. Patients were followed up for at least 1 year after treatment, and MRI showed no evidence of tumor regrowth. All patients experienced some level of recovery in facial nerve function. CONCLUSIONS Cavernous hemangioma of the IAC can be diagnosed

  2. Designed angiopoietin-1 variant, COMP-angiopoietin-1, rescues erectile function through healthy cavernous angiogenesis in a hypercholesterolemic mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ji-Kan; Kim, Woo Jean; Koh, Young Jun; Piao, Shuguang; Jin, Hai-Rong; Lee, Sae-Won; Choi, Min Ji; Shin, Hwa-Yean; Kwon, Mi-Hye; Jung, Keehoon; Koh, Gou Young; Suh, Jun-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advent of oral phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, curative treatment for erectile dysfunction (ED) remains unavailable. Recently, the link between ED and cardiovascular disease was unveiled and the main etiology of ED was found to be vasculogenic. Therefore, neovascularization is a promising strategy for curing ED. Angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) is an angiogenic growth factor that promotes the generation of stable and functional vasculature. Here, we demonstrate that local delivery of the soluble, stable, and potent Ang1 variant, COMP-Ang1 gene or protein, into the penises of hypercholesterolemic mice increases cavernous angiogenesis, eNOS phosphorylation, and cGMP expression, resulting in full recovery of erectile function and cavernous blood flow up to 8 weeks after treatment. COMP-Ang1-induced promotion of cavernous angiogenesis and erectile function was abolished in Nos3-/- mice and in the presence of the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME. COMP-Ang1 also restored the integrity of endothelial cell-cell junction by down-regulating the expression of histone deacetylase 2 in the penis of hypercholesterolemic mice and in primary cultured mouse cavernous endothelial cells. These findings constitute a new paradigm toward curative treatment of both cavernous angiopathy and ED. PMID:25783805

  3. Multiple Unilateral Traumatic Carotid-Cavernous Sphenoid Sinus Fistulas with Associated Massive Epistaxis: A Consequence of Parkour

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Jason F.; Vega, Rafael A.; Machinis, Theofilos G.; Reavey-Cantwell, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Traumatic carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) present the clinician with diagnostic and surgical challenges. Extension of a CCF into the sphenoid sinus presents additional management difficulties. Endovascular interventions using various thrombogenic materials such as balloons, coils, or liquids are effective treatment strategies. Ideally, these techniques are used to obliterate the fistula while maintaining the patency of the parent artery. Case Report We present a rare case of traumatic carotid-cavernous sphenoid sinus fistulas complicated by multiple tears in the internal carotid artery with direct communication to the cavernous and sphenoid sinus. As a result, the patient developed massive epistaxis requiring emergent endovascular intervention. A total of 87 detachable coils were placed into the cavernous and sphenoid sinuses via transarterial and transvenous routes in a staged procedure, resulting in complete obliteration of the patient's multiple fistulas. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of multiple fistulous tears in the internal carotid artery with extension to the cavernous and sphenoid sinus. This report emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis and neurosurgical intervention. PMID:25829888

  4. Designed angiopoietin-1 variant, COMP-angiopoietin-1, rescues erectile function through healthy cavernous angiogenesis in a hypercholesterolemic mouse.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Ji-Kan; Kim, Woo Jean; Koh, Young Jun; Piao, Shuguang; Jin, Hai-Rong; Lee, Sae-Won; Choi, Min Ji; Shin, Hwa-Yean; Kwon, Mi-Hye; Jung, Keehoon; Koh, Gou Young; Suh, Jun-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advent of oral phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, curative treatment for erectile dysfunction (ED) remains unavailable. Recently, the link between ED and cardiovascular disease was unveiled and the main etiology of ED was found to be vasculogenic. Therefore, neovascularization is a promising strategy for curing ED. Angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) is an angiogenic growth factor that promotes the generation of stable and functional vasculature. Here, we demonstrate that local delivery of the soluble, stable, and potent Ang1 variant, COMP-Ang1 gene or protein, into the penises of hypercholesterolemic mice increases cavernous angiogenesis, eNOS phosphorylation, and cGMP expression, resulting in full recovery of erectile function and cavernous blood flow up to 8 weeks after treatment. COMP-Ang1-induced promotion of cavernous angiogenesis and erectile function was abolished in Nos3(-/-) mice and in the presence of the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME. COMP-Ang1 also restored the integrity of endothelial cell-cell junction by down-regulating the expression of histone deacetylase 2 in the penis of hypercholesterolemic mice and in primary cultured mouse cavernous endothelial cells. These findings constitute a new paradigm toward curative treatment of both cavernous angiopathy and ED. PMID:25783805

  5. Comparative analysis of use of porous orbital implant with mucus membrane graft and dermis fat graft as a primary procedure in reconstruction of severely contracted socket

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Kasturi; Bhattacharjee, Harsha; Kuri, Ganesh; Das, Jayanta Kr; Dey, Debleena

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study is to present a surgical technique of primary porous orbital ball implantation with overlying mucus membrane graft (MMG) for reconstruction of severely contracted socket and to evaluate prosthesis retention and motility in comparison to dermis fat graft (DFG). Study Design: Prospective comparative study. Materials and Methods: A total of 24 patients of severe socket contracture (Grade 2-4 Krishna's classification) were subdivided into two groups, 12 patients in each group. In Group I, DFG have been used for reconstruction. In Group II, porous polyethylene implant with MMG has been used as a primary procedure for socket reconstruction. In Group I DFG was carried out in usual procedure. In case of Group II, vascularized scar tissues were separated 360° and were fashioned into four strips. A scleral capped porous polyethylene implant was placed in the intraconal space and four strips of scar tissue were secured to the scleral cap and extended part overlapped the implant to make a twofold barrier between the implant and MMG. Patients were followed-up as per prefixed proforma. Prosthesis motility and retention between the two groups were measured. Results: In Group I, four patients had recurrence of contracture with fall out of prosthesis. In Group II stable reconstruction was achieved in all the patients. In terms of prosthesis motility, maximum in Group I was 39.2% and Group II, was 59.3%. The difference in prosthesis retention (P = 0.001) and motility (P = 0.004) between the two groups was significant. Conclusion: Primary socket reconstruction with porous orbital implant and MMG for severe socket contracture is an effective method in terms of prosthesis motility and prosthesis retention. PMID:24618485

  6. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Orbit Determination Accuracy Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slojkowski, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Results from operational OD produced by the NASA Goddard Flight Dynamics Facility for the LRO nominal and extended mission are presented. During the LRO nominal mission, when LRO flew in a low circular orbit, orbit determination requirements were met nearly 100% of the time. When the extended mission began, LRO returned to a more elliptical frozen orbit where gravity and other modeling errors caused numerous violations of mission accuracy requirements. Prediction accuracy is particularly challenged during periods when LRO is in full-Sun. A series of improvements to LRO orbit determination are presented, including implementation of new lunar gravity models, improved spacecraft solar radiation pressure modeling using a dynamic multi-plate area model, a shorter orbit determination arc length, and a constrained plane method for estimation. The analysis presented in this paper shows that updated lunar gravity models improved accuracy in the frozen orbit, and a multiplate dynamic area model improves prediction accuracy during full-Sun orbit periods. Implementation of a 36-hour tracking data arc and plane constraints during edge-on orbit geometry also provide benefits. A comparison of the operational solutions to precision orbit determination solutions shows agreement on a 100- to 250-meter level in definitive accuracy.

  7. REAL-TIME MONITORING OF A SALT SOLUTION MINING CAVERN: FROM PRECURSORY SIGNS TO GENERAL COLLAPSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, E.; Contrucci, I.; Cao, N.; Bigarré, P.

    2009-12-01

    In order to improve our understanding in brutal large scale ground failure phenomenon, a salt solution mining cavern was instrumented in 2004 previously to its expected collapse as part of its mining scheme. A permanent early warning system was set up, including a high resolution microseismic monitoring network linked to a surface field displacement measurement system. The important amount of data collected during this 5 years experiment offered real-time insight of the evolution of the geological system. The complete data set recorded during the experiment made it possible to track with precision the main stages in the evolution of the cavern. The early signs of failure were detected by high resolution microseismic monitoring during spring 2008: a shift in microseismic background regime as well as recurrent microseismic episodes were undoubtedly associated to a general process of rock failure due to the salt cavern extending up to a critical size. This was accompanied by a few episodes of massive roof falls while the upper part of the overburden remained elastic, with no ground surface movement detected. During a second and last stage of evolution, on-line processing and analysis of a sudden intense microseismic activity allowed the interpretation of the rapid, energetic failure of a thin and very stiff bed rock underlying 120 meters deep. After this failure, the ground surface measurements indicated an irreversible acceleration of the subsidence up to the general collapse 24 hours later. As it will be shown, the in-depth analysis of the whole data set enables to characterize the dynamic process of rupture and its associated precursory signs. It provides also essential knowledge and feedback experience for operational monitoring of underground operations carried out on other sensitive mining sites.

  8. A predicted model for postoperative seizure outcomes after the surgical resection of supratentorial cavernous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun; Yu, Xiaobo; Shrestha, Sudeep; Qian, Cong; Wang, Lin; Chen, Gao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To explore a predicted model for postoperative seizure outcomes after the surgical resection of supratentorial cavernous malformations. This study was a retrospective review of consecutive patients with cerebral supratentorial cavernous malformations presenting with seizures. All patients underwent surgical resection of CCMs. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the predictive value of the preoperative seizure frequency, seizure type, seizure duration, lesion location, lesion size, and the presence of residual hemosiderin. A total of 43 patients met the inclusion criteria. After a mean follow-up period of 40.95 months, 34 patients who were free from postoperative seizures were classified into Engel class I, and the remaining 9 patients were classified into Engel classes II–IV. A univariate analysis showed that the seizure frequency (χ2 = 13.440, P = 0.004) and seizure duration (χ2 = 5.145, P = 0.023) prior to surgery were associated with a worse postoperative seizure prognosis. Other covariates including age at onset, gender, a history of the medications taken, smoking status, family history, lesion characteristics, and the role of hemosiderin were not related to seizure outcomes. Logistic regression results demonstrated that the preoperative seizure frequency was an effective predictor (P = 0.004). The receiver operating characteristic curve indicated that area under the curve for the preoperative seizure frequency test was 0.833 (95% confidence interval 0.709–0.957, P = 0.002). The preoperative seizure frequency was a prognostic factor for postoperative seizure outcomes after surgical resection of supratentorial cavernous malformations. To obtain a favorable prognosis for CCM patients with preoperative seizures, early intervention might be a better choice. PMID:27368051

  9. Design of a compact laparoscopic probe for optical stimulation of the cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2009-02-01

    The cavernous nerves are responsible for erectile function and course along the prostate surface, varying in size and location among patients, making preservation of sexual function challenging after prostate cancer surgery. Electrical stimulation has proven inconsistent and unreliable in identifying these nerves and evaluating nerve function. Optical stimulation of the rat cavernous nerves has recently been reported as a alternative to electrical stimulation, with potential advantages including noncontact stimulation and improved spatial selectivity. This study describes the design of a compact laparoscopic probe for future clinical use in optical nerve stimulation. The 10-Fr (3.4-mm-OD) prototype laparoscopic probe includes an aspheric lens for collimation of the laser beam with a 0.8- mm-diameter spot, coupled with a 200-μm-core optical fiber. A 45° gold-coated rod mirror in the probe tip provides side-firing delivery of the laser radiation. The probe handle houses a miniature linear motorized stage for lateral scanning of the probe tip over a 25-mm line along the prostate surface. A 5.5-W Thulium fiber laser with tunable wavelength range of 1850-1880 nm was tested with the probe. The probe fits through a standard 5-mm-ID laparoscopic port and is capable of delivering pulse energies up to 8 mJ (1.6 J/cm2) at a 2.5-ms pulse duration, well above the threshold (~ 0.35 J/cm2) for optical stimulation of the cavernous nerves.

  10. Metalloproteinases ADAM12 and MMP-14 are associated with cavernous sinus invasion in pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junwen; Voellger, Benjamin; Benzel, Julia; Schlomann, Uwe; Nimsky, Christopher; Bartsch, Jörg W; Carl, Barbara

    2016-09-15

    Invasion of tumor cells critically depends on cell-cell or cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Enzymes capable of modulating these interactions belong to the proteinase families of ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) and MMP (matrix metalloprotease) proteins. Our objective is to examine their expression levels and evaluate the relationship between expression levels and cavernous sinus invasion in pituitary adenomas. Tissue samples from 35 patients with pituitary adenomas were analyzed. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was employed to assess mRNA expression levels for ADAM and MMP genes. Protein levels were examined using immunohistochemistry and Western Blot. Correlation analyses between expression levels and clinical parameters were performed. By silencing ADAM12 and MMP-14 with siRNA in a mouse pituitary adenoma cell line (TtT/GF), their cellular effects were investigated. In our study, nine women and 26 men were included, with a mean age of 53.1 years (range 15-84 years) at the time of surgery. There were 19 cases with cavernous sinus invasion. The proteins ADAM12 and MMP-14 were significantly up-regulated in invasive adenomas compared to noninvasive adenomas. Both human isoforms of ADAM12 (ADAM12L and ADAM12s) were involved in tumor invasion; moreover, ADAM12L was found to correlate positively with Ki-67 proliferation index in pituitary adenomas. In TtT/GF pituitary adenoma cells, silencing of ADAM12 and MMP-14 significantly inhibited cell invasion and migration, respectively, whereas only silencing of ADAM12 suppressed cell proliferation. We conclude that ADAM12 and MMP-14 are associated with cavernous sinus invasion in pituitary adenomas, which qualifies these proteins in diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27144841

  11. Cavernous hemangioma of the bladder: an additional case managed by partial cystectomy and augmentation cystoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lahyani, Mounir; Slaoui, Amine; Jakhlal, Nabil; Karmouni, Tarik; Elkhader, Khalid; Koutani, Abdellatif; Andaloussi, Ahmed Ibn Attya

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous Hemangioma of the Bladder (CHB) is benign and rare lesions. Clinical presentation has no pathognomonic signs although gross painless hematuria is the most frequent complain. CHB is suspected by cystoscopy and radiologic findings and confirmed by pathologic examinations. Management is controversial due to the bleeding risk of this highly vascularized lesion. Partial cystectomy is the treatment of choice for surgically accessible lesions. However, it appears that small lesions could be treated using transurethral resection. Since CHB is a rare case, we report another case treated successfully with a partial cystectomy associated with an augmentation cystoplasy. PMID:26889312

  12. Risk assessment of converting salt caverns to natural gas storage. Final report, November 1994-July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, M.R.; Ellis, P.F.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this paper was an assessment of the risks of release of large quantities of natural gas from salt caverns converted from other uses to the storage of compressed natural gas (CNG). A total of 22 potential root causes for large releases of natural gas from converted salt converns were identified and ranked in terms of relative risk. While this project assessed the relative risks of major gas releases, the absolute risk was determined by implication to be extremely low, as indicated by the historical record.

  13. Cavernous hemangioma presenting as a right adnexal mass in a child.

    PubMed

    Correa-Rivas, María S; Colón-González, Gloria; Lugo-Vicente, Humberto

    2003-09-01

    This is the case of an 11-year-old girl who presented with a right adnexal mass and vague abdominal symptoms since seven months prior to her hospital admission for surgery. CT-scan and sonographic images were those of a benign lesion, probably ovarian torsion or infarction. Serum tumoral markers were normal. A right salpingo-oophorectomy and appendectomy were performed. Pathology examination revealed a cavernous hemangioma of the ovary. The clinicopathologic presentation of this unusual benign ovarian tumor is discussed. PMID:14619460

  14. Aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis after internal carotid arterial occlusion in polycythaemia vera.

    PubMed Central

    Melamed, E; Rachmilewitz, E A; Reches, A; Lavy, S

    1976-01-01

    Two patients with untreated polycythaemia vera developed intracranial internal carotid arterial occlusion followed by monocular blindness and the characteristic features of ipsilateral cavernous sinus thrombosis. Primary septic source and signs of systemic infection were absent. It is suggested that the predisposing factors in this unusual syndrome were hyperviscosity and venous sludging induced by the basic haematological disorder and progression of the thrombotic process within the internal carotid artery towards its intracavernous portion with occlusion of the ophthalmic artery and of the arterial branches which supply the walls of the sinus. Images PMID:932749

  15. Interactive evolution concept for analyzing a rock salt cavern under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Diethard; Mahmoudi, Elham; Khaledi, Kavan; von Blumenthal, Achim; Schanz, Tom

    2016-04-01

    The excess electricity produced by renewable energy sources available during off-peak periods of consumption can be used e.g. to produce and compress hydrogen or to compress air. Afterwards the pressurized gas is stored in the rock salt cavities. During this process, thermo-mechanical cyclic loading is applied to the rock salt surrounding the cavern. Compared to the operation of conventional storage caverns in rock salt the frequencies of filling and discharging cycles and therefore the thermo-mechanical loading cycles are much higher, e.g. daily or weekly compared to seasonally or yearly. The stress strain behavior of rock salt as well as the deformation behavior and the stability of caverns in rock salt under such loading conditions are unknown. To overcome this, existing experimental studies have to be supplemented by exploring the behavior of rock salt under combined thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. Existing constitutive relations have to be extended to cover degradation of rock salt under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. At least the complex system of a cavern in rock salt under these loading conditions has to be analyzed by numerical modeling taking into account the uncertainties due to limited access in large depth to investigate material composition and properties. An interactive evolution concept is presented to link the different components of such a study - experimental modeling, constitutive modeling and numerical modeling. A triaxial experimental setup is designed to characterize the cyclic thermo-mechanical behavior of rock salt. The imposed boundary conditions in the experimental setup are assumed to be similar to the stress state obtained from a full-scale numerical simulation. The computational model relies primarily on the governing constitutive model for predicting the behavior of rock salt cavity. Hence, a sophisticated elasto-viscoplastic creep constitutive model is developed to take into account the dilatancy and damage progress, as well as

  16. Delayed detection of carotid-cavernous fistulas associated with wartime blast-induced craniofacial trauma.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, Sudhakar; Bell, Randy Scott; Crandall, Ben; DeGraba, Tom; Armonda, Rocco A

    2010-05-01

    Blast-induced neurotrauma is a leading cause of military casualties. Its effects on cerebrovascular structures are not well understood. Vascular injury resulting from overpressure shock wave impact may have a delayed presentation and detection. The authors present the cases of 2 patients who sustained blast-induced craniofacial trauma and brain injury. Detection of a cervical dissection was delayed in one patient, and detection of carotid-cavernous fistulas was delayed in both patients. The authors report the successful obliteration of both the dissection and the carotidcavernous fistulas via an endovascular approach. Endovascular management provides both a reasonable and effective therapeutic option to blast-induced cerebrovascular injuries. PMID:20568946

  17. Carotid-cavernous fistula caused by rupture of persistent primitive trigeminal artery trunk aneurysm--case report.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masahiro; Ezura, Masayuki; Mino, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    A 60-year-old female presented with a carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) manifesting as left abducens nerve palsy. Left internal carotid digital subtraction angiography showed a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) near the CCF. Super-selective angiography showed direct shunt flow between the PPTA trunk aneurysm and the left cavernous sinus. The aneurysm was successfully occluded with detachable coils. The CCF disappeared and the PPTA was preserved. The abducens nerve paralysis had disappeared 6 months later. CCF caused by a PPTA trunk aneurysm is extremely rare. We speculate that the PPTA trunk aneurysm formed and then ruptured due to hemodynamic stress caused by hypoplasia of the basilar artery. PMID:21785245

  18. Decision-making in classic trigeminal neuralgia concurrent with a pontine cavernous malformation: Causal or coincidental association?

    PubMed

    Parise, Maud; Acioly, Marcus André; Vincent, Maurice; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is classically associated with neurovascular compression of the trigeminal nerve, at the root entry zone (REZ). However, patients are occasionally affected by intra-axial involvement of trigeminal sensory fibers caused by demyelinating diseases, strokes and, rarely, pontine cavernous malformations. We discuss the management strategies and decision-making process in a 55-year-old patient, affected by trigeminal neuralgia with 2 potential causative mechanisms: a neurovascular conflict at the trigeminal REZ and an ipsilateral cavernous malformation at the pontine nucleus of the trigeminal nerve. PMID:25450011

  19. Orbital complications in children: differential diagnosis of a challenging disease.

    PubMed

    Welkoborsky, Hans-J; Graß, Sylvia; Deichmüller, Cordula; Bertram, Oliver; Hinni, Michael L

    2015-05-01

    Orbital swelling in children presents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Most are associated with acute sinusitis with complicating factors possibly including: amaurosis, meningitis, intracranial abscess or even cavernous sinus thrombosis. However not all acute orbital swelling is associated with acute sinusitis. A careful evaluation is critical prior to initiating therapy. Clinical records of 49 children (27 girls, 22 boys, with an average age of 11.8 years) were retrospectively reviewed. Historical data evaluated included all available information from parents and previous treating physicians. All patients underwent intensive pediatric, ophthalmologic, and otorhinolaryngologic examinations. Computed tomography (CT scans) were additionally performed in 40 % of children. The results of any examinations were also evaluated. Eighteen of the 49 patients had an orbital complication due to acute sinusitis. All 18 had elevated body temperature, C-Reactive Protein (CRP) values and white blood cell counts. Endoscopy of the nose revealed pus in the middle meatus in each case. According to Chandlers' classification, ten children presented with a preseptal, and eight children had a postseptal orbital cellulitis. All patients were admitted to the hospital and treated with intravenous antibiotics. CT scans further demonstrated signs of subperiostal abscess in four children. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) was required in six children, including all patients with subperiostal abscess. Twenty children experienced orbital swelling unrelated to acute sinusitis, i.e. atheroma, inflammed insect stings, dental related abscess, conjunctivitis, and Herpes simplex associated superinfection. In three children, acute orbital swelling was caused by an orbital tumor. Orbital complications of an acute sinusitis occur often in the pediatric patient group, and most of these patients can be treated conservative with intravenous antibiotics. Indications for FESS include failure to

  20. Assessing fungal community structure from mineral surfaces in Kartchner Caverns using multiplexed 454 pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Michael Joe; Nelson, Will; Soderlund, Carol; Maier, Raina M; Pryor, Barry M

    2015-07-01

    Research on the distribution and structure of fungal communities in caves is lacking. Kartchner Caverns is a wet and mineralogically diverse carbonate cave located in an escarpment of Mississippian Escabrosa limestone in the Whetstone Mountains, Arizona, USA. Fungal diversity from speleothem and rock wall surfaces was examined with 454 FLX Titanium sequencing technology using the Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 as a fungal barcode marker. Fungal diversity was estimated and compared between speleothem and rock wall surfaces, and its variation with distance from the natural entrance of the cave was quantified. Effects of environmental factors and nutrient concentrations in speleothem drip water at different sample sites on fungal diversity were also examined. Sequencing revealed 2,219 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at the 95% similarity level. Speleothems supported a higher fungal richness and diversity than rock walls. However, community membership and the taxonomic distribution of fungal OTUs at the class level did not differ significantly between speleothems and rock walls. Both OTU richness and diversity decreased significantly with increasing distance from the natural cave entrance. Community membership and taxonomic distribution of fungal OTUs also differed significantly between the sampling sites closest to the entrance and those furthest away. There was no significant effect of temperature, CO2 concentration, or drip water nutrient concentration on fungal community structure on either speleothems or rock walls. Together, these results suggest that proximity to the natural entrance is a critical factor in determining fungal community structure on mineral surfaces in Kartchner Caverns. PMID:25608778

  1. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy Treatment of Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas: A Study of 100 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Litre, Claude Fabien Colin, Philippe; Noudel, Remy; Peruzzi, Philippe; Bazin, Arnaud; Sherpereel, Bernard; Bernard, Marie Helene; Rousseaux, Pascal

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: We discuss our experiences with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) in the treatment of cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2006, we monitored 100 patients diagnosed with cavernous sinus meningiomas; 84 female and 16 male patients were included. The mean patient age was 56 years. The most common symptoms were a reduction in visual acuity (57%), diplopia (50%), exophthalmy (30%), and trigeminal neuralgia (34%). Surgery was initially performed on 26 patients. All patients were treated with FSR. A total of 45 Gy was administered to the lesion, with 5 fractions of 1.8 Gy completed each week. Patient treatment was performed using a Varian Clinac linear accelerator used for cranial treatments and a micro-multileaf collimator. Results: No side effects were reported. Mean follow-up period was 33 months, with 20% of patients undergoing follow-up evaluation of more than 4 years later. The tumor control rate at 3 years was 94%. Three patients required microsurgical intervention because FSR proved ineffective. In terms of functional symptoms, an 81% improvement was observed in patients suffering from exophthalmy, with 46% of these patients being restored to full health. A 52% improvement was observed in diplopia, together with a 67% improvement in visual acuity and a 50% improvement in type V neuropathy. Conclusions: FSR facilitates tumor control, either as an initial treatment option or in combination with microsurgery. In addition to being a safe procedure with few side effects, FSR offers the significant benefit of superior functional outcomes.

  2. Compressed air energy storage monitoring to support refrigerated mined rock cavern technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Moo Yul; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2004-06-01

    This document is the final report for the Compressed Air Energy Storage Monitoring to Support Refrigerated-Mined Rock Cavern Technology (CAES Monitoring to Support RMRCT) (DE-FC26-01NT40868) project to have been conducted by CAES Development Co., along with Sandia National Laboratories. This document provides a final report covering tasks 1.0 and subtasks 2.1, 2.2, and 2.5 of task 2.0 of the Statement of Project Objectives and constitutes the final project deliverable. The proposed work was to have provided physical measurements and analyses of large-scale rock mass response to pressure cycling. The goal was to develop proof-of-concept data for a previously developed and DOE sponsored technology (RMRCT or Refrigerated-Mined Rock Cavern Technology). In the RMRCT concept, a room and pillar mine developed in rock serves as a pressure vessel. That vessel will need to contain pressure of about 1370 psi (and cycle down to 300 psi). The measurements gathered in this study would have provided a means to determine directly rock mass response during cyclic loading on the same scale, under similar pressure conditions. The CAES project has been delayed due to national economic unrest in the energy sector.

  3. Surrounding rock mass stability monitoring of underground caverns in a geomechanical model test using FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Zhu, Weishen; Zheng, Wenhua; He, Jianping

    2009-07-01

    Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBG) sensor is widely accepted as a structural stability device for all kinds of geomaterials by either embedding into or bonding onto the structures. The physical model in geotechnical engineering, which can accurately simulate the construction processes and the effects on the stability of underground caverns on basis of satisfying the similarity principles, is an actual physical entity. Due to a large number of restrained factors, a series of experiments are difficult to be carried out, in particular for how to obtain physical parameters during the experiments. Using the geo-mechanical model test of underground caverns in Shuangjiangkou Hydropower Station as a research object, the FBG sensors were mainly focused on and adopted to figure out the problem how to achieve the small displacements in the large-scale model test. The final experimental results show that the FBG sensor has higher measuring accuracy than other conventional sensors like strain gages and mini-extensometers. The experimental results agree well with the numerical simulation results. In the process of building the model, it's successful to embed the FBG sensors in the physical model through making a reserved pore and adding some special glue. In conclusion, FBG sensors can effectively measure the small displacement of monitoring points in the whole process of the geomechanical model test. The experimental results reveal the deformation and failure characteristics of the surrounding rock mass and make some guidance for the in-situ engineering construction.

  4. Proapoptotic effect and the mechanism of action of pingyangmycin on cavernous hemangiomas

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YIDENG; LI, PING; XIA, SIWEN; ZHUO, YANG; WU, LONGJUN

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the proapoptotic effects and the mechanism of action of pingyangmycin (PY) on cavernous hemangioma. The rat spleen was used as a model of cavernous hemangioma. PY was injected into the spleen and the pathological changes were observed at different time-points. Apoptosis was detected using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The expression levels of the apoptosis-related protein, caspase-3, were determined using immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Rats injected with normal saline were the control group. Injection of normal saline did not damage rat spleens. On days 2 and 5 following PY injection, the spleens exhibited slight swelling. On days 8 and 14, atrophic changes were observed and the splenic sinus endothelial cells were damaged. At various time-points following PY injection, the apoptotic cells were observed by TEM. The TUNEL assay showed that apoptosis occurred widely among the splenic sinus endothelial cells and other splenic cells. The apoptotic rate and caspase-3 expression levels increased with prolonged PY exposure. PY induced apoptosis of splenic sinus endothelial cells through the caspase-3 activation pathway, and resulted in endothelial cell necrosis and fibroblast hyperplasia. PMID:24396428

  5. Lateral sellar compartment O.T. (cavernous sinus): history, anatomy, terminology.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, D

    1998-08-01

    Claudios Galen (119-199 a.d.) dissected lower animals with parasellar carotid retia bathed in venous blood and transposed his findings to human anatomy. Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) corrected most of Galen's errors but apparently never looked into this small, extradural compartment, nor, apparently, did Winslow (Exposition Anatomique de la Structure du Corps Humain. London: N. Prevast, 1734), who christened it the "cavernous sinus," (CS) presumably thinking that it would resemble the corpora cavernosa of the penis. Multiple surgical explorations, gross dissections, microscopic views, and vascular casts from early fetuses to an 81 year old have been examined and reviewed. The CS is not a dural sinus nor is it cavernous. The compartment is extradural, and the venous structures contained within consist of a greatly variable plexus of extremely thin-walled veins. The name, CS, is a barrier to the understanding of the structure and function of this extradural anatomical jewel box, which contains fat, myelinated and nonmyelinated nerves, arteries, and a plexus of veins. It is proposed that this name be changed, because it is inaccurate and misleading. The replacement should leave no doubt about its meaning. The lateral sellar compartment is descriptive and accurate. The veins within are a parasellar plexus. PMID:9713986

  6. A Case of Cavernous Sinus Thrombophlebitis and Meningitis as a Complication in Osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hyun Chul; Park, So Hyun; Kim, Eun Sook; Kim, Young Il; Lee, Sun Ho

    2014-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare genetic bone disease characterized by increased bone density but prone to breakage due to defective osteoclastic function. Among two primary types of autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO), osteopetrosis type II is characterized by sclerosis of bones, predominantly involving the spine, the pelvis, and the skull base. Fragility of bones and dental abscess are leading complications. This report presents a case of osteopetrosis in a 52-years-old female, which was complicated by the development of cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis and meningitis. She was suffered from multiple fractures since one year ago. Laboratory data revealed elevated serum levels of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) without carbonic anhydrase II DNA mutation. A thoracolumbar spine X-ray showed, typical findings of ADO type II (ADO II; Albers-Schönberg disease), prominent vertebral endplates so called the 'rugger jersey spine'. Her older sister also showed same typical spine appearance. We report a case of ADO II with cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis and meningitis that was successfully treated with long-term antibiotics with right sphenoidotomy. PMID:25247162

  7. Lunar orbiting prospector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    One of the prime reasons for establishing a manned lunar presence is the possibility of using the potential lunar resources. The Lunar Orbital Prospector (LOP) is a lunar orbiting platform whose mission is to prospect and explore the Moon from orbit in support of early lunar colonization and exploitation efforts. The LOP mission is divided into three primary phases: transport from Earth to low lunar orbit (LLO), operation in lunar orbit, and platform servicing in lunar orbit. The platform alters its orbit to obtain the desired surface viewing, and the orbit can be changed periodically as needed. After completion of the inital remote sensing mission, more ambitious and/or complicated prospecting and exploration missions can be contemplated. A refueled propulsion module, updated instruments, or additional remote sensing packages can be flown up from the lunar base to the platform.

  8. Preliminary orbital parallax catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwell, M.

    1981-01-01

    The study is undertaken to calibrate the more reliable parallaxes derived from a comparison of visual and spectroscopic orbits and to encourage observational studies of other promising binaries. The methodological techniques used in computing orbital parallaxes are analyzed. Tables summarizing orbital data and derived system properties are then given. Also given is a series of detailed discussions of the 71 individual systems included in the tables. Data are listed for 57 other systems which are considered promising candidates for eventual orbital parallax determination.

  9. SEASAT B orbit synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, F. G.; Warmke, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Addition were made to Battelle's Interactive Graphics Orbit Selection (IGOS) program; IGOS was exercised via telephone lines from JPL, and candidate SEASAT orbits were analyzed by Battelle. The additions to the program enable clear understanding of the implications of a specific orbit to the diverse desires of the SEASAT user community.

  10. Five Equivalent d Orbitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauling, Linus; McClure, Vance

    1970-01-01

    Amplifies and clarifies a previous paper on pyramidal d orbitals. Discusses two sets of pyramid d orbitals with respect to their maximum bond strength and their symmetry. Authors described the oblate and prolate pentagonal antiprisms arising from the two sets of five equivalent d orbitals. (RR)

  11. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  12. The Effect of Audio Tours on Learning and Social Interaction: An Evaluation at Carlsbad Caverns National Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novey, Levi T.; Hall, Troy E.

    2007-01-01

    Auditory forms of nonpersonal communication have rarely been evaluated in informal settings like parks and museums. This study evaluated the effect of an interpretive audio tour on visitor knowledge and social behavior at Carlsbad Caverns National Park. A cross-sectional pretest/posttest quasi-experimental design compared the responses of audio…

  13. An Investigation of the Integrity of Cemented Casing Seals with Application to Salt Cavern Sealing and Abandonment

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifle, T.W.; Mellegard, K.D.; Skaug, N.T.; Bruno, M.S.

    2001-04-19

    This research project was pursued in three key areas. (1) Salt permeability testing under complex stress states; (2) Hydraulic and mechanical integrity investigations of the well casing shoe through benchscale testing; and (3) Geomechanical modeling of the fluid/salt hydraulic and mechanical interaction of a sealed cavern.

  14. Identifying the Structure of a Brine Cavern Using Two-Dimensional Seismic Reflection Imagery, Carlsbad, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, J. M.; Goodman, W. M.

    2011-12-01

    Shallow depths to the salt-bearing formations of the Permian Basin provide for cost-effective solution-mining operations in southeastern New Mexico and northwestern Texas. Over extraction of salt, coupled with limited overburden thickness and competency, led to the collapse of two solution-mined caverns near Carlsbad, New Mexico, in 2008. These collapses prompted the New Mexico Oil Conservation Division (OCD) to conduct an investigation focusing on brine extraction wells with geologic conditions and dimensions comparable to the collapsed wells. OCD concluded that the operations and geologic setting of the I&W, Inc. well site, located at the intersection of U.S. Highway 285 and 62 in the city of Carlsbad, shared similarities to sites where caverns failed. In 2009, a high-resolution, two-dimensional, P-wave seismic reflection analysis assisted in defining the lateral extent of the cavern and deformation of the overlying bridging strata at the I&W site. Cavern effects include downwarping and loss of amplitude of reflectors interpreted to represent upper Salado and overlying Rustler Formation strata. The snapshot of subsurface conditions provided by the seismic reflection data is being augmented with routine surface subsidence measure measurements as well as additional surface geophysical programs.

  15. Intraprocedural Angiographic CT as a Valuable Tool in the Course of Endovascular Treatment of Direct Sinus Cavernous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Gölitz, P.; Struffert, T.; Arc Saake, M.; Knossalla, F.; Doerfler, A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary This investigation aimed to demonstrate the potential of intraprocedural angiographic CT in monitoring complex endovascular coil embolization of direct carotid cavernous fistulas. Angiographic CT was performed as a dual rotational 5 s run with intraarterial contrast medium injection in two patients during endovascular coil embolization of direct carotid cavernous fistulas. Intraprocedural angiographic CT was considered helpful if conventional 2D series were not conclusive concerning coil position or if a precise delineation of the parent artery was impossible due to a complex anatomy or overlying coil material. During postprocessing multiplanar reformatted and dual volume images of angiographic CT were reconstructed. Angiographic CT turned out to be superior in the intraprocedural visualization of accidental coil migration into the parent artery where conventional 2D-DSA series failed to reliably detect coil protrusion. The delineation of coil protrusion by angiographic CT allowed immediate correct coil repositioning to prevent parent artery compromising. Angiographic CT can function as a valuable intraprocedurally feasible tool during complex coil embolizations of direct carotid cavernous fistulas. It allows the precise visualization of the cerebral vasculature and any accidental coil protrusion can be determined accurately in cases where conventional 2D-DSA series are unclear or compromised. Thus angiographic CT might contribute substantially to reduce procedural complications and to increase safety in the management of endovascular treatment of direct carotid cavernous fistulas. PMID:22958773

  16. Calvarial bone cavernous hemangioma with intradural invasion: An unusual aggressive course—Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Nasi, Davide; Somma, Lucia di; Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Liverotti, Valentina; Zizzi, Antonio; Dobran, Mauro; Gladi, Maurizio; Scerrati, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cavernous hemangioma of the skull is a rare pathological diagnosis, accounting for 0.2% of bone tumors and 7% of skull tumors. Usually calvarial bone cavernous hemangioma are associated with a benign clinical course and, despite their enlargement and subsequent erosion of the surrounding bone, the inner table of the skull remains intact and the lesion is completely extracranial. Presentation of a case The authors present the unique case of a huge left frontal bone cavernous malformation with intradural extension and brain compression determining a right hemiparesis. Discussion Calvarial cavernous hemangiomas are benign tumors. They arise from vessels in the diploic space and tend to involve the outer table of the skull with relative sparing of the inner table. More extensive involvement of the inner table and extradural space is very unusual and few cases are reported in literature. To the best of our knowledge, intradural invasion of calvarial hemangioma has not been previously reported. Conclusion Our case highlights the possibility of an aggressive course of this rare benign pathology. PMID:27061482

  17. Innervation of the cavernous body of the human efferent tear ducts and function in tear outflow mechanism

    PubMed Central

    PAULSEN, FRIEDRICH; HALLMANN, UTA; PAULSEN, JENS; THALE, ANDREAS

    2000-01-01

    The lacrimal sac and nasolacrimal duct are surrounded by a wide cavernous system of veins and arteries comparable to a cavernous body. The present study aimed to demonstrate the ultrastructure of the nervous tissue and the localisation of neuropeptides involved in the innervation of the cavernous body, a topic not previously investigated. Different S-100 protein antisera, neuronal markers (neuron-specific enolase, anti-200 kDa neurofilament), neuropeptides (substance P, neuropeptide Y, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide) and the neuronal enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase were used to demonstrate the distribution pattern of the nervous tissue. The ultrastructure of the innervating nerve fibres was also examined by means of standard transmission electron microscopy. The cavernous body contained specialised arteries and veins known as barrier arteries, capacitance veins, and throttle veins. Perivascularly, the tissue was rich in myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibres in a plexus-like network. Small seromucous glands found in the region of the fundus of the lacrimal sac were contacted by nerve fibres forming a plexus around their alveoli. Many nerve fibres were positive for S-100 protein (S 100), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), anti-200 kDa neurofilament (RT 97), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) immunoreactivity was only demonstrated adjacent to the seromucous glands. Both the density of nerve fibres as well as the presence of various neuropeptides emphasises the neural control of the cavernous body of the human efferent tear ducts. By means of this innervation, the specialised blood vessels permit regulation of blood flow by opening and closing the lumen of the lacrimal passage as effected by the engorgement and subsidence of the cavernous body, at the same time regulating tear outflow. Related functions such as a role in the

  18. Feasibility report on alternative methods for cooling cavern oils at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Bruce L.; Lord, David L.; Hadgu, Teklu

    2005-06-01

    Oil caverns at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) are subjected to geothermal heating from the surrounding domal salt. This process raises the temperature of the crude oil from around 75 F upon delivery to SPR to as high as 130 F after decades of storage. While this temperature regime is adequate for long-term storage, it poses challenges for offsite delivery, with warm oil evolving gases that pose handling and safety problems. SPR installed high-capacity oil coolers in the mid-1990's to mitigate the emissions problem by lowering the oil delivery temperature. These heat exchanger units use incoming raw water as the cooling fluid, and operate only during a drawdown event where incoming water displaces the outgoing oil. The design criteria for the heat exchangers are to deliver oil at 100 F or less under all drawdown conditions. Increasing crude oil vapor pressures due in part to methane intrusion in the caverns is threatening to produce sufficient emissions at or near 100 F to cause the cooled oil to violate delivery requirements. This impending problem has initiated discussion and analysis of alternative cooling methods to bring the oil temperature even lower than the original design basis of 100 F. For the study described in this report, two alternative cooling methods were explored: (1) cooling during a limited drawdown, and (2) cooling during a degas operation. Both methods employ the heat exchangers currently in place, and do not require extra equipment. An analysis was run using two heat transfer models, HEATEX, and CaveMan, both developed at Sandia National Laboratories. For cooling during a limited drawdown, the cooling water flowrate through the coolers was varied from 1:1 water:oil to about 3:1, with an increased cooling capacity of about 3-7 F for the test cavern Bryan Mound 108 depending upon seasonal temperature effects. For cooling in conjunction with a degas operation in the winter, cavern oil temperatures for the test cavern Big Hill 102 were

  19. Orbital Evolution of Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermott, S. F.; Kehoe, T. J. J.

    2011-10-01

    The synthetic orbital frequencies and eccentricities of main belt asteroids computed by Knezevic and Milani [2] show evidence that the structure of the asteroid belt has been determined by a dense of web of high-order resonances. By examining the orbital frequency distribution at high resolution, we discover a correlation between asteroid number density, mean orbital eccentricity and Lyapunov Characteristic Exponent. In particular, the orbital eccentricities of asteroids trapped in resonance tend to be higher than those of non-resonant asteroids and we argue that this is observational evidence for orbital evolution due to chaotic diffusion.

  20. Orbit Software Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osgood, Cathy; Williams, Kevin; Gentry, Philip; Brownfield, Dana; Hallstrom, John; Stuit, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Orbit Software Suite is used to support a variety of NASA/DM (Dependable Multiprocessor) mission planning and analysis activities on the IPS (Intrusion Prevention System) platform. The suite of Orbit software tools (Orbit Design and Orbit Dynamics) resides on IPS/Linux workstations, and is used to perform mission design and analysis tasks corresponding to trajectory/ launch window, rendezvous, and proximity operations flight segments. A list of tools in Orbit Software Suite represents tool versions established during/after the Equipment Rehost-3 Project.

  1. Giant cavernous hemangioma of the liver and multiple primary malignant tumors in a patient with suspected familial inhibition of natural killer cell activity--a case report.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, T; Uchida, K; Yoshida, K; Muto, T; Saito, H; Nemoto, K; Inoue, Z; Morita, T; Miyakoshi, H; Tamura, K

    1989-03-01

    A woman was operated on for a nonepithelial malignant tumor of the left leg and subsequently, for an epithelial carcinoma of the right breast and a borderline malignant tumor of the right ovary. She also developed a giant cavernous hemangioma that caused disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome, which necessitated a left trisegmentectomy of the liver. Her family history suggested a hereditary predisposition to diverse malignant neoplasms, and also to giant cavernous hemangioma of the liver. Immunological evaluation disclosed selective inhibition of natural killer cell activity. Hormonal and hereditary factors are discussed in relation to the development of multiple primary tumors and giant cavernous hemangioma of the liver. PMID:2724721

  2. Numerical study on criteria for design and operation of water curtain system in underground oil storage cavern using site descriptive fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Jiwon; Yeo, In Wook

    2013-04-01

    Underground unlined caverns have been constructed in fractured rocks to stockpile oil and petroleum products, where they are hydraulically contained by natural groundwater pressure. However, for the case that natural groundwater pressure is not maintained at the required level, water curtain boreholes, through which water is injected, are often constructed above the cavern as engineering barrier to secure water pressure enough to overwhelm the operational pressure of the cavern. For secure containment of oil and petroleum products inside the cavern, it is essential to keep water pressure around the cavern higher than operational pressure of the cavern using either natural groundwater pressure or engineering barrier. In the Republic of Korea, a number of underground stockpile bases are being operated by Korea National Oil Corporation (KNOC) and private companies, most of which have water curtain system. The criterion that KNOC adopts for water curtain system design and operation such as the vertical distance from the cavern and operational injection rate is based on the Åberg hypothesis that the vertical hydraulic gradient should be larger than one. The criterion has been used for maintaining oil storage cavern without its thorough review. In this study, systematic numerical works have been done for reviewing the Åberg criterion. As groundwater predominantly takes places through fractures in underground caverns, discrete fracture modeling approach is essential for this study. Fracture data, obtained from boreholes drilled at the stage of site investigation at the Yeosu stockpile base in Korea, were statistically analyzed in terms of orientation and intensity, which were used to generate the site descriptive three dimensional fracture networks. Then, groundwater flow modeling has been carried out for the fracture networks. Constant head boundaries were applied along the circumference of the cavern and water curtain boreholes. Main flow channel and hydraulic

  3. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Orbit Determination Accuracy Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slojkowski, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    LRO definitive and predictive accuracy requirements were easily met in the nominal mission orbit, using the LP150Q lunar gravity model. center dot Accuracy of the LP150Q model is poorer in the extended mission elliptical orbit. center dot Later lunar gravity models, in particular GSFC-GRAIL-270, improve OD accuracy in the extended mission. center dot Implementation of a constrained plane when the orbit is within 45 degrees of the Earth-Moon line improves cross-track accuracy. center dot Prediction accuracy is still challenged during full-Sun periods due to coarse spacecraft area modeling - Implementation of a multi-plate area model with definitive attitude input can eliminate prediction violations. - The FDF is evaluating using analytic and predicted attitude modeling to improve full-Sun prediction accuracy. center dot Comparison of FDF ephemeris file to high-precision ephemeris files provides gross confirmation that overlap compares properly assess orbit accuracy.

  4. Orbit correction in an orbit separated cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plostinar, C.; Rees, G. H.

    2014-04-01

    The orbit separated proton cyclotron (OSC) described in [1] differs in concept from that of a separated orbit cyclotron (SOC) [2]. Synchronous acceleration in an OSC is based on harmonic number jumps and orbit length adjustments via reverse bending. Four-turn acceleration in the OSC enables it to have four times fewer cryogenic-cavity systems than in a superconducting linac of the same high beam power and energy range. Initial OSC studies identified a progressive distortion of the spiral beam orbits by the off-axis, transverse deflecting fields in its accelerating cavities. Compensation of the effects of these fields involves the repeated use of a cavity field map, in a 3-D linac tracking code, to determine the modified arc bends required for the OSC ring. Subsequent tracking studies confirm the compensation scheme and show low emittance growth in acceleration.

  5. Intralesional hemorrhage and thrombosis without rupture in a pure spinal epidural cavernous angioma: a rare cause of acute lumbal radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Floeth, Frank; Riemenschneider, Markus; Herdmann, Jörg

    2010-07-01

    Pure spinal epidural cavernous angiomas are extremely rare lesions, and their normal shape is that of a fusiform mass in the dorsal aspects of the spinal canal. We report a case of a lumbo-sacral epidural cavernous vascular malformation presenting with acute onset of right-sided S1 radiculopathy. Clinical aspects, imaging, intraoperative findings, and histology are demonstrated. The patient, a 27-year-old man presented with acute onset of pain, paraesthesia, and numbness within the right leg corresponding to the S1 segment. An acute lumbosacral disc herniation was suspected, but MRI revealed a cystic lesion with the shape of a balloon, a fluid level and a thickened contrast-enhancing wall. Intraoperatively, a purple-blue tumor with fibrous adhesions was located between the right S1 and S2 nerve roots. Macroscopically, no signs of epidural bleedings could be denoted. After coagulation of a reticular venous feeder network and dissection of the adhesions the rubber ball-like lesion was resected in total. Histology revealed a prominent venous vessel with a pathologically thickened, amuscular wall surrounded by smaller, hyalinized, venous vessels arranged in a back-to-back position typical for the diagnosis of a cavernous angioma. Lumina were partially occluded by thrombi. The surrounding fibrotic tissue showed signs of recurrent bleedings. There was no obvious mass hemorrhage into the surrounding tissue. In this unique case, the pathologic mechanism was not the usual rupture of the cavernous angioma with subsequent intraspinal hemorrhage, but acute mass effect by intralesional bleedings and thrombosis with subsequent increase of volume leading to nerve root compression. Thus, even without a sudden intraspinal hemorrhage a spinal cavernous malformation can cause acute symptoms identical to the clinical features of a soft disc herniation. PMID:20213297

  6. [Diseases of the orbit].

    PubMed

    Lukasik, S; Betkowski, A; Cyran-Rymarz, A; Szuber, D

    1995-01-01

    Diseases of the orbital cavity require more attention because of its specific anatomic structure and placement. Their curing requires cooperation of many medical specialties. Analysis consider orbital fractures, mainly caused by car accidents (69.2%). The next half of them consider inflammatory processes and tumor in equal numbers. Malignant tumors of orbital cavity occur most frequently (48.0%), less frequent are pseudotumors--pseudotumor orbitae (36.0%) and rare--malignant ones (16.0%). Malignant tumors more frequently infiltrate the orbit in neighborhood (63.3%), less frequently they come out from orbit tissue (16.7%). It should be emphasized that the number of orbit inflammations decreases in subsequent years, whereas occurrence of orbit tumors increases. PMID:9454170

  7. [A case of CNS aspergillosis developing orbital apex syndrome and causing mycotic aneurysm and the subsequent cerebral infarction].

    PubMed

    Ueki, Yoshino; Kazuta, Toshinari; Naitou, Eri; Hayashi, Masaharu; Tanaka, Kozue; Mizutani, Toshio; Hirai, Shunsaku

    2002-08-01

    A 79-year-old woman, with no immune deficit, had presented progressive visual disturbance, diplopia and ptosis of her left eye over 2 weeks. T1-weighted MR images with gadolinium showed a heterogeneously enhanced lesion extending from the left orbital apex along the optic nerve to the cavernous sinus. Although we could not detect fungus by a transsphenoidal biopsy, we suspected fungal infection because of high level of galactomanan antigen in serum. Despite antifungal chemotherapy, her symptoms did not improve. CT image on day 40 showed an aneurysm in the left internal carotid artery, on day 43 cerebral infarction in the left internal carotid artery distribution and on day 45 she died. Autopsy disclosed that aspergillus hyphae invaded the left sphenoid sinus, cavernous sinus and wall of the aneurysm. In this case, fungal infection in the frontal skull base including orbital apex caused mycotic aneurysm in the intracavernous portion of the left internal carotid artery. Skull base aspergillosis presenting orbital apex syndrome is itself rare and in addition, the occurrence of cerebral infarction in the mycotic aneurysm has hardly been reported. We should have cerebrovascular disease in mind as a complication of CNS aspergillosis. PMID:12701224

  8. Solar Sail Optimal Orbit Transfers to Synchronous Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Robert B.; Coverstone, Victoria; Prussing, John E.; Lunney, Bryan C. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A constant outward radial thrust acceleration can be used to reduce the radius of a circular orbit of specified period. Heliocentric circular orbits are designed to match the orbital period of Earth or Mars for various radial thrust accelerations and are defined as synchronous orbits. Minimum-time solar sail orbit transfers to these synchronous heliocentric orbits are presented.

  9. Real-time monitoring of a salt solution mining cavern: view from microseismic and levelling monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contrucci, Isabelle; Cao, Ngoc-Tuyen; Klein, Emmanuelle; Daupley, Xavier; Bigarre, Pascal

    2010-05-01

    In 2004, in order to better understand processes involved in large-scale mine collapse, an instrumentation was settled in the surrounding of a salt cavern located at a depth of 180 m in NE France. The cavern was mined by solution mining until the large-scale ground failure occurred. A high resolution multi-parameter monitoring system was deployed in the framework of the GISOS (Scientific Interest Group on the Impact and Safety of Underground Structures formed by INERIS, BRGM, INPL and ENSG). Instrumentation, installed by INERIS, consisted of a microseismic network, coupled to automatic-measurement system for levelling (Tacheometer and RTK GPS). Quasi real time transmission of the data to INERIS, at Nancy, enabled rock mass activity of the site to be monitored on a few hours basis. Also, the various recorded observations, in the beginning of spring 2008, led the operator to cause the collapse in February 2009. This was done by intensive extraction of the brine contained in the cavern, which was considered to be at limit equilibrium. On the second day of pumping sudden increase in microseismic activity indicated the start of collapse, followed by manifestation of a surface crater about 35 hours later. All the data and information collected during this experiment are now being processed and back-analysed aimed at ensuring high quality of interpretation. In particular, the space-time distribution of the failures and the evolution of the waveforms enlighten the changing conditions in the geological overburden. When correlated with the measurements of the movement and the known geology, the microseismic data enable a precise description of the failure mechanism(s), and especially of the complex and major role of the overlying bedrock. Similarly, feedback from this experience should lead to practical recommendations concerning collapse phenomena monitoring in such a mining context. While the preliminary results already indicate the exceptional quality of this data set

  10. Stability and support issues in the construction of large span caverns for physics

    SciTech Connect

    Laughton, C.; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    New physics experiments, proposed to study neutrinos and protons, call for the use of large underground particle detectors. In the United States, such detectors would be housed in the US Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL), sited within the footprint of the defunct Homestake Mine, South Dakota. Although the experimental proposals differ in detail, all rely heavily upon the ability of the mined and reinforced rock mass to serve as a stable host for the detector facilities. Experimental proposals, based on the use of Water Cherenkov detector technology, specify rock caverns with excavated volumes in excess of half a million cubic meters, spans of at least 50 m, sited at depths of approximately one to 1.5 kilometers. Although perhaps sited at shallower depth, proposals based on the use of Liquid Argon (LAr) detector technology are no less challenging. LAr proposals not only call for the excavation of large span caverns, but have an additional need for the safe management of large quantities (kilo-tonnes) of cryogenic liquid, including critical provisions for the fail-safe egress of underground personnel and the reliable exhaust of Argon gas in the event of a catastrophic release. These multi-year, high value physics experiments will provide the key experimental data needed to support the research of a new generation of physicists as they probe the behavior of basic particles and the fundamental laws of nature. The rock engineer must deliver caverns that will reliably meet operational requirements and remain stable for periods conservatively estimated to be in excess of twenty years. This paper provides an overview of the DUSEL site conditions and discusses key end-user requirements and design criteria likely to dominate in determining the viability of experimental options. The paper stresses the paramount importance of collecting adequate site-specific data to inform early siting, dimensioning and layout decisions. Given the large-scale of the

  11. Zenithal ceiling tubes, a peculiar karst corrosion form in Carlsbad Caverns (New Mexico, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calaforra, José Maria; de Waele, Jo

    2010-05-01

    Carlsbad Caverns is a world renown show cave located in the Guadalupe Mountains (Chihuahuan desert, New Mexico) and managed by the United States National Park Service. The cave is hosted in the Permian Capitan Reef limestones that border the Delaware basin. It consists of elongated passages connecting wide rooms that extend to a depth of almost 300 m beneath the natural cave entrance, almost 200 m below the floor of nearby Walnut Canyon. As most caves of the Guadalupe mountains it has formed by rising hydrogen sulphide deriving from underlying oil and gas deposits, producing sulphuric acid by mixing with fresh water which corroded the limestone into unusually large chambers. This H2SO4 speleogenesis has produced gypsum that is present under various forms. Carlsbad Caverns has been widely studied by generations of cave scientists, and research has especially focalised on speleothems, mineralogy, speleogenesis, cave fauna and, mostly in the last decennia, microbiology. This has resulted in a large number of publications in many scientific journals, making Carlsbad Caverns one of the best studied caves of the world. During a trip to the Hall of the White Giant, in the squeezing crawlways that connect the main Corridor to the Sand Passage, several cylindrical vertical upward developing holes were observed on the ceiling at several heights. They have a circular cross-section with diameters of 1 to some centimetres and taper out towards their upper end. Their walls are smooth and their edges sharp. Their length can reach several decimetres. Sometimes gypsum can be found inside. They often occur randomly distributed in groups and their development is not necessarily controlled by fractures or other bedrock structures. These holes are similar in shape to the bellholes described from many tropical caves, but are much smaller. They also look like the holes described by Stanton (1986) from caves in the Mendip Hills. This author believed they formed by activity of snails (they

  12. Direct, spontaneous carotid-cavernous fistula with a contracted kidney: A rare association

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Namita; Amitava, Abadan Khan; Akram, Sardar Mohammed; Grover, Shivani

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 20-year-old female having systemic hypertension who presented with right-sided proptosis, chemosis, and diminished vision, preceded by an acute episode of unilateral throbbing headache. Imaging studies revealed a right-sided direct, spontaneous carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF), aneurysm of internal carotid artery, bleed in the parieto-frontal lobe, and swelling of extraocular muscles. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a small contracted right kidney measuring 64 mm × 27 mm. A direct spontaneous CCF can occur spontaneously following rupture of intracranial aneurysm without any history of trauma or connective tissue disorder. Prompt diagnosis of intravascular malformations at initial presentation can prevent neurological complications and vision loss. A team approach including emergency physicians, neurosurgeons, and ophthalmologists is needed for the proper management of such patients. PMID:27221688

  13. [A Case Report of Stereotactic Craniotomy for the Cerebral Cavernous Angioma].

    PubMed

    Ota, Yuichiro; Araki, Osamu; Oki, Shuichi; Inagawa, Tetsuji; Emoto, Katsuya; Shibukawa, Masaaki; Yamasaki, Hiroyuki; Kano, Yukari; Tani, Itaru

    2016-02-01

    A 59-year-old woman presented with right sensory loss and right hemiparesis. In February 2013, she was admitted to Araki Neurosurgical Hospital. A magnetic resonance imaging was performed that revealed a left temporal lobe hemorrhage. The image also showed a chronic stereotype hematoma. After 14 days of hospitalization, she underwent a stereotactic craniotomy. Subsequently, by postoperative pathological evaluation, the hematoma was diagnosed as a cavernous angioma. She had no postoperative complications. She was provided rehabilitation support and was discharged 28 days after the admission following which she rejoined work. A stereotactic craniotomy device is very useful in surgeries involving deep lesions. We present a case of stereotactic craniotomy and a few investigation reports. PMID:26856269

  14. Cavernous sinus thrombosis syndrome and brainstem involvement in patient with leptospirosis: Two rare complications of leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Alian, Shahriyar; Taghipour, Mehrdad; Sharifian, Rayka; Fereydouni, Mohammad Amin

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a bacterial disease that is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. It can affect humans and animals. In humans, it can lead to a wide spectrum of symptoms. It is known as the most common zoonosis in the world. The typical presentation of the disease is an acute biphasic febrile illness with or without jaundice. Less common clinical manifestations may result from involvement of different human body systems. In many places, this disease may be under-diagnosed, especially when associated with neurological complications. Moreover, without treatment, leptospirosis can lead to organ damages, and even death. Neurological complications are uncommon and are reported in a few cases. Cavernous sinus thrombosis syndrome and brainstem involvement are rare complications of leptospirosis and are associated with a high mortality risk. To our knowledge, no such cases have been reported in the literature. PMID:25535508

  15. Age and origin of carlsbad cavern and related caves from 40Ar/39Ar of alunite

    PubMed

    Polyak; McIntosh; Guven; Provencio

    1998-03-20

    40Ar/39Ar dating of fine-grained alunite that formed during cave genesis provides ages of formation for the Big Room level of Carlsbad Cavern [4.0 to 3.9 million years ago (Ma)], the upper level of Lechuguilla Cave (6.0 to 5.7 Ma), and three other hypogene caves (11.3 to 6.0 Ma) in the Guadalupe Mountains of New Mexico. Alunite ages increase and are strongly correlative with cave elevations, which indicates an 1100-meter decline in the water table, apparently related to tectonic uplift and tilting, from 11.3 Ma to the present. 40Ar/39Ar dating studies of the hypogene caves have the potential to help resolve late Cenozoic climatic, speleologic, and tectonic questions. PMID:9506939

  16. Rare case of intramasseteric cavernous hemangioma in a three-year-old boy: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Demir, Zühtü; Oktem, Fatih; Celebioğlu, Selim

    2004-06-01

    Intramuscular hemangiomas are rare, benign tumors of vascular origin. The masseter is the muscle most commonly involved in the head and neck region. Because of their infrequency, deep location, and unfamiliar presentation, these lesions are seldom correctly diagnosed clinically. This case report presents a severe facial asymmetry caused by a left intramasseteric cavernous hemangioma in a 3-year-old boy. We were unaware of the exact nature of the tumor until intraoperative examination. The routine investigations performed before operation failed to establish a diagnosis. Surgical excision was performed, and 1 year after the operation we observed that the patient's facial asymmetry had been corrected. In this article, we review the literature on intramasseteric hemangioma, discuss the clinical and radiologic diagnostic methods, and review the treatment methods. PMID:15224828

  17. Indirect cavernous carotid fistula in a 12-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Livi, Francesca; Ndoro, Samuel; Caird, John; Crimmins, Darach

    2016-01-01

    We present a very rare case of indirect cavernous carotid fistula (CCF) in a 12-year-old girl. Indirect CCF is extremely rare in the paediatric population. A 12-year-old girl presented with a 7-month history of frontal headaches and intermittent left-sided proptosis. On examination, she had dilated and engorged scleral veins on the left eye, mild dysdiadochokinesia and past pointing on the left side. A brain computer tomography with contrast, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and interventional radiography (IR) cerebral angiogram confirmed the diagnosis of CCF. The CCF was embolized and a follow-up brain MRI and an IR cerebral angiogram were conducted over the course of 8 months that revealed no evidence of residual CCF. CCF, though rare in the paediatric population, should be highly considered in the differential diagnosis when dilated scleral veins, proptosis and dysdiadokinesis are present in the clinical setting. Prompt treatment has good prognostic results. PMID:27273682

  18. Health assessment for Dixie Caverns Landfill, Salem, Virginia, Region 3. CERCLIS No. VAD980552095. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-20

    The Dixie Caverns Landfill, located in Salem, Virginia, is a 27-acre former municipal and light industrial sanitary landfill, consisting of a fly ash pile, organic sludge pit, and drum storage area. It operated from 1955 to 1976. Contamination on-site consists of lead and cadmium; and bis(2-chloroethoxy)methane, nitrobenzene, di-n-octylphthalate, naphthalene, 2,4-dichlorophenol, pentachlorophenol, 1,1-dichloroethane, benzene, diethylphthalate, di-n-butylphthalate, and bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate. The site represents a potential public health threat. An inhalation exposure hazard exists for visitors to the site, considering the high lead concentrations present in the fly ash, a material of fine particle size. Information currently available on the extent of surface water, groundwater, and sediment contamination is not adequate to determine if a public health threat also exists from these pathways.

  19. Cavernous sinus lesions biopsy with neuronavigation and tip-cut needle

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzetti, Martin; Carvalho, Herculano; Cattoni, Maria; Gonçalves-Ferreira, Antonio; Pimentel, José; Antuñes, Joao

    2014-01-01

    Background: Transoval biopsy of cavernous sinus (CS) lesions is the last non-invasive diagnostic option in those 15% of patients in whom etiology remains unclear in spite of extensive neuroradiological imaging, clinical assessment, and laboratory evaluation. However, there are no guidelines defining indications and the most appropriate technique for this procedure. Case Description: We present four patients in whom we performed X-ray and neuronavigation-assisted transoval CS biopsies using tip-cut needles. Conclusion: The technique described allows the operator to determine the optimal angle for entering the CS, avoiding the complications due to distorted anatomy, and facilitating orientation once inside the CS. It reduces both radiation exposure as well as general anesthesia duration. PMID:25593783

  20. Cavernous carotid artery pseudo-aneurysm treated by stenting in acromegalic patient.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Jorge Marcondes; Domingues, Flavio S; Espinosa, Gaudencio; Gadelha, Monica

    2003-06-01

    We report on a case of endovascular management of pseudoaneurysm of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery with covered stent reconstruction. A 36 years-old woman with a history of previous transsphenoidal approach for pituitary macroadenoma and false aneurysma formation was studied in a protocol that included balloon test occlusion and cerebral blood flow evaluation. An endovascular covered stent deployment in the area of the carotid laceration was performed with isolation of the aneurysm from the circulation and maintenance of the carotid flow. Helical angio-CT and cerebral digital subtraction angiography showed the carotid preservation without stenosis in the stented area. In conclusion, endovascular stent reconstruction for post-transsphenoidal carotid artery laceration and false aneurysm is demonstrated as useful technical adjunct in the management strategy and with the potential for carotid sacrifice morbidity avoidance. PMID:12894285

  1. Cavernous sinus thrombosis syndrome and brainstem involvement in patient with leptospirosis: Two rare complications of leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Alian, Shahriyar; Taghipour, Mehrdad; Sharifian, Rayka; Fereydouni, Mohammad Amin

    2014-09-01

    Leptospirosis is a bacterial disease that is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. It can affect humans and animals. In humans, it can lead to a wide spectrum of symptoms. It is known as the most common zoonosis in the world. The typical presentation of the disease is an acute biphasic febrile illness with or without jaundice. Less common clinical manifestations may result from involvement of different human body systems. In many places, this disease may be under-diagnosed, especially when associated with neurological complications. Moreover, without treatment, leptospirosis can lead to organ damages, and even death. Neurological complications are uncommon and are reported in a few cases. Cavernous sinus thrombosis syndrome and brainstem involvement are rare complications of leptospirosis and are associated with a high mortality risk. To our knowledge, no such cases have been reported in the literature. PMID:25535508

  2. ZPLD1 gene is disrupted in a patient with balanced translocation that exhibits cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Gianfrancesco, F; Esposito, T; Penco, S; Maglione, V; Liquori, C L; Patrosso, M C; Zuffardi, O; Ciccodicola, A; Marchuk, D A; Squitieri, F

    2008-08-13

    The past few years have seen rapid advances in our understanding of the genetics and molecular biology of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) with the identification of the CCM1, CCM2, and CCM3 genes. Recently, we have recruited a patient with an X/3 balanced translocation that exhibits CCM. By fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis, sequence analysis tools and database mining procedures, we refined the critical region to an interval of 200-kb and identified the interrupted ZPLD1 gene. We detected that the mRNA expression level of ZPLD1 gene is consistently decreased 2.5-fold versus control (P=0.0006) with allelic loss of gene expression suggesting that this protein may be part of the complex signaling pathway implicated in CCM formation. PMID:18632209

  3. Cavernous hemangioma with hematoma in the chest wall due to penetration from the anterior mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroshige; Miwa, Ken; Miyoshi, Kenichirou; Adachi, Yoshin; Fujioka, Shinji; Taniguchi, Yuji; Yaniguchi, Yuji

    2007-04-01

    The patient was a 51-year-old man who visited the hospital with swelling of the anterior chest. Chest computed tomography detected a tumor developing from the anterior mediastinum to the anterior chest wall. There was weak contrast enhancement inside the tumor, and calcification was observed in the central region. A soft tumor with an obscure border and that adhered to the back of the left sternum was surgically removed with thymic fat including the region of the chest wall that had been penetrated by the tumor. The tumor measured 30 x 25 mm, and a phlebolith was observed in the center. The pathological tissue was diagnosed to be a cavernous hemangioma, and there were no malignant findings in the endothelial cells. Mediastinal hemangioma should therefore be kept in mind during an evaluation of mediastinal tumors, and one must also take into account the effect on the surrounding organs. PMID:17491358

  4. Improved Vision from Severe Compressive Optic Neuropathy by Apical Cavernous Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyera; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Yasuda, Muneyoshi; Akutsu, Hiroyoshi; Kakizaki, Hirohiko

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman had a 1-year history of right vision loss. Her visual acuity was then 0.01 OD, and the critical flicker frequency (CFF) was 8 Hz OD. Goldmann perimetry examination showed inferior suppression of the right visual field center. Funduscopic examination revealed normal coloring of the right optic disc. Imaging studies showed an apical oval tumor. The optic nerve was compressed by both the tumor and the superior rectus muscle/levator palpebrae superioris complex. The tumor was dissected from the surrounding tissues and completely extracted. Histopathologic examination confirmed a cavernous hemangioma. The patient underwent three cycles of postoperative steroid pulse therapy. One year after the surgery, her visual acuity and CFF improved to 1.0 and 32 Hz OD, respectively. Her right visual field was within the normal range. PMID:27099610

  5. [Value of cavernous gasometry in the physiopathologic diagnosis and treatment of priapism].

    PubMed

    Llorente, C; Baena, V; Carnero, J; Rodríguez, J; Fernández Ovies, J M

    1990-01-01

    Currently, each case of priapism therapy must be customized depending on the patient's individual pathophysiology. To this end, in addition to anamnesis and the macroscopic aspect of the suctioned blood, quantification of existing ischaemia by cavernous gasometry is quite important. This will make possible the distinction between two types of priapism: ischaemic, vein-occlusive or low-flow; and nonischaemic, arterial or high-flow. Each of these priapism types presents a clearly different mechanism of production and, more importantly, a different response to the various therapeutic options currently available. The ischaemic form responds to suction-washing procedures and to the various techniques of vein by-pass. On the contrary, these manoeuvres will be useless in non-ischaemic or arterial priapism, where alpha-adrenergic injections or lacerated artery embolization should to be used. PMID:2080737

  6. Improved Vision from Severe Compressive Optic Neuropathy by Apical Cavernous Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyera; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Yasuda, Muneyoshi; Akutsu, Hiroyoshi; Kakizaki, Hirohiko

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman had a 1-year history of right vision loss. Her visual acuity was then 0.01 OD, and the critical flicker frequency (CFF) was 8 Hz OD. Goldmann perimetry examination showed inferior suppression of the right visual field center. Funduscopic examination revealed normal coloring of the right optic disc. Imaging studies showed an apical oval tumor. The optic nerve was compressed by both the tumor and the superior rectus muscle/levator palpebrae superioris complex. The tumor was dissected from the surrounding tissues and completely extracted. Histopathologic examination confirmed a cavernous hemangioma. The patient underwent three cycles of postoperative steroid pulse therapy. One year after the surgery, her visual acuity and CFF improved to 1.0 and 32 Hz OD, respectively. Her right visual field was within the normal range. PMID:27099610

  7. Cauda equina intradural extramedullary cavernous haemangioma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Mihai; Titus Grigorean, Valentin; Julieta Sinescu, Crina; Dumitru Lupascu, Cristian; Popescu, George; Mihaela Sandu, Aurelia; Emil Plesea, Iancu

    2013-01-01

    Cavernous haemangioma (cavernoma) is a benign vascular lesion, exceptionally located in cauda equina. We report a case, diagnosed and operated in the Department of Neurosurgery from Pitesti County Emergency Hospital, of a 60-year-old woman with history of lumbar region distress, who presented with low back pain, paravertebral muscle contracture, and bilateral lumbar radiculopathy, with sudden onset after lifting effort. The preoperative diagnosis was done using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the patient underwent surgery-two level laminectomy, dural incision, and tumor dissection from the cauda equina nerve roots under operatory microscope. Histopathological examination confirmed the positive diagnosis of cavernoma of cauda equina. The patient's outcome was favorable, without postoperative neurological deficits. PMID:24097094

  8. Interventional Treatment of a Symptomatic Neonatal Hepatic Cavernous Hemangioma Using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Kretschmar, Oliver Knirsch, Walter; Bernet, Vera

    2008-03-15

    Percutaneous intervention is one treatment option for symptomatic hepatic hemangioma in infants. We report the case of a newborn (birth weight 4060 g) with a large hepatic cavernous hemangioma, which presented early with high cardiac output failure due to arteriovenous shunting and signs of incipient Kasabach-Merritt syndrome. We performed a successful superselective transcatheter coil embolization of three feeding arteries on the seventh day of life. Because of remaining diffuse very small arteries causing a relevant residual shunt, additional occlusion of the three main draining veins was necessary with three Amplatzer vascular plugs. Cardiac failure resolved immediately. Without any additional therapy the large venous cavities disappeared within the following months. The tumor continues to regress in size 8 months after the intervention.

  9. Indirect cavernous carotid fistula in a 12-year-old girl

    PubMed Central

    Livi, Francesca; Ndoro, Samuel; Caird, John; Crimmins, Darach

    2016-01-01

    We present a very rare case of indirect cavernous carotid fistula (CCF) in a 12-year-old girl. Indirect CCF is extremely rare in the paediatric population. A 12-year-old girl presented with a 7-month history of frontal headaches and intermittent left-sided proptosis. On examination, she had dilated and engorged scleral veins on the left eye, mild dysdiadochokinesia and past pointing on the left side. A brain computer tomography with contrast, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and interventional radiography (IR) cerebral angiogram confirmed the diagnosis of CCF. The CCF was embolized and a follow-up brain MRI and an IR cerebral angiogram were conducted over the course of 8 months that revealed no evidence of residual CCF. CCF, though rare in the paediatric population, should be highly considered in the differential diagnosis when dilated scleral veins, proptosis and dysdiadokinesis are present in the clinical setting. Prompt treatment has good prognostic results. PMID:27273682

  10. Characterization of bedded salt for storage caverns -- A case study from the Midland Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hovorka, Susan D.; Nava, Robin

    2000-06-13

    The geometry of Permian bedding salt in the Midland Basin is a product of interaction between depositional facies and postdepositional modification by salt dissolution. Mapping high-frequency cycle patterns in cross section and map view using wireline logs documents the salt geometry. Geologically based interpretation of depositional and dissolution processes provides a powerful tool for mapping and geometry of salt to assess the suitability of sites for development of solution-mined storage caverns. In addition, this process-based description of salt geometry complements existing data about the evolution of one of the best-known sedimentary basins in the world, and can serve as a genetic model to assist in interpreting other salts.

  11. A locus for cerebral cavernous malformations maps to chromosome 7q in two families

    SciTech Connect

    Marchuk, D.A.; Gallione, C.J.; Morrison, L.A.; Davis, L.E.; Clericuzio, C.L.

    1995-07-20

    Cavernous malformations (angiomas) affecting the central nervous system and retina can be inherited in autosomal dominant pattern (OMIM 116860). These vascular lesions may remain clinically silent or lead to a number of neurological symptoms including seizure, intracranial hemorrhage, focal neurological deficit, and migraine. We have mapped a gene for this disorder in two families, one of Italian-American origin and one of Mexican-American origin, to markers on proximal 7q, with a combined maximum lod score of 3.92 ({theta} of zero) with marker D7S479. Haplotype analysis of these families places the locus between markers D7S502 proximally and D7S515 distally, an interval of approximately 41 cM. The location distinguishes this disorder from an autosomal dominant vascular malformation syndrome where lesions are primarily cutaneous and that maps to 9p21. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Age of Middle Pleistocene fauna and Lower Palaeolithic industries from Kent's Cavern, Devon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, C. J.; Berridge, P. J.; Bishop, M. J.; Richards, D. A.; Smart, P. L.

    2005-05-01

    Kent's Cavern has long been known as potentially among the oldest Palaeolithic sites in the country, with the basal Breccia deposit containing a sparse Lower Palaeolithic industry. The sediment consists of a chaotic clayey conglomerate emplaced as a series of debris flows, which entered the cave via blocked entrances at its southwest end. The Breccia contains a fauna dominated by the bear Ursus deningeri, with lion Felis leo and the voles Arvicola cantiana and Microtus oeconomus, establishing a late Cromerian age for the deposit. The artefacts comprise an industry of crudely manufactured handaxes and flakes, and show damage suggesting that they were brought into the cave by the debris flows, and may thus predate the sediment and fauna. We demonstrate an age of >340 ka for the Breccia using two independant dating methods, consistent with existing models of the age of the British Middle Pleistocene sequence.

  13. Orbit Determination of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazarico, Erwan; Rowlands, D. D.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Torrence, M. H.; Lemoine, F. G.; Zuber, M. T.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results on precision orbit determination from the radio science investigation of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft. We describe the data, modeling and methods used to achieve position knowledge several times better than the required 50-100m (in total position), over the period from 13 July 2009 to 31 January 2011. In addition to the near-continuous radiometric tracking data, we include altimetric data from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) in the form of crossover measurements, and show that they strongly improve the accuracy of the orbit reconstruction (total position overlap differences decrease from approx.70m to approx.23 m). To refine the spacecraft trajectory further, we develop a lunar gravity field by combining the newly acquired LRO data with the historical data. The reprocessing of the spacecraft trajectory with that model shows significantly increased accuracy (approx.20m with only the radiometric data, and approx.14m with the addition of the altimetric crossovers). LOLA topographic maps and calibration data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera were used to supplement the results of the overlap analysis and demonstrate the trajectory accuracy.

  14. Feasibility study for lowering the minimum gas pressure in solution-mined caverns based on geomechanical analyses of creep-induced damage and healing

    SciTech Connect

    Ratigan, J.L.; Nieland, J.D.; Devries, K.L.

    1998-12-31

    Geomechanical analyses were made to determine the minimum gas pressure allowable based on an existing stress-based criterion (Damage Potential) and an advanced constitutive model (MDCF model) capable of quantifying the level of damage and healing in rock salt. The MDCF model is a constitutive model developed for the WIPP to provide a continuum description of the dislocation and damage deformation of salt. The purpose of this study was to determine if the MDCF model is applicable for evaluating the minimum gas pressure of CNG storage caverns. Specifically, it was to be determined if this model would predict that the minimum gas pressure in the caverns could be lowered without compromising the stability of the cavern. Additionally, the healing behavior of the salt was analyzed to determine if complete healing of the damaged rock zone would occur during the period the cavern was at maximum gas pressure. Significant findings of this study are reported.

  15. Periprostatic implantation of neural differentiated mesenchymal stem cells restores cavernous nerve injury-mediated erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jia-Feng; Jia, Chang-Chang; Zheng, Zong-Heng; Ye, Xiao-Long; Wei, Bo; Huang, Li-Jun; Wei, Hong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been utilized to restore erectile function in animal models of cavernous nerve injury (CNI). However, transplantation of primary MSCs may lead to unpredictable therapeutic outcomes. In this study, we investigated the efficiency of neural differentiated MSCs (d-MSCs) on the restoration of erectile function in CNI rats. Rat bone marrow MSCs (r-BM-MSCs) were treated with all-trans retinoic acid to induce neural differentiation. Rats were divided into five groups: a sham operation group; a bilateral CNI group that received an intracavernous injection of r-BM-MSCs (IC group); and three groups that received periprostatic implantation of either r-BM-MSCs (IP group), d-MSCs (IP-d group), or PBS (PBS group). The data revealed that IP injection of d-MSCs ameliorated erectile function in a similar manner to an IC injection of MSCs and enhanced erectile function compared to an IP injection of MSCs. An in vivo time course of d-MSCs survival revealed that PKH26-labled d-MSCs were detectable either within or surrounding the cavernous nerve tissue. In addition, the expression of caspase-3 significantly increased in the PBS group and decreased after treatment with MSCs, especially in the IC and IP-d groups. Furthermore, the expression levels of neurotrophic factors increased significantly in d-MSCs. This study demonstrated that periprostatic implantation of d-MSCs effectively restored erectile function in CNI rats. The mechanism might be ascribed to decreases in the frequency of apoptotic cells, as well as paracrine signaling by factors derived from d-MSCs. PMID:27398139

  16. A servo controlled gradient loading triaxial model test system for deep-buried cavern.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu-guang; Zhang, Qiang-yong; Li, Shu-cai

    2015-10-01

    A servo controlled gradient loading model test system is developed to simulate the gradient geostress in deep-buried cavern. This system consists of the gradient loading apparatus, the digital servo control device, and the measurement system. Among them, the gradient loading apparatus is the main component which is used for exerting load onto the model. This loading apparatus is placed inside the counterforce wall/beam and is divided to several different loading zones, with each loading zone independently controlled. This design enables the gradient loading. Hence, the "real" geostress field surrounding the deep-buried cavern can be simulated. The loading or unloading process can be controlled by the human-computer interaction machines, i.e., the digital servo control system. It realizes the automation and visualization of model loading/unloading. In addition, this digital servo could control and regulate hydraulic loading instantaneously, which stabilizes the geostress onto the model over a long term. During the loading procedure, the collision between two adjacent loading platens is also eliminated by developing a guide frame. This collision phenomenon is induced by the volume shrinkage of the model when compressed in true 3D state. In addition, several accurate measurements, including the optical and grating-based method, are adopted to monitor the small deformation of the model. Hence, the distortion of the model could be accurately measured. In order to validate the performance of this innovative model test system, a 3D geomechanical test was conducted on a simulated deep-buried underground reservoir. The result shows that the radial convergence increases rapidly with the release of the stress in the reservoir. Moreover, the deformation increases with the increase of the gas production rate. This observation is consistence with field observation in petroleum engineering. The system is therefore capable of testing deep-buried engineering structures. PMID

  17. Lacrimal Sac Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma with Metastases to the Cavernous Sinus Following Dacryocystorhinostomy Treated with Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Jonathan C.P.; Beigi, Bijan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We report a very good outcome in a 44-year-old woman in whom cancer was missed as the cause of nasolacrimal duct obstruction and dacryocystitis and which was deemed inoperable after spreading to the cavernous sinus. Case Report The patient was referred to our unit 12 months following uneventful right dacryocystorhinostomy for nasolacrimal duct obstruction. This had been complicated by the formation of a significant canthal swelling 6 months later, which had been excised at that time. The symptom of nasolacrimal duct obstruction and scar recurrence prompted the referral to our unit. Examination and biopsy confirmed a malignancy. Despite extensive surgery, including concurrent radical neck dissection and parotidectomy, within 6 months, her mucoepidermoid carcinoma was found to have spread to the cavernous sinus, restricting blood flow from the carotid and causing an abducens nerve palsy. Though deemed inoperable at first, Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery was sought as treatment for her disease, resulting in a good outcome 4 years after surgery. Conclusion Experience from this case suggests the importance of considering malignancy as a cause in young patients when presenting with nasolacrimal duct obstruction. In such cases, and perhaps for all patients, biopsy specimens should be submitted as many tumours are found incidentally at the time of dacryocystorhinostomy. Whilst the external approach to dacryocystorhinostomy may identify abnormal anatomy intraoperatively, prompting biopsy, this is less likely with an endonasal approach where osteotomy precedes sac visualisation. The endonasal approach may therefore be less appropriate in such cases where malignancy is suspected as osteotomy may aid in the spread. PMID:27462255

  18. A servo controlled gradient loading triaxial model test system for deep-buried cavern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xu-guang; Zhang, Qiang-yong; Li, Shu-cai

    2015-10-01

    A servo controlled gradient loading model test system is developed to simulate the gradient geostress in deep-buried cavern. This system consists of the gradient loading apparatus, the digital servo control device, and the measurement system. Among them, the gradient loading apparatus is the main component which is used for exerting load onto the model. This loading apparatus is placed inside the counterforce wall/beam and is divided to several different loading zones, with each loading zone independently controlled. This design enables the gradient loading. Hence, the "real" geostress field surrounding the deep-buried cavern can be simulated. The loading or unloading process can be controlled by the human-computer interaction machines, i.e., the digital servo control system. It realizes the automation and visualization of model loading/unloading. In addition, this digital servo could control and regulate hydraulic loading instantaneously, which stabilizes the geostress onto the model over a long term. During the loading procedure, the collision between two adjacent loading platens is also eliminated by developing a guide frame. This collision phenomenon is induced by the volume shrinkage of the model when compressed in true 3D state. In addition, several accurate measurements, including the optical and grating-based method, are adopted to monitor the small deformation of the model. Hence, the distortion of the model could be accurately measured. In order to validate the performance of this innovative model test system, a 3D geomechanical test was conducted on a simulated deep-buried underground reservoir. The result shows that the radial convergence increases rapidly with the release of the stress in the reservoir. Moreover, the deformation increases with the increase of the gas production rate. This observation is consistence with field observation in petroleum engineering. The system is therefore capable of testing deep-buried engineering structures.

  19. Endovascular embolization of carotid-cavernous fistulas: A pioneering experience in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Plasencia, Andres R.; Santillan, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Background: Endovascular embolization represents the method of choice for the treatment of carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs). Methods: We report our experience using the endovascular technique in 24 patients harboring 25 CCFs treated between October 1994 and April 2010, with an emphasis on the role of detachable balloons for the treatment of direct CCFs. Results: Of the 16 patients who presented with direct CCFs (Barrow Type A CCFs) (age range, 7–62 years; mean age, 34.3 years), 14 were caused by traumatic injury and 2 by a ruptured internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm. Eight patients (age range, 32–71 years; mean age, 46.5 years) presented with nine indirect CCFs (Barrow Types B, C, and D). The clinical follow-up after endovascular treatment ranged from 2 to 108 months (mean, 35.2 months). In two cases (8%), the endovascular approach failed. Symptomatic complications related to the procedure occurred in three patients (12.5%): transient cranial nerve palsy in two patients and a permanent neurological deficit in one patient. Detachable balloons were used in 13 out of 16 (81.3%) direct CCFs and were associated with a cure rate of 92.3%. Overall, the angiographic cure rate was obtained in 22 out of 25 (88%) fistulas. Patients presenting with III nerve palsy improved gradually between 1 day and 6 months after treatment. Good clinical outcomes [modified Rankin scale (mRS) ≤ 2] were observed in 22 out of 24 (91.6%) patients at last follow-up. Conclusions: Endovascular treatment using detachable balloons still constitutes a safe and effective method to treat direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. PMID:22363900

  20. Genetic linkage of the familial cavernous malformation (CM) gene to chromosome 7q

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, J.H.; Zabramski, J.M.; Dubovsky, J.

    1994-09-01

    Cavernous malformations (also known as cavernous angiomas) are abnormalities of the central nervous system vasculature that affect approximately 0.5% of the population often leading to clinical sequelae such as headaches, seizures, hemorrhage and/or progressive neurological deficits. Non-familial and familial (autosomal dominant) forms of CM exist. Diagnosis is definitively made by surgery, autopsy or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Increased availability of MRI has recently made pre-symptomatic diagnosis possible, and reveals that familial CM may represent up to 70% of patients. This is a larger percentage than previously appreciated. A large Hispanic family from Arizona with CM was studied by MRI, and blood samples collected for DNA isolation and linkage analysis. Twenty-seven family members underwent brain MRI to determine disease status, regardless of clinical symptoms: 18 were positive for CM and 9 were unaffected. DNA samples were obtained from 19 of the imaged individuals (12 affected, 7 unaffected). Using a panel of highly informative polymorphic markers, the CM gene was localized to a 27 cM region of chromosome 7q. A maximum pairwise lod score of 4.2 was attained from this family alone. One individual within this pedigree may be a recombinant, which if proven by further analysis, will significantly narrow the region of localization. We are also studying another unrelated Hispanic pedigree with familial CM. Fourteen members have been imaged by brain MRI. DNA samples have been obtained from 10 of these (7 affected, 3 unaffected). Linkage analysis within this additional pedigree will help refine the map position and could provide evidence for genetic heterogeneity for this disease. Additional members from both pedigrees are being added to the analysis to further refine the linkage map. This work provides the first step in identifying the gene and etiology of this medically important disease.

  1. A servo controlled gradient loading triaxial model test system for deep-buried cavern

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xu-guang; Zhang, Qiang-yong; Li, Shu-cai

    2015-10-15

    A servo controlled gradient loading model test system is developed to simulate the gradient geostress in deep-buried cavern. This system consists of the gradient loading apparatus, the digital servo control device, and the measurement system. Among them, the gradient loading apparatus is the main component which is used for exerting load onto the model. This loading apparatus is placed inside the counterforce wall/beam and is divided to several different loading zones, with each loading zone independently controlled. This design enables the gradient loading. Hence, the “real” geostress field surrounding the deep-buried cavern can be simulated. The loading or unloading process can be controlled by the human-computer interaction machines, i.e., the digital servo control system. It realizes the automation and visualization of model loading/unloading. In addition, this digital servo could control and regulate hydraulic loading instantaneously, which stabilizes the geostress onto the model over a long term. During the loading procedure, the collision between two adjacent loading platens is also eliminated by developing a guide frame. This collision phenomenon is induced by the volume shrinkage of the model when compressed in true 3D state. In addition, several accurate measurements, including the optical and grating-based method, are adopted to monitor the small deformation of the model. Hence, the distortion of the model could be accurately measured. In order to validate the performance of this innovative model test system, a 3D geomechanical test was conducted on a simulated deep-buried underground reservoir. The result shows that the radial convergence increases rapidly with the release of the stress in the reservoir. Moreover, the deformation increases with the increase of the gas production rate. This observation is consistence with field observation in petroleum engineering. The system is therefore capable of testing deep-buried engineering structures.

  2. Satellite orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J. F.; Boggs, D. H.; Born, G. H.; Christensen, E. J.; Ferrari, A. J.; Green, D. W.; Hylkema, R. K.; Mohan, S. N.; Reinbold, S. J.; Sievers, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    A historic account of the activities of the Satellite OD Group during the MM'71 mission is given along with an assessment of the accuracy of the determined orbit of the Mariner 9 spacecraft. Preflight study results are reviewed, and the major error sources described. Tracking and data fitting strategy actually used in the real time operations is itemized, and Deep Space Network data available for orbit fitting during the mission and the auxiliary information used by the navigation team are described. A detailed orbit fitting history of the first four revolutions of the satellite orbit of Mariner 9 is presented, with emphasis on the convergence problems and the delivered solution for the first orbit trim maneuver. Also included are a solution accuracy summary, the history of the spacecraft orbit osculating elements, the results of verifying the radio solutions with TV imaging data, and a summary of the normal points generated for the relativity experiment.

  3. Marned Orbital Systems Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Despite the indefinite postponement of the Space Station in 1972, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continued to look to the future for some type of orbital facility during the post-Skylab years. In 1975, the MSFC directed a contract with the McDonnel Douglas Aerospace Company for the Manned Orbital Systems Concept (MOSC) study. This 9-month effort examined the requirements for, and defined a cost-effective orbital facility concept capable of, supporting extended manned missions in Earth orbit. The capabilities of this concept exceeded those envisioned for the Space Shuttle and Spacelab, both of which were limited by a 7 to 30-day orbital time constraint. The MOSC's initial operating capability was to be achieved in late 1984. A crew of four would man a four-module configuration. During its five-year orbital life the MOSC would have the capability to evolve into a larger 12-to-24-man facility. This is an artist's concept of MOSC.

  4. Family of Orbiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows the paths of three spacecraft currently in orbit around Mars, as well as the path by which NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander will approach and land on the planet. The t-shaped crosses show where the orbiters will be when Phoenix enters the atmosphere, while the x-shaped crosses show their location at landing time.

    All three orbiters, NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, NASA's Mars Odyssey and the European Space Agency's Mars Express, will be monitoring Phoenix during the final steps of its journey to the Red Planet.

    Phoenix will land just south of Mars's north polar ice cap.

  5. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is small, and its only effect on the seasons is their unequal durations. Here I show a pleasant way to guide students to the actual value of Earth's orbital eccentricity, starting from the durations of the four seasons. The date of perihelion is also found.

  6. Orbital physics in RIXS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfeld, Krzysztof; Marra, Pasquale; Grueninger, Markus; Schmitt, Thorsten; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2013-03-01

    In contrast to magnetism, phenomena associated with the orbital degrees of freedom in transition metal oxides had always been considered to be very difficult to observe. However, recently resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) has established itself as a perfect probe of the orbital excitations and orbital order in transition metal oxides. Here we give a brief overview of these recent theoretical and experimental advances which have inter alia led to the observation of the separation of the spin and orbital degree of freedom of an electron.

  7. Orbital Debris: A Chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portree, Davis S. F. (Editor); Loftus, Joseph P., Jr. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This chronology covers the 37-year history of orbital debris concerns. It tracks orbital debris hazard creation, research, observation, experimentation, management, mitigation, protection, and policy. Included are debris-producing, events; U.N. orbital debris treaties, Space Shuttle and space station orbital debris issues; ASAT tests; milestones in theory and modeling; uncontrolled reentries; detection system development; shielding development; geosynchronous debris issues, including reboost policies: returned surfaces studies, seminar papers reports, conferences, and studies; the increasing effect of space activities on astronomy; and growing international awareness of the near-Earth environment.

  8. Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Orbit

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the orbits of Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, a Solar-Terrestrial Probe mission comprising of four identically instrumented spacecraft that will study the Earth's magn...

  9. Effects of anesthesia with isoflurane on plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone in samples obtained from the cavernous sinus and jugular vein of horses.

    PubMed

    Carmalt, James L; Duke-Novakovski, Tanya; Schott, Harold C; van der Kolk, Johannes H

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine effects of anesthesia on plasma concentrations and pulsatility of ACTH in samples obtained from the cavernous sinus and jugular vein of horses. ANIMALS 6 clinically normal adult horses. PROCEDURES Catheters were placed in a jugular vein and into the cavernous sinus via a superficial facial vein. The following morning (day 1), cavernous sinus blood samples were collected every 5 minutes for 1 hour (collection of first sample = time 0) and jugular venous blood samples were collected at 0, 30, and 60 minutes. On day 2, horses were sedated with xylazine hydrochloride and anesthesia was induced with propofol mixed with ketamine hydrochloride. Horses were positioned in dorsal recumbency. Anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen and a continuous rate infusion of butorphanol tartrate. One hour after anesthesia was induced, the blood sample protocol was repeated. Plasma ACTH concentrations were quantified by use of a commercially available sandwich assay. Generalized estimating equations that controlled for horse and an expressly automated deconvolution algorithm were used to determine effects of anesthesia on plasma ACTH concentrations and pulsatility, respectively. RESULTS Anesthesia significantly reduced the plasma ACTH concentration in blood samples collected from the cavernous sinus. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Mean plasma ACTH concentrations in samples collected from the cavernous sinus of anesthetized horses were reduced. Determining the success of partial ablation of the pituitary gland in situ for treatment of pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction may require that effects of anesthesia be included in interpretation of plasma ACTH concentrations in cavernous sinus blood. PMID:27347826

  10. Titan Orbiter Aerorover Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler Jr., E. C.; Acuna, M.; Burchell, M. J.; Coates, A.; Farrell, W.; Flasar, M.; Goldstein, B. E.; Gorevan, S.; Hartle, R. E.; Johnson, W. T. K.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a combined Titan orbiter and Titan Aerorover mission with an emphasis on both in situ and remote sensing measurements of Titan's surface, atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetospheric interaction. The biological aspect of the Titan environment will be emphasized by the mission (i.e., search for organic materials which may include simple organics to 'amono' analogues of amino acids and possibly more complex, lightening detection and infrared, ultraviolet, and charged particle interactions with Titan's surface and atmosphere). An international mission is assumed to control costs. NASA will provide the orbiter, launch vehicle, DSN coverage and operations, while international partners will provide the Aerorover and up to 30% of the cost for the scientific instruments through collaborative efforts. To further reduce costs we propose a single PI for orbiter science instruments and a single PI for Aerorover science instruments. This approach will provide single command/data and power interface between spacecraft and orbiter instruments that will have redundant central DPU and power converter for their instruments. A similar approach could be used for the Aerorover. The mission profile will be constructed to minimize conflicts between Aerorover science, orbiter radar science, orbiter radio science, orbiter imaging science, and orbiter fields and particles (FP) science. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Traumatic posterior communicating artery-cavernous fistula, angioarchitecture, and possible pathogenesis: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Du, Bin; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Qing-Lin; Shen, Jie; Wang, Yun-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) are an abnormal vascular shunt between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus, and were traditionally classified into four subtypes based on the detailed fistulas anatomy and arterial supply. CCFs are frequently encountered in patients with traumatic skull base fractures. In this report, we present one such case caused by two head traumas. Computed tomography and digital subtraction angiography confirmed that this CCF arose from posterior communicating artery of the internal carotid artery, which is not included in the traditional Barrow et al’s categorization. The possible mechanisms include laceration of dural mater of posterior clinoid process and laceration or pseudoaneurysm formation of posterior communicating artery. This case was successfully treated with endovascular coil embolization. PMID:27099501

  12. Orbital Debris Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, R. L.; Jarkey, D. R.; Stansbery, G.

    2014-01-01

    Policies on limiting orbital debris are found throughout the US Government, many foreign space agencies, and as adopted guidelines in the United Nations. The underlying purpose of these policies is to ensure the environment remains safe for the operation of robotic and human spacecraft in near- Earth orbit. For this reason, it is important to consider orbital debris mitigation during the design of all space vehicles. Documenting compliance with the debris mitigation guidelines occurs after the vehicle has already been designed and fabricated for many CubeSats, whereas larger satellites are evaluated throughout the design process. This paper will provide a brief explanation of the US Government Orbital Debris Mitigation Standard Practices, a discussion of international guidelines, as well as NASA's process for compliance evaluation. In addition, it will discuss the educational value of considering orbital debris mitigation requirements as a part of student built satellite design.

  13. Orbital preservation in maxillectomy.

    PubMed

    Stern, S J; Goepfert, H; Clayman, G; Byers, R; Wolf, P

    1993-07-01

    Twenty-eight previously untreated patients with squamous carcinoma of the maxillary sinus underwent maxillectomy with preservation of the orbital contents at the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1971 and 1986. Eighteen patients had part or all of the orbital floor resected; nine patients were treated with radiotherapy, and nine had surgery only. Only 3 of 18 patients in this group (17%) retained significant function in the ipsilateral eye. Furthermore, local recurrence in this group was common (44%), regardless of whether postoperative radiotherapy was used. Ten patients retained the bony orbital floor; if the radiation fields did not include the eye, problems were minimal. Strong consideration should be given to orbital exenteration at the time of surgery, when the orbital floor is resected--especially if postoperative radiation fields will include the eye. PMID:8336956

  14. Mars Climate Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this mission is to study the climate history and the water distribution of Mars. Beautiful panoramic views of the shuttle on the launch pad, engine ignition, Rocket launch, and the separation and burnout of the Solid Rocket Boosters are shown. The footage also includes an animation of the mission. Detailed views of the path that the Orbiter traversed were shown. Once the Orbiter lands on the surface of Mars, it will dig a six to eight inch hole and collect samples from the planets' surface. The animation also included the prospective return of the Orbiter to Earth over the desert of Utah. The remote sensor on the Orbiter helps in finding the exact location of the Orbiter so that scientists may collect the sample and analyze it.

  15. Remote Controlled Orbiter Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garske, Michael; delaTorre, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The Remote Control Orbiter (RCO) capability allows a Space Shuttle Orbiter to perform an unmanned re-entry and landing. This low-cost capability employs existing and newly added functions to perform key activities typically performed by flight crews and controllers during manned re-entries. During an RCO landing attempt, these functions are triggered by automation resident in the on-board computers or uplinked commands from flight controllers on the ground. In order to properly route certain commands to the appropriate hardware, an In-Flight Maintenance (IFM) cable was developed. Currently, the RCO capability is reserved for the scenario where a safe return of the crew from orbit may not be possible. The flight crew would remain in orbit and await a rescue mission. After the crew is rescued, the RCO capability would be used on the unmanned Orbiter in an attempt to salvage this national asset.

  16. Orbital Pseudotumor as a Rare Extrahepatic Manifestation of Hepatitis C Infection

    PubMed Central

    Misselwitz, Benjamin; Epprecht, Jana; Mertens, Joachim; Biedermann, Luc; Scharl, Michael; Haralambieva, Eugenia; Lutterotti, Andreas; Weber, Konrad P.; Müllhaupt, Beat; Chaloupka, Karla

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C is frequently accompanied by immune-related extrahepatic manifestations affecting the skin, kidneys, central and peripheral nervous system and exocrine glands. We present the case of a 40-year-old man with left-sided ptosis, exophthalmos and headache. MRI demonstrated left-sided orbital pseudotumor with lacrimal and retro-orbital contrast enhancement extending to the cavernous sinus and the vestibulocochlear nerve. Immunological tests of serum and cerebrospinal fluid identified hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a potential causative agent but did not indicate any additional infectious, malignant or immunological disorder. Hepatological evaluation revealed no signs of advanced liver disease. After initial spontaneous improvement, the patient subsequently developed vestibulocochlear failure with gait disorder, tinnitus and transient left-parietal sensory loss. Lacrimal biopsy demonstrated lymphocytic infiltrate, prompting steroid treatment. After initial improvement, steroids could not be tapered below 40 mg daily for several months due to recurrent symptoms. Twelve months after the initial presentation, the patient's chronic HCV infection was successfully treated with sofosbuvir, simeprevir and ribavirin and he remains now free of symptoms without steroids. In patients with chronic hepatitis C, lymphocytic infiltrate of the salivary and lacrimal glands is a frequent phenomenon. However, the extent of the lymphocytic infiltrate beyond the lacrimal gland to the tip of the orbit, cavernous sinus and vestibulocochlear nerve as in our patient is highly unusual. For all symptomatic extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis C infection, treatment of HCV as the underlying immune stimulus is recommended, and it helped to control the symptoms in our patient. In addition, long-term follow-up for recurrent lymphocyte infiltrate and development of lymphoma is warranted. PMID:27403111

  17. Surgical Outcomes Using a Medial-to-Lateral Endonasal Endoscopic Approach to Pituitary Adenomas Invading the Cavernous Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Woodworth, Graeme F.; Patel, Kunal S.; Shin, Benjamin; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Tsouris, A. John; McCoul, Edward D.; Anand, Vijay K.; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECT To detail the extent of resection and complications with endonasal endoscopic surgery for pituitary tumors invading the cavernous sinus (CS) using a moderately aggressive approach to maximize extent of resection through the medial cavernous sinus wall while minimizing the risk of cranial neuropathy and blood loss. Tumor in the medical cavernous sinus was aggressively pursued while tumor in the lateral cavernous sinus was debulked in preparation for radiosurgery. METHODS A prospective surgical database of consecutive endonasal pituitary surgeries with verified CS invasion on intraoperative visual inspection was reviewed. The extent of resection as a whole and within the CS was assessed by an independent neuroradiologist using pre- and post-operative Knosp-Steiner (KS) categorization and volumetrics of the respective magnetic resonance images. The extent of resection and clinical outcomes were compared for medial (KS1-2) and lateral (KS3-4) lesions. RESULTS Thirty-six consecutive patients with pituitary adenomas involving the CS who had surgery via an endonasal endoscopic approach were identified. The extent of resection was 84.6% for KS 1–2 and 66.6% for KS 3–4 (p=.04). Gross-total resection was 53.8% for KS 1–2 and 8.7% for KS 3–4 (p=.0006). Of six patients (16.8%) with pre-operative cranial neuropathies, all showed subjective improvement after surgery. Surgical complications included 2 transient post-operative cranial neuropathies (5.6%), 1 postoperative CSF leak (2.8%), 1 reoperation for mucocele (2.8%) and 1 infection (2.8%). CONCLUSIONS The endoscopic endonasal “medial-to-lateral” approach permits safe debulking of tumors in the medial and lateral CS. Although GTR rates are moderate, particularly in the lateral CS, the risk of permanent cranial neuropathy is extremely low with a high chance of improvement of pre-existing deficits. This approach can also facilitate targeting for post-operative radiosurgery. PMID:24527820

  18. Traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula associated with persistent primitive trigeminal artery treated by transarterial coil embolization--case report.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Nozomu; Miyachi, Shigeru; Oi, Sachie; Yamamoto, Naohito

    2011-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman presented with traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula associated with persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) manifesting as right conjunctival chemosis, exophthalmos, and diplopia. The lesion was treated successfully by trans-arterial coil embolization using the double catheter method with balloon assist. Injury to the PPTA is relatively rare and the PPTA should be sacrificed together with the fistula during the repair. PMID:21273742

  19. Bleeding small bowel cavernous haemangioma following blunt trauma to the abdomen presenting as subacute intestinal obstruction in a child

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Dayang Anita Abdul; Khandasamy, Yugasaravanan; Tamba, Riana Pauline; Zaki, Faizah Mohd

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 6-year-old girl who developed subacute intestinal obstruction after a trivial blunt trauma to her abdomen. Her normal vital signs masked the presence of intestinal bleeding. An incidental finding at surgery of a haematomatous polypoid vascular growth of the ileum was subsequently confirmed to be cavernous haemangioma of the small bowel. Surgical resection was curative in this patient. PMID:22679168

  20. Fatal Peritoneal Bleeding Following Embolization of a Carotid-Cavernous Fistula in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV

    SciTech Connect

    Usinskiene, Jurgita; Mazighi, Mikael; Bisdorff, Annouk; Houdart, Emmanuel

    2006-12-15

    We report the case of a 25-year-old woman treated for a spontaneous carotid-cavernous fistula in a context of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV. Embolization with a transvenous approach was achieved without complications; however, the patient died 72 hr later of massive intraperitoneal bleeding. At autopsy, no lesion of the digestive arteries was identified. Possible causes of this bleeding are discussed.

  1. Orbital Causes of Incomitant Strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Lueder, Gregg T.

    2015-01-01

    Strabismus may result from abnormal innervation, structure, or function of the extraocular muscles. Abnormalities of the orbital bones or masses within the orbit may also cause strabismus due to indirect effects on the extraocular muscles. This paper reviews some disorders of the orbit that are associated with strabismus, including craniofacial malformations, orbital masses, trauma, and anomalous orbital structures. PMID:26180465

  2. Changes of nitric oxide synthase-containing nerve fibers and parameters for oxidative stress after unilateral cavernous nerve resection or manuplation in rat penis.

    PubMed

    Ozkara, Hamdi; Alan, Cabir; Atukeren, Pinar; Uyaner, Ilhan; Demirci, Cihan; Gümüştaş, M Koray; Alici, Bulent

    2006-06-30

    After pelvic surgeries such as radical prostatectomy, two major complications--urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction (ED) may occur. Etiologies for ED are multiple pathologic mediators/systems. Oxidative stress, which is known to be induced after surgical trauma, could be a cause of ED. The purposes of in this study are to investigate the effect of unilateral manipulation/ dissection and resection of the cavernous nerve (neurotomy) to NOS (nitric oxide synthase)-containing nerve fibers and pressure after electro stimulation in rat corpus cavernosum, and to determine whether these procedures would produce oxidative stress within rat cavernous tissue 3 weeks and 6 months after the operation. Male rats were divided into 5 groups. Rats in groups 1 and 2 underwent unilateral cavernous nerve manipulation and sacrificed 3 weeks and 6 months after the operation, respectively. Rats in groups 3 and 4 underwent unilateral neurotomy of a 5-mm. segment of the cavernous nerve, and they were sacrificed 3 weeks and 6 months after nerve ablation, respectively. Group 5 rats were control animals for biochemical analysis. Intracavernous pressure following electro stimulation reduced is significantly 3 weeks after unilateral resection, as compared to that of the manipulated nerve (P < 0.05), and it recovered 6 months after neurotomy. The recovery was also confirmed by NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) diaphorase staining in neurotomy groups. Lipid peroxidation, which is an indicater of oxidative stress, was determined by measuring thiobarbituric acid reacting substance (TBARS) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. These markers indicated that unilateral cavernous nerve manipulation or resection produced oxidative stress within rat corpus cavernosum. Oxidative stress was more prominent 3 weeks after unilateral neurotomy (P < 0.05). Also, compared to the control animal group, oxidative stress was observed three weeks after manipulation of unilateral

  3. Gene expression profile comparison in the penile tissue of diabetes and cavernous nerve injury-induced erectile dysfunction rat model

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Sung Chul; Lee, Sang Hoon; Jeon, Ju Hong; So, Insuk; Chae, Mee Ree; Park, Jong Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of cavernous nerve injury (CNI) on gene expression profiles in the cavernosal tissue of a CNI-induced erectile dysfunction (ED) model and to provide a basis for future investigations to discover potential target genes for ED treatment. Materials and Methods Young adult rats were divided randomly into 2 groups: sham operation and bilateral CN resection. At 12 weeks after CNI we measured erectile responses and performed microarray experiments and gene set enrichment analysis to reveal gene signatures that were enriched in the CNI-induced ED model. Alterations in gene signatures were compared with those in the diabetes-induced ED model. The diabetic-induced ED data is taken from GSE2457. Results The mean ratio of intracavernosal pressure/blood pressure for the CNI group (0.54±0.4 cmH2O) was significantly lower than that in the sham operation group (0.73±0.8 cmH2O, p<0.05). Supervised and unsupervised clustering analysis showed that the diabetes- and CNI-induced ED cavernous tissues had different gene expression profiles from normal cavernous tissues. We identified 46 genes that were upregulated and 77 genes that were downregulated in both the CNI- and diabetes-induced ED models. Conclusions Our genome-wide and computational studies provide the groundwork for understanding complex mechanisms and molecular signature changes in ED. PMID:27437539

  4. Technetium-99m labeled red blood cells for the detection and localization of cavernous hemangiomas of the bone

    SciTech Connect

    Lenane, P.

    1986-09-01

    Labeled red blood cells (RBCs) have already been proven useful in the detection and localization of many vascular abnormalities. One such abnormality is that of a cavernous hemangioma. Cavernous hemangiomas have a distinct circulation and have been found in many areas of the body. The ability to utilize this unique circulation is important to consider when choosing a diagnostic exam. This paper reports a case demonstrating the usefulness of labeled red blood cells for the detection and localization of cavernous hemangioma of the bone. A 31-yr-old female present with a history of persistent generalized headaches for many years. About 1 yr prior to the exam, she noticed that her headaches had become more localized to the right side of her head. Physical examination revealed a palpable lump developing on the right side of her head which was sensitive to the touch. The patient was then scheduled for a CT scan to be followed by both a bone scan and a /sup 99m/Tc blood-pool scan. A flow study using 15 mCi /sup 99m/Tc labeled RBCs was performed in the right lateral position at 1.5 sec/frame for 32 frames. Immediate blood-pool images 30-min, and 1-hr delayed images were recorded.

  5. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T.

    1985-08-06

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs.

  6. Visualization of atom's orbits.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byungwhan

    2014-02-01

    High-resolution imaging techniques have been used to obtain views of internal shapes of single atoms or columns of atoms. This review article focuses on the visualization of internal atomic structures such as the configurations of electron orbits confined to atoms. This is accomplished by applying visualization techniques to the reported images of atoms or molecules as well as static and dynamic ions in a plasma. It was found that the photon and electron energies provide macroscopic and microscopic views of the orbit structures of atoms, respectively. The laser-imaged atoms showed a rugged orbit structure, containing alternating dark and bright orbits believed to be the pathways for an externally supplied laser energy and internally excited electron energy, respectively. By contrast, the atoms taken by the electron microscopy provided a structure of fine electron orbits, systematically formed in increasing order of grayscale representing the energy state of an orbit. This structure was identical to those of the plasma ions. The visualized electronic structures played a critical role in clarifying vague postulates made in the Bohr model. Main features proposed in the atomic model are the dynamic orbits absorbing an externally supplied electromagnetic energy, electron emission from them while accompanying light radiation, and frequency of electron waves not light. The light-accompanying electrons and ionic speckles induced by laser light signify that light is composed of electrons and ions. PMID:24749452

  7. Orbit Stabilization of Nanosat

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON,DAVID J.

    1999-12-01

    An algorithm is developed to control a pulsed {Delta}V thruster on a small satellite to allow it to fly in formation with a host satellite undergoing time dependent atmospheric drag deceleration. The algorithm uses four short thrusts per orbit to correct for differences in the average radii of the satellites due to differences in drag and one thrust to symmetrize the orbits. The radial difference between the orbits is the only input to the algorithm. The algorithm automatically stabilizes the orbits after ejection and includes provisions to allow azimuthal positional changes by modifying the drag compensation pulses. The algorithm gives radial and azimuthal deadbands of 50 cm and 3 m for a radial measurement accuracy of {+-} 5 cm and {+-} 60% period variation in the drag coefficient of the host. Approaches to further reduce the deadbands are described. The methodology of establishing a stable orbit after ejection is illustrated in an appendix. The results show the optimum ejection angle to minimize stabilization thrust is upward at 86{sup o} from the orbital velocity. At this angle the stabilization velocity that must be supplied by the thruster is half the ejection velocity. An ejection velocity of 0.02 m/sat 86{sup o} gives an azimuthal separation after ejection and orbit stabilization of 187 m. A description of liquid based gas thrusters suitable for the satellite control is included in an appendix.

  8. Removal of orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew J.; Talent, David L.

    1989-01-01

    The several methods presently identified for the reduction of orbital debris populations are broadly classifiable as either preventive or remedial, and fall within distinctive operational regimes. For all particles, (1) in the 250-2000-km altitude band, intelligent sweepers may be used; (2) for large objects, in the 80-250-km altitude band, orbital decay renders removal impractical; (3) for the 250-750-km altitude band, deorbit devices should be used; (4) for 750-2500-km altitude, OMV rendezvous for propulsive deorbit package attachment is foreseeable; and beyond 2500 km, (5) propulsive escape from earth orbit is required.

  9. Working in orbit and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Lorr, D.B. ); Garshnek, V. ); Cadoux, C. )

    1989-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at a conference on the challenges for space medicine. Topics covered include radiation hazards in low earth orbit, polar orbit, geosynchronous orbit, and deep space.

  10. Orbit Determination Issues for Libration Point Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckman, Mark; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Libration point mission designers require knowledge of orbital accuracy for a variety of analyses including station keeping control strategies, transfer trajectory design, and formation and constellation control. Past publications have detailed orbit determination (OD) results from individual libration point missions. This paper collects both published and unpublished results from four previous libration point missions (ISEE (International Sun-Earth Explorer) -3, SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory), ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) and MAP (Microwave Anisotropy Probe)) supported by Goddard Space Flight Center's Guidance, Navigation & Control Center. The results of those missions are presented along with OD issues specific to each mission. All past missions have been limited to ground based tracking through NASA ground sites using standard range and Doppler measurement types. Advanced technology is enabling other OD options including onboard navigation using seaboard attitude sensors and the use of the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) measurement Delta Differenced One-Way Range (DDOR). Both options potentially enable missions to reduce coherent dedicated tracking passes while maintaining orbital accuracy. With the increased projected loading of the DSN (Deep Space Network), missions must find alternatives to the standard OD scenario.

  11. Habitability study shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Habitability design concepts for the Shuttle Orbiter Program are provided for MSC. A variety of creative solutions for the stated tasks are presented. Sketches, mock-ups, mechanicals and models are included for establishing a foundation for future development.

  12. Habitability study shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Studies of the habitability of the space shuttle orbiter are briefly summarized. Selected illustrations and descriptions are presented for: crew compartment, hygiene facilities, food system and galley, and storage systems.

  13. ARTEMIS Orbits Magnetic Moon

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's THEMIS spacecraft have completed their mission and are still working perfectly, so NASA is re-directing the outermost two spacecraft to special orbits around the Moon. Now called ARTEMIS, th...

  14. Space Shuttle Orbiter ECLSS.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoll, O. T.; Laubach, G. E.; Gibb, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    The Orbiter Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) provides the functions of atmosphere revitalization, crew life support, active thermal conditioning, and airlock support for EVA and docking activities. The ECLSS must satisfy the requirements of orbital missions with four to ten crewmembers and mission duration of a few hours to 30 days and the requirements associated with an atmospheric horizontal flight test program and ferry flight missions. The ECLSS development plan utilizes an ECLSS ground test article and thermal/vacuum testing to support the first horizontal flight test at the end of 1976. The ground testing and horizontal flight test program certify the Orbiter ECLSS for the first orbital flight in early 1978.

  15. MMS Orbit Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the orbits of Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS)mission, a Solar Terrestrial Probes mission comprising of fouridentically instrumented spacecraft that will study the Earth’sm...

  16. Altimetry, Orbits and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, O. L.

    1984-01-01

    The nature of the orbit error and its effect on the sea surface heights calculated with satellite altimetry are explained. The elementary concepts of celestial mechanics required to follow a general discussion of the problem are included. Consideration of errors in the orbits of satellites with precisely repeating ground tracks (SEASAT, TOPEX, ERS-1, POSEIDON, amongst past and future altimeter satellites) are detailed. The theoretical conclusions are illustrated with the numerical results of computer simulations. The nature of the errors in this type of orbits is such that this error can be filtered out by using height differences along repeating (overlapping) passes. This makes them particularly valuable for the study and monitoring of changes in the sea surface, such as tides. Elements of tidal theory, showing how these principles can be combined with those pertinent to the orbit error to make direct maps of the tides using altimetry are presented.

  17. Tethered orbital refueling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fester, Dale A.; Rudolph, L. Kevin; Kiefel, Erlinda R.; Abbott, Peter W.; Grossrode, Pat

    1986-01-01

    One of the major applications of the space station will be to act as a refueling depot for cryogenic-fueled space-based orbital transfer vehicles (OTV), Earth-storable fueled orbit maneuvering vehicles, and refurbishable satellite spacecraft using hydrazine. One alternative for fuel storage at the space station is a tethered orbital refueling facility (TORF), separated from the space station by a sufficient distance to induce a gravity gradient force that settles the stored fuels. The technical feasibility was examined with the primary focus on the refueling of LO2/LH2 orbital transfer vehicles. Also examined was the tethered facility on the space station. It was compared to a zero-gravity facility. A tethered refueling facility should be considered as a viable alternative to a zero-gravity facility if the zero-gravity fluid transfer technology, such as the propellant management device and no vent fill, proves to be difficult to develop with the required performance.

  18. Aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D. (Inventor); Nagy, Kornel (Inventor); Roberts, Barney B. (Inventor); Ried, Robert C. (Inventor); Kroll, Kenneth R. (Inventor); Gamble, Joe (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle which includes an aerobraking device which also serves as a heat shield in the shape of a raked-off elliptic or circular cone with a circular or elliptical base, and with an ellipsoid or other blunt shape nose. The aerobraking device is fitted with a toroid-like skirt and is integral with the support structure of the propulsion system and other systems of the space vehicle. The vehicle is intended to be transported in components to a space station in lower earth orbit where it is assembled for use as a transportation system from low earth orbit to geosynchronous earth orbit and return. Conventional guidance means are included for autonomous flight.

  19. Report on orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The success of space endeavors depends upon a space environment sufficiently free of debris to enable the safe and dependable operation of spacecraft. An environment overly cluttered with debris would threaten the ability to utilize space for a wide variety of scientific, technological, military, and commercial purposes. Man made space debris (orbital debris) differs from natural meteoroids because it remains in earth orbit during its lifetime and is not transient through the space around the Earth. The orbital debris environment is considered. The space environment is described along with sources of orbital debris. The current national space policy is examined, along with ways to minimize debris generation and ways to survive the debris environment. International efforts, legal issues and commercial regulations are also examined.

  20. Partonic orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, Firooz; Taghavi-Shahri, Fatemeh; Shahveh, Abolfazl

    2013-04-01

    Ji's decomposition of nucleon spin is used and the orbital angular momentum of quarks and gluon are calculated. We have utilized the so called valon model description of the nucleon in the next to leading order. It is found that the average orbital angular momentum of quarks is positive, but small, whereas that of gluon is negative and large. Individual quark flavor contributions are also calculated. Some regularities on the total angular momentum of the quarks and gluon are observed.

  1. A tapestry of orbits

    SciTech Connect

    King-Hele, D.

    1992-01-01

    In this book, the author describes how orbital research developed to yield a rich harvest of knowledge about the earth and its atmosphere. King-Hele relates a personal account of this research based on analysis of satellite orbits between 1957 and 1990 conducted from the Royal Aircraft Establishment in Farnborough England. The early research methods used before the launch of Sputnik in 1957 are discussed.

  2. The Lunar Orbital Prospector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redd, Frank J.; Cantrell, James N.; Mccurdy, Greg

    1992-01-01

    The establishment of lunar bases will not end the need for remote sensing of the lunar surface by orbiting platforms. Human and robotic surface exploration will necessarily be limited to some proximate distance from the support base. Near real-time, high-resolution, global characterization of the lunar surface by orbiting sensing systems will continue to be essential to the understanding of the Moon's geophysical structure and the location of exploitable minerals and deposits of raw materials. The Lunar Orbital Prospector (LOP) is an orbiting sensing platform capable of supporting a variety of modular sensing packages. Serviced by a lunar-based shuttle, the LOP will permit the exchange of instrument packages to meet evolving mission needs. The ability to recover, modify, and rotate sensing packages allows their reuse in varying combinations. Combining this flexibility with robust orbit modification capabilities and near real-time telemetry links provides considerable system responsiveness. Maintenance and modification of the LOP orbit are accomplished through use of an onboard propulsion system that burns lunar-supplied oxygen and aluminum. The relatively low performance of such a system is more than compensated for by the elimination of the need for Earth-supplied propellants. The LOP concept envisions a continuous expansion of capability through the incorporation of new instrument technologies and the addition of platforms.

  3. The Exoplanet Orbit Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. T.; Fakhouri, O.; Marcy, G. W.; Han, E.; Feng, Y.; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, A. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Valenti, J. A.; Anderson, J.; Piskunov, N.

    2011-04-01

    We present a database of well-determined orbital parameters of exoplanets, and their host stars' properties. This database comprises spectroscopic orbital elements measured for 427 planets orbiting 363 stars from radial velocity and transit measurements as reported in the literature. We have also compiled fundamental transit parameters, stellar parameters, and the method used for the planets discovery. This Exoplanet Orbit Database includes all planets with robust, well measured orbital parameters reported in peer-reviewed articles. The database is available in a searchable, filterable, and sortable form online through the Exoplanets Data Explorer table, and the data can be plotted and explored through the Exoplanet Data Explorer plotter. We use the Data Explorer to generate publication-ready plots, giving three examples of the signatures of exoplanet migration and dynamical evolution: We illustrate the character of the apparent correlation between mass and period in exoplanet orbits, the different selection biases between radial velocity and transit surveys, and that the multiplanet systems show a distinct semimajor-axis distribution from apparently singleton systems.

  4. FAM222B Is Not a Likely Novel Candidate Gene for Cerebral Cavernous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Spiegler, Stefanie; Kirchmaier, Bettina; Rath, Matthias; Korenke, G Christoph; Tetzlaff, Fabian; van de Vorst, Maartje; Neveling, Kornelia; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Kuss, Andreas W; Gilissen, Christian; Fischer, Andreas; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Felbor, Ute

    2016-07-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are prevalent slow-flow vascular lesions which harbour the risk to develop intracranial haemorrhages, focal neurological deficits, and epileptic seizures. Autosomal dominantly inherited CCMs were found to be associated with heterozygous inactivating mutations in 3 genes, CCM1 (KRIT1), CCM2 (MGC4607), and CCM3 (PDCD10) in 1999, 2003 and 2005, respectively. Despite the availability of high-throughput sequencing techniques, no further CCM gene has been published since. Here, we report on the identification of an autosomal dominantly inherited frameshift mutation in a gene of thus far unknown function, FAM222B (C17orf63), through exome sequencing of CCM patients mutation-negative for CCM1-3. A yeast 2-hybrid screen revealed interactions of FAM222B with the tubulin cytoskeleton and STAMBP which is known to be associated with microcephaly-capillary malformation syndrome. However, a phenotype similar to existing models was not found, neither in fam222bb/fam222ba double mutant zebrafish generated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases nor in an in vitro sprouting assay using human umbilical vein endothelial cells transfected with siRNA against FAM222B. These observations led to the assumption that aberrant FAM222B is not involved in the formation of CCMs. PMID:27587990

  5. Embolization of direct carotid cavernous fistulas with the novel double-balloon technique.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yin; Li, Lin; Tang, Jun; Zhu, Gang; Chen, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    Multiple endovascular management of direct carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) has been widely accepted as a treatment option. Embolization of the fistula with detachable balloons or thrombogenic coil-based occlusion has been the main choice to treat direct CCF, with good safety and efficacy. This study investigated the safety and efficacy of embolization of direct CCF with the novel double-balloon technique. A retrospective review of a prospective database on cerebral vascular disease was performed. We identified a total of five patients presenting with high-flow direct CCF. All patients were managed with transarterial embolization with the novel double-balloon technique. Three of the five patients were treated with two detachable balloons, and a completely occluded fistula with preservation of the internal carotid artery was achieved. Of the remaining two patients treated with more detachable balloons, one patient achieved a perfect outcome and the other one suffered from recurrent fistula due to balloon migration 3 weeks after embolization. During a follow-up period of 12-18 months, no symptoms reoccurred in any patient. Thus, the double-balloon treatment may be a promising method for CCF complete occlusion. This novel technique may bring more benefits in the following two cases: 1). A single inflated detachable balloon fails to completely occlude the CCF, which causing the next balloon can not pass into the fistula. 2). A giant CCF needs more balloons for fistula embolization. PMID:26586136

  6. Temperature-controlled optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves.

    PubMed

    Tozburun, Serhat; Hutchens, Thomas C; McClain, Michael A; Lagoda, Gwen A; Burnett, Arthur L; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2013-06-01

    Optical nerve stimulation (ONS) may be useful as a diagnostic tool for intraoperative identification and preservation of the prostate cavernous nerves (CN), responsible for erectile function, during prostate cancer surgery. Successful ONS requires elevating the nerve temperature to within a narrow range (~42 to 47°C) for nerve activation without thermal damage to the nerve. This preliminary study explores a prototype temperature-controlled optical nerve stimulation (TC-ONS) system for maintaining a constant (±1°C) nerve temperature during short-term ONS of the rat prostate CNs. A 150-mW, 1455-nm diode laser was operated in continuous-wave mode, with and without temperature control, during stimulation of the rat CNs for 15 to 30 s through a fiber optic probe with a 1-mm-diameter spot. A microcontroller opened and closed an in-line mechanical shutter in response to an infrared sensor, with a predetermined temperature set point. With TC-ONS, higher laser power settings were used to rapidly and safely elevate the CNs to a temperature necessary for a fast intracavernous pressure response, while also preventing excessive temperatures that would otherwise cause thermal damage to the nerve. With further development, TC-ONS may provide a rapid, stable, and safe method for intraoperative identification and preservation of the prostate CNs. PMID:23733025

  7. Two cases of familial cerebral cavernous malformation caused by mutations in the CCM1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Im-Yong; Yum, Mi-Sun; Kim, Eun-Hee; Choi, Hae-Won; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a vascular malformation characterized by abnormally enlarged capillary cavities without any intervening neural tissue. We report 2 cases of familial CCMs diagnosed with the CCM1 mutation by using a genetic assay. A 5-year-old boy presented with headache, vomiting, and seizure-like movements. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multiple CCM lesions in the cerebral hemispheres. Subsequent mutation analysis of his father and other family members revealed c.940_943 del (p.Val314 Asn315delinsThrfsX3) mutations of the CCM1 gene. A 10-month-old boy who presented with seizure-like movements was reported to have had no perinatal event. His aunt was diagnosed with cerebral angioma. Brain and spine MRI revealed multiple angiomas in the cerebral hemisphere and thoracic spinal cord. Mutation analysis of his father was normal, although that of the patient and his mother revealed c.535C>T (p.Arg179X) mutations of the CCM1 gene. Based on these studies, we suggest that when a child with a familial history of CCMs exhibits neurological symptoms, the physician should suspect familial CCMs and consider brain imaging or a genetic assay. PMID:27462358

  8. Structure and vascular function of MEKK3–cerebral cavernous malformations 2 complex

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Oriana S.; Deng, Hanqiang; Liu, Dou; Zhang, Ya; Wei, Rong; Deng, Yong; Zhang, Fan; Louvi, Angeliki; Turk, Benjamin E.; Boggon, Titus J.; Su, Bing

    2015-08-03

    Cerebral cavernous malformations 2 (CCM2) loss is associated with the familial form of CCM disease. The protein kinase MEKK3 (MAP3K3) is essential for embryonic angiogenesis in mice and interacts physically with CCM2, but how this interaction is mediated and its relevance to cerebral vasculature are unknown. Here we report that Mekk3 plays an intrinsic role in embryonic vascular development. Inducible endothelial Mekk3 knockout in neonatal mice is lethal due to multiple intracranial haemorrhages and brain blood vessels leakage. We discover direct interaction between CCM2 harmonin homology domain (HHD) and the N terminus of MEKK3, and determine a 2.35 Å cocrystal structure. We find Mekk3 deficiency impairs neurovascular integrity, which is partially dependent on Rho–ROCK signalling, and that disruption of MEKK3:CCM2 interaction leads to similar neurovascular leakage. We conclude that CCM2:MEKK3-mediated regulation of Rho signalling is required for maintenance of neurovascular integrity, unravelling a mechanism by which CCM2 loss leads to disease.

  9. Crystal Structure of CCM3, a Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Protein Critical for Vascular Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Zhang, R; Zhang, H; He, Y; Ji, W; Min, W; Boggon, T

    2010-01-01

    CCM3 mutations are associated with cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), a disease affecting 0.1-0.5% of the human population. CCM3 (PDCD10, TFAR15) is thought to form a CCM complex with CCM1 and CCM2; however, the molecular basis for these interactions is not known. We have determined the 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of CCM3. This structure shows an all {alpha}-helical protein containing two domains, an N-terminal dimerization domain with a fold not previously observed, and a C-terminal focal adhesion targeting (FAT)-homology domain. We show that CCM3 binds CCM2 via this FAT-homology domain and that mutation of a highly conserved FAK-like hydrophobic pocket (HP1) abrogates CCM3-CCM2 interaction. This CCM3 FAT-homology domain also interacts with paxillin LD motifs using the same surface, and partial CCM3 co-localization with paxillin in cells is lost on HP1 mutation. Disease-related CCM3 truncations affect the FAT-homology domain suggesting a role for the FAT-homology domain in the etiology of CCM.

  10. Recognition of microclimate zones through radon mapping, Lechuguilla Cave, Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, K.I.; LaRock, E.J. )

    1991-10-01

    Radon concentrations range from less than 185 to 3,515 Bq m-3 throughout Lechuguilla Cave, Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico. Concentrations in the entrance passages and areas immediately adjacent to these passages are controlled by outside air temperature and barometric pressure, similar to other Type 2 caves. Most of the cave is developed in three geographic branches beneath the entrance passages; these areas maintain Rn levels independent of surface effects, an indication that Rn levels in deep, complex caves or mines cannot be simply estimated by outside atmospheric parameters. These deeper, more isolated areas are subject to convective ventilation driven by temperature differences along the 477-m vertical extent of the cave. Radon concentrations are used to delineate six microclimate zones (air circulation cells) throughout the cave in conjunction with observed airflow data. Suspected surface connections contribute fresh air to remote cave areas demonstrated by anomalous Rn lows surrounded by higher values, the presence of mammalian skeletal remains, CO2 concentrations and temperatures lower than the cave mean, and associated surficial karst features.

  11. Crystal Structure of CCM3, a Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Protein Critical for Vascular Integrity*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Haifeng; He, Yun; Ji, Weidong; Min, Wang; Boggon, Titus J.

    2010-01-01

    CCM3 mutations are associated with cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), a disease affecting 0.1–0.5% of the human population. CCM3 (PDCD10, TFAR15) is thought to form a CCM complex with CCM1 and CCM2; however, the molecular basis for these interactions is not known. We have determined the 2.5 Å crystal structure of CCM3. This structure shows an all α-helical protein containing two domains, an N-terminal dimerization domain with a fold not previously observed, and a C-terminal focal adhesion targeting (FAT)-homology domain. We show that CCM3 binds CCM2 via this FAT-homology domain and that mutation of a highly conserved FAK-like hydrophobic pocket (HP1) abrogates CCM3-CCM2 interaction. This CCM3 FAT-homology domain also interacts with paxillin LD motifs using the same surface, and partial CCM3 co-localization with paxillin in cells is lost on HP1 mutation. Disease-related CCM3 truncations affect the FAT-homology domain suggesting a role for the FAT-homology domain in the etiology of CCM. PMID:20489202

  12. Developmental timing of CCM2 loss influences cerebral cavernous malformations in mice

    PubMed Central

    Boulday, Gwénola; Rudini, Noemi; Maddaluno, Luigi; Blécon, Anne; Arnould, Minh; Gaudric, Alain; Chapon, Françoise; Adams, Ralf H.; Dejana, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are vascular malformations of the central nervous system (CNS) that lead to cerebral hemorrhages. Familial CCM occurs as an autosomal dominant condition caused by loss-of-function mutations in one of the three CCM genes. Constitutive or tissue-specific ablation of any of the Ccm genes in mice previously established the crucial role of Ccm gene expression in endothelial cells for proper angiogenesis. However, embryonic lethality precluded the development of relevant CCM mouse models. Here, we show that endothelial-specific Ccm2 deletion at postnatal day 1 (P1) in mice results in vascular lesions mimicking human CCM lesions. Consistent with CCM1/3 involvement in the same human disease, deletion of Ccm1/3 at P1 in mice results in similar CCM lesions. The lesions are located in the cerebellum and the retina, two organs undergoing intense postnatal angiogenesis. Despite a pan-endothelial Ccm2 deletion, CCM lesions are restricted to the venous bed. Notably, the consequences of Ccm2 loss depend on the developmental timing of Ccm2 ablation. This work provides a highly penetrant and relevant CCM mouse model. PMID:21859843

  13. Endovascular repair of direct carotid-cavernous fistula in Ehlers-Danlos type IV.

    PubMed

    Linfante, Italo; Lin, Eugene; Knott, Eric; Katzen, Barry; Dabus, Guilherme

    2014-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV is a collagen vascular disease with an autosomal dominant inheritance caused by COL3A1 mutation. Patients with EDS type IV can present with organ rupture, spontaneous arterial dissections and ruptured aneurysms. Because of their propensity to form arterial dissections, aneurysms and rupture, they can develop carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) after minor trauma or spontaneously. In EDS, it has been reported that even conventional catheter diagnostic angiography may result in large artery dissections and vessel rupture. In addition, the treatment of CCF in EDS type IV can result in up to 59% mortality after initial treatment, of which 23% is attributed to direct complications of treatment. We present the case of a patient with EDS type IV who previously had spontaneous dissection and multiple pseudoaneurysms of both the iliac and femoral arteries and the distal abdominal aorta. Several years later the patient developed a direct type A CCF which was successfully treated with endovascular embolization using a transvenous approach with detachable coils. The literature pertaining to CCF in EDS type IV and its treatment is reviewed. PMID:24385391

  14. Endovascular repair of direct carotid-cavernous fistula in Ehlers-Danlos type IV.

    PubMed

    Linfante, Italo; Lin, Eugene; Knott, Eric; Katzen, Barry; Dabus, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV is a collagen vascular disease with an autosomal dominant inheritance caused by COL3A1 mutation. Patients with EDS type IV can present with organ rupture, spontaneous arterial dissections and ruptured aneurysms. Because of their propensity to form arterial dissections, aneurysms and rupture, they can develop carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) after minor trauma or spontaneously. In EDS, it has been reported that even conventional catheter diagnostic angiography may result in large artery dissections and vessel rupture. In addition, the treatment of CCF in EDS type IV can result in up to 59% mortality after initial treatment, of which 23% is attributed to direct complications of treatment. We present the case of a patient with EDS type IV who previously had spontaneous dissection and multiple pseudoaneurysms of both the iliac and femoral arteries and the distal abdominal aorta. Several years later the patient developed a direct type A CCF which was successfully treated with endovascular embolization using a transvenous approach with detachable coils. The literature pertaining to CCF in EDS type IV and its treatment is reviewed. PMID:24401479

  15. Dubin-Johnson syndrome with multiple liver cavernous hemangiomas: report of a familial case

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peifeng; Wang, Yingmei; Zhang, Jinmei; Geng, Ming; Li, Zengshan

    2013-01-01

    Dubin-Johnson syndrome (DJS) is a rare autosomal recessive inheritance disorder of bilirubin metabolism. Herein we reported a complicated but interesting case which is readily resulted in misdiagnosis or an indefinite diagnosis, and this is the first reported familial case of DJS with multiple liver cavernous hemangiomas. A 49-year-old man was referred to our hospital for jaundice and multiple low-density liver masses. Extensive laboratory investigations showed conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia and positive urine bilirubin. Microscopically, lesions were composed of blood-filled vascular channels of various sizes lined by a single layer of flat endothelial cells supported by fibrous tissue. Coarse brown granules presented in the hepatocytes of the liver lobules locating beside the tumor, particularly in the centrilobular hepatocytes, and the granules showed blue-green with Schmorl’s reaction lipofuscin staining. Interestingly, one of the patient’s six siblings (female) shared the same condition with him. The relationship between DJS and hemangiomas remains unclear, and it might be contributed to some hereditary factors, or probably occurred simultaneously by chance. It was certified that the true reason for the long-term unclear jaundice was DJS, which was presumed clinically to be caused by bile excretion obstacles associated with the hemangiomas. Liver biopsy and histochemical stain may be helpful to identify the reason of jaundice and avoid misdiagnosis or an indefinite diagnosis. PMID:24228133

  16. Stabiliztin of VEGFR2 Signaling by Cerebral Cavernous Malformation 3 is Critical for Vascular Development

    SciTech Connect

    Y He; H Zhang; L Yu; M Gunel; T Boggon; H Chen; W Min

    2011-12-31

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are human vascular malformations caused by mutations in three genes of unknown function: CCM1, CCM2, and CCM3. CCM3, also known as PDCD10 (programmed cell death 10), was initially identified as a messenger RNA whose abundance was induced by apoptotic stimuli in vitro. However, the in vivo function of CCM3 has not been determined. Here, we describe mice with a deletion of the CCM3 gene either ubiquitously or specifically in the vascular endothelium, smooth muscle cells, or neurons. Mice with global or endothelial cell-specific deletion of CCM3 exhibited defects in embryonic angiogenesis and died at an early embryonic stage. CCM3 deletion reduced vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) signaling in embryos and endothelial cells. In response to VEGF stimulation, CCM3 was recruited to and stabilized VEGFR2, and the carboxyl-terminal domain of CCM3 was required for the stabilization of VEGFR2. Indeed, the CCM3 mutants found in human patients lacking the carboxyl-terminal domain were labile and were unable to stabilize and activate VEGFR2. These results demonstrate that CCM3 promotes VEGFR2 signaling during vascular development.

  17. Temperature-controlled optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Hutchens, Thomas C.; McClain, Michael A.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2013-06-01

    Optical nerve stimulation (ONS) may be useful as a diagnostic tool for intraoperative identification and preservation of the prostate cavernous nerves (CN), responsible for erectile function, during prostate cancer surgery. Successful ONS requires elevating the nerve temperature to within a narrow range (˜42 to 47°C) for nerve activation without thermal damage to the nerve. This preliminary study explores a prototype temperature-controlled optical nerve stimulation (TC-ONS) system for maintaining a constant (±1°C) nerve temperature during short-term ONS of the rat prostate CNs. A 150-mW, 1455-nm diode laser was operated in continuous-wave mode, with and without temperature control, during stimulation of the rat CNs for 15 to 30 s through a fiber optic probe with a 1-mm-diameter spot. A microcontroller opened and closed an in-line mechanical shutter in response to an infrared sensor, with a predetermined temperature set point. With TC-ONS, higher laser power settings were used to rapidly and safely elevate the CNs to a temperature necessary for a fast intracavernous pressure response, while also preventing excessive temperatures that would otherwise cause thermal damage to the nerve. With further development, TC-ONS may provide a rapid, stable, and safe method for intraoperative identification and preservation of the prostate CNs.

  18. Structural basis of the junctional anchorage of the cerebral cavernous malformations complex

    PubMed Central

    Gingras, Alexandre R.; Liu, Jian J.

    2012-01-01

    The products of genes that cause cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2, and CCM3) physically interact. CCM1/KRIT1 links this complex to endothelial cell (EC) junctions and maintains junctional integrity in part by inhibiting RhoA. Heart of glass (HEG1), a transmembrane protein, associates with KRIT1. In this paper, we show that the KRIT1 band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, and moesin (FERM) domain bound the HEG1 C terminus (Kd = 1.2 µM) and solved the structure of this assembly. The KRIT1 F1 and F3 subdomain interface formed a hydrophobic groove that binds HEG1(Tyr1,380-Phe1,381), thus defining a new mode of FERM domain–membrane protein interaction. This structure enabled design of KRIT1(L717,721A), which exhibited a >100-fold reduction in HEG1 affinity. Although well folded and expressed, KRIT1(L717,721A) failed to target to EC junctions or complement the effects of KRIT1 depletion on zebrafish cardiovascular development or Rho kinase activation in EC. These data establish that this novel FERM–membrane protein interaction anchors CCM1/KRIT1 at EC junctions to support cardiovascular development. PMID:23007647

  19. EXCEPTIONAL AGGRESSIVENESS OF CEREBRAL CAVERNOUS MALFORMATION DISEASE ASSOCIATED WITH PDCD10 MUTATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Rebeiz, Tania; Stockton, Rebecca A.; McDonald, David A.; Mikati, Abdul Ghani; Zhang, Lingjiao; Austin, Cecilia; Akers, Amy L.; Gallione, Carol J.; Rorrer, Autumn; Gunel, Murat; Min, Wang; De Souza, Jorge Marcondes; Lee, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The phenotypic manifestations of cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) disease caused by rare PDCD10 mutations have not been systematically examined, and a mechanistic link to Rho kinase (ROCK) mediated hyperpermeability, a potential therapeutic target, has not been established. Methods We analyze PDCD10-siRNA treated endothelial cells for stress fibers, ROCK activity and permeability. ROCK activity is assessed in CCM lesions. Brain permeability and CCM lesion burden is quantified, and clinical manifestations are assessed in prospectively enrolled subjects with PDCD10 mutations. Results We determine that PDCD10 protein suppresses endothelial stress fibers, ROCK activity and permeability in vitro. Pdcd10 heterozygous mice have greater lesion burden than other Ccm genotypes. We demonstrate robust ROCK activity in murine and human CCM vasculature, and increased brain vascular permeability in humans with PDCD10 mutation. Clinical phenotype is exceptionally aggressive compared to the more common KRIT1 and CCM2 familial and sporadic CCM, with greater lesion burden and more frequent hemorrhages earlier in life. We first report other phenotypic features including scoliosis, cognitive disability and skin lesions, unrelated to lesion burden or bleeding. Conclusion These findings define a unique CCM disease with exceptional aggressiveness, and they inform preclinical therapeutic testing, clinical counseling and the design of trials. PMID:25122144

  20. Structure and vascular function of MEKK3-cerebral cavernous malformations 2 complex.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Oriana S; Deng, Hanqiang; Liu, Dou; Zhang, Ya; Wei, Rong; Deng, Yong; Zhang, Fan; Louvi, Angeliki; Turk, Benjamin E; Boggon, Titus J; Su, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations 2 (CCM2) loss is associated with the familial form of CCM disease. The protein kinase MEKK3 (MAP3K3) is essential for embryonic angiogenesis in mice and interacts physically with CCM2, but how this interaction is mediated and its relevance to cerebral vasculature are unknown. Here we report that Mekk3 plays an intrinsic role in embryonic vascular development. Inducible endothelial Mekk3 knockout in neonatal mice is lethal due to multiple intracranial haemorrhages and brain blood vessels leakage. We discover direct interaction between CCM2 harmonin homology domain (HHD) and the N terminus of MEKK3, and determine a 2.35 Å cocrystal structure. We find Mekk3 deficiency impairs neurovascular integrity, which is partially dependent on Rho-ROCK signalling, and that disruption of MEKK3:CCM2 interaction leads to similar neurovascular leakage. We conclude that CCM2:MEKK3-mediated regulation of Rho signalling is required for maintenance of neurovascular integrity, unravelling a mechanism by which CCM2 loss leads to disease. PMID:26235885

  1. Role of oxidative stress in surgical cavernous nerve injury in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ding, Xie-Gang; Li, Shi-Wen; Zheng, Hang; Zheng, Xin-Min; Navin, Shrestha; Li, Lu; Wang, Xing-Huan

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the role of oxidative stress in surgical cavernous nerve (CN) injury in a rat model. Eighty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, sham-operated rats; group 2, bilateral CN-crushed rats; and group 3, bilateral CN-transection-and-sutured-immediately rats. Oxidative stress was evaluated by malondialdehyde levels, super oxide dismutase (SOD) activities, and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities in serum. Erectile function was assessed by CN electrostimulation at 3 months with mean maximal intracavernous pressure (ICP) and maximal ICP per mean arterial pressure. Nerve injury was assessed by toluidine blue staining of CNs and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphorase staining of penile tissue. GPX protein expression and nitrotyrosine-3 (NT-3) levels in penile tissue were measured. Erectile function and the number of myelinated axons of CNs and NADPH-diaphorase-positive nerve fibers were statistically decreased between groups, from sham to crush to transection. For markers, both nerve-injury groups showed increased oxidative stress markers at early time points, with the transection group showing greater oxidative stress than the crushed group and values normalizing to sham levels by week 12. GPX expression and NT-3 levels in penile tissue were in concordance with the results of SOD and GPX. These results show that oxidative stress plays an important role in injured CNs, and different methods of CN injury can lead to different degrees of oxidative stress in a rat model. PMID:25597854

  2. 3D spectroscopy of merger Seyfert galaxy Mrk 334: nuclear starburst, superwind and the circumnuclear cavern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Aleksandrina; Moiseev, Alexei

    2010-01-01

    We are presenting new results on kinematics and structure of the Mrk 334 Seyfert galaxy. Panoramic (3D) spectroscopy is performed at the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences using the integral-field Multi-Pupil Fiber Spectrograph (MPFS) and scanning Fabry-Pérot interferometer. The deep images have revealed that Mrk 334 is observed during the final stage of its merging with a massive companion. A possible mass ratio ranges from 1/5 to 1/3. The merger has triggered mass redistribution in the disc resulting in an intensification of nuclear activity and in a burst of star formation in the inner region of the galaxy. The circumnuclear starburst is so intense that its contribution to the gas ionization exceeds that contribution of the active galactic nuclei (AGN). We interpret the nuclear gas outflow with velocities of ~200kms-1 as a galactic superwind that accompanies the violent star formation. This suggestion is consistent with the asymmetric X-ray brightness distribution in Mrk 334. The trajectory of the fragments of the disrupted satellite in the vicinity of the main galaxy nucleus can be traced. In the galaxy disc, a cavern is found that is filled with a low-density ionized gas. We consider this region to be the place where the remnants of the companion have recently penetrated through the gaseous disc of the main galaxy.

  3. A giant cavernous hemangioma of the liver extending into the pelvis

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jiayi; Anaya, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Giant cavernous hemangiomas are the most common tumors of the liver, ocurring in up to 20% of the general population. Given their benign course, asymptomatic nature and slow growth rate, treatment is rarely indicated. The case presented herein is unique as it describes an uncommon presentation of this common tumor and the circumstances in which surgical treatment is beneficial. Presentation of case We present a case of a 66 year-old patient with prostate cancer referred for evaluation of a massive 37 cm giant liver hemangioma, extending into the pelvis and in the planned field of radiation for prostate cancer, exhibiting rapid growth, and associated with significant symptomatology. Given these clinical characteristics, the patient was offered surgery and underwent a left trisectionectomy with an uneventful recovery. The patient's symptoms resolved and he was able to complete radiation to the pelvis. Discussion In the context of an unusual presentation, this case presentation reviews the typical clinical and imaging characteristics of giant liver hemangiomas and expands on the current indications for treatment, emphasizing the role of enucleation and resection for patients meeting appropriate indications. Conclusion Although liver hemangiomas are extremely common, surgical treatment is rarely required. With appropriate indications, and when enucleation is not feasible or ideal, major liver resection is a safe alternative approach with excellent outcomes when performed in the right setting. PMID:26117445

  4. New Anatomical Description of the Cavernous Sinus Surface and Its Significance in Microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Prescher, Andreas; Brors, Dominik; von Ammon, Klaus

    1997-01-01

    The anatomical and surgical approach to the sella region is of special interest for microsurgeons involved in ear, nose, and throat surgery, neurosurgery, ophthalmology, maxillofacial surgery, and skull base surgery. We investigated the surface morphology of the cavernous sinus and the sella turcica in 48 adult and 2 neonate specimens. To simplify the morphometric recording, distances between anatomical landmarks were defined. In addition, three triangles—the preinfundibular, the parasellar, and the internal carotid artery triangle—are introduced. These triangles are defined in order to determine the location where cranial nerves III, IV, V, and VI penetrate the dura with respect to the anterior and posterior clinoid processes and the tuberculum and dorsum sellae. The triangles were found to be symmetrical, with identical bilateral measurements, and the entry points of the cranial nerves were found to be constant. In 17 cases (34%), we found a dehiscence of the sellar diaphragm, and in 15 cases (30%), rope-like adhesions at the pituitary stalk. ImagesFigure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:17171029

  5. Cavernous Sinus: A Comprehensive Review of its Anatomy, Pathologic Conditions, and Imaging Features.

    PubMed

    Bakan, A A; Alkan, A; Kurtcan, S; Aralaşmak, A; Tokdemir, S; Mehdi, E; Özdemir, H

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the anatomy of the cavernous sinus (CS), illustrate numerous lesions that can affect the CS, and emphasize the imaging characteristics for each lesion to further refine the differential diagnoses. The CS, notwithstanding its small size, contains a complicated and crucial network that consists of the carotid artery, the venous plexus, and cranial nerves. The wide-ranging types of pathologies that can involve the CS can be roughly classified as tumoral, congenital, infectious/inflammatory/granulomatous, and vascular. Conditions that affect the CS usually lead to symptoms that are similar to each other; thus, for diagnosis, imaging procedures are required. Radiological evaluations are also required to detect pre- and postoperative CS invasion. Magnetic resonance imaging, which can be supplemented with thin-section contrast-enhanced sequences, is the preferred imaging technique for evaluating the CS. For correct diagnosis of CS lesions and accurate evaluations of CS invasions, it is essential to carefully analyze the anatomical structures within the CS and to acquire precise knowledge about the imaging features of CS lesions, which may frequently overlap. PMID:25410584

  6. Recent insights into cerebral cavernous malformations: a complex jigsaw puzzle under construction

    PubMed Central

    Faurobert, Eva; Albiges-Rizo, Corinne

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations are common vascular malformations with an unpredictable risk of hemorrhage which consequences range from headache to stroke or death. Three genes CCM1, 2, 3 have been linked to the disease. The encoded CCM proteins interact with each others within a large protein complex. Since less than two years, a plethora of new data has emerged on the signaling pathways in which they are involved. They regulate diverse aspects of endothelial cell morphogenesis and blood vessel stability such as cell-cell junctions, cell shape and polarity, or cell adhesion to extracellular matrix. Although fascinating, a global picture is hard yet to depict as little is known on how these pathways coordinate to orchestrate angiogenesis. We present here what is known on the structural domain organization of the CCM proteins, their association as a ternary complex and their subcellular localization. Numerous CCM partners have been identified by two-hybrid screens, genetic analyses or proteomic studies. We focus on the best characterized ones and we review data on the signaling pathways they regulate as a step toward better understanding the etiology of the disease. PMID:20096036

  7. Cavernous hemangioma of the liver. A single institution report of 16 resections.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, S I; Husser, W C

    1987-01-01

    Over the past 27 years cavernous hemangioma of the liver has been diagnosed in 12 nonoperated patients and in 16 patients who had resection of the lesion at Strong Memorial Hospital. In almost all patients the diagnosis was suggested by an imaging procedure. In the 12 nonoperated patients the average size of the tumor was 4.7 cm (range: 3-8 cm). No problems related to the tumor occurred during the follow-up period. The average size of the resected lesion was 10 cm (range: 4-32 cm). The usual indication for resection was pain, mass, or a combination of these manifestations. Five lobectomies, five left lateral segmentectomies, two trisegmentectomies, two segmentectomies, and two enucleations were performed. There were no postoperative deaths. Review of the literature indicates that although rapid growth of the lesion occurred during pregnancy in one patient, the effects of pregnancy or contraceptive drugs on growth are inconsistent. Spontaneous rupture occurs infrequently, and the potential for rupture should not constitute an indication for resection, which should be performed selectively. Intraoperative blood loss may be appreciable, but a mortality rate near 0% has been reported in all institutional series. Images Figs. 2A-D. Figs. 3A-C. Figs. 3A-C. Figs. 4A and B. PMID:3555360

  8. Structure and vascular function of MEKK3–cerebral cavernous malformations 2 complex

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Oriana S.; Deng, Hanqiang; Liu, Dou; Zhang, Ya; Wei, Rong; Deng, Yong; Zhang, Fan; Louvi, Angeliki; Turk, Benjamin E.; Boggon, Titus J.; Su, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations 2 (CCM2) loss is associated with the familial form of CCM disease. The protein kinase MEKK3 (MAP3K3) is essential for embryonic angiogenesis in mice and interacts physically with CCM2, but how this interaction is mediated and its relevance to cerebral vasculature are unknown. Here we report that Mekk3 plays an intrinsic role in embryonic vascular development. Inducible endothelial Mekk3 knockout in neonatal mice is lethal due to multiple intracranial haemorrhages and brain blood vessels leakage. We discover direct interaction between CCM2 harmonin homology domain (HHD) and the N terminus of MEKK3, and determine a 2.35 Å cocrystal structure. We find Mekk3 deficiency impairs neurovascular integrity, which is partially dependent on Rho–ROCK signalling, and that disruption of MEKK3:CCM2 interaction leads to similar neurovascular leakage. We conclude that CCM2:MEKK3-mediated regulation of Rho signalling is required for maintenance of neurovascular integrity, unravelling a mechanism by which CCM2 loss leads to disease. PMID:26235885

  9. Endovascular repair of direct carotid–cavernous fistula in Ehlers–Danlos type IV

    PubMed Central

    Linfante, Italo; Lin, Eugene; Knott, Eric; Katzen, Barry; Dabus, Guilherme

    2014-01-01

    Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV is a collagen vascular disease with an autosomal dominant inheritance caused by COL3A1 mutation. Patients with EDS type IV can present with organ rupture, spontaneous arterial dissections and ruptured aneurysms. Because of their propensity to form arterial dissections, aneurysms and rupture, they can develop carotid–cavernous fistula (CCF) after minor trauma or spontaneously. In EDS, it has been reported that even conventional catheter diagnostic angiography may result in large artery dissections and vessel rupture. In addition, the treatment of CCF in EDS type IV can result in up to 59% mortality after initial treatment, of which 23% is attributed to direct complications of treatment. We present the case of a patient with EDS type IV who previously had spontaneous dissection and multiple pseudoaneurysms of both the iliac and femoral arteries and the distal abdominal aorta. Several years later the patient developed a direct type A CCF which was successfully treated with endovascular embolization using a transvenous approach with detachable coils. The literature pertaining to CCF in EDS type IV and its treatment is reviewed. PMID:24385391

  10. Overall view of the Orbiter Servicing Structure within the Orbiter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overall view of the Orbiter Servicing Structure within the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. Can you see any hint of the Orbiter Discovery? It is in there. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  11. Intractable Posterior Epistaxis due to a Spontaneous Low-Flow Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula: A Case Report and a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Giotakis, A.; Kral, F.; Riechelmann, H.; Freund, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 90-year-old patient with intractable posterior epistaxis presenting as the only symptom of a nontraumatic low-flow carotid-cavernous sinus fistula. Purpose of this case report is to introduce low-flow carotid-cavernous sinus fistula in the differential diagnosis of intractable posterior epistaxis. We provide a literature review for the sequence of actions for the confrontation of posterior epistaxis. We also emphasize the significance of the radiological diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the management of posterior epistaxis due to pathology of the cavernous sinus. The gold-standard diagnostic procedure of carotid-cavernous sinus fistula is digital subtraction angiography (DSA). DSA with coils is also the state-of-the-art therapy. By failure of DSA, neurosurgery or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) may be used as alternatives. SRS may also be used as enhancement procedure of the DSA. Considering the prognosis of a successfully closed carotid-cavernous sinus fistula, recanalization occurs only in a minority of patients. Close follow-up is advised. PMID:26839726

  12. Comparison of relaxation responses of cavernous and trigonal smooth muscles from rabbits by alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists; prazosin, terazosin, doxazosin, and tamsulosin.

    PubMed

    Seo, K K; Lee, M Y; Lim, S W; Kim, S C

    1999-02-01

    Alpha1a-adrenergic receptor (AR) primarily mediates the contraction of the prostatic and cavernous smooth muscles. Among clinically available alpha1-AR antagonists for the medical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), tamsulosin has a modest selectivity for alpha1A- and alpha1D- over alpha1B-ARs. To compare the effects of various alpha1-AR antagonists on relaxation responses of cavernous and trigonal smooth muscles, isometric tension studies with relatively selective (tamsulosin) and non-selective (prazosin, doxazosin, and terazosin) alpha1A-AR antagonists, were conducted in the cavernous and trigonal muscle strips of rabbits (n=10 each). Tamsulosin had the strongest inhibitory effect on contraction of trigonal smooth muscle among the various alpha1-AR antagonists, and the inhibitory activities of prazosin, doxazosin, and terazosin were not statistically different. All alpha1-AR antagonists caused concentration-dependent relaxation of the cavernous muscle strips. Tamsulosin was shown to have greater potency than prazosin (more than 100-fold), doxazosin (more than 1000-fold), and terazosin (more than 1000-fold), in relaxation of cavernous smooth muscle. In conclusion, tamsulosin might be the most effective drug among the four commonly used alpha1-AR antagonists for the medical management of BPH. Tamsulosin might be a potential substitute for phentolamine in combination with vasoactive agents as an intracavernous injection therapy for patients with erectile dysfunction. PMID:10102527

  13. Mars Geoscience Orbiter and Lunar Geoscience Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuldner, W. V.; Kaskiewicz, P. F.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using the AE/DE Earth orbiting spacecraft design for the LGO and/or MGO missions was determined. Configurations were developed and subsystems analysis was carried out to optimize the suitability of the spacecraft to the missions. The primary conclusion is that the basic AE/DE spacecraft can readily be applied to the LGO mission with relatively minor, low risk modifications. The MGO mission poses a somewhat more complex problem, primarily due to the overall maneuvering hydrazine budget and power requirements of the sensors and their desired duty cycle. These considerations dictate a modification (scaling up) of the structure to support mission requirements.

  14. The orbits in cancer imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chong, V F H

    2006-01-01

    Primary malignant lesions in the orbit are relatively uncommon. However, the orbits are frequently involved in haematogeneous metastasis or by direct extension from malignancies originating from the adjacent nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses. This paper focuses on the more commonly encountered primary orbital malignancies and the mapping of tumour spread into the orbits. PMID:17114076

  15. Elliptical Orbit Performance Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myler, T.

    1984-01-01

    Elliptical Orbit Performance (ELOPE) computer program for analyzing orbital performance of space boosters uses orbit insertion data obtained from trajectory simulation to generate parametric data on apogee and perigee altitudes as function of payload data. Data used to generate presentation plots that display elliptical orbit performance capability of space booster.

  16. Orbital spacecraft resupply technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Tracey, T. R.; Bailey, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    The resupplying of orbital spacecraft using the Space Shuttle, Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle, Orbital Transfer Vehicle or a depot supply at a Space Station is studied. The governing factor in fluid resupply designs is the system size with respect to fluid resupply quantities. Spacecraft propellant management for tankage via diaphragm or surface tension configurations is examined. The capabilities, operation, and application of adiabatic ullage compression, ullage exchange, vent/fill/repressurize, and drain/vent/no-vent fill/repressurize, which are proposed transfer methods for spacecraft utilizing tankage configurations, are described. Selection of the appropriate resupply method is dependent on the spacecraft design features. Hydrazine adiabatic compression/detonation, liquid-free vapor venting to prevent freezing, and a method for no-vent liquid filling are analyzed. Various procedures for accurate measurements of propellant mass in low gravity are evaluated; a system of flowmeters with a PVT system was selected as the pressurant solubility and quantity gaging technique. Monopropellant and bipropellant orbital spacecraft consumable resupply system tanks which resupply 3000 lb of hydrazine and 7000 lb of MMH/NTO to spacecraft on orbit are presented.

  17. Orbital Fluid Resupply Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, Ralph N.

    1989-01-01

    Orbital fluid resupply can significantly increase the cost-effectiveness and operational flexibility of spacecraft, satellites, and orbiting platforms and observatories. Reusable tankers are currently being designed for transporting fluids to space. A number of options exist for transporting the fluids and propellant to the space-based user systems. The fluids can be transported to space either in the Shuttle cargo bay or using expendable launch vehicles (ELVs). Resupply can thus be accomplished either from the Shuttle bay, or the tanker can be removed from the Shuttle bay or launched on an ELV and attached to a carrier such as the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) or Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) for transport to the user to be serviced. A third option involves locating the tanker at the space station or an unmanned platform as a quasi-permanent servicing facility or depot which returns to the ground for recycling once its tanks are depleted. Current modular tanker designs for monopropellants, bipropellants, and water for space station propulsion are discussed. Superfluid helium tankers are addressed, including trade-offs in tanker sizes, shapes to fit the range of ELVs currently available, and boil-off losses associated with longer-term (greater than 6-month) space-basing. It is concluded that the mixed fleet approach to on-orbit consumables resupply offers significant advantages to the overall logistics requirements.

  18. Mars Telecommunications Orbiter, Artist's Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This illustration depicts a concept for NASA's Mars Telecommunications Orbiter in flight around Mars. The orbiter is in development to be the first spacecraft with a primary function of providing communication links while orbiting a foreign planet. The project's plans call for launch in September 2009, arrival at Mars in August 2010 and a mission of six to 10 years while in orbit. Mars Telecommunication Orbiter would serve as the Mars hub for an interplanetery Internet, greatly increasing the information payoff from other future Mars missions. The mission is designed to orbit Mars more than 10 times farther from the planet than orbiters dedicated primarily to science. The high-orbit design minimizes the time that Mars itself blocks the orbiter from communicating with Earth and maximizes the time that the orbiter is above the horizon -- thus capable of communications relay -- for rovers and stationary landers on Mars' surface.

  19. A cavernous hemangioma of the rectum treated as a hemorrhoid for 1 year prior to its diagnosis: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kishi, K; Takahashi, S; Sawata, T; Furumoto, T; Kawamura, Y; Kato, K

    1994-01-01

    We report herein the case of a 28-year-old woman with a rectal cavernous hemangioma in whom recurrent rectal bleeding and marked anemia were interpreted as being caused by her coexisting internal hemorrhoids, resulting in a delay in the correct diagnosis for 1 year. Digital examination revealed a walnut-sized, wide-based, and elastic soft mass, 3 cm proximal from the anal verge, in addition to the internal hemorrhoids. Colonofiberscopy revealed a bluish submucosal lesion with superficial capillary dilatation at the same site. A transanal local resection was performed and the histological diagnosis of the tumor was cavernous hemangioma. The patient has been well without any recurrence of rectal bleeding for 2 years and 6 months since her operation. Thus, although rectal cavernous hemangioma is rare, a lack of awareness of this condition could lead to misdiagnosis as hemorrhoids and subsequent inappropriate therapy. PMID:7865962

  20. Pre-existing caverns in salt formations could be the major cause of sinkhole hazards along the coast of the Dead Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legchenko, A.; Ezersky, M.; Boucher, M.; Camerlynck, C.; Al-Zoubi, A.; Chalikakis, K.

    2008-10-01

    Since 1990 hundreds of sinkholes have appeared along the coast of the Dead Sea. In the literature the rapid development of sinkholes is explained as a result of a drop in the level of the Dead Sea. This model assumes very fast dissolution of large volumes of salt and the creation of new caverns that cause sinkholes in 10 to 20 years. However, the results of our geophysical study do not confirm the fast dissolution assumption. To explain the available field observations, we propose the following model: (1) slow dissolution of salt (much longer than 20 years) with the creation of caverns without development of sinkholes; (2) sinkhole development is triggered by the lowering of the groundwater level because the rocks overlying the salt formation become unsaturated; (3) the time of sinkhole appearance is controlled by the mechanical properties of the rocks that overlie pre-existing caverns.

  1. Microsurgical resection of a cavernous angioma that involves the optic pathway using a pterional approach: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xi-Yan; Yu, Feng

    2012-12-01

    Cavernous angiomas affecting the optic pathway are rare. This report describes the case of a 12-year-old girl who presented with a 10-month history of right-sided blurred vision caused by a cavernous angioma affecting the right side of the optic chiasm. The computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated a hyperdense image with calcifications. T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a sellar mass with uneven isointensities and hyperintensities, while T2-weighted showing a heterogeneous signal, which was initially misdiagnosed as a craniopharyngioma. The patient underwent complete resection of the mass using a pterional approach, which rapidly decompresses and protects the optic nerve function, rather than conservative treatment or cranial irradiation. Postoperative histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of a cavernous angioma. PMID:22577850

  2. Ovarian Cavernous Hemangioma Presenting as a Large Growing Mass in a Postmenopausal Woman: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Suk; Han, Si Eun; Lee, Nam Kyung; Choi, Kyung Un; Joo, Jong Kil; Suh, Dong Soo; Kim, Heung Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian hemangiomas are usually of the cavernous type, and are rarely encountered. A 73-year-old woman presented with lower abdominal discomfort. Subsequent physical examination depicted a palpable mass in the lower abdomen. Abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) revealed a well-circumscribed mass with thin septa measuring 12.1 × 9.0 cm in the right ovary. Levels of the tumor markers cancer antigen (CA)-125 and CA 19-9 were within the normal range. At laparoscopy, the tumor was found to be confined to the right ovary and to have a smooth surface. The final histopathological result was ovarian cavernous hemangioma. Microscopically, the mass consisted of multiple, dilated, blood-filled vascular channels separated by loose connective tissue, and all were lined by a single layer of flattened endothelium. The authors present a case of ovarian cavernous hemangioma presenting as a large growing mass in a postmenopausal woman and review previously published literature. PMID:26793681

  3. Ovarian Cavernous Hemangioma Presenting as a Large Growing Mass in a Postmenopausal Woman: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Suk; Han, Si Eun; Lee, Nam Kyung; Choi, Kyung Un; Joo, Jong Kil; Suh, Dong Soo; Kim, Heung Yeol; Kim, Ki Hyung

    2015-12-01

    Ovarian hemangiomas are usually of the cavernous type, and are rarely encountered. A 73-year-old woman presented with lower abdominal discomfort. Subsequent physical examination depicted a palpable mass in the lower abdomen. Abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) revealed a well-circumscribed mass with thin septa measuring 12.1 × 9.0 cm in the right ovary. Levels of the tumor markers cancer antigen (CA)-125 and CA 19-9 were within the normal range. At laparoscopy, the tumor was found to be confined to the right ovary and to have a smooth surface. The final histopathological result was ovarian cavernous hemangioma. Microscopically, the mass consisted of multiple, dilated, blood-filled vascular channels separated by loose connective tissue, and all were lined by a single layer of flattened endothelium. The authors present a case of ovarian cavernous hemangioma presenting as a large growing mass in a postmenopausal woman and review previously published literature. PMID:26793681

  4. Cavernous hemangioma of the internal auditory canal encasing the VII and VIII cranial nerve complex: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mastronardi, Luciano; Carpineta, Ettore; Cacciotti, Guglielmo; Di Scipio, Ettore; Roperto, Raffaelino

    2016-04-01

    Cavernous angiomas originating in the internal auditory canal are very rare. In the available literature, only 65 cases of cavernomas in this location have been previously reported. We describe the case of a 22-year-old woman surgically treated for a cavernous hemangioma in the left internal auditory canal, mimicking on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging MRI an acoustic neuroma. Neurological symptoms were hypoacusia and dizziness. The cavernous angioma encased the seventh and, partially, the eighth cranial nerve complex. A "nearly total" removal was performed, leaving a thin residual of malformation adherent to the facial nerve. Postoperative period was uneventful; hearing was unchanged, but the patient had a moderate inferior left facial palsy (House-Brackmann grade II) slightly improved during the following weeks. On the basis of the observation of this uncommon case, we propose a revision of the literature and discuss clinical features, differential diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:26876892

  5. Three important components in the regeneration of the cavernous nerve: brain-derived neurotrophic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and the JAK/STAT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Yang; Jin, Xun-Bo; Lue, Tom F

    2011-03-01

    Retroperitoneal operations, such as radical prostatectomy, often damage the cavernous nerve, resulting in a high incidence of erectile dysfunction. Although improved nerve-sparing techniques have reduced the incidence of nerve injury, and the administration of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors has revolutionized the treatment of erectile dysfunction, this problem remains a considerable challenge. In recent years, scientists have focused on brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in the treatment of cavernous nerve injury in rat models. Results showed that both compounds were capable of enhancing the regeneration of the cavernous nerve and that activation of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway played a major role in the process. PMID:21170078

  6. Spin-Orbit Caloritronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchon, Aurelien; Ndiaye, Papa Birame; Moon, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2014-03-01

    Utilizing spin-orbit coupling to enable the electrical manipulation of ferromagnets has recently attracted a considerable amount of interest. This spin-orbit torque appears in magnetic systems displaying inversion symmetry breaking. Another adjacent emerging topic, spin caloritronics, aims at exploiting magnonic spin currents driven by temperature gradients, allowing for the transmission of information and the control of magnetic domain walls. In this work, we demonstrate that a magnon flow generates torques on the local magnetization when subjected to Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) just as an electron flow generates torques when submitted to Rashba interaction. A direct consequence is the capability to control the magnetization direction of a homogeneous ferromagnet by applying a temperature gradient or local RF excitations. Merging the spin-orbit torques with spin caloritronics is rendered possible by the emergence of DMI in magnetic materials and opens promising avenues in the development of chargeless information technology.

  7. Deceleration Orbit Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Church, M.

    1991-04-26

    During the accelerator studies period of 12/90-1/91 much study time was dedicated to improving the E760 deceleration ramps. 4 general goals were in mind: (1) Reduce the relative orbit deviations from the nominal reference orbit as much as possible. This reduces the potential error in the orbit length calculation - which is the primary source of error in the beam energy calculation. (2) Maximize the transverse apertures. This minimizes beam loss during deceleration and during accidental beam blow-ups. (3) Measure and correct lattice parameters. Knowledge of {gamma}{sub T}, {eta}, Q{sub h}, Q{sub v}, and the dispersion in the straight sections allows for a more accurate energy calculation and reliable SYNCH calculations. (4) Minimize the coupling. This allows one to discern between horizontal and vertical tunes.

  8. Orbital Superstructures in Spinels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomskii, Daniel

    2006-03-01

    Orbital degrees of freedom often lead to specific types of orbital and spin ordering. Complicated and interesting superstructures are observed in B-sublattice of spinels. This is connected with the geometric frustration of this lattice and with the interconnection of edge-sharing MO6 octahedra, which is especially important for transition metals with partially-filled t2g levels. In some such systems (MgTi2O4, CuIr2S4, AlV2O4) there appears strange superstructures with the formation of spin gap states. In other cases (ZnV2O4) structural transitions, apparently connected with orbital ordering, are followed by long-range magnetic ordering. Last but not least, the famous Verwey transition in magnetite Fe3O4 leads to a very complicated structural pattern, accompanied by the appearance of ferroelectricity. In this talk I will discuss all these examples, paying main attention to an interplay of charge, spin and orbital degrees of freedom. In particular, for MgTi2O4, and CuIr2S4 we proposed the picture of orbitally-driven Peierls state [1]. Similar phenomenon can also explain situation in ZnV2O4 [2], although the corresponding superstructure has not yet been observed experimentally. Finally, I propose the model of charge and orbital ordering in magnetite [3], which uses the idea of an interplay of site- and bond-centered ordering [4] and which seems to explain both the structural data and the presence of ferroelectricity in Fe3O4 below Verwey transition. [1] D.I.Khomskii and T.Mizokawa, Phys.Rev.Lett. 94, 156402 (2005); [2] Hua Wu, T.Mizokawa and D.I.Khomskii, unpublished; [3] D.I.Khomskii, unpublished; [4] D.V.Efremov, J.van den Brink and D.I.Khomskii, Nature Mater. 3, 853 (2004)

  9. Spiral Orbit Tribometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Stephen V.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Kingsbury, Edward; Jansen, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    The spiral orbit tribometer (SOT) bridges the gap between full-scale life testing and typically unrealistic accelerated life testing of ball-bearing lubricants in conjunction with bearing ball and race materials. The SOT operates under realistic conditions and quickly produces results, thereby providing information that can guide the selection of lubricant, ball, and race materials early in a design process. The SOT is based upon a simplified, retainerless thrust bearing comprising one ball between flat races (see figure). The SOT measures lubricant consumption and degradation rates and friction coefficients in boundary lubricated rolling and pivoting contacts. The ball is pressed between the lower and upper races with a controlled force and the lower plate is rotated. The combination of load and rotation causes the ball to move in a nearly circular orbit that is, more precisely, an opening spiral. The spiral s pitch is directly related to the friction coefficient. At the end of the orbit, the ball contacts the guide plate, restoring the orbit to its original radius. The orbit is repeatable throughout the entire test. A force transducer, mounted in-line with the guide plate, measures the force between the ball and the guide plate, which directly relates to the friction coefficient. The SOT, shown in the figure, can operate in under ultra-high vacuum (10(exp -9) Torr) or in a variety of gases at atmospheric pressure. The load force can be adjusted between 45 and 450 N. By varying the load force and ball diameter, mean Hertzian stresses between 0.5 and 5.0 GPa can be obtained. The ball s orbital speed range is between 1 and 100 rpm.

  10. Orbital metastases in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Magliozzi, Patrizio; Strianese, Diego; Bonavolontà, Paola; Ferrara, Mariantonia; Ruggiero, Pasquale; Carandente, Raffaella; Bonavolontà, Giulio; Tranfa, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    AIM To describe a series of Italian patients with orbital metastasis focusing on the outcomes in relation to the different primary site of malignancy. METHODS Retrospective chart review of 93 patients with orbital metastasis collected in a tertiary referral centre in a period of 38y and review of literature. RESULTS Out of 93 patients, 52 were females and 41 were males. Median age at diagnosis was 51y (range 1 to 88y). The patients have been divided into four groups on the basis of the year of diagnosis. The frequency of recorded cases had decreased significantly (P<0.05) during the last 9.5y. Primary tumor site was breast in 36 cases (39%), kidney in 10 (11%), lung in 8 (9%), skin in 6 (6%); other sites were less frequent. In 16 case (17%) the primary tumor remained unknown. The most frequent clinical findings were proptosis (73%), limited ocular motility (55%), blepharoptosis (46%) and blurred vision (43%). The diagnosis were established by history, ocular and systemic evaluation, orbital imaging studies and open biopsy or fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB). Treatment included surgical excision, irradiation, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, or observation. Ninety-one percent of patients died of metastasis with an overall mean survival time (OMST) after the orbital diagnosis of 13.5mo. CONCLUSION Breast, kidney and lung are the most frequent primary sites of cancer leading to an orbital metastasis. When the primary site is unknown, gastrointestinal tract should be carefully investigated. In the last decade a decrease in the frequency of orbital metastasis has been observed. Surgery provides a local palliation. Prognosis remains poor with a OMST of 13.5mo ranging from the 3mo in the lung cancer to 24mo in the kidney tumor. PMID:26558220

  11. Satellite orbit predictor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Morton l.; Garrett, James, Major

    An analog aid to determine satellite coverage of Emergency Locator Transmitters Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (ELT/EPIRB) distress incidence is discussed. The satellite orbit predictor is a graphical aid for determining the relationship between the satellite orbit, antenna coverage of the spacecraft and coverage of the Local User Terminal. The predictor allows the user to quickly visualize if a selected position will probably be detected and is composed of a base map and a satellite track overlay for each satellite.A table of equator crossings for each satellite is included.

  12. Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuber, Maria T.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to support the rebuild and implementation of the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) investigation and to perform scientific analysis of current Mars data relevant to the investigation. The instrument is part of the payload of the NASA Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission. The instrument is a rebuild of the Mars Observer Laser Altimeter that was originally flown on the ill-fated Mars Observer mission. The instrument is currently in orbit around Mars and has so far returned remarkable data.

  13. Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.; Kim, H. -M.; Ryu, D. -W.; Synn, J. -H.; Song, W. -K.

    2012-02-01

    We applied coupled nonisothermal, multiphase fluid flow and geomechanical numerical modeling to study the coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in concrete-lined rock caverns. The paper focuses on CAES in lined caverns at relatively shallow depth (e.g., 100 m depth) in which a typical CAES operational pressure of 5 to 8 MPa is significantly higher than both ambient fluid pressure and in situ stress. We simulated a storage operation that included cyclic compression and decompression of air in the cavern, and investigated how pressure, temperature and stress evolve over several months of operation. We analyzed two different lining options, both with a 50 cm thick low permeability concrete lining, but in one case with an internal synthetic seal such as steel or rubber. For our simulated CAES system, the thermodynamic analysis showed that 96.7% of the energy injected during compression could be recovered during subsequent decompression, while 3.3% of the energy was lost by heat conduction to the surrounding media. Our geomechanical analysis showed that tensile effective stresses as high as 8 MPa could develop in the lining as a result of the air pressure exerted on the inner surface of the lining, whereas thermal stresses were relatively smaller and compressive. With the option of an internal synthetic seal, the maximum effective tensile stress was reduced from 8 to 5 MPa, but was still in substantial tension. We performed one simulation in which the tensile tangential stresses resulted in radial cracks and air leakage though the lining. This air leakage, however, was minor (about 0.16% of the air mass loss from one daily compression) in terms of CAES operational efficiency, and did not significantly impact the overall energy balance of the system. However, despite being minor in terms of energy balance, the air leakage resulted in a distinct pressure increase in the surrounding rock that could be

  14. SU-E-I-91: Quantitative Assessment of Early Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Cavernous Hemangioma of Live Using In-Line Phase-Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the potential utility of in-line phase-contrast imaging (ILPCI) technique with synchrotron radiation in detecting early hepatocellular carcinoma and cavernous hemangioma of live using in vitro model system. Methods: Without contrast agents, three typical early hepatocellular carcinoma specimens and three typical cavernous hemangioma of live specimens were imaged using ILPCI. To quantitatively discriminate early hepatocellular carcinoma tissues and cavernous hemangioma tissues, the projection images texture feature based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) were extracted. The texture parameters of energy, inertia, entropy, correlation, sum average, sum entropy, difference average, difference entropy and inverse difference moment, were obtained respectively. Results: In the ILPCI planar images of early hepatocellular carcinoma specimens, vessel trees were clearly visualized on the micrometer scale. Obvious distortion deformation was presented, and the vessel mostly appeared as a ‘dry stick’. Liver textures appeared not regularly. In the ILPCI planar images of cavernous hemangioma of live specimens, typical vessels had not been found compared with the early hepatocellular carcinoma planar images. The planar images of cavernous hemangioma of live specimens clearly displayed the dilated hepatic sinusoids with the diameter of less than 100 microns, but all of them were overlapped with each other. The texture parameters of energy, inertia, entropy, correlation, sum average, sum entropy, and difference average, showed a statistically significant between the two types specimens image (P<0.01), except the texture parameters of difference entropy and inverse difference moment(P>0.01). Conclusion: The results indicate that there are obvious changes in morphological levels including vessel structures and liver textures. The study proves that this imaging technique has a potential value in evaluating early hepatocellular carcinoma and cavernous

  15. Oil content of sediments in the sump of a salt dome solution-mined cavern used for crude oil storage. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Niederhoff, P.; Giles, H.N.

    1981-09-01

    The studies reported herein were conducted to ascertain if petroleum hydrocarbons are likely to accumulate in the sump sediments of a salt dome solution cavern used for crude oil storage and, if so, which hydrocarbons and in what concentrations. Cavern K 117 at Etzel, West Germany was selected for sampling because considerable data were available pertaining to the cavern and its crude oil inventory as a result of earlier studies. Mineralogical analyses of the sump samples revealed that they predominantly consist of uncemented halite crystals, ranging up to several centimeters in length, with subordinate anhydrite, and traces of gypsum and clay. Some of the mineral particles are colorless and translucent, while others are noticeably contaminated with oil. The samples exuded a distinct petroleum odor. Gas chromatographic analysis of an evolved gas sample showed the presence of the normal-paraffins propane through octane. Gas chromatographic analyses of a solvent extract of the sediment showed hydrocarbon and sulfur-compound distributions typical of crude oil. An infrared spectrum of the extract was also characteristic of a weathered or topped crude oil. The hydrocarbon content of the sediment samples was determined to be 780 ppM on the basis of a tetrachloromethane extract. It is believed that the petroleum present in the sump sediments principally results from cavern workover operations involving the pulling and resetting of the brine tubing string. When the brine string is reset it fills with oil because a packer is not used. To displace this oil, river water is pumped down the tubing at a moderately high rate. During this flushing process, clay particles dispersed in the river water adsorb a film of oil. As the oil-filmed clay particles enter the brine in the cavern they electrolytically flocculate and oil is sedimented to the cavern sump.

  16. An Analytical Solution for Mechanical Responses Induced by Temperature and Air Pressure in a Lined Rock Cavern for Underground Compressed Air Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shu-Wei; Xia, Cai-Chu; Du, Shi-Gui; Zhang, Ping-Yang; Zhou, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Mechanical responses induced by temperature and air pressure significantly affect the stability and durability of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in a lined rock cavern. An analytical solution for evaluating such responses is, thus, proposed in this paper. The lined cavern of interest consists of three layers, namely, a sealing layer, a concrete lining and the host rock. Governing equations for cavern temperature and air pressure, which involve heat transfer between the air and surrounding layers, are established first. Then, Laplace transform and superposition principle are applied to obtain the temperature around the lined cavern and the air pressure during the operational period. Afterwards, a thermo-elastic axisymmetrical model is used to analytically determine the stress and displacement variations induced by temperature and air pressure. The developments of temperature, displacement and stress during a typical operational cycle are discussed on the basis of the proposed approach. The approach is subsequently verified with a coupled compressed air and thermo-mechanical numerical simulation and by a previous study on temperature. Finally, the influence of temperature on total stress and displacement and the impact of the heat transfer coefficient are discussed. This paper shows that the temperature sharply fluctuates only on the sealing layer and the concrete lining. The resulting tensile hoop stresses on the sealing layer and concrete lining are considerably large in comparison with the initial air pressure. Moreover, temperature has a non-negligible effect on the lined cavern for underground compressed air storage. Meanwhile, temperature has a greater effect on hoop and longitudinal stress than on radial stress and displacement. In addition, the heat transfer coefficient affects the cavern stress to a higher degree than the displacement.

  17. Direct traumatic carotid cavernous fistula: angiographic classification and treatment strategies. Study of 172 cases.

    PubMed

    Chi, Cuong Tran; Nguyen, Dang; Duc, Vo Tan; Chau, Huynh Hong; Son, Vo Tan

    2014-01-01

    We report our experience in treatment of traumatic direct carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) via endovascular intervention. We hereof recommend an additional classification system for type A CCF and suggest respective treatment strategies. Only type A CCF patients (Barrow's classification) would be recruited for the study. Based on the angiographic characteristics of the CCF, we classified type A CCF into three subtypes including small size, medium size and large size fistula depending on whether there was presence of the anterior carotid artery (ACA) and/or middle carotid artery (MCA). Angiograms with opacification of both ACA and MCA were categorized as small size fistula. Angiograms with opacification of either ACA or MCA were categorized as medium size fistula and those without opacification of neither ACA nor MCA were classified as large size fiatula. After the confirm angiogram, endovascular embolization would be performed impromptu using detachable balloon, coils or both. All cases were followed up for complication and effect after the embolization. A total of 172 direct traumatic CCF patients were enrolled. The small size fistula was accountant for 12.8% (22 cases), medium size 35.5% (61 cases) and large size fistula accountant for 51.7% (89 cases). The successful rate of fistula occlusion under endovascular embolization was 94% with preservation of the carotid artery in 70%. For the treatment of each subtype, a total of 21/22 cases of the small size fistulas were successfully treated using coils alone. The other single case of small fistula was defaulted. Most of the medium and large size fistulas were cured using detachable balloons. When the fistula sealing could not be obtained using detachable balloon, coils were added to affirm the embolization of the cavernous sinus via venous access. There were about 2.9% of patient experienced direct carotid artery puncture and 0.6% puncture after carotid artery cut-down exposure. About 30% of cases experienced

  18. Pure spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma: A case series of seven cases

    PubMed Central

    Esene, Ignatius Ngene; Ashour, Ahmed M; Marvin, Eric; Nosseir, Mohamed; Fayed, Zeiad Y; Seoud, Khaled; El Bahy, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pure spinal epidural cavernous hemangiomas (PSECHs) are rare vascular lesions with about 100 cases reported. Herein, we present a case series of 7 PSECHs discussing their clinical presentation, radiological characteristics, surgical technique and intraoperative findings, pathological features, and functional outcome. Materials and Methods: We retrieved from the retrolective databases of the senior authors, patients with pathologically confirmed PSECH operated between January 2002 and November 2015. From their medical records, the patients’ sociodemographic, clinical, radiological, surgical, and histopathological data were retrieved and analyzed. Results: The mean age of the seven cases was 50.3 years. Four were females. All the five cases (71.4%) in the thoracic spine had myelopathy and the 2 (28.6%) lumbar cases had sciatica. Local pain was present in all the cases. All the lesions were isointense on T1-weighted images, hyperintense on T2-weighted images, and in five cases there was strong homogeneous enhancement. In six cases (85.7%), classical laminectomy was done; lesions resected in one piece in five cases. Total excision was achieved in all the cases. Lesions were thin-walled dilated blood vessels, lined with endothelium, and engorged with blood and with scanty loose fibrous stroma. The median follow-up was 12 months (range: 1–144 months). All patients gradually improved neurologically and achieved a good outcome with no recurrence at the last follow-up. Conclusion: PSECH although rare is increasing reported and ought to be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural lesions. Early surgical treatment with total resection is recommended as would result in a good prognosis.

  19. Morphological Characteristics of the Sphenoid Sinus and Endoscopic Localization of the Cavernous Sinus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Youxiong; Zhan, Guowen; Liao, Jianchun; Dang, Ruishan; Wang, Hongli; Li, Yang; Zhang, Xiaote

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the morphological characteristics of the sphenoid sinus and endoscopic localization of the cavernous sinus (CS) using an extended endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach. Thirty sides of CS in 15 adult cadaver heads were dissected to simulate the extended endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach, and the morphology of the sphenoid sinus and anatomic structures of CS were observed. The opticocarotid recess (OCR), ophthalmomaxillary recess (V1V2R), and maxillomandibular recess (V2V3R) in the lateral wall of the sphenoid sinus were presented in 16 sides (53.3%), 6 sides (20%), and 4 sides (13.3%) of the 30 sides, respectively. OCR is a constant anatomic landmark in endoscopy and coincides with the anterior portion of the clinoidal triangle. The C-shaped internal carotid artery (ICA) in the lateral wall of the sphenoid sinus was presented in 11 sides (36.7%), the upper one-third of which corresponds to the middle portion of the clinoidal triangle, and the lower two-thirds of which correlates to the supratrochlear triangle, infratrochlear triangle, and ophthalmic nerve in CS, around which the medial, lateral, and anteroinferior interspaces are distributed. From a front-to-behind perspective, the C-shaped ICA consists of inferior horizontal segment, anterior vertical segment, clinoidal segment as well as partial subarachnoid segment of the ICA. OCR and C-shaped ICA in the lateral wall of the sphenoid sinus are the 2 reliable anatomic landmarks in the intraoperative location of the parasellar region of CS. PMID:26221856

  20. Microsurgical resectability, outcomes, and tumor control in meningiomas occupying the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Anil; Thakur, Jai Deep; Sonig, Ashish; Missios, Symeon

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Cavernous sinus meningiomas (CSMs) represent a cohort of challenging skull base tumors. Proper management requires achieving a balance between optimal resection, restoration of cranial nerve (CN) function, and maintaining or improving quality of life. The objective of this study was to assess the pre-, intra-, and postoperative factors related to clinical and neurological outcomes, morbidity, mortality, and tumor control in patients with CSM. METHODS A retrospective review of a single surgeon's experience with microsurgical removal of CSM in 65 patients between January 1996 and August 2013 was done. Sekhar's classification, modified Kobayashi grading, and the Karnofsky Performance Scale were used to define tumor extension, tumor removal, and clinical outcomes, respectively. RESULTS Preoperative CN dysfunction was evident in 64.6% of patients. CN II deficits were most common. The greatest improvement was seen for CN V deficits, whereas CN II and CN IV deficits showed the smallest degree of recovery. Complete resection was achieved in 41.5% of cases and was not significantly associated with functional CN recovery. Internal carotid artery encasement significantly limited the complete microscopic resection of CSM (p < 0.0001). Overall, 18.5% of patients showed symptomatic recurrence after their initial surgery (mean follow-up 60.8 months [range 3-199 months]). The use of adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) after microsurgery independently decreased the recurrence rate (p = 0.009; OR 0.036; 95% CI 0.003-0.430). CONCLUSIONS Modified Kobayashi tumor resection (Grades I-IIIB) was possible in 41.5% of patients. CN recovery and tumor control were independent of extent of tumor removal. The combination of resection and adjuvant SRS can achieve excellent tumor control. Furthermore, the use of adjuvant SRS independently decreases the recurrence rates of CSM. PMID:26745483