Science.gov

Sample records for intracranial vascular malformations

  1. Megadolicho vascular malformation of the intracranial arteries.

    PubMed

    Lodder, J; Janevski, B; van der Lugt, P J

    1981-01-01

    A patient is presented suffering a hemiparesis. Megadolicho-vascular malformation of the intracranial part of the internal carotid arteries and some of its branches and of the basilar artery was suggested by CT and confirmed by angiography. The value of CT compared with angiography in relation to intracranial megadolicho vascular malformations is discussed. PMID:6273040

  2. Intracranial vascular malformations: MR and CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kucharczyk, W.; Lemme-Pleghos, L.; Uske, A.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Dooms, G.; Norman, D.

    1985-08-01

    Twenty-four patients with 29 cerebrovascular malformations were evaluated with a combination of computed tomography (CT), angiography, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Characteristics of the malformations on MR images were reviewed retrospectively, and a comparative evaluation of MR and CT images was made. Of 14 angiographically evident malformations, 13 intra-axial lesions were detected on both CT and MR images, and one dural malformation gave false-negative results on both modalities. The appearance of parenchymal lesions on MR images closely mirrored characteristic CT findings. Angiographically evident malformations have a highly characteristic appearance on MR images. MR may be more sensitive than CT in the detection of small hemorrhagic foci associated with cryptic arteriovenous malformations and may add specificity in the diagnosis of occult malformations in some cases, but MR is less sensitive than CT for the detection of small calcified malformations.

  3. Clinical results of stereotactic heavy-charged-particle radiosurgery for intracranial angiographically occult vascular malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Phillips, M.H.; Frankel, K.A.; Steinberg, G.K.; Marks, M.P.; DeLaPaz, R.L.; Chuang, F.Y.S.; Lyman, J.T.

    1989-12-01

    Angiographically occult vascular malformations (AOVMs) of the brain have been recognized for many years to cause neurologic morbidity and mortality. They generally become symptomatic due to intracranial hemorrhage, focal mass effect, seizures or headaches. The true incidence of AOVMs is unknown, but autopsy studies suggest that they are more common than high-flow angiographically demonstrable arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). We have developed stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery for the treatment of inoperable intracranial vascular malformations, using the helium ion beams at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 184-inch Synchrocyclotron and Bevatron. This report describes the protocol for patient selection, radiosurgical treatment planning method, clinical and neuroradiologic results and complications encountered, and discusses the strengths and limitations of the method. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Angiographically occult vascular malformation of the intracranial accessory nerve: case report.

    PubMed

    Terterov, Sergei; McLaughlin, Nancy; Vinters, Harry; Martin, Neil A

    2016-07-01

    Angiographically occult cerebral vascular malformations (AOVMs) are usually found in the supratentorial brain parenchyma. Uncommonly, AOVMs can be found within the cavernous sinus or basal cisterns and can be associated with cranial nerves. AOVMs involving the intracranial segment of the spinal accessory nerve have not been described. A 46-year-old female patient presented with a history of episodic frontal headaches and episodes of nausea and dizziness, as well as gait instability progressing over 6 months prior to evaluation. Imaging revealed a well-circumscribed 3-cm extraaxial T1-weighted isointense and T2-weighted hyperintense contrast-enhancing mass centered in the region of the right lateral cerebellomedullary cistern. The patient underwent resection of the lesion. Although the intraoperative appearance was suggestive of a cavernous malformation, some histological findings were atypical, leading to the final diagnosis of vascular malformation, not otherwise specified. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful with complete resolution of symptoms. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of an AOVM involving the intracranial portion of the accessory nerve. For any AOVM located within the cerebellomedullary cistern or one suspected of involving a cranial nerve, the authors recommend including immunohistochemistry with primary antibody to neurofilament in the histopathology workup. PMID:26566204

  5. Intracranial vascular malformations: imaging of charged-particle radiosurgery. Part II. Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, M.P.; Delapaz, R.L.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Levy, R.P.; Enzmann, D.R.

    1988-08-01

    Seven of 24 patients with intracranial vascular malformations who were treated with helium-ion Bragg-peak radiosurgery had complications of therapy. New symptoms and corresponding radiologic abnormalities developed 4-28 months after therapy. Five patients had similar patterns of white matter changes and mass effect on computed tomographic scans and magnetic resonance images. The abnormalities were centered in the radiation field. Gray matter changes and abnormal enhancement in the thalamus and hypothalamus outside the radiation field developed in one patient. This patient also had vasculopathic changes on angiograms. Rapidly progressive large vessel vasculopathy developed in another patient and caused occlusion of major vessels. Thus, different mechanisms may be involved in the complications of heavy-ion radiosurgery.

  6. Fluctuating nature of an orbital venous-lymphatic anomaly in association with intracranial vascular malformations: a classical presentation.

    PubMed

    Kanagalingam, Sivashakthi; Wyse, Emily; Merbs, Shannath L; Pearl, Monica Smith

    2015-01-01

    Venous-lymphatic anomalies (VLA) are rare and benign congenital lesions of the lymphatic system, composed of endothelial-lined lymphatic cysts. They are most frequently located in the region of the head and neck, and represent 4% of all orbital masses. In those patients with extensive orbital VLAs, a strong association with intracranial vascular anomalies has been reported. Factors known to suddenly increase the size of these lesions include upper respiratory tract infections or intralesional haemorrhage; however, complete spontaneous regression is rare. We report on the classic presentation of a patient with a fluctuating right orbital VLA in association with an intracranial cavernous malformation and intracranial developmental venous anomaly. PMID:26438679

  7. Pulmonary vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Liechty, Kenneth W; Flake, Alan W

    2008-02-01

    Pulmonary vascular malformations have historically been diagnosed in a wide range of age groups, but the extensive use of prenatal imaging studies has resulted in the majority of lesions being diagnosed in utero. Among this group of lesions, bronchopulmonary sequestrations (BPS), hybrid lesions with both congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) and BPS, aberrant systemic vascular anastomoses, and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM), are the most common. The biologic behavior of these lesions and the subsequent therapy is, in large part, determined by the age of the patient at diagnosis. In the fetus, large BPS or hybrid lesions can result in fetal hydrops and in utero fetal demise. In the perinatal period, pulmonary hypoplasia from the mass effect or air trapping within the cystic component of hybrid lesions can result in life-threatening respiratory distress. In the postnatal period, communication of the lesion with the aero-digestive system can result in recurrent pneumonia. Alternatively, increased pulmonary blood flow from the systemic arterial supply can result in hemorrhage, hemoptysis, or high output cardiac failure. In addition, there have been several reports of malignant degeneration. Finally, the broad spectrum encompassed by these lesions makes classification and subsequent communication of the lesions confusing and difficult. This paper will review the components of these lesions, their associated anomalies, the diagnosis and natural history, and finally, current concepts in the management of pulmonary vascular malformations. PMID:18158137

  8. Intracranial Vascular Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... most commonly used in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Mechanical retrievers/aspiration systems: used to remove clots ... passageway between an artery and a vein. intracranial aneurysms, a ballooning out of the wall of an ...

  9. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Solveig L; Hook, Kristen P

    2016-03-01

    This review provides a clinically-oriented summary of the most commonly encountered overgrowth syndromes associated with vascular malformations. This manuscript will outline morphologic features, clinical evaluation and management of this complex group of patients. Recent genetic advances have aided in classification and help to explain overlapping clinical features in many cases. PMID:27607325

  10. [Intracranial arteriovenous malformations in pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Perquin, D A; Kloet, A; Tans, J T; Witte, G N; Dörr, P J

    1999-03-01

    Three women, aged 27, 32 and 30 years, respectively, suffered from headache, nausea and neurological abnormalities and were found to have an intracranial arteriovenous malformation (AVM). One of them after diagnosis had two pregnancies, both ended by caesarean section with good results. Another woman was 32 weeks pregnant when the AVM manifested itself with a haemorrhage; she recovered well and was delivered by caesarean section. After the AVM proved radiologically to have been obliterated, she delivered after her subsequent pregnancy by the vaginal route with vacuum extraction. The third woman was 15 weeks pregnant when major abnormalities developed. There was a large intracerebral haematoma with break-through to the ventricular system; this patient died. Intracranial haemorrhage during pregnancy is rate. It can result in maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. It appears that pregnancy does not increase the rate of first cerebral haemorrhage from an AVM. The management of AVM rupture during pregnancy should be based primarily on neurosurgical rather than on obstetric considerations. Close collaboration with a team of neurologists, neurosurgeons, obstetricians and anaesthesiologists is mandatory. PMID:10321255

  11. Vascular Integrity in the Pathogenesis of Brain Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Zhu, Wan

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) is an important cause of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), particularly in the young population. ICH is the first clinical symptom in about 50 % of bAVM patients. The vessels in bAVM are fragile and prone to rupture, causing bleeding into the brain. About 30 % of unruptured and non-hemorrhagic bAVMs demonstrate microscopic evidence of hemosiderin in the vascular wall. In bAVM mouse models, vascular mural cell coverage is reduced in the AVM lesion, accompanied by vascular leakage and microhemorrhage. In this review, we discuss possible signaling pathways involved in abnormal vascular development in bAVM. PMID:26463919

  12. Cryptic vascular malformations involving the brainstem

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, A.; Enzmann, D.

    1983-01-01

    Six patients with angiographically cryptic vascular malformations involving the brainstem were examined with computed tomography (CT). The clinical and CT findings of cryptic vascular malformations of the brainstem are described and distinguished from those of brainstem glioma and multiple sclerosis. Calcification within a brainstem lesion that displays relatively little mass effect and shows little contrast enhancement, particularly when associated with a long history of waxing and waning brainstem symptoms, should suggest a vascular malformation.

  13. Vascular Malformations: Approach by an Interventional Radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Pimpalwar, Sheena

    2014-01-01

    Children with vascular malformations are best managed with a multidisciplinary team of specialists. Interventional radiology may deliver primary treatment such as staged sclerotherapy and embolization for malformations that are poor candidates for primary surgical resection or play a supportive role such as preoperative or intraoperative embolization. A thorough understanding of vascular morphology and flow dynamics is imperative to choosing the best treatment tool and technique. In this review, the author discusses the selection of techniques and tools used to treat vascular malformations based on their angiographic morphology. PMID:25045335

  14. [Dynamic MRA in the evaluation of intracranial vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Gauvrit, J Y; Oppenheim, C; Savage, J; Nataf, F; Reyns, N; Pruvo, J P; Meder, J F; Leclerc, X

    2005-01-01

    Conventional catheter angiography (CCA) remains the gold standard for the evaluation of most intracranial vascular malformations. MRA techniques such as Time of Flight, Phase Contrast or 3D contrast-enhanced MRA, provide anatomic evaluation but without hemodynamic information. Recently developed, dynamic MRA is based on dynamic acquisition of images and image subtraction; these two principal characteristics produce images comparable to those obtained by CCA. The purpose of this review is to explain the principles, advantages and drawbacks of this technique in the evaluation of arteriovenous malformations, arteriovenous fistulas, aneurysms and venous thrombosis. PMID:15798609

  15. Clinical-radiological evaluation of sequelae of stereotactic radiosurgery for intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Steinberg, G.K.; Marks, M.P.; DeLaPaz, R.L.; Chuang, F.Y.S.

    1989-12-01

    Stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery has been used to treat 322 patients with surgically-inaccessible intracranial vascular malformations. (The clinical results of this method for the treatment of angiographically demonstrable arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and angiographically occult vascular malformations (AOVMs) of the brain are described in separate reports of this symposium). The great majority of patients have had an uneventful post-treatment course with satisfactory health outcomes. However, several categories of delayed sequelae of stereotactic radiosurgery have been identified, involving the vascular structures essential for the integrity of the brain tissue and the brain parenchyma directly. These categories reflect both reaction to injury and to alterations in regional hemodynamic status, and include vasogenic edema, occlusion of functional vasculature, radiation necrosis, and local or remote effects on cerebral arterial aneurysms. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Stereotactic proton beam therapy for intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Vernimmen, Frederik J.A.I. . E-mail: fv@sun.ac.za; Slabbert, Jacobus P.; Wilson, Jennifer A.; Fredericks, Shaheeda

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate hypofractionated stereotactic proton therapy of predominantly large intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) by analyzing retrospectively the results from a cohort of patients. Methods and Materials: Since 1993, a total of 85 patients with vascular lesions have been treated. Of those, 64 patients fulfilled the criteria of having an arteriovenous malformation and sufficient follow-up. The AVMs were grouped by volume: <14 cc (26 patients) and {>=}14 cc (38 patients). Treatment was delivered with a fixed horizontal 200 MeV proton beam under stereotactic conditions, using a stereophotogrammetric positioning system. The majority of patients were hypofractionated (2 or 3 fractions), and the proton doses are presented as single-fraction equivalent cobalt Gray equivalent doses (SFEcGyE). The overall mean minimum target volume dose was 17.37 SFEcGyE, ranging from 10.38-22.05 SFEcGyE. Results: Analysis by volume group showed obliteration in 67% for volumes <14 cc and 43% for volumes {>=}14 cc. Grade IV acute complications were observed in 3% of patients. Transient delayed effects were seen in 15 patients (23%), becoming permanent in 3 patients. One patient also developed a cyst 8 years after therapy. Conclusions: Stereotactic proton beam therapy applied in a hypofractionated schedule allows for the safe treatment of large AVMs, with acceptable results. It is an alternative to other treatment strategies for large AVMs. AVMs are likely not static entities, but probably undergo vascular remodeling. Factors influencing angiogenesis could play a new role in a form of adjuvant therapy to improve on the radiosurgical results.

  17. Lymphangiosarcoma complicating extensive congenital mixed vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Al Dhaybi, Rola; Agoumi, Mehdi; Powell, Julie; Dubois, Josée; Kokta, Victor

    2010-09-01

    Pediatric hepatic angiosarcoma is a very rare malignant vascular tumor. A few cases have shown pediatric hepatic angiosarcoma occurring on a background of preexisting vascular lesions. We report the case of a newborn girl who presented extensive limbs and upper trunk cutaneous mixed vascular malformations at birth. These malformations were associated with thrombocytopenia. Cutaneous biopsies revealed complex vascular malformations with a significant lymphatic component. Compressive body suit therapy led to regression of the limbs' cutaneous vascular malformations. At the age of 9 months, the patient presented multiple heterogeneous hepatosplenic nodules. Aggressive treatment with prednisone, vincristine, and hepatosplenic embolizations resulted in initial improvement of the hepatosplenic lesions for few months, followed by an increase of the lesions with failure of response to treatment despite adding alpha-interferon-2b to treatment. The patient died at the age of 19 months. The autopsy's pathological examination revealed a hepatic-based angiosarcoma with plurimetastatic dissemination to the spleen, lungs, peritoneum, pleura, mesenteric linings as well as the serosa of the stomach and small intestine. Multiple cutaneous and visceral complex capillaro-lymphatico-venous malformations were also identified. We hypothesize that these multiple extensive mixed vascular malformations were associated with chronic lymphedema which probably predisposed to the development of the angiosarcoma in our patient. PMID:20863270

  18. Stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery for the treatment of intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Levy, R.P.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lyman, J.T.; Chuang, F.Y.S.; Steinberg, G.K.; Marks, M.P.

    1989-12-01

    One of the more challenging problems of vascular neurosurgery is the management of surgically-inaccessible arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the brain. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we have developed the method of stereotactic heavy-charged-particle (helium-ion) Bragg peak radiosurgery for treatment of inoperable intracranial AVMs in over 300 patients since 1980 (Fabrikant et al. 1989, Fabrikant et al. 1985, Levy et al. 1989). This report describes patient selection, treatment method, clinical and neuroradiologic results and complications encountered. 4 refs.

  19. Retroperitoneal vascular malformation mimicking incarcerated inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Indu Bhushan; Sharma, Anuj; Singh, Ajay Kumar; Mohanty, Debajyoti

    2011-01-01

    A 30-year-old man presented to the Department of Surgery with a painful groin swelling on right side. Exploration revealed a reddish-blue hemangiomatous mass in the scrotum extending through inguinal canal into the retroperitoneum. On further dissection swelling was found to be originating from right external iliac vein. The swelling was excised after ligating all vascular connections. The histopathological examination of excised mass confirmed the diagnosis of venous variety of vascular malformation. This is the first reported case of vascular malformation arising from retroperitoneum and extending into inguinoscrotal region, presenting as incarcerated inguinal hernia. PMID:21633582

  20. Systemic to pulmonary vascular malformation.

    PubMed

    Pouwels, H M; Janevski, B K; Penn, O C; Sie, H T; ten Velde, G P

    1992-11-01

    A case is reported of life-threatening haemoptysis as a result of an anomalous communication between a bronchial artery and pulmonary vein, demonstrated by angiography. The patient recovered following bilobectomy of the right lower and middle lobes. When a systemic artery is involved in an arteriovenous malformation of the lung, haemodynamics are different compared with those present in malformations fed by the pulmonary artery. This implicates other clinical features, options for surgical intervention and prognosis. In reviewing the literature, a relationship with Rendu-Osler-Weber disease is absent in these specific malformations. PMID:1486979

  1. Congenital vascular malformations in scintigraphic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Pilecki, Stanisław; Gierach, Marcin; Gierach, Joanna; Świętaszczyk, Cyprian; Junik, Roman; Lasek, Władysław

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Congenital vascular malformations are tumour-like, non-neoplastic lesions caused by disorders of vascular tissue morphogenesis. They are characterised by a normal cell replacement cycle throughout all growth phases and do not undergo spontaneous involution. Here we present a scintigraphic image of familial congenital vascular malformations in two sisters. Material/Methods A 17-years-old young woman with a history of multiple hospitalisations for foci of vascular anomalies appearing progressively in the upper and lower right limbs, chest wall and spleen. A Parkes Weber syndrome was diagnosed based on the clinical picture. Due to the occurrence of new foci of malformations, a whole-body scintigraphic examination was performed. A 12-years-old girl reported a lump in the right lower limb present for approximately 2 years, which was clinically identified as a vascular lesion in the area of calcaneus and talus. Phleboscintigraphy visualized normal radiomarker outflow from the feet via the deep venous system, also observed in the superficial venous system once the tourniquets were released. In static and whole-body examinations vascular malformations were visualised in the area of the medial cuneiform, navicular and talus bones of the left foot, as well as in the projection of right calcaneus and above the right talocrural joint. Conclusions People with undiagnosed disorders related to the presence of vascular malformations should undergo periodic follow-up to identify lesions that may be the cause of potentially serious complications and to assess the results of treatment. Presented scintigraphic methods may be used for both diagnosing and monitoring of disease progression. PMID:24567769

  2. Oral vascular malformations: laser treatment and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, U.; Rocchetti, F.; Gaimari, G.; Tenore, G.; Palaia, G.; Lo Giudice, G.

    2016-03-01

    Vascular malformations are a very heterogeneous group of circulatory system's diseases that can involve different kind of vessels: arterial, venous or lymphatic ones. Many treatments, such as conventional surgery, embolization, steroid therapy and laser therapy, are available for vascular lesions. The laser approach relies more therapeutic techniques: the transmucosal thermophotocoagulation, intralesional photocoagulation, the excisional biopsy. Today laser is demonstrated to be the gold standard technique to treat vascular lesions that allows a safe and efficient treatment and a lower post-operative healing time. The only disadvantage is the risk of carbonization that could be avoided by using the multiple-spot single pulsed wave technique.

  3. Percutaneous Cryotherapy of Vascular Malformation: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelis, F.; Neuville, A.; Labreze, C.; Kind, M.; Bui, B.; Midy, D.; Palussiere, J.; Grenier, N.

    2013-06-15

    The present report describes a case of percutaneous cryotherapy in a 36-year-old woman with a large and painful pectoral venous malformation. Cryoablation was performed in a single session for this 9-cm mass with 24 h hospitalisation. At 2- and 6-month follow-up, the pain had completely disappeared, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a significant decrease in size. Percutaneous cryoablation shows promise as a feasible and apparently safe method for local control in patients with symptomatic venous vascular malformations.

  4. Pretreatment imaging of peripheral vascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Joshua B; Cogswell, Petrice M; McKusick, Michael A; Binkovitz, Larry A; Riederer, Stephen J; Young, Phillip M

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral vascular malformations (VMs) are complex and diverse vascular lesions which require individualized pretreatment planning. Pretreatment imaging using various modalities, especially magnetic resonance imaging and time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography, is a valuable tool for classifying peripheral VMs to allow proper diagnosis, demonstrate complete extent, identify the nidus, and distinguish between low-flow and high-flow dynamics that determines the treatment approach. We discuss pretreatment imaging findings in four patients with peripheral VMs and how diagnostic imaging helped guide management. PMID:25625123

  5. Advanced noninvasive imaging of spinal vascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Eddleman, Christopher S.; Jeong, Hyun; Cashen, Ty A.; Walker, Matthew; Bendok, Bernard R.; Batjer, H. Hunt; Carroll, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Spinal vascular malformations (SVMs) are an uncommon, heterogeneous group of vascular anomalies that can render devastating neurological consequences if they are not diagnosed and treated in a timely fashion. Imaging SVMs has always presented a formidable challenge because their clinical and imaging presentations resemble those of neoplasms, demyelination diseases, and infection. Advancements in noninvasive imaging modalities (MR and CT angiography) have increased during the last decade and have improved the ability to accurately diagnose spinal vascular anomalies. In addition, intraoperative imaging techniques have been developed that aid in the intraoperative assessment before, during, and after resection of these lesions with minimal and/or optimal use of spinal digital subtraction angiography. In this report, the authors review recent advancements in the imaging of SVMs that will likely lead to more timely diagnoses and treatment while reducing procedural risk exposure to the patients who harbor these uncommon spinal lesions. PMID:19119895

  6. GI-Associated Hemangiomas and Vascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Hemangiomas and vascular malformations of the gastrointestinal tract, rare clinical entities, present as overt or occult bleeding. They can be distributed throughout the intestinal digestive system, or present as a singular cavernous hemangioma or malformation, which is often located in the rectosigmoid region. Misdiagnosis is common despite characteristic radiographic features such as radiolucent phleboliths on plain film imaging and a purplish nodule on endoscopy. Adjunctive imaging such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are suggested as there is potential for local invasion. Endorectal ultrasound with Doppler has also been found to be useful in some instances. Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment, with an emphasis on sphincter preservation. Nonsurgical endoscopic treatment with banding and sclerotherapy has been reported with success, especially in instances where an extensive resection is not feasible. PMID:22942801

  7. Benign Vascular Malformation at the Ischial Tuberosity.

    PubMed

    Said, Rami; Bevelaqua, Anna-Christina

    2016-07-01

    A 31-year-old female student was referred to physical therapy with a chief complaint of proximal, posterior left thigh pain that began insidiously 12 months prior, and progressively worsened while training for a half-marathon. A mobile, soft mass was identified just inferior to the ischial tuberosity that was tender and painful to palpation, recreating the patient's chief complaint. Radiographic findings were negative for a suspected avulsion fracture at the ischial tuberosity. Therefore, the physician performed musculoskeletal ultrasonography, which revealed a superficial hypoechoic mass with vascular flow. Magnetic resonance imaging and a subsequent biopsy led to the diagnosis of a benign vascular malformation. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(7):607. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0410. PMID:27363574

  8. Oral encapsulated vascular malformation: An undescribed presentation in the mouth

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Márcio-Américo; Dias, Pedro-de Souza; Martínez-Martínez, Marisol; Sena-Filho, Marcondes; de Almeida, Oslei-Paes

    2016-01-01

    Vascular lesions have been classified in two broad categories, hemangiomas and malformations. Encapsulated vascular lesions have not been reported in the oral cavity, but they were described in other sites, mainly in the orbit. Herein, we present a case of an oral encapsulated vascular lesion located in the right buccal mucosa of a 69-year-old male, including histological and immunohistochemical description and a literature review. Key words:Buccal mucosa, hemangioma, vascular malformation, oral cavity. PMID:26855712

  9. US and MRI features in venous vascular malformation of the abdominal wall. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrino, F.; Maira, A.; Tarantino, C.C.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are classified as vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Venous vascular malformations are the most common type of vascular malformation. They may be isolated or multiple and they rarely affect the trunk. The authors report a rare case of isolated venous vascular malformation of the abdominal wall with an emphasis on the related MRI and ultrasound (US) features. PMID:23450707

  10. Amplatzer vascular plugs in congenital cardiovascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Barwad, Parag; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Kothari, Shyam S; Saxena, Anita; Gupta, Saurabh K; Juneja, Rajnish; Gulati, Gurpreet Singh; Jagia, Priya; Sharma, Sanjiv

    2013-01-01

    Background: Amplatzer vascular plugs (AVPs) are devices ideally suited to close medium-to-large vascular communications. There is limited published literature regarding the utility of AVPs in congenital cardiovascular malformations (CCVMs). Aims: To describe the use of AVPs in different CCVMs and to evaluate their safety and efficacy. Materials and Methods: All patients who required an AVP for the closure of CCVM were included in this retrospective review of our catheterization laboratory data. The efficacy and safety of AVPs are reported. Results: A total of 39 AVPs were implanted in 31 patients. Thirteen (33%) were AVP type I and 23 (59%) were AVP type II. AVP type III were implanted in two patients and type IV in one patient. The major indications for their use included closure of pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (AVM) (n = 7), aortopulmonary collaterals (n = 7), closure of a patent Blalock-Taussig shunt (n = 5), systemic AVM (n = 5), coronary AVM (n = 4), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) (n = 3), pulmonary artery aneurysms (n = 3), and venovenous collaterals (n = 2). Deployment of the AVP was done predominantly via the 5 – 7F Judkin's right coronary guide catheter. Overall 92% of the AVPs could be successfully deployed and resulted in occlusion of the target vessel in all cases, within 10 minutes. No procedure-related or access site complication occurred. Conclusions: AVPs are versatile, easy to use, and effective devices to occlude the vascular communications in a variety of settings. AVP II is especially useful in the closure of tubular structures with a high flow. PMID:24688229

  11. Laser treatment of oral vascular malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, U.; Gaimari, G.; Mohsen, M.; Tenore, G.; Palaia, G.

    2014-01-01

    Oral Vascular Malformations (OVM) are congenital anomalies characterized by morph-structural and/or functional changes of nature in severity and extension. OVM can affect any type of vessels arterial, venous or lymphatic and any capillary or anatomical. They are divided into two categories: low and high flow. In this study were treated 40 patients with OVM with a range size from 2 mm to 44 mm; they were subjected to clinical examination supported by Colour-Doppler Ultrasound instrumental examination and only for doubt cases the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was prescribed. Only low flow venous and capillary malformations were treated by GaAlAs laser (Wiser®, Lambda, Brindole,Italy, 980nm) and KTP laser (SmartLite®, DEKA, Florence, Italy, 532nm) with two different techniques: the Transmucosal Thermophotocoagulation (TMT) and the Intralesional Photocoagulation (ILP). These techniques permitted a good control of haemostasis, avoiding bleeding both during surgery and in the postoperative. It is obtained an excellent and good healing respectively in 10% and 60% of cases, a moderate and poor resolution respectively in 22.5% and 7.5% of cases. A clear diagnosis allowed the management of Venous malformations (VM) by laser devices with wavelengths highly absorbed in haemoglobin in safety and efficacy and according to the principles of minimal invasive surgery. The aim of this study was to verify if the laser is effective in the treatment of OVM for the purpose of the clinical findings and the postoperative course. The Authors concluded that the laser can be considered the "gold standard" for treating OVM.

  12. Emerging Techniques for Evaluation of the Hemodynamics of Intracranial Vascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Melissa; Chien, Aichi

    2015-01-01

    Advances in imaging modalities have improved the assessment of intracranial hemodynamics using non-invasive techniques. This review examines new imaging modalities and clinical applications of currently available techniques, describes pathophysiology and future directions in hemodynamic analysis of intracranial stenoses, aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations and explores how hemodynamic analysis may have prognostic value in predicting clinical outcomes and assist in risk stratification. The advent of new technologies such as pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling, accelerated magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) techniques, 4D digital subtraction angiography, and improvements in clinically available techniques such as phase-contrast MRA may change the landscape of vascular imaging and modify current clinical practice guidelines. PMID:25924168

  13. Stereotactic radiosurgery for intracranial arteriovenous malformations: A review.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Ranjith K; Rajshekhar, Vedantam

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has proven to be an effective strategy in the management of intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in children and adults over the past three decades. Its application has resulted in lowering the morbidity and mortality associated with treatment of deep-seated AVMs. SRS has been used as a primary modality of therapy as well as in conjunction with embolization and microsurgery in the management of AVMs. The obliteration rate after SRS has been reported to range from 35% to 92%. Smaller AVMs receiving higher marginal doses have obliteration rates of 70% and more. The median follow-up reported in most series is approximately 36-40 months. The median time to obliteration has been reported to be approximately 24-36 months in most series. Radiation-induced neurological complications have been reported in less than 10% of patients, with a 1.5%-6% risk of developing a new permanent neurological deficit. The bleeding rate during the latency to obliteration has been reported to be approximately 5%. This review describes the experience reported in literature with respect to the indications, dosage, factors affecting obliteration rate of AVMs, and complications after SRS. PMID:26588616

  14. Klippel-Trénaunay Syndrome with Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformation: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Mahniya F.; Tiwana, Muhammad H.; Johnson, Jamlik-Omari; Khosa, Faisal

    2014-01-01

    Klippel-Trénaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare vascular congenital anomaly affecting less than 200,000 people in the United States. Vascular malformations associated with KTS tend to affect slow flow systems: venous, capillary, and lymphatic systems. The nature of the syndrome leads to a higher risk for the development of arteriovenous malformations. Our case presentation describes a patient with KTS and an associated rare presentation of intraventricular arteriovenous malformation (AVM). PMID:24653849

  15. High Temporal and Spatial Resolution Imaging of Peripheral Vascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Mostardi, Petrice M.; Young, Phillip M.; McKusick, Michael A.; Riederer, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the performance of a recently developed 3D time-resolved CE-MRA technique, Cartesian Acquisition with Projection-Reconstruction-like sampling (CAPR), for accurate characterization and treatment planning of vascular malformations of the periphery. Materials and Methods Twelve patient studies were performed (eight female, four male; average age, 33 years). The protocol consisted of three-dimensional (3D) time-resolved CE-MRA followed by a single late phase T1-weighted acquisition. Vascular malformations were imaged in the forearm, hand, thigh, and foot. Imaging evaluation was performed for accurate characterization of lesion type, identification of feeding and draining vessels, involvement with surrounding tissue, overall quality for diagnosis and treatment planning, and correlation with conventional angiography. Results Time-resolved CE-MRA allowed for characterization of malformation flow and type. Feeding and draining vessels were identified in all cases. Overall quality for diagnosis and treatment planning was 3.58/4.0, and correlation with conventional angiography was scored as 3.89/4.0. Conclusion The CAPR time series has been shown to portray the temporal dynamics and structure of vascular malformations as well as the normal vasculature with high quality. CAPR time-resolved imaging is able to accurately characterize high and low flow lesions, allowing for pretreatment lesion assessment and treatment planning. Delayed imaging is important to capture complete filling of very slow flow vascular malformations. PMID:22674646

  16. [Cerebral arteriovenous malformations: value of the non invasive vascular imaging techniques].

    PubMed

    Leclerc, X; Gauvrit, J Y; Trystram, D; Reyns, N; Pruvo, J P; Meder, J F

    2004-12-01

    Imaging evaluation of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) requires selective visualization of the different compartments of the malformation in order to select the therapeutic management. Conventional angiography remains the reference to analyze intracranial vessel conspicuity but non-invasive methods constitute an excellent alternative. Among these techniques, CT angiography is rarely used because of the need to inject iodinated contrast material and because of irradiation. MR angiography provides useful information and can be performed using several techniques: time of flight with or without contrast material injection, phase contrast, three-dimensional (3D) gradient echo acquisition after contrast material injection and, more recently, MR digital subtraction angiography. The purpose of this review article is to summarize the different non-invasive techniques for vascular imaging and to analyze the usefulness of these techniques for the assessment of brain AVMs. PMID:15687950

  17. Vascular tumors and malformations in children, Introduction.

    PubMed

    Maguiness, Sheilagh M

    2016-03-01

    Over the past decade, I have been amazed at the growth in the field of vascular anomalies. The recognition of vascular birthmarks as a defined area of medicine is a relatively recent event. The International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA) was founded by Drs John Mulliken and Anthony Young in the late 1970s. Mulliken and Glowacki's sentinel 1982 paper on the biologic classification of vascular anomalies further established the field, by providing clarity of nomenclature and unifying concepts that had previously been lacking. PMID:27607317

  18. [Congenital vascular malformations: epidemiology, classification and therapeutic basis].

    PubMed

    Pereira Albino, J

    2010-01-01

    Congenital vascular malformations are part of the rare diseases of angiology and vascular surgery and can present in a variety of forms. They rise a lot of doubts and many diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Treatment options are widely variable and often debated; surgeons usually have doubts about the best procedure to adopt. It is also an area of great anatomic and functional variability where the confusion regarding the nomenclature and classifications has been frequent, rendering difficult to adopt standardized measures. There have been significant advances in the recent years towards reaching a consensus. Based on his practical clinical experience and past work on these issues, the author reviews the epidemiology, the classifications and the therapeutic basis of this pathology. The author emphasizes the fact that the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA) classification provides a useful framework for classifying vascular anomalies, as well as the therapeutic percutaneous embolization using polidocanol foam to control venous malformations. PMID:20972487

  19. Sclerotherapy using 1% sodium tetradecyl sulfate to treat a vascular malformation: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vascular malformations are the most common congenital and neonatal vascular anomalies in the head and neck region. The demand for simple and esthetic vascular malformation treatments have increased more recently. In this study, two patients that were diagnosed with venous malformations were treated with sodium tetradecyl sulfate as a sclerosing agent. Recurrence was not found one year after the surgery. This article gives a brief case report of sclerotherapy as an effective approach to treat vascular malformations in the oral cavity. PMID:26734559

  20. Assessment of PTEN-associated vascular malformations in a patient with Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome.

    PubMed

    Anusic, Sandra; Clemens, Robert Karl Josef; Meier, Thomas Oleg; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Misdiagnosis of phosphatase and tensin homologue hamartoma syndromes is common. Correct diagnosis has a relevant impact on patients, as the risk of malignancies is high and treatment options are limited. We report the case of a 24-year-old man who presented with symptomatic vascular intramuscular lesions of the left forearm and right calf, macrocephaly, post Hashimoto thyroiditis, a multicystic intracranial paratrigonal lesion, lentiginous hyperpigmented maculae on the foreskin and multiple skin lesions. MRI showed extended fibrofatty changes and malformed vessels in the forearm and calf lesions, also, arteriovenous shunting was present in these lesions. The patient had been treated by embolisation and surgically in the past, with limited results. A multidisciplinary assessment and genetic counselling were undertaken and a surveillance programme was initiated. Treatment options of the symptomatic vascular lesions include excision or possibly cryoablation. Physiotherapy to prevent progression of the contractures should be initiated meanwhile. PMID:27358095

  1. Assessing intracranial vascular compliance using dynamic arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lirong; Liu, Collin Y; Smith, Robert X; Jog, Mayank; Langham, Michael; Krasileva, Kate; Chen, Yufen; Ringman, John M; Wang, Danny J J

    2016-01-01

    Vascular compliance (VC) is an important marker for a number of cardiovascular diseases and dementia, which is typically assessed in the central and peripheral arteries indirectly by quantifying pulse wave velocity (PWV), and/or pulse pressure waveform. To date, very few methods are available for the quantification of intracranial VC. In the present study, a novel MRI technique for in-vivo assessment of intracranial VC was introduced, where dynamic arterial spin labeling (ASL) scans were synchronized with the systolic and diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle. VC is defined as the ratio of change in arterial cerebral blood volume (ΔCBV) and change in arterial pressure (ΔBP). Intracranial VC was assessed in different vascular components using the proposed dynamic ASL method. Our results show that VC mainly occurs in large arteries, and gradually decreases in small arteries and arterioles. The comparison of intracranial VC between young and elderly subjects shows that aging is accompanied by a reduction of intracranial VC, in good agreement with the literature. Furthermore, a positive association between intracranial VC and cerebral perfusion measured using pseudo-continuous ASL with 3D GRASE MRI was observed independent of aging effects, suggesting loss of VC is associated with a decline in perfusion. Finally, a significant positive correlation between intracranial and central (aortic arch) VC was observed using an ungated phase-contrast 1D projection PWV technique. The proposed dynamic ASL method offers a promising approach for assessing intracranial VC in a range of cardiovascular diseases and dementia. PMID:26364865

  2. Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium: Overview, Progress and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Akers, Amy L.; Ball, Karen L.; Clancy, Marianne; Comi, Anne M.; Faughnan, Marie E.; Gopal-Srivastava, Rashmi; Jacobs, Thomas P.; Kim, Helen; Krischer, Jeffrey; Marchuk, Douglas A.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Morrison, Leslie; Moses, Marsha; Moy, Claudia S.; Pawlikowska, Ludmilla; Young, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Brain vascular malformations are resource-intensive to manage effectively, are associated with serious neurological morbidity, lack specific medical therapies, and have no validated biomarkers for disease severity and progression. Investigators have tended to work in “research silos” with suboptimal cross-communication. We present here a paradigm for interdisciplinary collaboration to facilitate rare disease research. The Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium (BVMC) is a multidisciplinary, inter-institutional group of investigators, one of 17 consortia in the Office of Rare Disease Research Rare Disease Clinical Research Network (RDCRN). The diseases under study are: familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformations type 1, common Hispanic mutation (CCM1-CHM); Sturge-Weber Syndrome (SWS); and brain arteriovenous malformation in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Each project is developing biomarkers for disease progression and severity, and has established scalable, relational databases for observational and longitudinal studies that are stored centrally by the RDCRN Data Management and Coordinating Center. Patient Support Organizations (PSOs) are a key RDCRN component in the recruitment and support of participants. The BVMC PSOs include Angioma Alliance, Sturge Weber Foundation, and HHT Foundation International. Our networks of clinical centers of excellence in SWS and HHT, as well as our PSOs, have enhanced BVMC patient recruitment. The BVMC provides unique and valuable resources to the clinical neurovascular community, and recently reported findings are reviewed. Future planned studies will apply successful approaches and insights across the three projects to leverage the combined resources of the BVMC and RDCRN in advancing new biomarkers and treatment strategies for patients with vascular malformations. PMID:25221778

  3. Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium: Overview, Progress and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Akers, Amy L; Ball, Karen L; Clancy, Marianne; Comi, Anne M; Faughnan, Marie E; Gopal-Srivastava, Rashmi; Jacobs, Thomas P; Kim, Helen; Krischer, Jeffrey; Marchuk, Douglas A; McCulloch, Charles E; Morrison, Leslie; Moses, Marsha; Moy, Claudia S; Pawlikowska, Ludmilla; Young, William L

    2013-04-01

    Brain vascular malformations are resource-intensive to manage effectively, are associated with serious neurological morbidity, lack specific medical therapies, and have no validated biomarkers for disease severity and progression. Investigators have tended to work in "research silos" with suboptimal cross-communication. We present here a paradigm for interdisciplinary collaboration to facilitate rare disease research. The Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium (BVMC) is a multidisciplinary, inter-institutional group of investigators, one of 17 consortia in the Office of Rare Disease Research Rare Disease Clinical Research Network (RDCRN). The diseases under study are: familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformations type 1, common Hispanic mutation (CCM1-CHM); Sturge-Weber Syndrome (SWS); and brain arteriovenous malformation in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Each project is developing biomarkers for disease progression and severity, and has established scalable, relational databases for observational and longitudinal studies that are stored centrally by the RDCRN Data Management and Coordinating Center. Patient Support Organizations (PSOs) are a key RDCRN component in the recruitment and support of participants. The BVMC PSOs include Angioma Alliance, Sturge Weber Foundation, and HHT Foundation International. Our networks of clinical centers of excellence in SWS and HHT, as well as our PSOs, have enhanced BVMC patient recruitment. The BVMC provides unique and valuable resources to the clinical neurovascular community, and recently reported findings are reviewed. Future planned studies will apply successful approaches and insights across the three projects to leverage the combined resources of the BVMC and RDCRN in advancing new biomarkers and treatment strategies for patients with vascular malformations. PMID:25221778

  4. Intracranial Hypertension in a Patient with a Chiari Malformation Accompanied by Hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Pang, Chang Hwan; Lee, Soo Eon; Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee

    2015-09-01

    The Chiari malformation is an infrequently detected congenital anomaly characterized by the downward displacement of the cerebellum with a tonsillar herniation below the foramen magnum that may be accompanied by either syringomyelia or hydrocephalus. Surgery, such as foramen magnum decompression, is indicated for a symptomatic Chiari malformation, although an incidental lesion may be followed-up without further treatment. Infrequently, increased intracranial pressure emerges due to hyperthyroidism. A nineteen-year-old girl visited our outpatient clinic presented with a headache, nausea and vomiting. A brain and spinal magnetic resonance image study (MRI) indicated that the patient had a Chiari I malformation without syringomyelia or hydrocephalus. An enlarged thyroid gland was detected on a physical examination, and serum markers indicated Graves' disease. The patient started anti-hyperthyroid medical treatment. Subsequently, the headache disappeared after the medical treatment of hyperthyroidism without surgical intervention for the Chiari malformation. A symptomatic Chiari malformation is indicated for surgery, but a surgeon should investigate other potential causes of the symptoms of the Chiari malformation to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:26512271

  5. Intracranial Hypertension in a Patient with a Chiari Malformation Accompanied by Hyperthyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Chang Hwan; Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee

    2015-01-01

    The Chiari malformation is an infrequently detected congenital anomaly characterized by the downward displacement of the cerebellum with a tonsillar herniation below the foramen magnum that may be accompanied by either syringomyelia or hydrocephalus. Surgery, such as foramen magnum decompression, is indicated for a symptomatic Chiari malformation, although an incidental lesion may be followed-up without further treatment. Infrequently, increased intracranial pressure emerges due to hyperthyroidism. A nineteen-year-old girl visited our outpatient clinic presented with a headache, nausea and vomiting. A brain and spinal magnetic resonance image study (MRI) indicated that the patient had a Chiari I malformation without syringomyelia or hydrocephalus. An enlarged thyroid gland was detected on a physical examination, and serum markers indicated Graves' disease. The patient started anti-hyperthyroid medical treatment. Subsequently, the headache disappeared after the medical treatment of hyperthyroidism without surgical intervention for the Chiari malformation. A symptomatic Chiari malformation is indicated for surgery, but a surgeon should investigate other potential causes of the symptoms of the Chiari malformation to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:26512271

  6. Thoracolumbar spinal vascular malformation as a rare cause of isolated intraventricular hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Marlin, Evan S; Entwistle, John J; Arnold, Michael A; Pierson, Christopher R; Governale, Lance S

    2014-07-01

    Spinal vascular malformations are rare vascular lesions that most frequently present with back pain, radiculopathy, and/or myelopathy. Neurological decline is typically secondary to progressive radiculopathy, myelopathy, venous thrombosis, and stroke. Few case reports have described thoracolumbar spinal vascular malformations that present with both subarachnoid and intraventricular hemorrhage. This is the first reported case of a thoracolumbar spinal vascular malformation presenting with isolated intraventricular hemorrhage on initial imaging followed by acute and fatal rehemorrhage. PMID:24784978

  7. Stereotactic microresection of small cerebral vascular malformations (SCVM).

    PubMed

    Lerch, K D; Schaefer, D; Palleske, H

    1994-01-01

    Between 1988-1993 we performed CT-stereotactic guided microsurgical resection as a one-session-procedure in 46 patients bearing small (< 30 mm) cerebral vascular malformations (SCVM). The location of the SCVM was deep subcortical in 38 patients, temporal medio- basal in 3 and brainstem in 5. The surgical technique intended to minimise invasiveness by reducing the operative approach to a size less than the diameter of the lesion concerned. The mean diameter of our SCVM's was 20 mm ranging from 10 to 30 mm. Histologically we found 23 arteriovenous malformations, 22 cavernous malformations and 1 capillary telangiectasia (capillary malformation). Clinical symptomatology consisted mainly of seizures, (progressive) neurological deficit and (minute) acute intracerebral bleeding. The SCVMs could be demonstrated by contrast-enhanced CT as well as by MRI. 15 of the AVM's revealed as angiographically occult. Complete microsurgical resection of the SCVM was accomplished in all cases with a surgical morbidity of 6.5% and no operative mortality. In 14 patients, most of them with initial acute intracerebral haemorrhage, the pronounced focal neurological deficit improved. During the follow-up period (1/2-5 years) no rebleeding occurred. As far as epileptic seizures were concerned 13 patients became seizure-free without anticonvulsants and 11 patients seizure-free with anticonvulsant, in the remaining 4 patients seizures were reduced in frequency. PMID:7725939

  8. Evidence of redistribution of cerebral blood flow during treatment for an intracranial arteriovenous malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Batjer, H.H.; Purdy, P.D.; Giller, C.A.; Samson, D.S. )

    1989-10-01

    The presence of an intracranial arteriovenous malformation has a dramatic impact on local circulatory dynamics. Treatment of some arteriovenous malformations can result in disastrous hyperemic states caused by redistribution of previously shunted blood. This report describes serial hemodynamic measurements of both cerebral blood flow and flow velocity in 3 patients during treatment for arteriovenous malformations. Measurements of cerebral blood flow were made by computed tomographic scan employing the stable xenon inhalation technique; flow velocity, including autoregulatory characteristics, was measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasonogram. Substantial hyperemia developed in one patient (Case 1) after resection and in another (Case 3) after embolization. Embolization resulted in restoration of normal regional cerebral blood flow in a patient who demonstrated hypoperfusion before treatment (Case 2). In Patient 1, postoperative hyperemia was associated with persistently elevated flow velocities, and may have been accompanied by hemispheric neurological deficits. Sequential hemodynamic measurements may predict patients at risk of perioperative complications, and may become useful clinical guidelines for the extent and timing of embolization and for the timing of surgery after intracranial hemorrhage or preoperative embolization procedures.

  9. Treatment of a giant arteriovenous malformation associated with intracranial aneurysm rupture during pregnancy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junhui; Wang, Yuhai; Li, Peipei; Chen, Weiliang; Zhou, Jingxu; Hu, Xu; Zhu, Jie; Jiang, Bingjie

    2016-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) associated with aneurysm have rarely been reported in the literature. The present study reports the case of a 21-year-old pregnant female patient who presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage and an intracranial hematoma located in the anterior end of the corpus callosum. Furthermore, an anterior cerebral aneurysm and an AVM were identified by digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance angiography. The aneurysm was clipped and the AVM was successfully removed by microsurgery. The diagnosis of AVM associated with an aneurysm was confirmed via intraoperative and postoperative pathological examinations. By performing a review of the current literature, issues and surgical considerations associated with AVM associated with aneurysm were analyzed.

  10. Turner syndrome with spinal hemorrhage due to vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Min Kyung; Jung, Mo Kyung; Kim, Ki Eun; Kwon, Ah Reum; Kim, Duk Hee; Kim, Ho-Seong

    2015-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a relatively common chromosomal disorder and is associated with a range of comorbidities involving the cardiovascular system. Vascular abnormalities, in particular, are a common finding in cases of TS. However, dissection involving the vertebral arteries is rare. Here, we report the case of a 9-year-old girl with TS who had been treated with growth hormone replacement therapy for the past 3 years. She presented with weakness of both lower legs, and was ultimately diagnosed with spinal hemorrhage due to vascular malformation. We treated her with intravenous high dose dexamethasone (0.6 mg/kg) and she could walk without assistance after 6 days of treatment. In conclusion, when a patient with TS shows sudden weakness of the lower limbs, we should consider the possibility of spinal vessel rupture and try to take spine magnetic resonance imaging as soon as possible. We suggest a direction how to make a proper diagnosis and management of sudden vertebral artery hemorrhage in patients with TS. PMID:26817012

  11. Management of Low-Flow Vascular Malformations: Clinical Presentation, Classification, Patient Selection, Imaging and Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    McCafferty, Ian

    2015-10-15

    This review article aims to give an overview of the current state of imaging, patient selection, agents and techniques used in the management of low-flow vascular malformations. The review includes the current classifications for low-flow vascular malformations including the 2014 updates. Clinical presentation and assessment is covered with a detailed section on the common sclerosant agents used to treat low-flow vascular malformations, including dosing and common complications. Imaging is described with a guide to a simple stratification of the use of imaging for diagnosis and interventional techniques.

  12. Laser therapy and sclerotherapy in the treatment of oral and maxillofacial hemangioma and vascular malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crişan, Bogdan; BǎciuÅ£, Mihaela; BǎciuÅ£, Grigore; Crişan, Liana; Bran, Simion; Rotar, Horatiu; Moldovan, Iuliu; Vǎcǎraş, Sergiu; Mitre, Ileana; Barbur, Ioan; Magdaş, Andreea; Dinu, Cristian

    2016-03-01

    Hemangioma and vascular malformations in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery is a pathology more often found in recent years in patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the laser photocoagulation performed with a diode laser (Ga-Al-As) 980 nm wavelength in the treatment of vascular lesions which are located on the oral and maxillofacial areas, using color Doppler ultrasonography for evaluation of the results. We also made a comparison between laser therapy and sclerotherapy in order to establish treatment protocols and recommendations associated with this pathology. We conducted a controlled study on a group of 92 patients (38 male and 54 female patients, with an average age of 36 years) having low flow hemangioma and vascular malformations. Patients in this trial received one of the methods of treatment for vascular lesions such as hemangioma and vascular malformations: laser therapy or sclerotherapy. After laser therapy we have achieved a reduction in size of hemangioma and vascular malformations treated with such a procedure, and the aesthetic results were favorable. No reperfusion or recanalization of laser treated vascular lesions was observed after an average follow-up of 6 to 12 months. In case of sclerotherapy a reduction in the size of vascular lesions was also obtained. The 980 nm diode laser has been proved to be an effective tool in the treatment of hemangioma and vascular malformations in oral and maxillofacial area. Laser therapy in the treatment of vascular lesions was more effective than the sclerotherapy procedure.

  13. Thrombosed vascular malformation within the flexor tendon sheath of the index finger in the palm

    PubMed Central

    Schonauer, Fabrizio; Nele, Gisella; La Rusca, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Vascular malformations are relatively infrequent among benign lesions of the hand. We report the case of an arteriovenous malformation in a 48-year-old white woman presenting a mass in her left hand without any symptoms. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology and the lesion completely removed by surgery. PMID:27252973

  14. Intralesional bleomycin injection in management of low flow vascular malformations in children.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Anita T; Adams, Saleigh; Adams, Kevin; Hudson, Donald A

    2015-04-01

    Low flow vascular malformations are challenging to manage, particularly with their propensity to grow, and can lead to severe disfigurement and dysfunction. Traditional surgical excision is fraught with tedious dissection and complications, particularly in the head and neck region. Trends toward less invasive techniques, such as intralesional sclerotherapy, are proving to be successful independent treatments or adjuncts in management in low flow vascular malformations. This study was a retrospective case note review, over an 8-year period, reporting the outcomes of 32 children (mean = 5.8 years, range = 5 months-11.5 years) with radiologically confirmed low flow vascular malformations, treated with serial intralesional bleomycin injection (IBI) therapy. Patient demographics, lesion characteristics, imaging findings, treatment course, radiological and clinical response to treatment were recorded. An overall 91% (n = 29) response rate was achieved, with 28% obtaining complete resolution for low flow vascular malformations. Lesions were sub-categorized into venous malformation, including mixed venous-capillary (n = 27) or lymphatic malformation (LM) (n = 5). Twenty-seven of 32 children experienced no complications. Local complications included superficial skin infection (n = 2), skin necrosis (n = 1), hyperpigmentation, and minor contour deformity. There was no recurrence and no systemic side-effects to bleomycin. Mean follow-up was 38 months (range = 6-95 months). In conclusion, serial intralesional bleomycin injections can be effective and also safe in a paediatric population for the successful management of symptomatic or disfiguring low flow vascular malformations. PMID:25204206

  15. Pediatric Stroke: The Importance of Cerebral Arteriopathy and Vascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Beslow, Lauren A.; Jordan, Lori C.

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is an important cause of neurologic morbidity in childhood. Population-based estimates of the annual incidence of childhood stroke range from 2 to 13 per 100,000 children. This article will review recent literature on both hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke in children with a focus on cerebral arteriopathy and vascular malformations as stroke risk factors. Additional risk factors include congenital heart disease, sickle cell disease, and hematologic abnormalities among others. Outcomes are variable and are related to the severity of presentation, associated illnesses, and other factors. More than half of children who have had a stroke have long-term neurological sequelae. Five-year recurrence risk is estimated to be 5–19%. Children with cerebrovascular abnormalities are at the highest risk of recurrence (66% at 5 years for ischemic stroke in one study). Furthermore, cerebral arteriopathy including arterial dissection may account for up to 80% of childhood stroke in otherwise healthy children. In many cases, evaluation and treatment of pediatric stroke is not evidence-based, and regional and geographic variations in practice patterns exist. Multicenter cohort studies and ultimately dedicated pediatric clinical trials will be essential to establish comprehensive evidence-based guidelines for pediatric stroke care. PMID:20625743

  16. Vascular Malformation and Common Keratinocytic Nevus of the Soft Type: Phacomatosis Pigmentovascularis Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Laureano, André; Carvalho, Rodrigo; Amaro, Cristina; Freitas, Isabel; Cardoso, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Phacomatosis pigmentovascularis is a rare syndrome characterized by the coexistence of a pigmented nevus and a cutaneous vascular malformation. We report a 5-year-old boy with all the typical findings of phacomatosis pigmentovascularis type Ia. Although its existence according to the traditional classification has been questioned, this case represents a very rare association of a capillary vascular malformation and a common keratinocytic nevus of the soft type. PMID:25506441

  17. Structure and vascular function of MEKK3–cerebral cavernous malformations 2 complex

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Oriana S.; Deng, Hanqiang; Liu, Dou; Zhang, Ya; Wei, Rong; Deng, Yong; Zhang, Fan; Louvi, Angeliki; Turk, Benjamin E.; Boggon, Titus J.; Su, Bing

    2015-08-03

    Cerebral cavernous malformations 2 (CCM2) loss is associated with the familial form of CCM disease. The protein kinase MEKK3 (MAP3K3) is essential for embryonic angiogenesis in mice and interacts physically with CCM2, but how this interaction is mediated and its relevance to cerebral vasculature are unknown. Here we report that Mekk3 plays an intrinsic role in embryonic vascular development. Inducible endothelial Mekk3 knockout in neonatal mice is lethal due to multiple intracranial haemorrhages and brain blood vessels leakage. We discover direct interaction between CCM2 harmonin homology domain (HHD) and the N terminus of MEKK3, and determine a 2.35 Å cocrystal structure. We find Mekk3 deficiency impairs neurovascular integrity, which is partially dependent on Rho–ROCK signalling, and that disruption of MEKK3:CCM2 interaction leads to similar neurovascular leakage. We conclude that CCM2:MEKK3-mediated regulation of Rho signalling is required for maintenance of neurovascular integrity, unravelling a mechanism by which CCM2 loss leads to disease.

  18. Structure and vascular function of MEKK3-cerebral cavernous malformations 2 complex.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Oriana S; Deng, Hanqiang; Liu, Dou; Zhang, Ya; Wei, Rong; Deng, Yong; Zhang, Fan; Louvi, Angeliki; Turk, Benjamin E; Boggon, Titus J; Su, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations 2 (CCM2) loss is associated with the familial form of CCM disease. The protein kinase MEKK3 (MAP3K3) is essential for embryonic angiogenesis in mice and interacts physically with CCM2, but how this interaction is mediated and its relevance to cerebral vasculature are unknown. Here we report that Mekk3 plays an intrinsic role in embryonic vascular development. Inducible endothelial Mekk3 knockout in neonatal mice is lethal due to multiple intracranial haemorrhages and brain blood vessels leakage. We discover direct interaction between CCM2 harmonin homology domain (HHD) and the N terminus of MEKK3, and determine a 2.35 Å cocrystal structure. We find Mekk3 deficiency impairs neurovascular integrity, which is partially dependent on Rho-ROCK signalling, and that disruption of MEKK3:CCM2 interaction leads to similar neurovascular leakage. We conclude that CCM2:MEKK3-mediated regulation of Rho signalling is required for maintenance of neurovascular integrity, unravelling a mechanism by which CCM2 loss leads to disease. PMID:26235885

  19. Structure and vascular function of MEKK3–cerebral cavernous malformations 2 complex

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Oriana S.; Deng, Hanqiang; Liu, Dou; Zhang, Ya; Wei, Rong; Deng, Yong; Zhang, Fan; Louvi, Angeliki; Turk, Benjamin E.; Boggon, Titus J.; Su, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations 2 (CCM2) loss is associated with the familial form of CCM disease. The protein kinase MEKK3 (MAP3K3) is essential for embryonic angiogenesis in mice and interacts physically with CCM2, but how this interaction is mediated and its relevance to cerebral vasculature are unknown. Here we report that Mekk3 plays an intrinsic role in embryonic vascular development. Inducible endothelial Mekk3 knockout in neonatal mice is lethal due to multiple intracranial haemorrhages and brain blood vessels leakage. We discover direct interaction between CCM2 harmonin homology domain (HHD) and the N terminus of MEKK3, and determine a 2.35 Å cocrystal structure. We find Mekk3 deficiency impairs neurovascular integrity, which is partially dependent on Rho–ROCK signalling, and that disruption of MEKK3:CCM2 interaction leads to similar neurovascular leakage. We conclude that CCM2:MEKK3-mediated regulation of Rho signalling is required for maintenance of neurovascular integrity, unravelling a mechanism by which CCM2 loss leads to disease. PMID:26235885

  20. Role of stereotactic radiosurgery with a linear accelerator in treatment of intracranial arteriovenous malformations and tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, J S; Rossitch, E; Siddon, R; Moore, M R; Rockoff, M A; Alexander, E

    1990-05-01

    Between 1986 and 1988, 16 children were treated for 10 arteriovenous malformations and 6 recurrent intracranial tumors with stereotactic radiation therapy using a modified Clinac 6/100 linear accelerator. The median age of our patients was 10.5 years. For the group with arteriovenous malformation, follow-up ranged from 6 months to 37 months (median was 20 months). No patient bled during the follow-up period. Five of eight patients with follow-up longer than 12 months have achieved complete obliteration of their arteriovenous malformation by angiogram. The four remaining patients who have not achieved a complete obliteration are awaiting their 2-year posttreatment angiogram. The other patient has been treated within the year and have not yet been studied. Five of the six recurrent tumor patients are alive with a median follow-up of 8 months. The remaining patient was controlled locally, but he died of recurrent disease outside the area treated with radiosurgery. The radiographic responses of these patients have included three complete responses, two substantial reductions in tumor volume (greater than 50%) and one stabilization. Despite previous radiotherapy, there have been no significant complications in these patients. We conclude that stereotactic radiation therapy using a standard linear accelerator is an effective and safe technique in the treatment of selected intracranial arteriovenous malformations and tumors in children. In addition, stereotactic radiosurgery may have unique applications in the treatment of localized primary and recurrent pediatric brain tumors. PMID:2184409

  1. [Quality standards for ultrasonographic assessment of peripheral vascular malformations and vascular tumors. Report of the French Society for Vascular Medicine].

    PubMed

    Laroche, J-P; Becker, F; Khau-Van-Kien, A; Baudoin, P; Brisot, D; Buffler, A; Coupé, M; Jurus, C; Mestre, S; Miserey, G; Soulier-Sotto, V; Tissot, A; Viard, A; Vignes, S; Quéré, I

    2013-02-01

    THE QUALITY STANDARDS OF THE FRENCH SOCIETY OF VASCULAR MEDICINE FOR THE ULTRASONOGRAPHIC ASSESSMENT OF VASCULAR MALFORMATIONS ARE BASED ON THE TWO FOLLOWING REQUIREMENTS: Technical know-how: mastering the use of ultrasound devices and the method of examination. Medical know-how: ability to adapt the methods and scope of the examination to its clinical indication and purpose, and to rationally analyze and interpret its results. AIMS OF THE QUALITY STANDARDS: To describe an optimal method of examination in relation to the clinical question and hypothesis. To achieve consistent practice, methods, glossary, and reporting. To provide good practice reference points, and promote a high-quality process. ITEMS OF THE QUALITY STANDARDS: The three levels of examination; their clinical indications and goals. The reference standard examination (level 2), its variants according to clinical needs. The minimal content of the examination report; the letter to the referring physician (synthesis, conclusion and proposal for further investigation and/or therapeutic management). Commented glossary (anatomy, hemodynamics, semiology). Technical bases. Settings and use of ultrasound devices. Here, we discuss the methods of using ultrasonography for the assessment of peripheral vascular malformations and tumors. PMID:23312609

  2. Optic chiasmal cavernous angioma: A rare suprasellar vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Al-Shaar, Hussam; Bahatheq, Ayman; Takroni, Radwan; Al-Thubaiti, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Suprasellar cavernous malformation in the optic pathway is not commonly encountered. To date, there are only few reports present in the literature. Case Description: The authors report a rare case of suprasellar optic pathway cavernous malformation in a 33-year-old female who presented with progressive visual loss. Her imaging revealed a large heterogeneous, hyperintense, hemorrhagic right suprasellar extra-axial complex cystic structure, causing mass effect on the adjacent hypothalamus and third ventricle displacing these structures. Gross total resection of the lesion was achieved utilizing a right frontal craniotomy approach. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of suprasellar chiasmal cavernous malformation. Conclusion: Although visual pathway cavernous malformation is a rare event, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of lesions occurring suprasellarly in the visual pathway and hypothalamus. PMID:27583178

  3. Vascular malformations of the spinal cord (angiodysgenetic myelomalacia): a critique on its pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Badejo, L; Sangalang, V E

    1979-02-01

    Two cases of angiodysgenetic myelomalacia are presented. Both patients had progressive weakness and sensory deficits in the lower extremities and vascular malformations of their spinal cords. The lesions were located on the dorsum of the spinal cord and the dorso-spinal roots. We believe the symptoms that developed later in life were due to spinal cord ischemia resulting from late degenerative changes in the vessels of the malformation and an ever increasing spinal "steal". PMID:424976

  4. Percutaneous Sclerotherapy of Congenital Slow-Flow Vascular Malformations of the Orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Chiramel, George Koshy Keshava, Shyamkumar Nidugala Moses, Vinu Mammen, Suraj; David, Sarada; Sen, Sudipta

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThis manuscript describes the clinical features, imaging findings, treatment details, and short-term outcomes of a series of congenital slow-flow vascular malformations.MethodsThis was a prospective study of congenital slow-flow vascular malformations involving the orbital region treated at a single institution with percutaneous sclerotherapy.ResultsTen patients presented during the study period, comprising eight venous malformations, one lymphatic malformation, and one veno-lymphatic malformation. Nine patients underwent percutaneous sclerotherapy under digital subtraction angiography guidance, of which three developed marked rise in intraocular pressure requiring lateral canthotomy. The treatments were performed in the presence of an ophthalmologist who measured the intraorbital pressure during and after the procedure. On follow-up, some of the patients required repeat sessions of sclerotherapy. All patients had improvement of symptoms on follow up after the procedure.ConclusionCongenital slow-flow vascular malformations of the orbital region are rare lesions that should be treated using a multidisciplinary approach. Monitoring of the intraorbital pressure is required both during and after the procedure to decide about the need for lateral canthotomy to reduce the transiently increased intraorbital pressure.

  5. Intracranial arteriovenous malformation: relationships between clinical and radiographic factors and ipsilateral steal severity

    SciTech Connect

    Batjer, H.H.; Devous, M.D. Sr.; Seibert, G.B.; Purdy, P.D.; Ajmani, A.K.; Delarosa, M.; Bonte, F.J.

    1988-09-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are high flow shunts that may jeopardize the perfusion of adjacent tissue. Clinical and radiographic data from 62 patients were analyzed to determine their relationship to the severity of steal measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The ipsilateral steal index (ISteal(i)) was determined by dividing regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) values within hand-drawn regions of hypoperfusion in the ipsilateral hemisphere by total brain flow, which was calculated as the average rCBF of each hemisphere. Of the patients, 40% were less than 30 years of age, 45% were 30 to 50 years old, and 15% were over 50. Forty-eight per cent presented with hemorrhage and 34% presented with progressive deficits. There was angiographic steal in 37%, and postoperative hyperemic complications developed in 21%. All patients had ipsilateral regions of hypoperfusion. The ISteal(i) was less than 0.7 in 23 (37%), 0.7 to 0.8 in 20 (32%), and greater than 0.8 in 19 (31%). The ISteal(i) was significantly less severe in the patients over 50; 78% of these patients had an ISteal(i) of greater than 0.8 (P less than 0.01). A history of hemorrhage was associated with less severe steal than that in patients who had not bled (P = 0.088). Patients presenting with a history of progressive deficits had increased severity of steal compared with those without progressive deficits (P less than 0.05). A trend toward decreased severity of steal was noted in patients with unfavorable outcomes.

  6. Venous vascular malformation of the floor of mouth masquerading as a dermoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Dmytriw, Adam A; Song, Jin Soo A; Gullane, Patrick; terBrugge, Karel G; Yu, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Venous vascular malformations (VVMs) are described as abnormal post-capillary lesions which exhibit low flow. These are typically malleable and may grow with endocrine fluctuations. A VVM that mimics the classic appearance of dermoid tumor on imaging has never been reported. We encountered a 43-year-old woman with intermittent dysphagia relating to a firm submandibular mass. Physical exam and cross-sectional imaging revealed features consistent with variant dermoid cyst. However, catheter angiography eventually demonstrated a VVM which possessed vessels of variable size and partial thrombosis. We report the case and propose that catheter angiography remains important in cases where vascular malformation is considered. PMID:26851131

  7. Foot Drop after Ethanol Embolization of Calf Vascular Malformation: A Lesson on Nerve Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, Vincent Khwee-Soon; Mohan, P. Chandra; Liew, Wendy Kein Meng; Mahadev, Arjandas; Tay, Kiang Hiong

    2013-08-01

    Ethanol is often used in sclerotherapy to treat vascular malformations. Nerve injury is a known complication of this procedure. However, the management of this complication is not well described in literature. This case describes a 10-year-old boy with a slow flow vascular malformation in the right calf who underwent transarterial ethanol embolization following prior unsuccessful direct percutaneous sclerotherapy. The development of a dense foot drop that subsequently recovered is described, and the management of this uncommon but distressful complication is discussed.

  8. A long-Segmental Vascular Malformation in the Small Bowel Presenting With Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Preschool-Aged Child

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeoun Joo; Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Cho, Yong Hoon; Kim, Yong-Woo; Kim, Tae Un; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in pediatric patients has several causes. Vascular malformation of the small bowel is a rare disease leading to pediatric GI bleeding. To our knowledge, few reports describe ultrasound and computed tomography findings of venous malformations involving the small bowel. We present a case of long-segmental and circumferential vascular malformation that led to GI bleeding in a pre-school aged child, focusing on the radiologic findings. Although vascular malformation including of the GI tract is rare in children, it should be considered when GI bleeding occurs in pediatric patients. PMID:27110342

  9. beta-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease is found in cerebral and spinal cord vascular malformations.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, M. N.; Merz, P.; Bennett-Gray, J.; Menezes, A. H.; Goeken, J. A.; Schelper, R. L.; Wisniewski, H. M.

    1988-01-01

    Congo/Red deposition with birefringence to polarized light was demonstrated focally in cerebrovascular malformations removed surgically from 4 older patients (ages 85, 74, 74, and 63), and in a spinal cord vascular malformation in a 76-year-old patient. Lesser degrees of Congophilic change were observed in cerebrovascular malformations screened from 4 of 10 patients between the ages of 30 and 59. No Congophilic change was seen in 10 cerebrovascular malformations removed from patients under 30 years of age. Congophilic areas in all cases decorated with W-2 and 85/45 polyclonal antibodies raised to peptide sequences of cerebrovascular beta-amyloid and beta-amyloid of senile plaques from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the amyloid in these vascular malformations is immunologically related to beta-amyloid protein. This finding provides another indication that vascular beta-amyloid deposition is not specific for Alzheimer's disease and suggests that an existing abnormality of vessels may be a predisposing factor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2A Figure 2B Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3293463

  10. Venolymphatic vascular malformation of the parotid gland extending into the parapharyngeal space: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Khatib, Yasmeen; Dande, Madhura; Patel, Richa D; Gite, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Vascular malformations (VMs) are structural malformations of vascular development causing soft tissue abnormality with functional and esthetic impairment. They are named by their predominant vessel type as arterial, venous, lymphatic or mixed types. VMs of the parotid gland are extremely rare and constitute a distinct entity of parotid pathology that requires specific diagnostic tools and management. Till 2013, only fifty cases of VMs of the parotid have been described in the literature. We present a case of a venolymphatic malformation of the parotid gland extending into the parapharyngeal space in a 21-year-old male who presented with a swelling on the left side of the face extending into the neck. Diagnosis was suggested by ultrasonography and computed tomography scan and was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging examination. Complete surgical excision of the lesion was done with a favorable outcome. Diagnosis was confirmed based on histopathology and immunohistochemical studies. PMID:27601828

  11. Thermographic Assessment of a Vascular Malformation of the Hand: A New Imaging Modality

    PubMed Central

    Hardwicke, Joseph T.; Titley, O. Garth

    2016-01-01

    Vascular malformations of the hand are rare. Angiography is the current Gold Standard imaging modality. Thermal imaging is an emerging noninvasive, noncontact technology that does not require intravenous contrast agents. We present the case of a patient with an arteriovenous malformation affecting the hand in which thermal imaging has been used as an adjunct to capture baseline images to allow monitoring of progression. We suggest that thermal imaging provides an adjunct that can be used in addition to clinical examination and/or angiography for the diagnosis and routine follow-up of conservatively managed arteriovenous malformations, to monitor progression or vascular steal, and also for recording recurrence after surgical excision for which there is known to be a significant incidence. With the benefit of being a noninvasive imaging modality that does not require intravenous contrast, or ionizing radiation exposure, office-based thermal imaging may become commonplace. PMID:27195175

  12. Angiography of Hepatic Vascular Malformations Associated with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Manabu Tate, Etuko; Nishii, Toshiaki; Watarai, Jiro; Shioya, Takanobu; White, Robert I.

    2003-04-15

    Purpose: To describe the angiographic features of hepatic involvement in hereditary hemorrhagictelangiectasia (HHT), particularly the presence of portovenous shunts. Methods: We reviewed the angiographic findings of seven patients with HHT. The patients comprised three women and four men with a mean age of 51 years. Results: Intrahepatictelangiectasias were found in all seven patients and shunts between three vascular channels were found in six of seven patients. In the four patients who had portovenous shunts combined with arterioportal shunts, the portovenous shunts were large. Three patients had noportovenous shunts. Two of these patients had arteriovenous shunts, and one had no shunt. The mean age (69 years) of the patients with portovenous shunts was older than those without portovenous shunts (26 years). Conclusions: Hepatic vascular lesions in HHT are varied, ranging from telangiectasias to large shunts between three vascular channels. In an advanced stage of involvement, large portovenous shunts are present.

  13. Imaging Spectrum of Hemangioma and Vascular Malformations of the Head and Neck in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Salins, Paul C; Bhat, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the head and neck region in children constitute an interesting group of lesions that benefit immensely from imaging techniques. Imaging is essential for identification, characterization, and delineation of the extent of lesion and subsequent follow-up. Infantile hemangiomas, which are vascular tumors with a specific evolution pattern, constitute a large majority of these lesions. On the other hand, there are vascular malformations, which are anomalies of the vascular system, consisting of a range of vascular tissues associated with various flow patterns. When diagnosis is clinically evident, imaging should utilize non-radiation techniques and address the issues necessary for management. Timing and interpretation of imaging methods employed in assessing childhood vascular lesion should also take into consideration the natural history so that imaging is performed to address a specific question. This review highlights the typical appearance of a hemangioma and a group of vascular malformations of the head and neck. For descriptive purpose, an attempt has been made to group lesions into specific subsites, with each one having specific clinical significance. Cases included illustrate the spectrum of the disease ranging from classical form in young children to slightly differing manifestations of the disease in adolescents and adults. The illustrations also provide a novel way of presenting image data using volume-rendering techniques of 3D data. Multi-modality team interaction and management strategies of these complex lesions are also emphasized. PMID:25161800

  14. Neuropilin-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 are up-regulated in human vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Partanen, Taina A; Vuola, Pia; Jauhiainen, Suvi; Lohi, Jouko; Salminen, Päivi; Pitkäranta, Anne; Häkkinen, Sanna-Kaisa; Honkonen, Krista; Alitalo, Kari; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-01-01

    Despite multiple previous studies in the field of vascular anomalies, the mechanism(s) leading to their development, progression and maintenance has remained unclear. In this study, we have characterized the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factors and their receptors in 33 human vascular anomalies. Analysis with quantitative real-time PCR and gene-specific assays showed higher expression of neuropilin-2 (NRP2) and VEGF-receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) mRNAs in vascular malformations (VascM) as compared to infantile hemangiomas (Hem). In addition, the expression levels of PlGF and VEGF-C mRNA were significantly higher in venous VascM when compared to the other VascM and Hem. Higher expression of NRP2 and VEGFR-3 were confirmed by immunohistochemistry. To further study the importance of NRP2 and VEGFR-3, endothelial cell (EC) cultures were established from vascular anomalies. It was found that NRP2 and VEGFR-3 mRNA levels were significantly higher in some of the VascM ECs as compared to human umbilical vein ECs which were used as control cells in the study. Furthermore, adenoviral delivery of soluble decoy NRP2 prevented the proliferation of ECs isolated from most of the vascular anomalies. Our findings suggest that NRP2 functions as a factor maintaining the pathological vascular network in these anomalies. Thus, NRP2 could become a potential therapeutic target for the diagnosis and treatment of vascular anomalies. PMID:22961441

  15. [Intestinal venous vascular malformation: Unusual etiology of gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatrics. Case report].

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Inés S; Steimberg, Clarisa; Udaquiola, Julia; González, Lucio; Liberto, Daniel; Cieri, Patricio; Peralta, Oscar; Orsi, Marina

    2016-06-01

    Intestinal vascular malformations, especially those in the right colon, are a frequent cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in adults, but they are a very rare condition in children. Symptoms include acute hemorrhage, intestinal obstruction, or chronic anemia of uncertain etiology, which is the most frequent form of presentation but the most difficult to diagnose and thus properly treat. We report the case of an 11 year old boy admitted to the Emergency Room with abdominal pain, vomits, hemodynamic decompensation, who required expansion and blood transfusion. With history ofrecurrent bloody stools since infancy with repeated normal endoscopies and Tc99 scintigraphy with chronic anemia and no improvement despite adequate treatment. In the last admission, the videocolonoscopy detected a venous vascular malformation in the ileocecal region. The angiography and the entero multislice computer tomography scanner were valuable tools to confirm the diagnosis and to select the appropriate surgical procedure for this rare condition. PMID:27164348

  16. Percutaneous Treatment of Peripheral Vascular Malformations in Children: Long-Term Clinical Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Edwin van der; Otoide-Vree, Marleen; Pattynama, Peter M. T.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to assess the rate of complications and clinical failure at 3 and 12 months after percutaneous treatment of vascular malformations in children. Furthermore, we describe patient satisfaction of treatment results during 5 years of follow-up. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study, we evaluated 26 patients younger than aged 19 years who were treated for symptomatic vascular malformations. Data on treatment outcomes and patient satisfactions were obtained with a precoded structured questionnaire. Patient files and imaging data were retrieved to obtain information regarding the vascular malformations and treatment. Clinical success was defined as disappearance or partial improvement of the complaints. Patient satisfaction was declared whenever patients answered in the questionnaire that they were satisfied with the treatment results. Results: Of 26 eligible patients, we included 23 (88%). The mean follow-up was 36 (range, 15-127) months. Posttreatment, 87% (20/23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 66-97%) of patients reported clinical success at 3 months. At 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years of follow-up this percentage was 74%, 59%, 59%, 59%, and 59%, respectively. Eleven (48%, 95% CI 27-69%) patients had experienced complications and 22% (95% CI 7-44%) had major complications, of which 5 had required additional treatment. In all, 83% (19/23) of the patients reported satisfaction with the treatment. Conclusions: Percutaneous treatment of vascular malformations improved clinical symptoms in 87% of the patients at 3 months and were sustainable for half of all patients during a 5-year follow-up period. However, major complications were seen in 22%.

  17. [Biotinidase deficiency and vascular ring malformation: case report].

    PubMed

    González-Salazar, Francisco; Gabino Gerardo-Aviles, José; Rodríguez Jacobo, Sofía; Vargas-Camacho, Gerardo

    2014-10-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder that affects the cleavage of biotin. Family studies of the index case found that both parents are usually carriers and siblings have the altered gene, but only homozygotes have manifestations that vary depending on the deficiency grade. Mothers may have moderate deficiency and be asymptomatic; biotin deficiency in pregnant women causes defects in children. In a study, using human cells exposed to biotin deficiency, cell growth decreased contributing to the development of cleft palate. In newborns, biotinidase deficiency has been associated with VACTERL syndrome and annular pancreas. The case of an infant with biotinidase deficiency and congenital defect of the vascular ring is presented. This defect surrounds and compresses the trachea and esophagus, disturbing swallowing and breathing. Infant was supplemented with biotin and surgically intervened with excellent results. PMID:25192539

  18. Stabiliztin of VEGFR2 Signaling by Cerebral Cavernous Malformation 3 is Critical for Vascular Development

    SciTech Connect

    Y He; H Zhang; L Yu; M Gunel; T Boggon; H Chen; W Min

    2011-12-31

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are human vascular malformations caused by mutations in three genes of unknown function: CCM1, CCM2, and CCM3. CCM3, also known as PDCD10 (programmed cell death 10), was initially identified as a messenger RNA whose abundance was induced by apoptotic stimuli in vitro. However, the in vivo function of CCM3 has not been determined. Here, we describe mice with a deletion of the CCM3 gene either ubiquitously or specifically in the vascular endothelium, smooth muscle cells, or neurons. Mice with global or endothelial cell-specific deletion of CCM3 exhibited defects in embryonic angiogenesis and died at an early embryonic stage. CCM3 deletion reduced vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) signaling in embryos and endothelial cells. In response to VEGF stimulation, CCM3 was recruited to and stabilized VEGFR2, and the carboxyl-terminal domain of CCM3 was required for the stabilization of VEGFR2. Indeed, the CCM3 mutants found in human patients lacking the carboxyl-terminal domain were labile and were unable to stabilize and activate VEGFR2. These results demonstrate that CCM3 promotes VEGFR2 signaling during vascular development.

  19. Toxicity of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in the Treatment of Intracranial Tumors in Patients With Collagen Vascular Diseases or Multiple Sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lowell, Dot; Tatter, Stephen B.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Guzman, Allan F. de; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Lovato, James F.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Shaw, Edward G.; Urbanic, James J.; Chan, Michael D.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess toxicity in patients with either a collagen vascular disease (CVD) or multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with intracranial radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Between January 2004 and April 2009, 6 patients with MS and 14 patients with a CVD were treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for intracranial tumors. Treated lesions included 15 total brain metastases in 7 patients, 11 benign brain tumors, 1 low grade glioma, and 1 cavernous malformation. Toxicities were graded by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute/Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria. 'Rare toxicities' were characterized as those reported in the scientific literature at an incidence of <5%. Results: Median follow-up time was 16 months. Median dose to the tumor margin was 13.0 Gy (range, 12-21 Gy). Median size of tumor was 5.0 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.14-7.8 cm{sup 3}). Of the 14 patients with CVD, none experienced a Grade 3 or 4 toxicity or a toxicity characterized as rare. Of the 6 patients with MS, 3 experienced rare toxicities, and two of these were Grade 3 toxicities. Rare complications included a patient experiencing both communicating hydrocephalus and facial nerve palsy, as well as 2 additional patients with motor cranial nerve palsy. High-grade toxicities included the patient with an acoustic neuroma requiring ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement for obstructive hydrocephalus, and 1 patient with a facial nerve schwannoma who experienced permanent facial nerve palsy. Interval between radiosurgery and high-grade toxicities ranged from 1 week to 4 months. Conclusions: Our series suggests that patients with MS who receive GKRS may be at increased risk of rare and high-grade treatment-related toxicity. Given the time course of toxicity, treatment-related edema or demyelination represent potential mechanisms.

  20. Primary intra- and juxta-articular vascular malformations of the temporomandibular joint: a clinical analysis of 8 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qin; Yang, Chi; Chen, Min-Jie; Qiu, Ya-Ting; Qiu, Wei-Liu; Zheng, Jia-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze primary intra- and juxta-articular vascular malformations of the temporomandibular joint. Patients and methods: This study retrospectively reviewed eight patients (seven venous malformations and one lymphatico-venous malformation) who were treated for intra- or juxta-articular vascular malformations of the temporomandibular joint from November 2005 to January 2011. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively. Results: According to MRI findings, vascular malformations involving TMJ could be divided into 3 types; homogenous, lacunar and mixed types. All patients underwent surgical resection, and the final clinical diagnoses were confirmed by postoperative histopathology and immunohistochemical examinations. All treated patients had no clinical or radiographic signs of recurrence. Conclusion: Owing to the lower incidence and nonspecific clinical presentations, preoperative diagnosis of vascular malformations involving the TMJ region is very difficult. The classification based on MRI manifestations is proposed first, then it may greatly help in the initial diagnosis. Surgical resection is considered the first option for these TMJ lesions with excellent results. PMID:25932158

  1. The “Little AVM”: A New Entity in High-flow versus Low-flow Vascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Michael; Guilfoyle, Regan; Courtemanche, Douglas J.; Moss, Wendy; Bucevska, Marija

    2014-01-01

    Background: Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are high-flow lesions with abnormal connections between arteries and veins without an intervening capillary bed. Infrequently, the radiographic diagnosis of a vascular lesion will not support the clinical diagnosis of an AVM. These “discrepant” lesions are not adequately captured within the current classification system and represent a treatment dilemma. The purpose of this study is to review our center’s experience with vascular malformations where incongruity in a patient’s clinical and radiographic presentation produces a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Methods: A retrospective chart review of patients with atypical AVM pre sen ta tions was performed. Parameters reviewed included patient history and demogra phics, clinical presentation, radiological imaging, and treatment modalities. Results: Over a 15-year period, we identified 7 cases of vascular malformations with discrepant clinical and radiological findings concerning flow characteristics. All patients were treated based on their radiological diagnosis and most were managed with sclerotherapy. No lesions evolved into a high-flow process, and there was no recurrence at a minimum of 24 months of follow-up. Conclusions: We have identified and described a unique subcategory of vascular malformations that have clinical features of high-flow malformations but radiological features of low-flow malformations. These lesions behave like low-flow malformations and should be treated as such. We propose that complex vascular malformations are best evaluated by both clinical and specialized diagnostic radiological means; the radiologic diagnoses should supplant what is found clinically, and ultimately treatment should be preferentially based on a radiological diagnosis. PMID:25426370

  2. Georges Brohee Prize. Oestrogen-progesterone, a new therapy of bleeding gastrointestinal vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Van Cutsem, E

    1993-01-01

    Gastrointestinal vascular malformations can cause haemorrhage requiring multiple transfusions. Surgical or endoscopic therapy are ineffective when the vascular malformations are spread diffusely over the gastrointestinal tract, when lesions escape identification or are not accessible for treatment. Several reports suggest that oestrogen-progesterone therapy is effective in the treatment of epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. The aim of our studies is to test the hypothesis that oestrogen-progesterone is an effective treatment for bleeding gastrointestinal vascular malformations in patients with a very high transfusion need and in whom surgical or endoscopic treatment failed or could not be performed. The mean transfusion requirement prior to entering the studies amounted to 35.4 units packed per patient. In an uncontrolled trial oestrogen-progesterone therapy diminished significantly transfusion requirements from 3.4 units packed cells per patient per month to 0.1 units packed cells (p = 0.02). Haemorrhage ceased totally in 3 of 7 patients. A double-blind randomized placebo-controlled, cross-over trial shows that therapy with 0.050 mg ethinyloestradiol and 1 mg norethisterone is very effective in reducing transfusion requirements: 2.8 versus 11.2 units packed cells over a 6 month treatment period (p = 0.002). Only 3 of 13 patients treated with ethinyloestradiol and norethisterone required transfusions for persistent bleeding, while 12 of 13 patients in the placebo group had transfusion requirements (p = 0.001). After stopping hormonal therapy, no transfusions were needed for a mean of 10 months. This indicates a long-lasting effect of ethinyloestradiol and norethisterone on bleeding and transfusion requirements.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8342398

  3. Exogenous vascular endothelial growth factor induces malformed and hyperfused vessels during embryonic neovascularization.

    PubMed Central

    Drake, C J; Little, C D

    1995-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent and specific endothelial mitogen that is able to induce angiogenesis in vivo [Leung, D. W., Cachianes, G., Kuang, W.-J., Goeddel, D. V. & Ferrara, N. (1989) Science 246 1306-1309]. To determine if VEGF also influences the behavior of primordial endothelial cells, we used an in vivo vascular assay based on the de novo formation of vessels. Japanese quail embryos injected with nanomolar quantities of the 165-residue form of VEGF at the onset of vasculogenesis exhibited profoundly altered vessel development. In fact, the overall patterning of the vascular network was abnormal in all VEGF-injected embryos. The malformations were attributable to two specific endothelial cell activities: (i) inappropriate neovascularization in normally avascular areas and (ii) the unregulated, excessive fusion of vessels. In the first instance, supernumerary vessels directly linked the inflow channel of the heart to the aortic outflow channel. The second aberrant activity led to the formation of vessels with abnormally large lumens. Ultimately, unregulated vessel fusion generated massive vascular sacs that obliterated the identity of individual vessels. These observations show that exogenous VEGF has an impact on the behavior of primordial endothelial cells engaged in vasculogenesis, and they strongly suggest that endogenous VEGF is important in vascular patterning and regulation of vessel size (lumen formation). Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7543999

  4. Stereotactic radiosurgery of angiographically occult vascular malformations: Indications and preliminary experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kondziolka, D.; Lunsford, L.D.; Coffey, R.J.; Bissonette, D.J.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1990-12-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery has been shown to treat successfully angiographically demonstrated arteriovenous malformations of the brain. Angiographic obliteration has represented cure and eliminated the risk of future hemorrhage. The role of radiosurgery in the treatment of angiographically occult vascular malformations (AOVMs) has been less well defined. In the initial 32 months of operation of the 201-source cobalt-60 gamma knife at the University of Pittsburgh, 24 patients meeting strict criteria for high-risk AOVMs were treated. Radiosurgery was used conservatively; each patient had sustained two or more hemorrhages and had a magnetic resonance imaging-defined AOVM located in a region of the brain where microsurgical removal was judged to pose an excessive risk. Venous angiomas were excluded by performance of high-resolution subtraction angiography in each patient. Fifteen malformations were in the medulla, pons, and/or mesencephalon, and 5 were located in the thalamus or basal ganglia. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 24 months. Nineteen patients either improved or remained clinically stable and did not hemorrhage again during the follow-up interval. One patient suffered another hemorrhage 7 months after radiosurgery. Five patients experienced temporary worsening of pre-existing neurological deficits that suggested delayed radiation injury. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated signal changes and edema surrounding the radiosurgical target. Dose-volume guidelines for avoiding complications were constructed. Our initial experience indicates that stereotactic radiosurgery can be performed safely in patients with small, well-circumscribed AOVMs located in deep, critical, or relatively inaccessible cerebral locations.

  5. Major and minor arterial malformations in patients with cutaneous vascular abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Castroviejo, Ignacio; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel I; Viaño, Juan; López-Gutierrez, Juan C; Palencia, Rafael

    2010-05-01

    The association of persistent embryonic arteries and the absence of 1 carotid or vertebral arteries with facial or neck hemangioma or vascular malformation have been frequently described. The abnormalities can involve major or minor vessels. Of 22 patients of our series with this neurocutaneous syndrome, 20 had the origin of both anterior cerebral arteries from the same internal carotid artery. Thirteen patients showed absence or hypoplasia of 1 carotid artery and 10 of 1 vertebral artery; 10 showed persistence of the trigeminal artery; 3 had persistent proatlantal artery; 6 showed the absence of the posterior communicating artery; and 4 had hypoplastic posterior cerebral artery. Other less frequent abnormalities were found in 7 patients. Intellectual level of most patients was either borderline or below normal. Abnormalities in the vascularization and perfusion of the frontal lobes may contribute to the borderline or lower mental level of these patients. PMID:19808986

  6. Stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery for the treatment of intracranial arteriovenous malformations in childhood and adolescence

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lyman, J.T.

    1989-06-01

    Forty patients aged 6 to 18 years have now been treated for inoperable intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) using stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 184-inch Synchrocyclotron at the University of California, Berkeley. This paper describes the procedures for selection of patients, the treatment protocol, and the neurological and neuroradiological responses to stereotactic radiosurgery in this age group. The volumes of the treated AVMs ranged from 265 mm/sup 3/ to 60,000 mm/sup 3/. The results are favorable: thus far, 20 of 25 patients have experienced greater than or equal to 50% obliteration of their AVMs within 1 year after treatment, and 14 of 18 patients have experienced total obliteration of the AVM by 2 years after treatment. Two patients hemorrhaged from radiosurgically treated AVMs within 12 months after treatment, but none thereafter. Complications include vasogenic edema and arterial occlusion; three patients have had neurological worsening as definite or possible sequelae of treatment. The strengths and limitations of the method are discussed.

  7. Loss-of-Function Mutations in ELMO2 Cause Intraosseous Vascular Malformation by Impeding RAC1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Arda; Xiong, Jingwei Rachel; Vargel, İbrahim; Kösemehmetoğlu, Kemal; Canter, Halil İbrahim; Gerdan, Ömer Faruk; Longo, Nicola; Alzahrani, Ahmad; Camps, Mireia Perez; Taskiran, Ekim Zihni; Laupheimer, Simone; Botto, Lorenzo D; Paramalingam, Eeswari; Gormez, Zeliha; Uz, Elif; Yuksel, Bayram; Ruacan, Şevket; Sağıroğlu, Mahmut Şamil; Takahashi, Tokiharu; Reversade, Bruno; Akarsu, Nurten Ayse

    2016-08-01

    Vascular malformations are non-neoplastic expansions of blood vessels that arise due to errors during angiogenesis. They are a heterogeneous group of sporadic or inherited vascular disorders characterized by localized lesions of arteriovenous, capillary, or lymphatic origin. Vascular malformations that occur inside bone tissue are rare. Herein, we report loss-of-function mutations in ELMO2 (which translates extracellular signals into cellular movements) that are causative for autosomal-recessive intraosseous vascular malformation (VMOS) in five different families. Individuals with VMOS suffer from life-threatening progressive expansion of the jaw, craniofacial, and other intramembranous bones caused by malformed blood vessels that lack a mature vascular smooth muscle layer. Analysis of primary fibroblasts from an affected individual showed that absence of ELMO2 correlated with a significant downregulation of binding partner DOCK1, resulting in deficient RAC1-dependent cell migration. Unexpectedly, elmo2-knockout zebrafish appeared phenotypically normal, suggesting that there might be human-specific ELMO2 requirements in bone vasculature homeostasis or genetic compensation by related genes. Comparative phylogenetic analysis indicated that elmo2 originated upon the appearance of intramembranous bones and the jaw in ancestral vertebrates, implying that elmo2 might have been involved in the evolution of these novel traits. The present findings highlight the necessity of ELMO2 for maintaining vascular integrity, specifically in intramembranous bones. PMID:27476657

  8. Cerebral vascular malformations: Time-resolved CT angiography compared to DSA

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Cheemun; Chakraborty, Santanu; dos Santos, Marlise P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to prospectively test the hypothesis that time-resolved CT angiography (TRCTA) on a Toshiba 320-slice CT scanner enables the same characterization of cerebral vascular malformation (CVM) including arteriovenous malformation (AVM), dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF), pial arteriovenous fistula (PAVF) and developmental venous anomaly (DVA) compared to digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Materials and methods Eighteen (eight males, 10 females) consecutive patients (11 AVM, four DAVF, one PAVF, and two DVA) underwent 19 TRCTA (Aquillion one, Toshiba) for suspected CVM diagnosed on routine CT or MRI. One patient with a dural AVF underwent TRCTA and DSA twice before and after treatment. Of the 18 patients, 13 were followed with DSA (Artis, Siemens) within two months of TRCTA. Twenty-three sequential volume acquisitions of the whole head were acquired after injection of 50 ml contrast at the rate of 4 ml/sec. Two patients with DVA did not undergo DSA. Two TRCTA were not assessed because of technical problems. TRCTAs were independently reviewed by two neuroradiologists and DSA by two other neuroradiologists and graded according to the Spetzler-Martin classification, Borden classification, overall diagnostic quality, and level of confidence. Weighted kappa coefficients (k) were calculated to compare reader’s assessment of DSA vs TRCTA. Results There was excellent (k = 0.83 and 1) to good (k = 0.56, 0.61, 0.65 and 0.67) agreement between the different possible pairs of neuroradiologists for the assessment of vascular malformations. Conclusion TRCTA may be a sufficient noninvasive substitute for conventional DSA in certain clinical situations. PMID:26246101

  9. Co-occurrence of a cerebral cavernous malformation and an orbital cavernous hemangioma in a patient with seizures and visual symptoms: Rare crossroads for vascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Choudhri, Omar; Feroze, Abdullah H.; Lad, Eleonora M.; Kim, Jonathan W.; Plowey, Edward D.; Karamchandani, Jason R.; Chang, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are angiographically occult vascular malformations of the central nervous system. As a result of hemorrhage and mass effect, patients may present with focal neurologic deficits, seizures, and other symptoms necessitating treatment. Once symptomatic, most often from hemorrhage, CCMs are treated with microsurgical resection. Orbital cavernous hemangiomas (OCHs) are similar but distinct vascular malformations that present within the orbital cavity. Even though CCMs and OCHs are both marked by dilated endothelial-lined vascular channels, they are infrequently seen in the same patient. Case Description: We provide a brief overview of the two related pathologies in the context of a patient presenting to our care with concomitant lesions, which were both resected in full without complication. Conclusion: This is the first known report that describes a case of concomitant CCM and OCH and explores the origins of two pathologies that are rarely encountered together in neurosurgical practice. Recognition of disparate symptomatologies is important for properly managing these patients. PMID:25071938

  10. Use of intracranial and ocular thermography before and after arteriovenous malformation excision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Peter Y. K.; Lewis, Philip M.; Maller, Jerome J.

    2014-11-01

    Excision of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) is known to carry a risk of postoperative hemorrhage, postulated to be the result of normal perfusion pressure breakthrough. It is also possible that AVMs may cause a steal effect, reducing perfusion in nearby vessels. There is currently no simple method of visualizing the presence or absence of steal effect intraoperatively. We hypothesized that the infrared thermographic (heat sensitive) imaging of perilesional brain may be useful for detecting reduced perfusion due to steal. Moreover, we hypothesized that if steal effect was present, it could impact on ocular perfusion and thereby temperature. Our objective was, therefore, to investigate whether perilesional cortical and ocular temperature (OT) may be a marker of steal effect. We intraoperatively acquired conventional and thermal images of the surgical field and eyes bilaterally, pre- and post-excisions of a large left hemisphere AVM. We found OT asymmetry preoperatively, which was absent after the AVM was excised. Intraoperative thermal images showed an increase of perilesional temperature, although this could be confounded by generalized changes in cortical perfusion due to anesthetics or surgery.

  11. Intracranial capillary hemangioma mimicking a dissociative disorder

    PubMed Central

    John, Santosh G.; Pillai, Unnikrishnan; Lacasse, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Capillary hemangiomas, hamartomatous proliferation of vascular endothelial cells, are rare in the central nervous system (CNS). Intracranial capillary hemangiomas presenting with reversible behavioral abnormalities and focal neurological deficits have rarely been reported. We report a case of CNS capillary hemangioma presenting with transient focal neurological deficits and behavioral abnormalities mimicking Ganser's syndrome. Patient underwent total excision of the vascular malformation, resulting in complete resolution of his symptoms. PMID:24765434

  12. Unique remodeling processes after vascular injury in intracranial arteries: analysis using a novel mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Munehisa; Nakagami, Hironori; Sata, Masataka; Takaoka, Minoru; Azuma, Junya; Kiomy Osako, Mariana; Koriyama, Hiroshi; Kurinami, Hitomi; Wakayama, Kouji; Miyake, Takashi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-08-01

    The effectiveness of angioplasty and stenting in intracranial atherosclerotic diseases is controversial due to high rates of delayed restenosis and hemorrhage compared with extracranial arteries. However, the mechanisms underlying these differences are still unclear, because their pathophysiology is yet to be examined. To address this issue, we established a novel vascular injury model in the intracranial internal carotid arteries (IICAs) in mice, and analyzed the remodeling process in comparison to that of the femoral arteries (FAs). In IICAs, neointimal hyperplasia was observed from day 14 and grew until day 56. Although smooth muscle cells (SMCs) emerged in the neointima from day 28, SMCs in the injured media were continuously lost with eventual extinction of the media. Re-endothelialization was started from day 7 and completed on day 28. Accumulation of macrophages was continued in the adventitia until day 56. Compared with FAs, the following points are unique in IICAs: (1) delayed continuous formation of neointima; (2) accumulation of macrophages in the media on day 14; (3) continuous loss of SMCs in the media followed by extinction of the media itself; and (4) continuously growing adventitia. These pathophysiologic differences might be associated with unfavorable outcomes in percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting in intracranial arteries. PMID:23571280

  13. Biological distinctions between juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma and vascular malformation: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengjun; Sun, Xicai; Yu, Huapeng; Hu, Li; Wang, Dehui

    2011-10-01

    The exact nature of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is still in dispute. In recent years, the main controversy of its nature has focused on hemangioma and vascular malformation. In this study, the immunolocalization of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor-1/fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (VEGFR-1/Flt-1), VEGF receptor-2/fetal liver kinase-1 (VEGFR-2/Flk-1), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and CD34 was investigated in 28 cases of JNA and 20 cases of orbital cavernous hemangiomas (OCH). The immunostaining levels of VEGF, Flt-1, and Flk-1 were higher and more frequent in vascular endothelial cells of JNA than those of OCH (p<0.05). The average microvessel density (MVD) marked by CD34 in JNA was (49.3 ± 9.1)/HPF (high power field), which was higher than OCH (29.1 ± 6.7)/HPF (p<0.05). Immunoreactivity of PCNA was localized in both endothelial and stromal cell components of JNA, but was predominantly seen in the stromal cells. However, no PCNA immunoreactivity was identified in any of the stromal and endothelial cells in cases of OCH. The immunostaining levels of CD34, VEGF, Flt-1, Flk-1, and PCNA in JNA were higher than those in OCH. These data support the view that JNA has biological characteristics of an angiogenic histogenetic tumor. In the future, anti-angiogenic therapy may represent a novel treatment strategy for JNA. PMID:20688360

  14. Sex-dichotomous effects of NOS1AP promoter DNA methylation on intracranial aneurysm and brain arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhepei; Zhao, Jikuang; Sun, Jie; Nie, Sheng; Li, Keqing; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Tiefeng; Duan, Shiwei; Di, Yazhen; Huang, Yi; Gao, Xiang

    2016-05-16

    The goal of this study was to investigate the contribution of NOS1AP-promoter DNA methylation to the risk of intracranial aneurysm (IA) and brain arteriovenous malformation (BAVM) in a Han Chinese population. A total of 48 patients with IAs, 22 patients with BAVMs, and 26 control individuals were enrolled in the study. DNA methylation was tested using bisulfite pyrosequencing technology. We detected significantly higher DNA methylation levels in BAVM patients than in IA patients based on the multiple testing correction (CpG4-5 methylation: 5.86±1.04% vs. 4.37±2.64%, P=0.006). In women, CpG4-5 methylation levels were much lower in IA patients (3.64±1.97%) than in BAVM patients (6.11±1.20%, P<0.0001). However, in men, CpG1-3 methylation levels were much higher in the controls (6.92±0.78%) than in BAVM patients (5.99±0.70%, P=0.008). Additionally, there was a gender-based difference in CpG1 methylation within the controls (men vs. women: 5.75±0.50% vs. 4.99±0.53%, P=0.003) and BAVM patients (men vs. women: 4.70±0.74% vs. 5.50±0.87%, P=0.026). A subgroup analysis revealed significantly higher CpG3 methylation in patients who smoked than in those who did not (P=0.041). Our results suggested that gender modulated the interaction between NOS1AP promoter DNA methylation in IA and BAVM patients. Our results also confirmed that regular tobacco smoking was associated with increased NOS1AP methylation in humans. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are required to replicate and extend these findings. PMID:27080431

  15. Vascular malformations of central nervous system: A series from tertiary care hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    Karri, Sudhir Babu; Uppin, Megha S.; Rajesh, A.; Ashish, K.; Bhattacharjee, Suchanda; Rani, Y. Jyotsna; Sahu, B. P.; Saradhi, M Vijaya; Purohit, A. K.; Challa, Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To describe clinicopathological features of surgically resected vascular malformations (VMs) of central nervous system (CNS). Materials and Methods: Histologically diagnosed cases of VMs of CNS during April 2010–April 2014 were included. Demographic data, clinical and radiological features were obtained. Hematoxylin and eosin slides were reviewed along with Verhoeff-Van Gieson (VVG), Masson's trichrome, periodic acid-Schiff, and Perls' stains. Morphologically, cavernomas and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) were distinguished on the basis of vessel wall features on VVG and intervening glial parenchyma. Results: Fifty cases were diagnosed as VMs of CNS with an age range of 14–62 years. These included 36 cavernomas, 12 AVMs, 2 mixed capillary-cavernous angiomas. Most of the cavernoma patients (15/36) presented with seizures, whereas AVM patients (8/12) had a headache as the dominant symptom. Twenty-nine patients were reliably diagnosed on radiological features. Microscopic evidence of hemorrhage was seen in 24/36 cavernomas and 6/12 AVMs, as opposed to radiologic evidence of 10 and 4, respectively. Reactive gliosis was seen in 16 cavernomas. Conclusions: Histological features are important for classifying the VMs of CNS as there are no specific clinical and radiological features. Type of VM has a bearing on management, prognosis, and risk of hemorrhage. PMID:27114659

  16. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema.

    PubMed

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten; Thomsen, Carsten; Juhler, Marianne; Laursen, Henning; Broholm, Helle

    2011-12-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common primary intracranial tumors in adults. Although meningiomas are mostly benign, more than 50% of patients with meningioma develop peritumoral brain edema (PTBE), which may be fatal because of increased intracranial pressure. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific mitogen and angiogen. VEGF-A protein, which is identical to vascular permeability factor, is a regulator of angiogenesis. In this study, 101 patients with meningiomas, and possible co-factors to PTBE, such as meningioma subtypes and tumor location, were examined. Forty-three patients had primary, solitary, supratentorial meningiomas with PTBE. In these, correlations in PTBE, edema index, VEGF-A protein, VEGF gene expression, capillary length, and tumor water content were investigated. DNA-branched hybridization was used for measuring VEGF gene expression in tissue homogenates prepared from frozen tissue samples. The method for VEGF-A analysis resembled an ELISA assay, but was based on chemiluminescence. The edema index was positively correlated to VEGF-A protein (p = 0.014) and VEGF gene expression (p < 0.05). The capillary length in the meningiomas was positively correlated to the PTBE (p = 0.038). If VEGF is responsible for the formation of PTBE, the edema may be treated with the anti-VEGF drug Bevacizumab (Avastin), which has been shown to reduce PTBE in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:22085359

  17. Optimizing treatment parameters for the vascular malformations using 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Wei; Lin, He; Xie, Shusen

    2010-02-01

    Near infrared Nd:YAG pulsed laser treatment had been proved to be an efficient method to treat large-sized vascular malformations like leg telangiectasia for deep penetrating depth into skin and uniform light distribution in vessel. However, optimal clinical outcome was achieved by various laser irradiation parameters and the key factor governing the treatment efficacy was still unclear. A mathematical model in combination with Monte Carlo algorithm and finite difference method was developed to estimate the light distribution, temperature profile and thermal damage in epidermis, dermis and vessel during and after 1064 nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiation. Simulation results showed that epidermal protection could be achieved during 1064 nm Nd:YAG pulsed laser irradiation in conjunction with cryogen spray cooling. However, optimal vessel closure and blood coagulation depend on a compromise between laser spot size and pulse duration.

  18. Peripheral limb vascular malformations: an update of appropriate imaging and treatment options of a challenging condition

    PubMed Central

    Farrant, J; Chhaya, N; Anwar, I; Marmery, H; Platts, A; Holloway, B

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral vascular malformations encompass a wide spectrum of lesions that can present as an incidental finding or produce potentially life- or limb-threatening complications. They can have intra-articular and intraosseous extensions that will result in more diverse symptomology and present greater therapeutic challenges. Developments in classification, imaging and interventional techniques have helped to improve outcome. The onus is now placed on appropriate detailed preliminary imaging, diagnosis and classification to direct management and exclude other more common mimics. Radiologists are thus playing an increasingly important role in the multidisciplinary teams charged with the care of these patients. By fully understanding the imaging characteristics and image-guided procedures available, radiologists will be armed with the tools to meet these responsibilities. This review highlights the recent advances made in imaging and the options available in interventional therapy. PMID:25525685

  19. The role of vascular remodeling and inflammation in the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Penn, David L; Witte, Samantha R; Komotar, Ricardo J; Sander Connolly, E

    2014-01-01

    While the mechanisms triggering pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms have not been fully elucidated, different mechanisms have been proposed ranging from hemodynamic mechanisms to genetic predispositions. One mechanism that has been thoroughly explored is the physiological and pathological vascular remodeling that occurs in conjunction with inflammatory reactions resulting in the initiation and progression of these lesions. Both hemodynamic stimuli and vascular inflammation can trigger a series of biochemical reactions resulting in vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis and migration causing thinned, dilated areas of the cerebral vasculature. In addition, an imbalance between extracellular matrix remodeling proteins, such as matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors, can result in accelerated degradation of the internal elastic lamina and the adventitial layers, further weakening the vessel. While these processes occur under normal physiological conditions, situations that alter their balance such as inflammation caused by cigarette smoking or cocaine usage or hypoxia induced under chronic hypertensive conditions can alter the delicate balance of these reactions potentiating pathological remodeling and aneurysm development. The present study represents a thorough literature review of the vascular remodeling and inflammatory components to aneurysmal pathogenesis. PMID:24120708

  20. Pediatric neuroanesthesia. Arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Newfield, P; Hamid, R K

    2001-06-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous malformations can occur singly, multiply, and in conjunction with aneurysms and denovo, family, or in conjunction with connective-tissue disorders. Intracranial hemorrhage is the most common presentation, occurring in 20% to 50% of cases. In children, seizures are the second most common presentation occurring in 15% to 20% of cases. The modalities available treatment of arteriovenous malformations are microsurgery, embolization, and stereotactic radiosurgery with heavy particles, alpha knife, or linear accelerator. Induction, maintenance, and emergence from anesthesia are designed to prevent rupture of arteriovenous malformation and aneurysm and to improve intracranial compliance in the presence of an intracranial hematoma, during both diagnostic (CT, MR scanning) and therapeutic procedures. PMID:11469062

  1. Hemangiomas, angiosarcomas, and vascular malformations represent the signaling abnormalities of pathogenic angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Arbiser, J L; Bonner, M Y; Berrios, R L

    2009-11-01

    Angiogenesis is a major factor in the development of benign, inflammatory, and malignant processes of the skin. Endothelial cells are the effector cells of angiogenesis, and understanding their response to growth factors and inhibitors is critical to understanding the pathogenesis and treatment of skin disease. Hemangiomas, benign tumors of endothelial cells, represent the most common tumor of childhood. In our previous studies, we have found that tumor vasculature in human solid tumors expresses similarities in signaling to that of hemangiomas, making the knowledge of signaling in hemangiomas widely applicable. These similarities include expression of reactive oxygen, NFkB and akt in tumor vasculature. Furthermore, we have studied malignant vascular tumors, including hemangioendothelioma and angiosarcoma and have shown distinct signaling abnormalities in these tumors. The incidence of these tumors is expected to rise due to environmental insults, such as radiation and lumpectomy for breast cancer, dietary and industrial carcinogens (hepatic angiosarcoma), and chronic ultraviolet exposure and potential Agent Orange exposure. I hypothesize that hemangiomas, angiosarcomas, and vascular malformations represent the extremes of signaling abnormalities seen in pathogenic angiogenesis. PMID:19925405

  2. Persistence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations after successful embolotherapy with Amplatzer vascular plug: long-term results

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Aal, Ahmed Kamel; Ibrahim, Rafik Mohamed; Moustafa, Amr Soliman; Hamed, Maysoon Farouk; Saddekni, Souheil

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the frequency of persistence and complication rates of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) treated with Amplatzer vascular plug (AVP) or Amplatzer vascular plug type 2 (AVP2). METHODS We retrospectively reviewed a total of 22 patients with 54 PAVMs between June 2004 and June 2014. We included 12 patients with 35 PAVMs who received percutaneous embolization using AVP or AVP2 only without the use of any other embolic devices. The mean follow-up was 54±24.3 months (range, 31–97 months). The primary end-points of the study were the efficacy of embolotherapy, the increase in oxygen saturation, and the persistence of PAVM on follow-up. Secondary end point was the incidence of complications. RESULTS The study included 10 female and two male patients with a mean age of 50.2±13.7 years (range, 21–66 years). All PAVMs had a simple angioarchitecture. The technical success of the procedure for PAVM occlusion was 100%. There was a significant increase in the oxygen saturation following embolotherapy (P < 0.0001). Follow-up computed tomography angiography revealed successful treatment in 34 PAVMs (97%) and failed treatment in one PAVM (3%). Twenty-three aneurysmal sacs (67%) showed complete disappearance. The failed treatment was due to persistence of PAVM caused by subsequent development of systemic reperfusion, which did not require further intervention. There were two minor complications but no major complications were encountered. CONCLUSION Embolotherapy of PAVMs using AVP or AVP2 devices is safe and effective, with high technical success rate, low persistence and complication rates, and with excellent long-term results. PMID:27244759

  3. Malformation of cortical and vascular development in one family with parietal foramina determined by an ALX4 homeobox gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Valente, Marcelo; Valente, Kette D; Sugayama, Sofia S M; Kim, Chong Ae

    2004-01-01

    Vascular and cortical anomalies have been found in a family with parietal foramina type 2 (PFM2), which is determined by the ALX4 gene. It is believed that ALX4 has a bone-restricted expression. We report a case of PFM with age-related size variation in a 4-year-old boy, as well as in his mother, aunt and grandfather. MR imaging of the child demonstrates prominent malformations of cortical (polymicrogyric cortex with an unusual infolding pattern) and vascular development (persistence median prosencephalic vein), associated with high tentorial incisure periatrial white matter changes. PMID:15569759

  4. Walter E. Dandy's contributions to vascular neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Kretzer, Ryan M; Coon, Alexander L; Tamargo, Rafael J

    2010-06-01

    Although Walter E. Dandy (1886-1946) is appropriately credited with the first surgical clipping of an intracranial aneurysm in 1937--a procedure that established the modern field of vascular neurosurgery--his numerous other contributions to this specialty are not as well known. Dandy can be credited with the first detailed description of the vein of Galen malformation, the first description of x-ray visualization of an intracranial aneurysm, the first characterization of basilar artery dolichoectasia, and the publication of the first comprehensive operative case series of arteriovenous malformations, cavernous malformations, and developmental venous anomalies. In addition, Dandy performed the first surgical trapping of a cavernous internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm by clipping the supraclinoid ICA and ligating the cervical ICA, and he also executed the first intracranial surgical clipping of the ICA to treat a carotid-cavernous fistula. In this article the authors describe Dandy's contributions to the field of vascular neurosurgery. PMID:20515365

  5. HIF-1α and HIF-2α induced angiogenesis in gastrointestinal vascular malformation and reversed by thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Feng, Nan; Chen, Haiying; Fu, Sengwang; Bian, Zhaolian; Lin, Xiaolu; Yang, Li; Gao, Yunjie; Fang, Jingyuan; Ge, Zhizheng

    2016-01-01

    Thalidomide is used in clinical practice to treat gastrointestinal vascular malformation (GIVM), but the pathogenesis of GIVM is not clear. Hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) and 2 alpha (HIF-2α/EPAS1) are in the same family and act as master regulators of the adaptive response to hypoxia. HIF-1α and HIF-2α are up-regulated in vascular malformations in intestinal tissues from GIVM patients, but not in adjacent normal vessels. Therefore, we investigated the role of HIF-1α and HIF-2α during angiogenesis and the mechanism of thalidomide action. In vitro experiments confirmed that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was a direct target of HIF-2α and that HIF-1α and HIF-2α regulated NOTCH1, Ang2, and DLL4, which enhanced vessel-forming of endothelial cells. Thalidomide down-regulated the expression of HIF-1α and HIF-2α and inhibited angiogenesis. In vivo zebrafish experiments suggested that HIF-2α overexpression was associated with abnormal subintestinal vascular (SIV) sprouting, which was reversed by thalidomide. This result indicated that thalidomide regulated angiogenesis via the inhibition of HIF-1α and HIF-2α expression, which further regulated downstream factors, including VEGF, NOTCH1, DLL4, and Ang2. The abnormally high expression of HIF-1α and HIF-2α may contribute to GIVM. PMID:27249651

  6. HIF-1α and HIF-2α induced angiogenesis in gastrointestinal vascular malformation and reversed by thalidomide

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Nan; Chen, Haiying; Fu, Sengwang; Bian, Zhaolian; Lin, Xiaolu; Yang, Li; Gao, Yunjie; Fang, Jingyuan; Ge, Zhizheng

    2016-01-01

    Thalidomide is used in clinical practice to treat gastrointestinal vascular malformation (GIVM), but the pathogenesis of GIVM is not clear. Hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) and 2 alpha (HIF-2α/EPAS1) are in the same family and act as master regulators of the adaptive response to hypoxia. HIF-1α and HIF-2α are up-regulated in vascular malformations in intestinal tissues from GIVM patients, but not in adjacent normal vessels. Therefore, we investigated the role of HIF-1α and HIF-2α during angiogenesis and the mechanism of thalidomide action. In vitro experiments confirmed that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was a direct target of HIF-2α and that HIF-1α and HIF-2α regulated NOTCH1, Ang2, and DLL4, which enhanced vessel-forming of endothelial cells. Thalidomide down-regulated the expression of HIF-1α and HIF-2α and inhibited angiogenesis. In vivo zebrafish experiments suggested that HIF-2α overexpression was associated with abnormal subintestinal vascular (SIV) sprouting, which was reversed by thalidomide. This result indicated that thalidomide regulated angiogenesis via the inhibition of HIF-1α and HIF-2α expression, which further regulated downstream factors, including VEGF, NOTCH1, DLL4, and Ang2. The abnormally high expression of HIF-1α and HIF-2α may contribute to GIVM. PMID:27249651

  7. Intraoral venous malformation with phleboliths

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Ravi Prakash S.; Dhillon, Manu; Gill, Navneet

    2011-01-01

    The most common type of vascular malformation is the venous malformation and these are occasionally associated with phleboliths. We report a case of a 45 year old woman with intraoral venous malformation with phleboliths. PMID:24151422

  8. Lymphatic and other vascular malformative/overgrowth disorders are caused by somatic mutations in PIK3CA

    PubMed Central

    Luks, Valerie L.; Kamitaki, Nolan; Vivero, Matthew P.; Uller, Wibke; Rab, Rashed; Bovée, Judith V.M.G.; Rialon, Kristy L.; Guevara, Carlos J.; Alomari, Ahmad I.; Greene, Arin K.; Fishman, Steven J.; Kozakewich, Harry P.W.; Maclellan, Reid A.; Mulliken, John B.; Rahbar, Reza; Spencer, Samantha A.; Trenor, Cameron C.; Upton, Joseph; Zurakowski, David; Perkins, Jonathan A.; Kirsh, Andrew; Bennett, James T; Dobyns, William B; Kurek, Kyle C.; Warman, Matthew L.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Murillo, Rudy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To test the hypothesis that somatic PIK3CA mutations would be found in patients with more common disorders including isolated lymphatic malformation (LM) and Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS). Study design We used next generation sequencing, droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), and single molecule molecular inversion probes (smMIPs) to search for somatic PIK3CA mutations in affected tissue from patients seen at Boston Children’s Hospital who had an isolated LM (n=17), KTS (n=21), fibro-adipose vascular anomaly (FAVA; n=8), or congenital lipomatous overgrowth with vascular, epidermal, and skeletal anomalies syndrome (CLOVES; n = 33), the disorder for which we first identified somatic PIK3CA mutations. We also screened 5 of the more common PIK3CA mutations in a second cohort of patients with LM (n=31) from Seattle Children’s Hospital. Results Most individuals from Boston Children’s Hospital who had isolated LM (16/17) or LM as part of a syndrome, such as KTS (19/21), FAVA (4/8), and CLOVES (30/32) were somatic mosaic for PIK3CA mutations, with 5 specific PIK3CA mutations accounting for ~ 80% of cases. Seventy-four percent of patients with LM from Seattle Children’s Hospital also were somatic mosaic for 1 of 5 specific PIK3CA mutations. Many affected tissue specimens from both cohorts contained fewer than 10% mutant cells. Conclusions Somatic PIK3CA mutations are the most common cause of isolated lymphatic malformations and disorders in which lymphatic malformation is a component feature. Five PIK3CA mutations account for most cases. The search for causal mutations requires sampling of affected tissues and techniques that are capable of detecting low-level somatic mosaicism, because the abundance of mutant cells in a malformed tissue can be low. PMID:25681199

  9. Mathematical modeling of selective photothermolysis to aid the treatment of vascular malformations and hemangioma with pulsed dye laser.

    PubMed

    Shafirstein, Gal; Buckmiller, Lisa M; Waner, Milton; Bäumler, Wolfgang

    2007-06-01

    Pulsed dye lasers (PDL) are the standard of care in the treatment of cutaneous vascular disorders such as the port-wine strains or hemangiomas of infancy. Nonetheless, there is still uncertainty regarding the specific laser parameters that are likely to yield optimal clinical outcomes. Using mathematical modeling, we explain and associate clinical outcomes with laser wavelength, radiant exposure, and pulse time and shape. The model's prediction that a continuous PDL pulse of 0.45 ms with a radiant exposure of 6 J/cm(2) is equivalent to delivering a 1.5-ms pulse consisting of three pulses with a radiant exposure of 12 J/cm(2) is in agreement with clinical studies. The model also suggests that for vascular malformations involving vessel diameters in the range of 150-500 microm, one should use a PDL at a wavelength of 595 nm with a radiant exposure of at least 12 J/cm(2) and pulse time of 1.5 ms, delivered in three pulses. Whereas it is calculated that malformations with vessels smaller than 50 microm will not respond to PDL in any clinical setting, an excellent response to PDL treatment at either a 585- or 595-nm wavelength can be expected for malformations with vessel diameters of 50-150 microm. Epidermal cooling is highly recommended for all settings to minimize pain and the risk of side effects. Finally, the model is used to generate a reference table that suggests specific PDL parameters for the treatment of various malformations and hemangiomas. The table cannot replace a clinician's experience with respect to which and how parameters should be changed, but provides a defined window of parameters that should be tried to improve clinical response. PMID:17268765

  10. Evaluation of Non-contrast Dynamic MRA in Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformation (AVM): Comparison with time of flight (TOF) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA)

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Songlin; Yan, Lirong; Yao, Yuqiang; Wang, Shuo; Yang, Mingqi; Wang, Bo; Zhuo, Yan; Zhao, Jizong; Wang, Danny J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard to diagnose intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) but is invasive. Existing magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is suboptimal for assessing the hemodynamics of AVMs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of a novel noncontrast four-dimensional (4D) dynamic MRA (dMRA) in the evaluation of intracranial AVMs through comparison with DSA and time-of-flight (TOF) MRA. Materials and methods Nineteen patients (12 women, mean age 26.2±10.7 years) with intracranial AVMs were examined with 4D dMRA, TOF and DSA. Spetzler–Martin grading scale was evaluated using each of the above three methods independently by two raters. Diagnostic confidence scores for three components of AVMs (feeding artery, nidus and draining vein) were also rated. Kendall's coefficient of concordance was calculated to evaluate the reliability between two raters within each modality (dMRA, TOF, TOF plus dMRA). The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was applied to compare the diagnostic confidence scores between each pair of the three modalities Results dMRA was able to detect 16 out of 19 AVMs, and the ratings of AVM size and location matched those of DSA. The diagnostic confidence scores by dMRA were adequate for nidus (3.5/5), moderate for feeding arteries (2.5/5) and poor for draining veins (1.5/5). The hemodynamic information provided by dMRA improved diagnostic confidence scores by TOF MRA. Conclusion As a completely noninvasive method, 4D dMRA offers hemodynamic information with a temporal resolution of 50–100 ms for the evaluation of AVMs and can complement existing methods such as DSA and TOF MRA. PMID:22521994

  11. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  12. Current Status of the Application of Intracranial Venous Sinus Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kan; Yu, Tiecheng; Yuan, Yongjie; Yu, Jinlu

    2015-01-01

    The intracranial venous sinus is an important component of vascular disease. Many diseases involve the venous sinus and are accompanied by venous sinus stenosis (VSS), which leads to increased venous pressure and high intracranial pressure. Recent research has focused on stenting as a treatment for VSS related to these diseases. However, a systematic understanding of venous sinus stenting (VS-Stenting) is lacking. Herein, the literature on idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), venous pulsatile tinnitus, sinus thrombosis, high draining venous pressure in dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and arteriovenous malformation (AVM), and tumor-caused VSS was reviewed and analyzed to summarize experiences with VS-Stenting as a treatment. The literature review showed that satisfactory therapeutic effects can be achieved through stent angioplasty. Thus, the present study suggests that selective stent release in the venous sinus can effectively treat these diseases and provide new possibilities for treating intracranial vascular disease. PMID:26516306

  13. R132C IDH1 mutations are found in spindle cell hemangiomas and not in other vascular tumors or malformations.

    PubMed

    Kurek, Kyle C; Pansuriya, Twinkal C; van Ruler, Maayke A J H; van den Akker, Brendy; Luks, Valerie L; Verbeke, Sofie L J; Kozakewich, Harry P; Sciot, Raf; Lev, Dina; Lazar, Alexander J; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2013-05-01

    Spindle cell hemangioma (SCH) is a rare, benign vascular tumor of the dermis and subcutis. The lesions can be multifocal and are overrepresented in Maffucci syndrome, in which patients also have multiple enchondromas. Somatic mosaic R132C IDH1 hotspot mutations were recently identified in Maffucci syndrome. We evaluated the presence of mutations in solitary and multiple SCHs in patients without multiple enchondromas and tested a range of other vascular lesions that enter into the differential diagnosis. The R132C IDH1 mutation was identified by hydrolysis probes assay and confirmed by Sanger sequencing in 18 of 28 (64%) SCHs; of the 10 negative cases, 2 harbored a mutation in IDH2 (R172T and R172M) by Sanger sequencing. None of 154 other vascular malformations and tumors harbored an IDH1 R132C mutation, and R132H IDH1 mutations were absent in all 182 cases. All 16 SCHs examined by immunohistochemistry were negative for expression of HIF-1α. In conclusion, 20 of 28 (71%) SCHs harbored mutations in exon 4 of IDH1 or IDH2. Given that mutations were absent in 154 other vascular lesions, the mutation seems to be highly specific for SCH. The mutation does not induce expression of HIF-1α in SCH, and therefore the exact mechanism by which mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 lead to vascular tumorigenesis remains to be established. PMID:23485734

  14. Comparing monomodality treatments of low-grade intracranial arteriovenous malformation at Hospital Kuala Lumpur between 2008 and 2011: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    bin Rosli, Fadzlishah Johanabas; Mohammed Haspani, Mohammed Saffari; Izaini Ab Ghani, Abdul Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of Spetzler-Martin grades (SMGs) I-III are treated using either monomodality treatments of microsurgical excision, embolization or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), or a combination of two or more of these treatment options. At Hospital Kuala Lumpur, we still practice monomodality treatments for AVMs of these three grades. In this study, we wanted to achieve an understanding whether monomodality treatments can achieve a satisfactory outcome of AVM nidi for patients, for up to 3 years, and to gather an objective data for AVM treatment for the Malaysian population. Subjects and Methods: This is a retrospective review of records study. The data are acquired from case notes of patients with intracranial AVM of SMGs I to III who underwent monomodality treatment at Hospital Kuala Lumpur between 2008 and 2011. The patients were followed up with imaging for up to 3 years from the date of treatment. A total of 81 patients were recruited in this study, where 30 underwent microsurgical treatment, 27 underwent embolization, and 24 underwent SRS. Results: Total obliteration of AVM nidus was achieved in 96.7% of patients who underwent microsurgery, 8.7% of patients who underwent embolization, and 79.2% of patients who underwent SRS. The modified Rankin scale (mRS) for all three groups showed an improving trend, with the microsurgery group showing the best improvement (from 70% at 3 months to 92.3% at 3 years showing favorable mRS scores). Conclusions: The AVM nidus obliteration for each treatment group is comparable to the meta-analysis published in 2011. Each modality had its own set of complications; however, most of the patients in all three groups had either static or improved mRS at the end of the 3-year follow-up. PMID:26889274

  15. Arteriovenous malformation of nose-revision surgery.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, C V; Kailash, N; Kailas, Gayattre; Divya Jyothi, N

    2012-12-01

    Areteriovenous malformations are rare in the head and neck region and generally arise from intracranial vessels. We present one rare case with spontaneous arteriovenous malformations related to the nose. PMID:24294582

  16. Vascular Steal Syndrome, Optic Neuropathy, and Foreign Body Granuloma Reaction to Onyx-18 Embolization for Congenital Orbito-Facial Vascular Malformation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Catherine Y; Yonkers, Marc A; Liu, Tiffany S; Minckler, Don S; Tao, Jeremiah P

    2016-04-01

    A 34-year-old patient presented with a right orbito-facial mass since childhood, consistent with a congenital arteriovenous (AV) malformation. Prior to presentation, she had multiple incomplete surgical resections and embolizations with N-butyl acetyl acrylate and Onyx-18. The patient reported gradual, progressive vision loss shortly after Onyx-18 embolization. Five months after embolization, she presented with decreased vision, disfigurement and mechanical ptosis relating to a large subcutaneous mass affecting the medial right upper eyelid and forehead. Significant exam findings included a visual acuity of 20/400 (20/60 prior to embolization), an afferent pupillary defect, and optic disc pallor. MRI and angiography revealed a persistent AV malformation with feeders from the ophthalmic artery and an absent choroidal flush to the right eye. Pathology from surgical resection showed a significant foreign body giant cell reaction to the embolization material adjacent to the vessels. We suggest that an incomplete embolization with Onyx-18 may have caused vascular steal syndrome from the ophthalmic artery. PMID:27239463

  17. Vascular Steal Syndrome, Optic Neuropathy, and Foreign Body Granuloma Reaction to Onyx-18 Embolization for Congenital Orbito-Facial Vascular Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Catherine Y.; Yonkers, Marc A.; Liu, Tiffany S.; Minckler, Don S.; Tao, Jeremiah P.

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old patient presented with a right orbito-facial mass since childhood, consistent with a congenital arteriovenous (AV) malformation. Prior to presentation, she had multiple incomplete surgical resections and embolizations with N-butyl acetyl acrylate and Onyx-18. The patient reported gradual, progressive vision loss shortly after Onyx-18 embolization. Five months after embolization, she presented with decreased vision, disfigurement and mechanical ptosis relating to a large subcutaneous mass affecting the medial right upper eyelid and forehead. Significant exam findings included a visual acuity of 20/400 (20/60 prior to embolization), an afferent pupillary defect, and optic disc pallor. MRI and angiography revealed a persistent AV malformation with feeders from the ophthalmic artery and an absent choroidal flush to the right eye. Pathology from surgical resection showed a significant foreign body giant cell reaction to the embolization material adjacent to the vessels. We suggest that an incomplete embolization with Onyx-18 may have caused vascular steal syndrome from the ophthalmic artery. PMID:27239463

  18. Parry-Romberg syndrome with multiple intracranial cysts: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rakesh; Patil, Harshad

    2016-01-01

    Parry-Romberg syndrome (PRS) is a rare, poorly understood degenerative condition characterized by atrophic changes affecting one side of the face. The cause of these changes remains obscure. Migraine and facial pain such as trigeminal neuralgia are the most common neurological symptoms in this patient group. Sometimes, it causes epilepsy and rarely cerebral hemiatrophy, meningeal thickening, cortical dysgenesis, calcified lesions, aneurysms, and intracranial vascular malformations. Herein, the author reports the first case of PRS with multiple large intracranial cysts producing raised intracranial pressure. PMID:27606027

  19. Parry–Romberg syndrome with multiple intracranial cysts: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rakesh; Patil, Harshad

    2016-01-01

    Parry–Romberg syndrome (PRS) is a rare, poorly understood degenerative condition characterized by atrophic changes affecting one side of the face. The cause of these changes remains obscure. Migraine and facial pain such as trigeminal neuralgia are the most common neurological symptoms in this patient group. Sometimes, it causes epilepsy and rarely cerebral hemiatrophy, meningeal thickening, cortical dysgenesis, calcified lesions, aneurysms, and intracranial vascular malformations. Herein, the author reports the first case of PRS with multiple large intracranial cysts producing raised intracranial pressure. PMID:27606027

  20. Imaging of Spontaneous Ventriculomegaly and Vascular Malformations in Wistar rats: implications for Preclinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Tsang-Wei; Turtzo, L. Christine; Williams, Rashida A.; Lescher, Jacob D.; Dean, Dana D.; Frank, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Wistar rats are widely used in biomedical research and commonly serve as a model organism in neuroscience studies. In most cases when noninvasive imaging is not utilized, studies assume a consistent baseline condition in rats that lack visible differences. While performing a series of traumatic brain injury studies, we discovered mild spontaneous ventriculomegaly in 70/162 (43.2%) of Wistar rats that had been obtained from 2 different vendors. Advanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques, including MR angiography and diffusion tensor imaging, were utilized to evaluate the rats. Multiple neuropathologic abnormalities, including presumed arteriovenous malformations, aneurysms, cysts, white matter lesion and astrogliosis were found in association with ventriculomegaly. Postmortem micro-CT and immunohistochemical staining confirmed the presence of aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations. Diffusion tensor imaging significant decreases in fractional anisotropy and increases in mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity in multiple white matter tracts (p < 0.05). These results could impact the interpretation, e.g. of a pseudo-increase of axon integrity and a pseudo-decrease of myelin integrity, based on characteristics intrinsic to rats with ventriculomegaly. We suggest the use of baseline imaging to prevent the inadvertent introduction of a high degree of variability in preclinical studies of neurological disease or injury in the Wistar rats. PMID:25383642

  1. Volumetric Modulated Arc-Based Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Selected Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformations: Dosimetric Report and Early Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Sai; Srinivas, Chilukuri; Ramalingam, K.; Babaiah, M.; Swamy, S. Thirumalai; Arun, G.; Kathirvel, M.; Ashok, S.; Clivio, Alessandro; Fogliata, Antonella; Nicolini, Giorgia; Rao, K. Srinivasa; Reddy, T. Pratap; Amit, Jotwani; Vanetti, Eugenio; Cozzi, Luca

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, with a dosimetric and clinical feasibility study, RapidArc (a volumetric modulated arc technique) for hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy treatment of large arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were subject to multimodality imaging (magnetic resonance, computed tomography, and digital subtraction angiography) to determine nidus and target volumes, as well as involved organs at risk (optical structures, inner ear, brain stem). Plans for multiple intensity-modulated arcs with a single isocenter were optimized for a fractionation of 25 Gy in 5 fractions. All plans were optimized for 6-MV photon beams. Dose-volume histograms were analyzed to assess plan quality. Delivery parameters were reported to appraise technical features of RapidArc, and pretreatment quality assurance measurements were carried out to report on quality of delivery. Results: Average size of AVM nidus was 26.2 cm{sup 3}, and RapidArc plans provided complete target coverage with minimal overdosage (V{sub 100%} = 100% and V{sub 110%} < 1%) and excellent homogeneity (<6%). Organs at risk were highly spared. The D{sub 1%} to chiasm, eyes, lenses, optic nerves, and brainstem (mean {+-} SD) was 6.4 {+-} 8.3, 1.9 {+-} 3.8, 2.3 {+-} 2.2, 0.7 {+-} 0.9, 4.4 {+-} 7.2, 12.2 {+-} 9.6 Gy, respectively. Conformity index (CI{sub 95%}) was 2.2 {+-} 0.1. The number of monitor units per gray was 277 {+-} 45, total beam-on time was 2.5 {+-} 0.3 min. Planning vs. delivery {gamma} pass rate was 98.3% {+-} 0.9%. None of the patients developed acute toxicity. With a median follow-up of 9 months, 3 patients presented with deterioration of symptoms and were found to have postradiation changes but responded symptomatically to steroids. These patients continue to do well on follow-up. One patient developed headache and seizures, which was attributed to intracranial bleed, confirmed on imaging. Conclusion: Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy can be

  2. The “focus on aneurysm” principle: Classification and surgical principles of management of concurrent arterial aneurysm with arteriovenous malformation causing intracranial hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Vikas; Behari, Sanjay; Jaiswal, Awadhesh K.; Bhaisora, Kamlesh Singh; Shende, Yogesh P.; Phadke, Rajendra V.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Concurrent arterial aneurysms (AAs) occurring in 2.7-16.7% patients harboring an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) aggravate the risk of intracranial hemorrhage. Aim: We evaluate the variations of aneurysms simultaneously coexisting with AVMs. A classification-based management strategy and an abbreviated nomenclature that describes their radiological features is also proposed. Setting: Tertiary care academic institute. Statistics: Test of significance applied to determine the factors causing rebleeding in the groups of patients with concurrent AVM and aneurysm and those with only AVMs. Subjects and Methods: Sixteen patients (5 with subarachnoid hemorrhage and 11 with intracerebral/intraventricular hemorrhage; 10 with low flow [LF] and 6 with high flow [HF] AVMs) underwent radiological assessment of Spetzler Martin (SM) grading and flow status of AA + AVM. Their modified Rankin's score (mRS) at admission was compared with their follow-up (F/U) score. Results: Pre-operative mRS was 0 in 5, 2 in 6, 3 in 1, 4 in 3 and 5 in 1; and, SM grade I in 5, II in 3, III in 3, IV in 4 and V in 1 patients, respectively. AA associated AVMs were classified as: (I) Flow-related proximal (n = 2); (II) flow-related distal (n = 3); (III) intranidal (n = 5); (IV) extra-intranidal (n = 2); (V) remote major ipsilateral (n = 1); (VI) remote major contralateral (n = 1); (VII) deep perforator related (n = 1); (VIII) superficial (n = 1); and (IX) distal (n = 0). Their treatment strategy included: Flow related AA, SM I-III LF AVM: aneurysm clipping with AVM excision; nidal-extranidal AA, SM I-III LF AVM: Excision or embolization of both AA + AVM; nidal-extranidal and perforator-related AA, SM IV-V HF AVM: Only endovascular embolization or radiosurgery. Surgical decision-making for remote AA took into account their ipsilateral/contralateral filling status and vessel dominance; and, for AA associated with SM III HF AVM, it varied in each patient based on diffuseness of AVM nidus, flow

  3. Crystal Structure of CCM3, a Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Protein Critical for Vascular Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Zhang, R; Zhang, H; He, Y; Ji, W; Min, W; Boggon, T

    2010-01-01

    CCM3 mutations are associated with cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), a disease affecting 0.1-0.5% of the human population. CCM3 (PDCD10, TFAR15) is thought to form a CCM complex with CCM1 and CCM2; however, the molecular basis for these interactions is not known. We have determined the 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of CCM3. This structure shows an all {alpha}-helical protein containing two domains, an N-terminal dimerization domain with a fold not previously observed, and a C-terminal focal adhesion targeting (FAT)-homology domain. We show that CCM3 binds CCM2 via this FAT-homology domain and that mutation of a highly conserved FAK-like hydrophobic pocket (HP1) abrogates CCM3-CCM2 interaction. This CCM3 FAT-homology domain also interacts with paxillin LD motifs using the same surface, and partial CCM3 co-localization with paxillin in cells is lost on HP1 mutation. Disease-related CCM3 truncations affect the FAT-homology domain suggesting a role for the FAT-homology domain in the etiology of CCM.

  4. Crystal Structure of CCM3, a Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Protein Critical for Vascular Integrity*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Haifeng; He, Yun; Ji, Weidong; Min, Wang; Boggon, Titus J.

    2010-01-01

    CCM3 mutations are associated with cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), a disease affecting 0.1–0.5% of the human population. CCM3 (PDCD10, TFAR15) is thought to form a CCM complex with CCM1 and CCM2; however, the molecular basis for these interactions is not known. We have determined the 2.5 Å crystal structure of CCM3. This structure shows an all α-helical protein containing two domains, an N-terminal dimerization domain with a fold not previously observed, and a C-terminal focal adhesion targeting (FAT)-homology domain. We show that CCM3 binds CCM2 via this FAT-homology domain and that mutation of a highly conserved FAK-like hydrophobic pocket (HP1) abrogates CCM3-CCM2 interaction. This CCM3 FAT-homology domain also interacts with paxillin LD motifs using the same surface, and partial CCM3 co-localization with paxillin in cells is lost on HP1 mutation. Disease-related CCM3 truncations affect the FAT-homology domain suggesting a role for the FAT-homology domain in the etiology of CCM. PMID:20489202

  5. Surgical management of cavernous malformation of the optic nerve with canalicular extension

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Vítor M.; Gonçalves, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cavernous malformations arising in a single optic nerves paring the chiasm (intracranial prechiasmatic optic nerve) and expanding into the optic canal are extremely rare lesions. Published series or case reports regarding the surgical removal of these vascular malformations within this specific location are scarce. Case Description: We present the first case to be published, of an intracranial optic nerve cavernous malformation with a contiguous canalicular component that was totally and successfully removed through a microsurgical pterional approach with excellent clinical outcome. Conclusion: This pathology should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of optic neuropathy and visual loss. Early detection and surgical proposal are mandatory, warranting the prevention of permanent damage to visual pathways. Radical resection is challenging, but usually curative and associated with favorable visual outcomes. PMID:25422788

  6. Monro-Kellie 2.0: The dynamic vascular and venous pathophysiological components of intracranial pressure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    For 200 years, the ‘closed box’ analogy of intracranial pressure (ICP) has underpinned neurosurgery and neuro-critical care. Cushing conceptualised the Monro-Kellie doctrine stating that a change in blood, brain or CSF volume resulted in reciprocal changes in one or both of the other two. When not possible, attempts to increase a volume further increase ICP. On this doctrine’s “truth or relative untruth” depends many of the critical procedures in the surgery of the central nervous system. However, each volume component may not deserve the equal weighting this static concept implies. The slow production of CSF (0.35 ml/min) is dwarfed by the dynamic blood in and outflow (∼700 ml/min). Neuro-critical care practice focusing on arterial and ICP regulation has been questioned. Failure of venous efferent flow to precisely match arterial afferent flow will yield immediate and dramatic changes in intracranial blood volume and pressure. Interpreting ICP without interrogating its core drivers may be misleading. Multiple clinical conditions and the cerebral effects of altitude and microgravity relate to imbalances in this dynamic rather than ICP per se. This article reviews the Monro-Kellie doctrine, categorises venous outflow limitation conditions, relates physiological mechanisms to clinical conditions and suggests specific management options. PMID:27174995

  7. Severe holocord syrinx in a child with megalencephaly-capillary malformation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Segal, Devorah; Heary, Robert F; Sabharwal, Sanjeev; Barry, Maureen T; Ming, Xue

    2016-07-01

    The authors present the case of a child with megalencephaly-capillary malformation syndrome who developed a rapidly progressive holocord syringomyelia that was treated surgically. A 3-year-old boy with megalencephaly-capillary malformation-polymicrogyria (MCAP) syndrome presented with several months of right leg weakness, worsening scoliosis, and increased seizures. An MRI study of the brain demonstrated a Chiari I malformation and massively dilated syringomyelia extending from C-2 to the conus medullaris. The patient underwent an urgent suboccipital craniectomy with C1-3 laminectomies to relieve the CSF outflow obstruction with significant clinical improvement. Surgery was complicated by bleeding from intracranial vascular malformations. This report describes a very rapidly developing, massive holocord syringomyelia related to CSF obstruction due to an unusual congenital brain malformation and associated vascular overgrowth at the site. Serial, premorbid MRI studies demonstrated the very rapid progression from no Chiari malformation, to progressively greater cerebellar tonsillar herniation, to holocord syrinx. This complication has never been reported in MCAP syndrome and should be considered in any affected MCAP patient with a progressive neurological decline, even if previous spine imaging findings were normal. Surgical complications due to hemorrhage also need to be considered in this vascular brain malformation. PMID:27035547

  8. Real-time ultrasonography as a monitoring technique for interstitial Nd:YAG laser treatment of voluminous hemangiomas and vascular malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Jochen A.; Gottschlich, Stefan; Lippert, Burkard M.; Folz, Benedikt J.

    1998-01-01

    Voluminous vascular anomalies of the head and neck region are still treated with conventional surgery although Neodymium:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser therapy is an effective treatment method. One hundred thirty give patients with voluminous hemangiomas and vascular malformations were treated with interstitial Nd:YAG laser therapy, partly complemented by a non-contact mode Nd:YAG laser light application. The vascular tumors had a diameter of more than 3 cm in two or all three dimensions. Treatment was carried out under ultrasound and manual control. Nearly 60% of the patients showed a complete clinical regression of the vascular tumor, a third of the patients had a partial regression and were satisfied with the treatment outcome. Four patients were treated unsuccessfully with the laser and three of them subsequently underwent conventional surgery. Only 10 patients showed cosmetic and functional deficits. These results on the interstitial Nd:YAG laser therapy of voluminous hemangiomas and vascular malformations in a large patient group demonstrated the high effectiveness of this novel and innovative therapy modality.

  9. Spontaneous thrombosis of a vein of galen malformation.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Chandan B; Srinivas, Dwarakanath; Sampath, Somanna

    2016-01-01

    Vein of Galen malformation (VOGM) is a rare congenital vascular anomaly, comprising about 1% of all intracranial vascular anomalies, predominantly affecting the children less than 1 year of age. A 6-month-old infant presented with complaints of increasing head size of 3 months duration and multiple episodes of vomiting associated with refusal to feed since 7 days. He was a known case of VOGM who had initially refused treatment. Investigations revealed a spontaneously thrombosed VOGM with obstructive hydrocephalous. Child improved uneventfully with ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Spontaneous thrombosis of a VOGM is a rare occurrence and carries a better prognosis. The relevant literature is discussed with emphasis on etiopathogenesis, mechanism, and management of spontaneous thrombosis of the malformation. PMID:26889287

  10. Spontaneous thrombosis of a vein of galen malformation

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Chandan B.; Srinivas, Dwarakanath; Sampath, Somanna

    2016-01-01

    Vein of Galen malformation (VOGM) is a rare congenital vascular anomaly, comprising about 1% of all intracranial vascular anomalies, predominantly affecting the children less than 1 year of age. A 6-month-old infant presented with complaints of increasing head size of 3 months duration and multiple episodes of vomiting associated with refusal to feed since 7 days. He was a known case of VOGM who had initially refused treatment. Investigations revealed a spontaneously thrombosed VOGM with obstructive hydrocephalous. Child improved uneventfully with ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Spontaneous thrombosis of a VOGM is a rare occurrence and carries a better prognosis. The relevant literature is discussed with emphasis on etiopathogenesis, mechanism, and management of spontaneous thrombosis of the malformation. PMID:26889287

  11. Long term results of treatment of vascular malformations of the gastrointestinal tract by neodymium Yag laser photocoagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Rutgeerts, P; Van Gompel, F; Geboes, K; Vantrappen, G; Broeckaert, L; Coremans, G

    1985-01-01

    The effect of Yag laser photocoagulation on the course of bleeding of gastrointestinal vascular malformations was studied in 59 patients, with a total of 482 lesions. The lesions were located in the upper gastrointestinal tract alone in 25 patients, in the lower tract alone in 31 patients and in both the lower and the upper gastrointestinal tract in three patients. In the month before laser therapy the number of bleeding episodes averaged 1.09 +/- 0.6 (SD) per patient (n = 57) and the transfusion requirements 2.4 +/- 2.6 red blood cells units per patient, while in the month after treatment the bleeding incidence averaged 0.16 +/- 0.5 and the transfusion requirements 0.21 +/- 0.8 (both p less than 0.001). Long term results were analysed considering for each patient an equally long pretreatment and follow up period. After a mean follow up period of 11.5 months (1-48 months), 17 of the 57 patients available for follow up rebled. The reduction of the bleeding rate was statistically significant at one, six, 12, and 18 months of follow up, while transfusion rate was significantly decreased at one, six, and 12 months. The results were disappointing in patients with Osler-Weber-Rendu (n = 4) and in patients with angiomas associated with Von Willebrand's disease (n = 3), who all rebled. In angiodysplasia the treatment was successful in 82% of the 49 patients. The more numerous the lesions, the less effective the reduction in bleeding rate by laser treatment was. Histological studies showed that the haemostatic effect of Yag laser photocoagulation was obtained by destruction of the lesion. Rebleeding was due to lesions missed at the first treatment, incompletely treated lesions and recurrence of new lesions. In two patients a free caecal perforation necessitated a right hemicolectomy. In both patients numerous or very large lesions had been treated in the caecum. Images Fig. 3 PMID:3874122

  12. RASA1 analysis guides management in a family with capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation

    PubMed Central

    Flore, Leigh Anne; Leon, Eyby; Maher, Tom A.; Milunsky, Jeff M.

    2012-01-01

    Capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM; MIM 60354) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multifocal cutaneous capillary malformations, often in association with fast-flow vascular lesions, which may be cutaneous, subcutaneous, intramuscular, intraosseus, or cerebral arteriovenous malformations or arteriovenous fistulas. CM-AVM results from heterozygous mutations in the RASA1 gene. Capillary malformations of the skin are common, and clinical examination alone may not be able to definitively diagnose-or exclude- CM-AVM. We report a family in which the proband was initially referred for a genetic evaluation in the neonatal period because of the presence of a cardiac murmur and minor dysmorphic features. Both he and his mother were noted to have multiple capillary malformations on the face, head, and extremities. Echocardiography revealed dilated head and neck vessels and magnetic resonance imaging and angiography of the brain revealed a large infratentorial arteriovenous fistula, for which he has had two embolization procedures. RASA1 sequence analysis revealed a heterozygous mutation, confirming his diagnosis of CM-AVM. We established targeted mutation analysis for the proband's mother and sister, the latter of whom is a healthy 3-year-old whose only cutaneous finding is a facial capillary malformation. This revealed that the proband's mother is also heterozygous for the RASA1 mutation, but his sister is negative. Consequently, his mother will undergo magnetic resonance imaging and angiography screening for intracranial and spinal fast-flow lesions, while his sister will require no imaging or serial evaluations. Targeted mutation analysis has been offered to additional maternal family members. This case illustrates the benefit of molecular testing in diagnosis and making screening recommendations for families with CM-AVM.

  13. Rho kinase as a target for cerebral vascular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M; Sellers, James R; McKerracher, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The development of novel pharmaceutical treatments for disorders of the cerebral vasculature is a serious unmet medical need. These vascular disorders are typified by a disruption in the delicate Rho signaling equilibrium within the blood vessel wall. In particular, Rho kinase overactivation in the smooth muscle and endothelial layers of the vessel wall results in cytoskeletal modifications that lead to reduced vascular integrity and abnormal vascular growth. Rho kinase is thus a promising target for the treatment of cerebral vascular disorders. Indeed, preclinical studies indicate that Rho kinase inhibition may reduce the formation/growth/rupture of both intracranial aneurysms and cerebral cavernous malformations. PMID:26062400

  14. Early experience with X-ray magnetic resonance fusion for low-flow vascular malformations in the pediatric interventional radiology suite.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tiffany J; Girard, Erin; Shellikeri, Sphoorti; Setser, Randolph; Vossough, Arastoo; Ho-Fung, Victor; Cahill, Anne Marie

    2016-03-01

    This technical innovation describes our experience using an X-ray magnetic resonance fusion (XMRF) software program to overlay 3-D MR images on real-time fluoroscopic images during sclerotherapy procedures for vascular malformations at a large pediatric institution. Five cases have been selected to illustrate the application and various clinical utilities of XMRF during sclerotherapy procedures as well as the technical limitations of this technique. The cases demonstrate how to use XMRF in the interventional suite to derive additional information to improve therapeutic confidence with regards to the extent of lesion filling and to guide clinical management in terms of intraprocedural interventional measures. PMID:26681438

  15. Congenital Vascular Malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... types. The more primitive ones appear as thinwalled lakes in which venous blood collects and when they ... collection of grape-like clusters of these venous lakes. This type usually does not affect the venous ...

  16. Embolization biomaterial reinforced with nanotechnology for an in-situ release of anti-angiogenic agent in the treatment of hyper-vascularized tumors and arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Jubeli, E; Yagoubi, N; Pascale, F; Bédouet, L; Slimani, K; Labarre, D; Saint-Maurice, J P; Laurent, A; Moine, L

    2015-10-01

    A polymer based material was developed to act as an embolic agent and drug reservoir for the treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVM) and hyper vascularized solid tumors. The aim was to combine the blocking of blood supply to the target region and the inhibition of the embolization-stimulated angiogenesis. The material is composed of an ethanolic solution of a linear acrylate based copolymer and acrylate calibrated microparticles containing nanospheres loaded with sunitinib, an anti-angiogenic agent. The precipitation of the linear copolymer in aqueous environment after injection through microcatheter results in the formation of an in-situ embolization gel whereas the microparticles serve to increase the cohesive properties of the embolization agent and to form a reservoir from which the sunitinib-loaded nanospheres are released post-embolization. The swollen state of the microparticles in contact with aqueous medium results in the release of the nanospheres out of microparticles macromolecular structure. After the synthesis, the formulation and the characterization of the different components of the material, anti-angiogenic activity was evaluated in vitro using endothelial cells and in vivo using corneal neovascularization model in rabbit. The efficiency of the arterial embolization was tested in vivo in a sheep model. Results proved the feasibility of this new system for vascular embolization in association with an in situ delivery of anti-angiogenic drug. This combination is a promising strategy for the management of arteriovenous malformations and solid tumors. PMID:26386355

  17. Acquired vascular malformation in ruptured caesarean section scar: a rare cause of life-threatening vaginal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hilal, Kiran; Masroor, Imrana; Aziz, Aliya; Sayani, Raza

    2013-01-01

    Uterine arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are rare and potentially life-threatening lesions. Patients present with severe vaginal bleeding which usually does not respond to conservative management and on most of occasions requires radiological or surgical intervention. We report a case of acquired AVM in a ruptured caesarean section scar. The patient presented with life-threatening vaginal bleeding and was treated with gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist and subsequent angioembolisation coiling. PMID:23839607

  18. The Dural AV-Fistula (DAVF), the Most Frequent Acquired Vascular Malformation of the Central Nervous System (CNS).

    PubMed

    Wanke, I; Rüfenacht, D A

    2015-10-01

    Acquired arteriovenous malformations, such as is the case with dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVF), are the consequence of a pathological new arterial ingrowth into venous spaces that reaches directly the venous lumen, without interposition of a capillary network, thereby creating an AV-shunt.The following concise text will provide elements in regards to diagnosis, indication for treatment discussion and choice of endovascular treatment (EVT) method. PMID:26308245

  19. A locus for cerebral cavernous malformations maps to chromosome 7q in two families

    SciTech Connect

    Marchuk, D.A.; Gallione, C.J.; Morrison, L.A.; Davis, L.E.; Clericuzio, C.L.

    1995-07-20

    Cavernous malformations (angiomas) affecting the central nervous system and retina can be inherited in autosomal dominant pattern (OMIM 116860). These vascular lesions may remain clinically silent or lead to a number of neurological symptoms including seizure, intracranial hemorrhage, focal neurological deficit, and migraine. We have mapped a gene for this disorder in two families, one of Italian-American origin and one of Mexican-American origin, to markers on proximal 7q, with a combined maximum lod score of 3.92 ({theta} of zero) with marker D7S479. Haplotype analysis of these families places the locus between markers D7S502 proximally and D7S515 distally, an interval of approximately 41 cM. The location distinguishes this disorder from an autosomal dominant vascular malformation syndrome where lesions are primarily cutaneous and that maps to 9p21. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Multiple Intracranial Arteriovenous Fistulas in Cowden Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prats-Sánchez, Luis A; Hervás-García, Jose V; Becerra, Juan L; Lozano, Manuel; Castaño, Carlos; Munuera, Josep; Escudero, Domingo; García-Esperón, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Cowden syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease. It is characterized by multiple noncancerous tumorlike growths called hamartomas, which typically are found in the skin, oral mucosa, thyroid, breast, and gastrointestinal tract. It carries with it a potential risk of malignant transformation, especially of the breast and thyroid. In 80% of the cases, the human tumor suppressor gene, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), is mutated in the germ line. We report a patient with Cowden syndrome who presented with generalized seizure and left anterior temporal hemorrhage and a nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage due to multiple intracranial arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs). We discuss previous reports about vascular malformations in patients with Cowden syndrome and PTEN mutations. Importantly, we hypothesize that the production of multiple AVFs in our patient was associated with PTEN mutation. PMID:27105569

  1. Developmental venous anomalies and cavernous angiomas: a review of the concurrence, imaging, and treatment of these vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Beall, Douglas P; Bell, Jayson P; Webb, James R; Fish, Jon R

    2005-11-01

    Deep venous anomalies and cavernous angiomas are two distinct intracranial lesions. Although these lesions can be found in association with each other, they have different pathologic characteristics and developmental mechanisms. These lesions can produce a variety of clinical symptoms or in some cases can be asymptomatic. The management of these anomalies can include conservative measures in some cases and aggressive intervention in others. Several imaging modalities can be used to evaluate these distinct lesions and often more than one are needed for a prompt and reliable diagnosis. Because of the tendency of these lesions to occur simultaneously, thorough evaluation of these anomalies and their surrounding tissues is critical in their clinical management. In this review, the characteristics and radiographic evaluation of these lesions will be presented and the therapeutic options for these anomalies will be discussed. PMID:16379482

  2. Vascular malformation with phleboliths involving the parotid gland: A case report with a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ho, Caleb; Judson, Benjamin L; Prasad, Manju L

    2015-01-01

    Phleboliths within the parotid gland are exceedingly rare. We report a case of a venous malformation with multiple phleboliths that involved the left parotid gland and extended into the extraparotid tissue in a 43-year-old woman. We also review 13 similar cases that have been reported since 1948, and we highlight the significance of distinguishing phleboliths from sialoliths because management of the two can be entirely different. Phleboliths in and around the salivary glands primarily affect the parotid and submandibular glands in adult women. Patients can present with recurrent, intermittent swelling that may be associated with food intake and hyposalivation. Any sialolithiasis located outside of its most common location in the submandibular glands must be investigated thoroughly before surgery. PMID:26535823

  3. Galenic arteriovenous malformation with precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Ventureyra, E C; Badejo, A

    1984-01-01

    Pineal lesions may appear with precocious puberty. In this report, a patient with precocious puberty and macrogenitosomia caused by an arteriovenous malformation in the pineal region is presented. This vascular malformation was not visualized during investigations 3 years before the present series. It appears that the vascular malformation increased considerably in size within a 3-year period. This case suggests that some arteriovenous malformations may take a malignant course, increasing rapidly in size and behaving like tumors by causing destruction and compression of surrounding structures. This case seems to be unique because, to the best of our knowledge, an arteriovenous malformation associated with precocious puberty has never been described previously. PMID:6689808

  4. Amphibian malformations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    National Wildlife Health Center

    1998-01-01

    Frog malformations have been reported from 42 states. The broad geographic distribution of these malformations warrants national attention. Scientists at the USGS National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisconsin are studying this problem in an effort to document its scope and to determine the causes of the observed malformations.

  5. Safety and Efficacy Study of Sirolimus in Complicated Vascular Anomalies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-03

    Kaposiform Hemangioendotheliomas; Tufted Angioma; Capillary Venous Lymphatic Malformation; Venous Lymphatic Malformation; Microcystic Lymphatic Malformation; Mucocutaneous Lymphangiomatosis and Thrombocytopenia; Capillary Lymphatic Arterial Venous Malformations; PTEN Overgrowth Syndrome With Vascular Anomaly; Lymphangiectasia Syndromes

  6. Genetic basis for vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kirkorian, A Yasmine; Grossberg, Anna L; Püttgen, Katherine B

    2016-03-01

    The fundamental genetics of many isolated vascular anomalies and syndromes associated with vascular anomalies have been elucidated. The rate of discovery continues to increase, expanding our understanding of the underlying interconnected molecular pathways. This review summarizes genetic and clinical information on the following diagnoses: capillary malformation, venous malformation, lymphatic malformation, arteriovenous malformation, PIK3CA-related overgrowth spectrum (PROS), Proteus syndrome, SOLAMEN syndrome, Sturge-Weber syndrome, phakomatosis pigmentovascularis, congenital hemangioma, verrucous venous malformation, cutaneomucosal venous malformation, blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome, Parkes-Weber syndrome, and Maffucci syndrome. PMID:27607321

  7. Developmental venous anomaly, capillary telangiectasia, cavernous malformation, and arteriovenous malformation: spectrum of a common pathological entity?

    PubMed

    Kalani, M Yashar S; Zabramski, Joseph M; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Spetzler, Robert F

    2016-03-01

    Vascular malformations of the central nervous system are thought to originate from abnormal developmental processes during embryogenesis. Reports have cited the dynamic nature of these lesions and their "maturation" into other types of malformations. Herein we report on three patients with vascular malformations who exhibited dynamic alterations with stepwise progression of their lesions. These cases lend support to the hypothesis that these malformations may constitute the spectrum of a single disease caused by alterations in a common developmental program and that accumulating injury (e.g., by radiation) may allow one malformation type to mature into another. This concept warrants further investigation. PMID:26743915

  8. Intracranial atherosclerosis following radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, M.H.; Burger, P.C.; Heinz, E.R.; Friedman, A.H.; Halperin, E.C.; Schold, S.C. Jr.

    1988-07-01

    We describe a case of severe intracranial atherosclerosis in a young man who had received therapeutic radiation for a presumed brain neoplasm. Since there was no evidence of vascular disease outside the radiation ports, we speculate that accelerated atherosclerosis was induced by radiation and that hyperlipidemia may have predisposed him to this effect.

  9. Supernova hemorrhage: obliterative hemorrhage of brain arteriovenous malformations following γ knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew D; Hetts, Steven W; Young, William L; Halbach, Van V; Dowd, Christopher F; Higashida, Randall T; English, Joey D

    2012-09-01

    Hemorrhage represents the most feared complication of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in both untreated patients and those treated with gamma knife radiosurgery. Radiosurgery does not immediately lead to obliteration of the malformation, which often does not occur until years following treatment. Post-obliteration hemorrhage is rare, occurring months to years after radiosurgery, and has been associated with residual or recurrent AVM despite prior apparent nidus elimination. Three cases are reported of delayed intracranial hemorrhage in patients with cerebral AVMs treated with radiosurgery in which no residual AVM was found on catheter angiography at the time of delayed post-treatment hemorrhage. That the pathophysiology of these hemorrhages involves progressive venous outflow occlusion is speculated and the possible mechanistic link to subsequent vascular rupture is discussed. PMID:21990534

  10. Sonographic Diagnosis of Fetal Adrenal Hemorrhage Complicating a Vein of Galen Aneurysmal Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Kütük, Mehmet Serdar; Doğanay, Selim; Özdemir, Ahmet; Görkem, Süreyya Burcu; Öztürk, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    Background: The vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation (VGAM) is a rare intracranial vascular malformation which causes end-organ ischemia or venous congestion due to heart failure. Adrenal hemorrhage associated with VGAM has not been reported in the literature. We present the imaging findings of a fetal VGAM with adrenal hemorrhage. Case Report: A 26 year-old primigravida woman whose fetus with VGAM and mild cardiomegaly was scanned in the 34th week. On fetal ultrasound, a hyperechoic, well-circumscribed mass in the left suprarenal region was shown. Fetal and postnatal magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage. The baby died after delivery. Conclusion: Adrenal hemorrhage can complicate VGAM in fetuses with severe heart failure. Evaluation of the adrenal gland in affected cases may contribute to the prenatal counseling, and postnatal management. PMID:26966627

  11. Intracranial haemorrhage in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Fairhall, Jacob M; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2009-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) is a rare, yet potentially devastating event in pregnancy. There is a risk of maternal mortality or morbidity and a significant risk to the unborn child. The risk of haemorrhage increases during the third trimester and is greatest during parturition and the puerperium. ICH can be extradural, subdural, subarachnoid or intraparenchymal. Causes of bleeding include trauma, arteriovenous malformations, aneurysms, preeclampsia/eclampsia and venous thrombosis. Urgent neurosurgical conditions generally outweigh obstetric considerations in management decisions, although anaesthetic and surgical modifications can be made to minimize adverse effects to the fetus.

  12. Closed-Cell Stent-Assisted Coiling of Intracranial Aneurysms: Evaluation of Changes in Vascular Geometry Using Digital Subtraction Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Beller, Ebba; Klopp, David; Göttler, Jens; Kaesmacher, Johannes; Zimmer, Claus; Kirschke, Jan S.; Prothmann, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    Background Stent-assisted coil embolization (SACE) plays an important role in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. The purpose of this study was to investigate geometrical changes caused by closed-cell design stents in bifurcation and sidewall aneurysms. Methods 31 patients with 34 aneurysms underwent SACE with closed-cell design stents. Inflow angle α, determined by aneurysm neck and afferent vessel, and angle between afferent and efferent vessel close to (δ1), respectively, more remote from the aneurysm neck (δ2) were graphically determined in 2D angiography projections. Results Stent assisted coiling resulted in a significant increase of all three angles from a mean value (±SEM) of α = 119° (±6.5°) pretreatment to 130° (±6.6°) posttreatment (P ≤ .001), δ1 = 129° (±6.4°) to 139° (±6.1°), (P ≤ .001) and δ2 = 115° (±8.4°) to 126° (±7.5°), (P ≤ .01). Angular change of δ1 in AcomA aneurysms was significant greater compared to sidewall aneurysms (26°±4.9° versus 8°± 2.3°, P ≤ .05). The initial angle of δ1 and δ2 revealed a significantly inverse relationship to the angle increase (δ1: r = -0.41, P ≤ .05 and δ2: r = -0.47, P ≤ .01). Moreover, angle δ1 was significantly higher in unruptured compared to ruptured aneurysms (135°±7.1° versus 103°±10.8°, P ≤ .05). Conclusion Stent deployment modulates the geometry of the aneurysm-vessel complex, which may lead to favorable hemodynamic changes more similar to unruptured than to ruptured aneurysms. Our findings also suggest that the more acute-angled aneurysm-vessel anatomy, the larger the angular change. Further studies are needed to investigate whether these changes improve the clinical outcome. PMID:27073908

  13. Chiari Malformation

    MedlinePlus

    Chiari malformations (CMs) are structural defects in the cerebellum. The cerebellum is the part of the brain that controls balance. With CM, brain tissue extends into the spinal canal. It can happen when part of the skull is too ...

  14. Arteriovenous Malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the formation of brain AVMs. NIH Patient Recruitment for Arteriovenous Malformation Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. and Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 Brain Aneurysm Foundation 269 Hanover Street, ...

  15. Brain Malformations

    MedlinePlus

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  16. Intraneural Venous Malformations of the Median Nerve

    PubMed Central

    González Rodríguez, Alba; Midón Míguez, José

    2016-01-01

    Venous malformations arising from the peripheral nerve are a rare type of vascular malformation. We present the first case of an intraneural venous malformation of the median nerve to be reported in a child and review the previous two cases of median nerve compression due to a venous malformation that have been reported. These cases presented with painless masses in the volar aspect of the wrist or with symptoms suggestive of carpal tunnel syndrome. Clinical suspicion should lead to the use of Doppler ultrasonography as the first-line diagnostic tool. Magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology can confirm the diagnosis, as phleboliths are pathognomonic of venous malformations. Surgical treatment appears to be the only modality capable of successfully controlling the growth of an intraneural malformation. Sclerotherapy and radiotherapy have never been used to treat this type of malformation. PMID:27462571

  17. Chiari Malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & ... spine that can lead to nerve damage or paralysis. Chiari malformations also can happen after brain or spinal surgery. Doctors haven't identified a ...

  18. Arteriovenous Malformation Management

    SciTech Connect

    Yakes, Wayne F.; Rossi, Plinio; Odink, Henk

    1996-11-15

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are rare vascular lesions that can present with a myriad of clinical presentations. In our institutions, initial workup consists of a clinical exam, color Doppler imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging. After the initial noninvasive workup, arteriography, at times closed system venography, and ethanol endovascular repair of the AVM is performed under general anesthesia. Depending on the size of the lesion, additional Swan-Ganz line and arterial line monitoring are performed. Patients are usually observed overnight and uneventfully discharged the following day if no complication occurs. Patients are followed at periodic intervals despite cure of their lesion. Long-term follow-up is essential in AVM management.

  19. Intracranial hypertension: classification and patterns of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Iencean, SM

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension (ICH) was systematized in four categories according to its aetiology and pathogenic mechanisms: parenchymatous ICH with an intrinsic cerebral cause; vascular ICH, which has its aetiology in disorders of cerebral blood circulation; ICH caused by disorders of cerebro–spinal fluid dynamics and idiopathic ICH. The increase of intracranial pressure is the first to happen and then intracranial hypertension develops from this initial effect becoming symptomatic; it then acquires its individuality, surpassing the initial disease. The intracranial hypertension syndrome corresponds to the stage at which the increased intracranial pressure can be compensated and the acute form of intracranial hypertension is equivalent to a decompensated ICH syndrome. The decompensation of intracranial hypertension is a condition of instability and appears when the normal intrinsic ratio of intracranial pressure – time fluctuation is changed. The essential conditions for decompensation of intracranial hypertension are: the speed of intracranial pressure increase over normal values, the highest value of abnormal intracranial pressure and the duration of high ICP values. Medical objectives are preventing ICP from exceeding 20 mm Hg and maintaining a normal cerebral blood flow. The emergency therapy is the same for the acute form but each of the four forms of ICH has a specific therapy, according to the pathogenic mechanism and if possible to aetiology. PMID:20108456

  20. Inner Ear Conductive Hearing Loss and Unilateral Pulsatile Tinnitus Associated with a Dural Arteriovenous Fistula: Case Based Review and Analysis of Relationship between Intracranial Vascular Abnormalities and Inner Ear Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Cassandro, Ettore; Cassandro, Claudia; Sequino, Giuliano; Scarpa, Alfonso; Petrolo, Claudio; Chiarella, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    While pulsatile tinnitus (PT) and dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) are not rarely associated, the finding of a conductive hearing loss (CHL) in this clinical picture is unusual. Starting from a case of CHL and PT, diagnosed to be due to a DAVF, we analyzed relationship between intracranial vascular abnormalities and inner ear fluids. DAVF was treated with endovascular embolization. Following this, there was a dramatic recovery of PT and of CHL, confirming their cause-effect link with DAVF. We critically evaluated the papers reporting this association. This is the first case of CHL associated with PT and DAVF. We describe the most significant experiences and theories reported in literature, with a personal analysis about the possible relationship between vascular intracranial system and labyrinthine fluids. In conclusion, we believe that this association may be a challenge for otolaryngologists. So we suggest to consider the possibility of a DAVF or other AVMs when PT is associated with CHL, without alterations of tympanic membrane and middle ear tests. PMID:26693371

  1. Neurocysticercosis, familial cerebral cavernomas and intracranial calcifications: differential diagnosis for adequate management.

    PubMed

    Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Alves-Leon, Soniza; Domingues, Flavio Sampaio; Frossard, João Thiago; Lopes, Selva Paraguassu; Souza, Jorge Marcondes de

    2016-06-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is an endemic disease and important public health problem in some areas of the World and epilepsy is the most common neurological manifestation. Multiple intracranial lesions, commonly calcified, are seen on cranial computed tomography (CT) in the chronic phase of the disease and considered one of the diagnostic criteria of the diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the test that better depicts the different stages of the intracranial cysts but does not show clearly calcified lesions. Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM), also known as cerebral cavernomas, are frequent vascular malformations of the brain, better demonstrated by MRI and have also epilepsy as the main form of clinical presentation. When occurring in the familial form, cerebral cavernomas typically present with multiple lesions throughout the brain and, very often, with foci of calcifications in the lesions when submitted to the CT imaging. In the countries, and geographic areas, where NCC is established as an endemic health problem and neuroimaging screening is done by CT scan, it will be important to consider the differential diagnosis between the two diseases due to the differences in adequate management. PMID:27332076

  2. Hemorrhage Rates From Brain Arteriovenous Malformation in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Helen; Nelson, Jeffrey; Krings, Timo; terBrugge, Karel G.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Lawton, Michael T.; Young, William L.; Faughnan, Marie E.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a systemic disease characterized by mucocutaneous telangiectasias, epistaxis, and arteriovenous malformations (AVM). Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) rates in this population are not well described. We report ICH rates and characteristics in HHT patients with brain arteriovenous malformations (HHT-BAVM). Methods We studied the first 153 HHT-BAVM patients with follow-up data enrolled in the Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium HHT Project. We estimated ICH rates after BAVM diagnosis. Results The majority of patients were female (58%) and Caucasian (98%). The mean age at BAVM diagnosis was 31±19 years (range: 0–70), with 61% of cases diagnosed upon asymptomatic screening. Overall, 14% presented with ICH; among symptomatic cases, 37% presented ruptured. During 493 patient-years of follow-up, 5 ICH events occurred yielding a rate of 1.02% per-year (95% CI: 0.42–2.44%). ICH-free survival differed significantly by ICH presentation (P=0.003); ruptured cases had a higher ICH rate (10.07%, 95% CI: 3.25–31.21%) than unruptured cases (0.43%, 95% CI: 0.11–1.73%). Conclusions HHT-BAVM patients who present with hemorrhage are at a higher risk for re-hemorrhage compared to BAVMs detected pre-symptomatically. PMID:25858236

  3. Anorectal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Gangopadhyay, Ajay Narayan; Pandey, Vaibhav

    2015-01-01

    Anorectal malformations (ARMs) are among the more frequent congenital anomalies encountered in paediatric surgery, with an estimated incidence ranging between 1 in 2000 and 1 in 5000 live births. Antenatal diagnosis of an isolated ARM is rare. Most cases are diagnosed in the early neonatal period. There is a wide spectrum of presentation ranging from low anomalies with perineal fistula having simple management to high anomalies with complex management. Advances in the imaging techniques with improvement in knowledge of the embryology, anatomy and physiology of ARM cases have refined diagnosis and initial management. There has been marked improvement in survival of such patient over the last century. The management of ARM has moved forward from classical procedures to PSARP to minimal invasive procedures. But still the fecal and urinary incontinence can occur even with an excellent anatomic repair, mainly due to associated problems. There has been a paradigm shift in approach to these patients which involves holistic approach to the syndrome of Anorectal malformations with a long term goal of achievement of complete fecal and urinary continence with excellent quality of life. PMID:25552824

  4. Intracranial germinoma

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Manoj P.; Doughty, Kyle E.; Armstrong, Danielle; Melguizo-Gavilanes, Isaac; Cheek, Brennen S.; Opatowsky, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Pineal region tumors make up less than 1% of all intracranial neoplasms, with the majority being of germ cell origin. We describe the diagnostic evaluation and treatment of a patient presenting with neurological deficits who was found to have a germinoma of the pineal gland. PMID:25552796

  5. Distal access using hyperflexible atraumatic distal tip with optimized proximal stability of the Benchmark intracranial guide catheter for the treatment of cerebral vascular diseases: a technical note

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Arun; Puthuran, Mani; Eldridge, Paul R; Nahser, Hans C

    2016-01-01

    Background A stable guide catheter position within the intracranial vasculature is critical for safe, successful endovascular treatment. Objective To present ourinitial experience with the 0.071 inch inner diameter Benchmark guide catheter used in the treatment of intracranial cerebrovascular pathologies, demonstrating its safety and efficacy. Methods We retrospectively reviewed use of the Benchmark guide catheter from September through December 2014 in the management of various neuroendovascular intracranial pathologies. Clinical performance and complication rates were evaluated, with particular consideration of vessel tortuosity. A total of 62 Benchmarks were used, 47 in the anterior circulation, 10 in the posterior circulation, 4 in the external carotid, and 1 in the venous sinus. The five cases with access to the external carotid and venous sinus were excluded. Results The Benchmark was able to cross at least one 90° turn in 49 (86%) of the 57 patients. Reversal of the catheter was seen in 15% of 47 anterior circulation cases (4 at one 90° turn; 3 at two 90° turns). We report no complications of dissection or thromboembolic events. All guide catheter positions were safely achieved over a 0.035 Terumo stiff glidewire without need for an inner smaller lumen guide catheter for navigation. Conclusions Benchmark is a new guide catheter, with an ideal combination of both hyperflexible, atraumatic distal tip and optimized proximal shaft support to provide stable 6F primary access for a successful neurointerventional procedure. Benchmark can be easily, safely, and consistently positioned in a desired location within intracranial arteries providing a stable position for intervention and adequate angiography. PMID:26071386

  6. Combined Lymphedema and Capillary Malformation of the Lower Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Maclellan, Reid A.; Chaudry, Gulraiz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary lymphedema and capillary malformation are independent vascular malformations that can cause overgrowth of the lower extremity. We report a series of patients who had both types of malformations affecting the same leg. The condition is unique but may be confused with other types of vascular malformation overgrowth conditions (eg, Klippel–Trenaunay and Parkes Weber). Methods: Our Vascular Anomalies Center and Lymphedema Program databases were searched for patients with both capillary malformation and lymphedema. Diagnosis of lymphedema–capillary malformation was made by history, physical examination, and imaging studies. Because lymphedema–capillary malformation has phenotypical overlap with other conditions, only patients who had imaging confirming their diagnosis were included in the analysis. Clinical and radiological features, morbidity, and treatment were recorded. Results: Eight patients (4 females and 4 males) had confirmed lymphedema–capillary malformation. Referring diagnosis was Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome (n = 4), diffuse capillary malformation with overgrowth (n = 3), or lymphatic malformation (n = 1). The condition was unilateral (n = 6) or bilateral (n = 2). Morbidity included infection (n = 6), difficulty fitting clothes (n = 6), bleeding or leaking vesicles (n = 5), leg length discrepancy (n = 4), and difficulty ambulating (n = 3). All patients were managed with compression regimens. Operative management was liposuction (n = 3), treatment of phlebectatic veins (n = 3), staged skin/subcutaneous excision (n = 1), and/or epiphysiodesis (n = 1). Conclusions: Lymphedema and capillary malformation can occur together in the same extremity. Both conditions independently cause limb overgrowth primarily because of subcutaneous adipose deposition. Compression garments and suction-assisted lipectomy can improve the condition. Lymphedema–capillary malformation should not be confused with other vascular malformation overgrowth

  7. Vascular Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, Abel; Buchanan, Edward P.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are divided into two main groups: tumors and malformations. Vascular tumors are a large and complex group of lesions, especially for clinicians with none or little experience in this field. In the past, these lesions caused a great deal of confusion because many appear analogous to the naked eye. Thankfully, recent advances in diagnostic techniques have helped the medical community to enhance our comprehension, accurately label, diagnose, and treat these lesions. In this article, we will review the most frequent vascular tumors and provide the reader with the tools to properly label, diagnose, and manage these complex lesions. PMID:25045329

  8. Management of hemangiomas and other vascular tumors.

    PubMed

    Greene, Arin K

    2011-01-01

    Vascular tumors of childhood are typically benign. The 4 most common types are infantile hemangioma (IH), congenital hemangioma (CH), kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KHE), and pyogenic granuloma (PG). Vascular tumors must be differentiated from vascular malformations. Although tumors and malformations may appear as raised, blue, red, or purple lesions, their management differs significantly. PMID:21095471

  9. Endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Orlando; Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are abnormal dilations of the intracranial vessels, in which all the layers of the vascular wall are affected by degenerative changes that lead to distension of the vessel. Intracranial aneurysms can be classified based on their anatomic location, size, and morphology. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most devastating clinical presentation. The goal of preventing hemorrhage or rehemorrhage can only be achieved by excluding the aneurysm from the cerebral circulation. Endovascular or surgical clipping can achieve this goal. Multiple surgical and endovascular approaches have been described for treatment of intracranial aneurysm. Surgical approaches for anterior-circulation intracranial aneurysms include: pterional, orbitozygomatic, and lateral supraorbital craniotomies. Modern microsurgical techniques involve skull base dissection to achieve adequate exposure with minimal brain retraction. Endovascular techniques can be divided into: parent artery reconstruction with coil deposition (primary coil, balloon-assisted coiling, stent-assisted coiling, and other new techniques such as neck reconstruction devices and intraluminal occlusion devices); reconstruction with flow diversion; and deconstructive techniques with involving parent artery sacrifice with or without bypass. PMID:27430470

  10. Interhemispheric Lipoma, Callosal Anomaly, and Malformations of Cortical Development: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Tetsu; de Vries, Linda S; Manten, Gwendolyn T R; Lequin, Maarten; Cuppen, Inge; Shibasaki, Jun; Aida, Noriko

    2016-04-01

    Intracranial lipomas are rare congenital malformations. The most common type of intracranial lipoma is the interhemispheric lipoma, which is frequently associated with callosal anomalies such as hypogenesis or agenesis of the corpus callosum. In contrast, interhemispheric lipomas are less often accompanied with malformations of cortical development (MCD). We report magnetic resonance imaging findings of three infants with an interhemispheric lipoma, associated with a callosal anomaly, and MCD: two infants with nodular interhemispheric lipoma, agenesis of the corpus callosum, and polymicrogyria, and one infant with interhemispheric curvilinear lipoma, hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, and heterotopias. An association was suggested regarding the occurrence of these malformations. PMID:26808679

  11. Fusiform aneurysm of a persistent trigeminal artery associated with rare intracranial arterial variations and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kimball, David; Ples, Horia; Kimball, Heather; Miclaus, Gratian D; Matusz, Petru; Loukas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminal artery is one of four primitive anastomoses between the internal carotid artery and vertebrobasilar system that regresses in the sixth week of fetal development. A persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is generally an incidental finding but may also be associated with intracranial vascular pathologies such as aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, and cranial nerve compression syndromes. We present an extremely rare case of a right PTA with an associated bleeding fusiform aneurysm located in the carotidian (lateral) part of the PTA. In addition, this rare anatomic variation was associated with bilateral absence of the posterior communicating arteries, a left posterior cerebral artery originating from the left internal carotid artery, and agenesis of the A1 segment of the left anterior cerebral artery. PMID:25053265

  12. Combined neuroradiological and neurosurgical treatment of intracerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Adelt, D; Brückmann, H; Krenkel, W; Hacke, W; Zeumer, H

    1988-07-01

    Four patients with intracerebral vascular malformations underwent preoperative butylcyanoacrylate embolization via a calibrated leak catheter, in order to reduce the risks of surgery alone. In three cases the malformation was removed without causing neurological deficits. One patient died later from recurrent bleeding. PMID:3171616

  13. Venous Malformation: update on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis & management

    PubMed Central

    Dompmartin, Anne; Vikkula, Miikka; Boon, Laurence M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review was to discuss the current knowledge on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and therapeutic management of venous malformations. Venous malformations (VMs) are slow-flow vascular anomalies. They are simple, sporadic or familial (cutaneo-mucosal venous malformation or glomuvenous malformations), combined (e.g. capillaro-venous, capillaro-lymphaticovenous malformations) or syndromic (Klippel-Trenaunay, Blue Rubber Bleb Naevus and Maffucci). Genetic studies have identified causes of familial forms and of 40% of sporadic VMs. Another diagnostic advancement is the identification of elevated D-dimer level as the first biomarker of venous malformations within vascular anomalies. Those associated with pain are often responsive to Low Molecular Weight Heparin which should also be used to avoid disseminated intravascular coagulopathy secondary to intervention, especially if fibrinogen level is low. Finally, development of a modified sclerosing agent, ethylcellulose–ethanol, has improved therapy. It is efficient and safe, and widens indications for sclerotherapy to sensitive and dangerous areas such as hands, feet and periocular area. PMID:20870869

  14. Pathogenesis of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    KOMIYAMA, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVMs) represent a high risk of intracranial hemorrhages, which are substantial causes of morbidity and mortality of bAVMs, especially in children and young adults. Although a variety of factors leading to hemorrhages of bAVMs are investigated extensively, their pathogenesis is still not well elucidated. The author has reviewed the updated data of genetic aspects of bAVMs, especially focusing on clinical and experimental knowledge from hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which is the representative genetic disease presenting with bAVMs caused by loss-of-function in one of the two genes: endoglin and activin receptor-like kinase 1. This knowledge may allow us to infer the pathogensis of sporadic bAVMs and in the development of new medical therapies for them. PMID:27076383

  15. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral cavernous malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... R, Awad IA, Ginsberg MH. Cerebral cavernous malformations proteins inhibit Rho kinase to stabilize vascular integrity. J Exp Med. 2010 Apr 12;207(4):881-96. doi: 10.1084/jem.20091258. Epub 2010 Mar 22. Citation on ... CCM1 and CCM2 protein interactions in cell signaling: implications for cerebral cavernous ...

  16. FAM222B Is Not a Likely Novel Candidate Gene for Cerebral Cavernous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Spiegler, Stefanie; Kirchmaier, Bettina; Rath, Matthias; Korenke, G Christoph; Tetzlaff, Fabian; van de Vorst, Maartje; Neveling, Kornelia; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Kuss, Andreas W; Gilissen, Christian; Fischer, Andreas; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Felbor, Ute

    2016-07-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are prevalent slow-flow vascular lesions which harbour the risk to develop intracranial haemorrhages, focal neurological deficits, and epileptic seizures. Autosomal dominantly inherited CCMs were found to be associated with heterozygous inactivating mutations in 3 genes, CCM1 (KRIT1), CCM2 (MGC4607), and CCM3 (PDCD10) in 1999, 2003 and 2005, respectively. Despite the availability of high-throughput sequencing techniques, no further CCM gene has been published since. Here, we report on the identification of an autosomal dominantly inherited frameshift mutation in a gene of thus far unknown function, FAM222B (C17orf63), through exome sequencing of CCM patients mutation-negative for CCM1-3. A yeast 2-hybrid screen revealed interactions of FAM222B with the tubulin cytoskeleton and STAMBP which is known to be associated with microcephaly-capillary malformation syndrome. However, a phenotype similar to existing models was not found, neither in fam222bb/fam222ba double mutant zebrafish generated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases nor in an in vitro sprouting assay using human umbilical vein endothelial cells transfected with siRNA against FAM222B. These observations led to the assumption that aberrant FAM222B is not involved in the formation of CCMs. PMID:27587990

  17. [Elective cerebral arteriovenous malformation treatment with onyx after coil embolization of ruptured, flow-realeted aneurysm of the posterior circulation].

    PubMed

    Poncyljusz, Wojciech; Falkowski, Aleksander; Rać, Monika; Sagan, Leszek; Kojder, Ireneusz

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous posterior circulation malformation was planned to embolize by onyx injection after acute coil embolization of ruptured flow-realeted aneurysm of posterior cerebral artery. Control angiography revealed completely embolized malformation with normal vessel patency at the end of procedure. There were no adverse events related to this procedure and no neurologic deficit at the discharge. PMID:23276020

  18. Arteriovenous malformations of the head and neck: current concepts in management.

    PubMed

    Fowell, Christopher; Jones, Robert; Nishikawa, Hiroshi; Monaghan, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    The field of vascular anomalies and their clinical management is expanding and developments in the last few years have improved the understanding of haemangiomas and vascular malformations. In this paper, the first in the series of 3 educational reviews, we review the current trends and evidence-based management of arteriovenous malformations. PMID:27020371

  19. Increased intracranial pressure

    MedlinePlus

    Increased intracranial pressure is a rise in the pressure inside the skull that can result from or cause brain injury. ... Increased intracranial pressure can be due to a rise in pressure of the cerebrospinal fluid. This is ...

  20. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arun; Gulati, Gurpreet S; Parakh, Neeraj; Aggarwal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is a morbid condition associated with complications such as hemoptysis, right heart failure, paradoxical embolism, and even death. There is no known association of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension with pulmonary arteriovenous malformation. Possible hypothesis for this association is an increased pulmonary vascular resistance leading to the compensatory formation of pulmonary arteriovenous malformation. We present one such case presenting with hemoptysis that was managed with endovascular treatment. PMID:27413264

  1. Sincipital Encephaloceles: A Study of Associated Brain Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Achar, Shashidhar Vedavyas; Dutta, Hemonta Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the associated intracranial malformations in patients with sincipital encephaloceles. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted over 8 years from June 2007 to May 2015 on 28 patients. The patients were evaluated by either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging whichever was feasible. Encephaloceles were described with respect to their types, contents, and extensions. A note was made on the associated malformations with sincipital encephaloceles. Results: Fifty percent of the patients presented before the age of 3 years and both the sexes were affected equally. Nasofrontal encephalocele was the most common type seen in 13 patients (46.4%), and corpus callosal agenesis (12 patients) was the most common associated malformation. Other malformations noted were arachnoid cyst (10 patients), hydrocephalus (7 patients), and agyria-pachygyria complex (2 patients). Conclusion: Capital Brain malformations are frequently encountered in children with sincipital encephaloceles. Detail radiological evaluation is necessary to plan treatment and also to prognosticate such rare malformations. PMID:27313974

  2. Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Malformations Associated with Heterotaxy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Parinda H; Anderson, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used as an investigation during fetal life, particularly for assessment of intracranial masses, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, myelomeningocele, and abdominal masses. As the number of scans increases, so is the variety of congenital malformations being recognized. It is axiomatic that interpretation of the findings is enhanced when attention is paid to the likely findings in the setting of known syndromes, this information then dictating the need for additional acquisition of images. One such syndrome is so-called “visceral heterotaxy”, in which there is typically an isomeric, rather than a lateralized, arrangement of the thoracic and abdominal organs. Typically associated with complex congenital cardiac malformations, heterotaxy can also involve the central nervous system, and produce pulmonary, gastrointestinal, immunologic, and genitourinary malformations. In this review, we discuss how these findings can be demonstrated using fetal MRI.  PMID:26180693

  3. Cerebellar and Brainstem Malformations.

    PubMed

    Poretti, Andrea; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2016-08-01

    The frequency and importance of the evaluation of the posterior fossa have increased significantly over the past 20 years owing to advances in neuroimaging. Conventional and advanced neuroimaging techniques allow detailed evaluation of the complex anatomic structures within the posterior fossa. A wide spectrum of cerebellar and brainstem malformations has been shown. Familiarity with the spectrum of cerebellar and brainstem malformations and their well-defined diagnostic criteria is crucial for optimal therapy, an accurate prognosis, and correct genetic counseling. This article discusses cerebellar and brainstem malformations, with emphasis on neuroimaging findings (including diagnostic criteria), neurologic presentation, systemic involvement, prognosis, and recurrence. PMID:27423798

  4. A method for semi-automatic segmentation and evaluation of intracranial aneurysms in bone-subtraction computed tomography angiography (BSCTA) images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Susanne; Ditt, Hendrik; Biermann, Christina; Lell, Michael; Keller, Jörg

    2009-02-01

    The rupture of an intracranial aneurysm has dramatic consequences for the patient. Hence early detection of unruptured aneurysms is of paramount importance. Bone-subtraction computed tomography angiography (BSCTA) has proven to be a powerful tool for detection of aneurysms in particular those located close to the skull base. Most aneurysms though are chance findings in BSCTA scans performed for other reasons. Therefore it is highly desirable to have techniques operating on standard BSCTA scans available which assist radiologists and surgeons in evaluation of intracranial aneurysms. In this paper we present a semi-automatic method for segmentation and assessment of intracranial aneurysms. The only user-interaction required is placement of a marker into the vascular malformation. Termination ensues automatically as soon as the segmentation reaches the vessels which feed the aneurysm. The algorithm is derived from an adaptive region-growing which employs a growth gradient as criterion for termination. Based on this segmentation values of high clinical and prognostic significance, such as volume, minimum and maximum diameter as well as surface of the aneurysm, are calculated automatically. the segmentation itself as well as the calculated diameters are visualised. Further segmentation of the adjoining vessels provides the means for visualisation of the topographical situation of vascular structures associated to the aneurysm. A stereolithographic mesh (STL) can be derived from the surface of the segmented volume. STL together with parameters like the resiliency of vascular wall tissue provide for an accurate wall model of the aneurysm and its associated vascular structures. Consequently the haemodynamic situation in the aneurysm itself and close to it can be assessed by flow modelling. Significant values of haemodynamics such as pressure onto the vascular wall, wall shear stress or pathlines of the blood flow can be computed. Additionally a dynamic flow model can be

  5. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri) En Español Read in Chinese What is idiopathic intracranial hypertension? Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder that ...

  6. Recurrent subdural hygromas after foramen magnum decompression for Chiari Type I malformation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Erlick A C; Steele, Louise F; Magdum, Shailendra A

    2014-06-01

    A paediatric case of foramen magnum decompression for Chiari Type I malformation complicated by recurrent subdural hygromas (SH) and raised intracranial pressure without ventriculomegaly is described. SH pathogenesis is discussed, with consideration given to arachnoid fenestration. We summarise possibilities for treatment and avoidance of this unusual consequence of foramen magnum decompression. PMID:23952134

  7. RASA1 somatic mutation and variable expressivity in capillary malformation/arteriovenous malformation (CM/AVM) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Macmurdo, Colleen F; Wooderchak-Donahue, Whitney; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Le, Jenny; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Milla, Carlos; Teng, Joyce M C; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Stevenson, David A

    2016-06-01

    Germline mutations in RASA1 are associated with capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM) syndrome. CM-AVM syndrome is characterized by multi-focal capillary malformations and arteriovenous malformations. Lymphatic anomalies have been proposed as part of the phenotype. Intrafamilial variability has been reported, suggesting modifiers and somatic events. The objective of the study was to identify somatic RASA1 "second hits" from vascular malformations associated with CM-AVM syndrome, and describe phenotypic variability. Participants were examined and phenotyped. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood on all participants. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on the proband. Using Sanger sequencing, RASA1 exon 8 was PCR-amplified to track the c.1248T>G, p.Tyr416X germline variant through the family. A skin biopsy of a capillary malformation from the proband's mother was also obtained, and next-generation sequencing was performed on DNA from the affected tissue. A familial germline heterozygous novel pathogenic RASA1 variant, c.1248T>G (p.Tyr416X), was identified in the proband and her mother. The proband had capillary malformations, chylothorax, lymphedema, and overgrowth, while her affected mother had only isolated capillary malformations. Sequence analysis of DNA extracted from a skin biopsy of a capillary malformation of the affected mother showed a second RASA1 somatic mutation (c.2245C>T, p.Arg749X). These results and the extreme variable expressivity support the hypothesis that somatic "second hits" are required for the development of vascular anomalies associated with CM-AVM syndrome. In addition, the phenotypes of the affected individuals further clarify that lymphatic manifestations are also part of the phenotypic spectrum of RASA1-related disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26969842

  8. Medical management of vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Trenor, Cameron C

    2016-03-01

    We have entered an exciting era in the care of patients with vascular anomalies. These disorders require multidisciplinary care and coordination and dedicated centers have emerged to address this need. Vascular tumors have been treated with medical therapies for many years, while malformations have been historically treated with endovascular and operative procedures. The recent serendipitous discoveries of propranolol and sirolimus for vascular anomalies have revolutionized this field. In particular, sirolimus responses are challenging the dogma that vascular malformations are not biologically active. While initially explored for lymphatic anomalies, sirolimus is now being used broadly throughout the spectrum of vascular anomalies. Whether medical therapies are reserved for refractory patients or used first line is currently dependent on the experience and availability of alternative therapies at each institution. On the horizon, we anticipate new drugs targeting genes and pathways involved in vascular anomalies to be developed. Also, combinations of medications and protocols combining medical and procedural approaches are in development for refractory patients. PMID:27607327

  9. Coexistent arteriovenous malformation and hippocampal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Prayson, Richard A; O'Toole, Elizabeth E

    2016-06-01

    Cavernous angiomas or cavernomas have been occasionally described in patients presenting with medically intractable epilepsy. Reports of cavernomas associated with a second pathology potentially causative of seizures have rarely been documented; most commonly, the second pathology is focal cortical dysplasia or less frequently, hippocampal sclerosis. To our knowledge, cases of arteriovenous malformation arising in this clinical setting and associated with hippocampal sclerosis have not been previously described. We report a 56-year-old woman who initially presented at age 24years with staring spells. Imaging studies revealed an arteriovenous malformation in the right parietal lobe. At age 51years, she represented with signs and symptoms related to a hemorrhage from the malformation. The patient underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) of the lesion. She subsequently developed seizures, refractory to medical management. MRI studies showed atrophy in the right hippocampus. She underwent resection of the right parietal lobe and hippocampus. Histopathologic examination of the right parietal lesion revealed an arteriovenous malformation marked by focally prominent vascular sclerosis, calcification and adjacent hemosiderin deposition. The hippocampus was marked by prominent neuronal loss and gliosis in the CA1 region, consistent with CA1 sclerosis or hippocampal sclerosis International League Against Epilepsy type 2. PMID:26899356

  10. An Unusual Cause of Dysphagia: A Large Expectorated Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Aaron S.; Gunasena, Rivindi; Schaefer, Nathan R.; Kennedy, Edmund

    2015-01-01

    Background Vascular malformations are generally detected in childhood or adolescence with first presentations in adulthood being rare. Case Report We report the case of a 52-year-old female with threatened compromise of her airway after expectorating a massive arteriovenous malformation anchored at the supraglottis. The only preceding symptom was dysphagia. The lesion was resected, the patient had a quick recovery, and she has shown no evidence of recurrence. Conclusion Although uncommon, vascular malformations of the supraglottis or hypopharynx should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with dysphagia because of the potential to cause disastrous airway compromise. Although a lesion presenting acutely mandates a definitive airway plan, when clinically possible, computed tomography scan and indirect laryngoscopy can provide useful information for the airway and operative teams. PMID:26130989

  11. Surgical management of arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Visser, Anniek; FitzJohn, Trevor; Tan, Swee T

    2011-03-01

    This article presents our experience in managing a series of consecutive patients with arteriovenous malformation (AVM) referred to our Vascular Anomalies Centre over a 14-year period. These patients were culled from our prospective Vascular Anomalies Database 1996-2010. The medical records of these patients were reviewed to supplement the data collected. Out of 1131 patients with vascular anomalies, 53 patients (22 males, 31 females) with AVM were identified. Their mean age was 29 (range: 3-88) years with 14 stage-III, 34 stage-II and five stage-I AVMs, affecting the head and neck area (n=32), lower limb (n=13), upper limb (n=7) and trunk (n=1). Eight patients with eight stage-III and 14 patients with 15 stage-II AVMs underwent definitive surgery following preoperative embolisation in 10 patients. Seventeen patients required reconstruction with free flaps (n=8) or local or regional flaps (n=9), tissue expansion (n=4), tendon recession (n=1), tendon transfer (n=1), osseo-integration (n=1) and skin grafting (n=5). Fourteen patients required a combination of reconstructive techniques. During an average follow-up of 54 (range: 10-135) months, two (8.7%) lesions recurred but were improved following surgery. One patient with life-threatening stage-III AVM underwent 'palliative' surgery following preoperative embolisation and the lesion had improved and remained stable during the 4-year follow-up period. AVM is a challenging clinical problem that requires a multidisciplinary team approach. Complete surgical excision remains the gold-standard treatment and immediate reconstruction is an integral part of definitive surgery for AVM. The heterogeneous nature of AVM requires treatment to be tailored for individual patients and the complex excision defects necessitate expertise in a variety of reconstructive techniques. Our experience shows a recurrence rate of 8.7% following definitive surgery for AVM. PMID:20663728

  12. Symptomatic posterior fossa and supratentorial subdural hygromas as a rare complication following foramen magnum decompression for Chiari malformation Type I.

    PubMed

    Bahuleyan, Biji; Menon, Girish; Hariharan, Easwer; Sharma, Mridul; Nair, Suresh

    2011-02-01

    Symptomatic subdural hygroma due to foramen magnum decompression for Chiari malformation Type I is extremely rare. The authors present their experience with 2 patients harboring such lesions and discuss treatment issues. They conclude that the possibility of subdural hygromas should be considered in all patients presenting with increased intracranial tension following foramen magnum decompression for Chiari malformation Type I. Immediate neuroimaging and appropriate surgical intervention provides a good outcome. PMID:20849216

  13. Corpus callosum arteriovenous malformation with persistent trigeminal artery.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Chandan B; Devi, B Indira; Somanna, Sampath; Bhat, Dhananjaya I; Dawn, Rose

    2011-12-01

    A 13-year-old boy presented with an intracerebral haematoma secondary to a large corpus callosal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) with an associated persistent trigeminal artery, and was treated with Gamma-Knife Radiosurgery for the AVM. This report discusses the embryological basis, radiological features and various classifications of this rare vascular anomaly. PMID:21501055

  14. Diagnostic imaging in the evaluation of vascular birthmarks.

    PubMed

    Burrows, P E; Laor, T; Paltiel, H; Robertson, R L

    1998-07-01

    This article reviews the role of modern diagnostic imaging in the evaluation of patients with vascular birthmarks. There are two main categories of vascular anomalies: hemangiomas and vascular malformations. The findings on plain radiography, sonography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography, and the appropriate sequence of investigation for the different vascular anomalies are discussed. PMID:9704205

  15. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. The monitor senses the pressure inside the skull and sends measurements to a recording device. ... are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is ...

  16. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ICP monitoring; CSF pressure monitoring ... There are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is the most accurate monitoring method. To insert an intraventricular catheter, a ...

  17. Ventricular Tract Hemorrhage Following Intracranial Nail Removal: Utility of Real-time Endovascular Assistance

    PubMed Central

    Rennert, Robert C.; Steinberg, Jeffrey A.; Sack, Jayson; Pannell, J. Scott; Khalessi, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Penetrating brain trauma commonly results in occult neurovascular injury. Detailed cerebrovascular imaging can evaluate the relationship of intracranial foreign bodies to major vascular structures, assess for traumatic pseudoaneurysms, and ensure hemostasis during surgical removal. We report a case of a self-inflicted intracranial nail gun injury causing a communicating ventricular tract hemorrhage upon removal, as well as a delayed pseudoaneurysm. Pre- and post-operative vascular imaging, as well as intra-operative endovascular assistance, was critical to successful foreign body removal in this patient. This report demonstrates the utility of endovascular techniques for the assessment and treatment of occult cerebrovascular injuries from intracranial foreign bodies. PMID:27471490

  18. Ventricular Tract Hemorrhage Following Intracranial Nail Removal: Utility of Real-time Endovascular Assistance.

    PubMed

    Rennert, Robert C; Steinberg, Jeffrey A; Sack, Jayson; Pannell, J Scott; Khalessi, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    Penetrating brain trauma commonly results in occult neurovascular injury. Detailed cerebrovascular imaging can evaluate the relationship of intracranial foreign bodies to major vascular structures, assess for traumatic pseudoaneurysms, and ensure hemostasis during surgical removal. We report a case of a self-inflicted intracranial nail gun injury causing a communicating ventricular tract hemorrhage upon removal, as well as a delayed pseudoaneurysm. Pre- and post-operative vascular imaging, as well as intra-operative endovascular assistance, was critical to successful foreign body removal in this patient. This report demonstrates the utility of endovascular techniques for the assessment and treatment of occult cerebrovascular injuries from intracranial foreign bodies. PMID:27471490

  19. Intracranial Artery Calcification and Its Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao Hong; Wang, Li Juan; Wong, Ka Sing

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial arterial calcification (IAC) is an easily identifiable entity on plain head computed tomography scans. Recent studies have found high prevalence rates for IAC worldwide, and this may be associated with ischemic stroke and cognitive decline. Aging, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, and chronic kidney disease have been found to be associated with IAC. The severity of IAC can be assessed using different visual grading scales or various quantitative methods (by measuring volume or intensity). An objective method for assessing IAC using consistent criteria is urgently required to facilitate comparisons between multiple studies involving diverse populations. There is accumulating evidence from clinical studies that IAC could be utilized as an indicator of intracranial atherosclerosis. However, the pathophysiology underlying the potential correlation between IAC and ischemic stroke—through direct arterial stenosis or plaque stability—remains to be determined. More well-designed clinical studies are needed to explore the predictive values of IAC in vascular events and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:27165425

  20. Brain Arteriovenous Malformation Modeling, Pathogenesis and Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanqiu; Choi, Eun-Jung; McDougall, Cameron M.; Su, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Patients harboring brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) are at life-threatening risk of rupture and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). The pathogenesis of bAVM has not been completely understood. Current treatment options are invasive and ≈ 20% of patients are not offered interventional therapy because of excessive treatment risk. There are no specific medical therapies to treat bAVMs. The lack of validated animal models has been an obstacle for testing hypotheses of bAVM pathogenesis and testing new therapies. In this review, we summarize bAVM model development; and bAVM pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets that have been identified during model development. PMID:24723256

  1. Etiologies of uterine malformations.

    PubMed

    Jacquinet, Adeline; Millar, Debra; Lehman, Anna

    2016-08-01

    Ranging from aplastic uterus (including Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome) to incomplete septate uterus, uterine malformations as a group are relatively frequent in the general population. Specific causes remain largely unknown. Although most occurrences ostensibly seem sporadic, familial recurrences have been observed, which strongly implicate genetic factors. Through the study of animal models, human syndromes, and structural chromosomal variation, several candidate genes have been proposed and subsequently tested with targeted methods in series of individuals with isolated, non-isolated, or syndromic uterine malformations. To date, a few genes have garnered strong evidence of causality, mainly in syndromic presentations (HNF1B, WNT4, WNT7A, HOXA13). Sequencing of candidate genes in series of individuals with isolated uterine abnormalities has been able to suggest an association for several genes, but confirmation of a strong causative effect is still lacking for the majority of them. We review the current state of knowledge about the developmental origins of uterine malformations, with a focus on the genetic variants that have been implicated or associated with these conditions in humans, and we discuss potential reasons for the high rate of negative results. The evidence for various environmental and epigenetic factors is also reviewed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27273803

  2. Genetic factors involves in intracranial aneurysms – actualities

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, D; Munteanu, V; Coman, T; Ciurea, AV

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysm (IA) is a common vascular disorder, which frequently leads to fatal vascular rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Although various acquired risk factors associated with IAs have been identified, heritable conditions are associated with IAs formation but these syndromes account for less than 1% of all IAs in the population. Cerebral aneurysm disease is related to hemodynamic and genetic factors, associated with structural weakness in the arterial wall, which was acquired by a specific, often unknown, event. Possibly, the trigger moment of aneurysm formation may depend on the dynamic arterial growth, which is closely related to aging/ atherosclerosis. Genetic factors are known to have an important role in IA pathogenesis. Literature data provide complementary evidence that the variants on chromosomes 8q and 9p are associated with IA and that the risk of IA in patients with these variants is greatly increased with cigarette smoking. Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5-10% of the population). In comparison with sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located in the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Abbreviations: DNA = deoxyribonucleic acid, FIA = familial Intracranial Aneurysm, GWAS = genome-wide association studies, IL-6 = interleukin-6, ISUIA = International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms, IA = Intracranial aneurysm, mRNA = Messager ribonucleic acid, SNPs = single-nucleotide polymorphisms, SMCs = smooth muscle cells, sIAs = sporadic IAs, SAH = subarachnoid hemorrhage, TNF-α = tumor necrosis factor-alpha, COL4A1 = type IV collagen alpha-1 PMID:26351537

  3. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  4. Primary Intracranial Leptomeningeal Melanomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Hyoung; Lee, Chae-Heuck; Joo, Mee

    2015-01-01

    Primary intracranial malignant melanoma is a very rare and highly aggressive tumor with poor prognosis. A 66-year-old female patient presented a headache that had been slowly progressing for several months. A large benign pigmented skin lesion was found on her back. A brain MRI showed multiple linear signal changes with branching pattern and strong enhancement in the temporal lobe. The cytological and immunohiostochemical cerebrospinal fluid examination confirmed malignant melanoma. A biopsy confirmed that the pigmented skin lesion on the back and the conjunctiva were benign nevi. We report a case of primary intracranial malignant melanoma and review relevant literatures. PMID:26819692

  5. Traumatic Intracranial Aneurysm Formation following Closed Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Miley, Jefferson T; Rodriguez, Gustavo J; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2008-01-01

    Background: Traumatic intracranial aneurysms are rare conditions that can be a result of non-penetrating head trauma. We report the occurrence of intracranial aneurysms in patients with traumatic brain injury. Methods: All diagnostic cerebral angiograms performed in patients with traumatic brain injury at a level I trauma center from January 2006 to July 2007 were reviewed. Results: Diagnostic cerebral angiography was performed in 74 patients with the diagnosis of closed head injury. A total of 4 traumatic intracranial pseudoaneurysms were found in 4 patients, two in the supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery, one in the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery and one in the paraophthalmic segment of the internal carotid artery. Two patients were treated with coil embolization. One patient had follow up imaging on which there was no change in the size and morphology of the aneurysm. Conclusion: Intracranial aneurysms can develop in patients with closed head injury presumably related to shear or rotational injury. It is unclear whether these aneurysms should be classified as traumatic intracranial aneurysms or pseudoaneurysms, but the pathological findings frequently reveal disruption of the three vascular layers fulfilling the definition of pseudoaneurysm. For these reason we favor the name of post-traumatic intracranial pseudoaneurysms. PMID:22518228

  6. Angiographic Evidence of a Purely Pial Bihemispheric Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma

    PubMed Central

    Stetson, Nathaniel; Vadivelu, Sudhakar; Li, Jiang Y.; Setton, Avi; Chalif, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Classification of hemangiopericytoma (HPC) has evolved to a mesenchymal, nonmeningothelial grade two or three neoplasm according to the World Health Organization; however its blood supply has always been defined by dual origin, pial and dural contribution. Case Description. We present the case of a patient with an intracranial HPC with only pial vascular supply. Angiography confirmed the lack of dural supply to this bihemispheric intracranial mass. Subsequent histologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of hemangiopericytoma. Angiographic evidence here is atypical of the natural history of hemangiopericytomas with dual vascular supply and was critical in the decision-making towards surgical resection without tumor embolization. Conclusion. Data presented suggests the lack of dural vascular supply alone does not rule out the diagnosis of hemangiopericytoma. PMID:26881155

  7. Pediatric intraoral high-flow arteriovenous malformation: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Petel, Roy; Ashkenazi, Malka

    2014-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rarely reported in the dental pediatric literature. They may develop adjacent to primary molars and can be life-threatening due to their potential for massive bleeding. The most common symptom associated with documented cases of AVMs is spontaneous gingival bleeding. Other clinical signs include pain, erythematous gingiva, resorption and mobility of teeth, soft tissue discoloration, facial swelling, and asymmetry. Radiographically, AVMs are osteolytic lesions. The purpose of this report was to describe the challenge of diagnosis of a high-flow arteriovenous malformation located in the primary maxillary molar region, which was misdiagnosed as a dentoalveolar abscess adjacent to previously treated primary molars. A decision to extract a tooth with gingival swelling and associated spontaneous bleeding should be made after the differential diagnosis of a vascular malformation has been ruled out. PMID:25303512

  8. Treatment of congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Brucker, Sara Yvonne; Rall, Katharina; Campo, Rudi; Oppelt, Peter; Isaacson, Keith

    2011-03-01

    The prevalence of müllerian malformations is 1 in 200, or 0.5%. A third of the anomalies are septate, a third bicornuate uteri, 10% arcuate uterus, 10% didelphis and unicornuate uterus, and < 5% uterine and vaginal aplasia. Correct diagnosis of the malformation is most important but often very difficult. Correct treatment can only be performed if the malformation is clear. Longitudinal vaginal septums have to be removed due to potential obstetric problems. Transverse vaginal septums can cause hematocolpos and pain and have to be incised crosswise and excised so as not to shorten the vagina at the same time. Congenital vaginal agenesis occurs in Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome patients and in androgen insensitivity syndrome. The first choice for surgical treatment should be the new laparoscopic-assisted creation of a neovagina. Septate uterus has to be distinguished from a bicornuate uterus. Even if it is not proven to be a cause for infertility, the chance of miscarriage can be diminished by performing hysteroscopic metroplasty. Repair of a uterine septum in infertility patients often improves pregnancy rates. In contrast, surgical repair of a bicornuate uterus requires an abdominal metroplasty. This should only be performed if the patient has recurrent fetal loss due to the uterine structural defect. In a unicornuate uterus it is most important to determine if there is a second uterine horn that can cause cyclic pain if it has functioning endometrium. The only surgical option in these cases is to remove the rudimentary uterus with endometrium and hematometra, respectively. PMID:21437824

  9. Chiari-like Malformation.

    PubMed

    Loughin, Catherine A

    2016-03-01

    Chiari-like malformation is a condition of the craniocervical junction in which there is a mismatch of the structures of the caudal cranial fossa causing the cerebellum to herniate into the foramen magnum. This herniation can lead to fluid buildup in the spinal cord, also known as syringomyelia. Pain is the most common clinical sign followed by scratching. Other neurologic signs noted are facial nerve deficits, seizures, vestibular syndrome, ataxia, menace deficit, proprioceptive deficits, head tremor, temporal muscle atrophy, and multifocal central nervous system signs. MRI is the diagnostic of choice, but computed tomography can also be used. PMID:26631589

  10. Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula as a cause for symptomatic superficial siderosis: A report of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Griffin R.; Turan, Nefize; Buonanno, Ferdinando S.; Pradilla, Gustavo; Nogueira, Raul G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Superficial siderosis (SS) is the occult deposition of hemosiderin within the cerebral cortex due to repeat microhemorrhages within the central nervous system. The collection of hemosiderin within the pia and superficial cortical surface can lead to injury to the nervous tissue. The most common presentation is occult sensorineural hearing loss although many patients have been misdiagnosed with diseases such as multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis before being diagnosed with SS. Only one case report exists in the literature describing an intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) as the putative cause for SS. Case Description: We describe two cases of SS caused by a dAVF. Both patients had a supratentorial, cortical lesion supplied by the middle meningeal artery with venous drainage into the superior sagittal sinus. In both patients, symptoms improved after endovascular embolization. The similar anatomic relationship of both dAVFs reported presents an interesting question about the pathogenesis of SS. Similar to the pathologic changes seen in the formation of intracranial arterial aneurysms; it would be possible that changes in the blood vessel lining and wall might predispose a patient to chronic, microhemorrhage resulting in SS. Conclusions: We describe the second and third cases of a dAVF as the cause of SS, and the first cases of successful treatment of SS-associated dAVF with endovascular embolization. As noninvasive imaging techniques become more sensitive and easily obtained, one must consider their limitations in detecting occult intracranial vascular malformations such as dAVF as a possible etiology for SS. PMID:27127712

  11. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mohit; Li, Luyuan; Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  12. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luyuan; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  13. Retinal vascular changes are a marker for cerebral vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    The retinal circulation is a potential marker of cerebral vascular disease because it shares origin and drainage with the intracranial circulation and because it can be directly visualized using ophthalmoscopy. Cross sectional and cohort studies have demonstrated associations between chronic retinal and cerebral vascular disease, acute retinal and cerebral vascular disease and chronic retinal vascular disease and acute cerebral vascular disease. In particular, certain qualitative features of retinopathy, retinal artery occlusion and increased retinal vein caliber are associated with concurrent and future cerebrovascular events. These associations persist after accounting for confounding variables known to be disease-causing in both circulations, which supports the potential use of retinal vasculature findings to stratify individuals with regards to cerebral vascular disease risk. PMID:26008809

  14. A Review of Vascular Anomalies: Genetics and Common Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Killion, Elizabeth; Mohan, Kriti; Lee, Edward I.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular tumors and malformations are unique in that affected cells exhibit disrupted angiogenesis. The current treatment options often yield suboptimal results. New insight into the genetics and molecular basis of vascular anomalies may pave the way for potential development of targeted therapy. The authors review the genetic and molecular basis of vascular anomalies and common associated syndromes. PMID:25045331

  15. Local Model of Arteriovenous Malformation of the Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadezhda Telegina, Ms; Aleksandr Chupakhin, Mr; Aleksandr Cherevko, Mr

    2013-02-01

    Vascular diseases of the human brain are one of the reasons of deaths and people's incapacitation not only in Russia, but also in the world. The danger of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is in premature rupture of pathological vessels of an AVM which may cause haemorrhage. Long-term prognosis without surgical treatment is unfavorable. The reduced impact method of AVM treatment is embolization of a malformation which often results in complete obliteration of an AVM. Pre-surgical mathematical modeling of an arteriovenous malformation can help surgeons with an optimal sequence of the operation. During investigations, the simple mathematical model of arteriovenous malformation is developed and calculated, and stationary and non-stationary processes of its embolization are considered. Various sequences of embolization of a malformation are also considered. Calculations were done with approximate steady flow on the basis of balanced equations derived from conservation laws. Depending on pressure difference, a fistula-type AVM should be embolized at first, and then small racemose AVMs are embolized. Obtained results are in good correspondence with neurosurgical AVM practice.

  16. Sporadic Multifocal Venous Malformations of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Michael V.; Patel, Neha A.; Hu, Shirley; Pantelides, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To report a case of unusually widespread sporadic venous malformations of the head and neck associated with normal D-dimer levels and, due to the protean clinical manifestations and increased risk of coagulopathy of these lesions, to review their diagnosis and clinical management. Case Report. A 25-year-old man presented with a one-year history of intermittent right-sided neck swelling and tongue swelling. Physical exam revealed additional lesions present throughout the head and neck. There was no family history suggestive of heritable vascular malformations. Radiographic imaging demonstrated 15 lesions located in various tissue layers consistent with venous malformations. A coagulation screen showed a normal prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, international normalized ratio, D-dimer level, and fibrinogen level. It was determined that the patient was not at increased risk for intraoperative coagulopathy and preoperative heparin administration would not be necessary. The patient's buccal and tongue lesions were subsequently excised with no complications. The patient also underwent sclerotherapy evaluation for his neck mass. Conclusion. This case describes a unique presentation of sporadic multifocal venous malformations. It also emphasizes the importance of prompt diagnosis and workup when multiple venous malformations are present to prevent morbidity during surgical excision secondary to intravascular coagulopathy. PMID:26483982

  17. A rare case of pulmonary arterio-venous malformation with recurrent anemia: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Nataraju, Kamalesh Tagadur; Mukherjee, Tirthankar; Doddaiah, Ramachandra Prabhu Hosahalli; Nanjappa, Nagesh Gabbadi; Narasegowda, Lakshmikanth

    2015-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a rare vascular anomaly of the lung, which manifests predominantly as dyspnea (due to right to left shunting) and paradoxical embolism. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) being a rare genetic disorder is one of the most common causes of pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM). Here we report an interesting case of recurrent anemia in an elderly female, who was subsequently found to have multiple cutaneous and mucosal telangiectasias and a large pulmonary AVM. PMID:26180392

  18. Clinical syndromes of arteriovenous malformations of the transverse-sigmoid sinus.

    PubMed Central

    Obrador, S; Soto, M; Silvela, J

    1975-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations or fistulae shunting arterial blood from branches of the external and internal carotid and vertebral arteries into the transverse-sigmoid sinus may produce different clinical syndromes. The literature is reviewed with 96 patients including six personal cases. Usually these malformations have a congenital origin and only in 4% of the series was there a previous history of a severe head injury. Clinical groups are defined and the role of angiography assessed. Direct surgical approach with occlusion or removal of the vascular malformation is the treatment of choice. Possible methods of treatment by selective embolization are discussed. Images PMID:1097602

  19. Ten self-inflicted intracranial penetrating nail gun injuries

    PubMed Central

    Yuh, Sung-Joo; Alaqeel, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating craniocerebral injuries from nail gun use are rare. We describe a case of 10 self-inflicted nail gun injuries with intracranial penetrations. We also review the literature and discuss management strategies of such craniocerebral trauma. A 33-year-old male with a long-standing history of severe depression took a nail gun and sustained 10 penetrating intracranial injuries. Initial neuroimaging revealed 10 penetrating nails, all sparing the major cerebral vasculature. Immediate surgical removal was undertaken in the surgical suite using a combination of craniotomies, craniectomies, and blind removal. Intracranial injuries from self-inflicted nail gun misuse is becoming increasingly more frequent. Initial appropriate clinical decision-making are critical in preventing further cortical or vascular damage. PMID:26166596

  20. [Intracranial hemorrhage caused by neurosyphilis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Koh, Masaki; Kashiwazaki, Daina; Yamatani, Kazumasa; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    It is well known that neurosyphilis is a cause of stroke and its main subtype is ischemic stroke. In this report, we present a rare case with intracranial hemorrhage in left frontal lobe and subarachnoid hemorrhage due to neurosyphilis. A 56-year-old man developed conscious disturbance, right hemiparesis, and motor aphasia, and was admitted to our hospital. Rapid plasma reagin(RPR)and fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption(FTA-ABS)serology was positive in blood and cerebrospinal fluid. MR angiography and 3D-CT angiography demonstrated no vascular abnormalities. He responded well to penicillin treatment, followed by complete resolution of his neurological symptoms. Diagnosis of neurosyphilis is sometimes difficult, as patients usually present with non-specific symptoms such as intracranial hemorrhage. To our knowledge, only 3 cases of intracranial hemorrhage caused by neurosyphilis have been reported previously. This case is reported to raise the awareness of this uncommon but important manifestation of neurosyphilis. PMID:25087758

  1. Decompressive craniectomy for arteriovenous malformation-related intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Takasato, Yoshio; Masaoka, Hiroyuki; Nagatani, Kimihiro; Otani, Naoki; Wada, Kojiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2015-03-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM)-related intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the cause of approximately 2-3% of ICH and is an important factor in the significant morbidity and mortality in patients with AVM. Decompressive craniectomy (DC) is a surgical procedure to relieve malignant elevation of intracranial pressure. The use of DC to treat patients with AVM-ICH has been much less common. The present study describes our experience with DC for AVM-ICH and discusses the safety of this procedure. The present retrospective analysis compared 12 consecutive patients treated with DC for AVM-ICH with 23 patients treated with DC for hypertensive ICH. Nine patients were male and three were female, aged from 11 to 53 years (mean, 31.7 years). Hematoma volumes ranged from 50 to 106 ml (mean, 75.8 ml). The outcomes were good recovery in one patient, moderate disability in three, severe disability in seven, and vegetative state in one. Complications after DC included subdural hygroma in four patients, hydrocephalus in one, intracranial infection in two, and intracranial hemorrhage in one. No significant difference was found in the incidence of complications between DC for large AVM-ICH and DC for hypertensive ICH. In conclusion, the present study found no significant difference in the incidence of complications between DC for large AVM-ICH and DC for hypertensive ICH. Further investigations including a prospective randomized trial are needed to confirm the safety and efficacy of DC for the treatment of large AVM-ICH. PMID:25564272

  2. Brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Adi R

    2011-01-01

    An arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a particular abnormality of blood vessels. Brain AVMs are congenital, but symptoms usually do not appear until the second decade of life - if at all. The most common presenting symptom is a brain hemorrhage, but other possible symptoms include neurological deficits, seizures and headaches. Until recently, the gold standard for diagnosing AVM was conventional angiography. However, computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography are now the first-line diagnostic tools for AVMs. This article reviews the presenting symptoms, diagnostic procedures and treatment options for brain AVMs, including embolization, micro-surgery and radiosurgery. This article is a Directed Reading. Your access to Directed Reading quizzes for continuing education credit is determined by your CE preference. For access to other quizzes, go to www.asrt.org/store. PMID:21771938

  3. Unusual Presentation of Cerebral Cavernous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Hyung; Lim, Dong-Jun; Choi, Jong-Il; Ha, Sung-Kon; Kim, Sang-Dae; Kim, Se-Hoon

    2015-09-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CMs) are vascular malformations of the central nervous system, which can be detected in the absence of any clinical symptoms. Nodules and cysts with mixed signal intensity and a peripheral hemosiderin rim are considered brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings typical of CMs. A 48-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of abnormal MRI findings without significant neurological symptoms. A cyst with an internal fluid-fluid level was found in the left basal ganglia on the initial brain MRI. We decided to observe the natural course of the asymptomatic lesion with serial MRI follow-up. On MRI at the 5-month follow-up, the cystic mass was enlarged and showed findings consistent with those of cystic CM. Surgical resection was performed and the pathological diagnosis was CM. Our experience suggests that the initial presentation of a CM can be a pure cyst and neurosurgeons should consider the likelihood of CMs in cases of cystic cerebral lesions with intracystic hemorrhage. PMID:26523262

  4. Unusual Presentation of Cerebral Cavernous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Hyung; Choi, Jong-Il; Ha, Sung-Kon; Kim, Sang-Dae; Kim, Se-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CMs) are vascular malformations of the central nervous system, which can be detected in the absence of any clinical symptoms. Nodules and cysts with mixed signal intensity and a peripheral hemosiderin rim are considered brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings typical of CMs. A 48-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of abnormal MRI findings without significant neurological symptoms. A cyst with an internal fluid-fluid level was found in the left basal ganglia on the initial brain MRI. We decided to observe the natural course of the asymptomatic lesion with serial MRI follow-up. On MRI at the 5-month follow-up, the cystic mass was enlarged and showed findings consistent with those of cystic CM. Surgical resection was performed and the pathological diagnosis was CM. Our experience suggests that the initial presentation of a CM can be a pure cyst and neurosurgeons should consider the likelihood of CMs in cases of cystic cerebral lesions with intracystic hemorrhage. PMID:26523262

  5. Intracranial chondroma: a rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Veena; Mehdi, Ghazala; Varshney, Manoranjan; Jain, Anshu; Vashishtha, Sonal; Gaur, Kavita; Srivastava, Vinod Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial chondroma is a rare benign cartilaginous tumour with an incidence of less than 1% of all primary intracranial tumours. The authors are reporting here a case of intracranial chondroma in a 40-year-old man who presented with 5-month history of headache and gradual diminution of vision. A tentative diagnosis of chondroma was made on imprint cytology which was confirmed on histopathological examination. PMID:22696735

  6. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Young; Kim, Jin Bum; Nam, Taek Kyun; Kim, Young Baeg

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) usually results in various problems in the brain. But it can be presented as a myelopathy, which may make early diagnosis and management to be difficult. We recently experienced a case of cervical myelopathy caused by intracranial dAVF. A 60-year-old man presented with a 3-year history of gait disturbance due to a progressive weakness of both legs. Neurological examination revealed spastic paraparesis (grade IV) and Babinski sign on both sides. Magnetic resonance imaging showed serpentine vascular signal voids at C2-T1 on T2-weighted image with increased signal intensity and swelling of spinal cord at C1-C4. We performed a brain computed tomography angiography and found intracranial dAVF with multiple arteriovenous shunts. Venous drainages were noted at tentorial veins and cervical perimedullary veins. After Onyx embolization, the patient showed gradual improvement in motor power and gait disturbance. The venous drainage pattern is a well-known prognostic factor of dAVF. In our case, the intracranial dAVF drained to spinal perimedullary vein, which seemed to result in the ischemic myelopathy. Although it is rare condition, it sometimes can cause serious complications. Therefore, we should keep in mind the possibility of intracranial dAVF when a patient presents myelopathy. PMID:27437016

  7. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Young; Kim, Jin Bum; Nam, Taek Kyun; Kim, Young Baeg; Park, Seung Won

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) usually results in various problems in the brain. But it can be presented as a myelopathy, which may make early diagnosis and management to be difficult. We recently experienced a case of cervical myelopathy caused by intracranial dAVF. A 60-year-old man presented with a 3-year history of gait disturbance due to a progressive weakness of both legs. Neurological examination revealed spastic paraparesis (grade IV) and Babinski sign on both sides. Magnetic resonance imaging showed serpentine vascular signal voids at C2-T1 on T2-weighted image with increased signal intensity and swelling of spinal cord at C1-C4. We performed a brain computed tomography angiography and found intracranial dAVF with multiple arteriovenous shunts. Venous drainages were noted at tentorial veins and cervical perimedullary veins. After Onyx embolization, the patient showed gradual improvement in motor power and gait disturbance. The venous drainage pattern is a well-known prognostic factor of dAVF. In our case, the intracranial dAVF drained to spinal perimedullary vein, which seemed to result in the ischemic myelopathy. Although it is rare condition, it sometimes can cause serious complications. Therefore, we should keep in mind the possibility of intracranial dAVF when a patient presents myelopathy. PMID:27437016

  8. Intraocular/Intracranial pressure mismatch hypothesis for visual impairment syndrome in space.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Fan; Hargens, Alan R

    2014-01-01

    Visual impairment intracranial pressure syndrome (VIIP) is considered a major risk for future human spaceflight. Loss of hydrostatic pressure gradients in vascular and cerebrospinal fluid systems due to the removal of gravity associated with subsequent intracranial and intraocular fluid shifts and the resulting intraocular/intracranial pressure mismatch might be important etiology factors causingVIIP syndrome. Acclimation changes in the ocular and cerebral circulation and the two fluid systems during chronic microgravity exposure and their underlying mechanisms need further elucidation. Relevant findings may help to validate the pressure differential hypothesis for VlIP syndrome and to evaluate whether a gravity based countermeasure is needed. PMID:24479265

  9. PHACE(S) Syndrome With Absent Intracranial Internal Carotid Artery and Anomalous Circle of Willis.

    PubMed

    Winter, Pieta R; Itinteang, Tinte; Leadbitter, Philip; FitzJohn, Trevor; Tan, Swee T

    2015-06-01

    The authors present a case of PHACE(S) (posterior fossa malformations, hemangioma, arterial anomalies, cardiac defects, eye anomalies, and sternal cleft or supraumbilical raphe) syndrome with a right-sided segmental infantile hemangioma, and describe in detail, the associated absent ipsilateral intracranial internal carotid artery and anomalous Circle of Willis. Propranolol therapy led to accelerated, complete involution. Nadolol may reduce the theoretical risk of treating PHACE(S) patients with β-blockers. PMID:26080245

  10. Arteriovenous malformations of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Grunberger, I; DeAsis, A; Torno, R; Godec, C J

    1989-01-01

    We report a rare case of a localized arteriovenous malformation of the bladder mimicking a bladder tumor and presenting with gross hematuria. The mass was successfully resected transurethrally. PMID:2908934

  11. Embolization of uterine arteriovenous malformation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Wang, Guoyun; Xie, Fubo; Wang, Bo; Tao, Guowei; Kong, Beihua

    2013-01-01

    Background: Uterine arteriovenous malformation is a rare but potential life-threatening source of bleeding. A high index of suspicion and accurate diagnosis of the condition in a timely manor are essential because instrumentation that is often used for other sources of uterine bleeding can be lead to massive hemorrhage. Case: We describe here a case of uterine arteriovenous malformation. A 32-year-old woman presented abnormal vaginal bleeding following the induced abortion. A diagnosis of uterine arteriovenous malformation made on the basis of Doppler ultrasonraphy was confirmed through pelvic angiography. The embolization of bilateral uterine arteries was performed successfully. Conclusion: Uterine arteriovenous malformation should be suspected in patient with abnormal vaginal bleeding, especially who had the past medical history incluing cesarean section, induced abortion, or Dillation and Curethage and so on. Although angiography remains the gold standard, Doppler ultrasonography is also a good noninvasive technique. The transcatheter uterine artery embolization offers a safe and effective treatment PMID:24639742

  12. Intracranial Hypertension in Children without Papilledema.

    PubMed

    Chelse, Ana B; Epstein, Leon G

    2015-08-01

    Researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital studied the frequency of intracranial hypertension without papilledema in children followed in a multispecialty pediatric intracranial hypertension clinic. PMID:26933598

  13. [Combined treatment of arteriovenous malformations of the head and neck].

    PubMed

    Galich, S P; Dabizha, A Iu; Gindich, O A; Ogorodnik, Ia P; Al'tman, I V; Gomoliako, I V; Guch, A A

    2015-01-01

    An arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a vascular developmental abnormality conditioned by impaired embryonic morphogenesis and characterized by the development of an abnormal connection between arteries and veins. More than 50% of the total number of patients suffering from this pathology are those having the pathological foci localizing in the area of the head and neck. At present, a combined method is both a generally accepted and the most radical one used for treatment for AVM. However, in the majority of cases, excision of the malformation leaves an extensive and complicated defect of tissues, whose direct closure leads to coarse cicatricious deformities. Over the period from 2004 to 2012, we followed up a total of 37 patients presenting with arteriovenous malformations of the head and neck. At admission the patients underwent preoperative examination including clinical tests, ultrasound duplex scanning, arteriography, MRT, and computed tomography. 24-72 hours prior to the operative intervention the patients were subjected to embolisation of the main vessels supplying the vascular malformation. Excision of the AVM was in 8 cases followed by primary closure of the postoperative wound, in 17 patients the defect was closed by transposition of the axial flaps, and 12 subjects underwent free transplantation of composite complexes of tissues. Relapse of the disease was revealed in 17 patients. In the majority of cases, relapses developed during the first year after the operative intervention (10 cases). The control of the disease's course was obtained in 20 patients. In 8 of the 12 patients with free transplantation of flaps we managed to obtain long-term control over the disease's course (more than 5 years). Hence, free microsurgical transplantation of compound complexes of tissues may be considered as a method of choice for closing the defect after excising an AVM in the area of the head and neck. Replacement of the defect with a well-vascularized tissue complex

  14. In vitro model test and preliminary clinical application of a new method of ultrasonographic imaging: Vascular enhancement technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi; Duan, Yun You; Wang, Jia; Sun, Si Guo; Li, Juan; Hou, Wei Hua; Cao, Tie Sheng

    2009-09-01

    Vascular enhancement technology (VET) is a new form of ultrasonographic technology that can optimize images by enhancing the B-mode display with information derived from power Doppler. We designed an in vitro model to evaluate the accuracy and application method of VET and to apply this technology preliminarily in vivo in the vascular periphery. An in vitro model was designed with a flow pump system to simulate blood flow in soft tissue and the intracranial vasculature. Modeling vessels were imaged by traditional B mode, color Doppler flow imaging and VET. The diameter of the various silicon tubes was measured to verify the accuracy of VET. For in vivo application, 15 normal subjects and 26 patients suspected of having carotid artery plaques and cerebrovascular disease were examined using these three image modes. The imaging effects were observed and compared. VET imaging could clarify the lumens of the modeling vessels and reduce artifacts. The caliber of three sizes of silicon tubing was also measured accurately by VET. Of 15 normal subjects, sound artifacts in large vessels were inhibited and the intermedia membrane was clearly displayed by VET. The boundaries of carotid plaques were manifested by VET with well-defined edges. Three cases of hypoechoic soft plaque on the anterior wall missed in B-mode imaging were detected by VET. Intracranial scanning with VET identified cerebral vascular disease, including cerebral stenosis, arteriovenous malformations and aneurysms. The size and shape of the focus displayed by VET coincided with that observed using digital subtraction arteriography. VET is helpful in improving detection of the boundary of vessels and visualization of the microvasculature. PMID:19632758

  15. Malformations of cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Trudy; Atefy, Ramin; Sheen, Volney

    2012-01-01

    Background Malformations of cortical development (MCD) are increasingly recognized as an important cause of epilepsy and developmental delay. MCD encompass a wide spectrum of disorders with various underlying genetic etiologies and clinical manifestations. High resolution imaging has dramatically improved our recognition of MCD. Review Summary This review will provide a brief overview of the stages of normal cortical development, including neuronal proliferation, neuroblast migration, and neuronal organization. Disruptions at various stages lead to characteristic MCD. Disorders of neurogenesis give rise to microcephaly (small brain) or macrocephaly (large brain). Disorders of early neuroblast migration give rise to periventricular heterotopia (neurons located along the ventricles), whereas abnormalities later in migration lead to lissencephaly (smooth brain) or subcortical band heterotopia (smooth brain with a band of heterotopic neurons under the cortex). Abnormal neuronal migration arrest give rise to over-migration of neurons in cobblestone lissencephaly. Lastly, disorders of neuronal organization cause polymicrogyria (abnormally small gyri and sulci). This review will also discuss the known genetic mutations and potential mechanisms that contribute to these syndromes. Conclusion Identification of various gene mutations has not only given us greater insight into some of the pathophysiologic basis of MCD, but also an understanding of the processes involved in normal cortical development. PMID:18469675

  16. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in the development of arteriovenous malformations in the brain.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jaya Mary; Surendran, Sumi; Abraham, Mathew; Rajavelu, Arumugam; Kartha, Chandrasekharan C

    2016-01-01

    Vascular malformations are developmental congenital abnormalities of the vascular system which may involve any segment of the vascular tree such as capillaries, veins, arteries, or lymphatics. Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are congenital vascular lesions, initially described as "erectile tumors," characterized by atypical aggregation of dilated arteries and veins. They may occur in any part of the body, including the brain, heart, liver, and skin. Severe clinical manifestations occur only in the brain. There is absence of normal vascular structure at the subarteriolar level and dearth of capillary bed resulting in aberrant arteriovenous shunting. The causative factor and pathogenic mechanisms of AVMs are unknown. Importantly, no marker proteins have been identified for AVM. AVM is a high flow vascular malformation and is considered to develop because of variability in the hemodynamic forces of blood flow. Altered local hemodynamics in the blood vessels can affect cellular metabolism and may trigger epigenetic factors of the endothelial cell. The genes that are recognized to be associated with AVM might be modulated by various epigenetic factors. We propose that AVMs result from a series of changes in the DNA methylation and histone modifications in the genes connected to vascular development. Aberrant epigenetic modifications in the genome of endothelial cells may drive the artery or vein to an aberrant phenotype. This review focuses on the molecular pathways of arterial and venous development and discusses the role of hemodynamic forces in the development of AVM and possible link between hemodynamic forces and epigenetic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of AVM. PMID:27453762

  17. A case of combined soft tissue and intraosseous venous malformation of the thumb treated with sclerotherapy using a bone marrow aspiration needle

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kosuke; Sasaki, Satoru; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Nagao, Munetomo; Iwasaki, Daisuke; Fujita, Munezumi; Saito, Noriko; Oyama, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Yuhei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Vascular malformations of bone are complex lesions that can cause deformity and pain. A combined soft tissue and intraosseous venous malformation of the left thumb in a girl was treated with two sessions of ethanol sclerotherapy using a bone marrow aspiration needle under fluoroscopic guidance.

  18. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Shovlin, Claire L

    2014-12-01

    Within the past decade, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) have evolved from rare curiosities to not uncommon clinical states, with the latest estimates suggesting a prevalence of ~1 in 2,600. PAVMs provide anatomic right-to-left shunts, allowing systemic venous blood to bypass gas exchange and pulmonary capillary bed processing. Hypoxemia and enhanced ventilatory demands result, although both are usually asymptomatic. Paradoxical emboli lead to strokes and cerebral abscesses, and these commonly occur in individuals with previously undiagnosed PAVMs. PAVM hemorrhage is rare but is the main cause of maternal death in pregnancy. PAVM occlusion by embolization is the standard of care to reduce these risks. However, recent data demonstrate that currently recommended management protocols can result in levels of radiation exposure that would be classified as harmful. Recent publications also provide a better appreciation of the hematologic and cardiovascular demands required to maintain arterial oxygen content and oxygen consumption in hypoxemic patients, identify patient subgroups at higher risk of complications, and emphasize the proportion of radiologically visible PAVMs too small to treat by embolization. This review, therefore, outlines medical states that exacerbate the consequences of PAVMs. Chief among these is iron deficiency, which is commonly present due to concurrent hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: iron deficiency impairs hypoxemia compensations by restricting erythropoiesis and increases the risk of ischemic strokes. Management of periodontal disease, dental interventions, pulmonary hypertension, and pregnancy also requires specific consideration in the setting of PAVMs. The review concludes by discussing to what extent previously recommended protocols may benefit from modification or revision. PMID:25420112

  19. Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Within the past decade, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) have evolved from rare curiosities to not uncommon clinical states, with the latest estimates suggesting a prevalence of ∼1 in 2,600. PAVMs provide anatomic right-to-left shunts, allowing systemic venous blood to bypass gas exchange and pulmonary capillary bed processing. Hypoxemia and enhanced ventilatory demands result, although both are usually asymptomatic. Paradoxical emboli lead to strokes and cerebral abscesses, and these commonly occur in individuals with previously undiagnosed PAVMs. PAVM hemorrhage is rare but is the main cause of maternal death in pregnancy. PAVM occlusion by embolization is the standard of care to reduce these risks. However, recent data demonstrate that currently recommended management protocols can result in levels of radiation exposure that would be classified as harmful. Recent publications also provide a better appreciation of the hematologic and cardiovascular demands required to maintain arterial oxygen content and oxygen consumption in hypoxemic patients, identify patient subgroups at higher risk of complications, and emphasize the proportion of radiologically visible PAVMs too small to treat by embolization. This review, therefore, outlines medical states that exacerbate the consequences of PAVMs. Chief among these is iron deficiency, which is commonly present due to concurrent hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: iron deficiency impairs hypoxemia compensations by restricting erythropoiesis and increases the risk of ischemic strokes. Management of periodontal disease, dental interventions, pulmonary hypertension, and pregnancy also requires specific consideration in the setting of PAVMs. The review concludes by discussing to what extent previously recommended protocols may benefit from modification or revision. PMID:25420112

  20. Orthopedic issues in vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Samantha A; Sorger, Joel

    2014-08-01

    Vascular malformations impact the musculoskeletal system depending on the tissue involved (skin, subcutis, muscle, cartilage, or bone), the extent of involvement, and the type of anomalous vessels (arteries, capillaries, veins, or lymphatics). These malformations can cause a multitude of musculoskeletal problems for the patient and their Orthopedic Surgeon to manage. Leg-length discrepancy, intra-articular involvement, muscular lesions, and primary or secondary scoliosis are just to name a few. All of these problems can cause pain, deformity, and a range of functional limitations. Surgical and nonsurgical treatment plans both have a role in the care of these patients. Patients with vascular malformations may also suffer from life-threatening cardiovascular and hematologic abnormalities. For those patients who undergo surgery, thromboembolic risk is elevated, wound breakdown and infection are much more common, and bleeding risk continues well into the postoperative course. Because of the complex nature of these disorders, the clinician must have a full understanding of the types of lesions, their natural history, appropriate diagnostic studies, associated medical problems, indications for treatment, and all the treatment options. For severe malformations, especially syndromes such as CLOVES and Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, interdisciplinary team management is essential for the best outcomes. PMID:25241103

  1. Ectopic intracranial germinoma.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Samantha; Wu, Xiao; Kalra, Vivek B; Huttner, Anita J; Malhotra, Ajay

    2016-09-01

    Intracranial ectopic germinomas are often associated with synchronous midline disease. Germinomas involving the corpus callosum are exceedingly rare. The reported imaging appearance is not as varied as one might expect and a review of the literature reveals a few common imaging features amongst most ectopic lesions, including cyst formation. We report a 24-year-old man with panhypopituitarism. Neuroimaging revealed three enhancing lesions involving the pituitary infundibulum, the pineal region, and a parenchymal lesion involving the genu of the corpus callosum. The described ectopic mass, a parenchymal lesion, was associated with small peripheral cysts. Stereotactic biopsy and histopathological evaluation revealed this mass to be a germinoma. Following chemotherapy and radiation therapy, there was near-total resolution of the intracranial disease. Preoperative imaging plays an important role, not only in delineating the extent of disease, but also in assisting in generating an appropriate differential diagnosis. Germinomas in the corpus callosum are exceedingly rare but should be considered in the differential of any young patient with a characteristic cystic and solid intra-axial mass. PMID:27050919

  2. Primary intracranial choriocarcinoma: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Lv, X-F; Qiu, Y-W; Zhang, X-L; Han, L-J; Qiu, S-J; Xiong, W; Wen, G; Zhang, Y-Z; Zhang, J

    2010-11-01

    PICCC is the rarest, most malignant primary intracranial GCT. The purpose of this study was to describe and characterize the MR imaging findings in a series of 7 patients (6 males and 1 female; mean age, 11.9 years) with pathologically proved PICCC in our institution from 2004 to 2009. All tumors were located within the pineal (n = 6) or suprasellar (n = 1) regions. On T2-weighted MR imaging, the lesions appeared markedly heterogeneous with areas of both hypointensity and hyperintensity reflecting the histologic heterogeneity, including hemorrhage, fibrosis, cysts, or necrosis. Heterogeneous (n = 7), ringlike (n = 4), and/or intratumoral nodular (n = 3) enhancement was noted on T1-weighted images with gadolinium. These MR imaging findings, combined with patient age and serum β-HCG levels, may prove helpful in distinguishing PICCC from the more common primary brain tumors, thereby avoiding biopsy of this highly vascular tumor. PMID:20616180

  3. Pediatric lymphatic malformations: evolving understanding and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Defnet, Ann M; Bagrodia, Naina; Hernandez, Sonia L; Gwilliam, Natalie; Kandel, Jessica J

    2016-05-01

    Multimodal treatment of lymphatic malformations continues to expand as new information about the biology and genetics of these lesions is discovered, along with knowledge gained from clinical practice. A patient-centered approach, ideally provided by a multidisciplinary medical and surgical team, should guide timing and modality of treatment. Current treatment options include observation, surgery, sclerotherapy, radiofrequency ablation, and laser therapy. New medical and surgical therapies are emerging, and include sildenafil, propranolol, sirolimus, and vascularized lymph node transfer. The primary focus of management is to support and optimize these patients' quality of life. Researchers continue to study lymphatic malformations with the goal of increasing therapeutic options and developing effective clinical pathways for these complicated lesions. PMID:26815877

  4. Why study human limb malformations?

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Andrew OM

    2003-01-01

    Congenital limb malformations occur in 1 in 500 to 1 in 1000 human live births and include both gross reduction defects and more subtle alterations in the number, length and anatomy of the digits. The major causes of limb malformations are abnormal genetic programming and intra-uterine disruption to development. The identification of causative gene mutations is important for genetic counselling and also provides insights into the mechanisms controlling limb development. This article illustrates some of the lessons learnt from the study of human limb malformation, organized into seven categories. These are: (1) identification of novel genes, (2) allelic mutation series, (3) pleiotropy, (4) qualitative or (5) quantitative differences between mouse and human development, (6) physical and teratogenic disruption, and (7) unusual biological phenomena. PMID:12587917

  5. Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the maxilla complicated by a local pathogen infection

    PubMed Central

    Ella, Bruno; Lanotte, Aurelie; Sedarat, Cyril; Fricain, Jean-Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are usually observed on the skin, but they can also rarely affect the visceral organs and the maxillofacial area. In the maxillofacial area, these lesions can spread and they are potentially dangerous, as a biopsy or even a simple tooth extraction can lead to a catastrophic haemorrhage that may eventually cause death. There are several indications for the treatment, including age, size and type of vascular malformation. The purpose of this report is to describe an AVM on the maxilla, first diagnosed as an epulis, which has been treated for several years as a chronic local periodontitis. The lesion was finally stabilised after an antibiotic therapy. Improved knowledge of the development of these lesions and collaboration between dentists, radiologists and surgeons are necessary to improve the diagnosis and treatment of vascular malformations. PMID:23376660

  6. Evolutionary origin of cardiac malformations.

    PubMed

    Taussig, H B

    1988-10-01

    The author has proposed in previous publications that isolated cardiac malformations have an evolutionary origin. This is partly supported by the fact that isolated cardiac malformations found in humans occur also in other placental mammals as well as in birds. External gross examination of the heart in just over 5,000 birds was carried out during a 3 year period. Anomalies included one instance of duplicate hearts, two specimens in which no heart could be identified and in a fourth, a yellow-rumped warbler, the heart lay in the neck outside of the thoracic cavity. Published reports of similar occurrences of an ectopically placed heart concern birds, cattle and humans. The fact that various species of both placental mammals and birds show evidence of heritability for heart defects, and that these species cannot interbreed, combined with the fact that birds and mammals have many similar malformations, points to either a common external causative factor or a common origin. Genes that code the malformed heart must be transmitted with that part of the genetic makeup common to all birds and mammals. Malformations caused by teratogens produce widespread organ injury to a potentially normal embryo whereas the evolutionary malformation is an organ-specific anomaly in an otherwise normal mammal or bird and occurs in widely separated species. The implications of this theory are important for parents of children with an isolated congenital heart defect who may have ingested one or another drug or chemical or have been exposed to toxins or infectious agents before or after conception of the affected offspring. PMID:3047192

  7. Intracranial aneurysm and sildenafil

    PubMed Central

    Edriss, Hawa; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Sildenafil is one of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. To date, we found five reported cases of intracerebral bleeding and two reported cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage related to sildenafil use. We report a 49-year-old hypertensive and diabetic patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and loss of consciousness following ingestion of 100 mg of sildenafil prior to sexual intercourse. He was not previously aware of the presence of an aneurysm and had no family history of it. Computed tomography of his head revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of a saccular aneurysm with subsequent repeat hemorrhage within a few hours of presentation. A sudden increase in blood pressure led to pulmonary edema. Studies have shown that sildenafil acts on phosphodiesterase-1, -2 and -5 receptors and leads to a secondary increase in intracerebral circulation and vasodilatory effects, leading to sympathetic overactivity which increases the risk for intracranial bleeding. PMID:27034561

  8. Imaging of congenital pulmonary malformations.

    PubMed

    Praticò, Francesco Emanuele; Corrado, Michele; Della Casa, Giovanni; Parziale, Raffaele; Russo, Giuseppe; Gazzani, Silvia Eleonora; Rossi, Enrica; Borgia, Daniele; Mostardi, Maurizio; Bacchini, Emanuele; Cella, Simone; De Filippo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary malformations represent a broad spectrum of anomalies that may result in varied clinical and pathologic pictures, ranging from recurrent pulmonary infections and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which require timely drug therapy, up to large space-occupying lesions needing surgical treatment. This classification includes three distinct anatomical and pathological entities, represented by Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation, Bronchopulmonary Sequestration and Congenital Lobar Emphysema. The final result in terms of embryological and fetal development of these alterations is a Congenital Lung Hypoplasia. Since even Bronchial Atresia, Pulmonary Bronchogenic Cysts and Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernias are due to Pulmonary Hypoplasia, these diseases will be discussed in this review (1, 2). PMID:27467867

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Dandy-Walker malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... All Close All Description Dandy-Walker malformation affects brain development, primarily development of the cerebellum , which is the ... Walker malformation , signs and symptoms caused by abnormal brain development are present at birth or develop within the ...

  10. Combined laser and surgical treatment of giant port wine stain malformation - Case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewiera, I.; Drozdowski, P.; Wójcicki, P.

    2012-10-01

    Background:Port-wine stains (PWS) are vascular malformations of the skin concerning about 0,3% of the population. Though various laser systems have been used for various treatment regimens the treatment of PWS of large size is especially difficult and demanding from aesthetic and psychological point of view.

  11. Intracranial sonography in infancy.

    PubMed

    Harmat, G

    1985-01-01

    Neonates and older infants were subjected to sonography through the anterior fontanelle with grey-scale compound scanner. The patients were referred to us from neurosurgery or showed clinical symptoms of perinatal CNS damage (ventricular or intracerebral haemorrhage, subdural effusion, etc.) or malformations (meningomyelocele, encephalocele, cystic brain, cerebral dysgenesis, etc.). Sonography is the simplest non-invasive diagnostic method to exclude suspected hydrocephalus in cases of macrocephalus, or when the head of premature infants grows more rapidly than the rest of the body. When screening showed alterations, sonography was performed weekly or fortnightly according to the extent of deviation from the normal. In cases of progressive hydrocephalus, when shunt surgery was indicated, ultrasound was used to monitor the operation of the shunt. In early age, ultrasound is a tool equal in value to CT, but is far less expensive and the examination can safely be repeated at any time. PMID:3885973

  12. Possible association between acetazolamide administration during pregnancy and multiple congenital malformations

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saleem, Afnan I; Al-Jobair, Asma M

    2016-01-01

    Congenital malformations might occur because of environmental or genetic factors, and sometimes occur because of unknown causes. Acetazolamide is a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor that is used to treat idiopathic intracranial hypertension, glaucoma, and epilepsy. The use of acetazolamide has not been recommended for pregnant women because of reported teratogenic risks. Congenital malformations, such as ectrodactyly, syndactyly, cleft lip/palate, and retarded incisor teeth development, have been reported in experimental animals. However, tooth agenesis due to the use of acetazolamide has not been reported yet. Oligodontia is a severe type of tooth agenesis involving six or more congenitally missing teeth. The causes of oligodontia are attributed to environmental factors, such as irradiation, drugs, trauma, tumors, infection, genetic factors, or a combination. There is no credible evidence of undesirable effects of acetazolamide use in human pregnancy. However, we report a case of a 12-year-old Saudi boy who was exposed to maternal acetazolamide (1,000 mg/day) for treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension before pregnancy, during the first trimester, and throughout the pregnancy. This treatment might have resulted in some congenital malformations, such as ectrodactyly, syndactyly, and oligodontia. PMID:27143854

  13. Possible association between acetazolamide administration during pregnancy and multiple congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleem, Afnan I; Al-Jobair, Asma M

    2016-01-01

    Congenital malformations might occur because of environmental or genetic factors, and sometimes occur because of unknown causes. Acetazolamide is a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor that is used to treat idiopathic intracranial hypertension, glaucoma, and epilepsy. The use of acetazolamide has not been recommended for pregnant women because of reported teratogenic risks. Congenital malformations, such as ectrodactyly, syndactyly, cleft lip/palate, and retarded incisor teeth development, have been reported in experimental animals. However, tooth agenesis due to the use of acetazolamide has not been reported yet. Oligodontia is a severe type of tooth agenesis involving six or more congenitally missing teeth. The causes of oligodontia are attributed to environmental factors, such as irradiation, drugs, trauma, tumors, infection, genetic factors, or a combination. There is no credible evidence of undesirable effects of acetazolamide use in human pregnancy. However, we report a case of a 12-year-old Saudi boy who was exposed to maternal acetazolamide (1,000 mg/day) for treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension before pregnancy, during the first trimester, and throughout the pregnancy. This treatment might have resulted in some congenital malformations, such as ectrodactyly, syndactyly, and oligodontia. PMID:27143854

  14. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Facilitating Surgical Resection of Infantile Massive Intracranial Immature Teratoma.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Takahiro; Tsuji, Yoshihito; Shirase, Tomoyuki; Yukawa, Hiroyuki; Takeichi, Yasuhiro; Yamazoe, Naohiro

    2016-01-01

    Immature teratoma (IMT) is the most frequent histological subtype of infantile intracranial teratoma, the most common congenital brain tumor. IMT contains incompletely differentiated components resembling fetal tissues. Infantile intracranial IMT has a dismal prognosis, because it is often inoperable due to its massive size and high vascularity. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to be effective in decreasing tumor volume and vascularity to facilitate surgical resection in other types of infantile brain tumors. However, only one recent case report described the effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for infantile intracranial IMT in the literature, even though it is common entity with a poor prognosis in infants. Here, we describe the case of a 2-month-old male infant with a very large intracranial IMT. Maximal surgical resection was first attempted but was unsuccessful because of severe intraoperative hemorrhage. Neoadjuvant carboplatin and etoposide (CARE) chemotherapy was then administered with the aim of shrinking and devascularizing the tumor. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, tumor size did not decrease, but intraoperative blood loss significantly decreased and near-total resection was achieved by the second and third surgery. The patient underwent adjuvant CARE chemotherapy and has been alive for 3 years after surgery without tumor regrowth. Even when neoadjuvant chemotherapy does not decrease tumor volume of infantile intracranial IMT, surgical resection should be tried because chemotherapy can facilitate surgical resection and improve clinical outcome by reducing tumor vascularity. PMID:27039944

  15. Pulmonary vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Mélot, C; Naeije, R

    2011-04-01

    Diseases of the pulmonary vasculature are a cause of increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) in pulmonary embolism, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), and pulmonary arterial hypertension or decreased PVR in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations on hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, portal hypertension, or cavopulmonary anastomosis. All these conditions are associated with a decrease in both arterial PO2 and PCO2. Gas exchange in pulmonary vascular diseases with increased PVR is characterized by a shift of ventilation and perfusion to high ventilation-perfusion ratios, a mild to moderate increase in perfusion to low ventilation-perfusion ratios, and an increased physiologic dead space. Hypoxemia in these patients is essentially explained by altered ventilation-perfusion matching amplified by a decreased mixed venous PO2 caused by a low cardiac output. Hypocapnia is accounted for by hyperventilation, which is essentially related to an increased chemosensitivity. A cardiac shunt on a patent foramen ovale may be a cause of severe hypoxemia in a proportion of patients with pulmonary hypertension and an increase in right atrial pressure. Gas exchange in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations is characterized by variable degree of pulmonary shunting and/or diffusion-perfusion imbalance. Hypocapnia is caused by an increased ventilation in relation to an increased pulmonary blood flow with direct peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation by shunted mixed venous blood flow. PMID:23737196

  16. Vessel Wall Imaging of the Intracranial and Cervical Carotid Arteries.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Jun; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, Deok Hee

    2015-09-01

    Vessel wall imaging can depict the morphologies of atherosclerotic plaques, arterial walls, and surrounding structures in the intracranial and cervical carotid arteries beyond the simple luminal changes that can be observed with traditional luminal evaluation. Differentiating vulnerable from stable plaques and characterizing atherosclerotic plaques are vital parts of the early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of stroke and the neurological adverse effects of atherosclerosis. Various techniques for vessel wall imaging have been developed and introduced to differentiate and analyze atherosclerotic plaques in the cervical carotid artery. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) is the most important and popular vessel wall imaging technique for directly evaluating the vascular wall and intracranial artery disease. Intracranial artery atherosclerosis, dissection, moyamoya disease, vasculitis, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome can also be diagnosed and differentiated by using HR-MRI. Here, we review the radiologic features of intracranial artery disease and cervical carotid artery atherosclerosis on HR-MRI and various other vessel wall imaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography). PMID:26437991

  17. Vessel Wall Imaging of the Intracranial and Cervical Carotid Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Jun; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, Deok Hee

    2015-01-01

    Vessel wall imaging can depict the morphologies of atherosclerotic plaques, arterial walls, and surrounding structures in the intracranial and cervical carotid arteries beyond the simple luminal changes that can be observed with traditional luminal evaluation. Differentiating vulnerable from stable plaques and characterizing atherosclerotic plaques are vital parts of the early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of stroke and the neurological adverse effects of atherosclerosis. Various techniques for vessel wall imaging have been developed and introduced to differentiate and analyze atherosclerotic plaques in the cervical carotid artery. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) is the most important and popular vessel wall imaging technique for directly evaluating the vascular wall and intracranial artery disease. Intracranial artery atherosclerosis, dissection, moyamoya disease, vasculitis, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome can also be diagnosed and differentiated by using HR-MRI. Here, we review the radiologic features of intracranial artery disease and cervical carotid artery atherosclerosis on HR-MRI and various other vessel wall imaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography). PMID:26437991

  18. A new venture with sclerotherapy in an oral vascular lesion.

    PubMed

    Sitra, G; Kayalvizhi, E B; Sivasankari, T; Vishwanath, R

    2014-12-01

    Vascular malformations are one of the most common lesions of the oral cavity. The lesion may be a congenital malformation observed in neonates or arteriovenous malformation observed in adults. Various surgical and medical managements are possible for vascular lesions which include surgical excision, laser therapy, cryotherapy, selective embolization, intralesional sclerosing agents, β-blockers and steroid therapy. Here we report a case of oral vascular lesion where intralesional injection with 30 mg/ml of sodium tetradecyl sulfate (STS) was given, which resulted in local complications with severe inflammatory response including pain, swelling, and surface ulceration that remained for 2 weeks. Sclerotherapy with STS still remain an effective agent in treating benign oral vascular lesions and provides alternative or support for surgical methods. Sometimes it can lead to undesirable complications like allergic reactions, local inflammatory response, etc. PMID:25538471

  19. Warfarin and low-dose aspirin for stroke prevention from severe intracranial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Bekavac, I; Hanna, J P; Sila, C A; Furland, A J

    1999-01-01

    Management of symptomatic, intracranial, large-arterial atherosclerosis is controversial. We assessed the safety and efficacy of combining warfarin and low-dose aspirin to prevent stroke from intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis failing prior treatment with either aspirin or warfarin. Patients with severe intracranial stenosis were prescribed combination therapy, warfarin (international normalized ratio [INR] 2 to 3) and aspirin 81 mg daily. Ten men and six women treated with combination therapy had one recurrent ischemic event during 382 months of therapy. No patient suffered a myocardial infarction or sudden vascular death. No serious hemorrhagic complication occurred. The combination of warfarin and low-dose aspirin seems safe and effective in preventing recurrent stroke from symptomatic, intracranial, large-arterial occlusive disease after failure with either aspirin or warfarin monotherapy. PMID:17895135

  20. Intracranial extra-axial hemangioma in a newborn: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Dalsin, Marcos; Silva, Rafael Sodré; Galdino Chaves, Jennyfer Paula; Oliveira, Francine Hehn; Martins Antunes, Ápio Cláudio; Vedolin, Leonardo Modesti

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital hemangiomas are benign vascular tumors, and the intracranial counterpart was described in very few cases. Case Description: A newborn presented with an intracranial tumor associated with an arachnoid cyst, diagnosed by antenatal ultrasound at 37 weeks of gestation. Surgery was indicated due to increased head circumference and bulging fontanelle, and a complete resection of an extra-axial red–brown tumor was performed at the 3rd week of life. Microscopy revealed a hemangioma. Conclusion: Hemangioma is a rare differential diagnosis that must be considered in extra-axial intracranial tumors affecting infants and neonates. The radiological features are not helpful in differentiating from other tumors, and surgery is indicated when the diagnosis is uncertain or whenever there are signs of increased intracranial pressure. PMID:27274403

  1. Modeling of Intracranial Pressure Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Richard L.; Sullivan, Humbert G.; Miller, J. Douglas

    1978-01-01

    Digital computer simulation is utilized to test hypotheses regarding poorly understood mechanisms of intracranial pressure change. The simulation produces graphic output similar to records from polygraph recorders used in patient monitoring and in animal experimentation. The structure of the model is discussed. The mathematic model perfected by the comparison between simulation and experiment will constitute a formulation of medical information applicable to automated clinical monitoring and treatment of intracranial hypertension.

  2. Reconstruction of middle ear malformations

    PubMed Central

    Schwager, Konrad

    2008-01-01

    Malformations of the middle ear are classified as minor and major malformations. Minor malformations appear with regular external auditory canal, tympanic membrane and aerated middle ear space. The conducting hearing loss is due to fixation or interruption of the ossicular chain. The treatment is surgical, following the rules of ossiculoplasty and stapes surgery. In major malformations (congenital aural atresia) there is no external auditory canal and a deformed or missing pinna. The mastoid and the middle ear space may be underdevelopped, the ossicular chain is dysplastic. Surgical therapy is possible in patients with good aeration of the temporal bone, existing windows, a near normal positioned facial nerve and a mobile ossicular chain. Plastic and reconstructive surgery of the pinna should proceed the reconstruction of the external auditory canal and middle ear. In cases of good prognosis unilateral aural atresia can be approached already in childhood. In patients with high risk of surgical failure, bone anchored hearing aids are the treatment of choice. Recent reports of implantable hearing devices may be discussed as an alternative treatment for selected patients. PMID:22073077

  3. Coil Embolization for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of coil embolization compared with surgical clipping to treat intracranial aneurysms. The Technology Endovascular coil embolization is a percutaneous approach to treat an intracranial aneurysm from within the blood vessel without the need of a craniotomy. In this procedure, a microcatheter is inserted into the femoral artery near the groin and navigated to the site of the aneurysm. Small helical platinum coils are deployed through the microcatheter to fill the aneurysm, and prevent it from further expansion and rupture. Health Canada has approved numerous types of coils and coil delivery systems to treat intracranial aneurysms. The most favoured are controlled detachable coils. Coil embolization may be used with other adjunct endovascular devices such as stents and balloons. Background Intracranial Aneurysms Intracranial aneurysms are the dilation or ballooning of part of a blood vessel in the brain. Intracranial aneurysms range in size from small (<12 mm in diameter) to large (12–25 mm), and to giant (>25 mm). There are 3 main types of aneurysms. Fusiform aneurysms involve the entire circumference of the artery; saccular aneurysms have outpouchings; and dissecting aneurysms have tears in the arterial wall. Berry aneurysms are saccular aneurysms with well-defined necks. Intracranial aneurysms may occur in any blood vessel of the brain; however, they are most commonly found at the branch points of large arteries that form the circle of Willis at the base of the brain. In 85% to 95% of patients, they are found in the anterior circulation. Aneurysms in the posterior circulation are less frequent, and are more difficult to treat surgically due to inaccessibility. Most intracranial aneurysms are small and asymptomatic. Large aneurysms may have a mass effect, causing compression on the brain and cranial nerves and neurological deficits. When an intracranial aneurysm ruptures and bleeds

  4. A Case of Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension: The Role of Dynamic CT Myelography and Epidural Blood Patch in Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Yogesh; Hooda, Kusum; Li, Shuo; Karol, Ian; Muro, Gerard J

    2015-10-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) most commonly results from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks in the upper spinal canal. Alterations in the equilibrium between the volumes of intracranial blood and CSF lead to compensatory dilatation of the vascular spaces, mostly on the venous side. Dynamic computerized tomogram (CT) myelography can be very helpful in diagnosing the site of a CSF leak in the spinal canal. Subsequently, the site of the leak can be sealed with epidural blood patch (EBP). PMID:26630707

  5. Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms Associated with Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sangwoo; Kim, Jaeho; Kim, Chong-gue

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease is an inflammatory disorder involving multiple organs. Its cause is still unknown, but vasculitis is the major pathologic characteristic. The common vascular lesions associated with Behçet's disease are aneurysm formation, arterial or venous occlusive diseases, and varices. Arterial aneurysms mostly occur in large arteries. Intracranial aneurysms hardly occur with Behçet's disease. We would like to present a 41-year-old female patient with Behçet's disease who showed symptoms of severe headache due to subarachnoid hemorrhage. Brain computed tomography revealed multiple aneurysms. We also present a literature review of intracranial arterial aneurysms associated with Behçet's disease. PMID:27114964

  6. Vascular anomalies of the head and neck in children

    PubMed Central

    Mahady, Kate; Thust, Stefanie; Berkeley, Rupert; Stuart, Sam; Barnacle, Alex; Robertson, Fergus

    2015-01-01

    Sixty percent of vascular anomalies in children are found in the head and neck. These lesions can present throughout antenatal, perinatal and childhood development. They broadly fall into two categories: vascular tumours and vascular malformations. Their clinical and, often, psychological impact is determined by both pathological type and location: many lesions follow an uncomplicated natural course and other more complex, extensive or progressive lesions can present a threat to life from mass effect, haemorrhage or large volume arteriovenous shunting. Vascular tumours include infantile haemangioma (IH), congenital haemangioma (CH) and kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KH); of which IH is the most common. Management options for vascular tumours include conservative approaches, oral medications and surgical intervention as determined by tumour type, location and associated complications. Vascular malformations can be categorised into low flow and high flow lesions. Low flow lesions include capillary, venous and lymphatic malformations (LMs). High flow lesions describe the arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), a highly heterogeneous group of lesions which can present in a variety of ways—the mainstay of treatment for these dynamic lesions is endovascular or surgical obliteration. We provide a practical framework for clinical classification of vascular anomalies of the head and neck in children. We also explore principles of their clinical and radiological assessment along with management, highlighting the importance of a multi-disciplinary approach. PMID:26807370

  7. Vascular anomalies of the head and neck in children.

    PubMed

    Mahady, Kate; Thust, Stefanie; Berkeley, Rupert; Stuart, Sam; Barnacle, Alex; Robertson, Fergus; Mankad, Kshitij

    2015-12-01

    Sixty percent of vascular anomalies in children are found in the head and neck. These lesions can present throughout antenatal, perinatal and childhood development. They broadly fall into two categories: vascular tumours and vascular malformations. Their clinical and, often, psychological impact is determined by both pathological type and location: many lesions follow an uncomplicated natural course and other more complex, extensive or progressive lesions can present a threat to life from mass effect, haemorrhage or large volume arteriovenous shunting. Vascular tumours include infantile haemangioma (IH), congenital haemangioma (CH) and kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KH); of which IH is the most common. Management options for vascular tumours include conservative approaches, oral medications and surgical intervention as determined by tumour type, location and associated complications. Vascular malformations can be categorised into low flow and high flow lesions. Low flow lesions include capillary, venous and lymphatic malformations (LMs). High flow lesions describe the arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), a highly heterogeneous group of lesions which can present in a variety of ways-the mainstay of treatment for these dynamic lesions is endovascular or surgical obliteration. We provide a practical framework for clinical classification of vascular anomalies of the head and neck in children. We also explore principles of their clinical and radiological assessment along with management, highlighting the importance of a multi-disciplinary approach. PMID:26807370

  8. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  9. Intracranial complications following mastoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Migirov, Lela; Eyal, Ana; Kronenberg, Jona

    2004-01-01

    Mastoidectomy is a common surgical procedure in otology. However, postoperative complications of various degrees of severity may occur. We present 4 children who underwent mastoidectomy for middle ear and mastoid disease and developed postoperative intracranial complications. One child was operated on for brain abscess 1 week after the initial mastoidectomy. Another child appeared with seizures 5 days after the initial mastoidectomy and a subdural empyema was drained during revision surgery. Large bone defects with exposed middle cranial fossa dura were found at revision surgery in both cases and Proteus vulgaris and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from the mastoid and abscess cavities in these children. A small epidural collection was diagnosed in the third patient 2 days after initial mastoid surgery and was managed with intravenous antibiotics only. The other child was found to have sigmoid sinus thrombosis the day after mastoidectomy that was performed for nonresponsive acute mastoiditis. This child received both intravenous antibiotics and anticoagulants. Timely revision surgery, combinations of third- or fourth-generation cephalosporins with vancomycin or metronidazole and the addition of anticoagulants in cases of sinus thrombosis can lead to full recovery. PMID:15689642

  10. [Emergency cesarean section and craniectomy in a patient with rupture of a cerebral arteriovenous malformation].

    PubMed

    Monsalve-Mejía, G; Palacio, W; Rodríguez, C

    2014-04-01

    The intracerebral hemorrhage in pregnancy is a rare event, but can have catastrophic consequences for both mother and fetus. The management of non-ruptured arteriovenous malformations in pregnancy is not free of controversy in the current literature, as there is the possibility of spontaneous bleeding and becoming a true emergency. We report the case of a pregnant patient of 35 weeks with a diagnosis of a cerebral arteriovenous malformation, who developed a sudden onset of headache, generalized tonic-clonic seizures, loss of consciousness, and hemiparesis with radiological images of an intracranial hematoma with a mass effect, and signs of herniation. The multidisciplinary management is discussed, emphasizing perioperative cesarean approach plus craniotomy and drainage of the hematoma, and subsequent management in intensive care, and definitive management by neuroradiology, with a successful outcome. PMID:23664062

  11. Surgical and Endovascular Treatment for Spinal Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    ENDO, Toshiki; ENDO, Hidenori; SATO, Kenichi; MATSUMOTO, Yasushi; TOMINAGA, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    Spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a broad term that constitutes diverse vascular pathologies. To date, various classification schemes for spinal AVM have been proposed in literature, which helped neurosurgeons understand the pathophysiology of the disease and determine an optimal treatment strategy. To discuss indications and results of surgical and endovascular interventions for spinal AVM, this article refers to the following classification proposed by Anson and Spetzler in 1992: type I, dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF); type II, glomus intramedullary AVM; type III, juvenile malformations; and type IV, perimedullary AVF. In general, complete obliteration of the fistula is a key for better outcome in type I dural and type IV perimedullary AVFs. On the other hand, in type II glomus and type III juvenile malformations, functional preservation, instead of pursuing angiographical cure, is the main goal of the treatment. In such cases, reduction of the shunt flow can alleviate clinical symptoms. Proper management of spinal AVM should start with neurological examination and understanding of angioarchitectures, which provide critical information that guides the indication and modality of intervention. Finally, close collaboration of the microsurgical and endovascular teams are mandatory for successful treatment. PMID:26948701

  12. Guidelines for the treatment of head and neck venous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jia Wei; Mai, Hua Ming; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Yan An; Fan, Xin Dong; Su, Li Xin; Qin, Zhong Ping; Yang, Yao Wu; Jiang, Yin Hua; Zhao, Yi Fang; Suen, James Y

    2013-01-01

    Venous malformation is one of the most common benign vascular lesions, with approximately 40% of cases appearing in the head and neck. They can affect a patient’s appearance and functionality and even cause life-threatening bleeding or respiratory tract obstruction. The current methods of treatment include surgery, laser therapy, sclerotherapy, or a combined. The treatment of small and superficial venous malformations is relatively simple and effective; however, the treatment of deep and extensive lesions involving multiple anatomical sites remains a challenge for the physicians. For complex cases, the outcomes achieved with one single treatment approach are poor; therefore, individualized treatment modalities must be formulated based on the patient’s condition and the techniques available. Comprehensive multidisciplinary treatments have been adapted to achieve the most effective results. In this paper, based on the national and international literature, we formulated the treatment guidelines for head and neck venous malformations to standardize clinical practice. The guideline will be renewed and updated in a timely manner to reflect cutting-edge knowledge and to provide the best treatment modalities for patients. PMID:23724158

  13. Cerebral vascular effects of loading dose of dexmedetomidine: A Transcranial Color Doppler study

    PubMed Central

    Arulvelan, Appavoo; Manikandan, Sethuraman; Easwer, Hari Venkat; Krishnakumar, Kesavapisharady

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dexmedetomidine has been widely used in critical care settings because of its property of maintaining stable hemodynamics and inducing conscious sedation. The use of dexmedetomidine is in increasing trend particularly in patients with neurological disorders. Very few studies have focused on the cerebral hemodynamic effects of dexmedetomidine. This study is aimed to address this issue. Methods: Thirty patients without any intracranial pathology were included in this study. Middle cerebral artery flow velocity obtained from transcranial color Doppler was used to assess the cerebral hemodynamic indices. Mean flow velocity (mFV), pulsatility index (PI), cerebral vascular resistant index (CVRi), estimated cerebral perfusion pressure (eCPP), and zero flow pressure (ZFP) were calculated bilaterally at baseline and after infusion of injection Dexmedetomidine 1 mcg/Kg over 10 min. Results: Twenty-six patients completed the study protocol. After administration of loading dose of dexmedetomidine, mFV and eCPP values were significantly decreased in both hemispheres (P < 0.05); PI, CVRi, and ZFP values showed significant increase (P < 0.05) after dexmedetomidine infusion. Conclusion: Increase in PI, CVRi, and ZFP suggests that there is a possibility of an increase in distal cerebral vascular resistance (CVR) with loading dose of dexmedetomidine. Decrease in mFV and eCPP along with an increase in CVR may lead to a decrease in cerebral perfusion. This effect can be exaggerated in patients with preexisting neurological illness. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of dexmedetomidine on various other pathological conditions involving brain like traumatic brain injury and vascular malformations. PMID:26955211

  14. The Role of Macrophage in the Pathogenesis of Brain Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Guo, Yi; Zhao, Yuan-Li; Su, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (BAVM) is an important risk factor for intracranial hemorrhage, especially in children and young adults. Inflammation has been implicated in BAVM lesion progression. Among various inflammatory components, macrophage is one of the major inflammatory cells present in human ruptured and unruptured BAVM and in the BAVM lesions of animal models. The role of macrophage in BAVM pathogenesis is not fully understood. In this review, we summarize recent studies on macrophages and introduce a non-invasive imaging protocol as a potential tool for detecting macrophage in BAVM and predicting the risk of BAVM rupture. PMID:26495437

  15. Medical Therapy for Pediatric Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, Judith F.; Soni, Heather Mills; Pimpalwar, Sheena

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies (VAs) comprise a large variety of individual diagnoses that in different phases of treatment require a diverse number of medical specialists to provide optimal care. Medical therapies include agents usually associated with cancer chemotherapy, such as vincristine, as well more immunomodulatory types of drugs, such as glucocorticoids and sirolimus. These immunomodulating drugs are being successfully applied in cases that are typically categorized as vascular tumors, including kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KHE) and tufted angioma (TA), as well as some of the more invasive types of vascular malformations (i.e., microcystic lymphatic malformations and blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome (BRBNS). These therapies need to be combined with good supportive care, which often involves anticoagulation, antimicrobial prophylaxis, and comprehensive pain and symptom-relief strategies, as well as appropriate drug monitoring and management of side effects of medical treatment. The optimal care of these patients frequently involves close collaboration between surgeons, interventional and conventional radiologists, medical subspecialists, and nurses. PMID:25045333

  16. Management of Symptomatic Intracranial Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hoak, David A; Lutsep, Helmi L

    2016-09-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease is a common cause of stroke worldwide, causing approximately 10 % of strokes in the USA and up to 50 % in Asian populations. Recurrent stroke risks are particularly high in those with a stenosis of 70 % or more and a recent transient ischemic attack or stroke. Warfarin has been associated with higher major hemorrhage rates and no reduction of recurrent stroke compared to aspirin in patients with symptomatic intracranial stenosis. After early trials showed the feasibility of stenting, two randomized trials compared stenting plus medical management to medical management alone in symptomatic intracranial stenosis. Stenting was linked with increased risk and showed no benefit in any subpopulation of patients. Aggressive medical management in the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) trial was associated with half the risk of stroke compared to that in similar patients in a previous symptomatic intracranial stenosis trial after adjustment of confounding characteristics. Aggressive medical management comprises risk factor control, including a target systolic blood pressure <140 mmHg, a low density lipoprotein <70 mg/dL, hemoglobin A1C <7.0 %, and lifestyle management that incorporates exercise, smoking cessation and weight management, and the use of antithrombotics. PMID:27443379

  17. Stereotactic radiosurgery for intramedullary spinal arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Kalani, Maziyar A; Choudhri, Omar; Gibbs, Iris C; Soltys, Scott G; Adler, John R; Thompson, Patricia A; Tayag, Armine T; Samos, Cindy H; Chang, Steven D

    2016-07-01

    Spinal cord arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are rare lesions associated with recurrent hemorrhage and progressive ischemia. Occasionally a favorable location, size or vascular anatomy may allow management with endovascular embolization and/or microsurgical resection. For most, however, there is no good treatment option. Between 1997 and 2014, we treated 37 patients (19 females, 18 males, median age 30years) at our institution diagnosed with intramedullary spinal cord AVM (19 cervical, 12 thoracic, and six conus medullaris) with CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) stereotactic radiosurgery. A history of hemorrhage was present in 50% of patients. The mean AVM volume of 2.3cc was treated with a mean marginal dose of 20.5Gy in a median of two sessions. Clinical and MRI follow-up were carried out annually, and spinal angiography was repeated at 3years. We report an overall obliteration rate of 19% without any post-treatment hemorrhagic events. In those AVM that did not undergo obliteration, significant volume reduction was noted at 3years. Although the treatment paradigm for spinal cord AVM continues to evolve, radiosurgical treatment is capable of safely obliterating or significantly shrinking most intramedullary spinal cord AVM. PMID:26869363

  18. A giant frontal cavernous malformation with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arvind; Mittal, Radhey Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Cavernous malformations (CMs) are vascular anomalies with dilated spaces called caverns. These spaces are lined by endothelial cells and collage and devoid of smooth muscle or intervening neural tissue, and filled with blood at various stages of stasis, thrombosis, organization, and calcification. Most CMs are relatively small in size but when they are large enough they can produce sing of mass effect and may simulate neoplastic, vascular, inflammatory pathology. Giant CM (size >6 cm) are very rare lesions and very few cases are reported in world literature. We are reporting such a rare case of a 16 year male. Our case is also unique in the sense that it is the largest reported CM in Indian population. PMID:27114662

  19. Use of the TriSpan Coil to Facilitate the Transcatheter Occlusion of Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Cil, Barbaros E. E-mail: barbaros@hacettepe.edu.tr; Erdogan, Cueneyt; Akmangit, Ilkay; Cekirge, Saruhan; Balkanci, Ferhun

    2004-11-15

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) is a rare vascular malformation of the lung which may occur as an isolated entity or in association with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Because of considerable risk of serious complications such as cerebral embolism, brain abscess and pulmonary hemorrhage, definitive treatment should be considered in most patients. Embolization with coils or detachable balloons is currently the preferred treatment. Paradoxical embolization of coils and balloons may happen, especially in patients with PAVMs with large feeding arteries. In this report we present our initial experience with the use of the TriSpan coil to lower the risk of coil migration during the transcatheter occlusion of PAVMs.

  20. Congenital malformations in diabetic offspring.

    PubMed

    Temesio, P; Belitzky, R; Gallego, L; Martell, M; Pose, S V

    1977-01-01

    A retrospective study of 215 deliveries in diabetic mothers at Hospital de Clínicas (Montevideo, Uruguay) has been performed. Presence of congenital malformations (CM) was considered in relation to age of the mothers, class of maternal diabetes, maternal angiopathy, treatment and metabolic control. The prevalence of CM in the series was 9.8%. None of the factors analyzed seems to be statistically linked to the prevalence of CM. PMID:613685

  1. Primary intracranial lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Mufti, Shagufta T.; Baeesa, Saleh S.; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL), a rare form of aggressive extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), has increased in incidence during the last three decades and occurs in both immune compromised and immune competent hosts. It has an overall poor prognosis. Objective: This study attempts to further delineate the clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological profile of PCNSL at Jeddah to King Faisal Hospital and Research Center. Methods: Computerized search through the archives of King Faisal Hospital and Research Centre between July 2000- December 2012 identified 15 patients with pathologically confirmed PCNSL. These were analyzed retrospectively. Their clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological data were analyzed. Results: Of the 15 PCNSL patients, 8 (53.3%) were females and 7 (46.6%) were males. There was female predilection especially in the age group of 40-59 years. Mean age at diagnosis for all patients was 50.4 years. There was no patient in the pediatric age group. The most common location in the brain was the frontal region in 7 patients (46.6%), 7 (46.6%) had multiple intracranial masses; all 15 (100%) were Non Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, among which 13 (86.6%) were diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. All 15 (100%) cases showed diffuse and strong positivity for CD 45, and CD 20. Fourteen patients were immune competent while one was immune compromised. Conclusions: PCNSL often occurs in middle-aged and aged patients. There is female predilection especially in the middle age. Frontal region is the most common location with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma being the predominant subtype. PMID:27366250

  2. [Maternal imagination and congenital malformations].

    PubMed

    Van Heiningen, Teunis Willem

    2011-01-01

    Since antiquity philosophers and scientists tried to explain the cause of congenital malformations. In early modern medicine maternal imagination was largely accepted as their true cause, This concept was rejected by Blondel, a London physician. Around 1750 Wolff introduced the Hemmungsbildung as the cause of congenital malformations, a concept adopted in 1781 by Blumenbach. Later on Soemmerring (1784), Crichton (1785) and Meckel the younger adopted Blumenbach's concept. In 1824 Suringar further developed it. More and more the excessive development of fetal blood vessels or nerves was rejected as a possible cause, although from time to time these ideas were adopted again. In the early 1800s Etienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (1811) and Vrolik (1817) developed a classification of monstra. These attempts urged Isidore Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (Etienne's son) and Vrolik the younger (Gerard's son) to develop it further. Nevertheless, around 1840 Vrolik had to admit that although we are well acqainted with the various malformations, we are still ignorant of the primary cause of these phenomena. Meanwhile the dispute between the adherents of the theory of preformation and those who had adopted the concept of epigenesis exercised many minds. In the second half of the eighteenth century the latter theory became more and more adopted and this fact cleared the way for the ideas introduced by Wolff and Blumenbach, because it was consistent with the idea of a gradual development of fetal structures. PMID:22073754

  3. Treatment of intracranial foreign body.

    PubMed

    Karadas, Sevdegul; Dursun, Recep; Kiymaz, Nejmi

    2014-07-01

    Craniospinal penetrating foreign body (FB) injuries are interesting, but rarely observed, cases. They are important in terms of the complications that they may cause. The etiologies of craniospinal penetrating injuries and intracranial FB are also different. Though a sewing needle is more rarely seen in an intracranial FB, it may occur as atttempted infanticide or as a result of an accident especially in early childhood before the closure of fontanels. We detected an intracranial sewing needle in the head radiograph of a case admitted to the emergency department for another reason. We present this case since this is a rare injury and the etiologies of craniospinal penetrating foreign body have different characteristics. PMID:25255596

  4. The Horizon for Treating Cutaneous Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Amit M.; Chou, Elizabeth L.; Findeiss, Laura; Kelly, Kristen M.

    2013-01-01

    Dermatologists encounter a wide range of cutaneous vascular lesions, including infantile hemangiomas, port-wine stain birthmarks, arteriovenous malformations, venous malformations, Kaposi sarcomas, angiosarcomas, and angiofibromas. Current treatment modalities to reduce these lesions include topical and/or intralesional steroids, laser therapy, surgical resection, and endovascular therapy. However, each method has limitations owing to recurrence, comorbidities, toxicity, or lesion location. Photodynamic therapy, antiangiogenic therapy, and evolving methods of sclerotherapy are promising areas of development that may mitigate limitations of current treatments and offer exciting options for patients and their physicians. PMID:22640429

  5. Cervicofacial Lymphatic Malformations: A Retrospective Review of 40 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Byung Chae; Kim, Jae Bong; Lee, Jeong Woo; Choi, Kang Young; Yang, Jung Dug; Lee, Seok-Jong; Kim, Yong-Sun; Lee, Jong Min; Huh, Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background Lymphatic malformation (LM) is a form of congenital vascular malformation with a low incidence. Although LM has been studied, no consensus has emerged regarding its cause or treatment. Methods In this study, we retrospectively evaluated 40 patients who visited our vascular anomalies center for the treatment of cervicofacial LM, which is a common manifestation of LM. The medical records of patients over a period of 12 years were reviewed and analyzed for commonalities regarding the diagnosis and the results of treatment. Results Suspected cervicofacial LM was confirmed through imaging studies. No difference in incidence was observed according to sex, and 73% of patients first presented with symptoms before the age of two years. The left side and the V2–V3 area were most commonly affected. No significant differences in incidence were observed among the macrocystic, microcystic, and combined types of LM. A total of 28 out of 36 patients received sclerotherapy as the first choice of treatment, regardless of the type of lesion. Complete resolution was achieved in only 25% of patients. Conclusions LM is important to confirm the diagnosis early and to choose an appropriate treatment strategy according to the stage of the disease and each individual patient's symptoms. When treatment is delayed or an incorrect treatment is administered, patient discomfort increases as the lesion gradually spreads. Therefore, more so than is the case for most other diseases, a team approach on a case-by-case basis is important for the accurate and appropriate treatment of LM. PMID:26848440

  6. Management of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Deena M; Brown, Robert D

    2016-09-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA) occur in approximately 2-3 % of the population. Most of these lesions are incidentally found, asymptomatic and typically carry a benign course. Although the risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is low, this complication can result in significant morbidity and mortality, making assessment of this risk the cornerstone of UIA management. This article reviews important factors to consider when managing unruptured intracranial aneurysms including patient demographics, comorbidities, family history, symptom status, and aneurysm characteristics. It also addresses screening, monitoring, medical management and current surgical and endovascular therapies. PMID:27443382

  7. Computed tomographic spectrum of intracranial mycosis: correlation with histopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, M.A.; Stern, J.; deNapoli, R.A.

    1981-12-01

    Four cases of intracerebral fungal infection are reviewed. The clinical course is outlined, and the computed tomographic (CT) characteristics are analyzed in light of known pathological data. The CT appearance of intracranial mycosis is dependent on the type of fungus as well as the dominant infecting form, i.e., yeast or hyphae. The hyphal form leads predominantly to a CT pattern consistent with vascular occlusion and secondary abscess formation; the yeast form generally results in noncaseating granulomas, which appear on CT scan as nodular enhancing lesions. If the patient survives the acute infective process, these fungal lesions undergo a prolonged subacute phase, and may eventually calcify.

  8. Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms:

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, J.; Nguyen, T.; Chagnon, M.; Gevry, G.

    2007-01-01

    'if a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; 'but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties'. Sir Francis Bacon, The Advancement of Learning Summary In the absence of level one evidence, the treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms is grounded on opinions. Results of the largest registry available, ISUIA (the International Study on Unruptured Intraacranial Aneurysms) suggest that surgical or endovascular treatments are rarely justified. Yet the unruptured aneurysm is the most frequent indication for treatment in many endovascular centres. In preparation for the initiation of a randomized trial, we aimed at a better knowledge of endovascular expert opinions on unruptured aneurysms. We administered a standard questionnaire to 175 endovascular experts gathered at the WFITN meeting in Val d'lsère in 2007. Four paradigm unruptured aneurysms were used to poll opinions on risks of treatment or observation, as well as on their willingness to treat, observe or propose to the patient participation in a randomized trial, using six questions for each aneurysm. Opinions varied widely among lesions and among participants. Most participants (92.5%) were consistent, as they would offer treatment only if their estimate of the ten-year risk of spontaneous hemorrhage would exceed risks of treatment. Estimates of the natural history were consistently higher than that reported by ISUIA. Conversely, treatment risks were underestimated compared to those reported in ISUIA, but within the range reported in a recent French registry (ATENA). Participants were more confident in their evaluation of treatment risks and in their skills at treating aneurysms than in their estimates of risks of rupture entailed by the presence of the lesion, the latter being anchored at or close to 1% /year. The gulf between expert opinions, clinical practices and available data from registries persist. Expert opinions are compatible with the primary hypothesis

  9. [Vascular anomaly in the midcheek region of an infant--review of the diagnostic procedure].

    PubMed

    Rossler, L; Sander, V; Teuber, I; Stücker, M; Kreuter, A; Stricker, I; Hamelmann, E

    2015-05-01

    Clinical history, physical examination, evolution and imaging findings (Colour Doppler sonography, MRI if available) are of pivotal importance in the diagnostic pathway of an infantile vascular anomaly. Histopathology with specific stains and markers is contributive in difficult cases. Differentiation between vascular tumors (hemangioma) and vascular malformations is now well known and integrated into the ISSVA classification. We report here a 6-months-old boy, who presented with a localized cutaneous and expansive vascular birthmark in the left cheek and developed bleedings at the age of 18 months. Diagnostic features of a hemangioma were not evident, and the final diagnosis of a venous malformation was confirmed by histopathology. PMID:25985453

  10. Chiari Malformations and Syringohydromyelia in Children.

    PubMed

    Poretti, Andrea; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2016-04-01

    Chiari malformations are a heterogeneous group of disorders with distinct clinical anatomical features all of which involve the hindbrain. Our understanding of Chiari malformations increased tremendously over the past decades, and progress in neuroimaging was instrumental for that. Conventional and advanced neuroimaging of the brain and spine play a key role in the workup of children with suspected Chiari malformations. In addition, neuroimaging studies in Chiari malformations may guide the management, serve as a predictor of outcome, and shed light on the pathogenesis. PMID:27063663

  11. Outcomes of Surgical Treatment of Vascular Anomalies on the Vermilion

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Min; Lee, Jae Woo; Kim, Hoon Soo; Lee, In Sook

    2016-01-01

    Background The vermilion plays an important role in both the aesthetic and functional aspects of facial anatomy. Due to its structural features, the complete excision of vascular anomalies on the vermilion is challenging, making it difficult to determine the appropriate treatment strategy. Thus, the authors analyzed the results of surgical treatment of vascular anomalies on the vermilion. Methods The medical records of 38 patients with vascular anomalies on the vermilion who underwent surgery from 1995 to 2013 were analyzed. Nine of the cases had an involuted hemangioma, and 29 cases had a vascular malformation; of the vascular malformations, 13, 11, one, and four cases involved were capillary malformations (CMs), venous malformations (VMs), lymphatic malformations (LMs), and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), respectively. We investigated the surgical methods used to treat these patients, the quantity of surgical procedures, complications and instances of recurrence, and self-assessed satisfaction scores. Results A total of 50 operations were carried out: 28 horizontal partial excisions, eight vertical partial excisions, and 14 operations using other surgical methods. All cases of AVM underwent complete excision. Six cases experienced minor complications and one case of recurrence was observed. The overall average satisfaction score was 4.1 out of 5, while the satisfaction scores associated with each lesion type were 4.2 for hemangiomas, 3.9 for CMs, 4.2 for VMs, 5.0 for LMs, and 4.0 for AVMs. Conclusions It is difficult to completely excise vascular anomalies that involve the vermilion. This study suggests that partial excision focused on correcting the overall contour of the lips is effective and leads to satisfactory results. PMID:26848441

  12. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage After Lumboperitoneal Shunt for Fulminant Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fok, Anthony; Chandra, Ronil V; Gutman, Matthew; Ligtermoet, Matthew; Seneviratne, Udaya; Kempster, Peter

    2016-06-01

    A 33-year-old woman presented with severe visual loss from fulminant idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Her lumbar puncture opening pressure was 97 cm H2O. Soon after lumboperitoneal shunt surgery, she had a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated frontal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and neuroimaging findings consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). We hypothesize that an abrupt drop in intracranial pressure after lumboperitoneal shunting led to maladjustment of cerebral vascular autoregulation, which caused SAH and PRES. PMID:26919070

  13. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  14. Nasopharyngeal venous malformation: A rare condition managed with Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Lee, David R; Richter, Gresham T

    2015-10-01

    Venous malformations are benign but symptomatic vascular lesions of the head and neck that undergo soft tissue infiltration and relentless growth. Here we present a 31-year-old female referred for an obstructing and painful right posterior nasal mass. Flexible nasopharyngoscopy and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a 3 cm × 4 cm enhancing mucosal and submucosal venous malformation of the nasopharynx and oropharynx. Three staged episodes of transnasal endoscopically guided Nd:YAG laser therapy were performed with dramatic and sustained reduction in size and symptoms. No bleeding or complications occurred. Nd:YAG laser treatment of nasopharyngeal venous malformations is a safe and effective alternative to open surgical excision and sclerotherapy. PMID:25684672

  15. Intracranial haemorrhage and child abuse.

    PubMed

    Cheah, I G; Kasim, M S; Shafie, H M; Khoo, T H

    1994-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage is a major cause of severe morbidity and mortality in child abuse cases in developed countries. However, similar data are not available in most developing countries. This study therefore aimed to determine the incidence of intracranial haemorrhage amongst all cases of child physical abuse, the nature of the injuries incurred, and the morbidity and mortality resulting therefrom. Among 369 cases of physical abuse seen over a 4-year period, 41 (11.4%) had intracranial haemorrhage, of whom 37 (90%) were 2 years old or less. A history of trauma was present in only eight (20%), of which only two were compatible with the injuries incurred. Subdural haemorrhages accounted for 80% of the cases, with skull fractures present in only nine cases. Fifty-four per cent of the 37 children aged 2 years of age or less had no external signs of trauma, but 11 of them had retinal haemorrhages. This is in contrast to the children older than 2 years of age who all had external signs of trauma. The overall prognosis was dismal with an early mortality of almost 30% (13 cases) and at least seven cases with severe neurological sequelae. These findings are comparable with studies from developed countries which have established that non-accidental injury must be considered as a cause of intracranial haemorrhage in any young child, despite the absence of external signs of trauma. PMID:7880096

  16. Intracranial Schwannoma in a Cow

    PubMed Central

    Mitcham, S. A.; Kasari, T. R.; Parent, J. M.; Naylor, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A nine year old Hereford crossbred cow with a history of progressive neurological signs was referred to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon. A large intracranial mass, histologically identified as a schwannoma, was found to be compressing the left brain stem and appeared to have arisen from the left fifth cranial nerve. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:17422375

  17. Amphetamine abuse and intracranial haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, N; McConachie, N S

    2000-01-01

    Amphetamines taken by any route can cause cerebral vasculitis and intracranial haemorrhage. 8 cases were seen in a neurosurgical unit over 3.5 years. The published work indicates that those who experience these complications, mainly young adults, have poor outcomes. PMID:11089483

  18. Intracranial pressure and skull remodeling

    PubMed Central

    McCulley, Timothy J.; Jordan Piluek, W.; Chang, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    In this article we review bony changes resulting from alterations in intracranial pressure (ICP) and the implications for ophthalmologists and the patients for whom we care. Before addressing ophthalmic implications, we will begin with a brief overview of bone remodeling. Bony changes seen with chronic intracranial hypotension and hypertension will be discussed. The primary objective of this review was to bring attention to bony changes seen with chronic intracranial hypotension. Intracranial hypotension skull remodeling can result in enophthalmos. In advanced disease enophthalmos develops to a degree that is truly disfiguring. The most common finding for which subjects are referred is ocular surface disease, related to loss of contact between the eyelids and the cornea. Other abnormalities seen include abnormal ocular motility and optic atrophy. Recognition of such changes is important to allow for diagnosis and treatment prior to advanced clinical deterioration. Routine radiographic assessment of bony changes may allow for the identification of patient with abnormal ICP prior to the development of clinically significant disease. PMID:25859141

  19. Diffuse malformations of cortical development.

    PubMed

    Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Guerrini, Renzo

    2013-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCD) represent a major cause of developmental disabilities and severe epilepsy. Advances in imaging and genetics have improved the diagnosis and classification of these conditions. Up to now, eight genes have been involved in different types of MCD. Lissencephaly-pachygyria and subcortical band heterotopia (SBH) represent a malformative spectrum resulting from mutations of either LIS1 or DCX genes. LIS1 mutations cause a more severe malformation in the posterior brain regions. DCX mutations usually cause anteriorly predominant lissencephaly in males and SBH in female patients. Additional forms are X-linked lissencephaly with corpus callosum agenesis and ambiguous genitalia associated with mutations of the ARX gene. Lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia (LCH) encompass heterogeneous disorders named LCH types a to d. LCHa is related to mutation in LIS1 or DCX, LCHb with mutation of the RELN gene, and LCHd could be related to the TUBA1A gene. Polymicrogyria encompasses a wide range of clinical, etiological, and histological findings. Among several syndromes, recessive bilateral fronto-parietal polymicrogyria has been associated with mutations of the GPR56 gene. Bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria has been associated with mutations in the SRPX2 gene in a few individuals and with linkage to chromosome Xq28 in a some other families. X-linked bilateral periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) consists of PNH with focal epilepsy in females and prenatal lethality in males. Filamin A (FLNA) mutations have been reported in some families and in sporadic patients. It is possible to infer the most likely causative gene by brain imaging studies and other clinical findings. PMID:23622213

  20. High-Resolution MRI of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyo-Sung; Jahng, Geon-Ho; Lee, Han Na

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) causes up to 10% of all ischemic strokes, and the rate of recurrent vascular ischemic events is very high. Important predictors of vulnerability in atherosclerotic plaques include the degree of stenosis and the underlying plaque morphology. Vascular wall MRI can provide information about wall structures and atherosclerotic plaque components. High-resolution (HR)-MRI in ICAD poses a greater challenge in the neurologic fields, because a high in-plane resolution and a high signal-to-noise ratio are required for vessel wall imaging of ICAD. Until now, plaque imaging of ICAD has focused on assessing the presence of a plaque and evaluating the plaque load. Going forward, evaluation of plaque vulnerability through analysis of imaging characteristics will be a critical area of research. This review introduces the acquisition protocol for HR-MRI in ICAD and the current issues associated with imaging. PMID:24644529

  1. Risk of cerebral arteriovenous malformation rupture during pregnancy and puerperium

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Zhao, Yuan-li; Teo, Mario; Guo, Peng; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Rong; Cao, Yong; Ye, Xun; Kang, Shuai

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the risk of arteriovenous malformation (AVM) rupture is increased during pregnancy and puerperium. Methods: Participants included 979 female patients with intracranial AVM admitted to Beijing Tiantan Hospital between 1960 and 2010. Two neurosurgery residents reviewed medical records for each case. Of them, 393 patients with ruptured AVM between 18 and 40 years of age were used for case-crossover analysis. Number of children born and clinical information during pregnancy and puerperium were retrieved to identify whether AVM rupture occurred during this period. Results: Of the 979 women, 797 hemorrhages occurred during 25,578 patient-years of follow-up, yielding an annual hemorrhage rate of 3.11%. The annual AVM hemorrhage rate in patients aged 18 to 40 years (n = 579) was 2.78%, lower than the rate in other age groups (odds ratio = 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.65–0.86, p < 0.05). Of the 393 patients with rupture of AVM aged 18 to 40 years, 12 hemorrhages occurred in 12 patients over 452 pregnancies, yielding a hemorrhage rate of 2.65% per pregnancy or 3.32% per year. Among the remaining 381 patients, 441 hemorrhages occurred during 10,627 patient-years of follow-up, yielding an annual hemorrhage rate of 4.14%. The odds ratio for rupture of AVM during pregnancy and puerperium, compared with the control period, was 0.71 (95% confidence interval 0.61–0.82). Conclusions: No increased risk of hemorrhage was found in patients with cerebral AVM during pregnancy and the puerperium. We therefore would not advise against pregnancy in women with intracranial AVM. PMID:24759847

  2. Malformations of cortical development and aberrant cortical networks: epileptogenesis and functional organization.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Renzo; Barba, Carmen

    2010-12-01

    Malformations of cortical development are a major cause of drug-resistant epilepsy. Focal cortical dysplasia, heterotopia, and polymicrogyria are often manifested as discrete areas of abnormal neuronal migration and improper development of the cerebral cortex. Some of the patients harboring these malformations have obvious neurologic impairment, but others show unexpected deficits that are detectable only by screening. The role of surgical treatment of epilepsy due to localized malformations of cortical development is now established. However, its technical application can be challenging in that localization of function based on anatomic landmarks may not be reliable. Intracranial recordings have shown a high propensity for complex epileptogenic networks that may include remote cortical and subcortical regions. The MRI visible area of cortical abnormality should therefore be regarded as just an indicator of the epileptogenic zone rather than its tangible substrate. Completeness of resection, after delineation of the ictal onset zone, a key factor for successful epilepsy surgery, may be particularly difficult, and invasive EEG monitoring is necessary in most patients. Neural plasticity issues are of primary importance to surgical planning as the possibility of removing eloquent cortex permits more complete procedures with potentially higher rates of success. However, the functional consequences of malformative lesions are still poorly understood; conservation of function in the dysplastic cortex, its atypical representation, and relocation outside the malformed area are all possible. Surgical planning for associated epilepsy should therefore be based on individual assessments of structural imaging and of the major functions relevant to the area in question in the individual patient. PMID:21076336

  3. Radiographic Findings Associated with Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Masand, Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of patients with vascular tumors and malformations has been sufficiently refined to answer pertinent questions when making treatment decisions in this challenging subgroup of pediatric patients. The imaging modalities at hand include conventional radiography, Doppler ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging with time-resolved, contrast-material enhanced magnetic resonance angiography. This review article will focus on the characteristic imaging features of some focal and diffuse vascular lesions, which have been classified by their clinical history and physical exam, and further labeled as a vascular tumor or slow-flow versus high-flow vascular malformation based on the updated classification system proposed by the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies. The recent advances in knowledge regarding the biology of these vascular anomalies have led to increased awareness of the current nomenclature. Moreover, with better understanding of the imaging features, the radiologist has become a key player in the multidisciplinary approach offered at various institutions where appropriate treatment algorithms and interventional strategies are put together. This is crucial in avoiding misdiagnosis and improper management. PMID:25045332

  4. A clinical and experimental overview of sirenomelia: insight into the mechanisms of congenital limb malformations

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Allepuz, Carlos; Haro, Endika; González-Lamuño, Domingo; Martínez-Frías, María Luisa; Bertocchini, Federica; Ros, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    Sirenomelia, also known as sirenomelia sequence, is a severe malformation of the lower body characterized by fusion of the legs and a variable combination of visceral abnormalities. The causes of this malformation remain unknown, although the discovery that it can have a genetic basis in mice represents an important step towards the understanding of its pathogenesis. Sirenomelia occurs in mice lacking Cyp26a1, an enzyme that degrades retinoic acid (RA), and in mice that develop with reduced bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp) signaling in the caudal embryonic region. The phenotypes of these mutant mice suggest that sirenomelia in humans is associated with an excess of RA signaling and a deficit in Bmp signaling in the caudal body. Clinical studies of sirenomelia have given rise to two main pathogenic hypotheses. The first hypothesis, based on the aberrant abdominal and umbilical vascular pattern of affected individuals, postulates a primary vascular defect that leaves the caudal part of the embryo hypoperfused. The second hypothesis, based on the overall malformation of the caudal body, postulates a primary defect in the generation of the mesoderm. This review gathers experimental and clinical information on sirenomelia together with the necessary background to understand how deviations from normal development of the caudal part of the embryo might lead to this multisystemic malformation. PMID:21504909

  5. Impaired cerebral vasoreactivity after embolization of arteriovenous malformations: assessment with serial acetazolamide challenge xenon CT

    SciTech Connect

    Tarr, R.W.; Johnson, D.W.; Horton, J.A.; Yonas, H.; Pentheny, S.; Durham, S.; Jungreis, C.A.; Hecht, S.T. )

    1991-05-01

    Embolization of a portion of the nidus of an arteriovenous malformation not only may alter hemodynamics within the nidus, but also may change blood flow dynamics in adjacent normal vessels. Sequential acetazolamide-challenge xenon CT cerebral blood flow studies were performed in eight patients before and after embolization of arteriovenous malformations to assess the hemodynamic effects on the major vascular territories supplying the malformation. Acetazolamide is a potent cerebral vasodilator, and its administration combined with cerebral blood flow studies allows assessment of cerebral vasoreactivity. In seven of the eight patients, one or more parenchymal areas exhibited a normal cerebral blood flow augmentation response to acetazolamide before embolization, but diminished acetazolamide flow augmentation was seen after embolization, indicating abnormal vasoreactivity. We found that the decrease in vasoreactivity peaked 6-10 days after embolization. In one of the eight patients, a temporary delayed neurologic deficit developed during a period of impaired cerebral vasoreactivity following embolization. Our results suggest that embolization of an arteriovenous malformation can induce vasoreactivity changes in adjacent normal vessels. Because these changes appear to be somewhat time-dependent, an appropriate interval should be observed between embolization stages or before surgical resection of an arteriovenous malformation following embolization to allow hemodynamic equilibration to occur. Acetazolamide challenge combined with serial cerebral blood flow studies following embolization enables determination of this hemodynamic equilibration.

  6. Visual Fixation in Chiari Type II Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Michael S.; Sharpe, James A.; Lillakas, Linda; Dennis, Maureen; Steinbach, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Chiari type II malformation is a congenital deformity of the hindbrain. Square wave jerks are horizontal involuntary saccades that interrupt fixation. Cerebellar disorders may be associated with frequent square wave jerks or saccadic oscillations such as ocular flutter. The effects of Chiari type II malformation on visual fixation are unknown. We recorded eye movements using an eye tracker in 21 participants with Chiari type II malformation, aged 8 to 19 years while they fixated a target for 1 minute. Thirty-eight age-matched healthy participants served as controls. Square wave jerks’ parameters were similar in the 2 groups. Saccadic oscillations were not seen. Chiari type II malformation is not associated with pathological square wave jerks or abnormal saccadic oscillations. The congenital nature of this deformity may permit compensation that preserves stable visual fixation. Alternatively, the deformity of Chiari type II malformation may spare parts of the cerebellum that usually cause fixation instability when damaged. PMID:19182152

  7. Vulvar vascular tumors: a clinicopathologic study of 85 patients.

    PubMed

    Papalas, John A; Sangueza, Omar P; Puri, Puja K; Robboy, Stanley J; Selim, Maria A

    2013-02-01

    The subepidermal hormonally sensitive tissue of the vulva is anatomically unique and may give rise to a wide variety of vascular tumors. As a consequence, classifying vulvar vascular lesions has been challenging due both to the wide variety of lesions that may be encountered and the heterogeneity in reporting across several disciplines. The purpose of this study is to present an institutional experience of vulvar vascular lesions. Overall, 85 patients were identified over a 26-year period. Vascular lesions belonging to the following classes included (n, %total) benign vascular tumors (32, 38%), dilatations of preexisting vessels (31, 36%), hyperplasia/reactive (7, 8%), tumors with significant vascular component (11, 13%), malformations (3, 4%), and malignant vascular tumors (1, 1%). Two reaction patterns based on vulvar lymphatic pathology were identified: one is a stromal dominant pattern and the other is a vascular dominant pattern. Vulvar vascular malformations and true vascular malignancies, although rare, may have associated high morbidity. To accurately classify vulvar lymphatic lesions, the pathologist must carefully consider the patient's clinical history taking into account features such as preexisting lymphedema. PMID:23348141

  8. Bleeding Scrotal Vascular Lesions: Interventional Management with Transcatheter Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Jaganathan, Sriram; Gamanagatti, Shivanand Mukund, Amar; Dhar, Anita

    2011-02-15

    Vascular lesions of the scrotum are uncommon; the most common among them are varicocele lesions. The other vascular lesions that may involve the scrotum are hemangioma, lymphangioma, and arteriovenous malformations, which are exceedingly rare. The imaging modalities useful in the diagnosis and management of scrotal vascular lesions are grayscale sonography, color Doppler sonography, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, and digital subtraction angiography. We present two cases of scrotal vascular lesions involving the extratesticular scrotal soft tissues. Patients presented with bleeding and were treated by radiological interventional technique. We emphasize the importance of superselective catheterization and distal embolization.

  9. Intracranial Rosai-Dorfman disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo Yuan; Zong, Miao; Zong, Wen Jing; Sun, Yan Hui; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Hong Bo

    2016-10-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) is a rare histioproliferative disorder that only occasionally involves the central nervous system. We present the diagnosis and treatment of five patients with intracranial RDD. The patients were preoperatively misdiagnosed as meningioma or eosinophilic granuloma. All five patients were treated by total or subtotal surgical resection and none of them experienced recurrence. Histopathological examination showed a characteristic emperipolesis, the lymphocytes were engulfed in the S-100 protein and CD68 positive histiocytes, with negative expression of CD1a. Preoperative diagnosis of intracranial RDD is still challenging because the lesion is usually a dural-based lesion that mimics a meningioma. Surgical resection is an effective treatment and radiotherapy, steroid and chemotherapy has not demonstrated reliable therapeutic efficiency. PMID:27561856

  10. Clinical Analysis of Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byoung-Joo; Hong, Yong-Kil; Jeun, Sin-Soo; Lee, Kwan-Sung; Lee, Youn-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Objective Intracranial hemangiopericytomas (HPCs) are rare tumors with aggressive behavior, including local recurrence and distant metastasis. We conducted this retrospective study to evaluate the efficacy of grossly total resection and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for these tumors. Methods A total of 13 patients treated for intracranial HPC from January 1995 through May 2013 were included in this retrospective study. We analyzed the clinical presentations, radiologic appearances, treatment results, and follow-up outcomes, as well as reviewed other studies. Results The ages of the patients at the time of diagnosis ranged from 26 to 73 years (mean : 48 years). The majority of the patients were male (92.3%), and the majority of the tumors were located in the parasagittal and falx. The ratio of intracranial HPCs to meningiomas was 13 : 598 in same period, or 2.2%. Seven patients (53.8%) had anaplastic HPCs. Nine patients (69.2%) underwent gross total tumor resection in the first operation without mortality. Eleven patients (84.6%) underwent postoperative adjuvant RT. Follow-up period ranged from 13 to 185 months (mean : 54.3 months). The local recurrence rate was 46.2% (6/13), and there were no distant metastases. The 10-year survival rate after initial surgery was 83.9%. The initial mean Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) was 70.8 and the final mean KPS was 64.6. Conclusion Gross total tumor resection upon initial surgery is very important. We believe that adjuvant RT is helpful even with maximal tumor resection. Molecular biologic analyses and chemotherapy studies are required to achieve better outcomes in recurrent intracranial HPCs. PMID:24294454

  11. Is a Swine Model of Arteriovenous Malformation Suitable for Human Extracranial Arteriovenous Malformation? A Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Ming-ming; Fan, Xin-dong; Su, Li-xin

    2013-10-15

    Objective: A chronic arteriovenous malformation (AVM) model using the swine retia mirabilia (RMB) was developed and compared with the human extracranial AVM (EAVM) both in hemodynamics and pathology, to see if this brain AVM model can be used as an EAVM model. Methods: We created an arteriovenous fistula between the common carotid artery and the external jugular vein in eight animals by using end-to-end anastomosis. All animals were sacrificed 1 month after surgery, and the bilateral retia were obtained at autopsy and performed hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. Pre- and postsurgical hemodynamic evaluations also were conducted. Then, the blood flow and histological changes of the animal model were compared with human EAVM. Results: The angiography after operation showed that the blood flow, like human EAVM, flowed from the feeding artery, via the nidus, drained to the draining vein. Microscopic examination showed dilated lumina and disrupted internal elastic lamina in both RMB of model and nidus of human EAVM, but the thickness of vessel wall had significant difference. Immunohistochemical reactivity for smooth muscle actin, angiopoietin 1, and angiopoietin 2 were similar in chronic model nidus microvessels and human EAVM, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor was significant difference between human EAVM and RMB of model. Conclusions: The AVM model described here is similar to human EAVM in hemodynamics and immunohistochemical features, but there are still some differences in anatomy and pathogenetic mechanism. Further study is needed to evaluate the applicability and efficacy of this model.

  12. Intracranial ependymoma: factors affecting outcome.

    PubMed

    Massimino, Maura; Buttarelli, Francesca R; Antonelli, Manila; Gandola, Lorenza; Modena, Piergiorgio; Giangaspero, Felice

    2009-03-01

    Ependymomas account for 2-9% of all neuroepithelial tumors, amounting to 6-12% of all intracranial tumors in children and up to 30% of those in children younger than 3 years. Recent findings provide evidence that intracranial and spinal ependymomas share similar molecular profiles with the radial glia of their corresponding locations. The management of intracranial ependymoma is still not optimal. The 5-year progression-free survival for children with ependymoma ranges between 30 and 50% with a worse prognosis for patients with residual disease after surgery. The prognostic relevance of most factors are still being debated. Recent studies, in which the current WHO classification criteria were applied, reported the relationship between histological grade and outcome. Biomolecular studies have identified that gain of 1q25 and EGFR overexpression correlate to poor prognosis, whereas low expression of nucleolin correlated with a favorable outcome. Ependymomas have been considered a 'surgical disease', where completeness of excision can be reached in approximately half of the cases. At present the standard treatment is radiation therapy for all patients after gross-total or near-total resection. For high-risk patients, with residual tumor, an interesting, although experimental, approach could be chemotherapy followed by secondary surgery and postoperative conformal irradiation. PMID:19284379

  13. Bragg-peak proton-beam therapy for arteriovenous malformations of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kjellberg, R.N.; Hanamura, T.; Davis, K.R.; Lyons, S.L.; Adams, R.D.

    1983-08-04

    Patients with arteriovenous malformations of the brain, who are subject to disabling or fatal recurrent hemorrhage, seizures, severe headache, and progressive neurologic deficits, may be considered unsuitable for conventional therapies (craniotomy with excision or embolization), usually because of the location, size, or operative risk of the lesion. We have treated such patients with stereotactic Bragg-peak proton-beam therapy and report the follow-up of 74 of the first 75, 2 to 16 years after treatment. Proton-beam therapy is intended to induce subendothelial deposition of collagen and hyaline substance, which narrows the lumens of small vessels and thickens the walls of the malformation during the first 12 to 24 months after the procedure. Two deaths from hemorrhage occurred in the first 12 months after treatment, but no lethal or disabling hemorrhages occurred after this interval. Seizures, headaches, and progressive neurologic deficits were in most cases arrested or improved. Bragg-peak proton-beam therapy appears to be a useful technique for treatment of intracranial arteriovenous malformations, especially those that are unsuitable for treatment by other methods.

  14. Perceptual enhancement of arteriovenous malformation in MRI angiography displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhari, Kamyar; Baxter, John S. H.; Eagleson, Roy; Peters, Terry; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine

    2012-02-01

    The importance of presenting medical images in an intuitive and usable manner during a procedure is essential. However, most medical visualization interfaces, particularly those designed for minimally-invasive surgery, suffer from a number of issues as a consequence of disregarding the human perceptual, cognitive, and motor system's limitations. This matter is even more prominent when human visual system is overlooked during the design cycle. One example is the visualization of the neuro-vascular structures in MR angiography (MRA) images. This study investigates perceptual performance in the usability of a display to visualize blood vessels in MRA volumes using a contour enhancement technique. Our results show that when contours are enhanced, our participants, in general, can perform faster with higher level of accuracy when judging the connectivity of different vessels. One clinical outcome of such perceptual enhancement is improvement of spatial reasoning needed for planning complex neuro-vascular operations such as treating Arteriovenous Malformations (AVMs). The success of an AVM intervention greatly depends on fully understanding the anatomy of vascular structures. However, poor visualization of pre-operative MRA images makes the planning of such a treatment quite challenging.

  15. Endothelial cells in the context of brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Sammons, Vanessa; Davidson, Andrew; Tu, Jian; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2011-02-01

    A subset of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVM) cannot be treated using today's treatment paradigms. Novel therapies may be developed, however, as the underlying pathophysiology of these lesions becomes better understood. Endothelial cells (EC) are the subject of new biological therapies, such as radiosensitisation and vascular targeting. This work reviews the current research surrounding EC in the context of brain AVM, including both in vitro and AVM specimen analysis, with a particular focus on the effect of radiation on EC. EC are heterogeneous with no recognised common phenotype, which leads to difficulties in applying the results of the common studies using human umbilical vein endothelial cells to AVM research. Human brain EC are observed to have a high rate of proliferation and also have a reduced apoptotic response to inflammatory mediators such as transforming growth factor-beta. The angiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor and endothelin-1 (ET-1) are not normally produced by quiescent brain vasculature, but are produced by AVM EC. Radiation causes EC to separate and become disrupted. Leucocyte and platelet adherence is increased for several days post-irradiation due to increased E-selectin and P-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression. ET-1 is highly expressed in irradiated AVM EC. Radiosurgery produces local radiation-induced changes in EC, which may allow these changes to be harnessed in conjunction with other techniques such as vascular targeting. PMID:21167719

  16. High-resolution intracranial vessel wall imaging: imaging beyond the lumen.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew D; Yuan, Chun; Rutman, Aaron; Tirschwell, David L; Palagallo, Gerald; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Sekhar, Laligam N; Mossa-Basha, Mahmud

    2016-06-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of intracranial vasculopathies is important due to significant risk of morbidity with delayed and/or incorrect diagnosis both from the disease process as well as inappropriate therapies. Conventional vascular imaging techniques for analysis of intracranial vascular disease provide limited information since they only identify changes to the vessel lumen. New advanced MR intracranial vessel wall imaging (IVW) techniques can allow direct characterisation of the vessel wall. These techniques can advance diagnostic accuracy and may potentially improve patient outcomes by better guided treatment decisions in comparison to previously available invasive and non-invasive techniques. While neuroradiological expertise is invaluable in accurate examination interpretation, clinician familiarity with the application and findings of the various vasculopathies on IVW can help guide diagnostic and therapeutic decision-making. This review article provides a brief overview of the technical aspects of IVW and discusses the IVW findings of various intracranial vasculopathies, differentiating characteristics and indications for when this technique can be beneficial in patient management. PMID:26746187

  17. Cortical astrogliosis and increased perivascular aquaporin-4 in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Eide, Per Kristian; Eidsvaag, Vigdis Andersen; Nagelhus, Erlend A; Hansson, Hans-Arne

    2016-08-01

    The syndrome idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) includes symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) and impaired vision, usually in overweight persons. The pathogenesis is unknown. In the present prospective observational study, we characterized the histopathological changes in biopsies from the frontal brain cortical parenchyma obtained from 18 IIH patients. Reference specimens were sampled from 13 patients who underwent brain surgery for epilepsy, tumors or acute vascular diseases. Overnight ICP monitoring revealed abnormal intracranial pressure wave amplitudes in 14/18 IIH patients, who underwent shunt surgery and all responded favorably. A remarkable histopathological observation in IIH patients was patchy astrogliosis defined as clusters of hypertrophic astrocytes enclosing a nest of nerve cells. Distinct astrocyte domains (i.e. no overlap between astrocyte processes) were lacking in most IIH biopsy specimens, in contrast to their prevalence in reference specimens. Evidence of astrogliosis in IIH was accompanied with significantly increased aquaporin-4 (AQP4) immunoreactivity over perivascular astrocytic endfeet, compared to the reference specimens, measured with densitometry. Scattered CD68 immunoreactive cells (activated microglia and macrophages) were recognized, indicative of some inflammation. No apoptotic cells were demonstrable. We conclude that the patchy astrogliosis is a major finding in patients with IIH. We propose that the astrogliosis impairs intracranial pressure-volume reserve capacity, i.e. intracranial compliance, and contributes to the IIH by restricting the outflow of fluid from the cranium. The increased perivascular AQP4 in IIH may represent a compensatory mechanism to enhance brain fluid drainage. PMID:27188961

  18. Cerebral venous malformation with meningioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    MU, QINGCHUN; ZHANG, KUN; WANG, JUSTIN; SAYARI, ARASH; HUANG, HAIYAN

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old female patient was admitted to The First Hospital of Jilin University (Changchun, China) on 1st October 2011 with a 10-day history of discontinuous, whole-brain headache and a 1-year history of impaired vision and memory deterioration, accompanied by right facial numbness. Clinical signs and radiological features observed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) led to the diagnosis of an intracranial meningioma accompanied by a cerebral venous malformation (CVM). The patient underwent neurosurgical resection of the meningioma, but required no further treatment for the CVM. At a 1-year follow-up examination, the patient continued to complain of discontinuous headache. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was used to reconfirm the CVM diagnosis; however, no treatment was administered due to the high risks of treatment and only mild symptoms experienced by the patient. The present case demonstrates the efficacy of DSA for detecting the presence and specific nature of CVM, and compares the value of MRI and DSA in the diagnosis of CVM. The majority of CVM patients exhibit no clinical symptoms, and the disease prognosis is typically favorable. PMID:26998016

  19. Multimodal angiographic assessment of cerebral arteriovenous malformations: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Raphaël; Seiler, Aude; Robert, Thomas; Baharvahdat, Humain; Lafarge, Maxime; Savatovsky, Julien; Hodel, Jérôme; Ciccio, Gabriele; Chauvet, Dorian; Pistocchi, Silvia; Bartolini, Bruno; Redjem, Hocine; Piotin, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We describe our protocol of three-dimensional (3D) Roadmap intracranial navigation and image fusion for analysis of the angioarchitecture and endovascular treatment of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Methods We performed superselective catheterization of brain AVMs feeders under 3D-Roadmap navigation. Angiograms of each catheterized artery on two registered orthogonal views were transferred to the imaging workstations, and dedicated postprocessing imaging software allowed automated multiple overlays of the arterial supply of the AVM superselective acquisitions on the global angiogram in angiographic or 3D views and on coregistered MRI datasets. Results 11 untreated brain AVMs (4 with hemorrhagic presentation) were explored. The superselective acquisitions were performed under 3D-Roadmap navigation in 74 arteries, for a total of 79 targeted arteries. Imaging analysis was available at table side or postoperatively for discussion of the therapeutic strategy. No complications occurred during superselective catheterization. The accuracy of the coregistration of angiogram and MRI was submillimetric after automated mutual information coregistration, with manual re-registration by the physicians. Conclusions Superselective angiograms acquired under 3D-Roadmap navigation can be postprocessed with multiple overlays. The fluoroscopic navigation under 3D-Roadmapping and the coregistration of 3D rotational angiography, selective angiography, and 3D MR datasets appears reliable with millimeter accuracy, and could be implemented in the critical brain AVM embolization setting to allow refined analysis of AVM angioarchitecture. PMID:25280569

  20. Advanced Imaging of Chiari 1 Malformations.

    PubMed

    Fakhri, Akbar; Shah, Manish N; Goyal, Manu S

    2015-10-01

    Type I Chiari malformations are congenital deformities involving cerebellar tonsillar herniation downward through the foramen magnum. Structurally, greater than 5 mm of tonsillar descent in adults and more than 6 mm in children is consistent with type I Chiari malformations. However, the radiographic severity of the tonsillar descent does not always correlate well with the clinical symptomatology. Advanced imaging can help clinically correlate imaging to symptoms. Specifically, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow abnormalities are seen in patients with type I Chiari malformation. Advanced MRI involving cardiac-gated and phase-contrast MRI affords a view of such CSF flow abnormalities. PMID:26408061

  1. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Clinically Suspected Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Michael; Ahmed, Osmanuddin; Chandra, Ankur; Gage, Kenneth L; Gerhard-Herman, Marie D; Ginsburg, Michael; Gornik, Heather L; Johnson, Pamela T; Oliva, Isabel B; Ptak, Thomas; Steigner, Michael L; Strax, Richard; Rybicki, Frank J; Dill, Karin E

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations are often included in the differential diagnosis of common clinical presentations, including hypoxemia, hemoptysis, brain abscesses, and paradoxical stroke, as well as affecting 30% to 50% of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Various imaging studies are used in the diagnostic and screening settings, which have been reviewed by the ACR Appropriateness Criteria Vascular Imaging Panel. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation screening in patients with HHT is commonly performed with transthoracic echocardiographic bubble study, followed by CT for positive cases. Although transthoracic echocardiographic bubble studies and radionuclide perfusion detect right-to-left shunts, they do not provide all of the information needed for treatment planning and may remain positive after embolization. Pulmonary angiography is appropriate for preintervention planning but not as an initial test. MR angiography has a potential role in younger patients with HHT who may require lifelong surveillance, despite lower spatial resolution compared with CT. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:27209598

  2. PDCD10 Gene Mutations in Multiple Cerebral Cavernous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Cigoli, Maria Sole; Avemaria, Francesca; De Benedetti, Stefano; Gesu, Giovanni P.; Accorsi, Lucio Giordano; Parmigiani, Stefano; Corona, Maria Franca; Capra, Valeria; Mosca, Andrea; Giovannini, Simona; Notturno, Francesca; Ciccocioppo, Fausta; Volpi, Lilia; Estienne, Margherita; De Michele, Giuseppe; Antenora, Antonella; Bilo, Leda; Tavoni, Antonietta; Zamponi, Nelia; Alfei, Enrico; Baranello, Giovanni; Riva, Daria; Penco, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular abnormalities that may cause seizures, intracerebral haemorrhages, and focal neurological deficits. Familial form shows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with incomplete penetrance and variable clinical expression. Three genes have been identified causing familial CCM: KRIT1/CCM1, MGC4607/CCM2, and PDCD10/CCM3. Aim of this study is to report additional PDCD10/CCM3 families poorly described so far which account for 10-15% of hereditary cerebral cavernous malformations. Our group investigated 87 consecutive Italian affected individuals (i.e. positive Magnetic Resonance Imaging) with multiple/familial CCM through direct sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) analysis. We identified mutations in over 97.7% of cases, and PDCD10/CCM3 accounts for 13.1%. PDCD10/CCM3 molecular screening revealed four already known mutations and four novel ones. The mutated patients show an earlier onset of clinical manifestations as compared to CCM1/CCM2 mutated patients. The study of further families carrying mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 may help define a possible correlation between genotype and phenotype; an accurate clinical follow up of the subjects would help define more precisely whether mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 lead to a characteristic phenotype. PMID:25354366

  3. Pathogenesis of optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2016-01-01

    raised CSFP in patients, by evaluating optic disc and fundus changes by stereoscopic fundus photography and fluorescein fundus angiography. Based on the combined information from all the studies discussed above, it is clear that the pathogenesis of optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure is a mechanical phenomenon. It is primarily due to a rise of CSFP in the optic nerve sheath, which produces axoplasmic flow stasis in the optic nerve fibers in the surface nerve fiber layer and prelaminar region of the optic nerve head. Axoplasmic flow stasis then results in swelling of the nerve fibers, and consequently of the optic disc. Swelling of the nerve fibers and of the optic disc secondarily compresses the fine, low-pressure venules in that region, resulting in venous stasis and fluid leakage; that leads to the accumulation of extracellular fluid. Contrary to the previous theories, the various vascular changes seen in optic disc edema are secondary and not primary. Thus, optic disc edema in raised CSFP is due to a combination of swollen nerve fibers and the accumulation of extracellular fluid. My studies also provided information about the pathogeneses of visual disturbances in raised intracranial pressure. PMID:26453995

  4. Isolated asymptomatic pulmonary arteriovenous malformation presenting with ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Kelly L; Madan, Anoop; Frayne, Judith

    2016-07-01

    Young onset stroke is uncommon, and may be due to conditions other than traditional vascular risk factors. A 42-year-old woman with an ischaemic stroke was found to have left atrial bubble study positivity on transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) suggestive of patent foramen ovale, however she also had low peripheral oxygen saturation. Investigation revealed an isolated pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM), visible on admission chest radiograph. This can cause embolic stroke and is an alternate cause of the TTE findings. The PAVM was able to be closed via endovascular intervention, removing the shunt and therefore removing her risk of recurrent stroke events. This is a rare cause of embolic stroke in young people which can be easily missed on investigation yet is amenable to treatment. PMID:26896908

  5. Arteriovenous malformation of the pancreas: a case report.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Nobuyasu; Haga, Junichirou; Azami, Ayaka; Todate, Yukitoshi; Waragai, Mitsuru; Sato, Atai; Takano, Yoshinao; Kawakura, Kenji; Imai, Shigeki; Sakuma, Hideo; Teranishi, Yasushi

    2016-12-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the pancreas is uncommon in the gastrointestinal tract. We present a case of AVM of the pancreatic head in a 59-year-old male. He was admitted to a hospital with hematemesis and tarry stool and referred to our hospital in March 2014 on the diagnosis of pancreatic artery pseudoaneurysm. A computed tomography scan showed the presence of irregular dilated and/or stenotic vessels with meandering in the pancreatic head. Magnetic resonance imaging showed strong enhancement of the conglomeration in the pancreatic head. Selective angiography showed the proliferation of a vascular network in the pancreatic head and an early visualization of the portal vein at the arterial phase. The patient qualified for surgery with a preoperative diagnosis of AVM of the pancreatic head. We performed pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. The histological results confirmed the presence of irregular dilated tortuous arteries and veins in the pancreatic head. Surgical treatment may represent definitive management of symptomatic AVM. PMID:26943682

  6. Histopathological Features of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations in Japanese Patients.

    PubMed

    Hermanto, Yulius; Takagi, Yasushi; Yoshida, Kazumichi; Ishii, Akira; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Funaki, Takeshi; Mineharu, Yohei; Miyamoto, Susumu

    2016-06-15

    Clinical features of high risk brain arteriovenous malformations (BAVMs) are well characterized. However, pathological evidences about the differences that are possessed by high risk patients are still lacking. We reviewed archived routine hematoxylin-eosin specimens from a total of 54 surgical treated BAVMs. The histopathological features in nidus were semi-quantitatively analyzed. We obtained the pathological differences of BAVMs nidus between several clinical features. Among the analyzed pathological features, the significant differences were observed in degree of venous enlargement and intimal hyperplasia. Juvenile, female, diffuse nidus, high Spetzler-Martin grade, and low flow patients had a lesser degree of those parameters compared to adult, male, compact nidus, low Spetzler-Martin grade and high flow patients. High risk profiles of BAVMs patients were well-reflected in the nidus pathology. Therefore, juvenile, female, diffuse nidus, and low flow in Japanese BAVMs patients might have different vascular remodeling process that predispose to higher tendency of hemorrhage. PMID:27053330

  7. Intramedullary cavernous malformation of the spinal cord in two dogs.

    PubMed

    MacKillop, E; Olby, N J; Linder, K E; Brown, T T

    2007-07-01

    Intramedullary cavernous malformations (CVMs) of the spinal cord were diagnosed in 2 adult dogs that presented for paraparesis. An intramedullary spinal cord lesion was identified on a myelogram in the first dog, and expansion of the vertebral canal was evident on radiographs in the second. Extensive intraparenchymal hemorrhage was found on gross postmortem examination in both dogs, and a distinct lobulated intramedullary mass was evident in the second dog. Microscopically, both lesions were composed of dilated, thin-walled vascular channels with little-to-no intervening neural parenchyma. Both dogs had evidence of channel thrombosis along with perilesional hemorrhage and hemosiderin accumulation. The second dog had additional degenerative changes, including thickened fibrous channel walls with hyalinization, foci of mineralization, and occasional tongues of entrapped gliotic neuropil. CVMs appear to be an uncommon cause of both acute and chronic spinal cord disease in the dog. PMID:17606517

  8. Cardiovascular malformations and other cardiovascular abnormalities in neurofibromatosis 1.

    PubMed

    Lin, A E; Birch, P H; Korf, B R; Tenconi, R; Niimura, M; Poyhonen, M; Armfield Uhas, K; Sigorini, M; Virdis, R; Romano, C; Bonioli, E; Wolkenstein, P; Pivnick, E K; Lawrence, M; Friedman, J M

    2000-11-13

    Although it is well recognized that a peripheral vasculopathy may occur in patients with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), it is unclear whether cardiovascular abnormalities are more common. We reviewed the frequency of cardiovascular abnormalities, in particular, cardiovascular malformations (CVMs), among 2322 patients with definite NF1 in the National Neurofibromatosis Foundation International Database from 1991-98. Cardiovascular malformations were reported in 54/2322 (2.3%) of the NF1 patients, only 4 of whom had Watson syndrome or NF1-Noonan syndrome. There was a predominance of Class II "flow" defects [Clark, 1995: Moss and Adams' Heart Disease in Infants, Children, and Adolescents Including the Fetus and Young Adult. p 60-70] (43/54, 80%) among the NF1 patients with CVMs. Pulmonic stenosis, that was present in 25 NF1 patients, and aortic coarctation, that occurred in 5, constitute much larger proportions of all CVMs than expected. Of interest was the paucity of Class I conotruncal defects (2 patients with tetralogy of Fallot), and the absence of atrioventricular canal, anomalous pulmonary venous return, complex single ventricle and laterality defects. Besides the 54 patients with CVMs, there were 27 patients with other cardiac abnormalities (16 with murmur, 5 with mitral valve prolapse, 1 with intracardiac tumor, and 5 with electrocardiogram abnormalities). No patient in this study had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. There were 16 patients who had a peripheral vascular abnormality without an intracardiac CVM, plus an additional 4 patients among those with a CVM who also had a peripheral vascular abnormality. PMID:11078559

  9. Update on the management of anorectal malformations.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Andrea; Levitt, Marc A; Peña, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    Thirty-three years ago, on 10 August 1980, in Mexico City, the first patient with an anorectal malformation was operated on using the posterior sagittal approach. At that time it was not obvious that we were actually opening a "Pandora's box" that continues to give many positive surprises, a few disappointments, and the constant hope that each day we can learn more about how to improve the quality of life of children born with all different types of anorectal malformations. In November 2012, patient number 3000 in our database was operated in the city of Cochabamba, Bolivia; during one of our International Courses of Anorectal Malformations and Colorectal Problems in Children. The goal of this article is to give a brief update on the current management of patients with anorectal malformation, based on the multiple lessons learned during this period. PMID:23913263

  10. Revision surgery for Chiari malformation decompression.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Catherine A; Fried, Arno H

    2003-09-15

    Chiari malformations comprise four different hindbrain anomalies originally described by Hans Chiari, a professor of pathology at the German University in Prague. There are four basic Chiari malformations. The reasons for revision of Chiari malformation decompression may be for conservative or inadequate initial decompression or the development of postoperative complications. Another reason involves cases of both hindbrain herniation and syringomyelia in patients who have undergone adequate posterior fossa decompression without resolution of symptoms, signs, or radiological appearance of their syrinx cavity. Additionally, symptom recurrence has been reported in association with various types of dural grafts. Reoperation or revision surgery for patients with Chiari malformations is common and may not be due to technical error or inadequate decompression. The types of revision surgeries, their indications, and initial presentations will be reviewed. PMID:15347221

  11. Malformation and plastic surgery in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, Ralf; Magritz, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Malformations of the head and neck show a huge variety of clinical symptoms with functional and esthetic consequences. Often times its rehabilitation requires multi-staged and multi-disciplinary procedures and concepts. These must consider eating, speech, mimic expression, hearing and “esthetics” or at least “normality”. A survey of the most common head and neck malformations and their treatment options are presented here. PMID:25587361

  12. The Microcephaly-Capillary Malformation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaa, Ghayda M.; Paciorkowski, Alex R.; Smyser, Christopher D.; Willing, Marcia C.; Lind, Anne C.; Dobyns, William B.

    2012-01-01

    We report on three children from two families with a new pattern recognition malformation syndrome consisting of severe congenital microcephaly (MIC), intractable epilepsy including infantile spasms, and generalized capillary malformations that was first reported recently in this journal [Carter et al. (2011); Am J Med Genet A 155: 301–306]. Two of our reported patients are an affected brother and sister, suggesting this is an autosomal recessive severe congenital MIC syndrome. PMID:21815250

  13. Spontaneous arteriovenous malformations in the cervical area

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, J.

    1970-01-01

    Four patients with spontaneous arteriovenous malformations of cervical vessels have been presented. The embryology of these vessels has been discussed in order to suggest an explanation for the apparent difference in the incidence of arteriovenous malformations involving the internal carotid artery and those involving either the vertebral or the external carotid arteries. A fifth case (S.T.) is presented as a probable iatrogenic arteriovenous fistula and is to be added to the steadily growing reports of this phenomenon. Images PMID:5431722

  14. Intracranial volume in craniosynostotic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mooney, M P; Burrows, A M; Wigginton, W; Singhal, V K; Losken, H W; Smith, T D; Dechant, J; Towbin, A; Cooper, G M; Towbin, R; Siegel, M I

    1998-05-01

    Although craniosynostosis alters brain growth direction resulting in compensatory changes in the neurocranium, it has been suggested that such compensations occur with little reduction in intracranial volume (ICV). This hypothesis was tested in a rabbit model with nonsyndromic, familial coronal suture synostosis. Cross-sectional three-dimensional computed tomographic head scans were obtained from 79 rabbits (25 normal, 28 with delayed-onset synostosis, and 26 with early-onset synostosis) at 25, 42, and 126 days of age. Intracranial contents were reconstructed and indirect ICV was calculated. Results revealed that by 25 days of age the intracranial contents from early-onset synostosed rabbit skulls showed rostral (anterior) constrictions and a "beaten copper" morphology in the parietal and temporal regions compared with the other two groups. These deformities increased in severity with age. Quantitatively, ICV was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) by 7% in rabbits with early-onset synostosis compared with both control rabbits and rabbits with delayed-onset synostosis at 25 days of age. By 126 days of age, ICV in rabbits with synostosis was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) by 11% in early-onset synostosis and by 8% in delayed-onset synostosis compared with normal rabbits. Results suggest that in rabbits with uncorrected craniosynostosis, compensatory changes in the neurocranium were not adequate to allow normal expansion of the neurocapsular matrix. Further research is needed to determine if ICV reduction is correlated with cerebral atrophy or cerebral spinal fluid (i.e., ventricular or subarachnoid) space compression in this model. PMID:9693554

  15. Transnasal, intracranial penetrating injury treated endoscopically.

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Erdem Atalay; Okan, Cinemre; Pelin, Kesapli

    2006-04-01

    Intracranial penetrating injury through the nose is uncommon. We present the case of a four-year-old girl who sustained a transnasal, intracranial penetrating injury with a sharp wooden object. We performed endoscopic removal of the foreign body and repair of the associated cerebrospinal fluid fistula. PMID:16623978

  16. Acute surgical management in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Zaitun; Fenton, Eoin; Sattar, Muhammad Taufiq

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a headache syndrome with progressive symptoms of raised intracranial pressure. Most commonly, it is a slow process where surveillance and medical management are the main treatment modalities. We describe herein an acute presentation with bilateral sixth nerve palsies, papilloedema and visual deterioration, where acute surgical intervention was a vision-saving operation. PMID:23239783

  17. Vascular rings.

    PubMed

    Backer, Carl L; Mongé, Michael C; Popescu, Andrada R; Eltayeb, Osama M; Rastatter, Jeffrey C; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-06-01

    The term vascular ring refers to congenital vascular anomalies of the aortic arch system that compress the esophagus and trachea, causing symptoms related to those two structures. The most common vascular rings are double aortic arch and right aortic arch with left ligamentum. Pulmonary artery sling is rare and these patients need to be carefully evaluated for frequently associated tracheal stenosis. Another cause of tracheal compression occurring only in infants is the innominate artery compression syndrome. In the current era, the diagnosis of a vascular ring is best established by CT imaging that can accurately delineate the anatomy of the vascular ring and associated tracheal pathology. For patients with a right aortic arch there recently has been an increased recognition of a structure called a Kommerell diverticulum which may require resection and transfer of the left subclavian artery to the left carotid artery. A very rare vascular ring is the circumflex aorta that is now treated with the aortic uncrossing operation. Patients with vascular rings should all have an echocardiogram because of the incidence of associated congenital heart disease. We also recommend bronchoscopy to assess for additional tracheal pathology and provide an assessment of the degree of tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. The outcomes of surgical intervention are excellent and most patients have complete resolution of symptoms over a period of time. PMID:27301603

  18. Dabigatran-Associated Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Szarlej, Dorota K.; Rincon, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Dabigatran etexilate is an oral direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolization in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. Although dabigatran has a favorable safety profile, predictable pharmacokinetics, fewer drug interactions than warfarin, and does not require monitoring, clinical data regarding dabigatran reversal are limited. In addition, currently available laboratory assays allow measurement of the presence, but not extent, of dabigatran-associated anticoagulation. Patient age, renal function, weight, concurrent drug therapy, adherence, and concomitant disease states can affect dabigatran’s efficacy and safety. Management of dabigatran-related intracranial hemorrhage must be approached on a case-by-case basis and include assessment of degree of anticoagulation, severity of hemorrhage, renal function, timing of last dabigatran dose, and risk of thromboembolic events. Initial management includes dabigatran discontinuation and general supportive measures. Oral activated charcoal should be administered in those who ingested dabigatran within 2 hours. Four-factor prothrombin complex concentrates (4PCCs), activated PCC, or recombinant activated factor VII use may be reasonable but is not evidence based. Reserve fresh frozen plasma for patients with dilutional coagulopathy. If readily available, hemodialysis should be considered, particularly in patients with advanced kidney injury or excessive risk of thromboembolic events. More clinical studies are needed to determine a standardized approach to treating dabigatran-associated intracranial hemorrhage. Institutional protocol development will facilitate safe, efficacious, and timely use of the limited management options. PMID:26425251

  19. Desmopressin Acetate in Intracranial Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kapapa, Thomas; Röhrer, Stefan; Struve, Sabine; Petscher, Matthias; König, Ralph; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Woischneck, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The secondary increase in the size of intracranial haematomas as a result of spontaneous haemorrhage or trauma is of particular relevance in the event of prior intake of platelet aggregation inhibitors. We describe the effect of desmopressin acetate as a means of temporarily stabilising the platelet function. Patients and Methods. The platelet function was analysed in 10 patients who had received single (N = 4) or multiple (N = 6) doses of acetylsalicylic acid and 3 patients (control group) who had not taken acetylsalicylic acid. All subjects had suffered intracranial haemorrhage. Analysis was performed before, half an hour and three hours after administration of desmopressin acetate. Statistical analysis was performed by applying a level of significance of P ≤ 0.05. Results. (1) Platelet function returned to normal 30 minutes after administration of desmopressin acetate. (2) The platelet function worsened again after three hours. (3) There were no complications related to electrolytes or fluid balance. Conclusion. Desmopressin acetate can stabilise the platelet function in neurosurgical patients who have received acetylsalicylic acid prior to surgery without causing transfusion-related side effects or a loss of time. The effect is, however, limited and influenced by the frequency of drug intake. Further controls are needed in neurosurgical patients. PMID:25610644

  20. Vascular Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol Smoking Obesity Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.

  1. Endothelial Cilia Are Essential for Developmental Vascular Integrity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Sowjanya; Yu, Jianxin A.; Li, Jade; Li, Yuanyuan; Weinstein, Brant M.; Nicoli, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The cilium is a signaling platform of the vertebrate cell. It has a critical role in polycystic kidney disease and nephronophthisis. Cilia have been detected on endothelial cells, but the function of these organelles in the vasculature remains incompletely defined. In this study, using genetic and chemical genetic tools in the model organism zebrafish, we reveal an essential role of cilia in developmental vascular integrity. Embryos expressing mutant intraflagellar transport genes, which are essential and specific for cilia biogenesis, displayed increased risk of developmental intracranial hemorrhage, whereas the morphology of the vasculature remained normal. Moreover, cilia were present on endothelial cells in the developing zebrafish vasculature. We further show that the involvement of cilia in vascular integrity is endothelial autonomous, because endothelial-specific re-expression of intraflagellar transport genes in respective mutants rescued the intracranial hemorrhage phenotype. Finally, whereas inhibition of Hedgehog signaling increased the risk of intracranial hemorrhage in ciliary mutants, activation of the pathway rescued this phenotype. In contrast, embryos expressing an inactivating mutation in pkd2, one of two autosomal dominant cystic kidney disease genes, did not show increased risk of developmental intracranial hemorrhage. These results suggest that Hedgehog signaling is a major mechanism for this novel role of endothelial cilia in establishing vascular integrity. PMID:25214579

  2. Intracranial Pseudoaneurysms, Fusiform Aneurysms and Carotid-Cavernous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xianli; Jiang, Chuhan; Li, Youxiang; Lv, Ming; Zhang, Jingbo; Wu, Zhongxue

    2008-01-01

    Summary The study assessed the effectiveness and safety of endovascular covered stents in the management of intracranial pseudoaneurysms, fusiform aneurysms and direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Fourteen endovascular covered stents were used to repair three pseudoaneurysms, six fu-siform aneurysms and six direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Aneurysms were in the carotid artery in seven cases, in the vertebral artery two cases. It was not possible to treat two additional cases transcutaneously for technical reasons
2/15. Percutaneous closure of the lesions with an endovascular covered stent was successful in 13 of 15 cases. Initial follow-up showed good stent patency. No complications were observed after stent implantation. During follow-up, stent thromboses were detected in two of nine patients with follow-up digital subtracted angiography. One carotid-cavernous fistula of Barrow Type A transformed into Barrow Type D at nine month follow-up study was cured with a procudure of Onyx-18 injection. Endovascular covered stents may be an option for percutaneous closure of intracranial pseudoaneurysms, fusiform aneurysms and direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Endoluminal vascular repair with covered stents offers an alternative therapeutic approach to conventional modalities. PMID:20557743

  3. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension: diagnosis to management.

    PubMed

    Limaye, Kaustubh; Samant, Rohan; Lee, Ricky W

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension typically occurs from spontaneous CSF leak. CSF volume depletion rather than decrease in CSF pressure is thought to be the main causative feature for intracranial hypotension. More and more cases of intracranial hypotension are getting diagnosed with the advances in the imaging. The advances in the imaging have also led to the better understanding of the dynamic changes that occur with intracranial hypotension. The old theories of CSF overproduction or CSF underproduction have not been substantially associated with intracranial hypotension. It has also led to the fore different atypical clinical features and presentations. Although, it has been known for a long time, the diagnosis is still challenging and dilemma persists over one diagnostic modality over other and the subsequent management. Spontaneous CSF leaks occur at the spinal level and the skull base and other locations are rare. The anatomy of spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a very complex process with significant overlap in connective tissue disorders, previous dural weakness or meningeal diverticula. To localize the location of the CSF leak-CT myelography is the modality of choice. CSF cysternography may provide additional confirmation in uncertain cases and also MRI spine imaging may be of significant help in some cases. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension continues to be a diagnostic dilemma and our effort was to consolidate available information on the clinical features, diagnostics, and management for a practicing neurologist for a "15-20 min quick update of the topic". PMID:26661291

  4. Spectrum of urorectal septum malformation sequence.

    PubMed

    Shah, Krupa; Nayak, Shalini S; Shukla, Anju; Girisha, Katta M

    2016-05-01

    Urorectal septum malformation sequence (URSMS) is a rare spectrum of malformations involving various organ systems. Here, we present eight cases of URSMS, noted in autopsy, with different degrees of complexity, seven being the complete type and one being the partial type. All cases had gastrointestinal tract malformation in the form of the imperforate anus and indeterminate genitalia. Other gastrointestinal tract anomalies were anal agenesis in two cases, anorectal agenesis in two cases, and malformed lower intestinal tract in four cases. The associated renal abnormality was noted in five cases, which were unilateral renal agenesis, dysplastic kidney, hydronephrosis, horseshoe kidney, and unilateral hypoplastic ectopic kidney. External genital malformation, present in both male and female fetuses, included a knob-like structure at perineum in female fetuses, genital fold hypoplasia and penile aplasia or hypoplasia in male fetuses. Skeletal abnormalities included two cases of sacral agenesis and one case of lumbosacral dysraphism. Other anomalies included a case with alobar holoprosencephaly, truncus arteriosus with hypoplastic lungs in one case, and three cases with abdominal wall defects. It is our attempt to delineate a spectrum of abnormalities associated with URSMS. PMID:26663027

  5. Pharmacological management of pain after intracranial surgery.

    PubMed

    Leith, B

    1998-08-01

    Some healthcare professionals continue to believe that patients experience minimal pain and discomfort after intracranial surgery. However, clinical experience indicates that many patients experience significant pain after craniotomy. Despite research which supports the use of morphine as a method of pain control after intracranial surgery, some healthcare professionals continue to administer only codeine, which may be ineffective. Inadequate pain control can be associated with a variety of negative physiological and psychological consequences. Neuroscience nurses are challenged to re-evaluate their current beliefs and practices related to pain and pain control after intracranial surgery. PMID:9791776

  6. Vascular Diseases of the Spinal Cord: Infarction, Hemorrhage, and Venous Congestive Myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Shawn M; Jeong, William J; Morales, Humberto; Abruzzo, Todd A

    2016-10-01

    Vascular pathologies of the spinal cord are rare and often overlooked. This article presents clinical and imaging approaches to the diagnosis and management of spinal vascular conditions most commonly encountered in clinical practice. Ischemia, infarction, hemorrhage, aneurysms, and vascular malformations of the spine and spinal cord are discussed. Pathophysiologic mechanisms, clinical classification schemes, clinical presentations, imaging findings, and treatment modalities are considered. Recent advances in genetic and syndromic vascular pathologies of the spinal cord are also discussed. Clinically relevant spinal vascular anatomy is reviewed in detail. PMID:27616317

  7. [Radiotherapy of benign intracranial tumors].

    PubMed

    Delannes, M; Latorzeff, I; Chand, M E; Huchet, A; Dupin, C; Colin, P

    2016-09-01

    Most of the benign intracranial tumors are meningiomas, vestibular schwannomas, pituitary adenomas, craniopharyngiomas, and glomus tumors. Some of them grow very slowly, and can be observed without specific treatment, especially if they are asymptomatic. Symptomatic or growing tumors are treated by surgery, which is the reference treatment. When surgery is not possible, due to the location of the lesion, or general conditions, radiotherapy can be applied, as it is if there is a postoperative growing residual tumor, or a local relapse. Indications have to be discussed in polydisciplinary meetings, with precise evaluation of the benefit and risks of the treatments. The techniques to be used are the most modern ones, as multimodal imaging and image-guided radiation therapy. Stereotactic treatments, using fractionated or single doses depending on the size or the location of the tumors, are commonly realized, to avoid as much a possible the occurrence of late side effects. PMID:27523417

  8. Intracranial ROSAI-DORFMAN Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahzoni, Parvin; Zavareh, Mohsen Hani Tabaei; Bagheri, Marzie; Hani, Neda; Moqtader, Babak

    2012-01-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a benign lymphohistiocytosis that often involve lymph nodes and present as massive lymphadenopathy with sinus histiocytosis. The disease is rarely associated with intracranial involvement. Herein, we report a 33-years-old man with recent onset of unconsciousness. According to his past medical history, he was suffering from frontal headache, ataxia and dizziness with no sensory or motor defect since August 2010. At initial work up, MRI showed infiltrating mass in the left parietal region. Microscopically, the mass consisted of infiltration of abundant lymphoplasma cells, neutrophils and some histiocytes scattered in fibrotic background. Emperipolesis (lymphocytophagocytosis) of histiocytic cells made the diagnosis of Rosai-Dorfman disease. Rosai-Dorfman disease should be added in the list of differential diagnosis for a dural mass mimicking meningioma or cerebral mass mimicking glioma, therefore, immunohistochemical staining for EMA, S100 and CD1a should be performed to rule out the differential diagnosis. PMID:23267385

  9. Management of raised intracranial pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, J D; Czosnyka, M

    1993-01-01

    This review has been written at an unfortunate time. Novel questions are being asked of the old therapies and there is an abundance of new strategies both to lower ICP and protect the brain against cerebral ischaemia. In the United Kingdom, the problem is to ensure that appropriate patients continue to be referred to centres where clinical trials of high quality can be undertaken. One of the success stories of the past decade has been the decline in the number of road accidents as a result of seat belt legislation, improvements in car design and the drink/driving laws. Hence, fortunately there are fewer patients with head injuries to treat and it is even more important that patients are appropriately referred if studies to assess efficacy of the new strategies are not to be thwarted. The nihilistic concept that intensive investigation with ICP monitoring for patients with diffuse head injury or brain swelling following evacuation of a haematoma or a contusion has no proven beneficial effect on outcome, requires revision. A cocktail of therapies may be required that can be created only when patients are monitored in sufficient detail to reveal the mechanisms underlying their individual ICP problem. Ethical problems may arise over how aggressively therapy for intracranial hypertension should be pursued and for how long. There has always been the concern that cranial decompression or prolonged barbiturate coma may preserve patients but with unacceptably severe disability. Some patients may be salvaged from herniating with massive cerebral infarction with the use of osmotherapy but is the outcome acceptable? Similar considerations apply to some children with metabolic encephalopathies. Where such considerations have been scrutinised in patients with severe head injury, the whole spectrum of outcomes appears to be shifted so that the number of severe disabilities and persistent vegetative states are not increased. However, it is important to be sensitive to such issues

  10. Treatment of left ventricular assist device-associated arteriovenous malformations with thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Ray, Ranjan; Kale, Parag P; Ha, Richard; Banerjee, Dipanjan

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding because of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) is an increasingly recognized complication of continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). Currently, therapeutic options for LVAD-associated AVMs are limited and often require repeated endoscopic procedures and reduction or cessation of anticoagulation. Thalidomide has been utilized in the treatment of refractory bleeding because of gastrointestinal vascular malformations. Here we describe the case of a 66-year-old man with severe ischemic cardiomyopathy implanted with a continuous flow HeartMate II. His postoperative course was complicated by multiple hospital admissions for gastrointestinal bleeding because of LVAD-associated AVMs refractory to repeated argon plasma laser coagulation. Anticoagulation was discontinued with subsequent pump stoppage because of thrombus requiring urgent surgical pump exchange. Following this, thalidomide was initiated and anticoagulation with warfarin was continued. Since initiation of thalidomide, the patient has not had further gastrointestinal bleeding or evidence of pump thrombus in the subsequent 1 year. PMID:24830804

  11. [Intracranial pressure changes during xenon anesthesia in neurosurgical patients without intracranial hypertention].

    PubMed

    Rylova, A V; Lubnin, A Iu

    2011-01-01

    Xenon assures rapid awakening and stable hemodynamics, it also has some neuroprotective effect. This is the reason why it may become an anesthetic of choice in neurosurgery. Still there is little and controversial data on its impact upon ICP. This is the first study of xenon effect upon intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure and cerebrovascular reactivity during xenon anesthesia in neurosurgical patients without intracranial hypertension. We report a slight increase in intracranial and a slight decrease in cerebral perfusion pressure during xenon anesthesia and show that cerebrovascular reactivity is preserved. Thus we conclude that xenon anesthesia is safe for neurosurgical patients without intracranial hypertension. PMID:21957614

  12. Meningitis after cochlear implantation in Mondini malformation.

    PubMed

    Page, E L; Eby, T L

    1997-01-01

    Although the potential for CSF leakage and subsequent meningitis after cochlear implantation in the malformed cochlea has been recognized, this complication has not been previously reported. We report a case of CSF otorhinorrhea and meningitis after minor head trauma developing 2 years after cochlear implantation in a child with Mondini malformation. Leakage of CSF was identified from the cochleostomy around the electrode of the implant, and this leak was sealed with a temporalis fascia and muscle plug. Although this complication appears to be rare, care must be taken to seal the cochleostomy in children with inner ear malformations at the initial surgery, and any episode of meningitis after surgery must be thoroughly investigated to rule out CSF leakage from the labyrinth. PMID:9018266

  13. Sex hormone exposure during pregnancy and malformations.

    PubMed

    Briggs, M H; Briggs, M

    1979-01-01

    This general review of the effects of exposure to sex hormones during pregnancy and subsequent fetal malformation presents summaries of animal studies, develops the data indicating virilization and feminization in humans, documents chromosome abnormalities, and presents data on the connection of steroid exposure in utero and somatic malformations. Fetal exposure can occur 3 different ways, through hormonal pregnancy test, via obstetrical use of hormones, or because of continued maternal use of oral contraceptives after conception. In the latter case, an ongoing prospective study indicates that accidental ingestion of oral contraceptives after conception is not harmful to the fetus if taken during early pregnancy. Tables present summaries of numerous large surveys and retrospective studies linking particular sex hormones (exogenous) to particular fetal malformations including neural tube defects and other constellations of developmental problems. The question of exogenous hormone effects on the personality of infants who were exposed in utero is addressed. PMID:400321

  14. Anorectal Malformation: Paediatric Problem Presenting in Adult.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Rahulkumar N; Chikkala, Bhargav; Das, Cinjini; Biswas, Somak; Sarkar, Diptendra Kumar; Pandey, Sushil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This is a case report of 22-year-old girl admitted with abdominal distension, vomiting, and chronic constipation since birth. Abdomen was distended, and perineal examination revealed imperforate anus with vestibular fistula (ARM). So far worldwide very few cases have been reported about anorectal malformation presenting in adulthood, and thus extremely little data is available in the literature about an ideal management of anorectal malformation in adults. In our case in the treatment instead of conventional procedure of posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP) anal transposition was done and till two years after the definitive treatment during follow-up patient has been doing well with Kelly's score of six. Our experience suggests that anal transposition provides satisfactory outcome in adults presenting late with anorectal malformation. PMID:26539301

  15. Anorectal Malformation: Paediatric Problem Presenting in Adult

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Rahulkumar N.; Chikkala, Bhargav; Das, Cinjini; Biswas, Somak; Sarkar, Diptendra Kumar; Pandey, Sushil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This is a case report of 22-year-old girl admitted with abdominal distension, vomiting, and chronic constipation since birth. Abdomen was distended, and perineal examination revealed imperforate anus with vestibular fistula (ARM). So far worldwide very few cases have been reported about anorectal malformation presenting in adulthood, and thus extremely little data is available in the literature about an ideal management of anorectal malformation in adults. In our case in the treatment instead of conventional procedure of posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP) anal transposition was done and till two years after the definitive treatment during follow-up patient has been doing well with Kelly's score of six. Our experience suggests that anal transposition provides satisfactory outcome in adults presenting late with anorectal malformation. PMID:26539301

  16. What is the risk of intracranial bleeding during anti-VEGF therapy?

    PubMed

    Carden, Craig P; Larkin, James M G; Rosenthal, Mark A

    2008-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key mediator of physiological and pathological angiogenesis. All solid tumors are dependent on pathological angiogenesis, and anti-VEGF therapy has demonstrated clinical benefit in breast, colorectal, non-small-cell lung, and renal carcinomas. Central nervous system metastases are common in many of these tumor types. An increased risk of bleeding has been reported with anti-VEGF therapy, but the risk of intracranial bleeding is unknown with this type of therapy. We reviewed the available data to investigate the risk of intracranial bleeding with anti-VEGF therapy in the presence and absence of CNS metastases. The PubMed and Medline databases and the Proceedings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meetings were searched for articles, abstracts, and presentations of clinical trials. We identified 57 trials examining the safety and efficacy of anti-VEGF therapy in a total of 10,598 patients. Four trials examined the use of anti-VEGF therapy in treating patients with brain metastases. The presence of CNS metastases was a stated exclusion criterion in 76% of trials. The rate of intracranial bleeding was negligible. We conclude that there is no trial evidence that anti-VEGF therapy confers an increased risk of intracranial bleeding, even in the presence of CNS metastases. Future trials of anti-VEGF therapy should not exclude patients with controlled CNS metastases at enrollment. PMID:18539884

  17. Congenital Malformations Leading to Paradoxical Embolism.

    PubMed

    Bruckheimer, Elchanan

    2016-05-01

    The absolute separation of the right and left circulations and the filtration of blood by the pulmonary circulation are essential to prevent the passage of thrombotic material from the venous system into the systemic arterial circulation. Any breach of the intracardiac septae or circumvention of the pulmonary capillary network may cause a paradoxical embolus. The most common causes are atrial septal defects and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. This article discusses unusual connections and pathways related to congenital malformations. Although anticoagulation is necessary to prevent paradoxical emboli, the hematologic disturbances and the most appropriate therapy in these patients warrant further investigation. PMID:27150173

  18. Mayer-Rokitansky syndrome and anorectal malformation.

    PubMed

    Patankar, Shreeprasad P; Kalrao, Vijay; Patankar, Shilpa S

    2004-12-01

    Mayer Rokitansky Kuster Houser syndrome (MRKH syndrome) is characterized by Mullerian duct structures agenesis, vaginal atresia being the commonest variant. It can be associated with renal, skeletal, spine and other malformations. Patient with Mayer Rokitansky syndrome has a varied presentation from newborn period to adolescence. Thorough investigations are required for classification of the syndrome and diagnosis of associated anomalies. The MRKH syndrome patient may require complex vaginal reconstructive surgery and a detailed counseling about the potentials of menstruation and fertility. Here we are presenting a patient having association of anorectal malformation, Mullerian duct agenesis and renal anomaly. PMID:15630325

  19. Intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ai; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Matsuda, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Motoyama, Yasushi; Park, Young-Su; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Capillary hemangiomas are neoplasms involving skin and soft tissue in infants. These lesions rarely involved an intracranial space and reported age distribution ranges from infancy to middle age. We report an extremely rare case of rapidly rising intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly woman. Case Description: The 82-year-old woman presented with vomiting, reduced level of consciousness, and worsening mental state. Computed tomography showed a contrast-enhanced extra-axial lesion in the left frontal operculum, although no intracranial mass lesion was identifiable from magnetic resonance imaging taken 2 years earlier. Complete surgical excision was performed and histopathological examination diagnosed benign capillary hemangioma consisting of a variety of dilated capillary blood vessels lined by endothelial cells. Conclusion: This is the first description of rapid growth of an intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly woman. These lesions are exceedingly rare in the elderly population, but still show the capacity for rapid growth. Complete excision would prevent further recurrence. PMID:26664868

  20. Remotely-powered intracranial pressure monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, T. B.

    1979-01-01

    Implantable RF powered monitor uses capacitive transducer and stiff metal diaphragm that gives high stability for long term intracranial pressure monitoring. Design of monitor reduces risk of infection while improving patient comfort and mobility.

  1. Intracranial complications of transorbital stab wounds.

    PubMed Central

    De Villiers, J C; Sevel, D

    1975-01-01

    Oscular and orbital injuries due to stab wounds may mask underlying serious intracranial damage. The correct clinical assessment and treatment of such cases require the attention of a team comprising a neurosurgeon, ophthalmologist, otolaryngologist, and plastic surgeon. Images PMID:1125159

  2. The technical evolution of gamma knife radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Lunsford, L Dade; Niranjan, Ajay; Kano, Hideyuki; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery was first applied for the treatment of an intracranial arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in 1968. Using biplane angiography to target a small-volume, deep-seated lesion, photons were cross-fired on the pathological shunt. The AVM was obliterated within 3 years. This began a cautious introduction of Gamma Knife radiosurgery in the 1970s. As the Gamma Knife technology spread to sites in Europe, South America and the USA in the 1980s, AVM radiosurgery became a primary indication. During the early years the usual standard was to deliver a single radiosurgical isocenter to the target defined by 2-dimensional angiography. Most patients had small-volume AVMs unsuitable for surgical excision. Over time the technique of Gamma Knife AVM surgery evolved to include: careful patient selection, discussion of appropriate treatment strategies, anticonvulsant administration for lobar locations and intraoperative targeting using both high-resolution axial plane imaging--usually magnetic resonance imaging--coupled with biplane digital subtraction angiography. High-speed computer dose planning integrated with more detailed imaging strategies facilitated conformal radiation delivery in a single treatment session coupled with high selectivity of the dose delivered. Multiple isocenters became routine. Long-term follow-up care included serial imaging evaluations to assess the response and to detect complications. Imaging was critical to confirm the desired radiobiological response--complete obliteration. Long-term follow-up after obliteration confirmed that AVM radiosurgery had a high success rate for properly selected patients and a risk-benefit profile that substantiated patient safety. Twenty-year results after Gamma Knife radiosurgery for AVMs are currently available. Established roles have been found for pediatric cases and for larger-volume AVMs unsuitable for surgical removal. The role and technique of embolization prior to radiosurgery continue

  3. Stereological and Morphometric Analysis of MRI Chiari Malformation Type-1

    PubMed Central

    Alkoç, Ozan Alper; Songur, Ahmet; Eser, Olcay; Toktas, Muhsin; Esi, Ertap; Haktanir, Alpay

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this study, we aimed to investigate the underlying ethiological factors in chiari malformation (CM) type-I (CMI) via performing volumetric and morphometric length-angle measurements. Methods A total of 66 individuals [33 patients (20-65 years) with CMI and 33 control subjects] were included in this study. In sagittal MR images, tonsillar herniation length and concurrent anomalies were evaluated. Supratentorial, infratentorial, and total intracranial volumes were measured using Cavalieri method. Various cranial distances and angles were used to evaluate the platybasia and posterior cranial fossa (PCF) development. Results Tonsillar herniation length was measured 9.09±3.39 mm below foramen magnum in CM group. Tonsillar herniation/concurrent syringomyelia, concavity/defect of clivus, herniation of bulbus and fourth ventricle, basilar invagination and craniovertebral junction abnormality rates were 30.3, 27, 18, 2, 3, and 3 percent, respectively. Absence of cisterna magna was encountered in 87.9% of the patients. Total, IT and ST volumes and distance between Chamberlain line and tip of dens axis, Klaus index, clivus length, distance between internal occipital protuberance and opisthion were significantly decreased in patient group. Also in patient group, it was found that Welcher basal angle/Boogard angle increased and tentorial slope angle decreased. Conclusion Mean cranial volume and length-angle measurement values significantly decreased and there was a congenital abnormality association in nearly 81.5 percent of the CM cases. As a result, it was concluded that CM ethiology can be attributed to multifactorial causes. Moreover, congenital defects can also give rise to this condition. PMID:26713146

  4. Neurodevelopmental malformations of the cerebellar vermis in genetically engineered rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformati...

  5. Intracranial-to-intracranial bypass for posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms: options, technical challenges, and results in 35 patients.

    PubMed

    Abla, Adib A; McDougall, Cameron M; Breshears, Jonathan D; Lawton, Michael T

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Intracranial-to-intracranial (IC-IC) bypasses are alternatives to traditional extracranial-to-intracranial (EC-IC) bypasses to reanastomose parent arteries, reimplant efferent branches, revascularize branches with in situ donor arteries, and reconstruct bifurcations with interposition grafts that are entirely intracranial. These bypasses represent an evolution in bypass surgery from using scalp arteries and remote donor sites toward a more local and reconstructive approach. IC-IC bypass can be utilized preferentially when revascularization is needed in the management of complex aneurysms. Experiences using IC-IC bypass, as applied to posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) aneurysms in 35 patients, were reviewed. METHODS Patients with PICA aneurysms and vertebral artery (VA) aneurysms involving the PICA's origin were identified from a prospectively maintained database of the Vascular Neurosurgery Service, and patients who underwent bypass procedures for PICA revascularization were included. RESULTS During a 17-year period in which 129 PICA aneurysms in 125 patients were treated microsurgically, 35 IC-IC bypasses were performed as part of PICA aneurysm management, including in situ p3-p3 PICA-PICA bypass in 11 patients (31%), PICA reimplantation in 9 patients (26%), reanastomosis in 14 patients (40%), and 1 V3 VA-to-PICA bypass with an interposition graft (3%). All aneurysms were completely or nearly completely obliterated, 94% of bypasses were patent, 77% of patients were improved or unchanged after treatment, and good outcomes (modified Rankin Scale ≤ 2) were observed in 76% of patients. Two patients died expectantly. Ischemic complications were limited to 2 patients in whom the bypasses occluded, and permanent lower cranial nerve morbidity was limited to 3 patients and did not compromise independent function in any of the patients. CONCLUSIONS PICA aneurysms receive the application of IC-IC bypass better than any other aneurysm, with nearly one

  6. De novo development of a cerebral arteriovenous malformation following radiation therapy: Case report and an update to classical arteriovenous malformation nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Koch, Matthew J; Agarwalla, Pankaj K; Stapleton, Christopher J; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Loeffler, Jay S

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are traditionally considered primary congenital lesions that result from embryological aberrations in vasculogenesis. Recent insights, however, suggest that these lesions may be secondary to a vascular insult such as ischemia or trauma. Herein, the authors present a rare case of a secondary cerebral AVM, occurring in a young girl who received prior cranial radiation therapy. At age 3years, she underwent surgical resection, chemotherapy, and photon radiation therapy for treatment of a fourth ventricular ependymoma. At age 19years, she developed new onset seizures and was found to have a left medial temporal lobe AVM. Her seizures were managed successfully with anti-epileptic medications and the AVM was treated with proton radiation therapy. This case highlights a rare but possible vascular sequela of radiation therapy and adds to the growing body of evidence that cerebral AVM may arise as secondary lesions. PMID:26860850

  7. Perspective: Update on Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Beau B.; Biousse, Valérie; Newman, Nancy J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Provide an update on various features of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Design Perspective. Methods Selected articles on the epidemiology, clinical and imaging features, natural history, pathophysiology, and treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension were reviewed and interpreted in the context of the authors’ clinical and research experience. Results Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is primarily a disease of obese women of childbearing age, but it can affect patients of any weight, sex, and age. Although a relatively rare disorder, idiopathic intracranial hypertension’s associated costs in the U.S. entail hundreds of millions of dollars. Even following treatment, headaches are frequently persistent and may require the continued involvement of a neurologist. Quality of life reductions and depression are common among idiopathic intracranial hypertension patients. However, visual dysfunction, especially visual field abnormalities, represents the major morbidity of this disorder, and serial automated perimetry remains the primary mode of patient monitoring. Patients who are men, black, very obese, or anemic are at higher risk of visual loss. Vitamin A metabolism, adipose tissue as an actively secreting endocrine tissue, and cerebral venous abnormalities are areas of active study regarding idiopathic intracranial hypertension’s pathophysiology. Treatment studies show that lumbar puncture is a valuable treatment (in addition to its crucial diagnostic role) and that weight management is critical. However, open questions remain regarding the efficacy of acetazolamide, CSF diversion procedures, and cerebral venous stenting. Conclusions Many questions remain unanswered about idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Ongoing studies, especially an ongoing NIH-funded clinical trial of acetazolamide, should provide more insight into this important, yet poorly understood syndrome of isolated intracranial hypertension. PMID:21696699

  8. Intracranial aneurysms: analysis of results of microneurosurgery.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, C B; Loach, A B; O'laoire, S A

    1976-01-01

    Subarachnoid haemorrhage from intracranial aneurysms has a poor prognosis. Operative management of intracranial aneurysms was once considered ineffective. The first 100 cases treated by micorsurgery were analysed to see whether mortality and morbidity were reduced. Modern surgical techniques halved the total mortality but the morbidity was unaltered. Results can be improved by delaying surgery seven days and by treating any hypertension before surgery. PMID:963461

  9. Brain vascular and hydrodynamic physiology

    PubMed Central

    Tasker, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Protecting the brain in vulnerable infants undergoing surgery is a central aspect of perioperative care. Understanding the link between blood flow, oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption leads to a more informed approach to bedside care. In some cases, we need to consider how high can we let the partial pressure of carbon dioxide go before we have concerns about risk of increased cerebral blood volume and change in intracranial hydrodynamics? Alternatively, in almost all such cases, we have to address the question of how low can we let the blood pressure drop before we should be concerned about brain perfusion? This review, provides a basic understanding of brain bioenergetics, hemodynamics, hydrodynamics, autoregulation and vascular homeostasis to changes in blood gases that is fundamental to our thinking about bedside care and monitoring. PMID:24331089

  10. Imaging-Based Features of Headaches in Chiari Malformation Type I

    PubMed Central

    Alperin, Noam; Loftus, James R.; Oliu, Carlos J.; Bagci, Ahmet M.; Lee, Sang H.; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Sekula, Raymond; Lichtor, Terry; Green, Barth A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sub-occipital cough-induced headaches are considered a hallmark symptom of Chiari Malformation Type I (CMI). However, non-Valsalva–related suboccipital headaches and headaches in other locations are also common in CMI. The diagnostic significance and the underlying factors associated with these different headaches types are not well understood. Objective This imaging-based study compares cranial morphology and hydrodynamics in three types of headaches in CMI to better understand the pathophysiological basis for the different headache characteristics. Methods Twenty-two cranial physiologic and morphologic measures were obtained using specialized MRI scans from 63 symptomatic pretreated CMI patients, 40 with suboccipital-headaches induced by Valsalva maneuvers (34F, 36±10years), 15 with non-Valsalva related suboccipital-headaches (10F, 33±9years), 8 with non-suboccipital non-Valsalva induced headaches (8F, 39±13years), and 37 control subjects (24F, age 36±12years). Group differences were identified using two-tailed Student’s t-test. Results Posterior cranial fossa markers of CMI were similar among the three headache subtypes. However, the Valsalva-related suboccipital-headaches cohort demonstrated significantly lower intracranial compliance index than the non-Valsalva-related suboccipital-headaches cohort (7.5±3.4 vs. 10.9±4.9), lower intracranial volume change during the cardiac cycle (0.48±0.19 vs. 0.61±0.16mL), and higher MRICP (11.1±4.3 vs. 7.7±2.8mmHg, p=0.02). The Valsalva-related suboccipital-headaches cohort had smaller intracranial and lateral ventricles volumes compared to the healthy cohort. The non-Valsalva-related suboccipital-headaches cohort had reduced venous drainage through the jugular veins. Conclusion Valsalva-induced worsening of occipital-headaches appears related to a small intracranial volume rather than the smaller posterior cranial fossa. This explains the reduced intracranial compliance and corresponding higher

  11. [Lymphatic malformations in the head and neck area].

    PubMed

    Wiegand, S; Werner, J A

    2016-02-01

    Lymphatic malformations are congenital malformations of the lymphatic system. They are mainly located in the head and neck area, and grow proportional to the patients' body growth. Depending on the morphology, it can be distinguished between macrocystic, microcystic and mixed lymphatic malformations. Due to their infiltrative growth, microcystic lymphatic malformations are particularly difficult to treat. Therapeutic approaches include conventional surgical resection, laser therapy, sclerotherapy and systemic drug therapies. PMID:26820157

  12. Acquired pulmonary arteriovenous malformation secondary to hydatid cyst operation.

    PubMed

    Gezer, S; Turut, H; Oz, G; Demirag, F; Tastepe, I

    2007-10-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations are abnormal communications between pulmonary arteries and pulmonary veins. The majority of the cases are congenital in origin, and acquired pulmonary arteriovenous malformations are very rare. We present a case here, which - to the best of our knowledge - is the first acquired pulmonary arteriovenous malformation secondary to a hydatid cyst operation in the literature, and we discuss the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic modalities and treatment of acquired pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. PMID:17902072

  13. A somatic MAP3K3 mutation is associated with verrucous venous malformation.

    PubMed

    Couto, Javier A; Vivero, Matthew P; Kozakewich, Harry P W; Taghinia, Amir H; Mulliken, John B; Warman, Matthew L; Greene, Arin K

    2015-03-01

    Verrucous venous malformation (VVM), also called "verrucous hemangioma," is a non-hereditary, congenital, vascular anomaly comprised of aberrant clusters of malformed dermal venule-like channels underlying hyperkeratotic skin. We tested the hypothesis that VVM lesions arise as a consequence of a somatic mutation. We performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) on VVM tissue from six unrelated individuals and looked for somatic mutations affecting the same gene in specimens from multiple persons. We observed mosaicism for a missense mutation (NM_002401.3, c.1323C>G; NP_002392, p.Iso441Met) in mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 3 (MAP3K3) in three of six individuals. We confirmed the presence of this mutation via droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) in the three subjects and found the mutation in three additional specimens from another four participants. Mutant allele frequencies ranged from 6% to 19% in affected tissue. We did not observe this mutant allele in unaffected tissue or in affected tissue from individuals with other types of vascular anomalies. Studies using global and conditional Map3k3 knockout mice have previously implicated MAP3K3 in vascular development. MAP3K3 dysfunction probably causes VVM in humans. PMID:25728774

  14. Genetic basis of congenital cardiovascular malformations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular malformations are a singularly important class of birth defects and due to dramatic improvements in medical and surgical care, there are now large numbers of adult survivors. The etiologies are complex, but there is strong evidence that genetic factors play a crucial role. Over the la...

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of pediatric soft-tissue vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Oscar M

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used in the management of pediatric soft-tissue vascular anomalies for diagnosing and assessing extent of lesions and for evaluating response to therapy. MR imaging studies often involve a combination of T1- and T2-weighted images in addition to MR angiography and fat-suppressed post-contrast sequences. The MR imaging features of these vascular anomalies when combined with clinical findings can aid in diagnosis. In cases of complex vascular malformations and syndromes associated with vascular anomalies, MR imaging can be used to evaluate accompanying soft-tissue and bone anomalies. This article reviews the MR imaging protocols and appearances of the most common pediatric soft-tissue vascular anomalies. PMID:27229506

  16. Direct thrombus aspiration using the Penumbra system for the treatment of pediatric intracranial dissection.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Motoaki; Tateshima, Satoshi; Ali, Latisha; Raychev, Radoslav; Vinuela, Fernando

    2013-11-01

    We describe a case of a 15-year-old girl who developed a spontaneous intracranial arterial dissection with distal middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusions. From the digital subtraction angiography provided, the dissection flap appeared to originate at the internal carotid artery terminus with extension into the right M1 segment and occluding the right anterior cerebral artery, A1 segment. CT perfusion study showed salvageable tissue in the posterior MCA territory, including the motor cortex. In order to avoid further injury to the dissection, clot retrieval systems were not a treatment option. We therefore performed selective thrombus aspiration with the Penumbra system for the occluded central and precentral arteries distal to the non-occlusive dissecting lesion. Sufficient recanalization was achieved and the patient made a marked recovery. Although mechanical thrombectomy with the use of retrieval intracranial stent systems has demonstrated satisfactory recanalization rates, the aspiration methodology remains useful for patients with an accompanying proximal vascular lesion. PMID:23188785

  17. Intracranial Vasospasm without Intracranial Hemorrhage due to Acute Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jwa, Seung-Joo; Yang, Tae Ki; Lee, Chang Sub; Oh, Kyungmi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is very rare. Furthermore, intracranial vasospasm (ICVS) associated with spinal hemorrhage has been very rarely reported. We present an ICVS case without intracranial hemorrhage following SDH. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of severe headache. Multiple intracranial vasospasms were noted on a brain CT angiogram and transfemoral cerebral angiography. However, intracranial hemorrhage was not revealed by brain MRI or CT. On day 3 after admission, weakness of both legs and urinary incontinence developed. Spine MRI showed C7~T6 spinal cord compression due to hyperacute stage of SDH. After hematoma evacuation, her symptoms gradually improved. We suggest that spinal cord evaluation should be considered in patients with headache who have ICVS, although intracranial hemorrhage would not be visible in brain images. PMID:26713084

  18. [Vascular parkinsonism].

    PubMed

    Yamanouchi, H

    1997-01-01

    Critchley speculated that multiple vascular lesions of the basal ganglia must have an etiological connection to the symptoms of so-called vascular parkinsonism (VP), but without neuropathological confirmation. Some had doubts about its existence because of the lack of the pathologically confirmed case with adequate clinical correlation. At present, VP is characterized clinically by the short-stepped or frozen gait, lead-pipe rigidity, the symmetry of findings, absence of resting tremor, and negative response to levodopa in elderly patients with cerebrovascular lesions on CT/MRI. Pseudobulbar palsies, pyramidal tract findings, and/or multi-infarct dementia coexist in some of the cases. Most of clinically suspected VP patients have cerebral white matter lesions as well as basal ganglia lesions. PMID:9014431

  19. The role of stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of intracranial tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III )

    1990-03-01

    With the availability of gamma knife units and the development of modified linear accelerators, there is new interest in radiosurgery, especially as it applies to intracranial tumors. Among its advantages are the ability to precisely localize tumor and through small beam sizes deliver steep dose gradients at the field edges. This sharp dose gradient allows for the prescribed dose of radiation to be given to a tumor while avoiding vital structures only millimeters away. Radiosurgery has produced good results in the treatment of inoperable arteriovenous malformations and can be used as the sole curative therapy for small, radiographically distinct, benign noninvasive tumors. It is also used as salvage therapy in recurrent benign or malignant tumors that have previously been irradiated.

  20. Intracranial physiological calcifications in adults on computed tomography in Tabriz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Daghighi, M H; Rezaei, V; Zarrintan, S; Pourfathi, H

    2007-05-01

    Intracranial physiological calcifications are unaccompanied by any evidence of disease and have no demonstrable pathological cause. They are often due to calcium and sometimes iron deposition in the blood vessels of different structures of the brain. Computed tomography (CT) is the most sensitive means of detection of these calcifications. The aim of this study was the assessment of intracranial physiological calcifications in adults. We studied 1569 cases ranging in age from 15 to 85 in Tabriz Imam Khomeini Hospital, Iran. These patients had a history of head trauma and their CT scan did not show any evidence of pathological findings. The structures evaluated consisted of (A) the pineal gland, (B) the choroid plexus, (C) the habenula, (D) the basal ganglia, (E) the tentorium cerebelli, sagittal sinus and falx cerebri, (F) vessels and (G) lens and other structures which could be calcified. Of the 1569 subjects, 71.0% had pineal calcification, 66.2% had choroid plexus calcification, 20.1% had habenular calcification, 7.3% had tentorium cerebelli, sagittal sinus or falx cerebri calcifications, 6.6% had vascular calcification, 0.8% had basal ganglia calcification and 0.9% had lens and other non-defined calcifications. In general, the frequency of intracranial physiological calcifications was greater in men than in women. All types of calcification increased at older ages except for lens and other non-defined calcifications. We evaluated all the cranial structures and determined percentages for all types of intracranial physiological calcification. These statistics can be used for comparing physiological and pathological intracranial calcifications. Moreover, these statistics may be of interest from the clinical perspective and are potentially of clinical use. PMID:17594669

  1. Genetic animal models of malformations of cortical development and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael; Roper, Steven N

    2016-02-15

    Malformations of cortical development constitute a variety of pathological brain abnormalities that commonly cause severe, medically-refractory epilepsy, including focal lesions, such as focal cortical dysplasia, heterotopias, and tubers of tuberous sclerosis complex, and diffuse malformations, such as lissencephaly. Although some cortical malformations result from environmental insults during cortical development in utero, genetic factors are increasingly recognized as primary pathogenic factors across the entire spectrum of malformations. Genes implicated in causing different cortical malformations are involved in a variety of physiological functions, but many are focused on regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and neuronal migration. Advances in molecular genetic methods have allowed the engineering of increasingly sophisticated animal models of cortical malformations and associated epilepsy. These animal models have identified some common mechanistic themes shared by a number of different cortical malformations, but also revealed the diversity and complexity of cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of the pathological lesions and resulting epileptogenesis. PMID:25911067

  2. Primary Stenting of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Straube, T. Stingele, Robert; Jansen, Olav

    2005-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and safety of stenting intracranial atherosclerotic stenoses.Methods: In 12 patients the results of primary intracranial stenting were evaluated retrospectively. Patient ages ranged from 49 to 79 years (mean 64 years). Six patients presented with stenoses in the anterior circulation, and six had stenosis in the posterior circulation. One patient presented with extra- and intracranial tandem stenosis of the left internal carotid artery. Three patients presented with acute basilar thrombosis, caused by high-grade basilar stenoses.Results: Intracranial stenoses were successfully stented in 11 of 12 patients. In one patient the stent could not be advanced over the carotid siphon to reach the stenosis of the ophthalmic internal carotid artery. Follow-up digital subtraction angiographic studies were obtained in two patients who had presented with new neurologic signs or symptoms. In both cases the angiogram did not show any relevant stenotic endothelial hyperplasia. In one patient, after local thrombolysis the stenosis turned out to be so narrow that balloon angioplasty had to be performed before stent deployment. All three patients treated for stenosis-related basilar thrombosis died due to brainstem infarction that had ensued before the intervention.Conclusions: Prophylactic primary stenting of intracranial stenoses of the anterior or posterior cerebral circulation can be performed with a low complication rate; technical problems such as stent flexibility must still be solved. Local thrombolysis followed by stenting in stenosis-related thrombotic occlusion is technically possible.

  3. Hyperprolactinemia due to spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Schievink, Wouter I; Nuño, Miriam; Rozen, Todd D; Maya, M Marcel; Mamelak, Adam N; Carmichael, John; Bonert, Vivien S

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an increasingly recognized cause of headaches. Pituitary enlargement and brain sagging are common findings on MRI in patients with this disorder. The authors therefore investigated pituitary function in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension. METHODS Pituitary hormones were measured in a group of 42 consecutive patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension. For patients with hyperprolactinemia, prolactin levels also were measured following treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed prior to and following treatment. RESULTS The study group consisted of 27 women and 15 men with a mean age at onset of symptoms of 52.2 ± 10.7 years (mean ± SD; range 17-72 years). Hyperprolactinemia was detected in 10 patients (24%), ranging from 16 ng/ml to 96.6 ng/ml in men (normal range 3-14.7 ng/ml) and from 31.3 ng/ml to 102.5 ng/ml in women (normal range 3.8-23.2 ng/ml). In a multivariate analysis, only brain sagging on MRI was associated with hyperprolactinemia. Brain sagging was present in 60% of patients with hyperprolactinemia and in 19% of patients with normal prolactin levels (p = 0.02). Following successful treatment of the spontaneous intracranial hypotension, hyperprolactinemia resolved, along with normalization of brain MRI findings in all 10 patients. CONCLUSIONS Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a previously undescribed cause of hyperprolactinemia. Brain sagging causing distortion of the pituitary stalk (stalk effect) may be responsible for the hyperprolactinemia. PMID:25380110

  4. [Summary of 2004 Chinese National Conference on oral and maxillofacial vascular anomalies].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Yuan; Zheng, Cang-Shang; Zhou, Qi

    2004-08-01

    Congenital vascular anomalies have been the subject of much controversy and confusion over the years, many remain to be investigated and resolved. Authorized by the Managing Director Board of Chinese Stomatological Association (CSA), 2004 Chinese National Conference on Oral and Maxillofacial Vascular Anomalies was successfully held on July 15 to 18, 2004 in Shenzhen Grand Hotel. The conference was sponsored by Chinese Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (CSOMS), and undertaken by the Second People's Hospital of Shenzhen city. Professor ZHANG Zhen-kang, president of CSA, Professor QIU Wei-liu, president of CSOMS and academician of Chinese Academy of Engineers, and Professor LIU Bao-lin, vice president of CSOMS were present and made important speech at the meeting. More than 120 delegates nationwide attended this conference. Through a 3-day of oral presentation and discussion, the terminology, classification, treatment selection and outcome measurement of oral and maxillofacial hemangioma and vascular malformations were concerted among the delegates. Hemangiomas and vascular malformations have been recognized as distinct diseases that exhibit unique properties and behavior that demand an appropriately tailored treatment plan. The classification of Waner and Suen was adopted and different treatment modalities were reviewed and advocated for different lesions. Delegates were most interested in intralesional injection of Pingyangmycin for venous malformations, Krypton laser photodynamic therapy of venular malformations, Nd:YAG laser therapy for deep head and neck venous malformations after surgical exposure of the lesions, as well as "double" embolization of large venous malformations reported by Professor QIN Zhong-ping. The conference witnessed the foundation of the Division of Vascular Anomalies, Chinese Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. PMID:15349690

  5. Children With Intracranial Arachnoid Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhen; Li, Yongxin; Zhu, Fengjun; Zang, Dongdong; Zhao, Cailei; Li, Cong; Tong, Dan; Zhang, Heye; Chen, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We performed a dynamic study of arachnoid cysts (ACs) using magnetic resonance cisternography (MRC) and proposed a classification of ACs. Twenty-three suitable patients in our hospital entered into this study according to our inclusion criteria. MRC images were collected in all the subjects at 1 and 24 hours after the administration of intrathecal gadolinium-diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA). We allocate the enrolled patients into 2 groups, MRC group and surgery group. The MRC results were considered before treatment in 1 group (MRC group, 13 patients), whereas another group was surgically treated without considering the MRC results (surgery group, 10 patients). We calculated the enhanced area of cyst using modified MacDonald Criteria from the images and measured the surrounding subarachnoid area as the reference. We found that it was practically useful to quantify 3 types of ACs, complete communicating, incomplete communicating, and noncommunicating, according to MRC results in this study. All the subjects in both groups are closely observed before the treatment and the follow-up using the MRI examination. In the surgery group, 5 patients were found that the area of cysts shrank in the follow-up stage. However, there was no significant difference in the percentage shrinkage area between the 2 groups. We concluded that MRC with Gd-DTPA as a contrast agent is of significant clinical value for the diagnosis and treatment of children with intracranial ACs. This classification based on dynamic MRC is useful for making surgical recommendations. PMID:26554773

  6. [Suppurative intracranial infections in Africa].

    PubMed

    Loembe, P M; Okome-Kouakou, M; Alliez, B

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review recent African literature on suppurative intracranial infection and its implications for neurosurgery. In order of decreasing frequency the main lesions are brain abscess, subdural empyema, and epidural abscess. Despite progress in diagnostic imaging and availability of antibiotic therapy, these lesions still cause disturbingly high morbidity and mortality especially in sub-Saharan Africa where diagnosis is often delayed. The male-to-female ratio was 3.6:1 and 70 to 80% of patients were under the age of 20 years. Spread from the paranasal sinus or ear was the most common mechanism of infection. Hematogenous processes accounted for 22% of cases and the origin was undetermined in 11% to 26% of cases. Staphylococcus aureus and enteric gram-negative bacilli were the most common bacteria identified but cultures were reported as sterile in 30% to 50% of cases. While ultrasonography can be useful in newborns with an open fontanelle, arteriography is often the only feasible procedure for diagnosis in Black Africa. The diagnostic modality of choice is computed tomography which allows precise mapping prior to neurosurgery. Introduction of computed tomography in some African cities has led to a decrease in mortality ranging from 4.7% to 43%. The most effective treatment is a combination of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and surgical decompression of expanding lesions. The main procedures are aspiration through burr holes and craniotomy. Use of this combined strategy requires close cooperation between the neurosurgeon, infectious disease specialist, and microbiologist. Therapeutic indications are discussed within the context of Black Africa. PMID:9304016

  7. Massive glosso-cervical arteriovenous malformation: The rationale for a challenging surgical resection

    PubMed Central

    González-García, Raúl; Moreno-García, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Massive arterivenous malformations (AVM) in the cervico-facial area are rare but potentially life-threatening. Treatment protocols are not well-established. A 41-year old man presented large painless rubber-like mass within the entire neck, which also extended intraorally through the floor of the mouth, showing a slow growing pattern for 5 years. Angiography diagnosed it as cervicofacial AVM. Treatment approach consisted on the embolization of the right upper thyroid, lingual and facial arteries under intravenous sedation. Three days later, bilateral radical neck dissection and subtotal glossectomy was performed. A musculo-cutaneous pectoralis major pedicled flap was harvested to reconstruct the floor of the mouth. Treatment of massive AVMs in the cervico-facial area is challenging due to the associated disfigurement and frequent recurrence rate due to incomplete resection. Also, massive bleeding may be present despite pre-operative super-selective embolization. A new case is presented with focus on surgical treatment considerations. Key words:Arteriovenous malformation, high-flow vascular malformation, cervical region, tongue, surgical resection PMID:25593675

  8. Delayed presentation of an arteriovenous malformation after cerebellar hemangioblastoma resection—Case report

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, E. Emily; Otvos, Balint; Kshettry, Varun R.; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Haemangioblastoma has been uncommonly reported to occur in coexistence either temporally or spatially with the development of an arteriovenous malformations (AVM). We present a case of a delayed AVM following haemangioblastoma resection. Presentation of case 44 year old female initially presented with a several week history of headaches, vertigo and nausea and emesis and was found to have a cystic lesion with a solid enhancing component on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the superior aspect of the vermis. She underwent gross total resection and final pathology was consistent with WHO grade I haemangioblastoma. One year later, patient re-presented with headaches, dizziness and left trochlear nerve palsy with rotary nystagmus. Imaging revealed a left posterior tentorial paramedian cerebellar vascular nidus with venous drainage into the left transverses sinus suspicious for arteriovenous malformation. She underwent gross total resection of the lesion. Final pathology confirmed the diagnosis of an arteriovenous malformation. Discussion Recent research supports both haemangioblastoma and AVM are of embryologic origin but require later genetic alterations to develop into symptomatic lesions. It is unclear in our case if the AVM was present at the time of the initial haemangioblastoma resection or developed de novo after tumor resection. However, given the short time between tumor resection and presentation of AVM, de novo AVM although possible, appears less likely. Conclusion AVM and haemangioblastoma rarely presents together either temporally or spatially. We present a case of a delayed AVM following haemangioblastoma resection. More research is needed to elucidate the rare intermixture of these lesions. PMID:27086272

  9. [A case of arteriovenous malformation showed onset of symptoms on the late neonatal period].

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, S; Shirakuni, T; Hojo, H

    1982-08-01

    Arteriovenous malformation ruptured in the neonatal period is rare. The authors report a case of arteriovenous malformation showed onset of symptoms on the late neonatal period. A female Japanese baby was born at full term. Neonatal history was uneventful until she had bad temper, pallor and vomiting on 23th day. Her head size increased abnormally until it was 42.5 cm when she was admitted to Shizuoka Children's Hospital with a diagnosis of possible hydrocephalus at 2 months old. CT scan showed a large cystic cavity communicated with the dilated lateral ventricles. The ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was performed, but unfortunately the shunt was removed for the suspicion of abdominal complication. At the age of 4 months, right retrograde brachial angiography showed a tangle of abnormal vascular channels in the right fronto-lateral basal region (15X13X8 mm in size), which was fed a frontopolar artery and drained to superior saggital sinus. Frontal osteoplastic craniotomy was performed and total arteriovenous malformation with a partial frontal lobe was excised. Ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was reinserted for the post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus. She was healthy on 3 years old with mild motor deficit. PMID:7133311

  10. Monitoring intracranial pressure based on F-P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Ting; Tong, Xinglin; Chen, Guangxi

    2013-09-01

    Intracranial pressure is an important monitoring indicator of neurosurgery. In this paper we adopt all-fiber FP fiber optic sensor, using a minimally invasive operation to realize real-time dynamic monitoring intracranial pressure of the hemorrhage rats, and observe their intracranial pressure regularity of dynamic changes. Preliminary results verify the effectiveness of applications and feasibility, providing some basis for human brain minimally invasive intracranial pressure measurement.

  11. Novel use of 4D-CTA in imaging of intranidal aneurysms in an acutely ruptured arteriovenous malformation: is this the way forward?

    PubMed

    Chandran, Arun; Radon, Mark; Biswas, Shubhabrata; Das, Kumar; Puthuran, Mani; Nahser, Hans

    2016-09-01

    Ruptured arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a frequent cause of intracranial hemorrhage. The presence of associated aneurysms, especially intranidal aneurysms, is considered to increase the risk of re-hemorrhage. We present two cases where an intranidal aneurysm was demonstrated on four-dimensional CT angiography (time-resolved CT angiography) (4D-CTA). These features were confirmed by digital subtraction angiography (catheter arterial angiogram). This is the first report of an intranidal aneurysm demonstrated by 4D-CTA. 4D-CTA can offer a comprehensive evaluation of the angioarchitecture and flow dynamics of an AVM for appropriate classification and management. PMID:26180096

  12. Study Protocol: Asymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease in Pakistanis

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Ayeesha Kamran; Majeed, Farzin; Pasha, Omrana; Islam, Muhammad; Azam, Iqbal; Ilyas, Muhammad Saleem; Hussain, Munawar; Masood, Kamran; Ahmed, Bilal; Nazir, Sumaira; Sajjad, Zafar; Kasner, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) is the most frequent subtype of ischemic stroke globally. It is important to describe the determinants of early ICAD as a strategy to prevent strokes from clinically evident and progressive ICAD. Our objective is to report the determinants of asymptomatic ICAD by linking the presence or absence of ICAD on magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) with detailed risk assessment in asymptomatic adults. Methods This is an observational cross-sectional analytical study. We plan to recruit 200 adult participants from the radiology departments of two tertiary care centers of Karachi, Pakistan. The participants will first be screened for the absence of stroke symptoms via the Questionnaire for Verifying Stroke Free Status (QVSFS). QVSFS negative will be participants will be eligible. After written informed consent, participants will undergo detailed medical, sociodemographic, lifestyle, and anthropometric evaluation by a detailed interview. They will, in addition, undergo MRA to study the presence, degree, and distribution of asymptomatic ICAD. All MRA scans will be reviewed centrally by vascular neurologists blinded to clinical information. These images would be reviewed on DICOM Viewer 3.0 used for calculating the degree of stenosis using Warfarin–Aspirin Symptomatic Intracranial Disease (WASID) study defined criteria employing electronic calipers. A sample size of 200 will achieve 80% power for detecting a minimum difference of 20% in the prevalence of exposure factors (medical and lifestyle) between asymptomatic ICAD positive and ICAD negative persons. This study will generate regional data on risks for ICAD development and prevention in a high-risk susceptible population. Study ID: NCT02072876 PMID:25825629

  13. An Update on Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Thurtell, Matthew J.; Bruce, Beau B.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of unknown etiology often encountered in neurologic practice. It produces non-localizing symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure and, when left untreated, can result in severe irreversible visual loss. It most commonly occurs in obese women of childbearing age, but it can also occur in children, men, non-obese adults, and older adults. While it is frequently associated with obesity, it can be associated with other conditions, such as obstructive sleep apnea and transverse cerebral venous sinus stenoses. Recent identification of subgroups at high risk for irreversible visual loss, including black patients, men, and patients with fulminant forms of IIH, help guide the optimal management and follow-up. Ongoing studies of venous anatomy and physiology in IIH patients, as well as a recently begun randomized clinical treatment trial, should provide more insights into this common yet poorly understood syndrome of isolated intracranial hypertension. PMID:20944524

  14. Intracranial Hypertension Without Papilledema in Children.

    PubMed

    Aylward, Shawn C; Aronowitz, Catherine; Roach, E Steve

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to determine the frequency of intracranial hypertension without papilledema in children. Charts of patients evaluated in a pediatric intracranial hypertension clinic at our institution were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into 2 groups depending on whether they had presence or absence of optic nerve edema at the time of presentation. Age, body mass index, and opening cerebrospinal fluid pressures were considered continuous variables and compared by Wilcoxon rank sum test because of non-normality. A P-value of 0.05 was considered significant. A total of 228 charts were reviewed; 152 patients met the criteria for intracranial hypertension, and 27 patients (17.8%) met the criteria of headache without optic nerve edema. There was no clinically significant difference in age, body mass index, opening pressure, and modified opening pressure between the 2 groups. PMID:26012507

  15. Animal Models in Studying Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Xu, Hongzhi; Qin, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an important cause of hemorrhagic stroke. The etiology is largely unknown and the therapeutics are controversial. A review of AVM-associated animal models may be helpful in order to understand the up-to-date knowledge and promote further research about the disease. We searched PubMed till December 31, 2014, with the term “arteriovenous malformation,” limiting results to animals and English language. Publications that described creations of AVM animal models or investigated AVM-related mechanisms and treatments using these models were reviewed. More than 100 articles fulfilling our inclusion criteria were identified, and from them eight different types of the original models were summarized. The backgrounds and procedures of these models, their applications, and research findings were demonstrated. Animal models are useful in studying the pathogenesis of AVM formation, growth, and rupture, as well as in developing and testing new treatments. Creations of preferable models are expected. PMID:26649296

  16. FTO variant associated with malformation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rohena, Luis; Lawson, Michelle; Guzman, Edwin; Ganapathi, Mythily; Cho, Megan T; Haverfield, Eden; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame

    2016-04-01

    Common FTO variants are associated with obesity. However, it has recently been shown that homozygous FTO c.947G>A variant, which predicts p.R316Q, and c.956C>T, which predicts p.S319F, are associated with a malformation syndrome inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. We present a similar homozygous FTO c.965G>A variant that predicts p.R322Q, associated with a lethal malformation syndrome in a consanguineous Yemeni family. Functional studies showed that the p.R316Q, p.S219F, and p.R322Q variants render the FTO protein inactive. We further expand on the phenotype of homozygous FTO loss-of-function mutations to include eye abnormalities, gingival overgrowth, craniosynostosis, and cutaneous photosensitivity. PMID:26697951

  17. Introduction to cerebral cavernous malformation: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaehong

    2016-05-01

    The disease known as cerebral cavernous malformations mostly occurs in the central nervous system, and their typical histological presentations are multiple lumen formation and vascular leakage at the brain capillary level, resulting in disruption of the blood-brain barrier. These abnormalities result in severe neurological symptoms such as seizures, focal neurological deficits and hemorrhagic strokes. CCM research has identified 'loss of function' mutations of three ccm genes responsible for the disease and also complex regulation of multiple signaling pathways including the WNT/β-catenin pathway, TGF-β and Notch signaling by the ccm genes. Although CCM research is a relatively new and small scientific field, as CCM research has the potential to regulate systemic blood vessel permeability and angiogenesis including that of the blood-brain barrier, this field is growing rapidly. In this review, I will provide a brief overview of CCM pathogenesis and function of ccm genes based on recent progress in CCM research. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 255-262]. PMID:26923303

  18. Ischemic Colitis Due to a Mesenteric Arteriovenous Malformation in a Patient with a Connective Tissue Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Poullos, Peter D.; Thompson, Atalie C.; Holz, Grant; Edelman, Lauren A.; Jeffrey, R. Brooke

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is a rare, life-threatening, consequence of mesenteric arteriovenous malformations. Ischemia ensues from a steal phenomenon through shunting, and may be compounded by the resulting portal hypertension. Computed tomographic angiography is the most common first-line test because it is quick, non-invasive, and allows for accurate anatomic characterization. Also, high-resolution three-dimensional images can be created for treatment planning. Magnetic resonance angiography is similarly sensitive for vascular mapping. Conventional angiography remains the gold standard for diagnosis and also allows for therapeutic endovascular embolization. Our patient underwent testing using all three of these modalities. We present the first reported case of this entity in a patient with a vascular connective tissue disorder. PMID:25926912

  19. Disappearance of a Ruptured Distal Flow-Related Aneurysm after Arteriovenous Malformation Nidal Embolization.

    PubMed

    He, Lucy; Gao, Junwei; Thomas, Ajith J; Fusco, Matthew R; Ogilvy, Christopher S

    2015-11-01

    Aneurysms associated with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are well represented in the literature. Their exact etiology is poorly understood, but likely global hemodynamic changes coupled with vascular wall pathology play into their formation. Flow-related and intranidal aneurysms, in particular, appear to have an increased risk for hemorrhagic presentation. Treatment strategies for these aneurysms are particularly challenging. We report the case of an AVM-associated aneurysm causing intraventricular hemorrhage that disappeared after embolization of unrelated, distal feeding pedicles to the nidus, at a site distant from the aneurysm. We also review the literature with regards to these so-called "disappearing aneurysms" in the context of AVMs and other vascular pathologies. PMID:26072456

  20. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device used for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The...

  1. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device used for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The...

  2. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device used for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The...

  3. Statins and congenital malformations: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; Fischer, Michael A; Seely, Ellen W; Ecker, Jeffrey L; Franklin, Jessica M; Desai, Rishi J; Allen-Coleman, Cora; Mogun, Helen; Avorn, Jerry; Huybrechts, Krista F

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the teratogenic potential of statins. Design Cohort study. Setting United States. Participants A cohort of 886 996 completed pregnancies linked to liveborn infants of women enrolled in Medicaid from 2000 to 2007. Methods We examined the risk of major congenital malformations and organ specific malformations in offspring associated with maternal use of a statin in the first trimester. Propensity score based methods were used to control for potential confounders, including maternal demographic characteristics, obstetric and medical conditions, and use of other drugs. Results 1152 (0.13%) women used a statin during the first trimester. In unadjusted analyses, the prevalence of malformations in the offspring of these women was 6.34% compared with 3.55% in those of women who did not use a statin in the first trimester (relative risk 1.79, 95% confidence interval 1.43 to 2.23). Controlling for confounders, particularly pre-existing diabetes, accounted for this increase in risk (1.07, 0.85 to 1.37). There were also no statistically significant increases in any of the organ specific malformations assessed after accounting for confounders. Results were similar across a range of sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Our analysis did not find a significant teratogenic effect from maternal use of statins in the first trimester. However, these findings need to be replicated in other large studies, and the long term effects of in utero exposure to statins needs to be assessed, before use of statins in pregnancy can be considered safe. PMID:25784688

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Malformations of Midbrain-Hindbrain.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    We aim to review the magnetic resonance imaging appearance of malformations of midbrain and hindbrain. These can be classified as predominantly cerebellar malformations, combined cerebellar and brain stem malformations, and predominantly brain stem malformations. The diagnostic criteria for the majority of these morphological malformations are based on neuroimaging findings. The predominantly cerebellar malformations include predominantly vermian hypoplasia seen in Dandy-Walker malformation and rhombencephalosynapsis, global cerebellar hypoplasia reported in lissencephaly and microlissencephaly, and unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia seen in PHACES, vanishing cerebellum, and cerebellar cleft. Cerebellar dysplasias are seen in Chudley-McCullough syndrome, associated with LAMA1 mutations and GPR56 mutations; Lhermitte-Duclos disease; and focal cerebellar dysplasias. Cerebellar hyperplasias are seen in megalencephaly-related syndromes and hemimegalencephaly with ipsilateral cerebellomegaly. Cerebellar and brain stem malformations include tubulinopathies, Joubert syndrome, cobblestone malformations, pontocerebellar hypoplasias, and congenital disorders of glycosylation type Ia. Predominantly brain stem malformations include congenital innervation dysgenesis syndrome, pontine tegmental cap dysplasia, diencephalic-mesencephalic junction dysplasia, disconnection syndrome, and pontine clefts. PMID:26599961

  5. Neuroembryology and brain malformations: an overview.

    PubMed

    Sarnat, Harvey B; Flores-Sarnat, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Modern neuroembryology integrates descriptive morphogenesis with more recent insight into molecular genetic programing and data enabled by cell-specific tissue markers that further define histogenesis. Maturation of individual neurons involves the development of energy pumps to maintain membrane excitability, ion channels, and membrane receptors. Most malformations of the nervous system are best understood in the context of aberrations of normal developmental processes that result in abnormal structure and function. Early malformations usually are disorders of genetic expression along gradients of the three axes of the neural tube, defective segmentation, or mixed lineages of individual cells. Later disorders mainly involve cellular migrations, axonal pathfinding, synaptogenesis, and myelination. Advances in neuroimaging now enable the diagnosis of many malformations in utero, at birth, or in early infancy in the living patient by abnormal macroscopic form of the brain. These images are complimented by modern neuropathological methods that disclose microscopic, immunocytochemical, and subcellular details beyond the resolution of MRI. Correlations may be made of both normal and abnormal ontogenesis with clinical neurological and EEG maturation in the preterm or term neonate for a better understanding of perinatal neurological disease. Precision in terminology is a key to scientific communication. PMID:23622157

  6. Malformations of cortical development and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Leventer, Richard J; Guerrini, Renzo; Dobyns, William B

    2008-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCDs) are macroscopic or microscopic abnormalities of the cerebral cortex that arise as a consequence of an interruption to the normal steps of formation of the cortical plate. The human cortex develops its basic structure during the first two trimesters of pregnancy as a series of overlapping steps, beginning with proliferation and differentiation of neurons, which then migrate before finally organizing themselves in the developing cortex. Abnormalities at any of these stages, be they environmental or genetic in origin, may cause disruption of neuronal circuitry and predispose to a variety of clinical consequences, the most common of which is epileptic seizures. A large number of MCDs have now been described, each with characteristic pathological, clinical, and imaging features. The causes of many of these MCDs have been determined through the study of affected individuals, with many MCDs now established as being secondary to mutations in cortical development genes. This review will highlight the best-known of the human cortical malformations associated with epilepsy. The pathological, clinical, imaging, and etiologic features of each MCD will be summarized, with representative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images shown for each MCD. The malformations tuberous sclerosis, focal cortical dysplasia, hemimegalencephaly, classical lissencephaly, subcortical band heterotopia, periventricular nodular heterotopia, polymicrogyria, and schizencephaly will be presented. PMID:18472484

  7. Chiari I malformations: clinical and radiologic reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Elster, A D; Chen, M Y

    1992-05-01

    Clinical findings and magnetic resonance (MR) images in 68 patients with Chiari I malformations were retrospectively analyzed to identify those radiologic features that correlated best with clinical symptoms. A statistically significant (P = .03) female predominance of the malformation was observed, with a female: male ratio of approximately 3:2. Associated skeletal anomalies were seen in 24% of patients. Syringomyelia was detected in 40% of patients, most commonly between the C-4 and C-6 levels. Of the 25 patients who presented with spinal symptoms, 23 (92%) proved to have a syrinx at MR imaging. When the syrinx extended into the medulla (n = 3), however, brain stem symptoms predominated. Patients with objective brain stem or cerebellar signs had the largest mean tonsillar herniations. Patients with tonsillar herniations greater than 12 mm were invariably symptomatic, but approximately 30% of patients with tonsils herniating 5-10 mm below the foramen magnum were asymptomatic at MR imaging. "Incidental" Chiari I malformations are thus much more common than previously recognized, and careful clinical assessment remains the cornerstone for proper diagnosis and management. PMID:1561334

  8. Measuring Intracranial Pressure And Volume Noninvasively

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasonic technique eliminates need to drill into brain cavity. Intracranial dynamics instrument probes cranium ultrasonically to obtain data for determination of intracranial pressure (ICP) and pressure-volume index (PVI). Instrument determines sensitivity of skull to changes in pressure and by use of mechanical device to exert external calibrated pressure on skull. By monitoring volume of blood flowing into jugular vein, one determines change of volume of blood in cranial system. By measuring response of skull to increasing pressure (where pressure increased by tilting patient known amount) and by using cranial blood pressure, one determines intial pressure in cerebrospinal fluid. Once PVI determined, ICP determined.

  9. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension syndrome treated with fludrocortisone.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Marwan; El Khatib, Mohammad; Yamout, Bassem; Hujeily, Elissar; Ayoub, Sophie; Ayoub, Chakib; Skaf, Ghassan

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a rare syndrome characterized by orthostatic headache not associated with trauma or dural puncture. In most cases, it is caused by a spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid leakage as demonstrated by neuroradiological studies. The standard of care consists of conservative treatment including bed rest, hydration, and administration of caffeine or glucocorticoids. When such conservative therapy fails, an epidural blood patch is recommended. In this report, we describe the treatment of 2 patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension who failed conservative treatment and went on to have complete and sustained resolution of their symptoms after the administration of oral fludrocortisone. PMID:25612272

  10. Simulation of the human intracranial arterial tree.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, Leopold; Anor, Tomer; Cheever, Elizabeth; Madsen, Joseph R; Karniadakis, George Em

    2009-06-13

    High-resolution unsteady three-dimensional flow simulations in large intracranial arterial networks of a healthy subject and a patient with hydrocephalus have been performed. The large size of the computational domains requires the use of thousands of computer processors and solution of the flow equations with approximately one billion degrees of freedom. We have developed and implemented a two-level domain decomposition method, and a new type of outflow boundary condition to control flow rates at tens of terminal vessels of the arterial network. In this paper, we demonstrate the flow patterns in the normal and abnormal intracranial arterial networks using patient-specific data. PMID:19414460

  11. Nd:YAG laser photocoagulation of benign oral vascular lesions: a case series.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Rui; Silva, Igor Henrique; Carvalho, Alessandra Tavares; Leão, Jair Carneiro; Gueiros, Luiz Alcino

    2015-11-01

    Vascular anomalies of the head and neck are common lesions usually associated with functional and/or aesthetic limitations. The aim of the present paper was to report a case series of oral vascular malformations treated with Nd:YAG laser photocoagulation, highlighting the clinical evolution and post-surgical complications. Fifteen patients diagnosed with oral vascular malformations were treated with Nd:YAG laser followed by three sessions of biostimulation. None of the patients presented post-surgical pain, but 6 of 15 patients (40%) experienced minimal post-surgical complications. All cases presented complete resolution of the lesions after laser treatment. More importantly, 12 out of 15 (80%) resolved after a single session. Low morbidity, minimal patient discomfort, and satisfactory aesthetic results point Nd:YAG laser photocoagulation as a promising option for the management of benign oral vascular lesions. PMID:25962368

  12. Untreated clinical course of cerebral cavernous malformations: a prospective, population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Rustam Al-Shahi; Hall, Julie M; Horne, Margaret A; Moultrie, Fiona; Josephson, Colin B; Bhattacharya, Jo J; Counsell, Carl E; Murray, Gordon D; Papanastassiou, Vakis; Ritchie, Vaughn; Roberts, Richard C; Sellar, Robin J; Warlow, Charles P

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are prone to bleeding but the risk of intracranial haemorrhage and focal neurological deficits, and the factors that might predict their occurrence, are unclear. We aimed to quantify these risks and investigate whether they are affected by sex and CCM location. Methods We undertook a population-based study using multiple overlapping sources of case ascertainment (including a Scotland-wide collaboration of neurologists, neurosurgeons, stroke physicians, radiologists, and pathologists, as well as searches of registers of hospital discharges and death certificates) to identify definite CCM diagnoses first made in Scottish residents between 1999 and 2003, which study neuroradiologists independently validated. We used multiple sources of prospective follow-up both to identify outcome events (which were assessed by use of brain imaging, by investigators masked to potential predictive factors) and to assess adults' dependence. The primary outcome was a composite of intracranial haemorrhage or focal neurological deficits (not including epileptic seizure) that were definitely or possibly related to CCM. Findings 139 adults had at least one definite CCM and 134 were alive at initial presentation. During 1177 person-years of follow-up (completeness 97%), for intracranial haemorrhage alone the 5-year risk of a first haemorrhage was lower than the risk of recurrent haemorrhage (2·4%, 95% CI 0·0–5·7 vs 29·5%, 4·1–55·0; p<0·0001). For the primary outcome, the 5-year risk of a first event was lower than the risk of recurrence (9·3%, 3·1–15·4 vs 42·4%, 26·8–58·0; p<0·0001). The annual risk of recurrence of the primary outcome declined from 19·8% (95% CI 6·1–33·4) in year 1 to 5·0% (0·0–14·8) in year 5 and was higher for women than men (p=0·01) but not for adults with brainstem CCMs versus CCMs in other locations (p=0·17). Interpretation The risk of recurrent intracranial haemorrhage or

  13. A simulation model to study the role of the extracranial venous drainage pathways in intracranial hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Gadda, G; Taibi, A; Sisini, F; Gambaccini, M; Sethi, S K; Utriainen, D; Haacke, E M; Zamboni, P; Ursino, M

    2015-08-01

    Alterations in the extracranial venous circulation due to posture changes, and/or extracranial venous obstructions in patients with vascular diseases, can have important implications on cerebral hemodynamics. A hemodynamic model for the study of cerebral venous outflow was developed to investigate the correlations between extracranial blood redistributions and changes in the intracranial environment. Flow data obtained with both magnetic resonance (MR) and Echo-Color Doppler (ECD) technique are used to validate the model. The very good agreement between simulated supine and upright flows and experimental results means that the model can correctly reproduce the main factors affecting the extracranial venous circulation. PMID:26738101

  14. Vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Korczyn, Amos D; Vakhapova, Veronika; Grinberg, Lea T

    2012-01-01

    The epidemic grow of dementia causes great concern for the society. It is customary to consider Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as the most common cause of dementia, followed by vascular dementia (VaD). This dichotomous view of a neurodegenerative disease as opposed to brain damage caused by extrinsic factors led to separate lines of research in these two entities. Indeed, accumulated data suggest that the two disorders have additive effects and probably interact; however it is still unknown to what degree. Furthermore, epidemiological studies have shown “vascular” risk factors to be associated with AD. Therefore, a clear distinction between AD and VaD cannot be made in most cases, and is furthermore unhelpful. In the absence of efficacious treatment for the neurodegenerative process, special attention must be given to vascular component, even in patients with presumed mixed pathology. Symptomatic treatment of VaD and AD are similar, although the former is less effective. For prevention of dementia it is important to treat aggressively all factors, even in stroke survivors who do not show evidence of cognitive decline,. In this review, we will give a clinical and pathological picture of the processes leading to VaD and discuss it interaction with AD. PMID:22575403

  15. Simultaneous cerebral and spinal fluid pressure recordings in surgical indications of the Chiari malformation without myelodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Häckel, M; Benes, V; Mohapl, M

    2001-09-01

    Patients with Chiari's malformation without myelodysplasia often suffer from another associated spinal cord lesion--syringomyelia. A condition entirely overriding the clinical picture, affecting adversely the results of surgery as well as the prognosis of this congenital developmental defect. Proceeding from the results of their surgical treatment of 40 patients with hindbrain malformation, the authors recommend, in accordance with the literature, a different approach to and classification of patients depending on the presence of syringomyelia (A/B classification; A: syringomyelia on MR--present, B: absent). The pathological development of the syrinx is caused by obstruction to the natural CSF circulation in the subarachnoid spaces of the craniocervical junction (Williams' dissociation theory). The authors are convinced that routine (static) imaging methods (CT, MR) cannot prove the presence or behaviour of a CSF block, and that they cannot help choose reliably the optimum type of treatment. In contrast, direct measurement (and monitoring) of CSF pressure in different compartments of the CSF pathways (intracranial/intraspinal compartment, i.e., in front of and beyond the suspected block) are a method which can help ascertain with precision the presence and behaviour of a CSF circulatory block, and which also provides dynamic information on such a block during the diurnal rhythm for a period of several days. The authors present the results of a prospective study of 25 patients with hindbrain malformation and describe a technique of parallel monitoring of the two CSF compartments using an adaptation of the Williams method, as well as two different types of dissociation tests designed to prove the presence of a CSF block. CSF flow obstruction was found in 11 patients, in 14 patients it could not be proved. In 8 out of 9 patients with a fully developed syrinx (group A) the block was found as expected. It was, however, diagnosed also in 3 patients until then without any

  16. Developmental timing of CCM2 loss influences cerebral cavernous malformations in mice

    PubMed Central

    Boulday, Gwénola; Rudini, Noemi; Maddaluno, Luigi; Blécon, Anne; Arnould, Minh; Gaudric, Alain; Chapon, Françoise; Adams, Ralf H.; Dejana, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are vascular malformations of the central nervous system (CNS) that lead to cerebral hemorrhages. Familial CCM occurs as an autosomal dominant condition caused by loss-of-function mutations in one of the three CCM genes. Constitutive or tissue-specific ablation of any of the Ccm genes in mice previously established the crucial role of Ccm gene expression in endothelial cells for proper angiogenesis. However, embryonic lethality precluded the development of relevant CCM mouse models. Here, we show that endothelial-specific Ccm2 deletion at postnatal day 1 (P1) in mice results in vascular lesions mimicking human CCM lesions. Consistent with CCM1/3 involvement in the same human disease, deletion of Ccm1/3 at P1 in mice results in similar CCM lesions. The lesions are located in the cerebellum and the retina, two organs undergoing intense postnatal angiogenesis. Despite a pan-endothelial Ccm2 deletion, CCM lesions are restricted to the venous bed. Notably, the consequences of Ccm2 loss depend on the developmental timing of Ccm2 ablation. This work provides a highly penetrant and relevant CCM mouse model. PMID:21859843

  17. [Medullary venous malformation with azygos anterior cerebral artery aneurysm: a case report].

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Kobayashi, S; Sigemori, M; Watanabe, M; Kuramoto, S

    1987-03-01

    A case of medullary venous malformation with azygos anterior cerebral artery aneurysm is reported, which was associated with the leptomenigeal angiomatosis on the cortex of the right frontal lobe. A 62-year-old female was admitted to the Kurume University Hospital on June 21, 1985, because of a convulsive seizure. On admission, neurological and general examinations, except for slightly liver function disorder, was no abnormality. Plain CT scan showed the cortical atrophy and two small high-density areas in the right frontal lobe. Enhanced CT scan showed a high-density area in the genu of the corpus callosum. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), on T2 weighted image, showed a high signal intensity area in the right paraventricular deep white matter and the right frontal region. A right internal carotid angiogram in the venous phase showed numerous enlarged medullary veins in the deep frontal region, converging into a single large draining vein that empties into the basal vein of Rosenthal. An azygos anterior cerebral artery was visualized on the right and left carotid angiograms. The aneurysm was situated at the distal end of the azygos artery. Twenty eight days after admission, a right frontal cranioplastic craniotomy was performed. During operation, the surface of the right frontal lobe was covered by fine, vascular networks, which was reddish brown. A right frontal lobectomy, including venous malformation and vascular networks, was performed. The aneurysm was clipped via an interhemispheric approach. Histologically, the malformation vessels had spread into the subarachnoid space.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3600991

  18. [Factor VII deficiency revealed by intracranial hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Sfaihi Ben Mansour, L; Thabet, A; Aloulou, H; Turki, H; Chabchoub, I; Mhiri, F; Mnif, Z; Ben Ali, H; Kammoun, T; Hachicha, M

    2009-07-01

    Constitutional factor VII deficiency is a hereditary disease with recessive autosomic transmission. Its incidence is estimated to be 1/1,000,000 in the general population. We report a case of severe factor VII deficiency in infancy revealed by an intracranial hemorrhage in a 2-month-old infant. We describe the clinical, biological and therapeutic characteristics of this disease. PMID:19409767

  19. CSF imaging in benign intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    James, A. Everette; Harbert, J. C.; Hoffer, P. B.; DeLand, F. H.

    1974-01-01

    The cisternographic images in 10 patients with benign intracranial hypertension were reviewed. Nine were normal. Transfer of labelled tracer from the subarachnoid space was measured in five patients and was found to be abnormal in only two. The relation of these findings to the proposed pathophysiological alterations is discussed. Images

  20. The current approach to the diagnosis of vascular anomalies of the head and neck: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Swati; Singh, Aarti; Prakash, Anjali; Ghosh, Sujoy; Narang, Poonam; Gupta, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the years, various classifications have evolved for the diagnosis of vascular anomalies. However, it remains difficult to classify a number of such lesions. Because all hemangiomas were previously considered to involute, if a lesion with imaging and clinical characteristics of hemangioma does not involute, then there is no subclass in which to classify such a lesion, as reported in one of our cases. The recent classification proposed by the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA, 2014) has solved this problem by including non-involuting and partially involuting hemangioma in the classification. We present here five cases of vascular anomalies and discuss their diagnosis in accordance with the ISSVA (2014) classification. A non-involuting lesion should not always be diagnosed as a vascular malformation. A non-involuting lesion can be either a hemangioma or a vascular malformation depending upon its clinicopathologic and imaging characteristics. PMID:26125008

  1. Intracranial aneurysms: Diagnostics accuracy of three-dimensional, fourier transform, time-of-flight MR angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Korogi, Yukunori; Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Mabuchi, Nobuhisa; Miki, Hitoshi; Fujiwara, Satoru; Horikawa, Yoshiharu; Nakagawa, Toshio; O`Uchi, Toshihiro; Watabe, Tsuneya; Shiga, Hayao

    1994-10-01

    To assess the accuracy of three-dimensional, Fourier transform, time-of-flight magnetic resonance (MR) angiography in the identification of intracranial aneurysms. MR angiograms of 126 patients (59 male and 67 female patients, aged 12-77 years) with various intracranial vascular lesions were evaluated. Seventy-eight aneurysms, including 60 less than 5 mm in diameter, in 61 patients were depicted at conventional angiography. Eight projection images, as well as one axial collapsed MR angiogram obtained with a maximum-intensity projection algorithm, were used for evaluation. Sensitivity for the five observers ranged from 58% to 68% (mean, 63%). Higher sensitivity was achieved for anterior communicating and middle cerebral artery aneurysms, while that for internal carotid artery aneurysms was poor. Sensitivities for small and medium aneurysms ranged from 50% to 60% (mean, 56%) and from 77% to 94% (mean, 85%), respectively. MR angiography can depict intracranial aneurysms 5 mm or larger with good accuracy but is less useful for the identification of smaller aneurysms. 12 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. The Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure Syndrome in Long Duration NASA Astronauts: An Integrated Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, C. A.; Norsk, P.; Shelhamer, M. J.; Davis, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    The Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is currently NASA's number one human space flight risk. The syndrome, which is related to microgravity exposure, manifests with changes in visual acuity (hyperopic shifts, scotomas), changes in eye structure (optic disc edema, choroidal folds, cotton wool spots, globe flattening, and distended optic nerve sheaths). In some cases, elevated cerebrospinal fluid pressure has been documented postflight reflecting increased intracranial pressure (ICP). While the eye appears to be the main affected end organ of this syndrome, the ocular affects are thought to be related to the effect of cephalad fluid shift on the vascular system and the central nervous system. The leading hypotheses for the development of VIIP involve microgravity induced head-ward fluid shifts along with a loss of gravity-assisted drainage of venous blood from the brain, both leading to cephalic congestion and increased ICP. Although not all crewmembers have manifested clinical signs or symptoms of the VIIP syndrome, it is assumed that all astronauts exposed to microgravity have some degree of ICP elevation in-flight. Prolonged elevations of ICP can cause long-term reduced visual acuity and loss of peripheral visual fields, and has been reported to cause mild cognitive impairment in the analog terrestrial population of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH). These potentially irreversible health consequences underscore the importance of identifying the factors that lead to this syndrome and mitigating them.

  3. Dandy-Walker Malformation Presenting with Psychological Manifestations.

    PubMed

    Rohanachandra, Yasodha Maheshi; Dahanayake, Dulangi Maneksha Amerasinghe; Wijetunge, Swarna

    2016-01-01

    Dandy-Walker malformation, which is a congenital malformation of the cerebellum, is documented in literature to be associated with psychotic symptoms, obsessive compulsive symptoms, mood symptoms, hyperactivity, and impulsive behavior. The pathogenesis of psychiatric symptoms in Dandy-Walker malformation is thought to be due to disruption of the corticocerebellar tracts, resulting in what is known as cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. We present a case of Dandy-Walker malformation presenting with psychiatric symptoms. This case highlights the necessity to be aware of psychiatric manifestations of cerebellar disease as it has an impact on the diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27493822

  4. Dandy-Walker malformation in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zangwill, K M; Boal, D K; Ladda, R L

    1988-09-01

    We report on 2 Old Order Amish patients with Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome and the Dandy-Walker malformation; a similar case is noted in the literature. Pedigree analysis of our patients documents extensive inbreeding in successive generations. Considering the rarity of EvC syndrome and Dandy-Walker malformation as isolated malformations, the appearance of both in our 2 patients plus the patient in the literature suggests that Dandy-Walker malformation may be a manifestation in the EvC syndrome. However, in this isolate the coincidental occurrence of 2 rare recessive traits cannot be excluded. PMID:3223493

  5. Neuro-ophthalmology of type 1 Chiari malformation

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Ghasia, Fatema F.

    2016-01-01

    Chiari malformation is a congenital deformity leading to herniation of cerebellar tonsils. Headache is a typical symptom of this condition, but patients with Chiari malformation often present with double vision and vertigo. Examination of eye movements in such patients often reveals nystagmus and strabismus. Eye movement deficits in the context of typical symptomatic presentation are critical clinical markers for the diagnosis of Chiari malformation. We will review eye movement deficits that seen in patients with type 1 Chiari malformation. We will then discuss the underlying pathophysiology and therapeutic options for such deficits. PMID:26843890

  6. Malformations Among the X-Linked Intellectual Disability Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Roger E.; Schwartz, Charles E.; Rogers, R. Curtis

    2013-01-01

    Malformations are significant contributions to childhood mortality and disability. Their co-occurrence with intellectual disability may compound the health burden, requiring additional evaluation and management measures. Overall, malformations of greater or lesser severity occur in at least some cases of almost half of the 153 XLID syndromes. Genitourinary abnormalities are most common, but tend to contribute little or no health burden and occur in only a minority of cases of a given XLID syndrome. Some malformations (e.g., lissencephaly, hydranencephaly, long bone deficiency, renal agenesis/dysplasia) are not amenable to medical or surgical intervention; others (e.g., hydrocephaly, facial clefting, cardiac malformations, hypospadias) may be substantially corrected. PMID:24166814

  7. Opercular malformations: clinical and MRI features in 11 children.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Y; Adamsbaum, C; Sellier, N; Robain, O; Ponsot, G; Kalifa, G

    1995-11-01

    Opercular malformations are rare and complex brain malformations for which only very fragmented neuropathological descriptions have been reported. They are related to an abnormal development of both sylvian fissure and frontoparietal operculum. We report a retrospective clinical and MRI study of 11 patients presenting with opercular malformations. A congenital pseudobulbar syndrome was observed in six cases, various motor disorders in seven cases, mental retardation in six cases and epilepsy in four cases. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the main features of opercular malformations in children and to try to characterise this entity on the basis of its clinical features and MRI pattern. PMID:8577527

  8. Dandy-Walker Malformation Presenting with Psychological Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Dahanayake, Dulangi Maneksha Amerasinghe

    2016-01-01

    Dandy-Walker malformation, which is a congenital malformation of the cerebellum, is documented in literature to be associated with psychotic symptoms, obsessive compulsive symptoms, mood symptoms, hyperactivity, and impulsive behavior. The pathogenesis of psychiatric symptoms in Dandy-Walker malformation is thought to be due to disruption of the corticocerebellar tracts, resulting in what is known as cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. We present a case of Dandy-Walker malformation presenting with psychiatric symptoms. This case highlights the necessity to be aware of psychiatric manifestations of cerebellar disease as it has an impact on the diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27493822

  9. Malformations of the tooth root in humans.

    PubMed

    Luder, Hans U

    2015-01-01

    The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus, even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on root formation

  10. Malformations of the tooth root in humans

    PubMed Central

    Luder, Hans U.

    2015-01-01

    The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus, even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on root formation

  11. Congenital malformation and maternal occupational exposure to glycol ethers. Occupational Exposure and Congenital Malformations Working Group.

    PubMed

    Cordier, S; Bergeret, A; Goujard, J; Ha, M C; Aymé, S; Bianchi, F; Calzolari, E; De Walle, H E; Knill-Jones, R; Candela, S; Dale, I; Dananché, B; de Vigan, C; Fevotte, J; Kiel, G; Mandereau, L

    1997-07-01

    Glycol ethers are found in a wide range of domestic and industrial products, many of which are used in women's work environments. Motivated by concern about their potential reproductive toxicity, we have evaluated the risk of congenital malformations related to glycol ether exposure during pregnancy as part of a multicenter case-control study, conducted in six regions in Europe. The study comprised 984 cases of major congenital malformations and 1,134 controls matched for place and date of birth. Interviews of the mothers provided information about occupation during pregnancy, sociodemographic variables, and other potential risk factors (medical history, tobacco, alcohol, drugs). A chemist specializing in glycol ethers evaluated exposure during pregnancy, using the job description given by the mother, without knowledge of case or control status. We classified malformations into 22 subgroups. The overall odds ratio (OR) of congenital malformation associated with glycol ether exposure was 1.44 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10-1.90], after adjustment for several potential confounders. The association with exposure to glycol ethers appeared particularly strong in three subgroups: neural tube defects (OR = 1.94; 95% CI = 1.16-3.24), multiple anomalies (OR = 2.00; 95% CI = 1.24-3.23), and cleft lip (OR = 2.03; 95% CI = 1.11-3.73). In this last subgroup, risk, especially of an isolated defect, tended to increase with level of exposure. PMID:9209847

  12. Clinical Characteristics and Treatment Options of Infantile Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Li, Li; Zhang, Li-xin; Sun, Yu-juan; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To analyze the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of vascular anomalies, and determine which therapy is safe and effective. The data of vascular anomalies pediatric patients who arrived at Beijing children's Hospital from January 2001 to December 2014 were analyzed retrospectively, including the influence of gender, age, clinical manifestation, diagnosis, treatment options, and outcomes. As to infantile hemangiomas, the outcomes of different treatments and their adverse reactions were compared. As to spider angioma and cutaneous capillary malformation, the treatment effect of 595 nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) is analyzed. A total number of 6459 cases of vascular anomalies were reclassified according to the 2014 ISSVA classification system. Among them, the gender ratio is 1:1.69, head-and-neck involved is 53.3%, the onset age within the first month is 72.4%, the age of initial encounter that younger than 6 months is 60.1%. The most common anomalies were infantile hemangiomas (42.6%), congenital hemangiomas (14.1%), and capillary malformations (29.9%). In treating infantile hemangiomas, laser shows the lowest adverse reactions rate significantly. Propranolol shows a higher improvement rate than laser, glucocorticoids, glucocorticoids plus laser, and shows no significant difference with propranolol plus laser both in improvement rate and adverse reactions rate. The total improvement rate of 595 nm PDL is 89.8% in treating spider angioma and 46.7% in treating cutaneous capillary malformation. The improvement rate and excellent rate of laser in treating cutaneous capillary malformation are growing synchronously by increasing the treatment times, and shows no significant difference among different parts of lesion that located in a body. Vascular anomalies possess a female predominance, and are mostly occurred in faces. Definite diagnosis is very important before treatment. In treating infantile hemangioma, propranolol is recommended as the first

  13. [Early stage of a cloverleaf skull malformation].

    PubMed

    Fischer, G; Hori, A; Ulbrich, R; Rath, W

    1982-12-01

    Cloverleaf skull anomaly was diagnosed sonographically and in the fetogram, together with concomitant chondrodystrophy. This resulted in an indication for intentional abortion in the 29th week. Consequently, this rare form of skull monstrosity could be examined pathologico-anatomically for the first time in a very early stage of foetal development. Contrary to the widely held opinion that the reason for such hideous malformation is a hydrocephalus internus due to a deformation of the skull base, we found a practically negligible hydrocephalus, although the cloverleaf skull had already developed in a very marked manner. Hence, this case contradicts the generally adopted formal pathogenetic interpretation of cloverleaf skull monstrosity. PMID:7178767

  14. Spinal Arteriovenous Malformation Masquerating Zoster Sine Herpete

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Young; Ok, Se Jin; Oh, Chang Keun; Park, Sun Kyung; Kim, Do Wan

    2013-01-01

    Zoster sine herpete (ZSH) is difficult to diagnosis during an acute period due to the absence of the characteristic zosteriform dermatomal rash; therefore, progression to postherpetic neuralgia is more common than typical zoster. In addition, misdiagnosis of other neuropathic pain as ZSH is common in clinical situations. Here, we report a case of spinal arteriovenous malformation that mimics ZSH. This is a rare condition; therefore, high clinical suspicion for a correct diagnosis and proper examination are not easy. However, early diagnosis and definitive treatment are essential to prevent neurologic deficit and mortality. PMID:23342212

  15. Role of Embolization for Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jason A.; Lavine, Sean D.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are complex high-flow lesions that can result in devastating neurological injury when they hemorrhage. Embolization is a critical component in the management of many patients with cerebral AVMs. Embolization may be used as an independent curative therapy or more commonly in an adjuvant fashion prior to either micro- or radiosurgery. Although the treatment-related morbidity and mortality for AVMs—including that due to microsurgery, embolization, and radiosurgery—can be substantial, its natural history offers little solace. Fortunately, care by a multidisciplinary team experienced in the comprehensive management of AVMs can offer excellent results in most cases. PMID:25624978

  16. Toward postnatal reversal of ocular congenital malformations

    PubMed Central

    Sahel, José-Alain; Marazova, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Aniridia is a panocular disorder that severely affects vision in early life. Most cases are caused by dominantly inherited mutations or deletions of the PAX6 gene, which encodes a transcription factor that is essential for the development of the eye and the central nervous system. In this issue of the JCI, Gregory-Evans and colleagues demonstrate that early postnatal topical administration of an ataluren-based formulation reverses congenital malformations in the postnatal mouse eye, providing evidence that manipulation of PAX6 after birth may lead to corrective tissue remodeling. These findings offer hope that ataluren administration could be a therapeutic paradigm applicable to some major congenital eye defects. PMID:24355915

  17. Microlissencephaly: a heterogeneous malformation of cortical development.

    PubMed

    Barkovich, A J; Ferriero, D M; Barr, R M; Gressens, P; Dobyns, W B; Truwit, C L; Evrard, P

    1998-06-01

    We report the neonatal courses, early postnatal development, and neuroimaging findings of 17 patients with marked microcephaly and simplified cerebral gyral patterns, a condition that we call microlissencephaly. Retrospective analyses of the clinicoradiologic features of these patients allowed segregation of the patients into 5 distinct groups with varying outcomes. The apparent discreteness of these groups suggests multiple etiologies of this malformation, although there appears to be a strong genetic component with probable autosomal recessive inheritance. Utilizing the neonatal course and neuroradiologic features of these infants allows classification of specific subsets, which may be useful to predict outcome. PMID:9706619

  18. Chiari I malformation: classification and management.

    PubMed

    Bindal, A K; Dunsker, S B; Tew, J M

    1995-12-01

    Considerable debate exists about which surgical options are best for the management of the Chiari I malformation. We present a classification system for the Chiari I malformation that improves the prediction of outcome and guides the selection of surgical treatment. Twenty-seven adult patients with Chiari I malformations were grouped on the basis of the presence of signs and symptoms of brain stem compression, syringomyelia, or both. To objectively assess changes in clinical status postoperatively, a scale was developed to quantify the signs and symptoms, which were statistically analyzed by the paired t test. Five patients were asymptomatic and underwent no treatment. Ten patients had symptoms of brain stem compression without associated syringomyelia and underwent brain stem decompression, including anterior decompression in one patient with basilar invagination; all 10 patients had significant improvement at 4-year mean follow-up visits (P < 0.0001). In 12 patients with syringomyelia, 5 were symptomatic from syringomyelia only, 6 were symptomatic from both brain stem compression and syringomyelia, and 1 was symptomatic from brain stem compression only. The median length of symptoms before presentation was longer for patients with syringomyelia than for patients without (2 yr versus 9 mo; P < 0.025); the mean follow-up was 4 years. Surgical procedures included posterior brain stem decompression in 12 patients, plugging of the obex in 7, and placement of syringosubarachnoid shunts in 7, a syringopleural shunt in 1, and fourth ventricular stents in 2. In the 12 patients with syringomyelia, symptoms from brain stem compression dramatically improved with surgical decompression (P < 0.025), whereas symptoms from syringomyelia less dramatically improved or stabilized. The slight improvement or stabilization of syrinx symptoms represents a successful result, given the documented progressive nature of syringomyelia in this group. We conclude that surgical treatment for

  19. Intracranial stenosis, cerebrovascular diseases, and cognitive impairment in chinese.

    PubMed

    Hilal, Saima; Saini, Monica; Tan, Chuen Seng; Catindig, Joseree A; Dong, Yan Hong; Holandez, Rachelle L; Niessen, Wiro J; Vrooman, Henri A; Ting, Eric; Wong, Tien Yin; Chen, Christopher; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Ikram, Mohammad K

    2015-01-01

    Extracranial carotid artery disease has been shown to be related to cognitive deficits. However, limited data are available on intracranial stenosis (ICS) and cognitive impairment. We investigate the association between ICS and cognitive impairment in Chinese. Subjects (n=278), recruited from the Epidemiology of Dementia in Singapore Study, underwent comprehensive clinical evaluation, neuropsychological testing, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including 3-dimensional-time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Cognitive function was expressed as composite and domain-specific Z-scores. Cognitive impairment no dementia and dementia were diagnosed according to internationally accepted diagnostic criteria. Linear and logistic regression models were adjusted for age, sex, education, vascular risk factors, and other MRI markers. A total of 29 (10.4%) persons had ICS on MRA, which was significantly associated with both composite cognitive Z-scores [mean difference in Z-score, presence vs. absence of ICS: -0.37 (95% confidence interval: -0.63, -0.12)] and specific domains including executive function, language, visuomotor speed, verbal memory, and visual memory. ICS was also related to significant cognitive impairment (odds ratio: 5.10 [1.24 to 21.02]). With respect to other MRI markers, adjusted for the presence of lacunar infarcts, the associations of ICS with both composite and domain-specific Z-scores, and significant cognitive impairment became nonsignificant; however, adjustment for other MRI markers did not alter these associations. In this Chinese population, presence of ICS was associated with cognitive impairment independent of vascular risk factors. These associations may be mediated through the presence of infarcts. PMID:24731981

  20. Vascular permeability, vascular hyperpermeability and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Janice A.; Benjamin, Laura; Zeng, Huiyan; Dvorak, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    The vascular system has the critical function of supplying tissues with nutrients and clearing waste products. To accomplish these goals, the vasculature must be sufficiently permeable to allow the free, bidirectional passage of small molecules and gases and, to a lesser extent, of plasma proteins. Physiologists and many vascular biologists differ as to the definition of vascular permeability and the proper methodology for its measurement. We review these conflicting views, finding that both provide useful but complementary information. Vascular permeability by any measure is dramatically increased in acute and chronic inflammation, cancer, and wound healing. This hyperpermeability is mediated by acute or chronic exposure to vascular permeabilizing agents, particularly vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF, VEGF-A). We demonstrate that three distinctly different types of vascular permeability can be distinguished, based on the different types of microvessels involved, the composition of the extravasate, and the anatomic pathways by which molecules of different size cross-vascular endothelium. These are the basal vascular permeability (BVP) of normal tissues, the acute vascular hyperpermeability (AVH) that occurs in response to a single, brief exposure to VEGF-A or other vascular permeabilizing agents, and the chronic vascular hyperpermeability (CVH) that characterizes pathological angiogenesis. Finally, we list the numerous (at least 25) gene products that different authors have found to affect vascular permeability in variously engineered mice and classify them with respect to their participation, as far as possible, in BVP, AVH and CVH. Further work will be required to elucidate the signaling pathways by which each of these molecules, and others likely to be discovered, mediate the different types of vascular permeability. PMID:18293091

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of the Formation and Progression of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    KATAOKA, Hiroharu

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, only a little was understood about molecular mechanisms of the development of an intracranial aneurysm (IA). Recent advancements over the last decade in the field of genetics and molecular biology have provided us a wide variety of evidences supporting the notion that chronic inflammation is closely associated with the pathogenesis of IA development. In the field of genetics, large-scale Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has identified some IA susceptible loci and genes related to cell cycle and endothelial function. Researches in molecular biology using human samples and animal models have revealed the common pathway of the initiation, progression, and rupture of IAs. IA formation begins with endothelial dysfunction followed by pathological remodeling with degenerative changes of vascular walls. Medical treatments inhibiting inflammatory cascades in IA development are likely to prevent IA progression and rupture. Statins and aspirin are expected to suppress IA progression by their anti-inflammatory effects. Decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) inhibiting inflammatory transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) and Ets-1 are the other promising choice of the prevention of IA development. Further clarification of molecular mechanisms of the formation and progression of IAs will shed light to the pathogenesis of IA development and provide insight into novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for IAs. PMID:25761423

  2. A rabbit model of human familial, nonsyndromic unicoronal suture synostosis. II. Intracranial contents, intracranial volume, and intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Mooney, M P; Siegel, M I; Burrows, A M; Smith, T D; Losken, H W; Dechant, J; Cooper, G; Fellows-Mayle, W; Kapucu, M R; Kapucu, L O

    1998-06-01

    This two-part study reviews data from a recently developed colony of New Zealand white rabbits with familial, nonsyndromic unilateral coronal suture synostosis, and this second part presents neuropathological findings and age-related changes in intracranial volume (ICV) and intracranial pressure (ICP) in 106 normal rabbits and 56 craniosynostotic rabbits from this colony. Brain morphology and anteroposterior length were described in 44 rabbit fetuses and perinates (27 normal; 17 synostosed). Middle meningeal artery patterns were qualitatively assessed from 2-D PCC MRI VENC scans and endocranial tracings from 15, 126-day-old rabbits (8 normal, 7 rabbits with unicoronal synostosis). Brain metabolism was evaluated by assessing 18F-FDG uptake with high-resolution PET scanning in 7, 25-day-old rabbits (3 normal, 4 with unicoronal or bicoronal synostosis). Intracranial contents and ICV were assessed using 3-D CT scanning of the skulls of 30 rabbits (20 normal,10 with unicoronal synostosis) at 42 and 126 days of age. Serial ICP data were collected from 66 rabbits (49 normal; 17 with unicoronal synostosis) at 25 and 42 days of age. ICP was assessed in the epidural space using a Codman NeuroMonitor microsensor transducer. Results revealed that cerebral cortex morphology was similar between normal and synostosed fetuses around the time of synostosis. Significantly (P<0.05) decreased A-P cerebral hemisphere growth rates and asymmetrical cortical remodeling were noted with increasing age in synostotic rabbits. In addition, rabbits with unicoronal suture synostosis exhibited asymmetrical middle meningeal artery patterns, decreased and asymmetrical brain metabolism, a "beaten-copper" intracranial appearance, significantly (P<0.05) decreased ICV, and significantly (P<0.01) elevated ICP compared with normal control rabbits. The advantages and disadvantages of these rabbits as a model for human familial, nonsyndromic unicoronal suture synostosis are discussed, especially in light

  3. Intracranial and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Similarities, Differences, and Need for a New Class of Computational Models

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, J.D.; Taylor, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    Intracranial and abdominal aortic aneurysms result from different underlying disease processes and exhibit different rupture potentials, yet they share many histopathological and biomechanical characteristics. Moreover, as in other vascular diseases, hemodynamics and wall mechanics play important roles in the natural history and possible treatment of these two types of lesions. The goals of this review are twofold: first, to contrast the biology and mechanics of intracranial and abdominal aortic aneurysms to emphasize that separate advances in our understanding of each disease can aid in our understanding of the other disease, and second, to suggest that research on the biomechanics of aneurysms must embrace a new paradigm for analysis. That is, past biomechanical studies have provided tremendous insight but have progressed along separate lines, focusing on either the hemodynamics or the wall mechanics. We submit that that there is a pressing need to couple in a new way the separate advances in vascular biology, medical imaging, and computational biofluid and biosolid mechanics to understand better the mechanobiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of these lesions, which continue to be responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. We shall refer to this needed new class of computational tools as Fluid-Solid-Growth (FSG) Models. PMID:18647115

  4. Embryonic development and malformation of lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Wilting, Jörg; Buttler, Kerstin; Rössler, Jochen; Norgall, Susanne; Schweigerer, Lothar; Weich, Herbert A; Papoutsi, Maria

    2007-01-01

    In the human, malformations of lymphatic vessels can be observed as lymphangiectasia, lymphangioma and lymphangiomatosis, with a prevalence of 1.2-2.8 per thousand. Their aetiology is unknown and a causal therapy does not exist. We investigated the origin of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) in avian and murine embryos, and compared the molecular profile of LECs from normal and malformed lymphatics of children. In avian embryos, Prox1+ lymphangioblasts are located in the confluence of the cranial and caudal cardinal veins, where the jugular lymph sac (JLS) forms. Cell lineage studies show that the JLS is of venous origin. In contrast, the lymphatics of the dermis are derived from mesenchymal lymphangioblasts located in the dermatomes, suggesting a dual origin of LECs in avian embryos. The same may hold true for murine embryos, where Lyve1+ LEC precursors are found in the cardinal veins, and in the mesenchyme. The mesenchymal cells express the pan-leukocyte marker CD45, indicating a cell type with lymphendothelial and leukocyte characteristics. In the human, such cells might give rise to Kaposi's sarcoma. Microarray analyses of LECs from lymphangiomas of children show a large number of regulated genes, such as VEGFR3. Our studies show that lymphvasculogenesis and lymphangiogenesis occur simultaneously in the embryo, and suggest a function for VEGFR3 in lymphangiomas. PMID:18300425

  5. Twin pregnancy in the congenital malformed uterus.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Pentti K

    2016-07-01

    The frequency and outcome of twin pregnancies in women with uterine malformation were studied. The cohort comprised 13 (4.9%) women with twin pregnancy found among 263 women. They had 483 deliveries, 13 of them twins (2.7%; 95% CI 1.6-4.6%). Among 38 patients with unicornuate uterus 5 (6.8%) out of 74 deliveries were twins, 39 women with didelphic uterus 2 (3.2%) out of 62 deliveries and 147 women with septate or subseptate uterus 6 (2.3%) out of 264 deliveries were twins. The mean duration of gestation was 249 days (range 190-268 days), 5 (38%) out of 13 deliveries were premature, 25 out of 26 newborns were alive. Mean durations of gestation and mean weights of newborns did not differ when 7 cases with unicornuate or didelphic uterus were compared to 6 cases with complete or partial uterine septum. A congenital malformed uterus can bear twin pregnancy without severe complications apart from prematurity. PMID:26757792

  6. Genetic Basis of Congenital Cardiovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Belmont, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular malformations are a singularly important class of birth defects and, due to dramatic improvements in medical and surgical care, there are now large numbers of adult survivors. The etiologies are complex, but there is strong evidence that genetic factors play a crucial role. Over the last 15 years there has been enormous progress in the discovery of causative genes for syndromic heart malformations and in rare families with Mendelian forms. The rapid characterization of genomic disorders as major contributors to congenital heart defects is also notable. The genes identified encode many transcription factors, chromatin regulators, growth factors and signal transduction pathways– all unified by their required roles in normal cardiac development. Genome-wide sequencing of the coding regions promises to elucidate genetic causation in several disorders affecting cardiac development. Such comprehensive studies evaluating both common and rare variants would be essential in characterizing gene-gene interactions, as well as in understanding the gene-environment interactions that increase the susceptibility to congenital heart defects. PMID:24793338

  7. Angiogenesis in steno-occlusive vasculopathies as a common pathway for intracranial haemorrhage. A report of six cases.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, René; Rijssenbeek, Astrid L; Sprengers, Marieke E S; Bot, Joost C J; Majoie, Charles B L M; Roos, Yvo B W E M; Vandertop, William P

    2014-01-01

    Vasculopathies, including vasculitis of the central nervous system, can lead to stenosed, cicatrized vessels and the development of arterio-arteriolar collateral vessels. Bleeding due to these vascular changes, although rare, does occur. We describe six patients (all female, age range, 21-52 years; mean age, 42 years) with steno-occlusive lesions of intracranial vessels who presented with an acute intracranial haemorrhage. All had arterial steno-occlusive changes in conjunction with extensive leptomeningeal and arterio-arteriolar collaterals. Within the collaterals, focal dilatations could be identified, which were in close spatial relationship with the intracranial haemorrhage. Cause of bleeding was depicted on CT angiography in four out of six patients. One patient presented in childhood with acute stroke, one patient was diagnosed with Buerger's disease and one with sickle cell disease; the other three patients had no relevant history and the exact cause remained unclear. Outcome was favourable in all patients. Despite focal vascular weaknesses, no recurrent haemorrhage was seen during follow-up, supporting, at least in this small patient group, a conservative wait-and-see policy. PMID:24556309

  8. Varicella zoster CNS vascular complications. A report of four cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Francisco; Panyaping, Theeraphol; Tedesqui, Gustavo; Sossa, Daniel; Costa Leite, Claudia; Castillo, Mauricio

    2014-06-01

    This study explored the neurologic vascular complications of varicella zoster virus (VZV). We describe four patients presenting at our institution with neurologic involvement by VZV. MR and MRA studies of the intracranial arterial circulation in the head were read by board-certified radiologists using standard clinical procedures. On MRI, three patients had acute infarcts and in two instances irregularities and narrowings of vessels were visible. Many of these complications are recognized to be due to a vasculopathy affecting small or large vessels and resulting in cerebral infarctions and rarely hemorrhages. The pattern of cerebral infarction and vascular abnormalities is not specific and resembles those of vasculitis/vasculopathy from other causes. The central nervous system (CNS) vascular complications of VZV should be considered in the patients with simultaneous primary or prior VZV infection whose imaging studies show cerebral infarction and/or vasculitic appearing intracranial arteries. PMID:24976200

  9. Method for noninvasive intracranial pressure measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2000-01-01

    An ultrasonic-based method for continuous, noninvasive intracranial pressure (ICP) measurement and monitoring is described. The stress level in the skull bone is affected by pressure. This also changes the interfacial conditions between the dura matter and the skull bone. Standing waves may be set up in the skull bone and the layers in contact with the bone. At specific frequencies, there are resonance peaks in the response of the skull which can be readily detected by sweeping the excitation frequency on an excitation transducer in contact with a subject's head, while monitoring the standing wave characteristics from the signal received on a second, receiving transducer similarly in contact with the subject's head. At a chosen frequency, the phase difference between the excitation signal and the received signal can be determined. This difference can be related to the intracranial pressure and changes therein.

  10. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension presenting as postpartum headache.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Mariam; Salahuddin, Ayesha; Mathew, Namitha R; Nandhagopal, Ramachandiran

    2016-01-01

    Postpartum headache is described as headache and neck or shoulder pain during the first 6 weeks after delivery. Common causes of headache in the puerperium are migraine headache and tension headache; other causes include pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, post-dural puncture headache, cortical vein thrombosis, subarachnoid hemorrhage, posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome, brain tumor, cerebral ischemia, meningitis, and so forth. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a rare cause of postpartum headache. It is usually associated with papilledema, headache, and elevated intracranial pressure without any focal neurologic abnormality in an otherwise healthy person. It is more commonly seen in obese women of reproductive age group, but rare during pregnancy and postpartum. We present a case of IIH who presented to us 18 days after cesarean section with severe headache and was successfully managed. PMID:26818168

  11. Isolated Intracranial Rosai-Dorfman Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taufiq, Md.; Khair, Abul; Begum, Ferdousy; Akhter, Shabnam; Shamim Farooq, Md.; Kamal, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background. Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) is a benign histiocytic proliferative disorder of unknown etiology. This rare condition commonly causes massive cervical lymphadenopathy. Intracranial RDD without any nodal involvement is extremely rare. Case Report. A young Bangladeshi male complained of bilateral complete blindness with left sided deafness for about three years. There was no lymphadenopathy. MRI and CT scan of brain suggested an inflammatory/neoplastic (?meningioma) lesion located at left parasellar region which extended frontally to encircle both optic nerves and also to left prepontine area. Histopathologically the lesion was diagnosed as RDD. The patient was treated with steroid and significant clinical improvement observed. Conclusion. The prognosis of intracranial RDD is not poor. It can be treated with surgery with or without corticosteroids, chemotherapy, and so forth. But as the condition is extremely rare and often misdiagnosed, the clinician, radiologist, and histopathologist should have a suspicion in their mind about the possibility of RDD. PMID:26949555

  12. [Therapeutic activity of gemcitabine in intracranial tumors].

    PubMed

    Stukov, A N; Filatova, L V; Latipova, D Kh; Bespalov, V G; Belyaeva, O A; Kireeva, G S; Vasilieva, I N; Alexandrov, V A; Maidin, M A; Semenov, A L; Vershinina, S F; Markochev, A B; Abduloeva, N Kh; Chubenko, V A; Semiglazova, T Yu

    2015-01-01

    Gemcitabine is known to exert a therapeutic effect on brain tumors despite the limited permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In our experimental research single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of gemcitabine 25 mg/kg provided increase in median survival of mice with intracranially transplanted Ehrlich carcinoma by 41-89% (p < 0.001). In this experimental model i.p. administration of gemcitabine (permeability of the BBB of less than 10%), carmustine (good permeability of the BBB), cyclophosphamide (poor permeability of the BBB) and cisplatin (doesn't penetrate through the BBB) increased median survival of mice by 88% (p < 0.001), 59% (p = 0.001), 35% (p = 0.005) and 18% (p = 0.302) respectively. Considering strong correlation between antitumor activity of the drugs (carmustine, cyclophosphamide and cisplatin) and their permeability of the BBB, efficacy of gemcitabine in intracranial tumors could be due to its wide range of therapeutic doses. PMID:26087611

  13. Giant intracranial aneurysms: rapid sequential computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, R.S.; Cohen, W.A.; Kricheff, I.I.; Redington, R.W.; Berninger, W.H.

    1982-11-01

    Giant intracranial aneurysms often present as mass lesions rather than with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Routine computed tomographic (CT) scans with contrast material will generally detect them, but erroneous diagnosis of basal meningioma is possible. Rapid sequential scanning (dynamic CT) after bolus injection of 40 ml of Renografin-76 can conclusively demonstrate an intracranial aneurysm, differentiating it from other lesions by transit-time analysis of the passage of contrast medium. In five patients, the dynamics of contrast bolus transit in aneurysms were consistently different from the dynamics in pituitary tumors, craniopharyngiomas, and meningiomas, thereby allowing a specific diagnosis. Dynamic CT was also useful after treatment of the aneurysms by carotid artery ligation and may be used as an alternative to angiographic evaluation in determining luminal patency or thrombosis.

  14. Ruptured, Intracranial Dermoid Cyst - A Visual Diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Scheer, Fabian; Andresen, Reimer

    2016-01-01

    Dermoid cysts are a very rare entity of intracranial tumours. The traumatic or non-traumatic rupture of the cyst wall is a serious complication that can be treated surgically or conservatively depending on the clinical symptoms. However, more common entities have to be considered as a differential diagnosis. We report on a female patient who was admitted with complaints of significant, prolonged headache and diffuse pain. Analysis of her blood and cerebrospinal fluid indicated no clear pathology. A CT examination of the head revealed a ruptured dermoid cyst adjacent to the left sphenoidal bone. An additional MRI was conducted to confirm the CT findings and rule out an intracranial ischemia or vasospasms. A conservative therapy was scheduled and the patient recovered well. Using current imaging techniques, especially magnetic resonance imaging, it is possible to identify a ruptured dermoid cyst by its pathognomonic signal behavior and rule out potentially life threatening complications. PMID:27190918

  15. Congenital malformations in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) at Takasakiyama.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yukimaru; Kurita, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Takeshi; Kimoto, Satoshi; Egawa, Junko

    2014-04-01

    From the late 1960s to the early 1970s, many congenitally malformed infants were born into provisioned Japanese macaque troops. Although the exact cause of this problem was not determined, the occurrence of malformations decreased thereafter. We examined possible factors such as total population size, number of adult females, birth rate, and volume of provisioned food. Agrichemicals attached to provisioned food are suspected as the main cause, as other factors were found to have no influence. Many more malformations were seen in males compared with females, in feet compared with hands, and in the fourth compared with other digits. We confirmed that the frequency of congenital malformation was high during the 1960s through to the mid-1970s when increased levels of provisioned food were given and that the incidence of congenital malformations was also elevated among wild macaques during this time. PMID:24474604

  16. Aberrant Lymphatic Endothelial Progenitors in Lymphatic Malformation Development

    PubMed Central

    Wu, June K.; Kitajewski, Christopher; Reiley, Maia; Keung, Connie H.; Monteagudo, Julie; Andrews, John P.; Liou, Peter; Thirumoorthi, Arul; Wong, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Lymphatic malformations (LMs) are vascular anomalies thought to arise from dysregulated lymphangiogenesis. These lesions impose a significant burden of disease on affected individuals. LM pathobiology is poorly understood, hindering the development of effective treatments. In the present studies, immunostaining of LM tissues revealed that endothelial cells lining aberrant lymphatic vessels and cells in the surrounding stroma expressed the stem cell marker, CD133, and the lymphatic endothelial protein, podoplanin. Isolated patient-derived CD133+ LM cells expressed stem cell genes (NANOG, Oct4), circulating endothelial cell precursor proteins (CD90, CD146, c-Kit, VEGFR-2), and lymphatic endothelial proteins (podoplanin, VEGFR-3). Consistent with a progenitor cell identity, CD133+ LM cells were multipotent and could be differentiated into fat, bone, smooth muscle, and lymphatic endothelial cells in vitro. CD133+ cells were compared to CD133− cells isolated from LM fluids. CD133− LM cells had lower expression of stem cell genes, but expressed circulating endothelial precursor proteins and high levels of lymphatic endothelial proteins, VE-cadherin, CD31, podoplanin, VEGFR-3 and Prox1. CD133− LM cells were not multipotent, consistent with a differentiated lymphatic endothelial cell phenotype. In a mouse xenograft model, CD133+ LM cells differentiated into lymphatic endothelial cells that formed irregularly dilated lymphatic channels, phenocopying human LMs. In vivo, CD133+ LM cells acquired expression of differentiated lymphatic endothelial cell proteins, podoplanin, LYVE1, Prox1, and VEGFR-3, comparable to expression found in LM patient tissues. Taken together, these data identify a novel LM progenitor cell population that differentiates to form the abnormal lymphatic structures characteristic of these lesions, recapitulating the human LM phenotype. This LM progenitor cell population may contribute to the clinically refractory behavior of LMs. PMID:25719418

  17. Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Sumeet R; Gupta, Anju; Gupta, Vivek; Singhi, Pratibha D

    2016-08-01

    Neurological findings in HIV are common and include cognitive impairment, microcephaly, nonspecific white matter lesions and seizures. Cerebral vasculopathy and stroke are uncommon and may be due to primary HIV vasculopathy or opportunistic infections such as tuberculosis and cryptococcal meningitis. The authors describe a 7-y-old boy who presented with severe headache and was detected to have aneurysmal bleed due to intracranial aneurysm. PMID:27072660

  18. Filum ependymoma mimicking spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Schievink, Wouter I; Akopov, Sergey E

    2005-05-01

    A 34-year-old man with a 2-week history of orthostatic headaches and a "dry tap" at lumbar puncture was found to have a lumbar intradural mass on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. A myxopapillary ependymoma was resected and the patient's headache completely resolved. The combination of spontaneous orthostatic headaches and a "dry tap" at the time of lumbar puncture does not always indicate the presence of a spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and intracranial hypotension. PMID:15953283

  19. A novel guide catheter enabling intracranial placement.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Michael C; Sherma, Arun K; Surdell, Daniel; Shaibani, Ali; Bendok, Bernard R

    2009-11-15

    We describe use of a novel guide, catheter with a soft and pliable, 6-cm or 12-cm distal segment that enables distal, including intracranial, placement--the Neuron guide catheter (Penumbra, San Leandro, CA)--in the treatment of 11 cases with a range of neuroendovascular lesions. We were able to advance the Neuron guide catheter to the intended level in each case and suffered no complications related to catheter spasm, dissection, thrombosis or thromboembolism. PMID:19670314

  20. Intracranial Carotid Calcification on Cranial Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Deepak; Zishan, Umme Sara; Chappell, Francesca; Gregoriades, Maria-Lena; Sudlow, Cathie; Sellar, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification is associated with cerebrovascular risk factors and stroke, but few quantification methods are available. We tested the reliability of visual scoring, semiautomated Agatston score, and calcium volume measurement in patients with recent stroke. Methods— We used scans from a prospective hospital stroke registry and included patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke or transient ischemic stroke whose noncontrast cranial computed tomographic scans were available electronically. Two raters measured semiautomatic quantitative Agatston score, and calcium volume, and performed qualitative visual scoring using the original 4-point Woodcock score and a modified Woodcock score, where each image on which the internal carotid arteries appeared was scored and the slice scores summed. Results— Intra- and interobserver coefficient of variations were 8.8% and 16.5% for Agatston, 8.8% and 15.5% for calcium volume, and 5.7% and 5.4% for the modified Woodcock visual score, respectively. The modified Woodcock visual score correlated strongly with both Agatston and calcium volume quantitative measures (both R2=0.84; P<0.0001); calcium volume increased by 0.47-mm/point increase in modified Woodcock visual score. Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification increased with age by all measures (eg, visual score, Spearman ρ=0.4; P=0.005). Conclusions— Visual scores correlate highly with quantitative intracranial internal carotid artery calcification measures, with excellent observer agreements. Visual intracranial internal carotid artery scores could be a rapid and practical method for epidemiological studies. PMID:26251250

  1. Intracranial hemorrhage in cancer patients treated with anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Matthew J; Uhlmann, Erik J; Zwicker, Jeffrey I

    2016-04-01

    Both venous thromboembolism and intracranial metastases are common complications in the setting of primary brain tumors and metastatic malignancies. Anticoagulation is indicated in the presence of cancer-associated thrombosis in order to limit the risk of pulmonary embolism; however, there is reluctance to initiate anticoagulation in the setting of intracranial metastatic disease due to potential for intracranial hemorrhage. Recent evidence suggests that therapeutic anticoagulation can be safely administered in the setting of metastatic brain tumors. This review examines the current understanding of the pathophysiology of intracranial hemorrhage in malignancy, describes the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of brain tumors with therapeutic anticoagulation, and outlines management strategies relevant to the treatment of intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of anticoagulation. PMID:27067980

  2. Intracranial bacterial infections of oral origin.

    PubMed

    Moazzam, Alan A; Rajagopal, Sowmya M; Sedghizadeh, Parish P; Zada, Gabriel; Habibian, Mina

    2015-05-01

    Brain abscesses are rare but potentially deadly complications of odontogenic infections. This phenomenon has been described mainly in the form of case reports, as large-scale studies are difficult to perform. We compiled a total of 60 previously published cases of such a complication to investigate the predisposing factors, microbiology, and clinical outcomes of intracranial abscesses of odontogenic origin. A systematic review of the literature using the PubMed database was performed. Men accounted for 82.1% of cases, and the mean age was 42.1 years. Caries with periapical involvement and periodontitis were the two most common intra-oral sources, and wisdom tooth extraction was the most common preceding dental procedure. In 56.4% of cases, there were obvious signs of dental disease prior to development of intracranial infection. Commonly implicated microorganisms included Streptococcus viridans (especially the anginosus group), Actinomyces, Peptostreptococcus, Prevotella, Fusobacterium, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Eikenella corrodens. There was an 8.3% mortality rate. Intracranial abscesses can form anywhere within the brain, and appear unrelated to the side of dental involvement. This suggests that hematogenous spread is the most likely route of dissemination. PMID:25800939

  3. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for intracranial hemangioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Silva, Danilo; Grabowski, Mathew M; Juthani, Rupa; Sharma, Mayur; Angelov, Lilyana; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Chao, Samuel; Suh, John; Mohammadi, Alireza; Barnett, Gene H

    2016-09-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has become a treatment option for intracranial hemangioblastomas, especially in patients with poor clinical status and also high-risk surgical candidates. The objective of this study was to analyze clinical outcome and tumor control rates. Retrospective chart review revealed 12 patients with a total of 20 intracranial hemangioblastomas treated with GKRS from May 1998 until December 2014. Kaplan-Meier plots were used to calculate the actuarial local tumor control rates and rate of recurrence following GKRS. Univariate analysis, including log rank test and Wilcoxon test were used on the Kaplan-Meier plots to evaluate the predictors of tumor progression. Two-tailed p value of <0.05 was considered as significant. Median follow-up was 64months (2-184). Median tumor volume pre-GKRS was 946mm(3) (79-15970), while median tumor volume post-GKRS was 356mm(3) (30-5404). Complications were seen in two patients. Tumor control rates were 100% at 1year, 90% at 3years, and 85% at 5years, using the Kaplan-Meier method. There were no statistically significant univariate predictors of progression identified, although there was a trend towards successful tumor control in solid tumors (p=0.07). GKRS is an effective and safe option for treating intracranial hemangioblastoma with favorable tumor control rates. PMID:27422585

  4. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traver, William J.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is an overview of the some of the known results of spaceflight induced intracranial hypertension. Historical information from Gemini 5, Apollo, and the space shuttle programs indicated that some vision impairment was reported and a comparison between these historical missions and present missions is included. Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, Choroidal Folds, Hyperopic Shifts and Raised Intracranial Pressure has occurred in Astronauts During and After Long Duration Space Flight. Views illustrate the occurrence of Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, and Choroidal Folds. There are views of the Arachnoid Granulations and Venous return, and the question of spinal or venous compliance issues is discussed. The question of increased blood flow and its relation to increased Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is raised. Most observed on-orbit papilledema does not progress, and this might be a function of plateau homeostasis for the higher level of intracranial pressure. There are seven cases of astronauts experiencing in flight and post flight symptoms, which are summarized and follow-up is reviewed along with a comparison of the treatment options. The question is "is there other involvement besides vision," and other Clinical implications are raised,

  5. Angioplasty and Stenting for Intracranial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    IZUMI, Takashi; IMAMURA, Hirotoshi; SAKAI, Nobuyuki; MIYACHI, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Of the patients enrolled in the Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy (JR-NET), a surveillance study in Japanese, 1133 patients who underwent intracranial percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA)/stenting for intracranial stenosis during the period from 2005 to 2009 were investigated. A technical success was achieved in 98.3% of the patients, and 70.5% and 7.5% had a residual stenosis of < 30% and ≥ 50%, respectively. The incidence of ischemic complications and hemorrhagic complications was as low as 7.7% and 2.5%, respectively, but tended to increase in patients who underwent stenting. While a significant correlation with ischemic complications was observed in previously untreated patients and patients who underwent stenting followed by post-dilatation, a significant correlation with hemorrhagic complications was observed in patients who received emergency treatment and those treated between 24 hours and 14 days of the onset. Flexible intracranial stents are expected to contribute to improvement in the treatment outcome. PMID:24390191

  6. Detection of increased intracranial pressure by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hightower, Stephanie; Chin, Eric J; Heiner, Jason D

    2012-01-01

    Increases in intracranial pressure (ICP) may damage the brain by compression of its structures or restriction of its blood flow, and medical providers my encounter elevated ICP in conventional and non-conventional medical settings. Early identification of elevated ICP is critical to ensuring timely and appropriate management. However, few diagnostic methods are available for detecting increased ICP in an acutely ill patient, which can be performed quickly and noninvasively at the bedside. The optic nerve sheath is a continuation of the dura mater of the central nervous system and can be viewed by ocular ultrasound. Pressure changes within the intracranial cavity affect the diameter of the optic nerve sheath. Data acquired from multiple clinical settings suggest that millimetric increases in the optic nerve sheath diameter detected via ocular ultrasound correlate with increasing levels of ICP. In this review, we discuss the use of ocular ultrasound to evaluate for the presence of elevated ICP via assessment of optic nerve sheath diameter, and describe critical aspects of this valuable diagnostic procedure. Ultrasound is increasingly becoming a medical fixture in the modern battlefield where other diagnostic modalities can be unavailable or impractical to employ. As Special Forces and other austere medical providers become increasingly familiar with ultrasound, ocular ultrasound for the assessment of increased intracranial pressure may help optimize their ability to provide the most effective medical management for their patients. PMID:23032316

  7. Classification of vascular disorders in the skin and selected data on new evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Unger, Leonore; Haroske, Gunter; Heinig, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous vascular disorders are common. They include arteries, veins, and lymphatic vessels, or a mixture of them. In this review, we discuss classification, new developments in understanding and treatment of vascular diseases. We focus on infantile hemangiomas and drug therapy, vasculitides with new vasculitic syndromes, yellow nail syndrome and localized lymphatic malformations. Benign cutaneous vascular lesions may be a sign of severe internal diseases. In many cases multidisciplinary treatment is important. The dermatologist can often act as a pilot for these patients. PMID:22950555

  8. Associated malformations in patients with limb reduction deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Alembik, Yves; Dott, Beatrice; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2010-01-01

    Infants with limb reduction deficiencies (LRD) often have other associated congenital malformations. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated malformations in a defined population. This study included special strengths: each affected child was examined by a geneticist, all elective terminations were ascertained, and the surveillance for malformations was continued until 1 year of age. The associated malformations in infants with LRD were collected in all livebirths, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 25 years in 347,810 consecutive births in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital malformations. Of the 271 LRD infants born during this period, representing a prevalence of 7.8 per 10,000, 57.9% had associated malformations. There were 17(6.3%) patients with chromosomal abnormalities including 10 trisomies 18, and 62 (22.9%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but VA(C)TER(L) association. However numerous recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including Poland, ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting, oral-facial-digital, Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber, oculo-auriculo-vertebral defect spectrum, CHARGE, Townes-Brocks, Moebius, Du Pan, Smith-Lemli-Opitz, hypoglossia-hypodactyly, amniotic band, De Lange, Rubinstein-Taybi, Fanconi, radius aplasia- thrombocytopenia, Roberts, Holt-Oram, and fetal diethylstilbestrol. Seventy eight (28.8%) of the patients were multiply, non-syndromic, non chromosomal malformed infants (MCA). Malformations in the cardiac system, in the genital system, and in the central nervous system were the most common other malformations, 11.4%, 9.4%, and 7.7% of the associated malformations, respectively, followed by malformations in the renal system (4.8%), and in the digestive system (4.6%). Prenatal diagnosis was performed in 48.4% of dysmorphic syndromes with LRD. The overall prevalence

  9. [Intracranial volume reserve assessment based on ICP pulse wave analysis].

    PubMed

    Berdyga, J; Czernicki, Z; Jurkiewicz, J

    1994-01-01

    ICP waves were analysed in the situation of expanding intracranial mass. The aim of the study was to determine how big the intracranial added volume has to be in order to produce significant changes of harmonic disturbances index (HFC) of ICP pulse waves. The diagnostic value of HFC and other parameters was compared. The following other parameters were studied: intracranial pressure (ICP), CSF outflow resistance (R), volume pressure response (VPR) and visual evoked potentials (VEP). It was found that ICP wave analysis very clearly reflects the intracranial volume-pressure relation changes. PMID:8028705

  10. Imaging and interventions in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: A pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, Rajeev; Pant, Rochan; Indrajit, Inna K; Negi, Raj S; Sahu, Samresh; Hashim, P I; D'Souza, John

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is a syndrome of elevated intracranial pressure that can be primary or secondary. The primary form, now termed idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), was in the past a disease of exclusion and imaging played a limited role of excluding organic causes of raised intracranial pressure. However imaging markers have been described with patients with IIH at the orbit, sella and cerebral venous system. We wish to reiterate the characteristic imaging features of this poorly understood disease and also emphasise that stenting of the transverse sinus in select cases of IIH is an efficacious option. PMID:26752823

  11. Imaging and interventions in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Sivasankar, Rajeev; Pant, Rochan; Indrajit, Inna K; Negi, Raj S; Sahu, Samresh; Hashim, PI; D’Souza, John

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is a syndrome of elevated intracranial pressure that can be primary or secondary. The primary form, now termed idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), was in the past a disease of exclusion and imaging played a limited role of excluding organic causes of raised intracranial pressure. However imaging markers have been described with patients with IIH at the orbit, sella and cerebral venous system. We wish to reiterate the characteristic imaging features of this poorly understood disease and also emphasise that stenting of the transverse sinus in select cases of IIH is an efficacious option. PMID:26752823

  12. A segmentation algorithm of intracranial hemorrhage CT image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haibo; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Jianzhi

    2011-10-01

    To develop a computer aided detection (CAD) system that improves diagnostic accuracy of intracranial hemorrhage on cerebral CT. A method for CT image segmentation of brain is proposed, with which, several regions that are suspicious of hemorrhage can be segmented rapidly and effectively. Extracting intracranial area algorithm is introduced firstly to extract intracranial area. Secondly, FCM is employed twice, we named it with TFCM. FCM is first employed to identify areas of intracranial hemorrhage. Finally, FCM is employed to segment the lesions. Experimental results on real medical images demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness.

  13. Craniofacial malformation among endemic cretins in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Israel, H; Johnson, G F; Fierro-Benitez, R

    1983-01-01

    Nearly 6% of the inhabitants of two villages in Ecuador are deaf-mute and mentally retarded cretins. These communities are situated in the Andean highlands where environmental and dietary stores of iodine are extremely scarce. Endemic goiter and cretinism are widespread, and 10% of the cretins are additionally burdened with dwarfism and facial dysmorphia. Those with obvious involvement of the skeletal system were selected in order to study the extent of craniofacial malformation. Their appearance is characterized by midface hypoplasia, a broad nose with a depressed bridge, and a conspicuous circumoral prominence. Radiographic evaluation demonstrates a vertical displacement of the cranial base with an associated upward tilt of the midface. The flattened frontal bone, reduced frontal sinus pneumatization, and diminutive nasal bones collectively create a backward sloping face. The defect in the craniofacial skeleton of these Ecuadorian cretins is characteristic, and it readily sets them apart from the dysmorphism of those cretins with myxedema. PMID:6874895

  14. CT of thrombosed arteriovenous malformations in children

    SciTech Connect

    Mitnick, J.S.; Pinto, R.S.; Lin, J.P.; Rose, H.; Lieberman, A.

    1984-02-01

    Thrombosed arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in children are rare lesions that may present with headaches or a seizure disorder. Thirteen patients (4 months to 21 years of age) with this lesion were examined with computed tomography (CT). In 11 patients surgical confirmation was obtained, and the other two patients were examined with follow-up CT scans. Angiography either showed an avascular mass (7/13) or was negative (6/13). CT showed a lobulated lesion (8/13), peripheral location (11/13), and minimal surrounding edema (8/13). All of the lesions were hyperdense prior to the administration of contrast material and all enhanced either slightly or not at all following contrast material administration. It is concluded that these characteristic CT features aid in making the diagnosis of thrombosed AVM. The major differential diagnosis is small intracerebral neoplasm.

  15. Cerebral cavernous malformation proteins at a glance.

    PubMed

    Draheim, Kyle M; Fisher, Oriana S; Boggon, Titus J; Calderwood, David A

    2014-02-15

    Loss-of-function mutations in genes encoding KRIT1 (also known as CCM1), CCM2 (also known as OSM and malcavernin) or PDCD10 (also known as CCM3) cause cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). These abnormalities are characterized by dilated leaky blood vessels, especially in the neurovasculature, that result in increased risk of stroke, focal neurological defects and seizures. The three CCM proteins can exist in a trimeric complex, and each of these essential multi-domain adaptor proteins also interacts with a range of signaling, cytoskeletal and adaptor proteins, presumably accounting for their roles in a range of basic cellular processes including cell adhesion, migration, polarity and apoptosis. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we provide an overview of current models of CCM protein function focusing on how known protein-protein interactions might contribute to cellular phenotypes and highlighting gaps in our current understanding. PMID:24481819

  16. Multimodal device for assessment of skin malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekina, A.; Garancis, V.; Rubins, U.; Spigulis, J.; Valeine, L.; Berzina, A.

    2013-11-01

    A variety of multi-spectral imaging devices is commercially available and used for skin diagnostics and monitoring; however, an alternative cost-efficient device can provide an advanced spectral analysis of skin. A compact multimodal device for diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions was developed and tested. A polarized LED light source illuminates the skin surface at four different wavelengths - blue (450 nm), green (545 nm), red (660 nm) and infrared (940 nm). Spectra of reflected light from the 25 mm wide skin spot are imaged by a CMOS sensor. Four spectral images are obtained for mapping of the main skin chromophores. The specific chromophore distribution differences between different skin malformations were analyzed and information of subcutaneous structures was consecutively extracted.

  17. Diagnosis and management of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Papagiannis, J; Apostolopoulou, S; Sarris, GE; Rammos, S

    2002-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation is a rare anomaly that presents in several different ways. It can present as an isolated finding, or more often in the context of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. It can also complicate palliative surgery such as the Glenn operation for complex congenital heart disease with single ventricle physiology. Its management includes transcatheter embolization, which is the preferred mode of therapy, surgery (including resection of the affected lobe, segment, or the fistula itself), or rarely, medical therapy. Complications of the disease itself and of various modes of treatment are relatively common, and patients require close surveillance for possible recurrence, or development of new fistulas. In cases related to the Glenn operation, redirection of hepatic venous flow or heart transplantation may cure the problem. PMID:22368610

  18. Orbital masses: CT and MRI of common vascular lesions, benign tumors, and malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sarah N.; Sepahdari, Ali R.

    2012-01-01

    A wide variety of space occupying lesions may be encountered in the orbit. CT and MR imaging frequently help confirm the presence of a mass and define its extent. Characteristic imaging features may help distinguish among lesions that have overlapping clinical presentations. This review focuses on some of the common orbital masses. Common vascular lesions that are reviewed include: capillary (infantile) hemangioma, cavernous hemangioma (solitary encapsulated venous-lymphatic malformation), and lymphangioma (venous-lymphatic malformation). Benign tumors that are reviewed include: optic nerve sheath meningioma, schwannoma, and neurofibroma. Malignancies that are reviewed include: lymphoma, metastasis, rhabdomyosarcoma, and optic glioma. Key imaging features that guide radiological diagnosis are discussed and illustrated. PMID:23961022

  19. Neurogenic dysphagia resulting from Chiari malformations.

    PubMed

    Pollack, I F; Pang, D; Kocoshis, S; Putnam, P

    1992-05-01

    Between 1980 and 1989, 15 of 46 patients (11 children, 4 adults) who underwent suboccipital craniectomy and cervical laminectomy for symptomatic Chiari malformations presented with manifestations of neurogenic dysphagia. Each of these patients had normal swallowing function before the development of dysphagic symptoms. Dysphagia was progressive in all 15 and, in most cases, preceded the onset of other severe brain stem signs. The rate of symptom progression varied depending on the age of the patient. Whereas the six infants (all Chiari II) deteriorated rapidly after the onset of initial symptoms, the five older children (two Chiari I, three Chiari II) and four adults (all Chiari I) showed a more gradual deterioration. In 11 patients with severe dysphagia, barium video esophagograms, pharyngoesophageal motility studies, continuous esophageal pH monitoring, and appropriate scintigraphic studies were useful in defining the scope of the swallowing impairment and determining whether perioperative nasogastric or gastrostomy feedings, gastric fundoplication, and/or tracheostomy were needed to maintain adequate nutrition and avoid aspiration. These patients all had widespread dysfunction of the swallowing mechanism, with a combination of diffuse pharyngoesophageal dysmotility, cricopharyngeal achalasia, nasal regurgitation, tracheal aspiration, and gastroesophageal reflux. The pathophysiology of these swallowing impairments and their relation to the hindbrain malformation is discussed. Postoperative outcome with regard to swallowing function correlated with the severity of preoperative symptoms. The four patients with mild dysphagia showed rapid improvement in swallowing function after surgery. Seven patients with more severe impairment but without other signs of severe brain stem compromise, such as central apnea or complete bilateral vocal cord paralysis, also improved, albeit more slowly. In contrast, the outcome in the four patients who developed other signs of severe

  20. Diagnosis and Treatment of Venous Malformations. Consensus Document of the International Union of Phlebology (IUP): updated 2013.

    PubMed

    Lee, B B; Baumgartner, I; Berlien, P; Bianchini, G; Burrows, P; Gloviczki, P; Huang, Y; Laredo, J; Loose, D A; Markovic, J; Mattassi, R; Parsi, K; Rabe, E; Rosenblatt, M; Shortell, C; Stillo, F; Vaghi, M; Villavicencio, L; Zamboni, P

    2015-04-01

    Venous malformations (VMs) are the most common vascular developmental anomalies (birth defects) . These defects are caused by developmental arrest of the venous system during various stages of embryogenesis. VMs remain a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge due to the wide range of clinical presentations, unpredictable clinical course, erratic response to the treatment with high recurrence/ persistence rates, high morbidity following non-specific conventional treatment, and confusing terminology. The Consensus Panel reviewed the recent scientific literature up to the year 2013 to update a previous IUP Consensus (2009) on the same subject. ISSVA Classification with special merits for the differentiation between the congenital vascular malformation (CVM) and vascular tumors was reinforced with an additional review on syndrome-based classification. A "modified" Hamburg classification was adopted to emphasize the importance of extratruncular vs. truncular sub-types of VMs. This incorporated the embryological ongm, morphological differences, unique characteristics, prognosis and recurrence rates of VMs based on this embryological classification. The definition and classification of VMs were strengthened with the addition of angiographic data that determines the hemodynamic characteristics, the anatomical pattern of draining veins and hence the risk of complication following sclerotherapy. The hemolymphatic malformations, a combined condition incorporating LMs and other CVMs, were illustrated as a separate topic to differentiate from isolated VMs and to rectify the existing confusion with name-based eponyms such as Klippei-Trenaunay syndrome. Contemporary concepts on VMs were updated with new data including genetic findings linked to the etiology of CVMs and chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency. Besides, newly established information on coagulopathy including the role of D-Dimer was thoroughly reviewed to provide guidelines on investigations and

  1. The frequency and severity of intracranial hypotension post-intraoperative lumbar drainage using a Tuohy needle and the traditional needle.

    PubMed

    Hulou, M Maher; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad M; Gormley, William B; Zamani, Amir A; Dunn, Ian F; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2016-08-01

    Background Intraoperative lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage is a well-recognised technique in cranial and vascular surgery. The goal of the study was to assess the frequency and severity of intracranial hypotension post-intraoperative lumbar drainage performed using two different techniques, a 14G Tuohy needle versus an 18G traditional needle. Methods The medical records and imaging studies of 94 patients who had undergone open cranial operation were retrospectively studied: 47 patients had intraoperative lumbar drainage and 47 patients did not. A 14G Tuohy needle was employed in 27 (57.4%) patients and an 18G traditional needle was employed in 20 (42.6%) patients. Results There were signs of intracranial hypotension on MR images in nine (19.1%) patients who had intraoperative lumbar CSF drainage; none of the patients in the control group exhibited the MR signs of intracranial hypotension. A 14G needle was used in 6/9 patients and resulted in severe complications: one patient developed a delayed intracranial epidural hematoma that required emergency evacuation and a blood patch. Another patient developed somnolence that required two epidural blood patches and a third patient had protracted headaches. The 18G needle was used in the remaining 3/9 patients who were asymptomatic or presented with mild headaches. Conclusion The use of the smaller 18G traditional needle was associated with better outcomes with regards to intracranial hypotension, and the frequency of severe complications was higher with the use of the 14G Tuohy needle. PMID:26743824

  2. Congenital malformations and perinatal morbidity associated with intestinal neuronal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Berger, S; Ziebell, P; OFFsler, M; Hofmann-von Kap-herr, S

    1998-09-01

    A close relation between different forms of dysganglionosis such as intestinal neuronal dysplasia (IND) type B and aganglionosis has been established. No systematic analysis of other malformations and diseases accompanying IND has been made as yet. Congenital malformations and perinatal morbidity were analyzed in 109 patients with IND seen at the Department of Pediatric Surgery in Mainz from 1977 to 1996. IND was associated with Hirschsprung's disease in 47 cases; 22 children with IND had other abdominal malformations, including anal atresia, rectal stenosis, sigmoidal stenosis, ileal atresia, pyloric stenosis, and esophageal atresia. A cystic bowel duplication, a choledochal cyst, and a persisting urachus were also found. Extra-abdominal malformations such as Down's syndrome, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, aortic stenosis, and malformations of vertebral bodies were seen. Twin siblings of children with IND were either healthy (n=3) or died in utero (n=1). Seventeen children with IND developed severe intra-abdominal complications during the perinatal period such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), meconium ileus, or bowel perforations. NEC was frequently associated with preterm birth. Bowel perforations were seen in mature and preterm newborns with IND. Taken together, IND is found in a variety of obstructive bowel diseases. This may support the hypothesis that IND is a secondary phenomenon or that congenital atresias and stenoses of the digestive tract have a pathogenesis similar to that of intestinal innervation disturbances. IND may also be a part of complex malformation patterns since it occurs with a number of extraintestinal and non-obstructive intestinal malformations. PMID:9716673

  3. A developmental and genetic classification for midbrain-hindbrain malformations

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Kathleen J.; Dobyns, William B.

    2009-01-01

    Advances in neuroimaging, developmental biology and molecular genetics have increased the understanding of developmental disorders affecting the midbrain and hindbrain, both as isolated anomalies and as part of larger malformation syndromes. However, the understanding of these malformations and their relationships with other malformations, within the central nervous system and in the rest of the body, remains limited. A new classification system is proposed, based wherever possible, upon embryology and genetics. Proposed categories include: (i) malformations secondary to early anteroposterior and dorsoventral patterning defects, or to misspecification of mid-hindbrain germinal zones; (ii) malformations associated with later generalized developmental disorders that significantly affect the brainstem and cerebellum (and have a pathogenesis that is at least partly understood); (iii) localized brain malformations that significantly affect the brain stem and cerebellum (pathogenesis partly or largely understood, includes local proliferation, cell specification, migration and axonal guidance); and (iv) combined hypoplasia and atrophy of putative prenatal onset degenerative disorders. Pertinent embryology is discussed and the classification is justified. This classification will prove useful for both physicians who diagnose and treat patients with these disorders and for clinical scientists who wish to understand better the perturbations of developmental processes that produce them. Importantly, both the classification and its framework remain flexible enough to be easily modified when new embryologic processes are described or new malformations discovered. PMID:19933510

  4. Outcome of cochlear implantation in children with cochlear malformations.

    PubMed

    Bille, Jesper; Fink-Jensen, Vibeke; Ovesen, Therese

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study was the evaluation of outcomes of cochlear implantation (CI) in children with cochlear malformations. A retrospective case-control study was conducted in a tertiary referral centre. The patients were children with inner ear malformation judged by high-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging treated with uni- or bilateral CI and a follow-up period of at least 3 years. They were matched with a control group of children operated for other reasons. The patients were operated by one of two surgeons using similar techniques including a standard perimodiolar electrode in all cases. The intervention was therapeutic and rehabilitative. The main outcome measures were category of auditory performance (CAP) and speech intelligibility rating (SIR). Eighteen children were diagnosed with cochlear malformations (12 % of children receiving CI). No statistical differences regarding CAP and SIR scores were found between the two groups. Only one child was diagnosed with a common cavity and performed below average. Children with auditory neuropathy performed beyond average. Children with cochlear malformations performed equally to children without malformation in the long term. Standard perimodiolar electrodes can be used despite cochlear malformations. The most important factors determining the outcome is the age of the child at the time of implantation and duration of hearing loss before CI. Awareness towards an increased risk of complications in case of inner ear malformations is recommended. PMID:24407715

  5. Maternal Hypothyroidism in Early Pregnancy and Infant Structural Congenital Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Norstedt Wikner, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Background. The question is debated on whether maternal hypothyroidism or use of thyroxin in early pregnancy affects the risk for infant congenital malformations. Objectives. To expand the previously published study on maternal thyroxin use in early pregnancy and the risk for congenital malformations. Methods. Data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register were used for the years 1996–2011 and infant malformations were identified from national health registers. Women with preexisting diabetes or reporting the use of thyreostatics, anticonvulsants, or antihypertensives were excluded from analysis. Risk estimates were made as odds ratios (ORs) or risk ratios (RRs) after adjustment for year of delivery, maternal age, parity, smoking, and body mass index. Results. Among 23 259 infants whose mothers in early pregnancy used thyroxin, 730 had a major malformation; among all 1 567 736 infants, 48012 had such malformations. The adjusted OR was 1.06 (95% CI 0.98–1.14). For anal atresia the RR was 1.85 (95% CI 1.00–1.85) and for choanal atresia 3.14 (95% CI 1.26–6.47). The risk of some other malformations was also increased but statistical significance was not reached. Conclusions. Treated maternal hypothyroidism may be a weak risk factor for infant congenital malformations but an association with a few rare conditions is possible. PMID:24744955

  6. Atypical Cerebellar Slump Syndrome and External Hydrocephalus following Craniocervical Decompression for Chiari I Malformation: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    THAKAR, Sumit; DADLANI, Ravi; TAWARI, Manish; HEGDE, Alangar S

    2014-01-01

    Symptomatic cerebellar slump (CS) and external hydrocephalus (EH) are amongst the rarer complications of foramen magnum decompression (FMD) for Chiari I malformation (CM). CS typically presents with delayed onset headache related to dural traction or with neurological deficit offsetting the benefit of FMD. EH, consisting of ventriculomegaly along with subdural fluid collection(s) (SFCs), has been related to cerebrospinal fluid egress from a tiny breach in an otherwise intact arachnoid. We describe the case of a 21-year-old man with CM and syringomyelia who presented with impaired gag, spastic quadriparesis, and raised intracranial pressure 1 week following an uneventful FMD during which the arachnoid had been widely fenestrated. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an infratentorial SFC, dilated aqueduct and triventriculomegaly, features of CS, and a residual but resolving syrinx. His symptoms resolved following a high pressure ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. At a 6-month follow-up visit, he was asymptomatic and demonstrated partial resolution of the syrinx, with no recurrence of the SFC. The unusual features in the clinical course of this patient were an atypical CS syndrome presenting with concomitantly resolving syringomyelia, and the development of EH after a wide arachnoidal fenestration. This is the first case in indexed literature describing such a combination of unusual postoperative complications of a FMD. A hypothesis is presented to explain the clinico-radiological findings of the case. PMID:24257499

  7. A New Device for Vascular Embolization: Report on Case of Two Pulmonary Arteriovenous Fistulas Embolization Using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Michele; Rebonato, Alberto Greco, Laura; Stefanini, Giulio; Citone, Michele; Speranza, Annnarita; David, Vincenzo

    2006-10-15

    A pulmonary arteriovenous fistula (PAVF) is a rare vascular malformation commonly treated by embolization with coils or balloons to prevent the risk of several serious complications such as cerebral embolism and brain abscess. A 32-year-old female with two PAVFs and neurological ischemic manifestations has been successfully treated by transcatheter embolization of both fistulas using a new device (Amplatzer Vascular Plug). This self-expanding cylindrical nitinol mesh cage with high radial strength allows a chance of relocation until properly positioned. It is preferred to coils or balloons because a large caliber of feeding artery implied high risk of uncontrollable distal embolization. There appear to be no reports in the literature concerning use of this device, which could represent a useful innovative tool in embolotherapies, especially in large vascular areas.

  8. β-Adrenergic receptor expression in vascular tumors.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Karen M; Chang, Kay W; Truong, Mai T; Kwok, Shirley; West, Rob B; Heerema-McKenney, Amy E

    2012-11-01

    Propranolol has recently emerged as an effective therapy for infantile hemangiomas causing regression. The β-adrenergic receptor (AR) antagonist is thought to cause vasoconstriction by its effect on nitric oxide, block angiogenesis by its effect on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and induce apoptosis. In a prior report, we identified expression of β2-AR (B2-AR) and its phosphorylated form (B2-ARP) in a case of infantile hemangioma that responded to propranolol treatment. We now explore the expression of βARs on a variety of vascular lesions utilizing a tissue microarray containing 141 lesions, including infantile hemangiomas, angiosarcomas, hemangiomas, hemangioendotheliomas, and various vascular malformations. The array was immunostained for B2-AR, B2-ARP, and β3-AR (B3-AR), and the results scored for the intensity of endothelial cell expression as negative, weak positive, or strong positive. All phases of infantile hemangiomas had strong expression of all three receptors, with the exception of only weak expression of B2-ARP in the proliferative phase infantile hemangioma. Strong expression of all three receptors was present in many hemangiomas, hemangioendotheliomas, and vascular malformations. Absent to weak expression of all three receptors was seen in glomus tumor, hobnail hemangioendothelioma, pyogenic granuloma, and reactive vascular proliferations. This is the first study to report β-AR expression in a variety of vascular lesions. Although immunohistochemical expression of the receptors does not necessarily indicate that similar pathways of responsiveness to β-blockade are present, it does raises the possibility that β-blockade could potentially affect apoptosis and decrease responsiveness to VEGF. Additional study is warranted, as therapeutic options are limited for some patients with these lesions. PMID:22743651

  9. Neurosurgical management of congenital malformations of the brain.

    PubMed

    Hervey-Jumper, Shawn L; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Maher, Cormac O

    2011-08-01

    Congenital malformations encompass a diverse group of disorders that often present at birth, either as the result of genetic abnormalities, infection, errors of morphogenesis, or abnormalities in the intrauterine environment. Congenital disorders affecting the brain are now often diagnosed before delivery with the use of prenatal ultrasonography. Over the past several decades, there have been major advances in the understanding and management of these conditions. This review focuses on the most common cranial congenital malformations, limiting the discussion to the neurosurgically relevant aspects of arachnoid cysts, pineal cysts, Chiari malformations, and encephaloceles. PMID:21807319

  10. Two cases of familial cerebral cavernous malformation caused by mutations in the CCM1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Im-Yong; Yum, Mi-Sun; Kim, Eun-Hee; Choi, Hae-Won; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a vascular malformation characterized by abnormally enlarged capillary cavities without any intervening neural tissue. We report 2 cases of familial CCMs diagnosed with the CCM1 mutation by using a genetic assay. A 5-year-old boy presented with headache, vomiting, and seizure-like movements. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multiple CCM lesions in the cerebral hemispheres. Subsequent mutation analysis of his father and other family members revealed c.940_943 del (p.Val314 Asn315delinsThrfsX3) mutations of the CCM1 gene. A 10-month-old boy who presented with seizure-like movements was reported to have had no perinatal event. His aunt was diagnosed with cerebral angioma. Brain and spine MRI revealed multiple angiomas in the cerebral hemisphere and thoracic spinal cord. Mutation analysis of his father was normal, although that of the patient and his mother revealed c.535C>T (p.Arg179X) mutations of the CCM1 gene. Based on these studies, we suggest that when a child with a familial history of CCMs exhibits neurological symptoms, the physician should suspect familial CCMs and consider brain imaging or a genetic assay. PMID:27462358

  11. Segmental overgrowth, lipomatosis, arteriovenous malformation and epidermal nevus (SOLAMEN) syndrome is related to mosaic PTEN nullizygosity.

    PubMed

    Caux, Frédéric; Plauchu, Henri; Chibon, Frédéric; Faivre, Laurence; Fain, Olivier; Vabres, Pierre; Bonnet, Françoise; Selma, Zied Ben; Laroche, Liliane; Gérard, Marion; Longy, Michel

    2007-07-01

    We describe two patients from distinct Cowden disease families with specific germline PTEN mutations whose disease differs from the usual appearance of Cowden disease. Their phenotype associates classical manifestations of Cowden disease and congenital dysmorphisms including segmental overgrowth, arteriovenous and lymphatic vascular malformations, lipomatosis and linear epidermal nevus reminiscent of the diagnosis of Proteus syndrome. We provide evidence in one of the two patients of a secondary molecular event: a loss of the PTEN wild-type allele, restricted to the atypical lesions that may explain an overgrowth of the affected tissues and the atypical phenotype. These data provide a new demonstration of the Happle hypothesis to explain some segmental exacerbation of autosomal-dominant disorders. They also show that a bi-allelic inactivation of PTEN can lead to developmental anomalies instead of malignant transformation, thus raising the question of the limitations of the tumor suppressive function in this gene. Finally, we suggest using the term 'SOLAMEN syndrome' (Segmental Overgrowth, Lipomatosis, Arteriovenous Malformation and Epidermal Nevus) in these peculiar situations to help the difficult distinction between the phenotype of our patients and Proteus syndrome. PMID:17392703

  12. Somatic PIK3CA mutations as a driver of sporadic venous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Castel, Pau; Carmona, F. Javier; Grego-Bessa, Joaquim; Berger, Michael F.; Viale, Agnès; Anderson, Kathryn V.; Bague, Silvia; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Baselga, Eulàlia; Baselga, José

    2016-01-01

    Venous malformations (VM) are vascular malformations characterized by enlarged and distorted blood vessel channels. VM grow over time and cause substantial morbidity because of disfigurement, bleeding, and pain, representing a clinical challenge in the absence of effective treatments (Nguyen et al., 2014; Uebelhoer et al., 2012). Somatic mutations may act as drivers of these lesions, as suggested by the identification of TEK mutations in a proportion of VM (Limaye et al., 2009). We report that activating PIK3CA mutations gives rise to sporadic VM in mice, which closely resemble the histology of the human disease. Furthermore, we identified mutations in PIK3CA and related genes of the PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)/AKT pathway in about 30% of human VM that lack TEK alterations. PIK3CA mutations promote downstream signaling and proliferation in endothelial cells and impair normal vasculogenesis in embryonic development. We successfully treated VM in mouse models using pharmacological inhibitors of PI3Kα administered either systemically or topically. This study elucidates the etiology of a proportion of VM and proposes a therapeutic approach for this disease. PMID:27030594

  13. Somatic PIK3CA mutations as a driver of sporadic venous malformations.

    PubMed

    Castel, Pau; Carmona, F Javier; Grego-Bessa, Joaquim; Berger, Michael F; Viale, Agnès; Anderson, Kathryn V; Bague, Silvia; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Antonescu, Cristina R; Baselga, Eulàlia; Baselga, José

    2016-03-30

    Venous malformations (VM) are vascular malformations characterized by enlarged and distorted blood vessel channels. VM grow over time and cause substantial morbidity because of disfigurement, bleeding, and pain, representing a clinical challenge in the absence of effective treatments (Nguyenet al, 2014; Uebelhoeret al, 2012). Somatic mutations may act as drivers of these lesions, as suggested by the identification ofTEKmutations in a proportion of VM (Limayeet al, 2009). We report that activatingPIK3CAmutations gives rise to sporadic VM in mice, which closely resemble the histology of the human disease. Furthermore, we identified mutations inPIK3CAand related genes of the PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)/AKT pathway in about 30% of human VM that lackTEKalterations.PIK3CAmutations promote downstream signaling and proliferation in endothelial cells and impair normal vasculogenesis in embryonic development. We successfully treated VM in mouse models using pharmacological inhibitors of PI3Kα administered either systemically or topically. This study elucidates the etiology of a proportion of VM and proposes a therapeutic approach for this disease. PMID:27030594

  14. Recent insights into cerebral cavernous malformations: a complex jigsaw puzzle under construction

    PubMed Central

    Faurobert, Eva; Albiges-Rizo, Corinne

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations are common vascular malformations with an unpredictable risk of hemorrhage which consequences range from headache to stroke or death. Three genes CCM1, 2, 3 have been linked to the disease. The encoded CCM proteins interact with each others within a large protein complex. Since less than two years, a plethora of new data has emerged on the signaling pathways in which they are involved. They regulate diverse aspects of endothelial cell morphogenesis and blood vessel stability such as cell-cell junctions, cell shape and polarity, or cell adhesion to extracellular matrix. Although fascinating, a global picture is hard yet to depict as little is known on how these pathways coordinate to orchestrate angiogenesis. We present here what is known on the structural domain organization of the CCM proteins, their association as a ternary complex and their subcellular localization. Numerous CCM partners have been identified by two-hybrid screens, genetic analyses or proteomic studies. We focus on the best characterized ones and we review data on the signaling pathways they regulate as a step toward better understanding the etiology of the disease. PMID:20096036

  15. Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by Cerebellopontine Angle Arteriovenous Malformation Treated With Gamma Knife Radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Işik, Semra; Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Yilmaz, Baran; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Akakin, Akin; Kiliç, Türker

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a facial pain syndrome characterized as sudden onset and lightening-like sensation over somatosensorial branch(es) of fifth cranial nerve. Rarely, some underlying diseases or disorders could be diagnosed, such as multiple sclerosis, brain tumors, and vascular malformations. The authors present a 47-year-old man with trigeminal neuralgia over left V2 and V3 dermatomes. He had a previous transarterial embolization and long use of carbamazepine with partial response to treatment. Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR) was planned. A marginal dose of 15 Gy was given to 50% isodose line. His pain was relieved by GKR in 1.5 years. Treatment of posterior fossa arteriovenous malformations causing trigeminal neuralgia, with GKR has a very limited use in the literature. It, however, is obvious that success rate as pain relief, in a very challenging field of functional neurosurgery, is satisfactory. Large series, however, are in need to make a more comprehensive statement about efficacy and safety of the procedure in these pathologies. PMID:26674920

  16. [Cerebral vascular accidents in anticoagulant therapy].

    PubMed

    Woimant, F; Lecoz, P; Rajzbaum, G; Haguenau, M; Pépin, B

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-three patients hospitalized as they presented with cerebral vascular lesions during anticoagulant therapy (25 intracerebral hemorrhages, 7 subdural hematoma, and one ischemia lesion). Frequency of intra-cerebral hemorrhages along with anticoagulant therapy was about 11 p. 100, this of subdural hematoma ranged from 12 to 38 p. 100. Intra-cerebral hemorrhages failed to show any peculiar topography and volume was variable. A predisposing factor thus existed in about 50 p. 100 of cases: high blood pressure or arterial aneurysm. Previous cranial traumatism was only demonstrated in 48 p. 100 patients presenting with a subdural hematoma. Prognosis as for these intracranial hemorrhages might be compared to this of hemorrhagic lesions appearing under other etiologic conditions. Ischemia lesion was secondary to a severe thrombopenia to heparin. PMID:3813286

  17. 3D Road-Mapping in the Endovascular Treatment of Cerebral Aneurysms and Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Rossitti, S.; Pfister, M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary 3D road-mapping with syngo iPilot was used as an additional tool for assessing cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) for endovascular therapy. This method provides accurate superimposition of a live fluoroscopic image (native or vascular road-map) and its matching 2D projection of the 3D data set, delivering more anatomic information on one additional display. In the endovascular management of cases with complex anatomy, 3D road-mapping provides excellent image quality at the intervention site. This method can potentially reduce intervention time, the number of DSA runs, fluoroscopy time and the amount of contrast media used in a procedure, with reservation for these factors being mainly operator-dependent. 3D road-mapping probably does not provide any advantage in the treatment of cerebral aneurysms or AVMs with very simple configuration, and it should not be used when acquisition of an optimum 3D data set is not feasible. PMID:20465911

  18. Phlebolith in arteriovenous malformation in buccal fat pad masquerading sialolith: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Saha, Arpita; Mohapatra, Mounabati; Patra, Susama; Saha, Kaushik

    2015-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare vascular lesion in the buccal fat pad (BFP). One of the important complications associated with these lesions is phlebolith formation within it. To the best of authors' knowledge, there is no medical literature on AVM with phlebolith formation in BFP till date. The present case is a 12-year-old boy who presented with a swelling in the right side of the face, clinically diagnosed to be sialocele with sialolith. Excision of the mass was done, and histopathology revealed AVM with the formation of phlebolith. This rare entity needs to be kept in mind while evaluating a case of calcification in BFP. The first case of AVM with phlebolith formation in BFP is reported here along with brief review of literature. PMID:26097367

  19. Phlebolith in arteriovenous malformation in buccal fat pad masquerading sialolith: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Arpita; Mohapatra, Mounabati; Patra, Susama; Saha, Kaushik

    2015-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare vascular lesion in the buccal fat pad (BFP). One of the important complications associated with these lesions is phlebolith formation within it. To the best of authors’ knowledge, there is no medical literature on AVM with phlebolith formation in BFP till date. The present case is a 12-year-old boy who presented with a swelling in the right side of the face, clinically diagnosed to be sialocele with sialolith. Excision of the mass was done, and histopathology revealed AVM with the formation of phlebolith. This rare entity needs to be kept in mind while evaluating a case of calcification in BFP. The first case of AVM with phlebolith formation in BFP is reported here along with brief review of literature. PMID:26097367

  20. Platelet interaction within giant intracranial aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.; King, M.E.; Peerless, S.J.; Vezina, W.C.; Brown, G.W.; Chamberlain, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Turbulence within intracranial aneurysms may result in tearing of the aneurysmal wall, exposing the subendothelial matrix to circulating platelets. In this study, platelet interaction in giant intracranial aneurysms was evaluated by a dual-isotope technique employing In-labeled platelets and Tc-labeled red blood cells. The use of two isotopes allows the subtraction of the blood pool and the calculation of the ratio indium deposited:indium blood pool (In(D)/In(BP)). A ratio greater than zero indicates platelet deposition within aneurysm. Thirteen patients were evaluated in this way, with platelet deposition demonstrated in six. In these six patients, the ratio In(D)/In(BP) was found to be significantly elevated, with a mean value of 0.96 +/- 0.65. Three of these six patients has symptoms of recurrent transient neurological deficits; one of these three suffered a complete stroke following documentation of platelet deposition. In this case, the aneurysm was obtained at surgery and was found to contain intraluminal platelet aggregation when viewed by scanning electron microscopy. In the remaining seven patients, the ratio IN(D)/In(BP) was found not to be significantly elevated (mean -0.03 and/- 0.06), indicating the absence of active platelet deposition. Two of these patients had prior symptoms of cerebral ischemia; one of these was found to have an ulcer in the ipsilateral internal carotid artery which was probably responsible for thromboembolic events to the hemisphere. The authors conclude that platelet aggregation occurs more frequently than previously recognized in giant intracranial aneurysms, and their data substantiate the hypothesis that platelet metabolic products or thrombi originating from a large aneurysm may embolize to distal cerebral vessels.