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Sample records for intracranial vertebrobasilar artery

  1. Vertebrobasilar Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, Jessica C.; Boysen, Megan M.; Warren, Chase R.; Chakravarthy, Bharath; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2011-01-01

    The presentation of vertebrobasilar artery occlusion varies with the cause of occlusion and location of ischemia. This often results in delay in diagnosis. Areas of the brain supplied by the posterior circulation are difficult to visualize and usually require angiography or magnetic resonance imaging. Intravenous thrombolysis and local-intra arterial thrombolysis are the most common treatment approaches used. Recanalization of the occluded vessel significantly improves morbidity and mortality. Here we present a review of the literature and a case of a patient with altered mental status caused by vertebrobasilar artery occlusion. PMID:21691534

  2. Recurrent facial hemiparesis due to dolichoectatic vertebrobasilar artery: an unusual and ignored cause.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vijay Nath; Chaurasia, Rameshwar Nath; Gupta, Shailesh; Joshi, Deepika

    2013-01-01

    Dolichoectatic arteries are elongated tortuous aneurysms of intracranial arteries most commonly of vertebrobasilar tree presenting with ischaemic, haemorrhagic, thromboembolic lesions or with cranial nerve compression. The clinical presentation includes tic douloureux, neuralgia, tinnitus, vertigo, motor or sensory deficits, ataxia, dementia, Parkinsonism, hydrocephalus, headache, migraine, aneurysm, neoplasm, stroke/transient ischaemic attacks, leukoencephalopathy, central sleep apnoea and cerebellar dysfunctions. We present a case of recurrent facial nerve palsy secondary to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia, an interesting and rare condition. PMID:23505276

  3. Clinical Results of Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty and Stenting for Intracranial Vertebrobasilar Atherosclerotic Stenoses and Occlusions

    PubMed Central

    Tsuura, M.; Terada, T.; Masuo, O.; Tsumoto, T.; Yamaga, H.; Itakura, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Hyoutani, G.; Hayashi, S.

    2004-01-01

    Summary Eighteen patients with intracranial vertebrobasilar stenosis and occlusion were treated by PTA or stenting. In 11 of 18 cases, only PTA was performed and in seven of 18 cases, we used stents. The mean stenosis before and after PTA/stenting was 82.8% and 22.3%, respectively. In 11 cases of PTA only, the stenotic rate decreased from 81.8% to 29.6%, while 85.0% of the stenotic rate remarkably reduced to 6.0% in seven cases of stenting. The 30 days morbidity and 30 days mortality rate were 5.5% and 5.5%, respectively. There was only one haemorrhagic complication (cerebellar haemorrhage) in cases of stenting, and no ischemic events during or after the procedures. Restenosis (more than 50% stenosis) occurred in four of 18 cases(22.2%) during mean follow-up period of 12 months. Two patients with VA occlusion before treatment, developed restenosis and reocclusion. Complete total occlusion seems to be a high-risk lesion and strict follow-up is required. In this study, PTA/stenting for intracranial vertebrobasilar artery stenosis or occlusion is an effective treatment, but strict indications may be required because procedure-related 30 days morbidity rate was 5.5% in addition to unclear natural history. PMID:20587244

  4. Morphological Characteristics of the Vertebrobasilar Arterial System Are Associated with Vertebrobasilar Dolichoectasia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xi; Li, Yanjun; Huang, Qinghai; Liu, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Background Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia (VBD) is characterized by abnormal dilation, distortion, and extension of the vertebral artery (VA) and basilar artery (BA). This study investigated whether BA and VA morphological characteristics were factors predicting VBD. Material/Methods Individuals aged ≥18 years undergoing contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) of the head/neck were enrolled in 2012 at Changhai Hospital, Shanghai. Data concerning cardiovascular risk factors were recorded. Bilateral VA diameter and lateral displacement, BA diameter and lateral displacement, VA confluence displacement, and dominant VA (DVA) presence/absence were determined from CE-MRA. VBD was diagnosed using established criteria. DVA and no-DVA groups were compared. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify variables independently associated with VBD. Results Our study included 1153 individuals, of which 614 (53.3%) had DVA. The DVA group had higher mean age, hypertension prevalence (44.6% vs. 37.5%), and VBD prevalence (8.1% vs. 4.5%), and lower smoking prevalence (24.3% vs. 30.6%), than no-DVA patients. Univariate analysis revealed that age, female sex, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, alcohol consumption, and DVA presence were associated with VBD occurrence. Multivariate analysis showed that age and presence of a DVA were independently associated with VBD. Conclusions Age and presence of DVA are independently associated with VBD. PMID:27206494

  5. Morphological Characteristics of the Vertebrobasilar Arterial System Are Associated with Vertebrobasilar Dolichoectasia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xi; Li, Yanjun; Huang, Qinghai; Liu, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia (VBD) is characterized by abnormal dilation, distortion, and extension of the vertebral artery (VA) and basilar artery (BA). This study investigated whether BA and VA morphological characteristics were factors predicting VBD. MATERIAL AND METHODS Individuals aged ≥18 years undergoing contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) of the head/neck were enrolled in 2012 at Changhai Hospital, Shanghai. Data concerning cardiovascular risk factors were recorded. Bilateral VA diameter and lateral displacement, BA diameter and lateral displacement, VA confluence displacement, and dominant VA (DVA) presence/absence were determined from CE-MRA. VBD was diagnosed using established criteria. DVA and no-DVA groups were compared. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify variables independently associated with VBD. RESULTS Our study included 1153 individuals, of which 614 (53.3%) had DVA. The DVA group had higher mean age, hypertension prevalence (44.6% vs. 37.5%), and VBD prevalence (8.1% vs. 4.5%), and lower smoking prevalence (24.3% vs. 30.6%), than no-DVA patients. Univariate analysis revealed that age, female sex, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, alcohol consumption, and DVA presence were associated with VBD occurrence. Multivariate analysis showed that age and presence of a DVA were independently associated with VBD. CONCLUSIONS Age and presence of DVA are independently associated with VBD. PMID:27206494

  6. The vertebrobasilar arterial system in guinea pig as compared with dog and human.

    PubMed

    Majewska-Michalska, E

    1998-01-01

    The arterial system formed by branches of the vertebral and basilar arteries in guinea pig was compared to that of dog and human. The vertebrobasilar arterial system in particular species shows similarities and differences, considering its structure and arising branches. The differences are mainly due to the length of the basilar artery. In guinea pig the vertebrobasilar system distribute blood to the 2/3 of the brain. The same distribution is in dog. In human the carotid system predominates in the supply of the brain. PMID:9835170

  7. Wingspan Stent for High-Grade Symptomatic Vertebrobasilar Artery Atherosclerotic Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jian Zhao Zhenwei Gao Guodong Deng Jianping; Yu Jia; Gao Li; Yuan Yang; Qv Youzhi

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to present the treatment outcomes with Wingspan stent angioplasty of high-grade intracranial vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) stenosis in symptomatic patients. Methods: Between 2007 and 2010, the records of 30 patients with 31 intracranial high-grade VBA stenoses (all{>=}70%) who underwent elective stenting due to the failure of medical therapy were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical evaluation was performed based on the modified Rankin scale and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Results: In all cases, the stent deployment was technically successful. The mean stenosis decreased significantly from 82.28 {+-} 8.02% (range, 72-99%) to 11.18 {+-} 7.28% (range, 0-25%) after stent-assisted angioplasty (P < 0.05). Periprocedure complications occurred in 3 (10%) of 30 patients; there were 2 cases of perforator strokes and 1 case of transient flow insufficiency with stent overlap. Clinical follow-up (mean, 17.81 {+-} 11.49 months; range, 5-40 months) was available for 27 patients, and angiographic follow-up (mean, 9.95 {+-} 5.74 months, range, 5-20 months) was available for 19 patients. Only one case demonstrated recurrent symptoms with restenosis ({>=}50%). There were no recurrent ischemic events and no cases of restenosis in the other patients. Conclusions: According to our data, the Wingspan stent for symptomatic intracranial VBA stenoses is a safe and efficacious treatment alternative in cases with recurrent symptoms despite medical therapy. However, the improvement of outcome requires the reduction in the rate of procedure-related complications and long-term outcomes still have to be demonstrated.

  8. Vertebrobasilar circulatory disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... travel to the vertebrobasilar arteries and cause a stroke. Less common causes of vertebrobasilar vascular disorders include connective tissue diseases, blood vessel inflammation (vasculitis), and problems in the spinal bones of the ...

  9. Fusiform aneurysm of a persistent trigeminal artery associated with rare intracranial arterial variations and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kimball, David; Ples, Horia; Kimball, Heather; Miclaus, Gratian D; Matusz, Petru; Loukas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminal artery is one of four primitive anastomoses between the internal carotid artery and vertebrobasilar system that regresses in the sixth week of fetal development. A persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is generally an incidental finding but may also be associated with intracranial vascular pathologies such as aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, and cranial nerve compression syndromes. We present an extremely rare case of a right PTA with an associated bleeding fusiform aneurysm located in the carotidian (lateral) part of the PTA. In addition, this rare anatomic variation was associated with bilateral absence of the posterior communicating arteries, a left posterior cerebral artery originating from the left internal carotid artery, and agenesis of the A1 segment of the left anterior cerebral artery. PMID:25053265

  10. Trigeminal hypoplasia due to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia: A new entity

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhishek; Gupta, Prakhar; Haroon, Mohammad; Shah, Gaurav; Gupta, Gagan; Khalid, Mohd.

    2015-01-01

    The term “vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia” refers to anomalous dilatation of the intracranial arteries associated with elongation or tortuosity of the affected vessels. The etiology of the disease is unknown and is usually detected incidentally. The predominant clinical manifestations arise due to the mass effect of the dilated vessels and may include cranial nerve compression, extrinsic aqueductal compression, motor and sensory disturbances. Trigeminal hypoplasia is a very uncommon condition, usually described in association with Goldenhar-Gorlin syndrome and has not yet been attributed to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia. The current case report highlights this rare association of trigeminal nerve hypoplasia and vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia, leading to hemifacial and corneal anesthesia. PMID:26167222

  11. Megadolicho vascular malformation of the intracranial arteries.

    PubMed

    Lodder, J; Janevski, B; van der Lugt, P J

    1981-01-01

    A patient is presented suffering a hemiparesis. Megadolicho-vascular malformation of the intracranial part of the internal carotid arteries and some of its branches and of the basilar artery was suggested by CT and confirmed by angiography. The value of CT compared with angiography in relation to intracranial megadolicho vascular malformations is discussed. PMID:6273040

  12. Computed Tomography Angiography of Carotid Arteries and Vertebrobasilar System: A Simulation Study for Radiation Dose Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Manuel; Ellmann, Stephan; Allmendinger, Thomas; Eller, Achim; Kammerer, Ferdinand; May, Matthias S; Baigger, João F; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael M

    2015-07-01

    Computed tomography angiography (CTA) of carotid arteries and vertebrobasilar system is a standardized procedure with excellent image quality, but radiation exposure remains a matter of concern. The aim of this study is to examine to what extent radiation dose can be lowered in relation to a standard protocol by simulating examinations with lower tube currents applying a dedicated software.Lower tube current was simulated by a dedicated noise insertion and reconstruction software (ReconCT). In a phantom study, true scans were performed with different dose protocols and compared to the results of simulated dose reductions of the same degree, respectively. In a patient study, 30 CTAs of supra-aortic vessels were reconstructed at a level of 100%, 75%, 50%, and 25% of the initial dose. Objective and subjective image analyses were performed.No significant noise differences between true scans and simulated scans of mimicked contrasted vessels were found. In the patient study, the quality scores of the 4 dose groups differed statistically significant; this difference vanished for the comparison of the 100% and 75% datasets after dichotomization into the categories of diagnostic and nondiagnostic image quality (P = .50).This study suggests an easy-to-implement method of simulating CTAs of carotid arteries and vertebrobasilar system with lower tube current for dose reduction by artificially adding noise to the original raw data. Lowering the radiation dose in a moderate extent to 75% of the original dose levels does not significantly alter the diagnostic image quality. PMID:26131822

  13. Medico-legal aspects of traumatic injury of the vertebrobasilar artery.

    PubMed

    Hiraiwa, Kouichi; Sato, Taku; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Mizusawa, Ikubumi; Nata, Masayuki; Kodama, Namio

    2005-11-01

    Based on our experiences with medico-legal autopsies, we analyzed traumatic injury of the vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) in traffic accident victims. VBA rupture occurred in six cases with traumatic medullary lesions, but in none with cervical cord injury. A relatively small external force applied to the head or neck can induce isolated traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), which accounts for approximately 11% of fatal head injuries. We examined the relationship between site of impact and site of vascular injury in 16 cases of isolated traumatic SAH. The results showed that the vertebral artery (VA) on the side of impact tended to be longitudinally injured in victims experiencing an external force equivalent to that of a fist punch to the head or face. There was no clear relationship between the site of impact and the site of vascular injury in victims who had sustained an external force greater than that of a fist punch. However, our results suggest that an external force causing rotation of the head was likely to cause tearing of the artery. In cases in which an external force equivalent to that of a fist punch was applied to the head, a raised blood alcohol level was a significant risk factor for artery rupture. Furthermore, a difference in the diameters of the left and right VAs was a risk factor for artery rupture. To determine why the VA, the most frequent site of arterial dissection, is also frequently the site of injury, we histologically examined normal and dissected VBAs. We also discuss medico-legal issues of the causal relationship between external force applied and rupture or dissection of the VA. PMID:16308512

  14. Simulation of the human intracranial arterial tree.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, Leopold; Anor, Tomer; Cheever, Elizabeth; Madsen, Joseph R; Karniadakis, George Em

    2009-06-13

    High-resolution unsteady three-dimensional flow simulations in large intracranial arterial networks of a healthy subject and a patient with hydrocephalus have been performed. The large size of the computational domains requires the use of thousands of computer processors and solution of the flow equations with approximately one billion degrees of freedom. We have developed and implemented a two-level domain decomposition method, and a new type of outflow boundary condition to control flow rates at tens of terminal vessels of the arterial network. In this paper, we demonstrate the flow patterns in the normal and abnormal intracranial arterial networks using patient-specific data. PMID:19414460

  15. Intracranial Artery Calcification and Its Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao Hong; Wang, Li Juan; Wong, Ka Sing

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial arterial calcification (IAC) is an easily identifiable entity on plain head computed tomography scans. Recent studies have found high prevalence rates for IAC worldwide, and this may be associated with ischemic stroke and cognitive decline. Aging, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, and chronic kidney disease have been found to be associated with IAC. The severity of IAC can be assessed using different visual grading scales or various quantitative methods (by measuring volume or intensity). An objective method for assessing IAC using consistent criteria is urgently required to facilitate comparisons between multiple studies involving diverse populations. There is accumulating evidence from clinical studies that IAC could be utilized as an indicator of intracranial atherosclerosis. However, the pathophysiology underlying the potential correlation between IAC and ischemic stroke—through direct arterial stenosis or plaque stability—remains to be determined. More well-designed clinical studies are needed to explore the predictive values of IAC in vascular events and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:27165425

  16. Evaluation of the Effects of Sildenafil Citrate (Viagra) on Vertebral Artery Blood Flow in Patients with Vertebro-Basilar Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Berilgen, Sait; Ozdemir, Huseyin; Tekatas, Aslan; Ogur, Erkin

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) on the vertebral artery blood flow of patients with vertebro-basilar insufficiency (VBI) using color duplex sonography (CDS). Materials and Methods The study included 21 patients with VBI (aged 31-76; mean 61.0 ± 10.5 yrs). We administered a 50 mg oral dose of sildenafil citrate to all patients. Next, we measured the peak systolic velocity (Vmax), end diastolic velocity (Vmin), resistive index (RI), pulsatility index (PI), diameter, area, and flow volume (FV) of vertebral arteries using CDS before the administration of sildenafil citrate; 45 minutes after, and 75 minutes after administration. Statistical testing was performed using SPSS for windows version 11.0. The statistical test used to determine the outcome of the analysis was the repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Results Compared to the baseline values, the vertebral artery diameter, area, and FV increased significantly following the administration of sildenafil citrate. The diameter, area and FV increased from 3.39 mm at 45 minutes to 3.64 mm at 75 minutes, 9.43 cm2 to 10.80 cm2 at 45 minutes and 10.81 cm2 at 75 minutes, as well as from 0.07 L/min at baseline to 0.09 L/min at 45 minutes and unchanged at 75 minutes, respectively. Conclusion Sildenafil citrate elicited a significant effect on vertebral artery diameter, area and FVs. PMID:19039262

  17. The Effectiveness of Additional Treatment Modalities after the Failure of Recanalization by Thrombectomy Alone in Acute Vertebrobasilar Arterial Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong Mook; Sohn, Sung-Il; Hong, Jeong-Ho; Chang, Hyuk-Won; Lee, Chang-Young

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acute vertebrobasilar artery occlusion (AVBAO) is a devastating disease with a high mortality rate. One of the most important factors affecting favorable clinical outcome is early recanalization. Mechanical thrombectomy is an emerging treatment strategy for achieving a high recanalization rates. However, thrombectomy alone can be insufficient to complete recanalization, especially for acute stroke involving large artery atheromatous disease. The purpose of this study is to investigate the safety and efficacy of mechanical thrombectomy in AVBAO. Methods Fourteen consecutive patients with AVBAO were treated with mechanical thrombectomy. Additional multimodal treatments were intra-arterial (IA) thrombolysis, balloon angioplasty, or permanent stent placement. Recanalization by thrombectomy alone and multimodal treatments were assessed by the Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) score. Clinical outcome was determined using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at 7 days and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 3 months. Results Thrombectomy alone and multimodal treatments were performed in 10 patients (71.4%) and 4 patients (28.6%), respectively. Successful recanalization (TICI 2b-3) was achieved in 11 (78.6%). Among these 11 patients, 3 (27.3%) underwent multimodal treatment due to underlying atherosclerotic stenosis. Ten (71.4%) of the 14 showed NIHSS score improvement of >10. Overall mortality was 3 (21.4%) of 14. Conclusion We suggest that mechanical thrombectomy is safe and effective for improving recanalization rates in AVBAO, with low complication rates. Also, in carefully selected patients after the failure of recanalization by thrombectomy alone, additional multimodal treatment such as IA thrombolysis, balloons, or stents can be needed to achieve successful recanalization. PMID:26713141

  18. Assessing intracranial vascular compliance using dynamic arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lirong; Liu, Collin Y; Smith, Robert X; Jog, Mayank; Langham, Michael; Krasileva, Kate; Chen, Yufen; Ringman, John M; Wang, Danny J J

    2016-01-01

    Vascular compliance (VC) is an important marker for a number of cardiovascular diseases and dementia, which is typically assessed in the central and peripheral arteries indirectly by quantifying pulse wave velocity (PWV), and/or pulse pressure waveform. To date, very few methods are available for the quantification of intracranial VC. In the present study, a novel MRI technique for in-vivo assessment of intracranial VC was introduced, where dynamic arterial spin labeling (ASL) scans were synchronized with the systolic and diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle. VC is defined as the ratio of change in arterial cerebral blood volume (ΔCBV) and change in arterial pressure (ΔBP). Intracranial VC was assessed in different vascular components using the proposed dynamic ASL method. Our results show that VC mainly occurs in large arteries, and gradually decreases in small arteries and arterioles. The comparison of intracranial VC between young and elderly subjects shows that aging is accompanied by a reduction of intracranial VC, in good agreement with the literature. Furthermore, a positive association between intracranial VC and cerebral perfusion measured using pseudo-continuous ASL with 3D GRASE MRI was observed independent of aging effects, suggesting loss of VC is associated with a decline in perfusion. Finally, a significant positive correlation between intracranial and central (aortic arch) VC was observed using an ungated phase-contrast 1D projection PWV technique. The proposed dynamic ASL method offers a promising approach for assessing intracranial VC in a range of cardiovascular diseases and dementia. PMID:26364865

  19. Vessel Wall Imaging of the Intracranial and Cervical Carotid Arteries.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Jun; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, Deok Hee

    2015-09-01

    Vessel wall imaging can depict the morphologies of atherosclerotic plaques, arterial walls, and surrounding structures in the intracranial and cervical carotid arteries beyond the simple luminal changes that can be observed with traditional luminal evaluation. Differentiating vulnerable from stable plaques and characterizing atherosclerotic plaques are vital parts of the early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of stroke and the neurological adverse effects of atherosclerosis. Various techniques for vessel wall imaging have been developed and introduced to differentiate and analyze atherosclerotic plaques in the cervical carotid artery. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) is the most important and popular vessel wall imaging technique for directly evaluating the vascular wall and intracranial artery disease. Intracranial artery atherosclerosis, dissection, moyamoya disease, vasculitis, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome can also be diagnosed and differentiated by using HR-MRI. Here, we review the radiologic features of intracranial artery disease and cervical carotid artery atherosclerosis on HR-MRI and various other vessel wall imaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography). PMID:26437991

  20. Vessel Wall Imaging of the Intracranial and Cervical Carotid Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Jun; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, Deok Hee

    2015-01-01

    Vessel wall imaging can depict the morphologies of atherosclerotic plaques, arterial walls, and surrounding structures in the intracranial and cervical carotid arteries beyond the simple luminal changes that can be observed with traditional luminal evaluation. Differentiating vulnerable from stable plaques and characterizing atherosclerotic plaques are vital parts of the early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of stroke and the neurological adverse effects of atherosclerosis. Various techniques for vessel wall imaging have been developed and introduced to differentiate and analyze atherosclerotic plaques in the cervical carotid artery. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) is the most important and popular vessel wall imaging technique for directly evaluating the vascular wall and intracranial artery disease. Intracranial artery atherosclerosis, dissection, moyamoya disease, vasculitis, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome can also be diagnosed and differentiated by using HR-MRI. Here, we review the radiologic features of intracranial artery disease and cervical carotid artery atherosclerosis on HR-MRI and various other vessel wall imaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography). PMID:26437991

  1. High Agatston Calcium Score of Intracranial Carotid Artery

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Liou, Michelle; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Liu, Hua-Shan; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chou, Ming-Chung; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Hsian-He; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The effect of intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) calcification on cognitive impairment is uncertain. Our objective was to investigate whether intracranial ICA calcification is a significant cognitive predictor for cognitive impairment. Global cognition and degrees of intracranial ICA calcification of 579 subjects were assessed with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Agatston calcium scoring method, respectively. Other risk factors for cognitive impairment, including age, education level, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, hyperlipidemia, and body mass index, were documented and analyzed for their associations with cognitive function. In univariate analyses, older age, lower education level, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and higher intracranial ICA Agatston scores were significantly associated with cognitive impairment. In ordinal logistic regression, only age and total intracranial ICA Agatston score were significant risk factors for cognitive impairment. After adjustment for the other documented risk factors, subjects were 7% (95% CI: 5–10; P < 0.001) and 6% (95% CI: 0–13; P = 0.04) more likely to have lower cognitive category with every year increment of age and every 100-point increment of the total intracranial ICA Agatston score respectively. These results suggest an important role of the intracranial ICA calcification on cognitive impairment. PMID:26426620

  2. Multimodality Imaging of Vertebrobasilar Dolichoectasia: Clinical Presentations and Imaging Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Samim, Mohammad; Goldstein, Alan; Schindler, Joseph; Johnson, Michele H

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia (VBD) is characterized by ectasia, elongation, and tortuosity of the vertebrobasilar arteries, with a high degree of variability in clinical presentation. The disease origin is believed to involve degeneration of the internal elastic lamina, thinning of the media secondary to reticular fiber deficiency, and smooth muscle atrophy. The prevalence of VBD is variable, ranging from 0.05% to 18%. Most patients with VBD are asymptomatic and their VBD is detected incidentally; however, it is important to recognize that the presence of symptoms, which can lead to clinically significant morbidity and sometimes mortality, may influence clinical management. The most important clinical presentations of VBD are vascular events, such as ischemic stroke and catastrophic intracranial hemorrhage, or progressive compressive symptoms related to compression of adjacent structures, including the cranial nerves, brainstem, or third ventricle, causing hydrocephalus. The imaging diagnostic criteria for computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging include three quantitative measures of basilar artery morphology: laterality score, height of bifurcation, and basilar artery diameter. The authors review the relevant anatomy and disease origin of VBD; pertinent imaging findings, including intraluminal thrombus and relation to the cranial nerves; and imaging pitfalls, such as the hyperintense vessel sign on MR images and artifacts related to slow flow in the dolichoectatic vessel. In addition, clinical manifestations, the role of radiology in diagnosis and management of this condition, and available management options are reviewed. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27315445

  3. Urgent Intracranial Carotid Artery Decompression after Penetrating Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong Joon

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of intracranial carotid artery occlusion due to penetrating craniofacial injury by high velocity foreign body that was relieved by decompressive surgery. A 46-year-old man presented with a penetrating wound to his face. A piece of an electric angular grinder disc became lodged in the anterior skull base. Computed tomography revealed that the disc had penetrated the unilateral paraclinoid and suprasellar areas without flow of the intracranial carotid artery on the lesion side. The cavernous sinus was also compromised. Removal of the anterior clinoid process reopened the carotid blood flow, and the injection of glue into the cavernous sinus restored complete hemostasis during extraction of the fragment from the face. Digital subtraction angiography revealed complete recanalization of the carotid artery without any evidence of dissection. Accurate diagnosis regarding the extent of the compromised structures and urgent decompressive surgery with adequate hemostasis minimized the severity of penetrating damage in our patient. PMID:23634269

  4. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes. PMID:26929222

  5. Nonprogressive Unilateral Intracranial Arteriopathy in Children with Arterial Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yeon, Je Young

    2015-01-01

    The nonprogressive unilateral intracranial arteriopathy known as transient (focal) cerebral arteriopathy is not a well-recognized arteriopathy among practitioners of Korea and Japan, although it cannot be easily differentiated from early moyamoya disease. This review summarizes the nomenclature, pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation, clinico-radiological features, and management of nonprogressive (reversible or stable) unilateral arteriopathy based on the relevant literature and our own experiences. Nonprogressive unilateral arteriopathy should be strongly suspected in children presenting with basal ganglia infarction and arterial beading. The early identification of patients likely to have nonprogressive or progressive arteriopathy would ensure proper management and guide further research for secondary stroke prevention. PMID:26180606

  6. Emergency endovascular revascularization of tandem occlusions: Internal carotid artery dissection and intracranial large artery embolism.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Leker, Ronen R; Eichel, Roni; Gomori, Moshe; Itshayek, Eyal

    2016-06-01

    Internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) with concomitant occlusive intracranial large artery emboli is an infrequent cause of acute stroke, with poor response to intravenous thrombolysis. Reports on the management of this entity are limited. We present our recent experience in the endovascular management of occlusive ICAD and major intracranial occlusion. Consecutive anterior circulation acute stroke patients meeting Medical Center criteria for endovascular management of ICAD from June 2011 to June 2015 were included. Clinical, imaging, and procedure data were collected retrospectively under Institutional Review Board approval. The endovascular procedure for carotid artery revascularization and intracranial stent thrombectomy is described. Six patients met inclusion criteria (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score 12-24, time from symptom onset 2-8hours). Revascularization of the extracranial carotid dissection and stent thrombectomy were achieved in 5/6 patients, resulting in complete recanalization (Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction flow grade 3 in a mean 2.7hours), and modified Rankin Scale score 0-2 at 90 day follow-up. In one patient, attempts to microcatheterize the true arterial lumen failed and thrombectomy was therefore not feasible. No arterial dissection, arterial rupture or accidental stent detachment occurred, and there was no intracerebral hemorrhage or hemorrhagic transformation. Our preliminary data on this selected subgroup of patients suggest the presented approach is safe, feasible in a significant proportion of patients, and efficacious in achieving arterial recanalization and improving patient outcome. Crossing the dissected segment remains the most important limiting factor in achieving successful ICA recanalization. Further evaluation in larger series is warranted. PMID:26924182

  7. Characteristics of time-varying intracranial pressure on blood flow through cerebral artery: A fluid-structure interaction approach.

    PubMed

    Syed, Hasson; Unnikrishnan, Vinu U; Olcmen, Semih

    2016-02-01

    Elevated intracranial pressure is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in severe head injuries. Wall shear stresses in the artery can be affected by increased intracranial pressures and may lead to the formation of cerebral aneurysms. Earlier research on cerebral arteries and aneurysms involves using constant mean intracranial pressure values. Recent advancements in intracranial pressure monitoring techniques have led to measurement of the intracranial pressure waveform. By incorporating a time-varying intracranial pressure waveform in place of constant intracranial pressures in the analysis of cerebral arteries helps in understanding their effects on arterial deformation and wall shear stress. To date, such a robust computational study on the effect of increasing intracranial pressures on the cerebral arterial wall has not been attempted to the best of our knowledge. In this work, fully coupled fluid-structure interaction simulations are carried out to investigate the effect of the variation in intracranial pressure waveforms on the cerebral arterial wall. Three different time-varying intracranial pressure waveforms and three constant intracranial pressure profiles acting on the cerebral arterial wall are analyzed and compared with specified inlet velocity and outlet pressure conditions. It has been found that the arterial wall experiences deformation depending on the time-varying intracranial pressure waveforms, while the wall shear stress changes at peak systole for all the intracranial pressure profiles. PMID:26701867

  8. Multiple vertebro-basilar infarctions from fibromuscular dysplasia related dissecting aneurysm of the vertebral artery in a child.

    PubMed

    Vles, J S; Hendriks, J J; Lodder, J; Janevski, B

    1990-05-01

    A 9-year-old boy with paroxysmal headache suffered persistent, focal neurologic deficit in the vertebral-basilar artery territory. Angiography showed dissecting aneurysm and "a string of beads" lesion in the third segment of the left vertebral artery compatible with fibromuscular dysplasia. PMID:2359482

  9. Thinking outside the box: Use of the pressure wire to assess intracranial large artery stenoses.

    PubMed

    Sanon, Vani P; Prasad, Anand

    2016-08-01

    A novel study investigating the utility of the 0.014″ diameter pressure wire to assess the hemodynamic significance of intermediate intracranial stenosis. Technical aspects of pressure wire positioning across intracranial arteries are described. Further research is required to clarify the assessment of pressure gradients in the cerebral circulation and to define the optimal threshold for intervention. PMID:27530191

  10. High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Vessel Wall Imaging for Intracranial Arterial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xian-Jin; Wang, Wu; Liu, Zun-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the feasibility and clinical value of high-resolution magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging (HRMR VWI) for intracranial arterial stenosis. Date Sources: We retrieved information from PubMed database up to December 2015, using various search terms including vessel wall imaging (VWI), high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, intracranial arterial stenosis, black blood, and intracranial atherosclerosis. Study Selection: We reviewed peer-reviewed articles printed in English on imaging technique of VWI and characteristic findings of various intracranial vasculopathies on VWI. We organized this data to explain the value of VWI in clinical application. Results: VWI with black blood technique could provide high-quality images with submillimeter voxel size, and display both the vessel wall and lumen of intracranial artery simultaneously. Various intracranial vasculopathies (atherosclerotic or nonatherosclerotic) had differentiating features including pattern of wall thickening, enhancement, and vessel remodeling on VWI. This technique could be used for determining causes of stenosis, identification of stroke mechanism, risk-stratifying patients, and directing therapeutic management in clinical practice. In addition, a new morphological classification based on VWI could be established for predicting the efficacy of endovascular therapy. Conclusions: This review highlights the value of HRMR VWI for discrimination of different intracranial vasculopathies and directing therapeutic management. PMID:27231176

  11. Severe symptomatic intracranial internal carotid artery stenosis treated with intracranial stenting: a single center study with 58 patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi-Liang; Gao, Bu-Lang; Li, Tian-Xiao; Cai, Dong-Yang; Zhu, Liang-Fu; Xue, Jiang-Yu; Bai, Wei-Xing; Li, Zhao-Shuo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to investigate the safety and effectiveness of intracranial stenting in a population with severe (≥70%) symptomatic intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) atherosclerotic stenosis. METHODS Fifty-eight patients with severe intracranial ICA atherosclerotic stenosis were prospectively enrolled. The baseline data, cerebral angiography, success rate, perioperative complications, clinical and imaging follow-up were prospectively analyzed. RESULTS All patients had successful intracranial stenting (100%), and the mean degree of stenosis was improved from 84.3%±7.5% to 23.5%±5.1% after the stent procedure. During the 30-day perioperative period, only one patient (1.7%) had ischemic stroke. Seven patients (12.1%) had headache and dysphoria. Thirty-six patients (62.1%) had clinical follow-up for 6–68 months after stenting. Five female patients (13.9%) had ipsilateral stroke including one death, but no disabling stroke, while three other patients (8.3%) had ipsilateral temporary ischemic attack (TIA). The recurrent stroke rate was higher in patients presenting with stroke (4/17, 23.5%) than in patients presenting with TIA (1/19, 5.3%), with no statistical significance (P = 0.33). Thirteen patients (22.4%) had imaging follow-up of 5–12 months following stenting, five of whom (38.5%) had in-stent restenosis. CONCLUSION Intracranial stenting for patients with intracranial ICA atherosclerotic stenosis has a low perioperative stroke rate and decent outcome on long-term follow-up, despite a relatively high in-stent restenosis rate. PMID:26809831

  12. Intracranial-to-intracranial bypass for posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms: options, technical challenges, and results in 35 patients.

    PubMed

    Abla, Adib A; McDougall, Cameron M; Breshears, Jonathan D; Lawton, Michael T

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Intracranial-to-intracranial (IC-IC) bypasses are alternatives to traditional extracranial-to-intracranial (EC-IC) bypasses to reanastomose parent arteries, reimplant efferent branches, revascularize branches with in situ donor arteries, and reconstruct bifurcations with interposition grafts that are entirely intracranial. These bypasses represent an evolution in bypass surgery from using scalp arteries and remote donor sites toward a more local and reconstructive approach. IC-IC bypass can be utilized preferentially when revascularization is needed in the management of complex aneurysms. Experiences using IC-IC bypass, as applied to posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) aneurysms in 35 patients, were reviewed. METHODS Patients with PICA aneurysms and vertebral artery (VA) aneurysms involving the PICA's origin were identified from a prospectively maintained database of the Vascular Neurosurgery Service, and patients who underwent bypass procedures for PICA revascularization were included. RESULTS During a 17-year period in which 129 PICA aneurysms in 125 patients were treated microsurgically, 35 IC-IC bypasses were performed as part of PICA aneurysm management, including in situ p3-p3 PICA-PICA bypass in 11 patients (31%), PICA reimplantation in 9 patients (26%), reanastomosis in 14 patients (40%), and 1 V3 VA-to-PICA bypass with an interposition graft (3%). All aneurysms were completely or nearly completely obliterated, 94% of bypasses were patent, 77% of patients were improved or unchanged after treatment, and good outcomes (modified Rankin Scale ≤ 2) were observed in 76% of patients. Two patients died expectantly. Ischemic complications were limited to 2 patients in whom the bypasses occluded, and permanent lower cranial nerve morbidity was limited to 3 patients and did not compromise independent function in any of the patients. CONCLUSIONS PICA aneurysms receive the application of IC-IC bypass better than any other aneurysm, with nearly one

  13. Persistent Primitive Hypoglossal Artery (PPHA) - A Rare Anomaly with Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, M R; Vedaraju, K S; Manjappa, B H; Nagaraj, B R

    2016-01-01

    Persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) is a rare embryonic carotid vertebrobasilar artery anastomosis. Hypoglossal artery arises from the internal carotid artery (ICA) between the C1 and C2 vertebral levels and traverses through the hypoglossal canal to join the vertebro-basilar system. We present a rare case of an anomalous right sided PPHA as a sole supply to posterior circulation of brain with absent/hypoplastic bilateral vertebral arteries in a two year child who had presented with acute left sided haemiplegia. Three dimensional time of flight magnetic resonance angiography identified an anomalous vessel arising from the right internal carotid artery at the level of axis vertebra and joining the vertebra-basilar arterial system after coursing through the right hypoglossal canal. This anomaly when present may predispose the person to aneurysm formation, ischaemia in the posterior circulation and atherosclerotic disease of the intracranial vessels. PMID:26894148

  14. Persistent Primitive Hypoglossal Artery (PPHA) – A Rare Anomaly with Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Vedaraju, KS; Manjappa, BH; Nagaraj, BR

    2016-01-01

    Persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) is a rare embryonic carotid vertebrobasilar artery anastomosis. Hypoglossal artery arises from the internal carotid artery (ICA) between the C1 and C2 vertebral levels and traverses through the hypoglossal canal to join the vertebro-basilar system. We present a rare case of an anomalous right sided PPHA as a sole supply to posterior circulation of brain with absent/hypoplastic bilateral vertebral arteries in a two year child who had presented with acute left sided haemiplegia. Three dimensional time of flight magnetic resonance angiography identified an anomalous vessel arising from the right internal carotid artery at the level of axis vertebra and joining the vertebra-basilar arterial system after coursing through the right hypoglossal canal. This anomaly when present may predispose the person to aneurysm formation, ischaemia in the posterior circulation and atherosclerotic disease of the intracranial vessels. PMID:26894148

  15. Internal Maxillary Artery-Middle Cerebral Artery Bypass: Infratemporal Approach for Subcranial-Intracranial (SC-IC) Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Nossek, Erez; Costantino, Peter D.; Eisenberg, Mark; Dehdashti, Amir R.; Setton, Avi; Chalif, David J.; Ortiz, Rafael A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Internal maxillary artery (IMax)–middle cerebral artery (MCA) bypass has been recently described as an alternative to cervical extracranial-intracranial bypass. This technique uses a “keyhole” craniectomy in the temporal fossa that requires a technically challenging end-to-side anastomosis. OBJECTIVE: To describe a lateral subtemporal craniectomy of the middle cranial fossa floor to facilitate wide exposure of the IMax to facilitate bypass. METHODS: Orbitozygomatic osteotomy is used followed by frontotemporal craniotomy and subsequently laterotemporal fossa craniectomy, reaching its medial border at a virtual line connecting the foramen rotundum and foramen ovale. The IMax was identified by using established anatomic landmarks, neuronavigation, and micro Doppler probe (Mizuho Inc. Tokyo, Japan). Additionally, we studied the approach in a cadaveric specimen in preparation for microsurgical bypass. RESULTS: There were 4 cases in which the technique was used. One bypass was performed for flow augmentation in a hypoperfused hemisphere. The other 3 were performed as part of treatment paradigms for giant middle cerebral artery aneurysms. Vein grafts were used in all patients. The proximal anastomosis was performed in an end-to-side fashion in 1 patient and end-to-end in 3 patients. Intraoperative graft flow measured with the Transonic flow probe ranged from 20 to 60 mL/min. Postoperative angiography demonstrated good filling of the graft with robust distal flow in all cases. All patients tolerated the procedure well. CONCLUSION: IMax to middle cerebral artery subcranial-intracranial bypass is safe and efficacious. The laterotemporal fossa craniectomy technique resulted in reliable identification and wide exposure of the IMax, facilitating the proximal anastomosis. ABBREVIATIONS: EC-IC, extracranial-intracranial IMax, internal maxillary artery MCA, middle cerebral artery SC-IC, subcranial-intracranial STA, superficial temporal artery PMID:24618804

  16. PHACE(S) Syndrome With Absent Intracranial Internal Carotid Artery and Anomalous Circle of Willis.

    PubMed

    Winter, Pieta R; Itinteang, Tinte; Leadbitter, Philip; FitzJohn, Trevor; Tan, Swee T

    2015-06-01

    The authors present a case of PHACE(S) (posterior fossa malformations, hemangioma, arterial anomalies, cardiac defects, eye anomalies, and sternal cleft or supraumbilical raphe) syndrome with a right-sided segmental infantile hemangioma, and describe in detail, the associated absent ipsilateral intracranial internal carotid artery and anomalous Circle of Willis. Propranolol therapy led to accelerated, complete involution. Nadolol may reduce the theoretical risk of treating PHACE(S) patients with β-blockers. PMID:26080245

  17. Calcium entry blockers in the treatment of vertebrobasilar insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Hofferberth, B

    1986-01-01

    The influence of different calcium entry blockers on the vestibular system was investigated. The paper reports results from animal experiments and also from clinical studies with flunarizine and nimodipine. An animal experimental model of vertebrobasilar insufficiency was developed. The effect of the two drugs on the vestibular nystagmus was studied in Alsatian dogs before and after occluding one vertebral artery. In order to analyze the influence of the drugs on the vestibular nystagmus and on the clinical symptoms in patients with vertebrobasilar insufficiency, different open and double-blind studies were performed. PMID:3530776

  18. Association between extra- and intracranial calcifications of the internal carotid artery: a CBCT imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Aartman, I H A; Tsiklakis, K; van der Stelt, P; Berkhout, W E R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the association between the extracranial and intracranial calcification depiction of the internal carotid artery (ICA), incidentally found in CBCT examinations in adults, and to discuss the conspicuous clinical implications. Methods: Out of a series of 1085 CBCT examinations, 705 CBCT scans were selected according to pre-defined criteria. The extra- and intracranial calcifications depicted along the course of the ICA were documented according to a comprehensive set of descriptive criteria. Results: In total, 799 findings were detected, 60.1% (n = 480) were intracranially and 39.9% (n = 319) were extracranially allocated. The χ2 test showed associations between all variables (p < 0.001). Also, most of the combinations of variables showed statistically significant results in the McNemar's test (p < 0.001). Conclusions: We found that a significant correlation exists between extra- and intracranial calcifications of the ICA. It is clear that in cases of the presence of a calcification in the ICA extracranially, the artery's intracranial portion has an increased risk of showing the same findings. CBCT imaging is widely used as a diagnostic tool, thus, our results contribute to the identification of a subgroup of patients who should undergo further medical evaluation of the atherosclerosis of the ICAs. PMID:25690425

  19. Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization of a Wide-Neck Aneurysm of a Persistent Primitive Hypoglossal Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Baldi, Sebastian Zander, Tobias; Rabellino, Martin; Maynar, Manuel

    2009-03-15

    Persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) represents the second most common carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis. The association of PPHA with intracranial aneurysms is not unusual. Treatment of aneurysms located on the PPHA itself is challenging due to the increased risk of ischemic complications secondary to the hypoglossal artery often being the sole contributor of flow to the posterior circulation. We report a case of a wide-neck aneurysm in a PPHA successfully treated using a stent-assisted coil embolization technique.

  20. Basilar Artery Aneurysm at a Persistent Trigeminal Artery Junction

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, G.B.; Conti, M.L.M.; Veiga, J.C.E.; Jory, M.; Souza, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The trigeminal artery is an anastomosis between the embryonic precursors of the vertebrobasilar and carotid systems, and may persist into adult life. The association of the persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) with cerebral aneurysm is well documented in the literature and, in general, aneurysms are located in the anterior circulation. We describe a patient who presented with a panencephalic Fisher III subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm. Digital arteriography showed a saccular aneurysm in the middle third of the basilar artery, adjacent to the junction with a persistent trigeminal artery. She was submitted to endovascular treatment with embolization of the basilar artery aneurysm with coils. Aneurysms at the PTA junction with the basilar artery are rare. This paper describes a case of PTA associated with an aneurysm in the basilar artery at PTA junction and briefly reviews the literature. PMID:22005697

  1. Unique remodeling processes after vascular injury in intracranial arteries: analysis using a novel mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Munehisa; Nakagami, Hironori; Sata, Masataka; Takaoka, Minoru; Azuma, Junya; Kiomy Osako, Mariana; Koriyama, Hiroshi; Kurinami, Hitomi; Wakayama, Kouji; Miyake, Takashi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-08-01

    The effectiveness of angioplasty and stenting in intracranial atherosclerotic diseases is controversial due to high rates of delayed restenosis and hemorrhage compared with extracranial arteries. However, the mechanisms underlying these differences are still unclear, because their pathophysiology is yet to be examined. To address this issue, we established a novel vascular injury model in the intracranial internal carotid arteries (IICAs) in mice, and analyzed the remodeling process in comparison to that of the femoral arteries (FAs). In IICAs, neointimal hyperplasia was observed from day 14 and grew until day 56. Although smooth muscle cells (SMCs) emerged in the neointima from day 28, SMCs in the injured media were continuously lost with eventual extinction of the media. Re-endothelialization was started from day 7 and completed on day 28. Accumulation of macrophages was continued in the adventitia until day 56. Compared with FAs, the following points are unique in IICAs: (1) delayed continuous formation of neointima; (2) accumulation of macrophages in the media on day 14; (3) continuous loss of SMCs in the media followed by extinction of the media itself; and (4) continuously growing adventitia. These pathophysiologic differences might be associated with unfavorable outcomes in percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting in intracranial arteries. PMID:23571280

  2. Why a standard contrast-enhanced MRI might be useful in intracranial internal carotid artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Oeinck, Maximilian; Rozeik, Christoph; Wattchow, Jens; Meckel, Stephan; Schlageter, Manuel; Beeskow, Christel; Reinhard, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    In patients with ischemic stroke of unknown cause cerebral vasculitis is a rare but relevant differential diagnosis, especially when signs of intracranial artery stenosis are found and laboratory findings show systemic inflammation. In such cases, high-resolution T1w vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 'black blood' technique) at 3 T is preferentially performed, but may not be available in every hospital. We report a case of an 84-year-old man with right hemispheric transient ischemic attack and signs of distal occlusion in the right internal carotid artery (ICA) in duplex sonography. Standard MRI with contrast agent pointed the way to the correct diagnosis since it showed an intramural contrast uptake in the right ICA and both vertebral arteries. Temporal artery biopsy confirmed the suspected diagnosis of a giant cell arteritis and dedicated vessel wall MRI performed later supported the suspected intracranial large artery inflammation. Our case also shows that early diagnosis and immunosuppressive therapy may not always prevent disease progression, as our patient suffered several infarcts in the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory with consecutive high-grade hemiparesis of the right side within the following four months. PMID:26988083

  3. Giant intracranial aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery treated by direct surgical approach. Case report.

    PubMed

    Bas, M B; Guerra, N; Valsania, V; Boccardo, M

    2000-09-01

    We report the singular case of an exceptionally large giant communicating artery aneurysm successfully treated with a direct surgical approach. The clinical presentation was a relatively short history of frontal headache. In the pre- and postcontrast CT scans the lesion mimicked an intracranial tumor. At surgery the intraluminal thrombus was partially removed with an ultrasonic surgical aspirator; the decompression allowed the isolation and subsequent temporary dipping of the tracts A1 and A2 of both the anterior cerebral arteries. It was then possible to complete the thrombectomy and to dip the neck of the aneurysm. The report emphasizes the indispensable role of MRI for the accurate diagnosis of giant intracranial aneurysms and the recent improvement of the surgical results concerning this category of aneurysms (mainly related to the present wider availability of technical surgical instrumentation). PMID:11126447

  4. Stent-Assisted Clip Placement for Complex Internal Carotid Artery Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Chughtai, Morad; Khan, Asif A.; Suri, M. Fareed K.; Sherr, Gregory T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We report two procedures using a stent-assisted microsurgical clip placement to treat complex intracranial aneurysms originating from supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery. CASE DESCRIPTIONS In both procedures, primary clip placement was considered technically difficult due to either complex morphology or inferior protrusion of aneurysm fundus within the interclinoid space. A nitinol self-expanding stent was placed across the neck of the aneurysm either preoperatively or intraoperatively. Obliteration of aneurysm and patency of the artery was confirmed by angiography after clip placement. CONCLUSION Description of an integrated open microsurgical and endovascular approach and review of literature pertaining to considerations for treatment approach are discussed. PMID:26958150

  5. Modeling blood flow circulation in intracranial arterial networks: a comparative 3D/1D simulation study.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, L; Cheever, E; Anor, T; Madsen, J R; Karniadakis, G E

    2011-01-01

    We compare results from numerical simulations of pulsatile blood flow in two patient-specific intracranial arterial networks using one-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) models. Specifically, we focus on the pressure and flowrate distribution at different segments of the network computed by the two models. Results obtained with 1D and 3D models with rigid walls show good agreement in massflow distribution at tens of arterial junctions and also in pressure drop along the arteries. The 3D simulations with the rigid walls predict higher amplitude of the flowrate and pressure temporal oscillations than the 1D simulations with compliant walls at various segments even for small time-variations in the arterial cross-sectional areas. Sensitivity of the flow and pressure with respect to variation in the elasticity parameters is investigated with the 1D model. PMID:20661645

  6. Intracranial internal carotid artery angioplasthy and stenting in giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Antonio Méndez; Sierra-Hidalgo, Fernando; Calleja, Patricia; Navia, Pedro; Campollo, Jorge; Díaz-Guzmán, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 59-year-old woman who presented with several episodes of transient ischemic attack (TIA) caused by pathologically confirmed giant cell arteritis. She continued suffering from TIAs during admission despite immunosuppressant and antithrombotic therapy. Sudden neurological deterioration with paraparesis and cognitive impairment developed. A brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed bilateral watershed ischemic lesions. MR angiography demonstrated severe stenosis of both intracranial internal carotid arteries (ICAs). Angioplasty and stenting on the left ICA were performed, with evident clinical improvement occurring within 24 hours. Endovascular therapy may be an alternative option to treat severe GCA with symptomatic intracranial large vessel disease not responsive to intensive conventional medical treatment. PMID:24707958

  7. Treatment of Vertebro-Basilar Dissecting Aneurysms Using Intravascular Stents

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Kawano, Y.; Yoshimura, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Hara, M.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Endovascular surgery is an established primary therapeutic modality for dissecting aneurysms at vertebro-basilar arteries. Intravascular stents can be used to treat the dissecting aneurysms for which simple obliteration procedures cannot be used. In such cases, stent implantation alone or a combination of stents and coils need to be selected properly by taking into consideration the site and shape of dissections. In this report, three patterns of stent application are described and their method of selection is discussed. PMID:20569619

  8. Successfully Treated Isolated Posterior Spinal Artery Aneurysm Causing Intracranial Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    HORIO, Yoshinobu; KATSUTA, Toshiro; SAMURA, Kazuhiro; WAKUTA, Naoki; FUKUDA, Kenji; HIGASHI, Toshio; INOUE, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    There are very few published reports of rupture of an isolated posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysm, and consequently the optimal therapeutic strategy is debatable. An 84-year-old man presented with sudden onset of restlessness and disorientation. Neuroradiological imaging showed an intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with no visible intracranial vascular lesion. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detected a localized subarachnoid hematoma at Th10–11. Both contrast-enhanced spinal computed tomography and enhanced MRI and magnetic resonance angiography revealed an area of enhancement within the hematoma. Superselective angiography of the left Th12 intercostal artery demonstrated a faintly enhanced spot in the venous phase. Thirteen days after the onset of symptoms, a small fusiform aneurysm situated on the radiculopial artery was resected. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful and he was eventually discharged in an ambulatory condition. To our knowledge, this 84-year-old man is the oldest reported case of surgical management of a ruptured isolated PSA aneurysm. This case illustrates both the validity and efficacy of this therapeutic approach. PMID:26522607

  9. Progressive Intracranial Vertebral Artery Dissection Presenting with Isolated Trigeminal Neuralgia-Like Facial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Nakamizo, Tomoki; Koide, Takashi; Miyazaki, Hiromichi

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial vertebral artery dissection (IVAD) is a potentially life-threatening disease, which usually presents with ischemic stroke or subarachnoid hemorrhage. IVAD presenting with isolated facial pain is rare, and no case with isolated trigeminal neuralgia- (TN-) like facial pain has been reported. Here, we report the case of a 57-year-old male with IVAD who presented with acute isolated TN-like facial pain that extended from his left cheek to his left forehead and auricle. He felt a brief stabbing pain when his face was touched in the territory of the first and second divisions of the left trigeminal nerve. There were no other neurological signs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain 7 days after onset revealed dissection of the left intracranial vertebral artery without brain infarction. The pain gradually disappeared in approximately 6 weeks, and the patient remained asymptomatic thereafter, except for a brief episode of vertigo. Follow-up MRI revealed progressive narrowing of the artery without brain infarction. This case indicates that IVAD can present with isolated facial pain that mimics TN. IVAD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute facial pain or TN. PMID:26146576

  10. Basilar artery aneurysm at a persistent trigeminal artery junction. A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, G B; Conti, M L M; Veiga, J C E; Jory, M; Souza, R B

    2011-09-01

    The trigeminal artery is an anastomosis between the embryonic precursors of the vertebrobasilar and carotid systems, and may persist into adult life. The association of the persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) with cerebral aneurysm is well documented in the literature and, in general, aneurysms are located in the anterior circulation. We describe a patient who presented with a panencephalic Fisher III subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm. Digital arteriography showed a saccular aneurysm in the middle third of the basilar artery, adjacent to the junction with a persistent trigeminal artery. She was submitted to endovascular treatment with embolization of the basilar artery aneurysm with coils. Aneurysms at the PTA junction with the basilar artery are rare. This paper describes a case of PTA associated with an aneurysm in the basilar artery at PTA junction and briefly reviews the literature. PMID:22005697

  11. Optical coherence tomography of the intracranial vasculature and Wingspan stent in a patient

    PubMed Central

    Given, Curtis Alden; Ramsey, Christian Norman; Attizzani, Guilherme Ferragut; Jones, Michael R; Brooks, William H; Bezerra, Hiram G; Costa, Marco A

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 67-year-old man with medically refractory vertebrobasilar insufficiency and short segment occlusions of the intracranial vertebral arteries was treated with angioplasty and stent placement. Fifteen hours after the procedure the patient developed symptoms of posterior fossa ischemia and repeat angiography showed thrombus formation within the stent which was treated with thrombolytic and aggressive antiplatelet therapy. Angiography revealed lysis of the clot, but concerns regarding the mechanism of the thrombotic phenomenon prompted frequency-domain optical coherence tomography (FDOCT) assessment. FDOCT provided excellent visualization of the stent and vessel wall interactions, as well as excluding residual flow-limiting stenosis, obviating the need for further intervention. The potential utility of FDOCT in the evaluation of intracranial atherosclerotic disease and additional intracranial applications are discussed. PMID:24835808

  12. [Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Associated with Multiple Arterio-arterial Fistulas between the Systemic Arteries and the Pulmonary Artery:A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Junichi; Niijima, Kyo

    2016-09-01

    An intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula(dAVF)was incidentally detected in a 39-year-old man during a medical checkup. Except for a mild episode of pneumonia at the age of 22 years, his medical history was unremarkable. He had no family history of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia(HHT). The dAVF was treated radically via ligation of the fistula, without any complications. Postoperative angiography demonstrated that the dAVF had completely healed, but showed an aberrant, dilatated, and tortuous internal mammary artery. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan revealed multiple arterio-arterial fistulas between various systemic arteries and the pulmonary artery(an intercostal artery to the pulmonary artery fistula, an internal mammary artery to the pulmonary artery fistula, and an inferior phrenic artery to the pulmonary artery fistula). These thoracic lesions did not require additional treatment because they did not cause any symptoms, e.g., respiratory or cardiac failure. In most previous cases, such aberrant thoracic arterial fistulas were detected incidentally or based on the presence of minor clinical symptoms. However, in some cases, they caused severe respiratory or cardiac failure and were treated via the embolization of the responsible vessels. Therefore, the co-existence of thoracic arterial fistulas in patients with dAVF should be evaluated, even if the dAVF does not meet the criteria for HHT. Such thoracic lesions might cause a chest murmur that can be detected via a stethoscope or via a blunt costophrenic angle on chest radiography. PMID:27605480

  13. Computational hemodynamic study of intracranial aneurysms coexistent with proximal artery stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Peloc, Nora L.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.

    2012-03-01

    Intracranial aneurysms and artery stenosis are vascular diseases with different pathophysiological characteristics. However, although unusual, aneurysms may coexist in up to 5% of patients with stenotic plaque, according to a previous study. Another study showed that incidental detection of cerebral aneurysm in the same cerebral circulation as the stenotic plaque was less than 2%. Patients with concomitant carotid artery stenosis and unruptured intracranial aneurysms pose a difficult management decision for the physician. Case reports showed patients who died due to aneurysm rupture months after endarterectomy but before aneurysm clipping, while others did not show any change in the aneurysm after plaque removal, having optimum outcome after aneurysm coiling. The purpose of this study is to investigate the intraaneurysmal hemodynamic changes before and after treatment of stenotic plaque. Idealized models were constructed with different stenotic grade, distance and relative position to the aneurysm. Digital removal of the stenotic plaque was performed in the reconstructed model of a patient with both pathologies. Computational fluid dynamic simulations were performed using a finite element method approach. Blood velocity field and hemodynamic forces were recorded and analyzed. Changes in the flow patterns and wall shear stress values and distributions were observed in both ideal and image-based models. Detailed investigation of wall shear stress distributions in patients with both pathologies is required to make the best management decision.

  14. Influence of Parent Artery Segmentation and Boundary Conditions on Hemodynamic Characteristics of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yufeng; Oh, Je Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to explore the influence of segmentation of the upstream and downstream parent artery and hemodynamic boundary conditions (BCs) on the evaluated hemodynamic factors for the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of intracranial aneurysms. Materials and Methods Three dimensional patient-specific aneurysm models were analyzed by applying various combinations of inlet and outlet BCs. Hemodynamic factors such as velocity pattern, streamline, wall shear stress, and oscillatory shear index at the systolic time were visualized and compared among the different cases. Results Hemodynamic factors were significantly affected by the inlet BCs while there was little influence of the outlet BCs. When the inlet length was relatively short, different inlet BCs showed different hemodynamic factors and the calculated hemodynamic factors were also dependent on the inlet length. However, when the inlet length (L) was long enough (L>20D, where D is the diameter of inlet section), the hemodynamic factors became similar regardless of the inlet BCs and lengths. The error due to different inlet BCs was negligible. The effect of the outlet length on the hemodynamic factors was similar to that of the inlet length. Conclusion Simulated hemodynamic factors are highly sensitive to inlet BCs and upstream parent artery segmentation. The results of this work can provide an insight into how to build models and to apply BCs for more accurate estimation of hemodynamic factors from CFD simulations of intracranial aneurysms. PMID:26256976

  15. Dose to the intracranial arteries in stereotactic and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for skull base tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Nieder, Carsten . E-mail: cnied@hotmail.com; Grosu, Anca L.; Stark, Sybille; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Busch, Raymonde; Kneschaurek, Peter; Molls, Michael

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To examine retrospectively the maximum dose to the large skull base/intracranial arteries in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), because of the potential risk of perfusion disturbances. Methods and Materials: Overall, 56 patients with tumors adjacent to at least one major artery were analyzed. Our strategy was to perform FSRT with these criteria: 1.8 Gy per fraction, planning target volume (PTV) enclosed by the 95% isodose, maximum dose 107%. Dose limits were applied to established organs at risk, but not the vessels. If FSRT planning failed to meet any of these criteria, IMRT was planned with the same objectives. Results: In 31 patients (median PTV, 23 cm{sup 3}), the FSRT plan fulfilled all criteria. No artery received a dose {>=}105%. Twenty-five patients (median PTV, 39 cm{sup 3}) needed IMRT planning. In 11 of 25 patients (median PTV, 85 cm{sup 3}), no plan satisfying all our criteria could be calculated. Only in this group, moderately increased maximum vessel doses were observed (106-110%, n = 7, median PTV, 121 cm{sup 3}). The median PTV dose gradient was 29% (significantly different from the 14 patients with satisfactory IMRT plans). Three of the four patients in this group had paranasal sinus tumors. Conclusion: The doses to the major arteries should be calculated in IMRT planning for critical tumor locations if a dose gradient >13% within the PTV can not be avoided because the PTV is large or includes air cavities.

  16. Improving visualization of intracranial arteries at the skull base for CT angiography with calcified plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Adam; Lee, Chung-Wei; Yang, Chung-Yi; Liu, Hon-Man

    2010-03-01

    Bony structures at the skull base were the main obstacle to detection and estimation of arterial stenoses and aneurysms for CT angiography in the brain. Direct subtraction and the matched mask bone elimination (MMBE) have become two standard methods for removing bony structures. However, clinicians regularly find that calcified plaques at or near the carotid canal cannot be removed satisfactorily by existing methods. The blood-plaque boundary tends to be blurred by subtraction operation while plaque size is constantly overestimated by the bone mask dilation operation in the MMBE approach. In this study, we propose using the level of enhancement to adjust the MMBE bone mask more intelligently on the artery- and tissue-bone/plaque boundaries. The original MMBE method is only applied to the tissue-bone boundary voxels; while the artery-bone/blood-plaque boundary voxels, identified by a higher enhancement level, are processed by direct subtraction instead. A dataset of 6 patients (3 scanned with a regular dose and 3 scanned with a reduced dose) with calcified plaques at or near the skull base is used to examine our new method. Preliminary results indicate that the visualization of intracranial arteries with calcified plaques at the skull base can be improved effectively and efficiently.

  17. Indications and Outcomes of Prophylactic and Therapeutic Extracranial-to-intracranial Arterial Bypass for Cerebral Revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Gazyakan, Emre; Lee, Ching-Yi; Wu, Chieh-Tsai; Tsao, Chung-Kan; Craft, Randall; Henry, Steven L.; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Extracranial-to-intracranial (EC-IC) arterial bypass is a technically demanding procedure used to treat complex cerebral artery diseases. The indications, proper surgical techniques, and outcomes of this procedure have been under debate over the recent decades. Methods: Between January 2004 and December 2012, 28 patients, including patients with cerebral artery occlusion, intracranial aneurysm, cranial base tumor, and Moyamoya disease, underwent EC-IC bypass. Patients’ records were retrospectively reviewed for demography, indications, complications, high-flow versus low-flow bypass, patency rate of bypass, and neurological outcome. The patients were sorted into prophylactic (n = 16) and therapeutic (n = 12) groups based on the preoperative presentation of their neurological symptoms. Follow-up evaluation was performed at a mean of 32.7 ± 24.3 months. Results: The overall patency rate of bypass was 100%, the postoperative stroke rate was zero, and the surgical complication rate was 14.3%. There was no significant difference in the bypass patency rate between the 2 groups or between the high-flow and low-flow bypass patients. Patients who underwent prophylactic bypass had minimal surgical and total complications (P = 0.03 and P < 0.01, respectively) and a better neurological outcome. Surgical complications were more common in patients who underwent therapeutic bypass (25%). Conclusions: The collaboration of neurosurgeons and plastic surgeons in performing EC-IC bypass can result in excellent outcomes with a high bypass patency rate and few complications, particularly for prophylactic EC-IC bypass. PMID:25973350

  18. Unusual Finding of Vertebral Artery Fenestration in Spontaneous Deep Nuclear Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Binod; Munakomi, Sunil; Chaudhary, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Vertebral artery fenestration is accidentally detected during angiography or autopsy. Spontaneous deep nuclear hemorrhage in association with vertebral artery fenestration is a very unusual finding in angiography. Such an unusual finding has not been reported in the English literature. Here, we report two cases of spontaneous deep nuclear hemorrhage that presented with features of raised intracranial pressure. Computed tomography revealed a deep nuclear acute bleed in both cases. Digital subtraction angiographic findings were normal other than the presence of a long segment vertebral artery fenestration. Both extracranial and intracranial variations were detected. Although the existence of vascular fenestration in the vertebrobasilar system produces less clinical importance, it may influence the management of cervical and intracranial pathologies to avoid iatrogenic injury.  PMID:26918218

  19. [Intracranial arterial aneurysm in children. A cooperative study. Apropos of 43 cases].

    PubMed

    Roche, J L; Choux, M; Czorny, A; Dhellemmes, P; Fast, M; Frerebeau, P; Lapras, C; Sautreaux, J L

    1988-01-01

    This joint study describes 43 cases of intracranial arterial aneurysms in children diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms. In the pediatric age group, this malformation is notable because of the marked sex predilection in males (70%) and an unequal topographic incidence in the circle of Willis, where carotid artery (39.3%) and anterior communicating artery lesions (30%) predominate. The most frequent clinical sign was subarachnoid hemorrhage (81%), although symptoms caused by compression revealed the abnormality in 2.3% of patients. In this series, 11% of the patients suffered a head injury at the time of the hemorrhagic accident; this finding has been reported previously in the literature. Today, treatment is always surgical, consisting in removal of the aneurysmal sac. Surgical results are encouraging; all grade lesions considered together, 63.4% of the children were cured without any sequelae, 19.5% lost one school year but were able to lead a normal life, and 4.8% remained severely handicapped; overall postoperative mortality was 12.3%. Cerebral plasticity and tolerance of spasm in children are fundamental features of this aneurysmal pathology which partially explain the favorable results obtained with surgery. PMID:3059206

  20. Rigorous anaesthesia management protocol for patients with intracranial arterial stenosis: a prospective controlled-cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Laiwalla, Azim N; Ooi, Yinn Cher; Van De Wiele, Barbara; Ziv, Keren; Brown, Adam; Liou, Raymond; Saver, Jeffrey L; Gonzalez, Nestor R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Reducing variability is integral in quality management. As part of the ongoing Encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis Revascularisation for Symptomatic Intracranial Arterial Stenosis (ERSIAS) trial, we developed a strict anaesthesia protocol to minimise fluctuations in patient parameters affecting cerebral perfusion. We hypothesise that this protocol reduces the intraoperative variability of targeted monitored parameters compared to standard management. Design Prospective cohort study of patients undergoing encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis surgery versus standard neurovascular interventions. Patients with ERSIAS had strict perioperative management that included normocapnia and intentional hypertension. Control patients received regular anaesthetic standard of care. Minute-by-minute intraoperative vitals were electronically collected. Heterogeneity of variance tests were used to compare variance across groups. Mixed-model regression analysis was performed to establish the effects of treatment group on the monitored parameters. Setting Tertiary care centre. Participants 24 participants: 12 cases (53.8 years±16.7 years; 10 females) and 12 controls (51.3 years±15.2 years; 10 females). Adults aged 30–80 years, with transient ischaemic attack or non-disabling stroke (modified Rankin Scale <3) attributed to 70–99% intracranial stenosis of the carotid or middle cerebral artery, were considered for enrolment. Controls were matched according to age, gender and history of neurovascular intervention. Main outcome measures Variability of heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), systolic blood pressure and end tidal CO2 (ETCO2) throughout surgical duration. Results There were significant reductions in the intraoperative MAP SD (4.26 vs 10.23 mm Hg; p=0.007) and ETCO2 SD (0.94 vs 1.26 mm Hg; p=0.05) between the ERSIAS and control groups. Median MAP and ETCO2 in the ERSIAS group were higher (98 mm Hg, IQR 23 vs 75 mm Hg, IQR 15; p<0

  1. Endovascular Treatment of Supra-Aortic Extracranial Stenoses in Patients with Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency Symptoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zaytsev, A.Y. Stoyda, A.Y.; Smirnov, V.E.; Scherbyuk, A.N.; Kondrashin, S.A; Artukchina, E.G.; Kikevitch, V.A.

    2006-10-15

    Purpose. Stenoses and thromboses of vessels feeding the vertebrobasilar territory can evoke serious disturbances including ischemic stroke. We present our experience of endovascular interventions for patients with signs of vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) resulted from subclavian, vertebral and brachiocephalic arterial stenoses. Methods. Twenty-one patients (10 men) aged from 35 to 84 years (mean 64.3 years) with symptoms compatible with VBI underwent balloon angioplasty and stenting of subclavian (SA), innominate (IA) and vertebral (VA) arteries. Procedures were done by radiologists experienced in systematic stenting of the lesions. VBI was manifested by persistent signs in 15 patients, and by transitory ischemic attacks in the posterior circulatory territory in 4 (19%). Two patients (10%) experienced ischemic strokes (in the vertebrobasilar circulation in both cases). In 3 patients (14%) VBI was accompanied by upper limb vascular insufficiency symptoms. All cases were resistant to medical treatment. A neurologist assessed complaints, initial VBI signs and their alteration after intervention in all patients. Outcomes were measured with the 5-point scale suggested by Malek et al.: (1) excellent result (asymptomatic, no neurologic deficits and no symptoms of vertebrobasilar ischemia); (2) good (no neurologic deficits, at most one transient episode of vertebrobasilar ischemia over a period of 3 months after treatment); (3) fair (minimal neurologic deficit and at most one transient episode per month of vertebrobasilar ischemia); (4) poor (no improvement compared with neurologic status before treatment and/or persistent symptoms of vertebrobasilar ischemia); (5) death (regardless of cause). Endovascular treatment was performed for SA stenosis in 15 patients, for SA occlusion in 2, for IA stenosis in 2, and for VA stenosis in 2. There were 15 cases of atherosclerosis, 2 of aortoarteritis, 4 of proximal SA kinking. SA and IA stenoses ranged from 60% to 100% (mean 74

  2. Time management in acute vertebrobasilar occlusion.

    PubMed

    Kamper, Lars; Rybacki, Konrad; Mansour, Michael; Winkler, Sven B; Kempkes, Udo; Haage, Patrick

    2009-03-01

    Acute vertebrobasilar occlusion (VBO) is associated with a high risk of stroke and death. Although local thrombolysis may achieve recanalization and improve outcome, mortality is still between 35% and 75%. However, without recanalization the chance of a good outcome is extremely poor, with mortality rates of 80-90%. Early treatment is a fundamental factor, but detailed studies of the exact time management of the diagnostic and interventional workflow are still lacking. Data on 18 patients were retrospectively evaluated. Time periods between symptom onset, admission to hospital, time of diagnosis, and beginning of intervention were correlated with postinterventional neurological status. The Glasgow Coma Scale and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) were used to examine patients before and after local thrombolysis. Additionally, multivariate statistics were applied to reveal similarities between patients with neurological improvement. Primary recanalization was achieved in 77% of patients. The overall mortality was 55%. Major complications were intracranial hemorrhage and peripheral embolism. The time period from symptom onset to intervention showed a strong correlation with the postinterventional NIHSS as well as the patient's age, with the best results in a 4-h interval. Multivariate statistics revealed similarities among the patients. Evaluation of time management in acute VBO by multivariate statistics is a helpful tool for definition of similarities in this patient group. Similarly to the door-to-balloon time for acute coronary interventions, the chances for a good outcome depend on a short time interval between symptom onset and intervention. While the only manipulable time period starts with hospital admission, our results emphasize the necessity of efficient intrahospital workflow. PMID:18704570

  3. Time Management in Acute Vertebrobasilar Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kamper, Lars; Mansour, Michael; Winkler, Sven B.; Kempkes, Udo; Haage, Patrick

    2009-03-15

    Acute vertebrobasilar occlusion (VBO) is associated with a high risk of stroke and death. Although local thrombolysis may achieve recanalization and improve outcome, mortality is still between 35% and 75%. However, without recanalization the chance of a good outcome is extremely poor, with mortality rates of 80-90%. Early treatment is a fundamental factor, but detailed studies of the exact time management of the diagnostic and interventional workflow are still lacking. Data on 18 patients were retrospectively evaluated. Time periods between symptom onset, admission to hospital, time of diagnosis, and beginning of intervention were correlated with postinterventional neurological status. The Glasgow Coma Scale and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) were used to examine patients before and after local thrombolysis. Additionally, multivariate statistics were applied to reveal similarities between patients with neurological improvement. Primary recanalization was achieved in 77% of patients. The overall mortality was 55%. Major complications were intracranial hemorrhage and peripheral embolism. The time period from symptom onset to intervention showed a strong correlation with the postinterventional NIHSS as well as the patient's age, with the best results in a 4-h interval. Multivariate statistics revealed similarities among the patients. Evaluation of time management in acute VBO by multivariate statistics is a helpful tool for definition of similarities in this patient group. Similarly to the door-to-balloon time for acute coronary interventions, the chances for a good outcome depend on a short time interval between symptom onset and intervention. While the only manipulable time period starts with hospital admission, our results emphasize the necessity of efficient intrahospital workflow.

  4. Microcatheter Contrast Injections during Intra-Arterial Thrombolysis May Increase Intracranial Hemorrhage Risk

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Pooja; Broderick, Joseph P; Khoury, Jane C; Carrozzella, Janice A; Tomsick, Thomas A

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During intra-arterial(IA) revascularization, either guide catheter injections of contrast in the neck or microcatheter contrast injections (MCIs) at or beyond the site of an occlusion, can be used to visualize intracranial vasculature. Neurointerventionalists vary widely in their use of MCIs for a given circumstance. We tested the hypothesis that MCIs are a risk factor for intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) in the Interventional Management of Stroke (IMS) I and II trials of combined IV/IA rt-PA therapy. METHODS: All arteriograms with M1, M2, and ICA terminus occlusions were reanalyzed (n=98). The number of MCIs within or distal to the target occlusion was assigned. Post-procedure CTs were reviewed for CEx and ICH. CEx was defined as a hyperdensity suggestive of contrast (Hounsfield unit>90) seen at 24 hours, or present prior to 24 hours and persisting or replaced by ICH at 24 hours. RESULTS: In this IMS subset, the rate of any ICH was 58% (57/98). More MCIs were seen in the ICH group (median=2 vs 1; p=0.04). Increased MCIs were associated with higher ICH rates (p=0.03). MCIs remained associated with ICH in multivariable analysis (p=0.01), as did baseline CT edema/mass effect, atrial fibrillation, time to IV rt-PA initiation, and TICI reperfusion score. MCIs were also associated with CEx in unadjusted and adjusted analyses. CONCLUSIONS: MCIs may risk ICH in the setting of combined IV/IA rt-PA therapy, possibly due to contrast toxicity or pressure transmission by injections. MCIs should be minimized whenever possible. These findings will be tested prospectively in the IMS III trial. PMID:18772441

  5. Intracranial Vascular Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... most commonly used in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Mechanical retrievers/aspiration systems: used to remove clots ... passageway between an artery and a vein. intracranial aneurysms, a ballooning out of the wall of an ...

  6. Acute Stroke and Obstruction of the Extracranial Carotid Artery Combined with Intracranial Tandem Occlusion: Results of Interventional Revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Lescher, Stephanie Czeppan, Katja; Porto, Luciana; Singer, Oliver C.; Berkefeld, Joachim

    2015-04-15

    PurposeDue to high thrombus load, acute stroke patients with tandem obstructions of the extra- and intracranial carotid arteries or the middle cerebral artery show a very limited response to systemic thrombolysis. Interventional treatment with mechanical thrombectomy—often in combination with acute stenting of underlying atherosclerotic stenosis or dissection—is increasingly used. It has been shown that such complex interventions are technically feasible. The lack of optimal management strategies and clinical data encouraged us to review our acute stroke interventions in patient with anterior circulation tandem lesions to determine lesion patterns, interventional approaches, and angiographic or clinical outcomes.Patients and MethodsWe retrospectively analyzed a series of 39 consecutive patients with intracranial vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation simultaneously presenting with high-grade cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis or occlusion.ResultsEmergency ICA stent implantation was technically feasible in all patients, and intracranial recanalization with TICI ≥ 2b was reached in a large number of patients (64 %). Good clinical outcomes (mRS ≤ 2 at 3 months) were achieved in one third of the patients (36 %). Symptomatic hemorrhages occurred in four patients (10 %). Mortality was 10 %.ConclusionEndovascular recanalization of acute cervical carotid artery occlusion was technically feasible in all patients, and resulted in high extra- and intracranial revascularization rates. A trend for favorable clinical outcome was seen in a higher TICI score, younger age, good collateral status, and combined IV rTPA and endovascular therapy.

  7. Final Results of Cilostazol-Aspirin Therapy against Recurrent Stroke with Intracranial Artery Stenosis (CATHARSIS)

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Toi, Sono; Ezura, Masayuki; Okada, Yasushi; Takagi, Makoto; Nagai, Yoji; Matsubara, Yoshihiro; Minematsu, Kazuo; Suzuki, Norihiro; Tanahashi, Norio; Taki, Waro; Nagata, Izumi; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the effect of cilostazol plus aspirin versus aspirin alone on the progression of intracranial arterial stenosis (IAS), and to compare ischemic and hemorrhagic events in patients with symptomatic IAS, an investigator-driven, nationwide multicenter cooperative randomized controlled trial (CATHARSIS; ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier 00333164) was conducted. Methods 165 noncardioembolic ischemic stroke patients with >50% stenosis in the responsible intracranial artery after 2 weeks to 6 months from the onset were randomly allocated to receive either cilostazol 200 mg/day plus aspirin 100 mg/day (n = 83, CA group) or aspirin 100 mg/day alone (n = 82, A group). The primary endpoint was the progression of IAS on magnetic resonance angiography at 2 years after randomization. Secondary endpoints were any vascular events, any cause of death, serious adverse events, new silent brain infarcts, and worsening of the modified Rankin Scale score. Results Progression of IAS was observed in 9.6% of the CA group patients and in 5.6% of the A group patients, with no significant intergroup difference (p = 0.53). The incidence of the secondary endpoints tended to be lower in the CA group compared with the A group, although the differences were not significant. By using exploratory logistic regression analysis adjusted for patient background characteristics, it was shown that the risk for certain combinations of secondary endpoints was lower in the CA group than in the A group [all vascular events and silent brain infarcts: odds ratio (OR) = 0.37, p = 0.04; stroke and silent brain infarcts: OR = 0.34, p = 0.04; all vascular events, worsening of modified Rankin Scale scores and silent brain infracts: OR = 0.41, p = 0.03]. Major hemorrhage was observed in 4 patients of the CA group and in 3 of the A group. Conclusion Progression of IAS during the 2-year observation period appears to be less frequent than previously reported in stroke patients on antiplatelet agents after

  8. Use of superior thyroid artery as a donor vessel in extracranial-intracranial revascularization procedures: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Mura, Jorge; Cuevas, José Luis; Riquelme, Francisco; Torche, Esteban; Julio, Rodrigo; Isolan, Gustavo Rassier

    2014-12-01

    Objective To describe the use of the superior thyroid artery as a donor vessel in extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) revascularization when a "low-flow" bypass is required and the superficial temporal artery is not available. Design Case report. Setting University hospital. Participants Four cases. Main Outcome Measures Postoperative course after EC-IC bypass surgery. Results In case 1, the parent vessel was occluded postoperatively. The radial bypass was sufficient to replace the internal carotid artery (ICA) flow, and a prophylactic was turned into a definitive bypass. In case 2, the superior thyroid artery was used because the radial artery was not long enough to reach the external carotid artery. The recipient vessel was modified from the middle cerebral artery to the ophthalmic segment of the ICA. In case 3, the graft was occluded after surgery because of carotid artery reconstruction. In case 4, after surgery/radiotherapy for meningioma, the patient developed wound dehiscence and was reoperated for bypass occlusion. The graft was weak and bled intraoperatively, without infarction. The three first patients are intact, and the fourth remains disabled (Glasgow Outcome Scale: 3; Rankin Scale: 5). Conclusion The superior thyroid artery was adequate for proximal anastomosis in EC-IC procedures in the situations described. PMID:25452901

  9. Vessel-selective, non-contrast enhanced, time-resolved MR angiography with vessel-selective arterial spin labeling technique (CINEMA-SELECT) in intracranial arteries.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masanobu; Yoneyama, Masami; Tabuchi, Takashi; Takemura, Atsushi; Obara, Makoto; Tatsuno, Satoshi; Sawano, Seishi

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of the vessel-selective, non-contrast, time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) technique, "contrast inherent inflow enhanced multi-phase angiography combining vessel-selective arterial spin labeling technique (CINEMA-SELECT)". This sequence consists of two major techniques: pulsed star labeling of arterial regions (PULSAR) and Look-Locker sampling. We hypothesize that this technique allows selective labeling of single intracranial arteries, consisting of high-resolution four-dimensional data with a wide coverage of the brain. In this study, a new vessel-selective, time-resolved angiographic technique is demonstrated that can produce individual angiograms non-invasively by labeling the principal arterial vessels proximal to the circle of Willis. Clear vessel delineation is achieved, and the separation of the three vessels is evident in healthy volunteers. This technique could play an important role in the assessment of the structure and hemodynamics of intracranial arteries without the use of contrast agents. PMID:23475783

  10. Treatment of a Ruptured Vertebrobasilar Fusiform Aneurysm Using Pipeline Embolization Device

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lee A.; Lopes, Demetrius K.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment options of ruptured vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysms (VFA) are limited and often carry significant mortality and morbidity. We report the use of Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) to successfully treat a patient with a ruptured vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysm (VFA) who presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 73 year-old man with a history of cardiac stent placement seven days earlier presented with Hunt-Hess II SAH. He was taking aspirin and clopidogrel. Computed tomography angiogram revealed a large vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysm. Microsurgical treatment options are technically challenging and carry high risk. He underwent endovascular treatment of the ruptured VFA using overlapping PEDs. Five PEDs were placed in a telescoping fashion to reconstruct the affected portions of the left vertebral and basilar arteries. An additional 2-mm blister aneurysm in the right vertebral artery was also discovered during the conventional cerebral angiography and was treated with one additional PED. The patient remained neurologically intact after the procedure. He was continued on aspirin and clopidogrel. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging at three months demonstrated patency of the stents without any evidence of ischemic change. Follow-up conventional cerebral angiogram at six months demonstrated thrombosis of the VFA and reconstruction of the vertebrobasilar system. The patient remained clinically well. An endovascular approach using PEDs can be a safe and effective treatment option for ruptured VFA in selected cases. PMID:23593603

  11. Workflow Optimization in Vertebrobasilar Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kamper, Lars Meyn, Hannes; Nordmeyer, Simone; Kempkes, Udo; Piroth, Werner

    2012-06-15

    Objective: In vertebrobasilar occlusion, rapid recanalization is the only substantial means to improve the prognosis. We introduced a standard operating procedure (SOP) for interventional therapy to analyze the effects on interdisciplinary time management. Methods: Intrahospital time periods between hospital admission and neuroradiological intervention were retrospectively analyzed, together with the patients' outcome, before (n = 18) and after (n = 20) implementation of the SOP. Results: After implementation of the SOP, we observed statistically significant improvement of postinterventional patient neurological status (p = 0.017). In addition, we found a decrease of 5:33 h for the mean time period from hospital admission until neuroradiological intervention. The recanalization rate increased from 72.2% to 80% after implementation of the SOP. Conclusion: Our results underscore the relevance of SOP implementation and analysis of time management for clinical workflow optimization. Both may trigger awareness for the need of efficient interdisciplinary time management. This could be an explanation for the decreased time periods and improved postinterventional patient status after SOP implementation.

  12. Propranolol Use in PHACE Syndrome with Cervical and Intracranial Arterial Anomalies: Collective Experience in 32 Infants

    PubMed Central

    Metry, Denise; Frieden, Ilona J.; Hess, Christopher; Siegel, Dawn; Maheshwari, Mohit; Baselga, Eulalia; Chamlin, Sarah; Garzon, Maria; Mancini, Anthony J.; Powell, Julie; Drolet, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    1. Objective Combine collective clinical experience using oral propranolol therapy in PHACE syndrome infants with cerebrovascular anomalies. 2. Design Retrospective study of patients evaluated between July 2008 and October 2011. 3. Setting Seven pediatric dermatology centers. 4. Patients 32 infants with definite PHACE syndrome and cervical and/or intracranial arterial anomalies. 5. Intervention Oral propranolol: average dose of 1.8 mg/kg/day divided t.i.d. or b.i.d., for an average duration of 12.3 months. 6. Main Outcome Measure Adverse neurologic events. 7. Results 7/32 (22%) patients were categorized as higher-risk for stroke, defined on MRA as severe, long-segment narrowing or non-visualization of major cerebral or cervical vessels without anatomic evidence for collateral circulation, often in the presence of concomitant cardiovascular comorbidities. Only 1 patient developed a change in neurologic status during propranolol treatment: a mild right hemiparesis that remained static and improved while propranolol was continued. An additional 3 patients had worsening hemangioma ulceration and/or tissue necrosis during therapy. 8. Conclusions This is the largest report thus far of PHACE patients treated with propranolol. While no catastrophic neurologic events occurred, serious complications, particularly severe ulcerations were seen in a minority of patients, and given the sample size we cannot negate the possibility that propranolol could augment the risk of stroke in this population. We continue to advise caution in using systemic beta-blockers, particularly for children with vascular anomalies at higher risk for stroke. Use of the lowest possible dosage, slow dosage titration, and t.i.d. dosing in order to minimize abrupt changes in blood pressure and close follow-up, including neurologic consultation as needed, are recommended. PMID:22994362

  13. Persistent trigeminal artery as a rare cause of ischaemic lesion and migraine-like headache.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, S; Kurzepa, J; Czekajska-Chehab, E; Staśkiewicz, G; Polar, M K; Nastaj, M; Stochmal, E; Drop, A

    2015-01-01

    The persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is a rare remnant of the embryonic intracranial circulatory system that forms a carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis. In most cases PTA does not have clear clinical implications. However, some authors report the association of PTA occurrence with vertigo, dizziness and nerve palsy, resulting in diplopia, strabismus or trigeminal neuralgia in patients. In rare cases it may also be related to posterior cerebral circulation strokes. This work reports the case of a female patient who presented with migraine-like headache and an ischaemic lesion in the left temporal lobe in association with PTA. PMID:25792408

  14. Interplay of Proximal Flow Confluence and Distal Flow Divergence in Patient-Specific Vertebrobasilar System

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiaoping; Huang, Xu; Feng, Yundi; Tan, Wenchang; Liu, Huaijun

    2016-01-01

    Approximately one-quarter of ischemic strokes involve the vertebrobasilar arterial system that includes the upstream flow confluence and downstream flow divergence. A patient-specific hemodynamic analysis is needed to understand the posterior circulation. The objective of this study is to determine the distribution of hemodynamic parameters in the vertebrobasilar system, based on computer tomography angiography images. Here, the interplay of upstream flow confluence and downstream flow divergence was hypothesized to be a determinant factor for the hemodynamic distribution in the vertebrobasilar system. A computational fluid dynamics model was used to compute the flow fields in patient-specific vertebrobasilar models (n = 6). The inlet and outlet boundary conditions were the aortic pressure waveform and flow resistances, respectively. A 50% reduction of total outlet area was found to induce a ten-fold increase in surface area ratio of low time-averaged wall shear stress (i.e., TAWSS ≤ 4 dynes/cm2). This study enhances our understanding of the posterior circulation associated with the incidence of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27467755

  15. Interplay of Proximal Flow Confluence and Distal Flow Divergence in Patient-Specific Vertebrobasilar System.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaoping; Huang, Xu; Feng, Yundi; Tan, Wenchang; Liu, Huaijun; Huo, Yunlong

    2016-01-01

    Approximately one-quarter of ischemic strokes involve the vertebrobasilar arterial system that includes the upstream flow confluence and downstream flow divergence. A patient-specific hemodynamic analysis is needed to understand the posterior circulation. The objective of this study is to determine the distribution of hemodynamic parameters in the vertebrobasilar system, based on computer tomography angiography images. Here, the interplay of upstream flow confluence and downstream flow divergence was hypothesized to be a determinant factor for the hemodynamic distribution in the vertebrobasilar system. A computational fluid dynamics model was used to compute the flow fields in patient-specific vertebrobasilar models (n = 6). The inlet and outlet boundary conditions were the aortic pressure waveform and flow resistances, respectively. A 50% reduction of total outlet area was found to induce a ten-fold increase in surface area ratio of low time-averaged wall shear stress (i.e., TAWSS ≤ 4 dynes/cm2). This study enhances our understanding of the posterior circulation associated with the incidence of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27467755

  16. [Application of Silicone Rubber Stents in Intracranial Arterial Microanastomosis for Vessels with Intimal Dissection:A Technical Note].

    PubMed

    Funatsu, Takayuki; Kawashima, Akitsugu; Mochizuki, Yuichi; Kikuta, Yoshichika; Imanaka, Kousuke; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2015-10-01

    Intracranial arterial microanastomosis remains an important neurosurgical technique. Intimal dissection of donor or recipient arteries can cause bypass failure. We used a silicone rubber stent while performing arterial microanastomoses, and achieved an excellent postoperative patency rate. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the stent in cases of extensive intimal dissection. In 5 cases involving extensive intimal dissection of vessels out of a total of 856 microanastomoses that were performed between November 2000 and August 2014, we placed a silicone rubber stent in the lumen of the recipient artery for donor to recipient suturing. Surgery was performed in 3 cases of cerebrovascular atherosclerotic disease and in 2 cases requiring cerebral revascularization for the treatment of aneurysm recurrence. In one of the 5 cases in which arterial microanastomosis was performed in the spasm period after subarachnoid hemorrhage, a patent anastomosis could not be confirmed. We observed the following advantages of silicone stent use: clear visualization of the orifice created in the vessel, avoidance of suturing or damaging the contralateral side vessel edges, and maintenance of the shape of the anastomosed vessel segment. These advantages made it easier to visualize the intima and to achieve fixation by using tacking sutures. PMID:26435370

  17. Efficacy of Proximal Aspiration Thrombectomy for Using Balloon-Tipped Guide Catheter in Acute Intracranial Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Won; Hwang, Yang-Ha; Park, Jaechan; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mechanical thrombectomy (MT) for acute intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion is often complicated by difficult revascularization and non-involved territory embolization possibly related with larger clot-burden. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of proximal aspiration thrombectomy (PAT) using a balloon-tipped guide catheter for clot-burden reduction in such cases with period-to-period analysis (period 1 : standard MT without PAT; period 2 : PAT first, then standard MT for the remaining occlusion). Methods Eighty-six patients who underwent MT for acute intracranial ICA occlusion were included in this analysis from the prospectively maintained stroke registry (33 patients in period 1 and 53 in period 2). In period 2, 'responder' was defined as a case where some amount of clot was retrieved by PAT and the following angiography showed partial or full recanalization. Results Fifteen of fifty-three patients in period 2 (28.3%) were 'responders' to PAT. There was a significantly higher incidence of atrial fibrillation in the 'responder' subgroup. Period 2 showed a significantly shorter puncture-to-reperfusion time (94.5 minutes vs. 56.0 minutes; p=0.002), a significantly higher Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction of 2b-3 reperfusion (45.5% vs. 73.6%; p=0.009), but only a trend for better 3-month favorable outcome (mRS 0–2; 36.4% vs. 54.7%; p=0.097). There was no increase in the incidence of procedure-related complications or intracranial hemorrhage in period 2. Conclusion A strategy of PAT before standard MT may result in shorter puncture-to-reperfusion time and better angiographic outcome than a strategy of standard MT for acute intracranial ICA occlusion. PMID:27446520

  18. Spaceflight-induced alterations in cerebral artery vasoconstrictor, mechanical, and structural properties: implications for elevated cerebral perfusion and intracranial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Curtis R.; Hanna, Mina; Behnke, Bradley J.; Stabley, John N.; McCullough, Danielle J.; Davis, Robert T.; Ghosh, Payal; Papadopoulos, Anthony; Muller-Delp, Judy M.; Delp, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence indicates that cerebral blood flow is both increased and diminished in astronauts on return to Earth. Data from ground-based animal models simulating the effects of microgravity have shown that decrements in cerebral perfusion are associated with enhanced vasoconstriction and structural remodeling of cerebral arteries. Based on these results, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that 13 d of spaceflight [Space Transportation System (STS)-135 shuttle mission] enhances myogenic vasoconstriction, increases medial wall thickness, and elicits no change in the mechanical properties of mouse cerebral arteries. Basilar and posterior communicating arteries (PCAs) were isolated from 9-wk-old female C57BL/6 mice for in vitro vascular and mechanical testing. Contrary to that hypothesized, myogenic vasoconstrictor responses were lower and vascular distensibility greater in arteries from spaceflight group (SF) mice (n=7) relative to ground-based control group (GC) mice (n=12). Basilar artery maximal diameter was greater in SF mice (SF: 236±9 μm and GC: 215±5 μm) with no difference in medial wall thickness (SF: 12.4±1.6 μm; GC: 12.2±1.2 μm). Stiffness of the PCA, as characterized via nanoindentation, was lower in SF mice (SF: 3.4±0.3 N/m; GC: 5.4±0.8 N/m). Collectively, spaceflight-induced reductions in myogenic vasoconstriction and stiffness and increases in maximal diameter of cerebral arteries signify that elevations in brain blood flow may occur during spaceflight. Such changes in cerebral vascular control of perfusion could contribute to increases in intracranial pressure and an associated impairment of visual acuity in astronauts during spaceflight.—Taylor, C. R., Hanna, M., Behnke, B. J., Stabley, J. N., McCullough, D. J., Davis III, R. T., Ghosh, P., Papadopoulos, A., Muller-Delp, J. M., Delp, M. D. Spaceflight-induced alterations in cerebral artery vasoconstrictor, mechanical, and structural properties: implications for elevated

  19. Combined Neuroform Intracranial Stent and Bioactive Matrix Detachable Coil for Embolization of a Broad-Necked Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Q.P.; Li, T.L.; Duan, C.Z.; Chen, G.Z.

    2005-01-01

    Summary We report a patient with a wide-necked aneurysm arising at the bifurcation of the right internal carotid artery and the persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) treated successfully by Matrix detachable coil occlusion and assisted by a Neuroform intracranial stent. First, a Neuroform self-expanding intracranial stent was delivered via a 5-F Guider Softtip XP and placed as desired, then the aneurysm dome was embolized with two Matrix detachable coils through the interstices of the stent. The aneurysm was 80% occluded angiographically and the parent artery was patent. DSA imaging six months after the procedure showed the aneurysm to be obliterated at angiography and the neck tissue thickness of the aneurysm to be increased, but the parent artery diameter was not impacted. We describe the case in detail and discuss our preliminary experience of using the Neuroform stent and Matrix detachable coils for the treatment of a PPTA wide-necked aneurysm. PMID:20584437

  20. Spaceflight-induced alterations in cerebral artery vasoconstrictor, mechanical, and structural properties: implications for elevated cerebral perfusion and intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Curtis R; Hanna, Mina; Behnke, Bradley J; Stabley, John N; McCullough, Danielle J; Davis, Robert T; Ghosh, Payal; Papadopoulos, Anthony; Muller-Delp, Judy M; Delp, Michael D

    2013-06-01

    Evidence indicates that cerebral blood flow is both increased and diminished in astronauts on return to Earth. Data from ground-based animal models simulating the effects of microgravity have shown that decrements in cerebral perfusion are associated with enhanced vasoconstriction and structural remodeling of cerebral arteries. Based on these results, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that 13 d of spaceflight [Space Transportation System (STS)-135 shuttle mission] enhances myogenic vasoconstriction, increases medial wall thickness, and elicits no change in the mechanical properties of mouse cerebral arteries. Basilar and posterior communicating arteries (PCAs) were isolated from 9-wk-old female C57BL/6 mice for in vitro vascular and mechanical testing. Contrary to that hypothesized, myogenic vasoconstrictor responses were lower and vascular distensibility greater in arteries from spaceflight group (SF) mice (n=7) relative to ground-based control group (GC) mice (n=12). Basilar artery maximal diameter was greater in SF mice (SF: 236±9 μm and GC: 215±5 μm) with no difference in medial wall thickness (SF: 12.4±1.6 μm; GC: 12.2±1.2 μm). Stiffness of the PCA, as characterized via nanoindentation, was lower in SF mice (SF: 3.4±0.3 N/m; GC: 5.4±0.8 N/m). Collectively, spaceflight-induced reductions in myogenic vasoconstriction and stiffness and increases in maximal diameter of cerebral arteries signify that elevations in brain blood flow may occur during spaceflight. Such changes in cerebral vascular control of perfusion could contribute to increases in intracranial pressure and an associated impairment of visual acuity in astronauts during spaceflight. PMID:23457215

  1. Analysis of risk factors for perifocal oedema after endovascular embolization of unruptured intracranial arterial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Lukic, Snezana; Jankovic, Slobodan; Popovic, Katarina Surlan; Bankovic, Dragic; Popovic, Peter; Mijailovic, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Background Endovascular embolization is a treatment of choice for the management of unruptured intracranial aneurysms, but sometimes is complicated with perianeurysmal oedema. The aim of our study was to establish incidence and outcomes of perianeurysmal oedema after endovascular coiling of unruptured intracranial aneurysms, and to reveal possible risk factors for development of this potentially serious complication. Methods In total 119 adult patients with endovascular embolization of unruptured intracranial aneurysm (performed at Department for Interventional Neuroradiology, Clinical Center, Kragujevac, Serbia) were included in our study. The embolizations were made by electrolite-detachable platinum coils: pure platinum, hydrophilic and combination of platinum and hydrophilic coils. Primary outcome variable was perianeurysmal oedema visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 7, 30 and 90 days after the embolization. Results The perianurysmal oedema appeared in 47.6% of patients treated with hydrophilic coils, in 21.6% of patients treated with platinum coils, and in 53.8% of those treated with mixed type of the coils. The multivariate logistic regression showed that variables associated with occurrence of perianeurysmal oedema are volume of the aneurysm, hypertension, diabetes and smoking habit. Hypertension is the most important independent predictor of the perianeurysmal oedema, followed by smoking and diabetes. Conclusions The results of our study suggest that older patients with larger unruptured intracranial aneurysms, who suffer from diabetes mellitus and hypertension, and have the smoking habit, are under much higher risk of having perianeurysmal oedema after endovascular coiling. PMID:26834520

  2. Treatment of vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysms with Pipeline embolization device

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Osama; Storey, Christopher; Kalakoti, Piyush; Deep Thakur, Jai; Zhang, Shihao; Nanda, Anil; Guthikonda, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    Object Treatment of complex intracranial aneurysms with Pipeline embolization device (PED) (ev3/Covidien Vascular Therapies) has gained recent popularity. One application of PEDs that is not well described in the literature is the utility and long-term safety in treatment of vertebrobasilar fusiform (VBF) aneurysms. Despite the advancements in endovascular therapy, VBF aneurysms continue to challenging pathology. The authors provide long-term follow-up of VBF aneurysms treated with PEDs. Methods We retrospectively reviewed four patients that were treated at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport with PEDs for VBFs from 2012 to 2014. Each patient was discussed in a multidisciplinary setting between neurosurgeons and neurointerventionalists. Each patient underwent platelet function tests to ensure responsiveness to anti-platelet agents and was treated by one neurointerventionalist (HC). All patients were placed on aspirin and Plavix and were confirmed for therapeutic response prior to discharge. Results Follow-up ranged from 12 to 25 months, with a mean of 14.25 months. Two cases presented with a recurrence after the initial treatment, both of which required subsequent treatment. Of the four patients treated, one patient developed hemiparesis and three died. Conclusion Despite reports describing successful treatment of VBF aneurysms with PEDs, delayed complications after obliteration and remodeling can occur. We describe our institutional experience of VBFs treated with PEDs. Treatment of holobasilar fusiform aneurysms may carry a worse prognosis after treatment. Further long-term follow-up will provide a better understanding of this pathology. PMID:26089246

  3. [Vertebrobasilar transient ischemic attacks in young and middle aged patients].

    PubMed

    Beliavskiĭ, N N; Likhachev, S A; Varenik, T N; Demarin, V

    2008-01-01

    A complex clinical, neurological, laboratory, ultrasound and neuroimaging examination of 70 patients, aged 31-59 years, suffering from vertebrobasilar transient ischemic attack (TIA) was carried out in order to determine clinical and pathogenetic peculiarities of the disease in young and middle aged patients. The hemodynamically significant atherosclerotic lesion of the large cerebral arteries (LCA) as a cause of TIA was observed more rarely in the young and middle age groups than in elderly and aged people. Heart valves lesion was the main cause of cerebral cardioembolism in young and middle aged patients with TIA. A greater number of cases with other established causes of the disease (dissections, kinking of vertebral arteries, hemorheological microocclusion) were revealed. An undetermined pathogenesis of the disease mostly due to the inability to choose the main pathogenetic mechanism out of other potential mechanisms, e.g., the association of arterial hypertension with kinking, the hypoplasia or anomaly of the entrance of vertebral artery into the transverse channel, was observed in these groups more often than in elderly and aged people. The clinical picture of TIA in young and middle aged patients with hemodynamically significant atherosclerotic lesion of LCA had the highest similarity with that in elderly and aged ones. In case of cardioembolic pathogenesis, it was characterized by the markedly less severe signs of the disease and in case of the disease due to isolated arterial hypertension--by the lower rate of vascular white matter abnormalities on neuroimaging. A relatively higher rate of symptoms attributed to the manifestation of hypertensive crisis during the attack was observed in young and middle aged patients with TIA due to isolated arterial hypertension comparing with other pathogenetic variants of the disease. The clinical picture of TIA due to other established causes was depended on the main pathogenetic mechanism of the disease. PMID:19431240

  4. [Spontaneous occlusion of a dissecting aneurysm in the shape of "two dumplings on a skewer" at righ posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA): report of a case and neuroradiological findings].

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, K; Amoh, M; Nakamura, Y; Yasuma, Y; Kurokawa, S

    2000-06-01

    We present a case of a spontaneous dissecting aneurysm at the vertebrobasilar artery including the right PICA in a 44-year-old man, who suffered from headache, hiccup and ataxic gait. The arteriograms showed an irregular narrowing and dilatation in the right PICA and in the vertebrobasilar artery, and showed fusiform dilatations in the bilateral middle cerebral arteries. We observed intramural hematoma and true lumen at the right PICA dissecting aneurysm on T1-weighted images on magnetic resonance imaging (1.5T, MRI), and the intimal flap was enhanced on T1-weighted image after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA. The shape of the intramural hematoma showed a unique "two dumplings on a skewer" appearance, and the intensity of its hematoma in the false lumen decreased in gradient from adventitia to intimal flap on T1-weighted image on MRI. The dissecting aneurysm of the PICA was occluded spontaneously 1 month later, and it caused cerebellar infarction. However, the patient has been left only with the symptom of slight trunkal ataxia. Various shapes of intramural hematomas on MRI have been reported by Kitanaka in association with intracranial vertebrobasilar dissections. We suggest that "two dumplings on a skewer" shape which corresponds to the flow void of the true lumen, accompanied by intramural hematoma and enhanced intimal flap, on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image, should be regarded as a true "diagnostic sign" of a dissecting aneurysm. PMID:10875115

  5. Cerebral arterial occlusion and intracranial venous thrombosis in a woman taking oral contraceptives.

    PubMed Central

    Montón, F.; Rebollo, M.; Quintana, F.; Berciano, J.

    1984-01-01

    Occlusion of the middle cerebral artery and thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus are reported in a 30-year-old woman taking oral contraceptives (OC). The coexistence of arterial and venous cerebral pathology as a complication of OC use has only been previously reported in one case. The pathogenesis of this rare association is briefly discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6462985

  6. Hemodynamic Characteristics of the Vertebrobasilar System Analyzed Using MRI-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    Wake-Buck, Amanda K.; Gatenby, J. Christopher; Gore, John C.

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrobasilar system (VBS) is unique in human anatomy in that two arteries merge into a single vessel, and it is especially important because it supplies the posterior circulation of the brain. Atherosclerosis develops in this region, and atherosclerotic plaques in the vertebrobasilar confluence can progress with catastrophic consequences, including artery occlusion. Quantitative assessments of the flow characteristics in the VBS could elucidate the factors that influence flow patterns in this confluence, and deviations from normal patterns might then be used to predict locations to monitor for potential pathological changes, to detect early signs of disease, and to evaluate treatment options and efficacy. In this study, high-field MRI was used in conjunction with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling to investigate the hemodynamics of subject-specific confluence models (n = 5) and to identify different geometrical classes of vertebrobasilar systems (n = 12) of healthy adult subjects. The curvature of the vessels and their mutual orientation significantly affected flow parameters in the VBS. The basilar artery geometry strongly influenced both skewing of the velocity profiles and the wall shear stress distributions in the VBS. All five subjects modeled possessed varying degrees of vertebral asymmetry, and helical flow was observed in four cases, suggesting that factors other than vertebral asymmetry influence mixing of the vertebral artery flow contributions. These preliminary studies verify that quantitative, MR imaging techniques in conjunction with subject-specific CFD models of healthy adult subjects may be used to characterize VBS hemodynamics and to predict flow features that have been related to the initiation and development of atherosclerosis in large arteries. This work represents an important first step towards applying this approach to study disease initiation and progression in the VBS. PMID:23251503

  7. Association of Inter-arm Blood Pressure Difference with Asymptomatic Intracranial and Extracranial Arterial Stenosis in Hypertension Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Qian, Yuesheng; Tang, Xiaofeng; Ling, Huawei; Chen, Kemin; Li, Yan; Gao, Pingjin; Zhu, Dingliang

    2016-01-01

    Inter-arm blood pressure (BP) difference has been associated with ischemic stroke. Local atherosclerosis of stroke differ among vulnerable individuals, whereas intracranial arterial stenosis (ICAS) is more frequently affected Asians, and extracranial arterial stenosis (ECAS) is more prevalent among whites. We hereby sought to explore the association of inter-arm BP difference with ICAS and ECAS in stroke-free hypertensive patients in Chinese population. All the 885 subjects were evaluated of ICAS and ECAS through computerized tomographic angiography. Both arm BP was measured simultaneously by Vascular Profiler-1000 device. In the continuous study, ICAS was significantly associated with age, male, average brachial SBP, diabetes, anti-hypertensive treatment and inter-arm DBP difference. ECAS was associated with age, inter-arm SBP and LDL. In the categorical study, subjects with the top quartile of inter-arm DBP difference (≥4 mmHg) showed significantly higher risk of ICAS (OR = 2.109; 95% CI, 1.24-3.587). And the participants with the top quartile of inter-arm SBP difference (≥6 mmHg) showed significantly higher risk of ECAS (OR = 2.288; 95% CI, 1.309-3.998). In conclusion, we reported a diverse association of inter-arm SBP/DBP difference with the ICAS/ECAS. Inter-arm DBP difference might be the early symbol of ICAS in Chinese population, which need further verification in long-term cohort study. PMID:27412818

  8. Pathophysiology and management of intracranial arterial stenosis around the circle of Willis associated with hyperthyroidism: case reports and literature review.

    PubMed

    Matano, Fumihiro; Murai, Yasuo; Adachi, Koji; Kitamura, Takayuki; Teramoto, Akira

    2014-04-01

    Cases of moyamoya disease or intracranial arterial stenosis around the circle of Willis (M/IAS) associated with hyperthyroidism have been reported. However, most of these previous reports were of the ischemic form of M/IAS and primary hyperthyroidism. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have documented therapy for M/IAS associated with hyperthyroidism. We discuss four previously unreported cases, including those involving the intracerebral hemorrhage form and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) secretion from a pituitary adenoma (secondary hyperthyroidism). We analyzed data from 52 previously reported cases, including the 4 cases presented here, and discuss M/IAS associated with hyperthyroidism, treatment options, pathophysiology, the ischemic and hemorrhagic forms, secondary hyperthyroidism, and the relevant literature. Hyperthyroidism results in thyrotoxicosis and the stimulation of the superior cervical ganglion by TSH antibodies and f-T3/f-T4. Consequently, hypercoagulability and stenosis of the cerebral artery can occur. There are many reports of ischemic M/IAS associated with hyperthyroidism. A conservative approach to treatment is important in such cases; for example, antithyroid therapy should be the first choice to treat ischemic M/IAS. There have been only a limited number of reports on hemorrhagic M/IAS. We presume that hemorrhagic M/IAS tears the weakened vasculature in a manner similar to that of normal M/IAS (with no complicating hyperthyroidism). The authors also reported M/IAS associated with secondary hyperthyroidism due to pituitary thyroid secreting hormone secreting adenoma. PMID:24249431

  9. Cerebral Arterial Variations Associated with Moyamoya Disease Diagnosed by MR Angiography.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kurita, Hiroki; Ishihara, Shoichiro

    2014-12-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare progressive cerebrovascular steno-occlusive disease associated with different variations of the cerebral arteries. We evaluated the types and prevalence of such variations among patients with moyamoya disease. In our institution during the past seven years, we diagnosed 72 patients (24 male, 48 female; aged 6 to 75 years, mean, 42 years) with moyamoya disease by magnetic resonance (MR) angiography using either a 3-Tesla or one of two 1.5-T imagers and a standard time-of-flight technique without contrast media. An experienced neuroradiologist retrospectively reviewed the images. There were 15 cerebral arterial variations in 13 of 72 patients with moyamoya disease (18.1%), including four basilar artery fenestrations, three ophthalmic arteries arising from the middle meningeal artery, two intracranial vertebral artery fenestrations, two persistent first cervical intersegmental arteries, two persistent trigeminal arteries, one extracranial origin of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, and one persistent stapedial artery. Although our number of patients was small, moyamoya disease was frequently associated with variations of the cerebral arteries, especially fenestrations in the vertebrobasilar system and persistent trigeminal artery. PMID:25489893

  10. Application of 3.0T magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) technology in mild and moderate intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    LI, ZHONGWEI; LI, NAIKUN; QU, YANYAN; GAI, FENG; ZHANG, GUOWEI; ZHANG, GUANGHUI

    2016-01-01

    The application value of 3.0T magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) technology in mild and moderate intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis was evaluated. A total of 58 cases of transient ischemic attack (TIA) and 60 cases of ischemic cerebral apoplexy cases were selected. The cases were analysed using a GE Healthcare Signa HDx 3.0T superconducting whole-body magnetic resonance scan within 24 h of attack. Eight-channel head phased array coils and conventional sequence were used to create T1-weighted images (T1WI), T2WI, diffusion-weighted imaging, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and ASL imaging, which were generated into ASL pseudo-color images (blue was hypoperfusion area) through post-processing in order to compare and analyze the correlation and differences between ASL and conventional imaging in terms of lesion location, size, blood perfusion situation and signal range of relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF). The results showed that, 13 TIA cases of abnormal signal in conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can also be found through ASL technology. Diameter stenosis beyond 30% in MRA can also be tested in ASL. A positive rate in ASL was significantly higher than that of conventional MRI (χ2=29.078, P<0.001) and hypoperfusion area was greatly increased (t=32.526, P<0.001). The rCBF value was positively correlated with the degree of diameter stenosis shown in MRA (r=0.524, P=0.012). Additionally, the positive rate of ASL was positively correlated with the attack times of TIA (r=0.352, P=0.027). A total of 39 cerebral apoplexy cases of abnormal signal in conventional MRI were also found through ASL technology. A positive rate in ASL was significantly higher than that of conventional MRI (χ2=7.685, P=0.006) and hypoperfusion area was greatly increased (t=9.425, P<0.001). The rCBF value was positively correlated with the degree of diameter stenosis (r=0.635, P=0.009). In conclusion, 3.0T ASL correlated with early diagnosis of TIA and mild and

  11. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting for symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H.; Magoufis, Georgios; Kargiotis, Odysseas; Papadimitropoulos, Georgios; Vadikolias, Konstantinos; Karapanayiotides, Theodoros; Ellul, John; Alexandrov, Anne W.; Mitsias, Panayiotis D.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The cumulative safety and efficacy measures of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) for secondary stroke prevention in patients with symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis (sICAS) have not previously been evaluated using a meta-analytical approach. Methods: We conducted a systematic review and random effects meta-analysis of all available randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the safety and efficacy of PTAS (in comparison with medical therapy) for sICAS. Results: Three RCTs (678 total patients) were included in the quantitative analysis. PTAS was associated with a higher risk of recurrent ischemic stroke in the territory of qualifying artery both within 30 days [risk ratio (RR) = 2.21, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10–4.43] and 1 year (RR = 1.92, 95% CI 1.10–3.36). PTAS was also related to a higher risk of any ischemic stroke within 30 days from the index event (RR = 2.08, 95% CI 1.17–3.71). The risk for intracranial hemorrhage was found to be higher in PTAS patients both within 30 days (RR = 10.60, 95% CI 1.98–56.62) and 1 year (RR = 8.15, 95% CI 1.50–44.34). The composite outcome of any stroke or death within 1 year (RR = 2.29, 95% CI 1.13–4.66) and 2 years (RR = 1.52, 95% CI 1.04–2.21) was higher in PTAS than in medical therapy. PTAS was associated with a higher risk of any stroke or death within 2 years in the sICAS subgroup located in posterior circulation (RR = 2.37, 95% CI 1.27–4.42). Conclusions: PTAS is associated with adverse early and long-term outcomes and should not be recommended in patients with sICAS. Further research to identify subgroups of patients who could also serve as candidates for future interventional trials along with efforts to reduce procedure-related complications are needed.

  12. Puerarin and betahistine treatment of vertebrobasilar ischemia vertigo: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, YAN-YAN; CHEN, WEN; ZHANG, QING; LI, HUI; ZHANG, YE-WEN; KANG, QIAN; LAN, YI; WU, QING

    2016-01-01

    The present meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of puerarin co-treatment with betahistine in treating vertebrobasilar ischemia (VBI) vertigo. A total of 6 medical databases were searched, identifying randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of VBI vertigo performed until August 2014 that investigated a combined treatment of puerarin with betahistine or with other conventional drugs. The quality of the literature was evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias, and Rev Man 5.0 software was used for statistical analysis and evaluation. The present study included 7 RCTs, involving a total of 664 subjects, and revealed a statistically significant increase in efficacy between the control and the experimental group (odds ratio [OR], 4.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.05 to 8.15). The average blood flow velocity within the vertebrobasilar arteries increased following treatment with puerarin and betahistine compared with that of the control groups (OR, 7.59; 95% CI, 6.19 to 9.00); however, no difference was detected between these groups in the average flow velocity within the left vertebral artery (OR, 6.17; 95% CI, 5.22 to 7.13). The frequency of adverse reactions in the experimental group was lower (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.32 to 1.77) compared with the control group. Combined puerarin and betahistine regimens were more effective in treating VBI vertigo compared with other, conventional drugs; effectively alleviating the associated symptoms, including dizziness and increased average blood flow velocity within the vertebrobasilar arteries, without causing an increased number of serious side effects. However, the efficacy and safety of puerarin and betahistine use in treating VBI vertigo requires additional investigation. PMID:26998036

  13. Association of Inter-arm Blood Pressure Difference with Asymptomatic Intracranial and Extracranial Arterial Stenosis in Hypertension Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Qian, Yuesheng; Tang, Xiaofeng; Ling, Huawei; Chen, Kemin; Li, Yan; Gao, Pingjin; Zhu, Dingliang

    2016-01-01

    Inter-arm blood pressure (BP) difference has been associated with ischemic stroke. Local atherosclerosis of stroke differ among vulnerable individuals, whereas intracranial arterial stenosis (ICAS) is more frequently affected Asians, and extracranial arterial stenosis (ECAS) is more prevalent among whites. We hereby sought to explore the association of inter-arm BP difference with ICAS and ECAS in stroke-free hypertensive patients in Chinese population. All the 885 subjects were evaluated of ICAS and ECAS through computerized tomographic angiography. Both arm BP was measured simultaneously by Vascular Profiler-1000 device. In the continuous study, ICAS was significantly associated with age, male, average brachial SBP, diabetes, anti-hypertensive treatment and inter-arm DBP difference. ECAS was associated with age, inter-arm SBP and LDL. In the categorical study, subjects with the top quartile of inter-arm DBP difference (≥4 mmHg) showed significantly higher risk of ICAS (OR = 2.109; 95% CI, 1.24–3.587). And the participants with the top quartile of inter-arm SBP difference (≥6 mmHg) showed significantly higher risk of ECAS (OR = 2.288; 95% CI, 1.309–3.998). In conclusion, we reported a diverse association of inter-arm SBP/DBP difference with the ICAS/ECAS. Inter-arm DBP difference might be the early symbol of ICAS in Chinese population, which need further verification in long-term cohort study. PMID:27412818

  14. Pipeline endovascular reconstruction of traumatic dissecting aneurysms of the intracranial internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vikram; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Jindal, Gaurav

    2014-12-01

    A 22-year-old woman was involved in a motor vehicle collision resulting in multiple facial fractures and extensive internal carotid artery (ICA) injury including a right carotid-cavernous fistula, complex dissection flap and dissecting aneurysms. Endovascular coil embolization was initially performed to treat the cavernous carotid fistula and then again on two separate occasions to treat expanding dissecting aneurysms. Parent vessel reconstruction of the right ICA was subsequently performed with the Pipeline embolization device, resulting in complete anatomical restoration of this vessel. PMID:24353328

  15. Nocardia abscessus-related intracranial aneurysm of the internal carotid artery with associated brain abscess: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Farran, Yvette; Antony, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia infections primarily begin in the lungs and spread hematogenously to other sites in the body. Thus, a Nocardia brain abscess is not a completely uncommon occurrence. However, a Nocardia brain abscess complicated by a middle cerebral artery and infectious intracranial aneurysm is a very rare clinical entity. We present a case of an infectious intracranial aneurysm with an associated Nocardia brain abscess that required surgical intervention and resection. The patient was an immunocompetent 60-year-old male who presented with a chief complaint of headache and was found to have an infected intracranial aneurysm and cerebral abscess. He underwent drainage of the abscess with subsequent resection of the infected aneurysm. Cultures from both the blood vessel and brain tissue grew Nocardia abscessus. He was successfully treated with 6 weeks of ceftriaxone and high-dose trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Infectious intracranial aneurysms of the brain caused by Nocardia are rare occurrences, and only a single previous case has been described in the literature. The outcomes of this condition can be catastrophic if it is not treated with a combination of surgery and intravenous antibiotics. The guidelines for the management of this infection are not well defined at this time. PMID:26724261

  16. Penetrating intracranial nail-gun injury to the middle cerebral artery: A successful primary repair

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, Albert M.; Yuh, Sung-Joo; Hurlbert, R. John; Mitha, Alim P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Penetrating nail-gun injuries to the head are rare, however, the incidence has been gradually rising over the last decade. While there is a large volume of case reports in the literature, there are only a few incidences of cerebrovascular injury. We present a case of a patient with a nail-gun injury to the brain, which compromised the cerebral vasculature. In this article, we present the case, incidence, pathology, and a brief literature review of penetrating nail-gun injuries to highlight the principles of management pertaining to penetration of cerebrovascular structures. Case Description: A 26-year-old male presented with a penetrating nail-gun injury to his head. There were no neurological deficits. Initial imaging revealed that the nail had penetrated the cranium and suggested the vasculature to be intact. However, due to the proximity of the nail to the circle of Willis the operative approach was tailored in anticipation of a vascular injury. Intraoperatively removal of the foreign body demonstrated a laceration to the M1 branch of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), which was successfully repaired. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a vascular arterial injury to the MCA from a nail-gun injury. It is imperative to have a high clinical suspicion for cerebrovascular compromise in penetrating nail-gun injuries even when conventional imaging suggests otherwise. PMID:26500798

  17. Cognitive problems related to vertebrobasilar circulation.

    PubMed

    Koçer, Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are characterized by decreased regional cerebral blood flow. Supporting this concept, both cognitive training exercises and physical activity promote blood flow increase and correlate with healthy cognitive aging. The terminal branches of the posterior circulation supply blood to areas of the brain, such as the thalamus, hippocampus, occipital lobe, and cerebellum, involved with important intellectual functions, particularly recent memory, visual-spatial functioning, and visuomotor adaptations. Amnesia and visual agnosia may be a complication of not only posterior circulation infarctions but also vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) without accompanying structural infarcts. The cognitive impairment maybe a manifestation of transient attacks and may persist beyond resolution of symptoms related to ischemia. Early recognition of cognitive deficits in the VBI patient is important because several recent reports show stent placements or medical treatment may improve cognition. PMID:26738337

  18. Comparison of BMSs with SES for Symptomatic Intracranial Disease of the Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yue Xuanye; Yin Qin; Xi Gangming; Zhu Wusheng; Xu Gelin; Zhang Renliang; Zhou Zhiming; Ma Minmin; Jin Guangfu; Liu Xinfeng

    2011-02-15

    This study was designed to compare the clinical and angiographic outcomes of patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic middle cerebral artery stenosis treated with balloon-mounted stents (BMS) and self-expandable Wingspan system (SES). We reviewed the 69 consecutive stent placement procedures for symptomatic atherosclerotic stenosis ({>=}70) in M1 segment of middle cerebral artery in 67 patients in 3 years. According to the stent types, the patients were classed as BMS and SES groups. The demographic characteristics, conventional risk factors of ischemic stroke, degree of stenosis, periprocedural complications, stent types, and clinical and angiographic outcomes were analyzed. There were 39 patients in the BMS group and 28 patients in the SES group. The demographic characteristics, conventional risk factors, and periprocedural complications were similar but different in residual stenosis after stenting in both groups (5.9% {+-} 9.9% vs. 14.4% {+-} 14.6%; P = 0.01). For the overall cohort, the rate of stroke or death and restenosis was 10.9% (7/66) and 24.5% (14/57), respectively. The frequency of restenosis was higher in the SES group than in the BMS group (log-rank, P = 0.04; crude hazard ratio = 3.03; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-9.15; P = 0.049; and adjusted hazard ratio = 3.61; 95% CI, 1.06-12.27; P = 0.04); however, there was no difference in clinical outcomes (log-rank, P = 0.51; crude hazard ratio = 1.66; 95% CI, 0.36-7.61; P = 0.51; and adjusted hazard ratio = 0.59; 95% CI, 0.04-7.89; P = 0.69). The corrected degree of restenosis was higher in the SES than the BMS group. The prevalence of restenosis was higher in the SES than the BMS group, but the perioperative complications and follow-up clinical outcomes had no significant difference.

  19. Subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by a fungal aneurysm of the vertebral artery as a complication of intracranial aneurysm clipping. Case report.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, W P; Pilz, P; Chuang, I H

    1990-12-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are an uncommon manifestation of fungal infection. A case is described in which the formation of an aneurysm followed an intracranial intraoperative Aspergillus infection attributable to a long period of preoperative antibiotic medication and immunosuppressive therapy with steroids. PMID:2230983

  20. Reconstructive Treatment of Ruptured Intracranial Spontaneous Vertebral Artery Dissection Aneurysms: Long-Term Results and Predictors of Unfavorable Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qing-Hai; Xu, Yi; Hong, Bo; Li, Qiang; Liu, Jian-Min; Zhao, Wen-Yuan; Deng, Ben-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Few studies focused on predictors of unfavorable outcomes (modified Rankin Scale, 2–6) after reconstructive treatment of the ruptured intracranial spontaneous vertebral artery dissection aneurysms (ris-VADAs), which was evaluated based on 57 reconstructed lesions in this study. Methods Results of 57 consecutive patients (M:F = 29∶28; median age, 48 years; range, 27 to 69 years) harboring 57 ris-VADAs, which were treated with coils combined with single stent(n = 32), double overlapping stents (n = 16), and triple overlapping stents (n = 9) between October 2000 to March 2011, were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Results The available (n = 54) mean durations of angiographic and clinical follow-ups were 27 months (range, 12 to 78) and 62 months (range, 12 to 132), respectively. The involvement of PICA (p = 0.004), size of lesions (p = 0.000), quantity of stent (p = 0.001), and coil type (p = 0.002) affected the immediate obliteration grade, which was only risk factor for angiographic recurrences (p = 0.031). Although the post-treatment outcomes did not differ between single stent and multiple stents (p = 0.434), 5 angiographic recurrences, 1 rebleeding and 1 suspected rebleeding, all occurred in partial obliteration after single-stent-assisted coiling. Progressive thrombosis and in-stent obliteration were not detected on follow-up angiograms. Older age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.090; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.004–1.184; p = 0.040) and unfavorable Hunt-Hess scale (OR = 4.289; 95%CI, 1.232–14.933; p = 0.022) were independent predictors of unfavorable outcomes in the reconstructed ris-VADAs. Conclusions Immediate obliteration grade was only risk factor for angiographic recurrence after reconstructive treatment. Unfavorable Hunt-Hess grade and older age were independent predictors of unfavorable outcomes in ris-VADAs. PMID:23840616

  1. [A Case of Aplastic or Twig-Like Middle Cerebral Artery Presenting with an Intracranial Hemorrhage Two Years after a Transient Ischemic Attack].

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Taku; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Koguchi, Motofumi; Tajima, Yutaka; Suzuyama, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    Aplastic or twig-like middle cerebral artery (Ap/T-MCA) is a rare anatomical anomaly, which can be associated with intracranial hemorrhage and cerebral ischemia. A 52-year-old woman who presented with sudden headache was admitted to our hospital. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging showed no abnormality; however, magnetic resonance angiogram revealed an occlusion or severe stenosis in the left middle cerebral artery. Three-dimensional CT angiography demonstrated severe stenosis in the left middle cerebral artery. The patient was discharged without any neurological deficit; however, she subsequently complained of temporary weakness in the right hand. It was possibly due to a transient ischemic attack; therefore, cilostazol 200 mg/day was administered for prevention of cerebral ischemia. Single photon emission computed tomography(with or without administration of acetazolamide)showed neither significant decrease in the cerebral blood flow nor cerebrovascular reactivity; hence, surgical revascularization was not performed. However, two years after the initial admission, she was urgently admitted to our hospital with sudden headache and nausea followed by aphasia and weakness of the right extremities. CT images showed diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage and intracerebral hemorrhage in the left temporo-parietal lobe. Cerebral angiography revealed that the left middle cerebral artery was Ap/T-MCA without cerebral aneurysms. The patient was treated conservatively, and she eventually recovered without any neurological deficit except mild aphasia. Since Ap/T-MCA is associated with both hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke, antiplatelet therapy should be administered carefully. Moreover, it is necessary to consider extracranial-intracranial bypass to reduce hemodynamic stress on the abnormal vessels. PMID:26856268

  2. Noncontrast-enhanced three-dimensional (3D) intracranial MR angiography using pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling and accelerated 3D radial acquisition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huimin; Block, Walter F; Turski, Patrick A; Mistretta, Charles A; Johnson, Kevin M

    2013-03-01

    Pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL) can be used to generate noncontrast magnetic resonance angiograms of the cerebrovascular structures. Previously described PCASL-based angiography techniques were limited to two-dimensional projection images or relatively low-resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging due to long acquisition time. This work proposes a new PCASL-based 3D magnetic resonance angiography method that uses an accelerated 3D radial acquisition technique (VIPR, spoiled gradient echo) as the readout. Benefiting from the sparsity provided by PCASL and noise-like artifacts of VIPR, this new method is able to obtain submillimeter 3D isotropic resolution and whole head coverage with a 8-min scan. Intracranial angiography feasibility studies in healthy (N = 5) and diseased (N = 5) subjects show reduced saturation artifacts in PCASL-VIPR compared with a standard time-of-flight protocol. These initial results show great promise for PCASL-VIPR for static, dynamic, and vessel selective 3D intracranial angiography. PMID:22532423

  3. Aggressive medical treatment with or without stenting in high-risk patients with intracranial artery stenosis (SAMMPRIS): the final results of a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Derdeyn, Colin P; Chimowitz, Marc I; Lynn, Michael J; Fiorella, David; Turan, Tanya N; Janis, L Scott; Montgomery, Jean; Nizam, Azhar; Lane, Bethany F; Lutsep, Helmi L; Barnwell, Stanley L; Waters, Michael F; Hoh, Brian L; Hourihane, J Maurice; Levy, Elad I; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Harrigan, Mark R; Chiu, David; Klucznik, Richard P; Clark, Joni M; McDougall, Cameron G; Johnson, Mark D; Pride, G Lee; Lynch, John R; Zaidat, Osama O; Rumboldt, Zoran; Cloft, Harry J

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Early results of the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent stroke in Intracranial Stenosis trial showed that, by 30 days, 33 (14·7%) of 224 patients in the stenting group and 13 (5·8%) of 227 patients in the medical group had died or had a stroke (percentages are product limit estimates), but provided insufficient data to establish whether stenting offered any longer-term benefit. Here we report the long-term outcome of patients in this trial. Methods We randomly assigned (1:1, stratified by centre with randomly permuted block sizes) 451 patients with recent transient ischaemic attack or stroke related to 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery to aggressive medical management (antiplatelet therapy, intensive management of vascular risk factors, and a lifestyle-modification programme) or aggressive medical management plus stenting with the Wingspan stent. The primary endpoint was any of the following: stroke or death within 30 days after enrolment, ischaemic stroke in the territory of the qualifying artery beyond 30 days of enrolment, or stroke or death within 30 days after a revascularisation procedure of the qualifying lesion during follow-up. Primary endpoint analysis of between-group differences with log-rank test was by intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT 00576693. Findings During a median follow-up of 32·4 months, 34 (15%) of 227 patients in the medical group and 52 (23%) of 224 patients in the stenting group had a primary endpoint event. The cumulative probability of the primary endpoints was smaller in the medical group versus the percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) group (p=0·0252). Beyond 30 days, 21 (10%) of 210 patients in the medical group and 19 (10%) of 191 patients in the stenting group had a primary endpoint. The absolute differences in the primary endpoint rates between the two groups were 7·1% at year 1 (95% CI 0·2 to

  4. Persistent Aneurysm Growth Following Pipeline Embolization Device Assisted Coiling of a Fusiform Vertebral Artery Aneurysm: A Word of Caution!

    PubMed Central

    Kerolus, Mena; Lopes, Demetrius K.

    2015-01-01

    The complex morphology of vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysms makes them one of the most challenging lesions treated by neurointerventionists. Different management strategies in the past included parent vessel occlusion with or without extra-intracranial bypass surgery and endovascular reconstruction by conventional stents. Use of flow diversion has emerged as a promising alternative option with various studies documenting its efficacy and safety. However, there are various caveats associated with use of flow diversion in patients with fusiform vertibrobasilar aneurysms especially in patients presenting with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We report a rare case of persistent aneurysmal growth after coiling and placement of the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED; ev3, Irvine, California, USA) for SAH from a fusiform vertebral artery aneurysm. As consequences of aneurysm rupture can be devastating especially in patients with a prior SAH, the clinical relevance of recognizing and understanding such patterns of failure cannot be overemphasized as highlighted in the present case. PMID:25763295

  5. The transclival artery: a variant persistent carotid-basilar arterial anastomosis not previously reported.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, Jared D; Dahlin, Brian C; O'Brien, William T

    2016-01-01

    During embryological development, primitive anastomoses exist between the carotid and vertebrobasilar arteries. These anastomoses typically regress or are incorporated into the developing vasculature. Persistence beyond fetal development, however, results in vascular anomalies that alter haemodynamic flow with a predisposition for aneurysm formation. The carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses mirror the primitive communications and include (from most to least common) the trigeminal, hypoglossal, proatlantal and otic arteries. The hypoglossal and proatlantal variants extend through the hypoglossal canal or foramen magnum, respectively. We present a previously undescribed variant of these persistent fetal anastomoses, the 'transclival artery', which courses through its own transclival skull base canal/foramen. PMID:27413022

  6. Persistent trigeminal artery arising from the arterial ring/fenestration of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Kurita, Hiroki; Ishihara, Shoichiro

    2012-09-01

    A persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most common carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis, usually arising from the cavernous or precavernous segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and connecting to the distal basilar artery. There are two types of PTA, lateral and medial. We present the first case of a lateral-type PTA arising from the large arterial ring/fenestration of the cavernous segment of the left ICA with findings from both magnetic resonance angiography and selective catheter angiography. PMID:22215430

  7. [Vertigo and peripheral ischemic cochleovestibular syndrome caused by circulatory insufficiency in the vertebrobasilar system].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, N S; Kirichenko, I M

    2006-01-01

    We studied characteristics of vestibular and acoustic disorders in patients with arterial hypertension, atherosclerosis and vascular dystonia; correlation between peripheral cochleovestibular syndromes (PCVS) and circulation in the major and intracranial arteries, central hemodynamics, organic changes in the brain. We discovered that anomalies and asymmetry in vertebral arteries diameters, stenoses, reduced stroke and minute blood volumes play an essential role in development of PCVS. The latter are rarely accompanied with ischemic foci in the brain. Medication of vascular vertigo consists in administration of an adequate drug. We believe that betaserk is most effective. PMID:16710175

  8. Rupture of giant vertebrobasilar aneurysm following flow diversion: mechanical stretch as a potential mechanism for early aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Fox, Benjamin; Humphries, William Edward; Doss, Vinodh T; Hoit, Daniel; Elijovich, Lucas; Arthur, Adam S

    2014-01-01

    A patient with a giant symptomatic vertebrobasilar aneurysm was treated by endoscopic third ventriculostomy for obstructive hydrocephalus followed by treatment of the aneurysm by flow diversion using a Pipeline Embolization Device. After an uneventful procedure and initial periprocedural period, the patient experienced an unexpected fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage 1 week later. Autopsy demonstrated extensive subarachnoid hemorrhage and aneurysm rupture (linear whole wall rupture). The patent Pipeline Embolization Device was in its intended location, as was the persistent coil occlusion of the distal left vertebral artery. The aneurysm appeared to rupture in a linear manner and contained a thick large expansile clot that seemed to disrupt or rupture the thin aneurysm wall directly opposite the basilar artery/Pipeline Embolization Device. We feel the pattern of aneurysm rupture in our patient supports the idea that the combination of flow diversion and the resulting growing intra-aneurysmal thrombus can create a mechanical force with the potential to cause aneurysm rupture. PMID:25355741

  9. Rupture of giant vertebrobasilar aneurysm following flow diversion: mechanical stretch as a potential mechanism for early aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Fox, Benjamin; Humphries, William Edward; Doss, Vinodh T; Hoit, Daniel; Elijovich, Lucas; Arthur, Adam S

    2015-11-01

    A patient with a giant symptomatic vertebrobasilar aneurysm was treated by endoscopic third ventriculostomy for obstructive hydrocephalus followed by treatment of the aneurysm by flow diversion using a Pipeline Embolization Device. After an uneventful procedure and initial periprocedural period, the patient experienced an unexpected fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage 1 week later. Autopsy demonstrated extensive subarachnoid hemorrhage and aneurysm rupture (linear whole wall rupture). The patent Pipeline Embolization Device was in its intended location, as was the persistent coil occlusion of the distal left vertebral artery. The aneurysm appeared to rupture in a linear manner and contained a thick large expansile clot that seemed to disrupt or rupture the thin aneurysm wall directly opposite the basilar artery/Pipeline Embolization Device. We feel the pattern of aneurysm rupture in our patient supports the idea that the combination of flow diversion and the resulting growing intra-aneurysmal thrombus can create a mechanical force with the potential to cause aneurysm rupture. PMID:25361560

  10. A novel approach using Neuron 6F guiding catheter for the embolization of intracranial aneurysm with coiling of the parent internal carotid artery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Donghai; Wang, Ying; Su, Wandong; Wang, Yunyan; Li, Gang; Li, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    To describe our initial experience and early outcomes with distal placement of the Neuron 6F guiding catheter through coiled ICA for aneurysmal EVT. We examined the utility of the Neuronf 70 6F guiding catheter for the embolization procedure in such cases, fourteen cases of aneurysm with coiling of the parent ICA are presented via traditional guiding catheters. With the support of 8F ENVOY guiding catheter as a shuttle sheath, the NeuronTM 70 6F guiding catheter was successfully placed through coiled extracranial ICA, so the mirocatheter could be delivered to a more strategic position for embolization of the aneurysm. Coiling of extracranial ICA was found as parent artery on angiogram in all patients with ruptured aneurysms. Even where there were two curvatures of more than 360° in the coiled segment of the ICA, NeuronTM 70 6F guiding catheter could be placed through the coiling to a distal position and enabled EVT of intracranial aneurysms with no related neurological complications. Neuron guiding catheter is a useful device for embolization of aneurysm where there is coiling of parent ICA, easily placed through the coiling of the ICA and provided robust anatomical support via enhanced catheter-to-vessel wall engagement. PMID:25785169

  11. A novel approach using Neuron 6F guiding catheter for the embolization of intracranial aneurysm with coiling of the parent internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Donghai; Wang, Ying; Su, Wandong; Wang, Yunyan; Li, Gang; Li, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    To describe our initial experience and early outcomes with distal placement of the Neuron 6F guiding catheter through coiled ICA for aneurysmal EVT. We examined the utility of the Neuronf 70 6F guiding catheter for the embolization procedure in such cases, fourteen cases of aneurysm with coiling of the parent ICA are presented via traditional guiding catheters. With the support of 8F ENVOY guiding catheter as a shuttle sheath, the Neuron(TM) 70 6F guiding catheter was successfully placed through coiled extracranial ICA, so the mirocatheter could be delivered to a more strategic position for embolization of the aneurysm. Coiling of extracranial ICA was found as parent artery on angiogram in all patients with ruptured aneurysms. Even where there were two curvatures of more than 360° in the coiled segment of the ICA, Neuron(TM) 70 6F guiding catheter could be placed through the coiling to a distal position and enabled EVT of intracranial aneurysms with no related neurological complications. Neuron guiding catheter is a useful device for embolization of aneurysm where there is coiling of parent ICA, easily placed through the coiling of the ICA and provided robust anatomical support via enhanced catheter-to-vessel wall engagement. PMID:25785169

  12. 3-Fluoro-Deoxyglucose for the assessment of cerebral perfusion and glucose transport - Indications for extracranial-intracranial arterial bypass and followup studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdorn, H.M.; Vyska, K.; Machulla, H.J.; Knust, E.J.

    1985-05-01

    3-Fluor-Deoxyglucose (3FDG) is a glucose-analogue which is transported across the blood-brain-barrier by the same carrier as glucose but is only phoshorylated to a minor part. By a newly developed model, it became possible to estimate both cerebral perfusion and glucose transport in a single examination, determining the Michaelis-Menten-constant K/sub M/ and the maximal velocity v/sub m/. Normal values were determined as follows: gray matter perfusion 88+-8 ml/ 100g min; v/sub m/ was 2.46 ..mu..mol/g min; K/sub M/ was 6.42 ..mu..mol/g. This method was applied successfully in a series of 15 patients with cerebral ischemia to select suitable candidates for extacranial-intracranial (EC-IC) arterial bypass surgery and to follow them up to 15 months postop. In patients with minor strokes and transient ischemic attacks (TIA), areas which appeared normal in conventional CT presented with reduced perfusion values (down to 67 ml/ 100 g min) and either normal or reduced v/sub m/ (down to 0.8 ..mu..mol/g min). These patients were thought optimal candidates for EC-IC bypass in order to improve the misery perfusion rate.

  13. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage following ischemia in vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Arseny A; Husain, Shakir; Sztajzel, Roman; Croquelois, Alexandre; Lobrinus, Johannes A; Thaler, David; Städler, Claudio; Hungerbühler, Hansjörg; Caso, Valeria; Rinkel, Gabriel J; Michel, Patrik

    2016-07-01

    Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia (VBD) is a chronic disorder with various cerebrovascular and compressive manifestations, involving subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Occurrence of SAH shortly after worsening of clinical VBD symptoms has occasionally been reported. The goal of the study was to examine this association, in particular its pathophysiology, clinical precursor signs, time course, and outcome.To this end, in a retrospective multicenter study, we analyzed 20 patients with VBD and SAH in regard to preceding clinical symptoms, presence of vertebrobasilar thrombosis and ischemia, outcome and neuropathological correlates.Median age of the 7 female and 13 male patients was 70 years (interquartile range [IQR] 18.3 years). Fourteen patients (70%) presented with new or acutely worsening posterior fossa signs at a median of 3 days prior to SAH (IQR 2, range 0.5-14). A thrombus within the VBD was detected in 12 patients (60%). Thrombus formation was associated with clinical deterioration (χ = 4.38, P = 0.04) and ponto-cerebellar ischemia (χ = 8.09, P = 0.005). During follow-up after SAH, 13 patients (65%) died, after a median survival time of 24 hours (IQR 66.2, range 2-264 hours), with a significant association between proven ponto-cerebellar ischemia and case fatality (χ = 6.24, P = 0.01).The data establish an association between clinical deterioration in patients with VBD, vertebrobasilar ischemia, and subsequent SAH. Antithrombotic treatment after deterioration appears controversial and SAH outcome is frequently fatal. Our data also indicate a short window of 3 days that may allow for evaluating interventional treatment, preferably within randomized trials. PMID:27399083

  14. Cervical spondylosis causing vertebrobasilar insufficiency: a surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Donald R.; Vanderark, Gary D.; Kempe, Ludwig G.

    1971-01-01

    Although the most common aetiology of transient vertebrobasilar insufficiency is atherosclerosis, a similar syndrome may occasionally be produced by cervical osteophytes. The possibility of such a remedial lesion makes further investigation mandatory in such patients—especially if symptoms are associated with sudden movements of the head or neck. When vertebral compression results from osteophytes, it can be easily relieved by a minor modification of the usual anterior cervical fusion technique. This method has proved to be quite efficacious in two patients whose case histories are reported. Images PMID:5096552

  15. Risk factors for neurological worsening and symptomatic watershed infarction in internal carotid artery aneurysm treated by extracranial-intracranial bypass using radial artery graft.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Hidetoshi; Tanikawa, Rokuya; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu; Tsuboi, Toshiyuki; Noda, Kosumo; Ota, Nakao; Miyata, Shiro; Oda, Jumpei; Takeda, Rihee; Tokuda, Sadahisa; Kamada, Kyousuke

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT The revascularization technique, including bypass created using the external carotid artery (ECA), radial artery (RA), and M2 portion of middle cerebral artery (MCA), has remained indispensable for treatment of complex aneurysms. To date, it remains unknown whether diameters of the RA, superficial temporal artery (STA), and C2 portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and intraoperative MCA blood pressure have influences on the outcome and the symptomatic watershed infarction (WI). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the factors for the symptomatic WI and neurological worsening in patients treated by ECA-RA-M2 bypass for complex ICA aneurysm with therapeutic ICA occlusion. METHODS The authors measured the sizes of vessels (RA, C2, M2, and STA) and intraoperative MCA blood pressure (initial, after ICA occlusion, and after releasing the RA graft bypass) in 37 patients. Symptomatic WI was defined as presence of the following: postoperative new neurological deficits, WI on postoperative diffusion-weighted imaging, and ipsilateral cerebral blood flow reduction on SPECT. Neurological worsening was defined as the increase in 1 or more modified Rankin Scale scores. First, the authors performed receiver operating characteristic curve analysis for continuous variables and the binary end point of the symptomatic WI. The clinical, radiological, and physiological characteristics of patients with and without the symptomatic WI were compared using the log-rank test. Then, the authors compared the variables between patients with and without neurological worsening at discharge and at the 12-month follow-up examination or last hospital visit. RESULTS Symptomatic WI was observed in 2 (5.4%) patients. The mean MCA pressure after releasing the RA graft (< 55 mm Hg; p = 0.017), mean (MCA pressure after releasing the RA graft)/(initial MCA pressure) (< 0.70 mm Hg; p = 0.032), and mean cross-sectional area ratio ([RA/C2 diameter](2) < 0.40 mm [p < 0.0001] and [STA/C2

  16. The “focus on aneurysm” principle: Classification and surgical principles of management of concurrent arterial aneurysm with arteriovenous malformation causing intracranial hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Vikas; Behari, Sanjay; Jaiswal, Awadhesh K.; Bhaisora, Kamlesh Singh; Shende, Yogesh P.; Phadke, Rajendra V.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Concurrent arterial aneurysms (AAs) occurring in 2.7-16.7% patients harboring an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) aggravate the risk of intracranial hemorrhage. Aim: We evaluate the variations of aneurysms simultaneously coexisting with AVMs. A classification-based management strategy and an abbreviated nomenclature that describes their radiological features is also proposed. Setting: Tertiary care academic institute. Statistics: Test of significance applied to determine the factors causing rebleeding in the groups of patients with concurrent AVM and aneurysm and those with only AVMs. Subjects and Methods: Sixteen patients (5 with subarachnoid hemorrhage and 11 with intracerebral/intraventricular hemorrhage; 10 with low flow [LF] and 6 with high flow [HF] AVMs) underwent radiological assessment of Spetzler Martin (SM) grading and flow status of AA + AVM. Their modified Rankin's score (mRS) at admission was compared with their follow-up (F/U) score. Results: Pre-operative mRS was 0 in 5, 2 in 6, 3 in 1, 4 in 3 and 5 in 1; and, SM grade I in 5, II in 3, III in 3, IV in 4 and V in 1 patients, respectively. AA associated AVMs were classified as: (I) Flow-related proximal (n = 2); (II) flow-related distal (n = 3); (III) intranidal (n = 5); (IV) extra-intranidal (n = 2); (V) remote major ipsilateral (n = 1); (VI) remote major contralateral (n = 1); (VII) deep perforator related (n = 1); (VIII) superficial (n = 1); and (IX) distal (n = 0). Their treatment strategy included: Flow related AA, SM I-III LF AVM: aneurysm clipping with AVM excision; nidal-extranidal AA, SM I-III LF AVM: Excision or embolization of both AA + AVM; nidal-extranidal and perforator-related AA, SM IV-V HF AVM: Only endovascular embolization or radiosurgery. Surgical decision-making for remote AA took into account their ipsilateral/contralateral filling status and vessel dominance; and, for AA associated with SM III HF AVM, it varied in each patient based on diffuseness of AVM nidus, flow

  17. Intracranial Stenting Using a Drug-Eluting Stent for Moyamoya Disease Involving Supraclinoid Internal Carotid Artery: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    KIM, Tackeun; KWON, O-Ki; OH, Chang Wan; BANG, Jae Seung; HWANG, Gyojun; LEE, Young-Jin

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman was diagnosed with moyamoya disease (MMD) and underwent right-side bypass surgery. After surgery, previous symptoms disappeared. One month later, transient right hemiparetic attacks and motor dysphasia developed. Angiography revealed progressive severe stenosis of left supraclinoid segment of internal carotid artery. Angioplasty using a drug-eluting stent (DES) was performed. For 18 months, she presented no ischemic symptom and no in-stent stenosis was observed in follow-up angiography. This is the first case report about effect of DES use for MMD. Considering that intimal hyperplasia is a pathophysiology of stenosis, DES may have a role in reducing progression of stenosis in selected moyamoya patients. PMID:24097093

  18. Intra-arterial administration of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) causes more intracranial bleeding than does intravenous rt-PA in a transient rat middle cerebral artery occlusion model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Intra-arterial (IA) administration of rt-PA for ischemic stroke has the potential for greater thrombolytic efficacy, especially for a large thrombus in the M1 or M2 segment of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is a concern with IA or intravenous (IV) administration especially as the therapeutic window is extended. However, because IA administration delivers a higher local concentration of agent, the incidence and severity of ICH may be greater than with similar doses IV. We investigated the safety of rt-PA administration by IA compared to IV infusion following 6 hours of MCA occlusion (MCAo) with reflow in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Methods Male SHRs were subjected to 6 hours MCAo with 18 hours reflow using a snare ligature model. They were treated with IA saline, IA rt-PA (1, 5, 10, 30 mg/kg), or IV rt-PA (10 and 30 mg/kg) by a 10 to 60 minute infusion beginning approximately 1 minute before reflow. The rats were recovered for 24 hours after MCAo onset at which time Bleeding Score, infarct volume, and Modified Bederson Score were measured. Results Greater hemorrhagic transformation occurred with 10 and 30 mg/kg rt-PA administered IA than IV. The IV 10 mg/kg rt-PA dosage induced significantly less bleeding than did the 1 or 5 mg/kg IA groups. No significant increase in infarct volume was observed after IA or IV treatment. Rats treated with 30 mg/kg rt-PA by either the IA or IV route had greater neurological dysfunction compared to all other groups. Conclusions Administration of rt-PA by the IA route following 6 hours of MCAo results in greater ICH and worse functional recovery than comparable dosages IV. Significantly greater bleeding was observed when the IA dose was a tenth of the IV dose. The increased bleeding did not translate in larger infarct volumes. PMID:21933438

  19. Coil Embolization for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of coil embolization compared with surgical clipping to treat intracranial aneurysms. The Technology Endovascular coil embolization is a percutaneous approach to treat an intracranial aneurysm from within the blood vessel without the need of a craniotomy. In this procedure, a microcatheter is inserted into the femoral artery near the groin and navigated to the site of the aneurysm. Small helical platinum coils are deployed through the microcatheter to fill the aneurysm, and prevent it from further expansion and rupture. Health Canada has approved numerous types of coils and coil delivery systems to treat intracranial aneurysms. The most favoured are controlled detachable coils. Coil embolization may be used with other adjunct endovascular devices such as stents and balloons. Background Intracranial Aneurysms Intracranial aneurysms are the dilation or ballooning of part of a blood vessel in the brain. Intracranial aneurysms range in size from small (<12 mm in diameter) to large (12–25 mm), and to giant (>25 mm). There are 3 main types of aneurysms. Fusiform aneurysms involve the entire circumference of the artery; saccular aneurysms have outpouchings; and dissecting aneurysms have tears in the arterial wall. Berry aneurysms are saccular aneurysms with well-defined necks. Intracranial aneurysms may occur in any blood vessel of the brain; however, they are most commonly found at the branch points of large arteries that form the circle of Willis at the base of the brain. In 85% to 95% of patients, they are found in the anterior circulation. Aneurysms in the posterior circulation are less frequent, and are more difficult to treat surgically due to inaccessibility. Most intracranial aneurysms are small and asymptomatic. Large aneurysms may have a mass effect, causing compression on the brain and cranial nerves and neurological deficits. When an intracranial aneurysm ruptures and bleeds

  20. Acute vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke due to electric injury.

    PubMed

    Singh Jain, Rajendra; Kumar, Sunil; Suresh, Desai Tushar; Agarwal, Rakesh

    2015-07-01

    Electrical injuries are most commonly due to household accidents.Various factors determine the severity of electric injury, including type of current, amperage, voltage, tissue resistance, pathway of current,and duration of contact with the body. Various types of neurologic damage due to electrical injury have been described in literature. It may manifest as peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord damage, seizures, cerebellarataxia, hypoxic encephalopathy, and intracerebral hemorrhage. Acute ischemic stroke is an infrequent complication of electrical injury. Herein,we report a case of middle-aged man, who accidentally sustained high voltage electrical injury followed by acute vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed acute infarctin bilateral cerebellar and medial occipital regions. Computed tomographic angiogram of the brain and neck vessels was normal. Possibly,in our patient, the mechanism could be related to direct vascular injury due to electric current. PMID:25684743

  1. Endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Orlando; Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are abnormal dilations of the intracranial vessels, in which all the layers of the vascular wall are affected by degenerative changes that lead to distension of the vessel. Intracranial aneurysms can be classified based on their anatomic location, size, and morphology. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most devastating clinical presentation. The goal of preventing hemorrhage or rehemorrhage can only be achieved by excluding the aneurysm from the cerebral circulation. Endovascular or surgical clipping can achieve this goal. Multiple surgical and endovascular approaches have been described for treatment of intracranial aneurysm. Surgical approaches for anterior-circulation intracranial aneurysms include: pterional, orbitozygomatic, and lateral supraorbital craniotomies. Modern microsurgical techniques involve skull base dissection to achieve adequate exposure with minimal brain retraction. Endovascular techniques can be divided into: parent artery reconstruction with coil deposition (primary coil, balloon-assisted coiling, stent-assisted coiling, and other new techniques such as neck reconstruction devices and intraluminal occlusion devices); reconstruction with flow diversion; and deconstructive techniques with involving parent artery sacrifice with or without bypass. PMID:27430470

  2. Vertebro-Basilar Junction Aneurysms: A Single Centre Experience and Meta-Analysis of Endovascular Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Francesca; Ganau, Mario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Vascular lesions of the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) are challenging in neurosurgical practice, and their gold-standard therapy is still under debate. We describe the operative strategies currently in use for the management of these complex vascular lesions and discuss their rationale in a literature meta-analysis and single centre blinded retrospective study. The single centre study included a review of initial presentation, angiographic features and clinical outcome (with modified Rankin Scale [mRS] scores) over a long-term follow-up. In our series, small aneurysms were effectively treated by endosaccular coil embolization, whereas a strategy including flow-diverter devices combined with endosaccular coil embolization was the option of choice in large and giant aneurysms, leading to satisfactory outcomes in most cases. Our Medline review showed that endovascular treatment was chosen in most VBJ cases, whereas the microsurgical option was assigned to only a few cases. Among the endovascular treatments, the most common techniques used for the treatment of VBJ aneurysms were: coiling, stent-assisted coiling and flow diversion. Our study highlights that aneurysm morphology, location and patient-specific angio-architecture are key factors to be considered in the management of VBJ aneurysms. Most case series, including our own, show that parent artery reconstruction using a flow-diverter device is a feasible and successful technique in some cases of giant and complex aneurysms (especially those involving the lower third of the basilar artery) while a "sit back, wait and see" approach may represent the safest and most reasonable option. PMID:25489898

  3. Intracranial germinoma

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Manoj P.; Doughty, Kyle E.; Armstrong, Danielle; Melguizo-Gavilanes, Isaac; Cheek, Brennen S.; Opatowsky, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Pineal region tumors make up less than 1% of all intracranial neoplasms, with the majority being of germ cell origin. We describe the diagnostic evaluation and treatment of a patient presenting with neurological deficits who was found to have a germinoma of the pineal gland. PMID:25552796

  4. Bilateral vertebral artery occlusion with retrograde basilary flow in three cases of giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Boettinger, Markus Robert; Sebastian, Schreglmann Robert; Gamulescu, Maria-Andreea Robert; Grauer, Oliver; Ritzka, Markus; Schuierer, Gerhard Robert; Bogdahn, Ulrich Robert; Steinbrecher, Andreas; Schlachetzki, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Vertebrobasilar ischaemia is a rare life-threatening complication in giant cell arteritis (GCA). We report three patients with bilateral vertebral artery occlusion. Neurovascular imaging, including CT-angiography, MR-angiography and colour-coded duplex sonography revealed flow reversal in the basilar artery as well as inflammation of the vertebral vessel wall. The first patient died from massive brainstem infarction, the other two patients survived the initial inflammatory phase of GCA. No stroke recurrence at 12 months’ follow-up on warfarin and steroid treatment was observed. Bilateral distal vertebral artery occlusion and retrograde basilar artery flow persisted. Outcome in these patients is dependant on potent immunosuppression, concurrent atherosclerotic steno-occlusive disease and presence and/or rapid development of sufficient collateral pathways into the vertebrobasilar circulation. The identification of patients with high risk of ischaemia due to compromised vertebrobasilar flow may be important to select adjunct treatment to immunosuppression, such as anticoagulation in GCA. PMID:21691390

  5. Stent-assisted coil embolization for anterior cerebral artery dissection presented with cerebral infarction

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Mitsuhiro; Hattori, Itaro; Sasaki, Makoto; Ishimori, Hisatsugu; Nemoto, Akihiro; Hikita, Chiyoe; Sato, Junko; Fukuta, Shinya; Morimoto, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Compared to those found in the vertebrobasilar system, intracranial dissection in the anterior circulation is relatively rare, especially in the anterior cerebral artery (ACA). Moreover, only several cases of ACA dissection that underwent endovascular treatment have been reported. Here we present a rare case of gradually developing ACA dissecting aneurysm causing cerebral infarction, successfully treated by stent-assisted coil embolization. Case Description: A 36-year-old man was admitted with sudden right hemiparesis. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed cerebral infarction in the left ACA territory, and MR angiography showed segmental stenosis at the A2 portion of the left ACA. Three-dimensional digital subtraction angiogram showed segmental dilatation and stenosis at the left A2 portion. We diagnosed ACA dissection causing acute cerebral infarction and treated the patient conservatively. Five months after the onset, the dissecting artery at the left A2 portion formed a gradually dilating aneurysm, suggesting increased risk for aneurysmal rupture. We attempted endovascular treatment entailing coil embolization of an aneurysm while preserving the left A2 with stent assistance. The patient remained neurologically stable 6 months after the procedure. Conclusions: Although there are few reported cases of ACA dissection where endovascular treatment was attempted, we consider stent-assisted embolization for gradually developing ACA dissecting aneurysm as an alternative method to prevent bleeding and recurrent infarction. PMID:26677416

  6. Exome Sequencing Identifies SMAD3 Mutations as a Cause of Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection with Intracranial and Other Arterial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Regalado, Ellen S.; Guo, Dong-chuan; Villamizar, Carlos; Avidan, Nili; Gilchrist, Dawna; McGillivray, Barbara; Clarke, Lorne; Bernier, Francois; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Bertoli-Avella, Aida M.; Shendure, Jay; Rieder, Mark J.; Nickerson, Deborah A; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Thoracic aortic aneurysms leading to acute aortic dissections (TAAD) can be inherited in families in an autosomal dominant manner. As part of the spectrum of clinical heterogeneity of familial TAAD, we recently described families with multiple members that had TAAD and intracranial aneurysms or TAAD and intracranial and abdominal aortic aneurysms inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Objective To identify the causative mutation in a large family with autosomal dominant inheritance of TAAD with intracranial and abdominal aortic aneurysms by performing exome sequencing of two distantly related individuals with TAAD and identifying shared rare variants. Methods and Results A novel frame shift mutation, p. N218fs (c.652delA), was identified in the SMAD3 gene and segregated with the vascular diseases in this family with a LOD score of 2.52. Sequencing of 181 probands with familial TAAD identified three additional SMAD3 mutations in 4 families, p.R279K (c.836G>A), p.E239K (c.715G>A), and p.A112V (c.235C>T) resulting in a combined LOD score of 5.21. These four mutations were notably absent in 2300 control exomes. SMAD3 mutations were recently described in patients with Aneurysms Osteoarthritis Syndrome and some of the features of this syndrome were identified in individuals in our cohort, but these features were notably absent in many SMAD3 mutation carriers. Conclusions SMAD3 mutations are responsible for 2% of familial TAAD. Mutations are found in families with TAAD alone, along with families with TAAD, intracranial aneurysms, aortic and bilateral iliac aneurysms segregating in an autosomal dominant manner. PMID:21778426

  7. Doppler sonography characteristics of vertebrobasilar circulation in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vidović, Mirjana; Sinanović, Osman; Smajlović, Dzevdet; Burina, Adnan; Hudić, Josip

    2008-08-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze the doppler sonography findings of vertebrobasilar circulation (VB) in patients with Parkinson's disease. 40 patients were analyzed (25 men's and 15 women) with Parkinson's disease, average age was 61.9 years (SD=11.43), treated at the Clinic for Neurology in Tuzla. Device for doppler sonography was Multidop x 4. Doppler sonography findings of VB circulation were analyzed in order to computerized tomography (CT) findings of the brain (with or without ischemic lacunar lesions) and in order to presence of postural disturbances as one of dominant Parkinson's disease symptoms during actual hospitalization. Our results suggest that vertebrobasilar insufficiency is more frequent in patients with Parkinson's disease (no matter of type) and postural disturbances as a dominant symptom comparing to group of Parkinson's disease patients without postural disturbances. These results implicate the importance of doppler sonography findings of vertebrobasilar circulation in patients with Parkinson's disease and possibility of considering role of vertebrobasilar insufficiency in development of postural disturbances. PMID:18816258

  8. Whole-body mathematical model for simulating intracranial pressure dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakin, William D. (Inventor); Penar, Paul L. (Inventor); Stevens, Scott A. (Inventor); Tranmer, Bruce I. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A whole-body mathematical model (10) for simulating intracranial pressure dynamics. In one embodiment, model (10) includes 17 interacting compartments, of which nine lie entirely outside of intracranial vault (14). Compartments (F) and (T) are defined to distinguish ventricular from extraventricular CSF. The vasculature of the intracranial system within cranial vault (14) is also subdivided into five compartments (A, C, P, V, and S, respectively) representing the intracranial arteries, capillaries, choroid plexus, veins, and venous sinus. The body's extracranial systemic vasculature is divided into six compartments (I, J, O, Z, D, and X, respectively) representing the arteries, capillaries, and veins of the central body and the lower body. Compartments (G) and (B) include tissue and the associated interstitial fluid in the intracranial and lower regions. Compartment (Y) is a composite involving the tissues, organs, and pulmonary circulation of the central body and compartment (M) represents the external environment.

  9. Postural Effects on Intracranial Pressure as Assessed Noninvasively

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Hargens, Alan R.; Ballard, R. E.; Shuer, L. M.; Cantrell, J. H.; Yost, W. T.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate effects of whole body tilting on intracranial compliance and pressure in six healthy volunteers by using a noninvasive ultrasonic device. Subjects were randomly tilted up or down sequentially at 60 degree, 30 degree head-up, supine, and 15 degree head-down position for one minute at each angle. We measured arterial blood pressure with a finger pressure cuff and changes in intracranial distance with an ultrasonic device. The device measures skull movement on the order of micro-meter. Our ultrasound technique demonstrates that skull movement is highly correlated (r$(circumflex){2}$=0.77) with intracranial pressure variations due to cerebral arterial pulsation. The amplitudes of arterial pressure (r$(circumflex){2}$=0.99 and those of intracranial distance changes (r$(circumflex){2}$=0.87) associated with one cardiac cycle were inversely correlated with the angle of tilt. The ratio of pulsation amplitudes for intracranial distance over arterial pressure also showed a significant increase as the angle of tilt was lowered (p=0.003). Thus, postural changes alter intracranial compliance in healthy volunteers and intracranial volume-buffering capacity is reduced in head-down position.

  10. Increased intracranial pressure

    MedlinePlus

    Increased intracranial pressure is a rise in the pressure inside the skull that can result from or cause brain injury. ... Increased intracranial pressure can be due to a rise in pressure of the cerebrospinal fluid. This is ...

  11. Otic artery: a review of normal and pathological features.

    PubMed

    Vasović, Ljiljana; Arsić, Stojanka; Vlajković, Slobodan; Jovanović, Ivan; Jovanović, Predrag; Ugrenović, Sladjana; Andjelković, Zlatibor

    2010-05-01

    Three primitive arteries - the trigeminal, otic and hypoglossal take the names according to their close relation with the V, VIII and XII cranial nerves, while at the cervical level, the first segmental artery is named the primitive proatlantal intersegmental artery. When the human embryo is 4 mm long, these arteries serve as transitory anastomoses between primitive internal carotid arteries and bilateral longitudinal neural arterial plexus, which is the precursor of future basilar artery. Normal and/or abnormal morphofunctional aspects of the prenatal and postnatal forms of the otic artery are described according to the personal and literature data. Many (ab) normal arteries are also noted in differential diagnosis of the otic artery. Postnatally, individual incidence rates of the carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses have been found to be inversely related to their order of disappearance. The persistent trigeminal artery has a reported incidence from 0.06-0.6%, whereas the persistent primitive otic artery has been convincingly documented only in minor rates. Persistent carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses between the anterior and posterior cranial circulation are important to recognize during angiography for endovascular and surgical planning. Most frequently, the otic artery was an incidental finding. PMID:20424561

  12. Primary Stenting of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Straube, T. Stingele, Robert; Jansen, Olav

    2005-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and safety of stenting intracranial atherosclerotic stenoses.Methods: In 12 patients the results of primary intracranial stenting were evaluated retrospectively. Patient ages ranged from 49 to 79 years (mean 64 years). Six patients presented with stenoses in the anterior circulation, and six had stenosis in the posterior circulation. One patient presented with extra- and intracranial tandem stenosis of the left internal carotid artery. Three patients presented with acute basilar thrombosis, caused by high-grade basilar stenoses.Results: Intracranial stenoses were successfully stented in 11 of 12 patients. In one patient the stent could not be advanced over the carotid siphon to reach the stenosis of the ophthalmic internal carotid artery. Follow-up digital subtraction angiographic studies were obtained in two patients who had presented with new neurologic signs or symptoms. In both cases the angiogram did not show any relevant stenotic endothelial hyperplasia. In one patient, after local thrombolysis the stenosis turned out to be so narrow that balloon angioplasty had to be performed before stent deployment. All three patients treated for stenosis-related basilar thrombosis died due to brainstem infarction that had ensued before the intervention.Conclusions: Prophylactic primary stenting of intracranial stenoses of the anterior or posterior cerebral circulation can be performed with a low complication rate; technical problems such as stent flexibility must still be solved. Local thrombolysis followed by stenting in stenosis-related thrombotic occlusion is technically possible.

  13. Intracranial Carotid Calcification on Cranial Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Deepak; Zishan, Umme Sara; Chappell, Francesca; Gregoriades, Maria-Lena; Sudlow, Cathie; Sellar, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification is associated with cerebrovascular risk factors and stroke, but few quantification methods are available. We tested the reliability of visual scoring, semiautomated Agatston score, and calcium volume measurement in patients with recent stroke. Methods— We used scans from a prospective hospital stroke registry and included patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke or transient ischemic stroke whose noncontrast cranial computed tomographic scans were available electronically. Two raters measured semiautomatic quantitative Agatston score, and calcium volume, and performed qualitative visual scoring using the original 4-point Woodcock score and a modified Woodcock score, where each image on which the internal carotid arteries appeared was scored and the slice scores summed. Results— Intra- and interobserver coefficient of variations were 8.8% and 16.5% for Agatston, 8.8% and 15.5% for calcium volume, and 5.7% and 5.4% for the modified Woodcock visual score, respectively. The modified Woodcock visual score correlated strongly with both Agatston and calcium volume quantitative measures (both R2=0.84; P<0.0001); calcium volume increased by 0.47-mm/point increase in modified Woodcock visual score. Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification increased with age by all measures (eg, visual score, Spearman ρ=0.4; P=0.005). Conclusions— Visual scores correlate highly with quantitative intracranial internal carotid artery calcification measures, with excellent observer agreements. Visual intracranial internal carotid artery scores could be a rapid and practical method for epidemiological studies. PMID:26251250

  14. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri) En Español Read in Chinese What is idiopathic intracranial hypertension? Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder that ...

  15. Unilateral symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis and myopathy in an adolescent with Graves disease: a case report of an high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia; Zhu, Jiajia; Huang, Dongling; Shi, Changzheng; Guan, Yuqing; Zhou, Liang; Pan, Suyue

    2015-01-01

    Vascular and muscular involvements in Graves disease (GD) are rare. Here, we report a case of a 17-year-old patient with unilateral symptomatic middle cerebral artery stenosis concurrent with GD and myopathy. He presented with a 1-day history of acute severe right-sided hemiparesis and aphasia and a 3-week history of high metabolic syndrome. The pathogenesis of the stenosis is most likely vasculitis rather than atherosclerosis, based on contrast-enhanced high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging showing concentric wall enhancement. We suggest that lipid storage myopathy is secondary to GD, and it is likely mitochondrial dysfunction or immune dysfunction induced by GD responsible for the myopathy and that magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is capable of establishing the diagnosis of myopathy. Thus, MRS can be used for follow-up evaluations of the myopathy along with the pathology biopsy. PMID:25444029

  16. Traumatic Intracranial Aneurysm Formation following Closed Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Miley, Jefferson T; Rodriguez, Gustavo J; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2008-01-01

    Background: Traumatic intracranial aneurysms are rare conditions that can be a result of non-penetrating head trauma. We report the occurrence of intracranial aneurysms in patients with traumatic brain injury. Methods: All diagnostic cerebral angiograms performed in patients with traumatic brain injury at a level I trauma center from January 2006 to July 2007 were reviewed. Results: Diagnostic cerebral angiography was performed in 74 patients with the diagnosis of closed head injury. A total of 4 traumatic intracranial pseudoaneurysms were found in 4 patients, two in the supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery, one in the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery and one in the paraophthalmic segment of the internal carotid artery. Two patients were treated with coil embolization. One patient had follow up imaging on which there was no change in the size and morphology of the aneurysm. Conclusion: Intracranial aneurysms can develop in patients with closed head injury presumably related to shear or rotational injury. It is unclear whether these aneurysms should be classified as traumatic intracranial aneurysms or pseudoaneurysms, but the pathological findings frequently reveal disruption of the three vascular layers fulfilling the definition of pseudoaneurysm. For these reason we favor the name of post-traumatic intracranial pseudoaneurysms. PMID:22518228

  17. Erdheim-Chester Disease: An Unusual Cause of Intracranial Vasculitis and Progressive Leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sagnier, Sharmila; Debruxelles, Sabrina; Lepreux, Sébastien; Sibon, Igor

    2016-05-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a non-Langerhans histiocytosis affecting multiple organs. Stroke as symptom onset of ECD with intracranial vasculitis is unusual. We report the case of a 64-year-old man who presented with an acute ischemic stroke associated with a moderate leukoencephalopathy and intracranial arteries stenosis. Four years later, he developed movement disorders with dysarthria and cognitive impairment. Neuroradiological findings demonstrated a rapidly progressive and diffuse leukoencephalopathy associated with brain atrophy and infiltration of the intracranial vertebral artery wall. Brain postmortem evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of ECD. This diagnosis should be evoked in patients with cryptogenic stroke, progressive leukoencephalopathy, and infiltration of the arterial wall. PMID:26996751

  18. [Hemorrhagic Adult Unilateral Moyamoya Disease with Multiple Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Saya; Inoue, Akihiro; Miyazaki, Hajime; Onoue, Shinji; Ichikawa, Haruhisa; Fukumoto, Shinya; Iwata, Shinji; Kohno, Kanehisa

    2016-02-01

    Adult unilateral moyamoya disease with intracranial aneurysm is frequently reported in the literature, but there is much variation in its treatment. In this case report, we describe the time course and treatment regimen of a patient with moyamoya disease and review the literature regarding moyamoya disease with intracranial aneurysm. A 64-year-old man had untreated intracranial aneurysm and unilateral moyamoya disease for 10 years. He presented with sudden-onset right hemiparesis and aphasia due to a subcortical hemorrhage. He was admitted to the local neurosurgical unit, and upon resolution of symptoms, he was admitted to our hospital. A cerebral angiogram revealed the champagne bottleneck sign of the left carotid artery and obliteration of the top of the left intracranial carotid artery with a moyamoya phenomenon. Two unruptured intracranial aneurysms were identified in the anterior communicating artery(Acom A) and the right intracranial carotid artery(C3). We performed superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis followed by aneurysmal neck clipping of the Acom A aneurysm. Postoperative imaging showed no new ischemic damage and improved cerebral blood flow. Although the patient experienced temporal worsening of aphasia, his function recovered a few months later and he was able to resume his normal daily life activities. The combination of direct bypass surgery and aneurysmal neck clipping might be a therapeutic option for hemorrhagic unilateral moyamoya disease with unruptured intracranial aneurysm. PMID:26856265

  19. Brainstem infarction in a patient with internal carotid dissection and persistent trigeminal artery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most commonly described fetal anastomosis between the carotid and vertebrobasilar circulations. Case presentation We report a 42-year-old patient presenting with internal carotid dissection, and imaging features of brainstem infarction. Conclusion Based on the imaging studies we presume occlusive carotid dissection with extensive thrombosis within a persistent trigeminal artery as the cause of this brainstem ischemia. PMID:20598138

  20. Bilateral mechanical rotational vertebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Dargon, Phong T; Liang, Conrad W; Kohal, Anmol; Dogan, Aclan; Barnwell, Stanley L; Landry, Gregory J

    2013-10-01

    Rotational vertebral artery occlusion, or bow hunter's stroke, is reversible, positional symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischemia. The typical mechanism of action is obstruction of a dominant vertebral artery with contralateral head rotation in the setting of baseline ipsilateral vertebral artery stenosis or occlusion. Here we present a rare case of mechanical occlusion of bilateral patent vertebral arteries manifesting as near syncope with rightward head rotation. Diagnostic cerebral angiography showed dynamic right C5 vertebral occlusion and left C2 vertebral occlusion. The patient underwent right C4/5 transverse process decompression. Postoperative angiogram showed patent flow through the right vertebral artery in neutral position and with head turn with resultant resolution of symptoms. PMID:23465174

  1. Clinical Features and Treatment of Distal Intracranial Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Mou, Kejie; Zhou, Zheng; Yin, Jinbo; Yang, Hui; Liu, Jun

    2016-05-01

    To analyze the clinical characteristics, therapies, and outcomes of distal intracranial aneurysms, the authors retrospectively studied the clinical and imaging data of 18 patients with distal intracranial aneurysms. There were 10 males and 8 females, aged from 11 months to 59 years (mean, 40.4 ± 11.4 years). All patients were diagnosed by digital subtract angiography. Aneurysm locations were as follows: distal anterior cerebral artery (n = 5), distal middle cerebral artery (n = 2), distal posterior cerebral artery (n = 6), distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery (n = 3), distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (n = 1), and distal superior cerebellar artery (n = 1). Endovascular embolization was performed on 16 patients, including coil embolization on 10 patients and embolization using Glubran 2 surgical glue on 6 patients, and 7 of the 16 patients also underwent parent artery occlusion. Aneurysms were all completely embolized at the first phase for these 16 patients. The other 2 patients underwent craniotomy with hematoma evacuation and complete aneurysm clipping. Postoperatively, 14 patients showed a good recovery, 2 patients had neurological deficits, 1 patient had seizures and was managed with drugs, 1 patient developed hydrocephalus, and a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was performed. Follow-up angiographies showed no aneurysm recurrence. Clinical manifestations of distal intracranial aneurysms are varied. Their treatment should follow the principle of individual choice. Endovascular embolization is an effective way to treat distal intracranial aneurysms; and for those with intracranial hematoma, craniotomy with hematoma evacuation and aneurysm clipping may be a feasible treatment. PMID:26982109

  2. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. The monitor senses the pressure inside the skull and sends measurements to a recording device. ... are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is ...

  3. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ICP monitoring; CSF pressure monitoring ... There are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is the most accurate monitoring method. To insert an intraventricular catheter, a ...

  4. Symptomatic Vertebral Artery Loop: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Doweidar, Ahmed; Al-Sayed, Saeed; Al-Kandery, Salwa

    2014-01-01

    Vertebral artery loop formation is a rare anatomical variant capable of causing bony erosion, encroachment on cervical neural foramen, neurovascular compression, or vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Health professionals should keep the diagnosis of vertebral artery loop formation in mind, especially when the plain radiograph of the cervical spine shows enlargement of the intervertebral foramen. If overlooked, serious complications like vertebral artery injury may occur during surgery or vertebrobasilar angiography, as well as cerebrovascular stroke during transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections. This case report aims at increasing the awareness of both clinicians and radiologists of this entity as a known rare cause of cervical radiculopathy. In suspected cases, Magnetic resonance imaging & Magnetic resonance angiography should always be the first choice in this regard. PMID:25426228

  5. Genetic factors involves in intracranial aneurysms – actualities

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, D; Munteanu, V; Coman, T; Ciurea, AV

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysm (IA) is a common vascular disorder, which frequently leads to fatal vascular rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Although various acquired risk factors associated with IAs have been identified, heritable conditions are associated with IAs formation but these syndromes account for less than 1% of all IAs in the population. Cerebral aneurysm disease is related to hemodynamic and genetic factors, associated with structural weakness in the arterial wall, which was acquired by a specific, often unknown, event. Possibly, the trigger moment of aneurysm formation may depend on the dynamic arterial growth, which is closely related to aging/ atherosclerosis. Genetic factors are known to have an important role in IA pathogenesis. Literature data provide complementary evidence that the variants on chromosomes 8q and 9p are associated with IA and that the risk of IA in patients with these variants is greatly increased with cigarette smoking. Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5-10% of the population). In comparison with sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located in the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Abbreviations: DNA = deoxyribonucleic acid, FIA = familial Intracranial Aneurysm, GWAS = genome-wide association studies, IL-6 = interleukin-6, ISUIA = International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms, IA = Intracranial aneurysm, mRNA = Messager ribonucleic acid, SNPs = single-nucleotide polymorphisms, SMCs = smooth muscle cells, sIAs = sporadic IAs, SAH = subarachnoid hemorrhage, TNF-α = tumor necrosis factor-alpha, COL4A1 = type IV collagen alpha-1 PMID:26351537

  6. Molecular basis and genetic predisposition to intracranial aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Weinsheimer, Shantel; Ronkainen, Antti; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms, also called cerebral aneurysms, are dilatations in the arteries that supply blood to the brain. Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm leads to a subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is fatal in about 50% of the cases. Intracranial aneurysms can be repaired surgically or endovascularly, or by combining these two treatment modalities. They are relatively common with an estimated prevalence of unruptured aneurysms of 2%–6% in the adult population, and are considered a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Known risk factors include smoking, hypertension, increasing age, and positive family history for intracranial aneurysms. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms is complex. Genome-wide approaches such as DNA linkage and genetic association studies, as well as microarray-based mRNA expression studies, provide unbiased approaches to identify genetic risk factors and dissecting the molecular pathobiology of intracranial aneurysms. The ultimate goal of these studies is to use the information in clinical practice to predict an individual's risk for developing an aneurysm or monitor its growth or rupture risk. Another important goal is to design new therapies based on the information on mechanisms of disease processes to prevent the development or halt the progression of intracranial aneurysms. PMID:25117779

  7. Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms Associated with Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sangwoo; Kim, Jaeho; Kim, Chong-gue

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease is an inflammatory disorder involving multiple organs. Its cause is still unknown, but vasculitis is the major pathologic characteristic. The common vascular lesions associated with Behçet's disease are aneurysm formation, arterial or venous occlusive diseases, and varices. Arterial aneurysms mostly occur in large arteries. Intracranial aneurysms hardly occur with Behçet's disease. We would like to present a 41-year-old female patient with Behçet's disease who showed symptoms of severe headache due to subarachnoid hemorrhage. Brain computed tomography revealed multiple aneurysms. We also present a literature review of intracranial arterial aneurysms associated with Behçet's disease. PMID:27114964

  8. Complications in the Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms with Silk Stents: an Analysis of 30 Consecutive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cirillo, L.; Leonardi, M.; Dall’olio, M.; Princiotta, C.; Stafa, A.; Simonetti, L.; Toni, F.; Agati, R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Flow-diverting stents (Silk and PED) have radically changed the approach to intracranial aneurysm treatment from the use of endosaccular materials to use of an extraaneurysmal endoluminal device. However, much debate surrounds the most appropriate indications for the use of FD stents and the problems raised by several possible complications. We analysed our technical difficulties and the early (less than ten days after treatment) and late complications encountered in 30 aneurysms treated comprising 13 giant lesions, 12 large, five with maximum diameters <10 mm and one blister-like aneurysm. In our experience the primary indications for the use of FD stents can be the symptomatic intracavernous giant aneurysms. Although the extracavernous carotid siphon aneurysms have major risk of bleeding, FD stents are indicated clearly explaining the risks to the patient in case of severe mass effect. There is a very complex assessment for aneurysms of the vertebrobasilar circulation. PMID:23217636

  9. Spastic Quadriparesis Caused by Anomalous Vertebral Artery Compression of Spinal Cord at the Cervico-Medullary Junction

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, S; Adkatalwar, Vijayendra; Shiva, Meyyappan; Agrawal, Nitesh; Ramakrishnan, K G

    2015-01-01

    Vascular compression of medulla or spinal cord at the cervico-medullary junction has been commonly described in the literature and is often attributed to dolichoectasia of the vertebrobasilar arteries. We describe a case of anomalous course of the cervical segments of the bilateral vertebral arteries which were seen entering the spinal canal directly after exiting the transverse foramen of axis and causing significant cord compression at the cervico-medullary region leading to spastic quadriparesis. PMID:25924176

  10. A rabbit model of human familial, nonsyndromic unicoronal suture synostosis. II. Intracranial contents, intracranial volume, and intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Mooney, M P; Siegel, M I; Burrows, A M; Smith, T D; Losken, H W; Dechant, J; Cooper, G; Fellows-Mayle, W; Kapucu, M R; Kapucu, L O

    1998-06-01

    This two-part study reviews data from a recently developed colony of New Zealand white rabbits with familial, nonsyndromic unilateral coronal suture synostosis, and this second part presents neuropathological findings and age-related changes in intracranial volume (ICV) and intracranial pressure (ICP) in 106 normal rabbits and 56 craniosynostotic rabbits from this colony. Brain morphology and anteroposterior length were described in 44 rabbit fetuses and perinates (27 normal; 17 synostosed). Middle meningeal artery patterns were qualitatively assessed from 2-D PCC MRI VENC scans and endocranial tracings from 15, 126-day-old rabbits (8 normal, 7 rabbits with unicoronal synostosis). Brain metabolism was evaluated by assessing 18F-FDG uptake with high-resolution PET scanning in 7, 25-day-old rabbits (3 normal, 4 with unicoronal or bicoronal synostosis). Intracranial contents and ICV were assessed using 3-D CT scanning of the skulls of 30 rabbits (20 normal,10 with unicoronal synostosis) at 42 and 126 days of age. Serial ICP data were collected from 66 rabbits (49 normal; 17 with unicoronal synostosis) at 25 and 42 days of age. ICP was assessed in the epidural space using a Codman NeuroMonitor microsensor transducer. Results revealed that cerebral cortex morphology was similar between normal and synostosed fetuses around the time of synostosis. Significantly (P<0.05) decreased A-P cerebral hemisphere growth rates and asymmetrical cortical remodeling were noted with increasing age in synostotic rabbits. In addition, rabbits with unicoronal suture synostosis exhibited asymmetrical middle meningeal artery patterns, decreased and asymmetrical brain metabolism, a "beaten-copper" intracranial appearance, significantly (P<0.05) decreased ICV, and significantly (P<0.01) elevated ICP compared with normal control rabbits. The advantages and disadvantages of these rabbits as a model for human familial, nonsyndromic unicoronal suture synostosis are discussed, especially in light

  11. Intracranial fungal aneurysm caused by Candida endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, S; Wakabayashi, K; Yamazaki, K; Miyakawa, T; Arai, H

    1998-01-01

    We describe a 67-year-old man who died 4 days after suffering a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Autopsy revealed a fresh subarachnoid hemorrhage and a ruptured fungal aneurysm near the trifurcation of the right middle cerebral artery. In comparison with 21 previously reported cases in which the fungal aneurysms were proved to be intracranial, the present case had several characteristic features: the causative fungus of the aneurysm was Candida (only one such case has been reported previously). The aneurysm was caused by direct Candida invasion of the arterial wall from the Candida embolus (previously reported aneurysms have been caused by direct invasion of the arterial wall during fungal meningitis). The source of the Candida was endocarditis (the main sources of fungus in previously reported cases have been sinusitis, dental extraction wounds, and some forms of surgery). We describe the features of this rare autopsy case of a ruptured fungal aneurysm caused by Candida originating from endocarditis and review the literature. PMID:9707334

  12. Giant intracranial aneurysms: rapid sequential computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, R.S.; Cohen, W.A.; Kricheff, I.I.; Redington, R.W.; Berninger, W.H.

    1982-11-01

    Giant intracranial aneurysms often present as mass lesions rather than with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Routine computed tomographic (CT) scans with contrast material will generally detect them, but erroneous diagnosis of basal meningioma is possible. Rapid sequential scanning (dynamic CT) after bolus injection of 40 ml of Renografin-76 can conclusively demonstrate an intracranial aneurysm, differentiating it from other lesions by transit-time analysis of the passage of contrast medium. In five patients, the dynamics of contrast bolus transit in aneurysms were consistently different from the dynamics in pituitary tumors, craniopharyngiomas, and meningiomas, thereby allowing a specific diagnosis. Dynamic CT was also useful after treatment of the aneurysms by carotid artery ligation and may be used as an alternative to angiographic evaluation in determining luminal patency or thrombosis.

  13. A Histoenzymatic Study of Human Intracranial Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Henry F.

    1972-01-01

    A light microscopy study on the localization of enzyme activity within atherosclerotic human intracranial arteries was performed on autopsy material obtained within 4 hours of death. The data suggests that the atherosclerotic process first goes through a proliferative phase and then a degenerative phase culminating in the formation of a plaque. In the proliferative phase, smooth muscle cell proliferation has formed a thickened intima. Tetrazolium reductase, adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) and adenosine monophosphatase (AMPase) activities are present in these cells, while all dehydrogenases and acid phosphatase activities were weak or not present. As the degenerative phase commences, an area of necrosis, lipid and macrophage accumulation is formed on the lumen side of the elastica. This area increases in size until a plaque is formed. Unsaturated polar and nonpolar lipid, cholesterol, α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, acid phosphatase, and AMPase activities are associated with these areas and in foam cells, which are often found in the thickened intima of the proliferative phase. Tetrazolium reductase and ATPase activities decrease in the thickened intima as the area of necrosis increases in size, while dehydrogenase activity, except that for α-glycerophosphate, remains low or not present. Patterns of enzyme alterations for various stages of the disease process in intracranial arteries, the aorta and coronary arteries suggest a similar, if not identical, progression of the atherosclerotic process, irrespective of known differences in the prevalence of atherosclerosis. ImagesFig 2Fig 3Fig 5Fig 1Fig 4 PMID:4260721

  14. Complete oculomotor palsy caused by persistent trigeminal artery.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Domenico; Consoli, Domenico; Lanza, Pier Luigi; Plastino, Massimiliano; Nicoletti, Francesco; Ceccotti, Claudio

    2010-10-01

    Primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most frequent embryonic communication between the carotid and vertebro-basilar system. PTA is a pathophysiology phenomenon which has been implicated as a rare cause of cranial nerve dysfunction. We report the case of a 40-year-old woman who developed a complete oculomotor nerve palsy caused by a persistent ecstatic trigeminal artery. Brain MRI and MRA studies documented a neurovascular conflict between the oculomotor nerve and a PTA. To the best of our knowledge there is no report about complete third cranial nerve palsy NC due to a PTA. A role of this rare vascular condition is discussed. PMID:20552240

  15. Primary Intracranial Leptomeningeal Melanomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Hyoung; Lee, Chae-Heuck; Joo, Mee

    2015-01-01

    Primary intracranial malignant melanoma is a very rare and highly aggressive tumor with poor prognosis. A 66-year-old female patient presented a headache that had been slowly progressing for several months. A large benign pigmented skin lesion was found on her back. A brain MRI showed multiple linear signal changes with branching pattern and strong enhancement in the temporal lobe. The cytological and immunohiostochemical cerebrospinal fluid examination confirmed malignant melanoma. A biopsy confirmed that the pigmented skin lesion on the back and the conjunctiva were benign nevi. We report a case of primary intracranial malignant melanoma and review relevant literatures. PMID:26819692

  16. Bilateral persistent primitive trigeminal arteries associated with trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Son, B; Yang, S; Sung, J; Lee, S

    2013-03-01

    Persistent carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses (PCVBA) include the primitive trigeminal artery (PTA), the primitive otic artery (POA), the primitive hypoglossal artery and proatlantal arteries (ProAs). The PTA is the most commonly seen of these accounting for approximately 80-85% of PCVBAs. The PTA which connects the internal carotid artery (ICA) to the basilar artery (BA) may occasionally connect to the superior or posterior inferior cerebellar arteries without interposition to the BA. It is then referred to as a persistent trigeminal artery variant (PTAV), an anomalous carotid-cerebellar anastomosis. Bilateral occurrence of PTA is extremely rare. During vertebral artery (VA) development the anterior radicular artery of segment C1 from the proatlantal artery of Padget evolves into the intradural component of the VA (V4 segment) plus a short extradural segment (distal V3 segment). Agenesis of a single anterior radicular artery of ProA results in the absence of one distal VA associated with an unremarkable contralateral VA and the BA. Absence or hypoplasia of the terminal portion of one VA is a commonly observed anatomic variant. However, absence of the terminal portions of both VAs is exceptional. A rare case of bilateral PTAs is presented with unilateral PTA and a contralateral PTAV causing trigeminal neuralgia. Furthermore, the bilateral PTAs were associated with the absence of the proximal portion of the BA in addition to the bilateral lack of a distal VA. This finding comes as a logical consequence of the developmental anatomy of the vertebrobasilar junction and is consistent with the assumed congenital nature of the anatomic variant. PMID:22113402

  17. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mohit; Li, Luyuan; Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  18. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luyuan; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  19. Intracranial atherosclerosis following radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, M.H.; Burger, P.C.; Heinz, E.R.; Friedman, A.H.; Halperin, E.C.; Schold, S.C. Jr.

    1988-07-01

    We describe a case of severe intracranial atherosclerosis in a young man who had received therapeutic radiation for a presumed brain neoplasm. Since there was no evidence of vascular disease outside the radiation ports, we speculate that accelerated atherosclerosis was induced by radiation and that hyperlipidemia may have predisposed him to this effect.

  20. Fahr's Syndrome Associated with Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Umit; Kahilogullari, Gökmen; Demirel, Altan; Arat, Anıl; Unlu, Agahan

    2016-01-01

    Fahr's Syndrome is characterized by the presence of intracerebral, bilateral and symmetrical calcifications located in bilateral basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum. The etiology is not exactly known. The authors reported a very rare case who had Fahr's Syndrome and intracerebral aneurysms simultaneously. The patient was female and presented with headache. Her examinations revealed aneurysms on the middle cerebral artery, internal carotid artery and ophthalmic artery. That is the first case reported in the literature having multiple intracranial aneurysms and Fahr's Syndrome together. PMID:27400114

  1. [A case of polyarteritis nodosa with giant intracranial aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Uemura, Jyunichi; Inoue, Takeshi; Aoki, Junya; Saji, Naoki; Shibazaki, Kensaku; Kimura, Kazumi

    2013-01-01

    A 46-year-old man with a history of the left retinal central artery obstruction and old cerebral infarction in the right middle cerebral artery region presented with right total blindness due to the right retinal central artery occlusion accompanied by a cherry red spot. He had been found to have a giant, 17 mm-in-diameter aneurysm of the right internal carotid artery and a right vertebral arterial aneurysm. The intra-arterial thrombolysis was performed with urokinase injection for the right eye artery origin, and the right eyesight has improved. Cranial and pelvic angiography showed multiple stenosis and dilatation of external carotid and internal iliac arteries. The right superficial temporal artery biopsy revealed the arteritis with fibrinoid necrosis. He was diagnosed as having polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) by clinical course, angiography, and the superficial temporal artery biopsy. Several studies have reported that PAN had less intracranial aneurysm and the diameter of the aneurysm was less than 5 mm. Our case is the first report that PAN had giant aneurysm of 17 mm, diagnosed by temporal artery biopsy. The temporal artery biopsy should be considered to diagnose PAN. PMID:23782823

  2. Warfarin and low-dose aspirin for stroke prevention from severe intracranial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Bekavac, I; Hanna, J P; Sila, C A; Furland, A J

    1999-01-01

    Management of symptomatic, intracranial, large-arterial atherosclerosis is controversial. We assessed the safety and efficacy of combining warfarin and low-dose aspirin to prevent stroke from intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis failing prior treatment with either aspirin or warfarin. Patients with severe intracranial stenosis were prescribed combination therapy, warfarin (international normalized ratio [INR] 2 to 3) and aspirin 81 mg daily. Ten men and six women treated with combination therapy had one recurrent ischemic event during 382 months of therapy. No patient suffered a myocardial infarction or sudden vascular death. No serious hemorrhagic complication occurred. The combination of warfarin and low-dose aspirin seems safe and effective in preventing recurrent stroke from symptomatic, intracranial, large-arterial occlusive disease after failure with either aspirin or warfarin monotherapy. PMID:17895135

  3. Treatment of fenestrated vertebrobasilar junction-related aneurysms with endovascular techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhu, De-Yuan; Fang, Yi-Bin; Wu, Yi-Na; Li, Qiang; Duan, Guo-Li; Liu, Jian-Min; Xu, Yi; Hong, Bo; Zhao, Wen-Yuan; Huang, Qing-Hai

    2016-06-01

    Fenestrated vertebrobasilar junction-related aneurysms (fVBJ-AN) are uncommon and endovascular management strategies have become the first options for the treatment of these lesions. This clinical study aimed to report our experience in the endovascular management of these lesions and to review the literature. We retrospectively reviewed 10 consecutive patients harboring 12 fVBJ-AN between January 2007 and December 2014. The demographic, angiographic and clinical data were reviewed. Additionally, a literature review was performed. Endovascular management strategies were successfully applied in all 10 patients. Post-procedural angiograms indicated total occlusion in eight (66.7%) aneurysms, a residual neck in one (8.3%) aneurysm, and three residual aneurysms (25%). No procedure-related complications were observed. Follow-up angiograms were obtained in eight patients and revealed nine occluded aneurysms and one improved aneurysm; two patients were lost to angiographic follow-up. Clinical follow-ups were obtained in all patients (until July 2015), and the modified Rankin Scale scores at 69.5months (range 17-101months) of follow-up were 0 in eight patients and 1 in two patients. Endovascular management strategies provided a high occlusion rate and an acceptable complication rate and are thus efficacious in the treatment of fVBJ-AN. Further studies are necessary to validate the utility of these treatments due to the low incidence of fVBJ-AN. PMID:26778513

  4. Intracranial chondroma: a rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Veena; Mehdi, Ghazala; Varshney, Manoranjan; Jain, Anshu; Vashishtha, Sonal; Gaur, Kavita; Srivastava, Vinod Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial chondroma is a rare benign cartilaginous tumour with an incidence of less than 1% of all primary intracranial tumours. The authors are reporting here a case of intracranial chondroma in a 40-year-old man who presented with 5-month history of headache and gradual diminution of vision. A tentative diagnosis of chondroma was made on imprint cytology which was confirmed on histopathological examination. PMID:22696735

  5. High-Resolution Postcontrast Time-of-Flight MR Angiography of Intracranial Perforators at 7.0 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Harteveld, Anita A.; De Cocker, Laurens J. L.; Dieleman, Nikki; van der Kolk, Anja G.; Zwanenburg, Jaco J. M.; Robe, Pierre A.; Luijten, Peter R.; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Different studies already demonstrated the benefits of 7T for precontrast TOF-MRA in the visualization of intracranial small vessels. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of high-resolution 7T TOF-MRA after the administration of a gadolinium-based contrast agent in visualizing intracranial perforating arteries. Materials and Methods Ten consecutive patients (7 male; mean age, 50.4 ± 9.9 years) who received TOF-MRA at 7T after contrast administration were retrospectively included in this study. Intracranial perforating arteries, branching from the parent arteries of the circle of Willis, were identified on all TOF-MRA images. Provided a TOF-MRA before contrast administration was present, a direct comparison between pre- and postcontrast TOF-MRA was made. Results It was possible to visualize intracranial perforating arteries branching off from the entire circle of Willis, and their proximal branches. The posterior cerebral artery (P1 and proximal segment of P2) appeared to have the largest number of visible perforating branches (mean of 5.1 in each patient, with a range of 2–7). The basilar artery and middle cerebral artery (M1 and proximal segment M2) followed with a mean number of 5.0 and 3.5 visible perforating branches (range of 1–9 and 1–8, respectively). Venous contamination in the postcontrast scans sometimes made it difficult to discern the arterial or venous nature of a vessel. Conclusion High-resolution postcontrast TOF-MRA at 7T was able to visualize multiple intracranial perforators branching off from various parts of the circle of Willis and proximal intracranial arteries. Although confirmation in a larger study is needed, the administration of a contrast agent for high-resolution TOF-MRA at 7T seems to enable a better visualization of the distal segment of certain intracranial perforators. PMID:25774881

  6. Intracranial Hypertension in Children without Papilledema.

    PubMed

    Chelse, Ana B; Epstein, Leon G

    2015-08-01

    Researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital studied the frequency of intracranial hypertension without papilledema in children followed in a multispecialty pediatric intracranial hypertension clinic. PMID:26933598

  7. Intracranial haemorrhage in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Fairhall, Jacob M; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2009-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) is a rare, yet potentially devastating event in pregnancy. There is a risk of maternal mortality or morbidity and a significant risk to the unborn child. The risk of haemorrhage increases during the third trimester and is greatest during parturition and the puerperium. ICH can be extradural, subdural, subarachnoid or intraparenchymal. Causes of bleeding include trauma, arteriovenous malformations, aneurysms, preeclampsia/eclampsia and venous thrombosis. Urgent neurosurgical conditions generally outweigh obstetric considerations in management decisions, although anaesthetic and surgical modifications can be made to minimize adverse effects to the fetus.

  8. Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization of Vertebrobasilar Dissecting Aneurysms: Procedural Outcomes and Factors for Recanalization

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jin Pyeong; Rhim, Jong Kook; Park, Jeong Jin; Cho, Won-Sang; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Jeong Eun; Hwang, Gyojun; Kwon, O-Ki; Han, Moon Hee

    2016-01-01

    Objective Outcomes of stent-assisted coil embolization (SACE) have not been well established in the setting of vertebrobasilar dissecting aneurysms (VBDAs) due to the low percentage of cases that need treatment and the array of available therapeutic options. Herein, we presented clinical and radiographic results of SACE in patients with VBDAs. Materials and Methods A total of 47 patients (M:F, 30:17; mean age ± SD, 53.7 ± 12.6 years), with a VBDA who underwent SACE between 2008 and 2014 at two institutions were evaluated retrospectively. Medical records and radiologic data were analyzed to assess the outcome of SACE procedures. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to determine the factors that were associated with aneurysmal recanalization after SACE. Results Stent-assisted coil embolization technically succeeded in all patients. Three cerebellar infarctions occurred on postembolization day 1, week 2, and month 2, but no other procedure-related complications developed. Immediately following SACE, 25 aneurysms (53.2%) showed no contrast filling into the aneurysmal sac. During a mean follow-up of 20.2 months, 37 lesions (78.7%) appeared completely occluded, whereas 10 lesions showed recanalization, 5 of which required additional embolization. Overall recanalization rate was 12.64% per lesion-year, and mean postoperative time to recanalization was 18 months (range, 3–36 months). In multivariable analysis, major branch involvement (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.28; p = 0.013) and the presence of residual sac filling (HR: 8.49, p = 0.044) were identified as statistically significant independent predictors of recanalization. No bleeding was encountered in follow-up monitoring. Conclusion Stent-assisted coil embolization appears feasible and safe for treatment of VBDAs. Long-term results were acceptable in a majority of patients studied, despite a relatively high rate of incomplete occlusion immediately after SACE. Major branch involvement and coiled

  9. Direct thrombus aspiration using the Penumbra system for the treatment of pediatric intracranial dissection.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Motoaki; Tateshima, Satoshi; Ali, Latisha; Raychev, Radoslav; Vinuela, Fernando

    2013-11-01

    We describe a case of a 15-year-old girl who developed a spontaneous intracranial arterial dissection with distal middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusions. From the digital subtraction angiography provided, the dissection flap appeared to originate at the internal carotid artery terminus with extension into the right M1 segment and occluding the right anterior cerebral artery, A1 segment. CT perfusion study showed salvageable tissue in the posterior MCA territory, including the motor cortex. In order to avoid further injury to the dissection, clot retrieval systems were not a treatment option. We therefore performed selective thrombus aspiration with the Penumbra system for the occluded central and precentral arteries distal to the non-occlusive dissecting lesion. Sufficient recanalization was achieved and the patient made a marked recovery. Although mechanical thrombectomy with the use of retrieval intracranial stent systems has demonstrated satisfactory recanalization rates, the aspiration methodology remains useful for patients with an accompanying proximal vascular lesion. PMID:23188785

  10. Ectopic intracranial germinoma.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Samantha; Wu, Xiao; Kalra, Vivek B; Huttner, Anita J; Malhotra, Ajay

    2016-09-01

    Intracranial ectopic germinomas are often associated with synchronous midline disease. Germinomas involving the corpus callosum are exceedingly rare. The reported imaging appearance is not as varied as one might expect and a review of the literature reveals a few common imaging features amongst most ectopic lesions, including cyst formation. We report a 24-year-old man with panhypopituitarism. Neuroimaging revealed three enhancing lesions involving the pituitary infundibulum, the pineal region, and a parenchymal lesion involving the genu of the corpus callosum. The described ectopic mass, a parenchymal lesion, was associated with small peripheral cysts. Stereotactic biopsy and histopathological evaluation revealed this mass to be a germinoma. Following chemotherapy and radiation therapy, there was near-total resolution of the intracranial disease. Preoperative imaging plays an important role, not only in delineating the extent of disease, but also in assisting in generating an appropriate differential diagnosis. Germinomas in the corpus callosum are exceedingly rare but should be considered in the differential of any young patient with a characteristic cystic and solid intra-axial mass. PMID:27050919

  11. Platelet interaction within giant intracranial aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.; King, M.E.; Peerless, S.J.; Vezina, W.C.; Brown, G.W.; Chamberlain, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Turbulence within intracranial aneurysms may result in tearing of the aneurysmal wall, exposing the subendothelial matrix to circulating platelets. In this study, platelet interaction in giant intracranial aneurysms was evaluated by a dual-isotope technique employing In-labeled platelets and Tc-labeled red blood cells. The use of two isotopes allows the subtraction of the blood pool and the calculation of the ratio indium deposited:indium blood pool (In(D)/In(BP)). A ratio greater than zero indicates platelet deposition within aneurysm. Thirteen patients were evaluated in this way, with platelet deposition demonstrated in six. In these six patients, the ratio In(D)/In(BP) was found to be significantly elevated, with a mean value of 0.96 +/- 0.65. Three of these six patients has symptoms of recurrent transient neurological deficits; one of these three suffered a complete stroke following documentation of platelet deposition. In this case, the aneurysm was obtained at surgery and was found to contain intraluminal platelet aggregation when viewed by scanning electron microscopy. In the remaining seven patients, the ratio IN(D)/In(BP) was found not to be significantly elevated (mean -0.03 and/- 0.06), indicating the absence of active platelet deposition. Two of these patients had prior symptoms of cerebral ischemia; one of these was found to have an ulcer in the ipsilateral internal carotid artery which was probably responsible for thromboembolic events to the hemisphere. The authors conclude that platelet aggregation occurs more frequently than previously recognized in giant intracranial aneurysms, and their data substantiate the hypothesis that platelet metabolic products or thrombi originating from a large aneurysm may embolize to distal cerebral vessels.

  12. Circle of Willis Configuration as a Determinant of Intracranial Dolichoectasia

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Jose; Sultan, Sally; Bagci, Ahmet; Rundek, Tatjana; Alperin, Noam; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Wright, Clinton B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Circle of Willis (COW) variants might influence arterial caliber in the brain. We hypothesized that these variants would be associated with the prevalence of intracranial dolichoectasia (DE). Methods We examined COW variants and DE in a sample of stroke-free participants (n = 436) undergoing magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) as part of a population-based study. Large intracranial arterial diameters were obtained when available; if not, the artery was defined as hypoplastic or absent according to its visibility on MRA. Subscores for the anterior and the posterior circulations were created. DE was defined as arterial diameters ≥ 2 SD above the population mean for that artery, adjusting for intracranial volume. Generalized linear models with a Poisson distribution were used to evaluate predictors of both absent and hypoplastic vessels, and logistic regression was used to assess the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of DE depending on COW variants. Results Only 44% of the sample had all 14 arteries present, 32% lacked 1 artery, 18% lacked 2 and 6% lacked 3 or more. DE of at least 1 artery was not associated with the total number of hypoplastic or absent arteries, but DE in a posterior circulation artery was weakly associated with the number of absent arteries in the posterior circulation (β coefficient = 0.36, p = 0.06). DE of at least 1 artery was more frequent in those with 1 or more absent arteries (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.03–1.57). Posterior circulation DE was more frequent in participants with at least 1 or more absent arteries at any location (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.02–1.78). Participants with an incomplete posterior COW were more likely to have DE in the anterior circulation (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.01–2.33). Having an absent left anterior cerebral artery (ACA) A1 segment was associated with right ACA DE (OR 34.1, 95% CI 3.16–368.2); an absent right ACA was associated with left ACA DE (OR 14.1, 95% CI 1.69–118.28). Absence of 1 (OR 1

  13. Neuroblastoma with intracranial involvement: an ENSG Study.

    PubMed

    Shaw, P J; Eden, T

    1992-01-01

    We report the experience of the European Neuroblastoma Study Group (ENSG) with central nervous system (CNS) involvement of neuroblastoma. Among this series of intensively treated patients, CNS neuroblastoma was diagnosed by computerised tomography (CT) scanning, rather than by autopsy. Cranial disease occurred in 5% of ENSG patients. Of 11 patients with intracranial disease, 4 had disease in the posterior fossa, a site rarely reported previously. Furthermore, 5 cases had CNS metastases at a time when there was no detectable disease elsewhere, rather than as part of extensive relapse. The pattern of disease we observed, at least for those with parenchymal disease, is in keeping with arterial spread. Although CT scanning is the optimal modality for identifying CNS disease, 2 cases had normal head CT scans prior to the onset of CNS disease. As most patients had symptoms of raised intracranial pressure (RICP) at the time the CNS disease was diagnosed, there does not seem to be any indication for routine CT scanning of the head at diagnosis, but this should be performed as soon as any symptoms or signs appear. With patients living longer with their disease, vigilance must be maintained during follow-up. PMID:1734220

  14. Spontaneous thrombosis in giant intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, I R; Dorsch, N W; Besser, M

    1982-01-01

    Twelve patients in a series of 22 with giant intracranial aneurysms demonstrated neuroradiological features of partial or total spontaneous intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. The presence of this intra-aneurysmal clot significantly altered the computed tomographic appearance of the giant aneurysm. Massive intra-aneurysmal thrombosis did not protect against subarachnoid haemorrhage and the likelihood of rupture of a clot containing giant aneurysm was not significantly different from that of a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. Although parent artery occlusion from a thrombosed giant aneurysm, and massive aneurysmal thrombosis leading to the formation of giant serpentine aneurysm were documented, these are rare epiphenomena. The risk of embolisation from a partially thrombosed giant aneurysm, which was documented in one case, would appear to be greater than that from a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. The findings in this series, and a review of literature, suggest that the presence of intra-aneurysmal clot in giant intracranial aneurysms has little prognostic significance and does not alter the management or outcome after treatment. Images PMID:7175528

  15. [Ruptured Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysm Coiling in a Patient with Ipsilateral Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion via the Posterior Communicating Artery].

    PubMed

    Ashida, Noriaki; Saitoh, Minoru; Fujita, Atsushi; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-09-01

    Background:De novo aneurysms after internal carotid artery(ICA)occlusion occur in the contralateral ICA or anterior communicating artery. Hemodynamic changes with increased blood flow to the contralateral carotid circulation were considered the main factor for the formation of these aneurysms. We report a rare case of ruptured ICA aneurysm associated with ipsilateral ICA occlusion treated with coil embolization via the vertebrobasilar and posterior communicating arteries. Case Presentation:An 82-year-old woman presented with sudden-onset disturbance of consciousness at our outpatient clinic and went into cardiopulmonary arrest. Computed tomography(CT)performed after cardiopulmonary resuscitation revealed diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage. Three-dimensional CT angiography revealed a right ICA aneurysm associated with the ipsilateral ICA occlusion. Considering that the patient showed clinical improvement with the critical care for neurogenic pulmonary edema, the aneurysm was treated with endovascular coil embolization via the posterior communicating artery. With this technique, complete obliteration was attained without perioperative complication. Conclusion:Endovascular coil embolization via the posterior communicating artery was proven effective as a treatment method for ruptured ICA aneurysms with ipsilateral ICA occlusion. Hemodynamic stress due to increased blood flow in the posterior communicating artery may play an important role in the growth and rupture of ICA aneurysms. PMID:27605482

  16. [Increased intracranial pressure and brain edema].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, W; Erbguth, F

    2013-03-01

    In primary and secondary brain diseases, increasing volumes of the three compartments of brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, or blood lead to a critical increase in intracranial pressure (ICP). A rising ICP is associated with typical clinical symptoms; however, during analgosedation it can only be detected by invasive ICP monitoring. Other neuromonitoring procedures are not as effective as ICP monitoring; they reflect the ICP changes and their complications by other metabolic and oxygenation parameters. The most relevant parameter for brain perfusion is cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), which is calculated as the difference between the middle arterial pressure (MAP) and the ICP. A mixed body of evidence exists for the different ICP-reducing treatment measures, such as hyperventilation, hyperosmolar substances, hypothermia, glucocorticosteroids, CSF drainage, and decompressive surgery. PMID:23503630

  17. [Increased intracranial pressure and brain edema].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, W; Erbguth, F

    2013-09-01

    In primary and secondary brain diseases, increasing volumes of the three compartments of brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, or blood lead to a critical increase in intracranial pressure (ICP). A rising ICP is associated with typical clinical symptoms; however, during analgosedation it can only be detected by invasive ICP monitoring. Other neuromonitoring procedures are not as effective as ICP monitoring; they reflect the ICP changes and their complications by other metabolic and oxygenation parameters. The most relevant parameter for brain perfusion is cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), which is calculated as the difference between the middle arterial pressure (MAP) and the ICP. A mixed body of evidence exists for the different ICP-reducing treatment measures, such as hyperventilation, hyperosmolar substances, hypothermia, glucocorticosteroids, CSF drainage, and decompressive surgery. PMID:24061872

  18. Endovascular treatment of frontopolar artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Karanam, Lakshmi S Prasanna; Alurkar, Anand; Chakka, Sivaramakrishna

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic intracranial aneurysms are rare and usually present with subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracranial hemorrhage, subdural hematoma, or intraventricular hemorrhage. These are usually not true aneurysms; hence treatment of these cases poses a therapeutic challenge. In this case report, we describe a young Asian male who presented with a ruptured pseudoaneurysm of the distal branch of the anterior cerebral artery. It was treated successfully with endovascular embolization. To our knowledge, there are few reports of this entity in the literature. PMID:27048313

  19. Intracranial aneurysm and sildenafil

    PubMed Central

    Edriss, Hawa; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Sildenafil is one of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. To date, we found five reported cases of intracerebral bleeding and two reported cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage related to sildenafil use. We report a 49-year-old hypertensive and diabetic patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and loss of consciousness following ingestion of 100 mg of sildenafil prior to sexual intercourse. He was not previously aware of the presence of an aneurysm and had no family history of it. Computed tomography of his head revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of a saccular aneurysm with subsequent repeat hemorrhage within a few hours of presentation. A sudden increase in blood pressure led to pulmonary edema. Studies have shown that sildenafil acts on phosphodiesterase-1, -2 and -5 receptors and leads to a secondary increase in intracerebral circulation and vasodilatory effects, leading to sympathetic overactivity which increases the risk for intracranial bleeding. PMID:27034561

  20. Use of the Microangiographic Fluoroscope for Coiling of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Binning, Mandy J.; Orion, David; Yashar, Parham; Webb, Sharon; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Jain, Amit; Rudin, Stephen; Hopkins, L. Nelson; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Levy, Elad I.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neurointervention is an ever-evolving specialty with tools including microcatheters, microwires, and coils that allow treatment of pathological conditions in increasingly smaller intracranial arteries, requiring increasing accuracy. As endovascular tools evolve, so too should the imaging. OBJECTIVE To detail the use of microangiography performed with a novel fluoroscope during coiling of intracranial aneurysms in 2 separate patients and discuss the benefits and potential limitations of the technology. METHODS The microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF) is an ultra high-resolution x-ray detector with superior resolution over a small field of view. The MAF can be incorporated into a standard angiographic C-arm system for use during endovascular procedures. RESULTS The MAF was useful for improved visualization during endovascular coiling of 2 unruptured intracranial aneurysms, without adding significant time to the procedure. No significant residual aneurysm filling was identified post-coiling, and no complications occurred. CONCLUSION The MAF is a high-resolution detector developed for use in neurointerventional cases in which superior image quality over a small field of view is required. It has been used with success for coiling of 2 unruptured aneurysms at our institution. It shows promise as an important tool in improving the accuracy with which neurointerventionists can perform certain intracranial procedures. PMID:21694658

  1. Modeling of Intracranial Pressure Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Richard L.; Sullivan, Humbert G.; Miller, J. Douglas

    1978-01-01

    Digital computer simulation is utilized to test hypotheses regarding poorly understood mechanisms of intracranial pressure change. The simulation produces graphic output similar to records from polygraph recorders used in patient monitoring and in animal experimentation. The structure of the model is discussed. The mathematic model perfected by the comparison between simulation and experiment will constitute a formulation of medical information applicable to automated clinical monitoring and treatment of intracranial hypertension.

  2. Y-Stenting Endovascular Treatment for Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysms : A Single-Institution Experience in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Joo

    2012-01-01

    Objective Stent-assisted coiling on intracranial aneurysm has been considered as an effective technique and has made the complex aneurysms amenable to coiling. To achieve reconstruction of intracranial vessels with preservation of parent artery the use of stents has the greatest potential for assisted coiling. We report the results of our experiences in ruptured wide-necked intracranial aneurysms using Y-stent coiling. Methods From October 2003 to October 2011, 12 patients (3 men, 9 women; mean age, 62.6) harboring 12 complex ruptured aneurysms (3 middle cerebral artery, 9 basilar tip) were treated by Y-stent coiling by using self-expandable intracranial stents. Procedural complications, clinical outcome, and initial and midterm angiographic results were evaluated. The definition of broad-necked aneurysm is neck diameter over than 4 mm or an aneurysm with a neck diameter smaller than 4 mm in which the dome/neck ratio was less than 2. Results In all patients, the aneurysm was successfully occluded with no apparent procedure-related complication. There was no evidence of thromboembolic complication, arterial dissection and spasm during procedure. Follow-up studies showed stable and complete occlusion of the aneurysm in all patients with no neurologic deficits. Conclusion The present study did show that the Y-stent coiling seemed to facilitate endovascular treatment of ruptured wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. More clinical data with longer follow-up are needed to establish the role of Y-stent coiling in ruptured aneurysms. PMID:23115659

  3. Treatment of ruptured intracranial dissecting aneurysms in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Wong, George Kwok Chu; Tang, Hoi Bun; Poon, Wai Sang; Yu, Simon Chun Ho

    2010-01-01

    Background: Data suggests that hemorrhagic presentations occur in 20% of internal carotid artery dissections and 50% of vertebral artery dissections. A Finnish study has reported favorable outcomes in only 32% of patients. We aimed to review the epidemiology and management outcomes in a Chinese population. Methods: We reviewed the aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage registry of patients who presented with intracranial dissecting aneurysms at a neurosurgical center in Hong Kong over a five-year period. Results: A total of 23 patients with intracranial dissecting aneurysms were identified, accounting for 8% of all spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. Forty-eight percent of the patients identified were treated by main trunk occlusion and 39% were treated by embolization or stent-assisted embolization or stent alone. Thirteen percent were managed by craniotomy and trapping or wrapping. Favorable outcomes at six months were achieved in 67%. Conclusions: Patients with intracranial dissecting aneurysms account for a significant proportion of the cases of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage in our population. Carefully selected endovascular and microsurgical treatments can lead to management outcomes similar to patients with saccular aneurysms. PMID:21206536

  4. Giant vertebral artery aneurysm in a child treated with endovascular parent artery occlusion and coil embolization

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hun-Soo; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Wada, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Hironaka, Yasuo; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intracranial giant vertebral artery aneurysms are extremely rare in the pediatric population and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The present report describes a case of a pediatric patient with giant vertebral artery aneurysm who presented with intracranial mass effect. This patient was successfully treated with endovascular parent artery occlusion and coil embolization. Case Description: A 7-year-old girl presented with tetraparesis, ataxia, dysphagia, and dysphonia. Cerebral angiography revealed intracranial giant aneurysm arising from the right vertebral artery. The patient underwent endovascular parent artery occlusion alone to facilitate aneurysmal thrombosis as an initial treatment. This was done to avoid a coil mass effect to the brainstem. However, incomplete thrombosis occurred in the vicinity of the vertebral artery union. Therefore, additional coil embolization for residual aneurysm was performed. Two additional coil embolization procedures were performed in response to recurrence. Mass effect and clinical symptoms gradually improved, and the patient had no associated morbidity or recurrence at 2 years after the last fourth coil embolization. Conclusion: Intracranial giant vertebral artery aneurysms are rare and challenging in pediatric patients. Staged endovascular strategy can be a safe and effective treatment option. PMID:25071937

  5. The safety of Pipeline flow diversion in fusiform vertebrobasilar aneurysms: a consecutive case series with longer-term follow-up from a single US center.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Sabareesh K; Lin, Ning; Sonig, Ashish; Rai, Ansaar T; Carpenter, Jeffrey S; Levy, Elad I; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT Pessimism exists regarding flow diversion for posterior circulation aneurysms because of reports of perforator territory infarcts and delayed ruptures. The authors report the results of patients who underwent Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) flow diversion using novel strategies for treatment of fusiform posterior circulation aneurysms, and compare these results with those from previously reported series. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective review of data from consecutive patients with fusiform vertebrobasilar artery aneurysms treated with the PED. RESULTS This review resulted in the identification of 12 such patients (mean [± SD] age 55.1 ± 14.1 years). Eleven patients had symptoms; 1 had a dissecting aneurysm identified on imaging for neck pain. The average aneurysm size was 13.25 ± 4.5 mm. None of the aneurysms were ruptured or previously treated. The average clinical follow-up duration was 22.1 ± 10.7 months and radiological follow-up was 14.5 ± 11.1 months from the index PED treatment. One patient suffered a perforator stroke and had a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 4 at last follow-up. Another patient had a retained stent pusher requiring retrieval via surgical cut-down but recovered to an mRS score of 0 at last follow-up. Eleven (91.7%) of 12 patients recovered to an mRS score of 0 or 1. Two patients had aneurysmal remnants at 7 and 10 months, respectively, after the index PED, which were retreated with PEDs. At last follow-up, all 12 aneurysms were occluded and PEDs were patent. The minimum follow-up duration was 12 months from the index PED treatment; no patient experienced delayed hemorrhage, stroke, or in-stent stenosis. CONCLUSIONS Flow diversion with selective adjunctive techniques is evolving to become a safer treatment option for posterior circulation aneurysms. This is the longest clinical follow-up duration reported for a single-center experience of flow-diversion treatment of these aneurysms. PMID:26654175

  6. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  7. Intracranial complications following mastoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Migirov, Lela; Eyal, Ana; Kronenberg, Jona

    2004-01-01

    Mastoidectomy is a common surgical procedure in otology. However, postoperative complications of various degrees of severity may occur. We present 4 children who underwent mastoidectomy for middle ear and mastoid disease and developed postoperative intracranial complications. One child was operated on for brain abscess 1 week after the initial mastoidectomy. Another child appeared with seizures 5 days after the initial mastoidectomy and a subdural empyema was drained during revision surgery. Large bone defects with exposed middle cranial fossa dura were found at revision surgery in both cases and Proteus vulgaris and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from the mastoid and abscess cavities in these children. A small epidural collection was diagnosed in the third patient 2 days after initial mastoid surgery and was managed with intravenous antibiotics only. The other child was found to have sigmoid sinus thrombosis the day after mastoidectomy that was performed for nonresponsive acute mastoiditis. This child received both intravenous antibiotics and anticoagulants. Timely revision surgery, combinations of third- or fourth-generation cephalosporins with vancomycin or metronidazole and the addition of anticoagulants in cases of sinus thrombosis can lead to full recovery. PMID:15689642

  8. Management of Symptomatic Intracranial Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hoak, David A; Lutsep, Helmi L

    2016-09-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease is a common cause of stroke worldwide, causing approximately 10 % of strokes in the USA and up to 50 % in Asian populations. Recurrent stroke risks are particularly high in those with a stenosis of 70 % or more and a recent transient ischemic attack or stroke. Warfarin has been associated with higher major hemorrhage rates and no reduction of recurrent stroke compared to aspirin in patients with symptomatic intracranial stenosis. After early trials showed the feasibility of stenting, two randomized trials compared stenting plus medical management to medical management alone in symptomatic intracranial stenosis. Stenting was linked with increased risk and showed no benefit in any subpopulation of patients. Aggressive medical management in the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) trial was associated with half the risk of stroke compared to that in similar patients in a previous symptomatic intracranial stenosis trial after adjustment of confounding characteristics. Aggressive medical management comprises risk factor control, including a target systolic blood pressure <140 mmHg, a low density lipoprotein <70 mg/dL, hemoglobin A1C <7.0 %, and lifestyle management that incorporates exercise, smoking cessation and weight management, and the use of antithrombotics. PMID:27443379

  9. Primary intracranial lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Mufti, Shagufta T.; Baeesa, Saleh S.; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL), a rare form of aggressive extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), has increased in incidence during the last three decades and occurs in both immune compromised and immune competent hosts. It has an overall poor prognosis. Objective: This study attempts to further delineate the clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological profile of PCNSL at Jeddah to King Faisal Hospital and Research Center. Methods: Computerized search through the archives of King Faisal Hospital and Research Centre between July 2000- December 2012 identified 15 patients with pathologically confirmed PCNSL. These were analyzed retrospectively. Their clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological data were analyzed. Results: Of the 15 PCNSL patients, 8 (53.3%) were females and 7 (46.6%) were males. There was female predilection especially in the age group of 40-59 years. Mean age at diagnosis for all patients was 50.4 years. There was no patient in the pediatric age group. The most common location in the brain was the frontal region in 7 patients (46.6%), 7 (46.6%) had multiple intracranial masses; all 15 (100%) were Non Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, among which 13 (86.6%) were diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. All 15 (100%) cases showed diffuse and strong positivity for CD 45, and CD 20. Fourteen patients were immune competent while one was immune compromised. Conclusions: PCNSL often occurs in middle-aged and aged patients. There is female predilection especially in the middle age. Frontal region is the most common location with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma being the predominant subtype. PMID:27366250

  10. Modeling of the acute effects of primary hypertension and hypotension on the hemodynamics of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sarrami-Foroushani, Ali; Villa-Uriol, Maria-Cruz; Nasr Esfahany, Mohsen; Coley, Stuart C; Di Marco, Luigi Yuri; Frangi, Alejandro F; Marzo, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Hemodynamics is a risk factor in intracranial aneurysms (IA). Hypertension and pharmacologically induced hypotension are common in IA patients. This study investigates how hypertension and hypotension may influence aneurysmal hemodynamics. Images of 23 IAs at typical locations were used to build patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics models. The effects of hypotension and hypertension were simulated through boundary conditions by modulating the normotensive flow and pressure waveforms, in turn produced by a 1D systemic vascular model. Aneurysm location and flow pattern types were used to categorize the influence of hypotension and hypertension on relevant flow variables (velocity, pressure and wall shear stress). Results indicate that, compared to other locations, vertebrobasilar aneurysms (VBA) are more sensitive to flow changes. In VBAs, space-averaged velocity at peak systole increased by 30% in hypertension (16-21% in other locations). Flow in VBAs in hypotension decreased by 20% (10-13% in other locations). Momentum-driven hemodynamic types were also more affected by hypotension and hypertension, than shear-driven types. This study shows how patient-specific modeling can be effectively used to identify location-specific flow patterns in a clinically-relevant study, thus reinforcing the role played by modeling technologies in furthering our understanding of cardiovascular disease, and their potential in future healthcare. PMID:25118666

  11. Treatment of intracranial foreign body.

    PubMed

    Karadas, Sevdegul; Dursun, Recep; Kiymaz, Nejmi

    2014-07-01

    Craniospinal penetrating foreign body (FB) injuries are interesting, but rarely observed, cases. They are important in terms of the complications that they may cause. The etiologies of craniospinal penetrating injuries and intracranial FB are also different. Though a sewing needle is more rarely seen in an intracranial FB, it may occur as atttempted infanticide or as a result of an accident especially in early childhood before the closure of fontanels. We detected an intracranial sewing needle in the head radiograph of a case admitted to the emergency department for another reason. We present this case since this is a rare injury and the etiologies of craniospinal penetrating foreign body have different characteristics. PMID:25255596

  12. Management of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Deena M; Brown, Robert D

    2016-09-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA) occur in approximately 2-3 % of the population. Most of these lesions are incidentally found, asymptomatic and typically carry a benign course. Although the risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is low, this complication can result in significant morbidity and mortality, making assessment of this risk the cornerstone of UIA management. This article reviews important factors to consider when managing unruptured intracranial aneurysms including patient demographics, comorbidities, family history, symptom status, and aneurysm characteristics. It also addresses screening, monitoring, medical management and current surgical and endovascular therapies. PMID:27443382

  13. Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms:

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, J.; Nguyen, T.; Chagnon, M.; Gevry, G.

    2007-01-01

    'if a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; 'but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties'. Sir Francis Bacon, The Advancement of Learning Summary In the absence of level one evidence, the treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms is grounded on opinions. Results of the largest registry available, ISUIA (the International Study on Unruptured Intraacranial Aneurysms) suggest that surgical or endovascular treatments are rarely justified. Yet the unruptured aneurysm is the most frequent indication for treatment in many endovascular centres. In preparation for the initiation of a randomized trial, we aimed at a better knowledge of endovascular expert opinions on unruptured aneurysms. We administered a standard questionnaire to 175 endovascular experts gathered at the WFITN meeting in Val d'lsère in 2007. Four paradigm unruptured aneurysms were used to poll opinions on risks of treatment or observation, as well as on their willingness to treat, observe or propose to the patient participation in a randomized trial, using six questions for each aneurysm. Opinions varied widely among lesions and among participants. Most participants (92.5%) were consistent, as they would offer treatment only if their estimate of the ten-year risk of spontaneous hemorrhage would exceed risks of treatment. Estimates of the natural history were consistently higher than that reported by ISUIA. Conversely, treatment risks were underestimated compared to those reported in ISUIA, but within the range reported in a recent French registry (ATENA). Participants were more confident in their evaluation of treatment risks and in their skills at treating aneurysms than in their estimates of risks of rupture entailed by the presence of the lesion, the latter being anchored at or close to 1% /year. The gulf between expert opinions, clinical practices and available data from registries persist. Expert opinions are compatible with the primary hypothesis

  14. Design of the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chimowitz, Marc I.; Lynn, Michael J.; Turan, Tanya N.; Fiorella, David; Lane, Bethany F.; Janis, Scott; Derdeyn, Colin P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with recent transient ischemic attack or stroke caused by 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery are at high risk of recurrent stroke on usual medical management, suggesting the need for alternative therapies for this disease. Methods The Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent stroke in Intracranial Stenosis trial is an ongoing, randomized, multicenter, two-arm trial that will determine whether intracranial angioplasty and stenting adds benefit to aggressive medical management alone for preventing the primary endpoint (any stroke or death within 30 days after enrollment or after any revascularization procedure of the qualifying lesion during follow-up, or stroke in the territory of the symptomatic intracranial artery beyond 30 days) during a mean follow-up of 2 years in patients with recent TIA or stroke caused by 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery. Aggressive medical management in both arms consists of aspirin 325 mg per day, clopidogrel 75mg per day for 90 days after enrollment, intensive risk factor management primarily targeting systolic blood pressure < 140 mm Hg (< 130 mm Hg in diabetics) and low density cholesterol < 70 mg / dl, and a lifetsyle modification program. The sample size required todetect a 35% reduction in the rate of the primary endpoint from angioplasty and stenting based on the log-rank test with an alpha of 0.05, 80% power, and adjusting for a 2% loss to follow-up and 5% crossover from the medical to the stenting arm is 382 patients per group. Conclusion This is the first randomized trial to compare intracranial angioplasty and stenting with medical therapy and to incorporate intensive management of multiple risk factors and a lifestyle modification program in the study design. Hopefully, the results of the trial will lead to more effective therapy for this high-risk disease. PMID:21729789

  15. Ruptured cerebral aneurysm associated with a persistent primitive trigeminal artery variant

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Yu; Ohmori, Yuki; Kawano, Takayuki; Kai, Yutaka; Morioka, Motohiro; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi

    2011-01-01

    Background: Primitive trigeminal artery variants (PTAVs) are one of the rare persistent fetal anastomoses between the carotid and vertebrobasilar circulations. They originate from the internal carotid artery and join one of the cerebellar arteries instead of the basilar artery. Case Description: We present an 82-year-old woman with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured aneurysm originating at a PTAV. Three-dimensional computed tomography angiogram and cerebral angiography revealed bilateral PTAV and two aneurysms originating at the left PTAV. The proximal and distal aneurysms were saccular and fusiform, respectively. She underwent surgical treatment and her postoperative course was uneventful. Conclusion: Our case demonstrates that extremely rare cerebral aneurysms associated with PTAV can be addressed successfully by surgical intervention. PMID:22059121

  16. Management of Carotid Artery Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Thomas S.; Ducic, Yadranko; Gordin, Eli; Stroman, David

    2014-01-01

    With increased awareness and liberal screening of trauma patients with identified risk factors, recent case series demonstrate improved early diagnosis of carotid artery trauma before they become problematio. There remains a need for unified screening criteria for both intracranial and extracranial carotid trauma. In the absence of contraindications, antithrombotic agents should be considered in blunt carotid artery injuries, as there is a significant risk of progression of vessel injury with observation alone. Despite CTA being used as a common screening modality, it appears to lack sufficient sensitivity. DSA remains to be the gold standard in screening. Endovascular techniques are becoming more widely accepted as the primary surgical modality in the treatment of blunt extracranial carotid injuries and penetrating/blunt intracranial carotid lessions. Nonetheless, open surgical approaches are still needed for the treatment of penetrating extracranial carotid injuries and in patients with unfavorable lesions for endovascular intervention. PMID:25136406

  17. Intracranial haemorrhage and child abuse.

    PubMed

    Cheah, I G; Kasim, M S; Shafie, H M; Khoo, T H

    1994-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage is a major cause of severe morbidity and mortality in child abuse cases in developed countries. However, similar data are not available in most developing countries. This study therefore aimed to determine the incidence of intracranial haemorrhage amongst all cases of child physical abuse, the nature of the injuries incurred, and the morbidity and mortality resulting therefrom. Among 369 cases of physical abuse seen over a 4-year period, 41 (11.4%) had intracranial haemorrhage, of whom 37 (90%) were 2 years old or less. A history of trauma was present in only eight (20%), of which only two were compatible with the injuries incurred. Subdural haemorrhages accounted for 80% of the cases, with skull fractures present in only nine cases. Fifty-four per cent of the 37 children aged 2 years of age or less had no external signs of trauma, but 11 of them had retinal haemorrhages. This is in contrast to the children older than 2 years of age who all had external signs of trauma. The overall prognosis was dismal with an early mortality of almost 30% (13 cases) and at least seven cases with severe neurological sequelae. These findings are comparable with studies from developed countries which have established that non-accidental injury must be considered as a cause of intracranial haemorrhage in any young child, despite the absence of external signs of trauma. PMID:7880096

  18. Intracranial Schwannoma in a Cow

    PubMed Central

    Mitcham, S. A.; Kasari, T. R.; Parent, J. M.; Naylor, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A nine year old Hereford crossbred cow with a history of progressive neurological signs was referred to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon. A large intracranial mass, histologically identified as a schwannoma, was found to be compressing the left brain stem and appeared to have arisen from the left fifth cranial nerve. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:17422375

  19. Amphetamine abuse and intracranial haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, N; McConachie, N S

    2000-01-01

    Amphetamines taken by any route can cause cerebral vasculitis and intracranial haemorrhage. 8 cases were seen in a neurosurgical unit over 3.5 years. The published work indicates that those who experience these complications, mainly young adults, have poor outcomes. PMID:11089483

  20. Intracranial pressure and skull remodeling

    PubMed Central

    McCulley, Timothy J.; Jordan Piluek, W.; Chang, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    In this article we review bony changes resulting from alterations in intracranial pressure (ICP) and the implications for ophthalmologists and the patients for whom we care. Before addressing ophthalmic implications, we will begin with a brief overview of bone remodeling. Bony changes seen with chronic intracranial hypotension and hypertension will be discussed. The primary objective of this review was to bring attention to bony changes seen with chronic intracranial hypotension. Intracranial hypotension skull remodeling can result in enophthalmos. In advanced disease enophthalmos develops to a degree that is truly disfiguring. The most common finding for which subjects are referred is ocular surface disease, related to loss of contact between the eyelids and the cornea. Other abnormalities seen include abnormal ocular motility and optic atrophy. Recognition of such changes is important to allow for diagnosis and treatment prior to advanced clinical deterioration. Routine radiographic assessment of bony changes may allow for the identification of patient with abnormal ICP prior to the development of clinically significant disease. PMID:25859141

  1. Intracranial hypertension: classification and patterns of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Iencean, SM

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension (ICH) was systematized in four categories according to its aetiology and pathogenic mechanisms: parenchymatous ICH with an intrinsic cerebral cause; vascular ICH, which has its aetiology in disorders of cerebral blood circulation; ICH caused by disorders of cerebro–spinal fluid dynamics and idiopathic ICH. The increase of intracranial pressure is the first to happen and then intracranial hypertension develops from this initial effect becoming symptomatic; it then acquires its individuality, surpassing the initial disease. The intracranial hypertension syndrome corresponds to the stage at which the increased intracranial pressure can be compensated and the acute form of intracranial hypertension is equivalent to a decompensated ICH syndrome. The decompensation of intracranial hypertension is a condition of instability and appears when the normal intrinsic ratio of intracranial pressure – time fluctuation is changed. The essential conditions for decompensation of intracranial hypertension are: the speed of intracranial pressure increase over normal values, the highest value of abnormal intracranial pressure and the duration of high ICP values. Medical objectives are preventing ICP from exceeding 20 mm Hg and maintaining a normal cerebral blood flow. The emergency therapy is the same for the acute form but each of the four forms of ICH has a specific therapy, according to the pathogenic mechanism and if possible to aetiology. PMID:20108456

  2. Late intracranial haemorrhage and subsequent carotid-cavernous sinus fistula after fracture of the facial bones.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chien-Ming; Cheng, Chi-Sheng

    2013-12-01

    Carotid-cavernous sinus fistula is an arteriovenous fistula between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus, and is usually caused by a traumatic tear or a ruptured aneurysm of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. We describe a rare case of delayed intracranial haemorrhage and carotid-cavernous sinus fistula that presented 3 weeks after fracture of the facial bones. The patient developed orbital apex syndrome including ptosis of upper eyelid, pulsatile exophthalmos, chemosis, loss of ocular motility, monocular blindness on the right, and numbness of the right infraorbital region. After transcatheter intra-arterial embolisation, the ptosis and chemosis improved. PMID:23958350

  3. Emerging Techniques for Evaluation of the Hemodynamics of Intracranial Vascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Melissa; Chien, Aichi

    2015-01-01

    Advances in imaging modalities have improved the assessment of intracranial hemodynamics using non-invasive techniques. This review examines new imaging modalities and clinical applications of currently available techniques, describes pathophysiology and future directions in hemodynamic analysis of intracranial stenoses, aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations and explores how hemodynamic analysis may have prognostic value in predicting clinical outcomes and assist in risk stratification. The advent of new technologies such as pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling, accelerated magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) techniques, 4D digital subtraction angiography, and improvements in clinically available techniques such as phase-contrast MRA may change the landscape of vascular imaging and modify current clinical practice guidelines. PMID:25924168

  4. A Case Report of Locked-in Syndrome Due to Bilateral Vertebral Artery Dissection After Cervical Spine Manipulation Treated by Arterial Embolectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jiang-Qiong; Yin, Bo; Fu, Fang-Wang; Shao, Sheng-Min; Lin, Yan; Dong, Qi-Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Tong; Zheng, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cervical spine manipulation (CSM) is a commonly spinal manipulative therapies for the relief of cervical spine-related conditions worldwide, but its use remains controversial. CSM may carry the potential for serious neurovascular complications, primarily due to vertebral artery dissection (VAD) and subsequent vertebrobasilar stroke. Here, we reported a rare case of locked-in syndrome (LIS) due to bilaterial VAD after CSM treated by arterial embolectomy. A 36-year-old right-handed man was admitted to our hospital with numbness and weakness of limbs after treating with CSM for neck for half an hour. Gradually, although the patient remained conscious, he could not speak but could communicate with the surrounding by blinking or moving his eyes, and turned to complete quadriplegia, complete facial and bulbar palsy, dyspnea at 4 hours after admission. He was diagnosed with LIS. Then, the patient was received cervical and brain computed tomography angiography that showed bilateral VAD. Aortocranial digital subtraction angiography showed vertebrobasilar thrombosis, blocking left vertebral artery, and stenosis of right vertebral artery. The patient was treated by using emergency arterial embolectomy and followed by antiplatelet therapy and supportive therapy in the intensive care unit and a general ward. Twenty-seven days later, the patient's physical function gradually improved and discharged but still left neurological deficit with muscle strength grade 3/5 and hyperreflexia of limbs. Our findings suggested that CSM might have potential severe side-effect like LIS due to bilaterial VAD, and arterial embolectomy is an important treatment choice. The practitioner must be aware of this complication and should give the patients informed consent to CSM, although not all stroke cases temporally related to SCM have pre-existing craniocervical artery dissection. PMID:26844510

  5. A Case Report of Locked-in Syndrome Due to Bilateral Vertebral Artery Dissection After Cervical Spine Manipulation Treated by Arterial Embolectomy.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jiang-Qiong; Yin, Bo; Fu, Fang-Wang; Shao, Sheng-Min; Lin, Yan; Dong, Qi-Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Tong; Zheng, Guo-Qing

    2016-02-01

    Cervical spine manipulation (CSM) is a commonly spinal manipulative therapies for the relief of cervical spine-related conditions worldwide, but its use remains controversial. CSM may carry the potential for serious neurovascular complications, primarily due to vertebral artery dissection (VAD) and subsequent vertebrobasilar stroke. Here, we reported a rare case of locked-in syndrome (LIS) due to bilaterial VAD after CSM treated by arterial embolectomy.A 36-year-old right-handed man was admitted to our hospital with numbness and weakness of limbs after treating with CSM for neck for half an hour. Gradually, although the patient remained conscious, he could not speak but could communicate with the surrounding by blinking or moving his eyes, and turned to complete quadriplegia, complete facial and bulbar palsy, dyspnea at 4 hours after admission. He was diagnosed with LIS. Then, the patient was received cervical and brain computed tomography angiography that showed bilateral VAD. Aortocranial digital subtraction angiography showed vertebrobasilar thrombosis, blocking left vertebral artery, and stenosis of right vertebral artery. The patient was treated by using emergency arterial embolectomy and followed by antiplatelet therapy and supportive therapy in the intensive care unit and a general ward. Twenty-seven days later, the patient's physical function gradually improved and discharged but still left neurological deficit with muscle strength grade 3/5 and hyperreflexia of limbs.Our findings suggested that CSM might have potential severe side-effect like LIS due to bilaterial VAD, and arterial embolectomy is an important treatment choice. The practitioner must be aware of this complication and should give the patients informed consent to CSM, although not all stroke cases temporally related to SCM have pre-existing craniocervical artery dissection. PMID:26844510

  6. Iatrogenic intracranial pseudoaneurysms: neuroradiological and therapeutical considerations, including endovascular options.

    PubMed

    Ciceri, E F M; Regna-Gladin, C; Erbetta, A; Chiapparini, L; Nappini, S; Savoiardo, M; Di Meco, F

    2006-11-01

    Intracranial pseudoaneurysms represent a potentially fatal complication of intracranial surgery. Our purpose is to describe their neuroradiological characteristics, prognostic features and possible treatment. Eight cases of postsurgical intracranial pseudoaneurysms have been observed at our institution since 1988. Four were observed following transsphenoidal (TS) surgery and four after pterional craniotomies. Two types of iatrogenic pseudoaneurysms were observed: "fusiform", probably due to weakening of the adventitia during surgical peeling of the tumour from the artery (three cases) and "saccular", occurring after a more focal or complete laceration of the vessel (five cases), more often after TS surgery. A thorough preoperative neuroradiological examination may identify anatomical conditions at risk for development of this severe complication. Postoperative neuroradiological follow-up is mandatory in cases in which unusual bleeding has occurred during the perioperative period, but absence of bleeding does not exclude the possible development of a pseudoaneurysm. Endovascular treatment of pseudoaneurysms represents a safe and durable procedure, specifically in those cases in which damage to the carotid siphon occurred during TS surgery. PMID:17122940

  7. Sensitivity of Quantified Intracranial Aneurysm Geometry to Imaging Modality

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Manasi; Retarekar, Rohini; Harbaugh, Robert E.; Hasan, David; Policeni, Bruno; Rosenwasser, Robert; Ogilvy, Christopher; Raghavan, Madhavan L.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the sensitivity of intracranial aneurysm geometry to the modality of imaging. Four imaging modalities—3D rotational angiography (3DRA), computed tomography angiography (CTA), contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA), and time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA)—were assessed using data from a flow phantom and human subjects. A silicone flow phantom of the head and neck arteries with a 10 mm ACOM aneurysm was imaged using all four modalities under steady flow conditions. Three human subjects with mid to large sized intracranial aneurysm who had a 3DRA scan and one of CTA, CE-MRA, or TOF-MRA performed within a day were also studied. The aneurysm and contiguous vasculature were segmented for all available scans and geometric measures of their size (5 indices) and shape (6 indices) were estimated and compared. Visually, the size and shape of segmented 3D models of the aneurysms were similar across scan modalities for both the human subjects and the flow phantom. Consequently, the computed indices were consistent across modalities in the key morphometric indices. In conclusion, quantified indices of 3D geometry of the mid to large sized intracranial aneurysms investigated in this small study population are not sensitive to scanning modality. PMID:24151529

  8. Modified Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization Technique to Treat an Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, M. M.; Northeast, A.; Lintott, P.; Liong, W.-C.; Warakaulle, D. R.

    2010-10-15

    Stent-assisted coil embolization is a well-described technique for the treatment of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. We describe a modification of this technique used successfully to occlude a wide-necked internal iliac artery aneurysm.

  9. Transient Ischemic Attack in the Setting of Carotid Atheromatous Disease with a Persistent Primitive Hypoglossal Artery Successfully Treated with Stenting: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meng; Moisi, Marc; Zwillman, Michael E; Volpi, John J; Diaz, Orlando; Klucznik, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Fetal brain perfusion is supplied by the primitive dorsal aorta anteriorly, longitudinal neural arteries posteriorly, and anastomotic transverse segmentals. Most notable of these connections are the primitive trigeminal, otic, hypoglossal, and proatlantal arteries. With cranial-cervical circulatory maturation and development of the posterior communicating segments and vertebro-basilar system, these primitive segmental anastomoses normally regress. Anomalous neurovascular development can result in persistence of these anastomoses. Due to its territory of perfusion, the persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) is associated with vertebral artery and posterior communicating artery hypoplasia or aplasia. As a consequence, primary blood supply to the hindbrain comes chiefly from this single artery. Although usually clinically silent, PPHA is susceptible to common cerebrovascular disorders including athero-ischemic disease and saccular aneurysmal dilation to name a few. We present a case of transient ischemic attack in a patient with a PPHA and proximal atherosclerotic disease treated by endovascular stenting. PMID:26929891

  10. Transient Ischemic Attack in the Setting of Carotid Atheromatous Disease with a Persistent Primitive Hypoglossal Artery Successfully Treated with Stenting: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Moisi, Marc; Zwillman, Michael E; Volpi, John J; Diaz, Orlando; Klucznik, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Fetal brain perfusion is supplied by the primitive dorsal aorta anteriorly, longitudinal neural arteries posteriorly, and anastomotic transverse segmentals. Most notable of these connections are the primitive trigeminal, otic, hypoglossal, and proatlantal arteries. With cranial-cervical circulatory maturation and development of the posterior communicating segments and vertebro-basilar system, these primitive segmental anastomoses normally regress. Anomalous neurovascular development can result in persistence of these anastomoses. Due to its territory of perfusion, the persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) is associated with vertebral artery and posterior communicating artery hypoplasia or aplasia. As a consequence, primary blood supply to the hindbrain comes chiefly from this single artery. Although usually clinically silent, PPHA is susceptible to common cerebrovascular disorders including athero-ischemic disease and saccular aneurysmal dilation to name a few. We present a case of transient ischemic attack in a patient with a PPHA and proximal atherosclerotic disease treated by endovascular stenting.  PMID:26929891

  11. Bacterial DNA findings in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Pyysalo, Mikko J; Pyysalo, Liisa M; Pessi, Tanja; Karhunen, Pekka J; Lehtimäki, Terho; Oksala, Niku; Öhman, Juha E

    2016-05-01

    Objective Chronic inflammation has earlier been detected in ruptured intracranial aneurysms. A previous study detected both dental bacterial DNA and bacterial-driven inflammation in ruptured intracranial aneurysm walls. The aim of this study was to compare the presence of oral and pharyngeal bacterial DNA in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms. The hypothesis was that oral bacterial DNA findings would be more common and the amount of bacterial DNA would be higher in ruptured aneurysm walls than in unruptured aneurysm walls. Materials and methods A total of 70 ruptured (n = 42) and unruptured (n = 28) intracranial aneurysm specimens were obtained perioperatively in aneurysm clipping operations. Aneurysmal sac tissue was analysed using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to detect bacterial DNA from several oral species. Both histologically non-atherosclerotic healthy vessel wall obtained from cardiac by-pass operations (LITA) and arterial blood samples obtained from each aneurysm patient were used as control samples. Results Bacterial DNA was detected in 49/70 (70%) of the specimens. A total of 29/42 (69%) of the ruptured and 20/28 (71%) of the unruptured aneurysm samples contained bacterial DNA of oral origin. Both ruptured and unruptured aneurysm tissue samples contained significantly more bacterial DNA than the LITA control samples (p-values 0.003 and 0.001, respectively). There was no significant difference in the amount of bacterial DNA between the ruptured and unruptured samples. Conclusion Dental bacterial DNA can be found using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction in both ruptured and unruptured aneurysm walls, suggesting that bacterial DNA plays a role in the pathogenesis of cerebral aneurysms in general, rather than only in ruptured aneurysms. PMID:26777430

  12. Pure tentorial subdural hematoma from rupture of aneurysm along the transmastoid branches of the occipital artery

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Zaidat, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pure subdural hematoma (without subarachnoid, intraventricular, or intraparenchymal hemorrhage) due to a ruptured intracranial aneurysm is rare. Most reported cases involve an aneurysm along the internal carotid artery, posterior communicating artery, or middle cerebral artery. No reports have described an aneurysm along the transmastoid branches of the occipital artery. Case Description: A 70-year-old female presented with sudden-onset, excruciating headaches, associated with dizziness, nausea, and emesis. There was no history of trauma. Computed tomography (CT) head demonstrated a pure tentorial subdural hematoma. Vascular imaging revealed bilateral aneurysms along the transmastoid branches of the intracranial portion of both the occipital arteries. Consequently, these branches were embolized, with no residual filling of the aneurysms. After the procedure, the patient remained neurologically well. The patient was monitored appropriately for vasospasm, and was discharged home 10 days after presentation. Conclusion: Rupture of aneurysms along intracranial branches of the occipital artery can lead to pure subdural hematoma along the tentorium. PMID:27583173

  13. Intracranial Pseudoaneurysms, Fusiform Aneurysms and Carotid-Cavernous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xianli; Jiang, Chuhan; Li, Youxiang; Lv, Ming; Zhang, Jingbo; Wu, Zhongxue

    2008-01-01

    Summary The study assessed the effectiveness and safety of endovascular covered stents in the management of intracranial pseudoaneurysms, fusiform aneurysms and direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Fourteen endovascular covered stents were used to repair three pseudoaneurysms, six fu-siform aneurysms and six direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Aneurysms were in the carotid artery in seven cases, in the vertebral artery two cases. It was not possible to treat two additional cases transcutaneously for technical reasons
2/15. Percutaneous closure of the lesions with an endovascular covered stent was successful in 13 of 15 cases. Initial follow-up showed good stent patency. No complications were observed after stent implantation. During follow-up, stent thromboses were detected in two of nine patients with follow-up digital subtracted angiography. One carotid-cavernous fistula of Barrow Type A transformed into Barrow Type D at nine month follow-up study was cured with a procudure of Onyx-18 injection. Endovascular covered stents may be an option for percutaneous closure of intracranial pseudoaneurysms, fusiform aneurysms and direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Endoluminal vascular repair with covered stents offers an alternative therapeutic approach to conventional modalities. PMID:20557743

  14. Arterial embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... the artery (arterial bypass) to create a second source of blood supply Clot removal through a balloon catheter placed into the affected artery or through open surgery on the artery (embolectomy) Opening of the ...

  15. Intracranial Rosai-Dorfman disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo Yuan; Zong, Miao; Zong, Wen Jing; Sun, Yan Hui; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Hong Bo

    2016-10-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) is a rare histioproliferative disorder that only occasionally involves the central nervous system. We present the diagnosis and treatment of five patients with intracranial RDD. The patients were preoperatively misdiagnosed as meningioma or eosinophilic granuloma. All five patients were treated by total or subtotal surgical resection and none of them experienced recurrence. Histopathological examination showed a characteristic emperipolesis, the lymphocytes were engulfed in the S-100 protein and CD68 positive histiocytes, with negative expression of CD1a. Preoperative diagnosis of intracranial RDD is still challenging because the lesion is usually a dural-based lesion that mimics a meningioma. Surgical resection is an effective treatment and radiotherapy, steroid and chemotherapy has not demonstrated reliable therapeutic efficiency. PMID:27561856

  16. Bow hunter's syndrome secondary to bilateral dynamic vertebral artery compression.

    PubMed

    Healy, Andrew T; Lee, Bryan S; Walsh, Kevin; Bain, Mark D; Krishnaney, Ajit A

    2015-01-01

    Bow hunter's syndrome is a condition in which vertebrobasilar insufficiency is resultant from head rotation, clinically manifested by presyncopal sensation, syncope, dizziness, and nausea. It is usually diagnosed clinically, with supporting vascular imaging demonstrating an occluded or at the very least compromised unilateral vertebral artery, while the dominant vertebral artery remains patent in the neutral position. Dynamic imaging is utilized to confirm the rotational compression of the dominant vertebral artery. We present the rare case of a patient with typical Bow hunter's symptoms, bilaterally patent vertebral arteries on neutral imaging, and bilateral compromise with head rotation. Our patient underwent posterior decompression of the culprit atlanto-axial transverse foramen and subaxial cervical fusion, with resolution of his symptoms. Our patient exemplifies the possibility of bilateral dynamic vertebral artery occlusion. We show that Bow hunter's syndrome cannot be ruled out in the setting of bilaterally patent vertebral arteries on neutral imaging and that severe cervical spondylosis should impart further clinical suspicion of this unusual phenomenon. PMID:25070633

  17. Clinical Analysis of Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byoung-Joo; Hong, Yong-Kil; Jeun, Sin-Soo; Lee, Kwan-Sung; Lee, Youn-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Objective Intracranial hemangiopericytomas (HPCs) are rare tumors with aggressive behavior, including local recurrence and distant metastasis. We conducted this retrospective study to evaluate the efficacy of grossly total resection and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for these tumors. Methods A total of 13 patients treated for intracranial HPC from January 1995 through May 2013 were included in this retrospective study. We analyzed the clinical presentations, radiologic appearances, treatment results, and follow-up outcomes, as well as reviewed other studies. Results The ages of the patients at the time of diagnosis ranged from 26 to 73 years (mean : 48 years). The majority of the patients were male (92.3%), and the majority of the tumors were located in the parasagittal and falx. The ratio of intracranial HPCs to meningiomas was 13 : 598 in same period, or 2.2%. Seven patients (53.8%) had anaplastic HPCs. Nine patients (69.2%) underwent gross total tumor resection in the first operation without mortality. Eleven patients (84.6%) underwent postoperative adjuvant RT. Follow-up period ranged from 13 to 185 months (mean : 54.3 months). The local recurrence rate was 46.2% (6/13), and there were no distant metastases. The 10-year survival rate after initial surgery was 83.9%. The initial mean Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) was 70.8 and the final mean KPS was 64.6. Conclusion Gross total tumor resection upon initial surgery is very important. We believe that adjuvant RT is helpful even with maximal tumor resection. Molecular biologic analyses and chemotherapy studies are required to achieve better outcomes in recurrent intracranial HPCs. PMID:24294454

  18. Intracranial ependymoma: factors affecting outcome.

    PubMed

    Massimino, Maura; Buttarelli, Francesca R; Antonelli, Manila; Gandola, Lorenza; Modena, Piergiorgio; Giangaspero, Felice

    2009-03-01

    Ependymomas account for 2-9% of all neuroepithelial tumors, amounting to 6-12% of all intracranial tumors in children and up to 30% of those in children younger than 3 years. Recent findings provide evidence that intracranial and spinal ependymomas share similar molecular profiles with the radial glia of their corresponding locations. The management of intracranial ependymoma is still not optimal. The 5-year progression-free survival for children with ependymoma ranges between 30 and 50% with a worse prognosis for patients with residual disease after surgery. The prognostic relevance of most factors are still being debated. Recent studies, in which the current WHO classification criteria were applied, reported the relationship between histological grade and outcome. Biomolecular studies have identified that gain of 1q25 and EGFR overexpression correlate to poor prognosis, whereas low expression of nucleolin correlated with a favorable outcome. Ependymomas have been considered a 'surgical disease', where completeness of excision can be reached in approximately half of the cases. At present the standard treatment is radiation therapy for all patients after gross-total or near-total resection. For high-risk patients, with residual tumor, an interesting, although experimental, approach could be chemotherapy followed by secondary surgery and postoperative conformal irradiation. PMID:19284379

  19. A Cadaveric Study of Bilateral Configuration of Posterior Bifurcation of Posterior Communicating Artery in Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Anubha; Mandal, Shyamash

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Various studies have been done regarding variations of circle of Willis, but few literatures are available about the detail configurations on Indian population. Posterior communicating artery is the main collateral channel between the vertebrobasilar and carotid system. It may act as a main source of blood flow via posterior cerebral artery if fetal configuration is present. Aim of the study is to see the bilateral configurations to compare the blood supply of both cerebral hemispheres via posterior cerebral artery in human cadavers. Materials and Methods: Fifty six formalin fixed brains were used for study. The specimens were classified into 3 types and 21 subtypes according to the configuration of the vessel of both hemispheres. As hemodynamic balance is dependent on the calibre of the vessel, the diameter of the arteries were also taken into consideration. Pearson’s correlation had been done. Result: In present study type I is 57.2%, type II is 37.5% and type III is 5.4%. Incidence of unilateral fetal type posterior cerebral artery is in high percentage (33.9%). Greatest diameter of posterior communicating artery is 3.8mm on right and 3.6mm on left side. Significant correlations also have been found between arterial segments of different types. Conclusion: It is expected that the study will help to enrich the knowledge about the arterial predominance of origin of posterior cerebral artery of both cerebral hemispheres in normal or variant cases and its effect on perfusion images. PMID:25954608

  20. Bilateral persistent trigeminal artery variants diagnosed by MR angiography.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Akira

    2011-12-01

    A persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most common anastomosis between the carotid and vertebrobasilar system. A PTA variant (PTAV) is a rare anomaly in which the cerebellar artery arises from the internal carotid artery (ICA) without connection with the basilar artery (BA). I present what I believe is the first report of bilateral PTAVs diagnosed using magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and briefly discuss the embryology of this rare anomaly. An 81-year-old woman with small infarctions underwent cerebral MR imaging and MR angiography with a 1.5-tesla imager for the evaluation of brain lesions. An MR angiography was obtained using the standard noncontrast three-dimensional time-of-flight technique. The MR angiographic demonstration of bilateral anterior inferior cerebellar arteries arising from the precavernous segment of the ICA without anastomosis to the BA indicated bilateral PTAVs. This is the first report of bilateral PTAVs diagnosed by MR angiography. The literature review indicates that an estimated prevalence of bilateral PTAVs is about 0.0012%. PMID:21544587

  1. Intracranial volume in craniosynostotic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mooney, M P; Burrows, A M; Wigginton, W; Singhal, V K; Losken, H W; Smith, T D; Dechant, J; Towbin, A; Cooper, G M; Towbin, R; Siegel, M I

    1998-05-01

    Although craniosynostosis alters brain growth direction resulting in compensatory changes in the neurocranium, it has been suggested that such compensations occur with little reduction in intracranial volume (ICV). This hypothesis was tested in a rabbit model with nonsyndromic, familial coronal suture synostosis. Cross-sectional three-dimensional computed tomographic head scans were obtained from 79 rabbits (25 normal, 28 with delayed-onset synostosis, and 26 with early-onset synostosis) at 25, 42, and 126 days of age. Intracranial contents were reconstructed and indirect ICV was calculated. Results revealed that by 25 days of age the intracranial contents from early-onset synostosed rabbit skulls showed rostral (anterior) constrictions and a "beaten copper" morphology in the parietal and temporal regions compared with the other two groups. These deformities increased in severity with age. Quantitatively, ICV was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) by 7% in rabbits with early-onset synostosis compared with both control rabbits and rabbits with delayed-onset synostosis at 25 days of age. By 126 days of age, ICV in rabbits with synostosis was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) by 11% in early-onset synostosis and by 8% in delayed-onset synostosis compared with normal rabbits. Results suggest that in rabbits with uncorrected craniosynostosis, compensatory changes in the neurocranium were not adequate to allow normal expansion of the neurocapsular matrix. Further research is needed to determine if ICV reduction is correlated with cerebral atrophy or cerebral spinal fluid (i.e., ventricular or subarachnoid) space compression in this model. PMID:9693554

  2. Transnasal, intracranial penetrating injury treated endoscopically.

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Erdem Atalay; Okan, Cinemre; Pelin, Kesapli

    2006-04-01

    Intracranial penetrating injury through the nose is uncommon. We present the case of a four-year-old girl who sustained a transnasal, intracranial penetrating injury with a sharp wooden object. We performed endoscopic removal of the foreign body and repair of the associated cerebrospinal fluid fistula. PMID:16623978

  3. Acute surgical management in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Zaitun; Fenton, Eoin; Sattar, Muhammad Taufiq

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a headache syndrome with progressive symptoms of raised intracranial pressure. Most commonly, it is a slow process where surveillance and medical management are the main treatment modalities. We describe herein an acute presentation with bilateral sixth nerve palsies, papilloedema and visual deterioration, where acute surgical intervention was a vision-saving operation. PMID:23239783

  4. Dabigatran-Associated Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Szarlej, Dorota K.; Rincon, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Dabigatran etexilate is an oral direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolization in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. Although dabigatran has a favorable safety profile, predictable pharmacokinetics, fewer drug interactions than warfarin, and does not require monitoring, clinical data regarding dabigatran reversal are limited. In addition, currently available laboratory assays allow measurement of the presence, but not extent, of dabigatran-associated anticoagulation. Patient age, renal function, weight, concurrent drug therapy, adherence, and concomitant disease states can affect dabigatran’s efficacy and safety. Management of dabigatran-related intracranial hemorrhage must be approached on a case-by-case basis and include assessment of degree of anticoagulation, severity of hemorrhage, renal function, timing of last dabigatran dose, and risk of thromboembolic events. Initial management includes dabigatran discontinuation and general supportive measures. Oral activated charcoal should be administered in those who ingested dabigatran within 2 hours. Four-factor prothrombin complex concentrates (4PCCs), activated PCC, or recombinant activated factor VII use may be reasonable but is not evidence based. Reserve fresh frozen plasma for patients with dilutional coagulopathy. If readily available, hemodialysis should be considered, particularly in patients with advanced kidney injury or excessive risk of thromboembolic events. More clinical studies are needed to determine a standardized approach to treating dabigatran-associated intracranial hemorrhage. Institutional protocol development will facilitate safe, efficacious, and timely use of the limited management options. PMID:26425251

  5. Desmopressin Acetate in Intracranial Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kapapa, Thomas; Röhrer, Stefan; Struve, Sabine; Petscher, Matthias; König, Ralph; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Woischneck, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The secondary increase in the size of intracranial haematomas as a result of spontaneous haemorrhage or trauma is of particular relevance in the event of prior intake of platelet aggregation inhibitors. We describe the effect of desmopressin acetate as a means of temporarily stabilising the platelet function. Patients and Methods. The platelet function was analysed in 10 patients who had received single (N = 4) or multiple (N = 6) doses of acetylsalicylic acid and 3 patients (control group) who had not taken acetylsalicylic acid. All subjects had suffered intracranial haemorrhage. Analysis was performed before, half an hour and three hours after administration of desmopressin acetate. Statistical analysis was performed by applying a level of significance of P ≤ 0.05. Results. (1) Platelet function returned to normal 30 minutes after administration of desmopressin acetate. (2) The platelet function worsened again after three hours. (3) There were no complications related to electrolytes or fluid balance. Conclusion. Desmopressin acetate can stabilise the platelet function in neurosurgical patients who have received acetylsalicylic acid prior to surgery without causing transfusion-related side effects or a loss of time. The effect is, however, limited and influenced by the frequency of drug intake. Further controls are needed in neurosurgical patients. PMID:25610644

  6. Arterial stick

    MedlinePlus

    ... venous blood) mainly in its content of dissolved gases . Testing arterial blood shows the makeup of the ... arteries. Blood samples are mainly taken to measure gases in the arteries. Abnormal results may point to ...

  7. Noninvasive Intracranial Pressure Determination in Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Noraky, James; Verghese, George C; Searls, David E; Lioutas, Vasileios A; Sonni, Shruti; Thomas, Ajith; Heldt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) should ideally be measured in many conditions affecting the brain. The invasiveness and associated risks of the measurement modalities in current clinical practice restrict ICP monitoring to a small subset of patients whose diagnosis and treatment could benefit from ICP measurement. To expand validation of a previously proposed model-based approach to continuous, noninvasive, calibration-free, and patient-specific estimation of ICP to patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), we made waveform recordings of cerebral blood flow velocity in several major cerebral arteries during routine, clinically indicated transcranial Doppler examinations for vasospasm, along with time-locked waveform recordings of radial artery blood pressure (APB), and ICP was measured via an intraventricular drain catheter. We also recorded the locations to which ICP and ABP were calibrated, to account for a possible hydrostatic pressure difference between measured ABP and the ABP value at a major cerebral vessel. We analyzed 21 data records from five patients and were able to identify 28 data windows from the middle cerebral artery that were of sufficient data quality for the ICP estimation approach. Across these windows, we obtained a mean estimation error of -0.7 mmHg and a standard deviation of the error of 4.0 mmHg. Our estimates show a low bias and reduced variability compared with those we have reported before. PMID:27165879

  8. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension: diagnosis to management.

    PubMed

    Limaye, Kaustubh; Samant, Rohan; Lee, Ricky W

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension typically occurs from spontaneous CSF leak. CSF volume depletion rather than decrease in CSF pressure is thought to be the main causative feature for intracranial hypotension. More and more cases of intracranial hypotension are getting diagnosed with the advances in the imaging. The advances in the imaging have also led to the better understanding of the dynamic changes that occur with intracranial hypotension. The old theories of CSF overproduction or CSF underproduction have not been substantially associated with intracranial hypotension. It has also led to the fore different atypical clinical features and presentations. Although, it has been known for a long time, the diagnosis is still challenging and dilemma persists over one diagnostic modality over other and the subsequent management. Spontaneous CSF leaks occur at the spinal level and the skull base and other locations are rare. The anatomy of spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a very complex process with significant overlap in connective tissue disorders, previous dural weakness or meningeal diverticula. To localize the location of the CSF leak-CT myelography is the modality of choice. CSF cysternography may provide additional confirmation in uncertain cases and also MRI spine imaging may be of significant help in some cases. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension continues to be a diagnostic dilemma and our effort was to consolidate available information on the clinical features, diagnostics, and management for a practicing neurologist for a "15-20 min quick update of the topic". PMID:26661291

  9. Reconfigurable Polymer Networks for Improved Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninh, Chi Suze Q.

    Endovascular embolization of intracranial aneurysms is a minimally invasive treatment in which an implanted material forms a clot to isolate the weakened vessel. Current strategy suffers from long-term potential failure modes. These potential failure modes include (1) enzymatic degradation of the fibrin clot that leads to compaction of the embolic agent, (2) incomplete filling of the aneurysm sac by embolic agent, and (3) challenging geometry of wide neck aneurysms. In the case of wide neck aneurysms, usually an assisting metal stent is used to help open the artery. However, metal stents with much higher modulus in comparison to the soft blood vessel can cause biocompatibilities issues in the long term such as infection and scarring. Motivated to solve these challenges associated with endovascular embolization, strategies to synthesize and engineer reconfigurable and biodegradable polymers as alternative therapies are evaluated in this thesis. (1) Reconfiguration of fibrin gel's modulus was achieved through crosslinking with genipin released from a biodegradable polymer matrix. (2) Reconfigurability can also be achieved by transforming triblock co-polymer hydrogel into photoresponsive material through incorporation of melanin nanoparticles as efficient photosensitizers. (3) Finally, reconfigurability can be conferred on biodegradable polyester networks via Diels-Alder coupling of furan pendant groups and dimaleimide crosslinking agent. Taken all together, this thesis describes strategies to transform a broad class of polymer networks into reconfigurable materials for improved treatment of intracranial aneurysms as well as for other biomedical applications.

  10. Radiotherapy-related intracranial aneurysms: A role for conservative management

    PubMed Central

    Parag, Sayal; Arif, Zafar; Chittoor, Rajaraman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy-related intracranial aneurysms are a recognized but rare phenomenon and often present following rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage. Treatment poses a particular dilemma and both endovascular, and surgical approaches have been used with varied success. We present the case of a radiotherapy-related aneurysm treated conservatively with a favorable outcome. Case Description: A 37-year-old man was diagnosed with a left temporal lobe mass for which he underwent an uneventful craniotomy and debulking. Histology revealed Grade III anaplastic astrocytoma following which he received radiotherapy. Three years later, he presented with subacute headache and transient dysphasia. Computed tomography and catheter angiography revealed a fusiform aneurysm of the supramarginal branch of the left middle cerebral artery with probable intra-aneurysmal thrombus. Adjacent vessels also showed mild vasculitic changes. Trial balloon occlusion of the parent vessel resulted in profound dysphasia and was therefore abandoned. Bypass surgery or stent placement was deemed to have too high a risk of neurological deficit, and keeping in mind, the diagnosis of anaplastic astrocytoma, conservative management was pursued with partial thrombosis noted on serial imaging and stable appearances subsequently at 42 months’ follow-up. Conclusion: Conservative management can be pursued in selective cases of radiotherapy-related aneurysms, particularly if the risk of treating is too high and in the context of intracranial malignancy with limited lifespan. PMID:27313964

  11. Neisseria sicca meningitis following intracranial hemorrhage and ventriculostomy tube placement.

    PubMed

    Carter, J Elliot; Mizell, Kelly N; Evans, Tara N

    2007-12-01

    A normal component of the flora of the oropharynx, Neisseria sicca was first isolated in 1906 and has since been reported as a rare cause of various human infections including endocarditis, pneumonia, sinusitis, sepsis, and urethritis. We report the case of a 44-year-old African-American female with a history of hypertension who presented with complaints of right frontal headache, nausea, photophobia, and vomiting. A computed tomography scan of the patient's brain showed a large subarachnoid hemorrhage, and an arteriogram confirmed a large posterior communicating artery aneurysm. A ventriculostomy tube was placed, and the patient subsequently developed an elevated temperature and elevated white blood cell count. Cerebrospinal fluid studies showed elevated protein and glucose levels and cultures positive for N. sicca. This is only the seventh reported case of culture-proven meningitis related to N. sicca, and the first reported case associated with intracranial hemorrhage and ventriculostomy tube placement. PMID:17904282

  12. Pharmacological management of pain after intracranial surgery.

    PubMed

    Leith, B

    1998-08-01

    Some healthcare professionals continue to believe that patients experience minimal pain and discomfort after intracranial surgery. However, clinical experience indicates that many patients experience significant pain after craniotomy. Despite research which supports the use of morphine as a method of pain control after intracranial surgery, some healthcare professionals continue to administer only codeine, which may be ineffective. Inadequate pain control can be associated with a variety of negative physiological and psychological consequences. Neuroscience nurses are challenged to re-evaluate their current beliefs and practices related to pain and pain control after intracranial surgery. PMID:9791776

  13. A gastric artery aneurysm complicated by a dissection of gastric and hepatic arteries: possible role of adventitial inflammation and disruption of internal elastic lamina in splanchnic artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masahiko; Mellen, Paul F

    2008-06-01

    A 77-year-old woman was found deceased at home. An autopsy examination revealed a hemoperitoneum due to a ruptured false aneurysm of a branch of the left gastric artery. A long dissection extending from the aneurysm involved splanchnic arteries including the left gastric, common hepatic, right and left branches of proper hepatic, and intrahepatic arteries. An intimal tear was identified in the common hepatic artery. Neutrophils infiltrating in the adventitia may have been reactive and may have triggered the adventitial rupture of aneurysm or development of the dissection. Disruption of the internal elastic lamina, which has been proposed to cause dissection of intracranial arteries, was seen in the dissected arteries. Little is currently known about aneurysms or dissections of splanchnic arteries; however, observation of adventitial inflammation and internal elastic lamina may help disclose the etiology and pathogenesis. PMID:18520493

  14. [Radiotherapy of benign intracranial tumors].

    PubMed

    Delannes, M; Latorzeff, I; Chand, M E; Huchet, A; Dupin, C; Colin, P

    2016-09-01

    Most of the benign intracranial tumors are meningiomas, vestibular schwannomas, pituitary adenomas, craniopharyngiomas, and glomus tumors. Some of them grow very slowly, and can be observed without specific treatment, especially if they are asymptomatic. Symptomatic or growing tumors are treated by surgery, which is the reference treatment. When surgery is not possible, due to the location of the lesion, or general conditions, radiotherapy can be applied, as it is if there is a postoperative growing residual tumor, or a local relapse. Indications have to be discussed in polydisciplinary meetings, with precise evaluation of the benefit and risks of the treatments. The techniques to be used are the most modern ones, as multimodal imaging and image-guided radiation therapy. Stereotactic treatments, using fractionated or single doses depending on the size or the location of the tumors, are commonly realized, to avoid as much a possible the occurrence of late side effects. PMID:27523417

  15. Intracranial ROSAI-DORFMAN Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahzoni, Parvin; Zavareh, Mohsen Hani Tabaei; Bagheri, Marzie; Hani, Neda; Moqtader, Babak

    2012-01-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a benign lymphohistiocytosis that often involve lymph nodes and present as massive lymphadenopathy with sinus histiocytosis. The disease is rarely associated with intracranial involvement. Herein, we report a 33-years-old man with recent onset of unconsciousness. According to his past medical history, he was suffering from frontal headache, ataxia and dizziness with no sensory or motor defect since August 2010. At initial work up, MRI showed infiltrating mass in the left parietal region. Microscopically, the mass consisted of infiltration of abundant lymphoplasma cells, neutrophils and some histiocytes scattered in fibrotic background. Emperipolesis (lymphocytophagocytosis) of histiocytic cells made the diagnosis of Rosai-Dorfman disease. Rosai-Dorfman disease should be added in the list of differential diagnosis for a dural mass mimicking meningioma or cerebral mass mimicking glioma, therefore, immunohistochemical staining for EMA, S100 and CD1a should be performed to rule out the differential diagnosis. PMID:23267385

  16. Management of raised intracranial pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, J D; Czosnyka, M

    1993-01-01

    This review has been written at an unfortunate time. Novel questions are being asked of the old therapies and there is an abundance of new strategies both to lower ICP and protect the brain against cerebral ischaemia. In the United Kingdom, the problem is to ensure that appropriate patients continue to be referred to centres where clinical trials of high quality can be undertaken. One of the success stories of the past decade has been the decline in the number of road accidents as a result of seat belt legislation, improvements in car design and the drink/driving laws. Hence, fortunately there are fewer patients with head injuries to treat and it is even more important that patients are appropriately referred if studies to assess efficacy of the new strategies are not to be thwarted. The nihilistic concept that intensive investigation with ICP monitoring for patients with diffuse head injury or brain swelling following evacuation of a haematoma or a contusion has no proven beneficial effect on outcome, requires revision. A cocktail of therapies may be required that can be created only when patients are monitored in sufficient detail to reveal the mechanisms underlying their individual ICP problem. Ethical problems may arise over how aggressively therapy for intracranial hypertension should be pursued and for how long. There has always been the concern that cranial decompression or prolonged barbiturate coma may preserve patients but with unacceptably severe disability. Some patients may be salvaged from herniating with massive cerebral infarction with the use of osmotherapy but is the outcome acceptable? Similar considerations apply to some children with metabolic encephalopathies. Where such considerations have been scrutinised in patients with severe head injury, the whole spectrum of outcomes appears to be shifted so that the number of severe disabilities and persistent vegetative states are not increased. However, it is important to be sensitive to such issues

  17. Severe narrowing of left cavernous carotid artery associated with Fusobacterium necrophorum infection.

    PubMed

    DeGaffe, Guenet H; Murphy, James R; Butler, Ian J; Shelburne, Julia; Heresi, Gloria P

    2013-08-01

    Severe oropharyngeal infection can result in Lemierre's disease, a syndrome with high mortality secondary to inflammation and thrombosis of cervical and intracranial veins with involvement of contiguous structures; however arterial involvement is rare. We report a case of Lemierre's disease in a 12 year old boy with severe narrowing of the left cavernous carotid artery. PMID:23664903

  18. [Intracranial pressure changes during xenon anesthesia in neurosurgical patients without intracranial hypertention].

    PubMed

    Rylova, A V; Lubnin, A Iu

    2011-01-01

    Xenon assures rapid awakening and stable hemodynamics, it also has some neuroprotective effect. This is the reason why it may become an anesthetic of choice in neurosurgery. Still there is little and controversial data on its impact upon ICP. This is the first study of xenon effect upon intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure and cerebrovascular reactivity during xenon anesthesia in neurosurgical patients without intracranial hypertension. We report a slight increase in intracranial and a slight decrease in cerebral perfusion pressure during xenon anesthesia and show that cerebrovascular reactivity is preserved. Thus we conclude that xenon anesthesia is safe for neurosurgical patients without intracranial hypertension. PMID:21957614

  19. Rapid ventricular pacing for a basilar artery pseudoaneurysm in a pediatric patient: case report.

    PubMed

    Nimjee, Shahid M; Smith, Tony P; Kanter, Ronald J; Ames, Warwick; Machovec, Kelly A; Grant, Gerald A; Zomorodi, Ali R

    2015-06-01

    Large cerebral aneurysms of the basilar apex are difficult to treat. Recently, endovascular treatment has mitigated much of the morbidity associated with treating these lesions. However, the morphology of aneurysms of the vertebrobasilar system can preclude endovascular treatment. Rapid ventricular pacing (RVP) facilitates open surgical treatment of cerebral aneurysms. It can assist in reducing the pressure of the neck of the aneurysm, allowing safe application of a clip. The authors present a case of a pediatric patient who developed a basilar artery pseudoaneurysm that required surgery. Given the large size of the aneurysm, RVP was performed, allowing the surgeons to dissect the dome of the aneurysm from the surrounding tissue and pontine perforating branches away from the lesion to safely clip the lesion. The patient had an uneventful recovery. To the authors' knowledge, this represents the first known case of RVP to aid in basilar artery clip occlusion in a pediatric patient. PMID:25745950

  20. Intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ai; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Matsuda, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Motoyama, Yasushi; Park, Young-Su; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Capillary hemangiomas are neoplasms involving skin and soft tissue in infants. These lesions rarely involved an intracranial space and reported age distribution ranges from infancy to middle age. We report an extremely rare case of rapidly rising intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly woman. Case Description: The 82-year-old woman presented with vomiting, reduced level of consciousness, and worsening mental state. Computed tomography showed a contrast-enhanced extra-axial lesion in the left frontal operculum, although no intracranial mass lesion was identifiable from magnetic resonance imaging taken 2 years earlier. Complete surgical excision was performed and histopathological examination diagnosed benign capillary hemangioma consisting of a variety of dilated capillary blood vessels lined by endothelial cells. Conclusion: This is the first description of rapid growth of an intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly woman. These lesions are exceedingly rare in the elderly population, but still show the capacity for rapid growth. Complete excision would prevent further recurrence. PMID:26664868

  1. Remotely-powered intracranial pressure monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, T. B.

    1979-01-01

    Implantable RF powered monitor uses capacitive transducer and stiff metal diaphragm that gives high stability for long term intracranial pressure monitoring. Design of monitor reduces risk of infection while improving patient comfort and mobility.

  2. Intracranial complications of transorbital stab wounds.

    PubMed Central

    De Villiers, J C; Sevel, D

    1975-01-01

    Oscular and orbital injuries due to stab wounds may mask underlying serious intracranial damage. The correct clinical assessment and treatment of such cases require the attention of a team comprising a neurosurgeon, ophthalmologist, otolaryngologist, and plastic surgeon. Images PMID:1125159

  3. Perspective: Update on Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Beau B.; Biousse, Valérie; Newman, Nancy J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Provide an update on various features of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Design Perspective. Methods Selected articles on the epidemiology, clinical and imaging features, natural history, pathophysiology, and treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension were reviewed and interpreted in the context of the authors’ clinical and research experience. Results Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is primarily a disease of obese women of childbearing age, but it can affect patients of any weight, sex, and age. Although a relatively rare disorder, idiopathic intracranial hypertension’s associated costs in the U.S. entail hundreds of millions of dollars. Even following treatment, headaches are frequently persistent and may require the continued involvement of a neurologist. Quality of life reductions and depression are common among idiopathic intracranial hypertension patients. However, visual dysfunction, especially visual field abnormalities, represents the major morbidity of this disorder, and serial automated perimetry remains the primary mode of patient monitoring. Patients who are men, black, very obese, or anemic are at higher risk of visual loss. Vitamin A metabolism, adipose tissue as an actively secreting endocrine tissue, and cerebral venous abnormalities are areas of active study regarding idiopathic intracranial hypertension’s pathophysiology. Treatment studies show that lumbar puncture is a valuable treatment (in addition to its crucial diagnostic role) and that weight management is critical. However, open questions remain regarding the efficacy of acetazolamide, CSF diversion procedures, and cerebral venous stenting. Conclusions Many questions remain unanswered about idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Ongoing studies, especially an ongoing NIH-funded clinical trial of acetazolamide, should provide more insight into this important, yet poorly understood syndrome of isolated intracranial hypertension. PMID:21696699

  4. Intracranial aneurysms: analysis of results of microneurosurgery.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, C B; Loach, A B; O'laoire, S A

    1976-01-01

    Subarachnoid haemorrhage from intracranial aneurysms has a poor prognosis. Operative management of intracranial aneurysms was once considered ineffective. The first 100 cases treated by micorsurgery were analysed to see whether mortality and morbidity were reduced. Modern surgical techniques halved the total mortality but the morbidity was unaltered. Results can be improved by delaying surgery seven days and by treating any hypertension before surgery. PMID:963461

  5. Acute Ischemic Stroke Involving Both Anterior and Posterior Circulation Treated by Endovascular Revascularization for Acute Basilar Artery Occlusion via Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Atsushi; Hosoda, Kohkichi; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of acute ischemic stroke involving both the anterior and posterior circulation associated with a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA), treated by endovascular revascularization for acute basilar artery (BA) occlusion via the PPTA. An otherwise healthy 67-year-old man experienced sudden loss of consciousness and quadriplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extensive acute infarction in the right cerebral hemisphere, and magnetic resonance angiography showed occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) and BA. Because the volume of infarction in the territory of the right MCA was extensive, we judged the use of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator to be contraindicated. Cerebral angiography revealed hypoplasia of both vertebral arteries and the presence of a PPTA from the right internal carotid artery. A microcatheter was introduced into the BA via the PPTA and revascularization was successfully performed using a Merci Retriever with adjuvant low-dose intraarterial urokinase. After treatment, his consciousness level and right motor weakness improved. Although persistent carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses such as a PPTA are relatively rare vascular anomalies, if the persistent primitive artery is present, it can be an access route for mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27446523

  6. Acute Ischemic Stroke Involving Both Anterior and Posterior Circulation Treated by Endovascular Revascularization for Acute Basilar Artery Occlusion via Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery.

    PubMed

    Imahori, Taichiro; Fujita, Atsushi; Hosoda, Kohkichi; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of acute ischemic stroke involving both the anterior and posterior circulation associated with a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA), treated by endovascular revascularization for acute basilar artery (BA) occlusion via the PPTA. An otherwise healthy 67-year-old man experienced sudden loss of consciousness and quadriplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extensive acute infarction in the right cerebral hemisphere, and magnetic resonance angiography showed occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) and BA. Because the volume of infarction in the territory of the right MCA was extensive, we judged the use of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator to be contraindicated. Cerebral angiography revealed hypoplasia of both vertebral arteries and the presence of a PPTA from the right internal carotid artery. A microcatheter was introduced into the BA via the PPTA and revascularization was successfully performed using a Merci Retriever with adjuvant low-dose intraarterial urokinase. After treatment, his consciousness level and right motor weakness improved. Although persistent carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses such as a PPTA are relatively rare vascular anomalies, if the persistent primitive artery is present, it can be an access route for mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27446523

  7. Evaluation of Cranial and Cervical Arteries and Brain Tissue in Transient Ischemic Attack Patients with Magnetic Resonance Angiography and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Long; Li, Chang-Shan; Fu, Jun-Hua; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Rui; Xu, Wen-Jian

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) have been widely used in the prediction of ischemic stroke; however, the differences of the 2 methods in detection the artery lesion differences between transient ischemic attack (TIA) and infarction patients have been long neglected. We performed the present study to investigate the differences between vessel characteristics detected by MRA and DWI in acute stroke and TIA patients. Material/Methods We classified 110 subjects into 2 groups and all the patients underwent both MRA and DWI. The degree of stenosis of cranial and cervical arteries, the distribution of the stenosis, the development and changes of the vessels, and the DWI scanning results of the brain tissue were all analyzed. Results We detected a significant difference in the number and the degree of stenosis of cranial and cervical arteries among the 3 groups (P=0.006). Compared with health controls, patients with TIA and cerebral infraction had much more severe stenosis and occlusive arteries (P<0.05). However, no significant difference was detected between TIA and cerebral infraction patients (P=0.148). Moreover, a higher rate of unilateral vertebral artery dysplasia was found in the vertebrobasilar TIA patients. Higher lesion signals were also observed by DWI in TIA patients of internal carotid artery system (4/8, 50%). Conclusions Vessel characteristics were not significantly different between TIA and infarction patients. Unilateral vertebral artery hypoplasia was a predisposing factor for vertebrobasilar TIA and ischemic focus in DWI detection was always caused by severe artery lesions. PMID:26073092

  8. Intraoperative Combined Use of Somatosensory Evoked Potential, Microvascular Doppler Sonography, and Indocyanine Green Angiography in Clipping of Intracranial Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhili; Zhang, Guanni; Huang, Guangfu; Wang, Zhengyu; Tan, Haibin; Liu, Jinping; Li, Aiguo

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combining application of somatosensory evoked potential (SEP), microvascular Doppler sonography (MDS), and indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) in intracranial aneurysm clipping surgery. Material/Methods A total of 158 patients undergoing an intracranial aneurysm clipping operation were recruited. All patients were evaluated with intraoperative SEP and MDS monitoring, and 28 of them were evaluated with intraoperative combined monitoring of SEP, MDS, and ICGA. Results The SEP waves dropped during temporary occlusion of arteries in 19 cases (12.0%), and returned to normal after the clips were repositioned. After aneurysms were clipped, the vortex flow signals were detected by MDS in 6 cases. The aneurysm neck remnants were detected by ICGA in 2 cases of olfactory artery (OA) and in 1 case of middle cerebral artery (MCA), which disappeared after the clips were repositioned. Postoperative CTA or DSA showed that aneurysms were clipped completely and parent arteries and perforating vessels were patent. GOS at 1 month after the surgery was good in 111 cases (70.3%), mild disability in 22 cases (13.9%), severe disability in 14 cases (8.9%), vegetative state in 5 cases (3.2%), and death in 6 cases (3.8%). Conclusions Intraoperative combining application of SEP, MDS, and ICGA can reduce brain tissue ischemia and damage and disability and mortality rate after effective clipping of intracranial aneurysms, thereby improving surgical outcomes. PMID:26845425

  9. Bilateral carotid and bilateral vertebral artery dissection following facial massage.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Andrea L; Zink, Walter; Zimmerman, Robert; Riina, Howard; Benitez, Ronald

    A 50-year-old woman underwent facial massage. After 13 days, she experienced left retro-orbital pain, ptosis, and miosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed stenotic dissection of bilateral cervical internal carotid and vertebral arteries. The intracranial vasculature was intact. She was treated conservatively with long-term oral anticoagulation and remains asymptomatic 18 months later. PMID:18388028

  10. Estimation of Hidden State Variables of the Intracranial System Using Constrained Nonlinear Kalman Filters

    PubMed Central

    Nenov, Valeriy; Bergsneider, Marvin; Glenn, Thomas C.; Vespa, Paul; Martin, Neil

    2007-01-01

    Impeded by the rigid skull, assessment of physiological variables of the intracranial system is difficult. A hidden state estimation approach is used in the present work to facilitate the estimation of unobserved variables from available clinical measurements including intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV). The estimation algorithm is based on a modified nonlinear intracranial mathematical model, whose parameters are first identified in an offline stage using a nonlinear optimization paradigm. Following the offline stage, an online filtering process is performed using a nonlinear Kalman filter (KF)-like state estimator that is equipped with a new way of deriving the Kalman gain satisfying the physiological constraints on the state variables. The proposed method is then validated by comparing different state estimation methods and input/output (I/O) configurations using simulated data. It is also applied to a set of CBFV, ICP and arterial blood pressure (ABP) signal segments from brain injury patients. The results indicated that the proposed constrained nonlinear KF achieved the best performance among the evaluated state estimators and that the state estimator combined with the I/O configuration that has ICP as the measured output can potentially be used to estimate CBFV continuously. Finally, the state estimator combined with the I/O configuration that has both ICP and CBFV as outputs can potentially estimate the lumped cerebral arterial radii, which are not measurable in a typical clinical environment. PMID:17281533

  11. Intracranial aneurysms: Diagnostics accuracy of three-dimensional, fourier transform, time-of-flight MR angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Korogi, Yukunori; Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Mabuchi, Nobuhisa; Miki, Hitoshi; Fujiwara, Satoru; Horikawa, Yoshiharu; Nakagawa, Toshio; O`Uchi, Toshihiro; Watabe, Tsuneya; Shiga, Hayao

    1994-10-01

    To assess the accuracy of three-dimensional, Fourier transform, time-of-flight magnetic resonance (MR) angiography in the identification of intracranial aneurysms. MR angiograms of 126 patients (59 male and 67 female patients, aged 12-77 years) with various intracranial vascular lesions were evaluated. Seventy-eight aneurysms, including 60 less than 5 mm in diameter, in 61 patients were depicted at conventional angiography. Eight projection images, as well as one axial collapsed MR angiogram obtained with a maximum-intensity projection algorithm, were used for evaluation. Sensitivity for the five observers ranged from 58% to 68% (mean, 63%). Higher sensitivity was achieved for anterior communicating and middle cerebral artery aneurysms, while that for internal carotid artery aneurysms was poor. Sensitivities for small and medium aneurysms ranged from 50% to 60% (mean, 56%) and from 77% to 94% (mean, 85%), respectively. MR angiography can depict intracranial aneurysms 5 mm or larger with good accuracy but is less useful for the identification of smaller aneurysms. 12 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Persistent trigeminal artery causing "double" neurovascular conflict.

    PubMed

    Clerici, Angelo Maurizio; Merlo, Paola; Rognone, Felice; Noce, Monica; Rognone, Elisa; Bono, Giorgio

    2009-03-01

    We report the case of a 73-year-old woman who presented with right VI nerve palsy and homolateral atypical trigeminal neuralgia; standard neuroradiological investigation of orbital/retroorbital regions and intracranial arteries excluded the most commonly demonstrable underlying causes while brain magnetic resonance (T1-weighted fat suppression; T2-weighted thin-section) and magnetic resonance angiography disclosed the evidence of "double" neurovascular conflict because of persistent trigeminal artery with aneurysmal dilation. A role of this almost rare vascular condition in causing painful ophthalmoplegia is discussed. PMID:19267790

  13. High-speed extra-intracranial bypass combined with an assisting low-speed anastomosis: surgical technique and a clinical example.

    PubMed

    Byval'tsev, V A; Belykh, E G; Kikuta, K; Sorokovikov, V A; Grigor'ev, E G

    2015-01-01

    Described herein is the technique of performing assisting low-speed and high-speed extra-intracranial bypass, followed by a clinical case report concerning successful application of this technique in trapping of a giant aneurysm of the cavernous portion of the internal carotid artery in a female patient after endured transitory ischaemic attack during the test with temporary balloon-mediated occlusion of the internal carotid artery. PMID:26673311

  14. Intracranial Vasospasm without Intracranial Hemorrhage due to Acute Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jwa, Seung-Joo; Yang, Tae Ki; Lee, Chang Sub; Oh, Kyungmi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is very rare. Furthermore, intracranial vasospasm (ICVS) associated with spinal hemorrhage has been very rarely reported. We present an ICVS case without intracranial hemorrhage following SDH. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of severe headache. Multiple intracranial vasospasms were noted on a brain CT angiogram and transfemoral cerebral angiography. However, intracranial hemorrhage was not revealed by brain MRI or CT. On day 3 after admission, weakness of both legs and urinary incontinence developed. Spine MRI showed C7~T6 spinal cord compression due to hyperacute stage of SDH. After hematoma evacuation, her symptoms gradually improved. We suggest that spinal cord evaluation should be considered in patients with headache who have ICVS, although intracranial hemorrhage would not be visible in brain images. PMID:26713084

  15. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Vilela, P; Goulão, A

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. PMID:15657789

  16. The significance of the extracellular matrix in intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Austin, G; Fisher, S; Dickson, D; Anderson, D; Richardson, S

    1993-01-01

    To what extent might change sin the extracellular matrix proteins in intracranial aneurysms (IA) or parent artery (PA) wall contribute to enlargement? Using IA specimens obtained from the coroner's office, the wall structure by light (Trichrome and Actin stains) and immunofluorescent microscopy (IF) (collagen I and fibronectin) have been studied in 18 specimens. It is well known that IA only arise when there is a deficiency in the internal elastic membrane and some breakdown in the media. The results show a normal three layer structure of intima, media, (muscularis), and adventitia in the PA extending out into the neck of the aneurysm. Immunofluorescent stains (IS) show collagen I and fibronectin limited to the adventitia and muscularis, respectively, of the PA and control arteries. The enlarging IA wall shows almost complete loss of this architecture. By IF stain, collagen I and fibronectin are intermingled throughout the IA wall. It is postulated that loss of structure and the confining muscularis layer permit easier elastic enlargement from a more or less homogeneous wall structure. PMID:7681275

  17. A Rare Cause of Retinal Artery Occlusion in Severe Hypernatremic Dehydration in Newborns.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Pinar Altiaylik; Kabatas, Emrah Utku; Kurtul, Bengi Ece; Dilli, Dilek; Zenciroglu, Aysegul; Okumus, Nurullah

    2016-05-01

    Neonatal hypernatremia is an important electrolyte disorder that may have serious complications. It may be a rare and underdiagnosed cause of venous and arterial thrombosis, leading to severe brain damage by cerebral edema and intracranial hemorrhage. Here, the authors present a case of bilateral central retinal artery occlusion in a newborn with severe hypernatremic dehydration who is found to be normal in terms of other causes of retinal arterial thromboembolization. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:482-485.]. PMID:27183555

  18. Fatal Intraventricular Hemorrhage After the Extracranial Carotid Artery Angioplasty and Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Krajickova, Dagmar Krajina, Antonin; Nova, Marketa; Raupach, Jan

    2005-05-15

    We report on a 72-year-old female with an unusual intracranial bleeding complication after an extracranial carotid artery stenting procedure performed for a tight left ICA stenosis associated with contralateral carotid occlusion. Two hours after the procedure, the initial signs of intracranial bleeding appeared that led to the patient's demise 5 days later. A brain CT showed and autopsy proved massive intraventricular bleeding. To our knowledge, our case is only the second report of isolated reperfusion intraventricular hemorrhage post-CAS.

  19. [Revascularization of the carotid and vertebral arteries in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Illuminati, G; Bezzi, M; D'Urso, A; Giacobbi, D; Ceccanei, G; Vietri, F

    2004-01-01

    From January 1994 to July 2004, 323 patients underwent 348 revascularization of carotid bifurcation for atherosclerotic stenoses. Eighty eight patients (group A) were 75 year-old or older, whereas 235 (group B) were younger than 75 years. Postoperative mortality/neurologic morbidity rate was 1% in group A, and 1.4% in group B. At 5 years, patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were, respectively, 91% and 92% in group A, and 89% and 91% in group B. None of these differences was statistically significant. In the same time period, 26 internal carotid arteries were revascularized in 24 patients, 75 or more aged, for a symptomatic kinking. Postoperative mortality/morbidity rate was absent, whereas, at 5 years, patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were, respectively, 88% and 92%. Twelve vertebral arteries were revascularized in 12 patients, 75 or more aged, for invalidating symptoms of vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Postoperative mortality/neurologic morbidity rate was absent. In one case postoperative recurrence of symptoms occurred, despite a patent revascularization. Patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were 84% and 75%, at 5 years. Revascularization of carotid and vertebral arteries in the elderly can be accomplished with good results, superposable to those of standard revascularization of carotid bifurcation in a younger patients' population. PMID:15803810

  20. Noninvasive evaluation of the extracranial carotid arteries in patients with cerebrovascular events and atrial fibrillations.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, J; Rothlauf, E; Materese, E; Halperin, J

    1988-08-01

    Noninvasive carotid artery testing was performed in 73 patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation who were referred because of symptoms or signs of cerebrovascular disease. Thromboembolism related to atrial fibrillation without valvular heart disease was the probable source of cerebral ischemia in 25 (80%) of 31 patients with stroke and coexisting atherosclerotic disease at the carotid artery bifurcation in six (20%). Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation was the probable source of symptoms in nine (70%) of 13 of patients with transient cerebral ischemia, while coexisting carotid artery disease was present in four (30%). Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation accounted for the symptoms in four of five patients with amaurosis fugax, with atherosclerotic carotid artery disease present in one. The remaining 24 patients had nonhemispheric symptoms of cerebrovascular disease, including vertebrobasilar insufficiency, dizziness, and syncope, and only one had a carotid lesion. A significantly higher proportion of patients with focal hemispheric symptoms had coexisting carotid disease than patients with nonfocal symptoms had, suggesting that atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease contributes to stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Noninvasive carotid artery testing may be helpful in identifying atherosclerotic lesions at the carotid artery bifurcation in patients with atrial fibrillation and cerebrovascular disease, because different therapeutic modalities may be appropriate when two potential sources of cerebral ischemia are present. PMID:3041939

  1. Management of the left subclavian artery during endovascular repair of the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Noor, Nadim; Sadat, Umar; Hayes, Paul D; Thompson, Matthew M; Boyle, Jonathan R

    2008-04-01

    Endovascular repair is rapidly becoming the treatment of choice for thoracic aortic disease, which oftentimes involves or lies in close proximity to the left subclavian artery (LSA). In order to extend the proximal landing zone for the stent-graft and obtain an adequate seal, the LSA ostium is often covered, with or without concomitant subclavian artery revascularization. In this article, we review the LSA anatomy and consequences of LSA coverage as a backdrop for a discussion of the ramifications of LSA coverage during endovascular thoracic aortic repair (TEVAR). Early series reported high rates of LSA revascularization as an adjunct to endovascular repair for aortic pathology adjacent to the LSA ostium. Initial reports of low morbidity associated with simple LSA ostium coverage are not supported by contemporary literature, which suggests revascularization reduces the risks of cerebrovascular accident and spinal cord ischemia. Coverage of the LSA without revascularization may be justified only in emergency situations or when thorough investigations of cerebral and vertebrobasilar circulation have concluded that the risk to brain and spinal cord is low. Subclavian revascularization should be considered in the presence of a dominant left vertebral artery, bilateral carotid artery disease, an occluded/stenosed right vertebral artery, presence of a left internal mammary artery graft, or when a long length of thoracic aorta is covered. PMID:18426279

  2. Nitrous oxide withdrawal reduces intracranial pressure in the presence of pneumocephalus.

    PubMed

    Skahen, S; Shapiro, H M; Drummond, J C; Todd, M M; Zelman, V

    1986-08-01

    Nitrous oxide anesthesia has been implicated as contributing to the development of delayed tension pneumocephalus following surgery performed in the sitting position. The authors tested the hypothesis that withdrawal of nitrous oxide anesthesia administered during formation of an intracranial gas cavity would lead to a decrease in intracranial pressure (ICP) as N2O diffuses from the cavity back into the blood. Ten halothane-anesthetized rabbits were prepared for measurement of supracortical ICP and arterial blood pressure (BP) and for intracranial volume alterations via a cisterna magna infusion catheter. Hyperventilation (Paco2 = 28-30 mmHg) and mannitol were used to shrink the brain to accommodate intracranial infusion of either air or lactated Ringer's (LR) solution, which was used to elevate ICP to between 10-15 mmHg from a baseline ICP of 2.1 +/- 2.5 mmHg over a period of 8 to 10 min. Following stabilization at an elevated ICP, inhalation of nitrous oxide (75%) was either initiated or withdrawn (if already present during the induced ICP increase) and the subsequent changes in mean ICP and BP were recorded. Following ICP elevation with LR to 10 +/- 1 mmHg, initiation of 75% N2O administration resulted in no change in ICP and modest increases (P less than 0.05) in BP and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP = BP - ICP) after 4 min. However, when ICP was raised (to 12 +/- 3.5 mmHg) with intracranial air infusion, subsequent initiation of 75% N2O inhalation caused an abrupt ICP increase to 22.3 +/- 9 mmHg (from control P less than 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3740508

  3. Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms Using Flow-Diverting Silk Stents (BALT): a Single Centre Experience

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, M.; Cirillo, L.; Toni, F.; Dall’Olio, M.; Princiotta, C.; Stafa, A.; Simonetti, L.; Agati, R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Silk stent (Balt, Montmorency, France) is a retractable device designed to achieve curative reconstruction of the parent artery associated with an intracranial aneurysm. We present our initial experience with the Silk flow-diverting stent in the management and follow-up of 25 patients presenting with intracranial aneurysms. Twenty-five patients (age range, 34-81 years; 24 female) were treated with the Silk flow-diverting device. Aneurysms ranged in size from small (5), large (10) and giant (10) and included wide-necked aneurysms, multiple, nonsaccular, and recurrent intracranial aneurysms. Nine aneurysms were treated for headache, 14 for mass effect. None presented with haemorrhage. All patients were pretreated with dual antiplatelet medications for at least 72 hours before surgery and continued taking both agents for at least three months after treatment. A total of 25 Silk stents were used. Control MR angiography and/or CT angiography was typically performed prior to discharge and at one, three, six and 12 months post treatment. A follow-up digital subtraction angiogram was performed between six and 19 months post treatment. Complete angiographic occlusion or subtotal occlusion was achieved in 15 patients in a time frame from three days to 12 months. Three deaths and one major complication were encountered during the study period. Two patients, all with cavernous giant aneurysms, experienced transient exacerbations of preexisting cranial neuropathies and headache after the Silk treatment. Both were treated with corticosteroids, and symptoms resolved completely within a month. In our experience the Silk stent has proven to be a valuable tool in the endovascular treatment of intracranial giant partially thrombosed aneurysms and aneurysms of the internal carotid artery cavernous segment presenting with mass effect. The time of complete occlusion of the aneurysms and the risk of the bleeding is currently not predictable. PMID:22005692

  4. Hyperprolactinemia due to spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Schievink, Wouter I; Nuño, Miriam; Rozen, Todd D; Maya, M Marcel; Mamelak, Adam N; Carmichael, John; Bonert, Vivien S

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an increasingly recognized cause of headaches. Pituitary enlargement and brain sagging are common findings on MRI in patients with this disorder. The authors therefore investigated pituitary function in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension. METHODS Pituitary hormones were measured in a group of 42 consecutive patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension. For patients with hyperprolactinemia, prolactin levels also were measured following treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed prior to and following treatment. RESULTS The study group consisted of 27 women and 15 men with a mean age at onset of symptoms of 52.2 ± 10.7 years (mean ± SD; range 17-72 years). Hyperprolactinemia was detected in 10 patients (24%), ranging from 16 ng/ml to 96.6 ng/ml in men (normal range 3-14.7 ng/ml) and from 31.3 ng/ml to 102.5 ng/ml in women (normal range 3.8-23.2 ng/ml). In a multivariate analysis, only brain sagging on MRI was associated with hyperprolactinemia. Brain sagging was present in 60% of patients with hyperprolactinemia and in 19% of patients with normal prolactin levels (p = 0.02). Following successful treatment of the spontaneous intracranial hypotension, hyperprolactinemia resolved, along with normalization of brain MRI findings in all 10 patients. CONCLUSIONS Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a previously undescribed cause of hyperprolactinemia. Brain sagging causing distortion of the pituitary stalk (stalk effect) may be responsible for the hyperprolactinemia. PMID:25380110

  5. Children With Intracranial Arachnoid Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhen; Li, Yongxin; Zhu, Fengjun; Zang, Dongdong; Zhao, Cailei; Li, Cong; Tong, Dan; Zhang, Heye; Chen, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We performed a dynamic study of arachnoid cysts (ACs) using magnetic resonance cisternography (MRC) and proposed a classification of ACs. Twenty-three suitable patients in our hospital entered into this study according to our inclusion criteria. MRC images were collected in all the subjects at 1 and 24 hours after the administration of intrathecal gadolinium-diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA). We allocate the enrolled patients into 2 groups, MRC group and surgery group. The MRC results were considered before treatment in 1 group (MRC group, 13 patients), whereas another group was surgically treated without considering the MRC results (surgery group, 10 patients). We calculated the enhanced area of cyst using modified MacDonald Criteria from the images and measured the surrounding subarachnoid area as the reference. We found that it was practically useful to quantify 3 types of ACs, complete communicating, incomplete communicating, and noncommunicating, according to MRC results in this study. All the subjects in both groups are closely observed before the treatment and the follow-up using the MRI examination. In the surgery group, 5 patients were found that the area of cysts shrank in the follow-up stage. However, there was no significant difference in the percentage shrinkage area between the 2 groups. We concluded that MRC with Gd-DTPA as a contrast agent is of significant clinical value for the diagnosis and treatment of children with intracranial ACs. This classification based on dynamic MRC is useful for making surgical recommendations. PMID:26554773

  6. [Suppurative intracranial infections in Africa].

    PubMed

    Loembe, P M; Okome-Kouakou, M; Alliez, B

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review recent African literature on suppurative intracranial infection and its implications for neurosurgery. In order of decreasing frequency the main lesions are brain abscess, subdural empyema, and epidural abscess. Despite progress in diagnostic imaging and availability of antibiotic therapy, these lesions still cause disturbingly high morbidity and mortality especially in sub-Saharan Africa where diagnosis is often delayed. The male-to-female ratio was 3.6:1 and 70 to 80% of patients were under the age of 20 years. Spread from the paranasal sinus or ear was the most common mechanism of infection. Hematogenous processes accounted for 22% of cases and the origin was undetermined in 11% to 26% of cases. Staphylococcus aureus and enteric gram-negative bacilli were the most common bacteria identified but cultures were reported as sterile in 30% to 50% of cases. While ultrasonography can be useful in newborns with an open fontanelle, arteriography is often the only feasible procedure for diagnosis in Black Africa. The diagnostic modality of choice is computed tomography which allows precise mapping prior to neurosurgery. Introduction of computed tomography in some African cities has led to a decrease in mortality ranging from 4.7% to 43%. The most effective treatment is a combination of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and surgical decompression of expanding lesions. The main procedures are aspiration through burr holes and craniotomy. Use of this combined strategy requires close cooperation between the neurosurgeon, infectious disease specialist, and microbiologist. Therapeutic indications are discussed within the context of Black Africa. PMID:9304016

  7. Monitoring intracranial pressure based on F-P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Ting; Tong, Xinglin; Chen, Guangxi

    2013-09-01

    Intracranial pressure is an important monitoring indicator of neurosurgery. In this paper we adopt all-fiber FP fiber optic sensor, using a minimally invasive operation to realize real-time dynamic monitoring intracranial pressure of the hemorrhage rats, and observe their intracranial pressure regularity of dynamic changes. Preliminary results verify the effectiveness of applications and feasibility, providing some basis for human brain minimally invasive intracranial pressure measurement.

  8. An Update on Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Thurtell, Matthew J.; Bruce, Beau B.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of unknown etiology often encountered in neurologic practice. It produces non-localizing symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure and, when left untreated, can result in severe irreversible visual loss. It most commonly occurs in obese women of childbearing age, but it can also occur in children, men, non-obese adults, and older adults. While it is frequently associated with obesity, it can be associated with other conditions, such as obstructive sleep apnea and transverse cerebral venous sinus stenoses. Recent identification of subgroups at high risk for irreversible visual loss, including black patients, men, and patients with fulminant forms of IIH, help guide the optimal management and follow-up. Ongoing studies of venous anatomy and physiology in IIH patients, as well as a recently begun randomized clinical treatment trial, should provide more insights into this common yet poorly understood syndrome of isolated intracranial hypertension. PMID:20944524

  9. Intracranial Hypertension Without Papilledema in Children.

    PubMed

    Aylward, Shawn C; Aronowitz, Catherine; Roach, E Steve

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to determine the frequency of intracranial hypertension without papilledema in children. Charts of patients evaluated in a pediatric intracranial hypertension clinic at our institution were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into 2 groups depending on whether they had presence or absence of optic nerve edema at the time of presentation. Age, body mass index, and opening cerebrospinal fluid pressures were considered continuous variables and compared by Wilcoxon rank sum test because of non-normality. A P-value of 0.05 was considered significant. A total of 228 charts were reviewed; 152 patients met the criteria for intracranial hypertension, and 27 patients (17.8%) met the criteria of headache without optic nerve edema. There was no clinically significant difference in age, body mass index, opening pressure, and modified opening pressure between the 2 groups. PMID:26012507

  10. Arachnoid Membrane Suturing for Prevention of Subdural Fluid Collection in Extracranial-intracranial Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gun Woo; Kim, Tae Sun; Moon, Hyung Sik; Jang, Jae Won; Seo, Bo Ra; Lee, Jung Kil; Kim, Jae Hyoo; Kim, Soo Han

    2014-01-01

    Objective Water-tight closure of the dura in extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass is impossible because the superficial temporal artery (STA) must run through the dural defect. Consequently, subdural hygroma and subcutaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection frequently occur postoperatively. To reduce these complications, we prospectively performed suturing of the arachnoid membrane after STA-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) and evaluated the clinical usefulness. Materials and Methods Between Mar. 2005 and Oct. 2010, extracranial-intracranial arterial bypass (EIAB) with/without encephalo-myo-synangiosis was performed in 88 cases (male : female = 53 : 35). As a control group, 51 patients (57 sides) underwent conventional bypass surgery without closure of the arachnoid membrane. Postoperative computed tomography (CT) scan was performed twice in three days and seven days later, respectively, for evaluation of the presence of subdural fluid collection and other mass lesions. Results The surgical result was excellent, with no newly developing ischemic event until recent follow-up. The additional time needed for arachnoid suture was five to ten minutes, when three to eight sutures were required. Post-operative subdural fluid collection was not seen on follow-up computed tomography scans in all patients. Conclusion Arachnoid suturing is simple, safe, and effective for prevention of subdural fluid collection in EC-IC bypass surgery, especially the vulnerable ischemic hemisphere. PMID:25045645

  11. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device used for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The...

  12. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device used for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The...

  13. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device used for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The...

  14. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty in a patient with internal carotid artery stenosis following gamma knife radiosurgery for recurrent pituitary adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hidemichi; Onodera, Hidetaka; Sase, Taigen; Uchida, Masashi; Morishima, Hiroyuki; Oshio, Kotaro; Shuto, Takashi; Tanaka, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intracranial vascular complications following radiosurgery are extremely rare. Case Description: We report a case of stenosis in the internal carotid artery 5 years after gamma knife radiosurgery for a recurrent pituitary adenoma. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty was performed successfully with anatomical and functional improvement. Conclusion: These results suggested the importance of monitoring for arterial stenosis in the long-term follow-up. Moreover, this is the first case of endovascular treatment as an effective therapy for intracranial arterial stenosis due to radiotherapy. PMID:26069850

  15. Measuring Intracranial Pressure And Volume Noninvasively

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasonic technique eliminates need to drill into brain cavity. Intracranial dynamics instrument probes cranium ultrasonically to obtain data for determination of intracranial pressure (ICP) and pressure-volume index (PVI). Instrument determines sensitivity of skull to changes in pressure and by use of mechanical device to exert external calibrated pressure on skull. By monitoring volume of blood flowing into jugular vein, one determines change of volume of blood in cranial system. By measuring response of skull to increasing pressure (where pressure increased by tilting patient known amount) and by using cranial blood pressure, one determines intial pressure in cerebrospinal fluid. Once PVI determined, ICP determined.

  16. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension syndrome treated with fludrocortisone.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Marwan; El Khatib, Mohammad; Yamout, Bassem; Hujeily, Elissar; Ayoub, Sophie; Ayoub, Chakib; Skaf, Ghassan

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a rare syndrome characterized by orthostatic headache not associated with trauma or dural puncture. In most cases, it is caused by a spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid leakage as demonstrated by neuroradiological studies. The standard of care consists of conservative treatment including bed rest, hydration, and administration of caffeine or glucocorticoids. When such conservative therapy fails, an epidural blood patch is recommended. In this report, we describe the treatment of 2 patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension who failed conservative treatment and went on to have complete and sustained resolution of their symptoms after the administration of oral fludrocortisone. PMID:25612272

  17. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  18. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury ...

  19. Selective intracranial magnification angiography of the rabbit: basic techniques and anatomy.

    PubMed

    Culp, Benjamin C; Brown, Aliza T; Erdem, Eren; Lowery, John; Culp, William C

    2007-02-01

    Development of new therapies for stroke requires animal models with well-defined intracranial vasculature. The rabbit as a small animal model has many desirable traits; however, a modern atlas of rabbit angiographic anatomy is not readily available. Improved digital subtraction magnification angiography and superselective small-catheter techniques now allow excellent anatomical definition. Angiographic techniques include selection of the internal carotid artery and subselection with microcatheters that can progress to branches of the circle of Willis and provide high-resolution cerebral angiography. The authors present an overview of current techniques and illustrations of the angiography of cerebral vessels. PMID:17327550

  20. One-dimensional model for the intracranial pulse morphological analysis during hyperventilation and CO2 inhalation tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jaiyoung; Hu, Xiao; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2015-11-01

    The brain's CO2 reactivity mechanism is coupled with cerebral autoregulation and other unique features of cerebral hemodynamics. We developed a one-dimensional nonlinear model of blood flow in the cerebral arteries coupled to lumped parameter (LP) networks. The LP networks incorporate cerebral autoregulation, CO2 reactivity, intracranial pressure, cerebrospinal fluid, and cortical collateral blood flow models. The model was used to evaluate hemodynamic variables (arterial deformation, blood velocity and pressure) in the cerebral vasculature during hyperventilation and CO2 inhalation test. Tests were performed for various arterial blood pressure (ABP) representing normal and hypotensive conditions. The increase of the cerebral blood flow rates agreed well with the published measurements for various ABP measurements taken during clinical CO2 reactivity tests. The changes in distal vasculature affected the reflected pulse wave energy, which caused the waveform morphological changes at the middle cerebral, common and internal carotid arteries. The pulse morphological analysis demonstrated agreement with previous clinical measurements for cerebral vasoconstriction and vasodilation.

  1. [Factor VII deficiency revealed by intracranial hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Sfaihi Ben Mansour, L; Thabet, A; Aloulou, H; Turki, H; Chabchoub, I; Mhiri, F; Mnif, Z; Ben Ali, H; Kammoun, T; Hachicha, M

    2009-07-01

    Constitutional factor VII deficiency is a hereditary disease with recessive autosomic transmission. Its incidence is estimated to be 1/1,000,000 in the general population. We report a case of severe factor VII deficiency in infancy revealed by an intracranial hemorrhage in a 2-month-old infant. We describe the clinical, biological and therapeutic characteristics of this disease. PMID:19409767

  2. CSF imaging in benign intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    James, A. Everette; Harbert, J. C.; Hoffer, P. B.; DeLand, F. H.

    1974-01-01

    The cisternographic images in 10 patients with benign intracranial hypertension were reviewed. Nine were normal. Transfer of labelled tracer from the subarachnoid space was measured in five patients and was found to be abnormal in only two. The relation of these findings to the proposed pathophysiological alterations is discussed. Images

  3. Arterial stick

    MedlinePlus

    ... limit tissue damage. Alternative Names Blood sample - arterial ... by: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, ...

  4. Arterial Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... rial line can provide valuable information to adjust oxygen therapy or mechanical ventilator (respirator; breathing machine) settings. The blood oxygen pres- sure measures from an arterial line give ...

  5. Intracranial distribution of the sympathetic system in mice: DiI tracing and immunocytochemical labeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maklad, A.; Quinn, T.; Fritzsch, B.

    2001-01-01

    The intracranial distribution of the cephalic branches of the superior cervical ganglion (scg) was studied in mice using indocarbocyanine dye (DiI) anterograde tracing. Two main branches were traced from the scg. The first branch joined the nerve of the pterygoid canal (the vidian nerve), npc, from which several intracranial sympathetic branches passed to the branches of the trigeminal nerve (tgn), abducent nerve (abn), trochlear nerve (trn), and oculomotor nerve (ocn). Most of the second branch joined the abn, from which sympathetic fibers dispersed in the distal region of the trigeminal ganglion (tgg) to form a plexus close to the ganglion's branches. Branches from this plexus joined the branches of the tgn, trn, and ocn. Several minor branches arising from the second branch of the scg were also observed. One formed a sympathetic plexus around the internal carotid artery (ica); a second formed a sympathetic plexus in the proximal region of tgg, close to its root; and a third branch coursed laterally to reach the ear by passing along the greater petrosal nerve (gpn). All of the intracranial trajectories traced from scg were found to be catecholaminergic, and likely sympathetic, using tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunocytochemistry.

  6. [Treatment outcome of chemotherapy with superselective cerebral artery catheterization in vegetative state patients].

    PubMed

    Kondrat'eva, E A; Panuntsev, V S; Pak, V A; Chachkhaliia, M Kh; Tsentsiper, L M; Kondrat'ev, S A; Borovikova, V N

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to assess the impact of superselective neurotransmitter metabolic therapy in patients in a vegetative state. Superselective intraarterial infusion was conducted on 26 patients with relevant international criteria for the diagnosis of vegetative state. Comprehensive assessment of neurologic symptoms and severity of low metabolism on PET scan allowed to select the vascular pool, for the catheter installation. The catheter was placed either in the carotid or the vertebrobasilar pool. Infusion of neurotransmitter agents was conducted for 7 days continuously. Control of the level of metabolism of labeled glucose in the brain (PET) was performed within 2 weeks after arterial infusion. 14 out of 26 patients showed a positive trend of changes in energy metabolism of the brain. However, only 7 out of 14 patients showed further recovery of consciousness. The data confirms that the delivery path and a combination of medications play a definite role in the effectiveness of vegetative state therapy. PMID:21692220

  7. Dissection of the extracranial vertebral artery: report of four cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed Central

    Hinse, P; Thie, A; Lachenmayer, L

    1991-01-01

    Four cases of cervical vertebral artery (VA) dissection are reported. In three patients VA dissection was associated with neck trauma. All patients were young or middle-aged (range 27 to 49 years). In two there was a history of migraine. Pain preceded neurological symptoms from hours to six weeks. Three patients had neurological deficits including elements of the lateral medullary syndrome, and one experienced recurrent transient ischaemic attacks in the vertebrobasilar territory. Angiographic findings included irregular stenosis, occlusion and pseudoaneurysm; in two patients VA abnormalities were bilateral. All patients were treated with anticoagulants and improved. In a review of 28 cases with traumatic dissection and 29 cases with spontaneous dissection of the VA reported in the literature, distinct clinical and angiographic features emerge. Aetiology remains obscure in most cases of spontaneous dissection and management is still controversial. Images PMID:1744639

  8. The arteries of brain base in species of Bovini tribe.

    PubMed

    Zdun, Maciej; Frąckowiak, Hieronim; Kiełtyka-Kurc, Agata; Kowalczyk, Karolina; Nabzdyk, Maria; Timm, Anita

    2013-11-01

    Studies were conducted on 78 preparations of head and brain arteries in four species of Bos genus, that is in domestic cattle (N = 59), including 22 foetuses (CRL 36.5-78.5 cm), in banteng (Bos javanicus, N = 3), yak (Bos mutus f. grunniens, N = 2), American bison (Bison bison, N = 4), and European bison (Bison bonasus, N = 10). The comparative analysis permitted to demonstrate a similar pattern of brain base arteries in the studied animals. In the studied species, blood vessels of the arterial circle of the brain were found to form by bifurcation of intracranial segments of inner carotid arteries, which protruded from the paired rostral epidural rete mirabile. In Bovidae arterial circle of the brain was supplied with blood mainly by maxillary artery through the blood vessels of the paired rostral epidural rete mirabile. The unpaired caudal epidural rete mirabile was participating in blood supply to the arterial circle of the brain from vertebral and occipital arteries. It manifested character of a taxonomic trait for species of Bos and Bison genera. Basilar artery in all the examined animals manifested a variable diameter, with preliminary portion markedly narrowed, which prevented its participation in blood supply to the arterial circle of the brain. The results and taxonomic position of the species made the authors to suggest a hypothesis that a similar arterial pattern on the brain base might be present also in other species, not included in this analysis. PMID:24106047

  9. Massive epistaxis resulting from an intracavernous internal carotid artery traumatic pseudoaneurysm: complete resolution with overlapping uncovered stents.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Juretschke, Fernando; Castro, Enrique; Mateo Sierra, Olga; Iza, Begoña; Manuel Garbizu, Jose; Fortea, Fernando; Villoria, Francisco

    2009-12-01

    Blunt traumatic injuries of the intracranial carotid arteries can result in pseudoaneurysm formation. A pseudoaneurysm of the intracavernous carotid artery may rupture into the cavernous sinus, causing life-threatening epistaxis. We report a case of intracavernous traumatic psedoaneurysm presenting with delayed massive epistaxis. The endovascular treatment with overlapping self-expanding stents achieved complete exclusion of the pseudoaneurysm with preservation of the intracavernous carotid artery. PMID:19350203

  10. Aneurysm in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery variant: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Saad; Azeem, Abdul; Jiwani, Amyna; Javed, Gohar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There are variations in the anatomy of the vertebrobasilar system amongst which the Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery-Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery (AICA-PICA) variant is thought to have a prevalence of 20–24% (based on retrospective studies). Despite this, aneurysms of the AICA-PICA variant are rare. We present a case of an AICA-PICA aneurysm and discuss its presentation and management, along with a review of literature. Presentation of case We describe the case of a 35 year old female who presented with signs of meningismus. On the basis of radiological imaging it was initially misdiagnosed as a thrombosed arteriovenous malformation (AVM). The patient was eventually discharged with a plan of interval imaging and interventional radiology (if required). The patient presented again with similar signs and symptoms. Re-evaluation of imaging revealed an aneurysm of the AICA-PICA variant which was managed surgically. Discussion Aneurysms of the AICA-PICA variant are rare. The radiological features and surgical management represent a unique clinical entity and are discussed below. Conclusion The prevalence of the AICA-PICA variant might be high but aneurysms in this vessel are rare. The scant knowledge available on this subject makes it a diagnostic difficulty. PMID:27017276

  11. Concurrent Ruptured Pseudoaneurysm of the Internal Carotid Artery and Cerebral Infarction as an Initial Manifestation of Polycythemia Vera

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyu-Sun; Ryu, Je-Il; Oh, Young-Ha

    2015-01-01

    The most common neurologic manifestations of polycythemia vera (PV) are cerebral infarction and transient ischemic attacks, while cerebral hemorrhage or intracranial dissection has been rarely associated with PV. Here we report the first case of a 59-year-old patient with intracranial supraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection causing cerebral infarction and concomitant subarachnoid hemorrhage due to pseudoaneurysm rupture as clinical onset of PV. This case report discusses the possible mechanism and treatment of this extremely rare condition. PMID:26361530

  12. Incidental diagnosis of two intracranial aneurysms following surgical evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Das, Joe M.; Rajmohan, B. P.; Sharmad, M. S.; Peethambaran, Anilkumar

    2015-01-01

    The development of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) following evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a very rare phenomenon. SAH in this context occurring secondary to intracranial aneurysm rupture is still rare. We report a case of an elderly lady who presented with right hemiplegia and altered sensorium. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain revealed a left fronto-temporoparietal CSDH with midline shift, which was promptly evacuated surgically via a single burr-hole. Postoperatively, her level of consciousness deteriorated and there was increased the amount of drain. Emergency CT of the brain revealed diffuse SAH. CT cerebral angiogram revealed one aneurysm each in the right internal carotid artery and anterior communicating artery. Meanwhile, her consciousness level improved on conservative management. The relatives were not keen for further follow-up. PMID:25972954

  13. Incidental diagnosis of two intracranial aneurysms following surgical evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Das, Joe M; Rajmohan, B P; Sharmad, M S; Peethambaran, Anilkumar

    2015-01-01

    The development of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) following evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a very rare phenomenon. SAH in this context occurring secondary to intracranial aneurysm rupture is still rare. We report a case of an elderly lady who presented with right hemiplegia and altered sensorium. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain revealed a left fronto-temporoparietal CSDH with midline shift, which was promptly evacuated surgically via a single burr-hole. Postoperatively, her level of consciousness deteriorated and there was increased the amount of drain. Emergency CT of the brain revealed diffuse SAH. CT cerebral angiogram revealed one aneurysm each in the right internal carotid artery and anterior communicating artery. Meanwhile, her consciousness level improved on conservative management. The relatives were not keen for further follow-up. PMID:25972954

  14. Comparative study of novel endovascular treatment techniques for intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantón, Gádor; Lasheras, Juan C.; Levy, David I.; Sparks, Steven R.

    2002-11-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are life-threatening vascular lesions, which are potentially treatable to avoid the consequences of their rupture. Current treatments, either surgical or endovascular, are all guided to reduce the hemodynamic forces acting on the aneurysm wall in an effort to minimize the risk of rupture. Surgical clipping is still the most used technique to treat this type of aneurysm but there is a continued demand for less invasive approaches. This has led to the development of several endovascular techniques. We report here a comparative study of the reduction in the hemodynamic stresses and the modification of the flow in the parent vessel resulting from the use of three different techniques. The first one consists of endosaccular packing with platinum coils (GDC, Target Therapeutics), which is already widely used but its long-term efficacy has not yet been determined. The second one consists of the embolization of the aneurismal sac with Onyx, a polymer which hardens when in contact with the blood (being developed by Micro Therapeutics, Inc.). The third one involves the packing of the sac with hydrocoils, platinum wires coated with a gel which quickly hydrates when in contact with blood (developed by MicroVention). A Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) system is used to measure in vitro the velocity field inside a model of an ACOM aneurysm (an aneurysm forming in the anterior communicating artery). Physiological accurate pulsatile flow conditions are input to the arterial model through a programmable pump. The measurements show that although all treatment techniques lead to a reduction in both normal and tangential shear stresses on the aneurismal sac, each one of them also leads to different modifications of the flow in the parent vessel which may have consequences related to potential for clotting. Comparison of the untreated aneurysm with the above three treated cases also showed that the characteristics of the wall shear stresses on the parent

  15. Vortex dynamics in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trylesinski, Gabriel; Varble, Nicole; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui

    2013-11-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are potentially devastating pathological dilations of arterial walls that affect 2-5% of the population. In our previous CFD study of 119 IAs, we found that ruptured aneurysms were correlated with complex flow pattern and statistically predictable by low wall shear stress and high oscillatory shear index. To understand flow mechanisms that drive the pathophysiology of aneurysm wall leading to either stabilization or growth and rupture, we aim at exploring vortex dynamics of aneurysmal flow and provide insight into the correlation between the previous predictive morphological parameters and wall hemodynamic metrics. We adopt the Q-criterion definition of coherent structures (CS) and analyze the CS dynamics in aneurysmal flows for both ruptured and unruptured IA cases. For the first time, we draw relevant biological conclusions concerning aneurysm flow mechanisms and pathophysiological outcome. In pulsatile simulations, the coherent structures are analyzed in these 119 patient-specific geometries obtained using 3D angiograms. The images were reconstructed and CFD were performed. Upon conclusion of this work, better understanding of flow patterns of unstable aneurysms may lead to improved clinical outcome.

  16. Flow instability and wall shear stress variation in intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Baek, H.; Jayaraman, M. V.; Richardson, P. D.; Karniadakis, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the flow dynamics and oscillatory behaviour of wall shear stress (WSS) vectors in intracranial aneurysms using high resolution numerical simulations. We analyse three representative patient-specific internal carotid arteries laden with aneurysms of different characteristics: (i) a wide-necked saccular aneurysm, (ii) a narrower-necked saccular aneurysm, and (iii) a case with two adjacent saccular aneurysms. Our simulations show that the pulsatile flow in aneurysms can be subject to a hydrodynamic instability during the decelerating systolic phase resulting in a high-frequency oscillation in the range of 20–50 Hz, even when the blood flow rate in the parent vessel is as low as 150 and 250 ml min−1 for cases (iii) and (i), respectively. The flow returns to its original laminar pulsatile state near the end of diastole. When the aneurysmal flow becomes unstable, both the magnitude and the directions of WSS vectors fluctuate at the aforementioned high frequencies. In particular, the WSS vectors around the flow impingement region exhibit significant spatio-temporal changes in direction as well as in magnitude. PMID:20022896

  17. Intracranial Stenting in the Treatment of Wide-Necked Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, M.; Dall'olio, M.; Cenni, P.; Raffi, L.; Simonetti, L.

    2007-01-01

    Summary We positioned the following self-expanding stents certified for intracranial application: 16 Neuro form (Boston Scientific), three INX (Medtronic), one Leo (Balt). 6F calibre femoral introducers and guiding catheters were used for stent placement changing to 5F calibre introducers and guiding catheters (Envoy, Cordis) for the Neuroform 2 and 3 stents. All procedures were carried out under general anaesthesia and heparinization. Our pharmacological protocol consisted of adjunctive treatment with anti-aggregants during the interventional procedure and for the following six months, without premedication. From November 2000 to August 2006 we treated 28 patients (27 F/1M) with giant wide-necked aneurysms and one dissecting basilar artery aneurysm requiring the placement of 29 stents. We successfully positioned 20 stents: 11 stents combined with coils (8 immediate; 3 late) with complete exclusion of the aneurysm from the circulation in seven cases and subtotal exclusion in four; nine stents not followed by embolization with complete exclusion of the aneurysm from the circulation in six cases and subtotal exclusion in three. Stenting was not possible in nine cases due to extreme vessel tortuosity and the poor flexibility of release systems for the first stents. No late stent occlusion or subarachnoid haemorrhage were encountered after treatment. PMID:20566126

  18. Cerebral blood flow autoregulation during intracranial hypertension in hypoxic lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.O.; Backofen, J.E.; Koehler, R.C.; Jones, M.D. Jr.; Traystman, R.J. )

    1987-12-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that hypoxic hypoxia interferes with cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation when intracranial pressure (ICP) is elevated in pentobarbital-anesthetized lambs (3 to 9 days old). Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was lowered stepwise from 73 to 23 mmHg in eight normoxic lambs and from 65 to 31 mmHg in eight other hypoxic lambs by ventricular infusion of artificial cerebrospinal fluid. In normoxic lambs, CBF measured by microspheres labeled with six different radioisotopes was not significantly changed over this range of CPP. In animals made hypoxic, base-line CBF was twice that of normoxic lambs. CBF was unchanged as CPP was reduced to 31 mmHg. Lower levels of CPP were not attained because a pressor response occurred with further elevations of ICP. No regional decrements in blood flow to cortical arterial watershed areas or to more caudal regions, such as cerebellum, brain stem, or thalamus, were detected with elevated ICP. Cerebral O{sub 2} uptake was similar in both groups and did not decrease when CPP was reduced. These results demonstrate that normoxic lambs have a considerable capacity for effective autoregulation of CBF when ICP is elevated. Moreover, cerebral vasodilation in response to a level of hypoxia approximating that normally seen prenatally does not abolish CBF autoregulation when ICP is elevated during the first postnatal week.

  19. Angioplasty and stent placement -- peripheral arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery; PTA - peripheral artery; Angioplasty - peripheral arteries; Iliac artery -angioplasty; Femoral artery - angioplasty; Popliteal artery - angioplasty; Tibial artery - angioplasty; Peroneal artery - ...

  20. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dead bowel - mesenteric; Dead gut - mesenteric; Atherosclerosis - mesenteric artery; Hardening of the arteries - mesenteric artery ... The arteries that supply blood to the intestines run directly from the aorta, the main artery from the heart. ...

  1. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to ... is peripheral artery disease treated? What is peripheral artery disease (PAD)? Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, refers ...

  2. Monro-Kellie 2.0: The dynamic vascular and venous pathophysiological components of intracranial pressure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    For 200 years, the ‘closed box’ analogy of intracranial pressure (ICP) has underpinned neurosurgery and neuro-critical care. Cushing conceptualised the Monro-Kellie doctrine stating that a change in blood, brain or CSF volume resulted in reciprocal changes in one or both of the other two. When not possible, attempts to increase a volume further increase ICP. On this doctrine’s “truth or relative untruth” depends many of the critical procedures in the surgery of the central nervous system. However, each volume component may not deserve the equal weighting this static concept implies. The slow production of CSF (0.35 ml/min) is dwarfed by the dynamic blood in and outflow (∼700 ml/min). Neuro-critical care practice focusing on arterial and ICP regulation has been questioned. Failure of venous efferent flow to precisely match arterial afferent flow will yield immediate and dramatic changes in intracranial blood volume and pressure. Interpreting ICP without interrogating its core drivers may be misleading. Multiple clinical conditions and the cerebral effects of altitude and microgravity relate to imbalances in this dynamic rather than ICP per se. This article reviews the Monro-Kellie doctrine, categorises venous outflow limitation conditions, relates physiological mechanisms to clinical conditions and suggests specific management options. PMID:27174995

  3. Occipital artery anastomosis to vertebral artery causing pulsatile tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew David; English, Joey; Hetts, Steven W

    2014-03-01

    Pulsatile tinnitus can result from various vascular etiologies that cause transmission of pulsatile turbulent flow into the inner ear. Less commonly, non-vascular sources cause increased blood flow and transmission of sound perceived as tinnitus. Thorough clinical examination leads to appropriate imaging evaluation and therapeutic planning. Most pulsatile tinnitus results from expected mechanisms, such as dural arteriovenous fistula, jugular bulb dehiscence, or paraganglioma; however, the literature contains reports of numerous rare causes, particularly variant anatomic morphologies. We present the case of a novel cause of pulsatile tinnitus in which collateral vascular flow compensated for decreased normal intracranial cerebral arterial supply and might have caused catastrophic consequences if intervened upon after assumptions based on an incomplete evaluation. PMID:23493341

  4. GIANT PSEUDOANEURYSM OF A SPLANCHNIC ARTERY; A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nwafor, I A; Eze, J C; Ezemba, N; Ngene, C I; Akpan, A F

    2015-01-01

    A true aneurysm is defined as an enlargement of an artery resulting in a diameter more than 1.5 times the anatomic size. It can be fusiform when it covers the entire perimeter of the vessel, or saccular when it bulges on one side of the artery. The pseudoaneurysm is a pulsating encapsulated haematoma in communication with the lumen of the ruptured vessel,which affects the the intima and the media and which is stopped from developing by the adventitia and the surrounding connective tissue. Geographically, aneurysm can be broadly divided into intracranial and extracranial types.While the neurosurgeon manages the intracranial types, the vascular surgeon manages the extracranial types. Vascular surgeons also do divide the extracranial types into central (abdominal-aorto-iliac, thoracic including ascending, transverse aortic arch and descending), peripheral (extremities) and visceral (splanchnic arteries). Splanchnic artery aneurysm includes the coeliac, superior mesenteric, inferior mesenteric arteries including their branches. Of all intra-abdominal aneurysms, only around 5% are due to the splanchnic arteries,which could be either true or pseudo. The prevalence has been estimated at 0.1-0.2%. PMID:27487600

  5. Method for noninvasive intracranial pressure measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2000-01-01

    An ultrasonic-based method for continuous, noninvasive intracranial pressure (ICP) measurement and monitoring is described. The stress level in the skull bone is affected by pressure. This also changes the interfacial conditions between the dura matter and the skull bone. Standing waves may be set up in the skull bone and the layers in contact with the bone. At specific frequencies, there are resonance peaks in the response of the skull which can be readily detected by sweeping the excitation frequency on an excitation transducer in contact with a subject's head, while monitoring the standing wave characteristics from the signal received on a second, receiving transducer similarly in contact with the subject's head. At a chosen frequency, the phase difference between the excitation signal and the received signal can be determined. This difference can be related to the intracranial pressure and changes therein.

  6. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension presenting as postpartum headache.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Mariam; Salahuddin, Ayesha; Mathew, Namitha R; Nandhagopal, Ramachandiran

    2016-01-01

    Postpartum headache is described as headache and neck or shoulder pain during the first 6 weeks after delivery. Common causes of headache in the puerperium are migraine headache and tension headache; other causes include pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, post-dural puncture headache, cortical vein thrombosis, subarachnoid hemorrhage, posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome, brain tumor, cerebral ischemia, meningitis, and so forth. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a rare cause of postpartum headache. It is usually associated with papilledema, headache, and elevated intracranial pressure without any focal neurologic abnormality in an otherwise healthy person. It is more commonly seen in obese women of reproductive age group, but rare during pregnancy and postpartum. We present a case of IIH who presented to us 18 days after cesarean section with severe headache and was successfully managed. PMID:26818168

  7. Isolated Intracranial Rosai-Dorfman Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taufiq, Md.; Khair, Abul; Begum, Ferdousy; Akhter, Shabnam; Shamim Farooq, Md.; Kamal, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background. Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) is a benign histiocytic proliferative disorder of unknown etiology. This rare condition commonly causes massive cervical lymphadenopathy. Intracranial RDD without any nodal involvement is extremely rare. Case Report. A young Bangladeshi male complained of bilateral complete blindness with left sided deafness for about three years. There was no lymphadenopathy. MRI and CT scan of brain suggested an inflammatory/neoplastic (?meningioma) lesion located at left parasellar region which extended frontally to encircle both optic nerves and also to left prepontine area. Histopathologically the lesion was diagnosed as RDD. The patient was treated with steroid and significant clinical improvement observed. Conclusion. The prognosis of intracranial RDD is not poor. It can be treated with surgery with or without corticosteroids, chemotherapy, and so forth. But as the condition is extremely rare and often misdiagnosed, the clinician, radiologist, and histopathologist should have a suspicion in their mind about the possibility of RDD. PMID:26949555

  8. [Therapeutic activity of gemcitabine in intracranial tumors].

    PubMed

    Stukov, A N; Filatova, L V; Latipova, D Kh; Bespalov, V G; Belyaeva, O A; Kireeva, G S; Vasilieva, I N; Alexandrov, V A; Maidin, M A; Semenov, A L; Vershinina, S F; Markochev, A B; Abduloeva, N Kh; Chubenko, V A; Semiglazova, T Yu

    2015-01-01

    Gemcitabine is known to exert a therapeutic effect on brain tumors despite the limited permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In our experimental research single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of gemcitabine 25 mg/kg provided increase in median survival of mice with intracranially transplanted Ehrlich carcinoma by 41-89% (p < 0.001). In this experimental model i.p. administration of gemcitabine (permeability of the BBB of less than 10%), carmustine (good permeability of the BBB), cyclophosphamide (poor permeability of the BBB) and cisplatin (doesn't penetrate through the BBB) increased median survival of mice by 88% (p < 0.001), 59% (p = 0.001), 35% (p = 0.005) and 18% (p = 0.302) respectively. Considering strong correlation between antitumor activity of the drugs (carmustine, cyclophosphamide and cisplatin) and their permeability of the BBB, efficacy of gemcitabine in intracranial tumors could be due to its wide range of therapeutic doses. PMID:26087611

  9. Ruptured, Intracranial Dermoid Cyst - A Visual Diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Scheer, Fabian; Andresen, Reimer

    2016-01-01

    Dermoid cysts are a very rare entity of intracranial tumours. The traumatic or non-traumatic rupture of the cyst wall is a serious complication that can be treated surgically or conservatively depending on the clinical symptoms. However, more common entities have to be considered as a differential diagnosis. We report on a female patient who was admitted with complaints of significant, prolonged headache and diffuse pain. Analysis of her blood and cerebrospinal fluid indicated no clear pathology. A CT examination of the head revealed a ruptured dermoid cyst adjacent to the left sphenoidal bone. An additional MRI was conducted to confirm the CT findings and rule out an intracranial ischemia or vasospasms. A conservative therapy was scheduled and the patient recovered well. Using current imaging techniques, especially magnetic resonance imaging, it is possible to identify a ruptured dermoid cyst by its pathognomonic signal behavior and rule out potentially life threatening complications. PMID:27190918

  10. Dissecting aneurysm of vertebral artery manifestating as contralateral abducens nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin Sue; Lee, Sang Hyung; Son, Young-Je; Chung, Young Seob

    2013-03-01

    Isolated abducens nerve paresis related to ruptured vertebral artery (VA) aneurysm is rare. It usually occurs bilaterally or ipsilaterally to the pathologic lesions. We report the case of a contralateral sixth nerve palsy following ruptured dissecting VA aneurysm. A 38-year-old man was admitted for the evaluation of a 6-day history of headache. Abnormalities were not seen on initial computed tomography (CT). On admission, the patient was alert and no signs reflecting neurologic deficits were noted. Time of flight magnetic resonance angiography revealed a fusiform dilatation of the right VA involving origin of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient suddenly suffered from severe headache with diplopia the day before the scheduled cerebral angiography. Neurologic examination disclosed nuchal rigidity and isolated left abducens nerve palsy. Emergent CT scan showed high density in the basal and prepontine cistern compatible with ruptured aneurismal hemorrhage. Right vertebral angiography illustrated a right VA dissecting aneurysm with prominent displaced vertebrobasilar artery to inferiorly on left side. Double-stent placement was conducted for the treatment of ruptured dissecting VA aneurysm. No diffusion restriction signals were observed in follow-up magnetic resonance imaging of the brain stem. Eleven weeks later, full recovery of left sixth nerve palsy was documented photographically. In conclusion, isolated contralateral abducens nerve palsy associated with ruptured VA aneurysm may develop due to direct nerve compression by displaced verterobasilar artery triggered by primary thick clot in the prepontine cistern. PMID:23634273

  11. Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Sumeet R; Gupta, Anju; Gupta, Vivek; Singhi, Pratibha D

    2016-08-01

    Neurological findings in HIV are common and include cognitive impairment, microcephaly, nonspecific white matter lesions and seizures. Cerebral vasculopathy and stroke are uncommon and may be due to primary HIV vasculopathy or opportunistic infections such as tuberculosis and cryptococcal meningitis. The authors describe a 7-y-old boy who presented with severe headache and was detected to have aneurysmal bleed due to intracranial aneurysm. PMID:27072660

  12. Filum ependymoma mimicking spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Schievink, Wouter I; Akopov, Sergey E

    2005-05-01

    A 34-year-old man with a 2-week history of orthostatic headaches and a "dry tap" at lumbar puncture was found to have a lumbar intradural mass on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. A myxopapillary ependymoma was resected and the patient's headache completely resolved. The combination of spontaneous orthostatic headaches and a "dry tap" at the time of lumbar puncture does not always indicate the presence of a spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and intracranial hypotension. PMID:15953283

  13. A novel guide catheter enabling intracranial placement.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Michael C; Sherma, Arun K; Surdell, Daniel; Shaibani, Ali; Bendok, Bernard R

    2009-11-15

    We describe use of a novel guide, catheter with a soft and pliable, 6-cm or 12-cm distal segment that enables distal, including intracranial, placement--the Neuron guide catheter (Penumbra, San Leandro, CA)--in the treatment of 11 cases with a range of neuroendovascular lesions. We were able to advance the Neuron guide catheter to the intended level in each case and suffered no complications related to catheter spasm, dissection, thrombosis or thromboembolism. PMID:19670314

  14. Intracranial capillary hemangioma mimicking a dissociative disorder

    PubMed Central

    John, Santosh G.; Pillai, Unnikrishnan; Lacasse, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Capillary hemangiomas, hamartomatous proliferation of vascular endothelial cells, are rare in the central nervous system (CNS). Intracranial capillary hemangiomas presenting with reversible behavioral abnormalities and focal neurological deficits have rarely been reported. We report a case of CNS capillary hemangioma presenting with transient focal neurological deficits and behavioral abnormalities mimicking Ganser's syndrome. Patient underwent total excision of the vascular malformation, resulting in complete resolution of his symptoms. PMID:24765434

  15. Aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis after internal carotid arterial occlusion in polycythaemia vera.

    PubMed Central

    Melamed, E; Rachmilewitz, E A; Reches, A; Lavy, S

    1976-01-01

    Two patients with untreated polycythaemia vera developed intracranial internal carotid arterial occlusion followed by monocular blindness and the characteristic features of ipsilateral cavernous sinus thrombosis. Primary septic source and signs of systemic infection were absent. It is suggested that the predisposing factors in this unusual syndrome were hyperviscosity and venous sludging induced by the basic haematological disorder and progression of the thrombotic process within the internal carotid artery towards its intracavernous portion with occlusion of the ophthalmic artery and of the arterial branches which supply the walls of the sinus. Images PMID:932749

  16. Intracranial hemorrhage in cancer patients treated with anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Matthew J; Uhlmann, Erik J; Zwicker, Jeffrey I

    2016-04-01

    Both venous thromboembolism and intracranial metastases are common complications in the setting of primary brain tumors and metastatic malignancies. Anticoagulation is indicated in the presence of cancer-associated thrombosis in order to limit the risk of pulmonary embolism; however, there is reluctance to initiate anticoagulation in the setting of intracranial metastatic disease due to potential for intracranial hemorrhage. Recent evidence suggests that therapeutic anticoagulation can be safely administered in the setting of metastatic brain tumors. This review examines the current understanding of the pathophysiology of intracranial hemorrhage in malignancy, describes the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of brain tumors with therapeutic anticoagulation, and outlines management strategies relevant to the treatment of intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of anticoagulation. PMID:27067980

  17. Intracranial bacterial infections of oral origin.

    PubMed

    Moazzam, Alan A; Rajagopal, Sowmya M; Sedghizadeh, Parish P; Zada, Gabriel; Habibian, Mina

    2015-05-01

    Brain abscesses are rare but potentially deadly complications of odontogenic infections. This phenomenon has been described mainly in the form of case reports, as large-scale studies are difficult to perform. We compiled a total of 60 previously published cases of such a complication to investigate the predisposing factors, microbiology, and clinical outcomes of intracranial abscesses of odontogenic origin. A systematic review of the literature using the PubMed database was performed. Men accounted for 82.1% of cases, and the mean age was 42.1 years. Caries with periapical involvement and periodontitis were the two most common intra-oral sources, and wisdom tooth extraction was the most common preceding dental procedure. In 56.4% of cases, there were obvious signs of dental disease prior to development of intracranial infection. Commonly implicated microorganisms included Streptococcus viridans (especially the anginosus group), Actinomyces, Peptostreptococcus, Prevotella, Fusobacterium, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Eikenella corrodens. There was an 8.3% mortality rate. Intracranial abscesses can form anywhere within the brain, and appear unrelated to the side of dental involvement. This suggests that hematogenous spread is the most likely route of dissemination. PMID:25800939

  18. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for intracranial hemangioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Silva, Danilo; Grabowski, Mathew M; Juthani, Rupa; Sharma, Mayur; Angelov, Lilyana; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Chao, Samuel; Suh, John; Mohammadi, Alireza; Barnett, Gene H

    2016-09-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has become a treatment option for intracranial hemangioblastomas, especially in patients with poor clinical status and also high-risk surgical candidates. The objective of this study was to analyze clinical outcome and tumor control rates. Retrospective chart review revealed 12 patients with a total of 20 intracranial hemangioblastomas treated with GKRS from May 1998 until December 2014. Kaplan-Meier plots were used to calculate the actuarial local tumor control rates and rate of recurrence following GKRS. Univariate analysis, including log rank test and Wilcoxon test were used on the Kaplan-Meier plots to evaluate the predictors of tumor progression. Two-tailed p value of <0.05 was considered as significant. Median follow-up was 64months (2-184). Median tumor volume pre-GKRS was 946mm(3) (79-15970), while median tumor volume post-GKRS was 356mm(3) (30-5404). Complications were seen in two patients. Tumor control rates were 100% at 1year, 90% at 3years, and 85% at 5years, using the Kaplan-Meier method. There were no statistically significant univariate predictors of progression identified, although there was a trend towards successful tumor control in solid tumors (p=0.07). GKRS is an effective and safe option for treating intracranial hemangioblastoma with favorable tumor control rates. PMID:27422585

  19. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traver, William J.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is an overview of the some of the known results of spaceflight induced intracranial hypertension. Historical information from Gemini 5, Apollo, and the space shuttle programs indicated that some vision impairment was reported and a comparison between these historical missions and present missions is included. Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, Choroidal Folds, Hyperopic Shifts and Raised Intracranial Pressure has occurred in Astronauts During and After Long Duration Space Flight. Views illustrate the occurrence of Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, and Choroidal Folds. There are views of the Arachnoid Granulations and Venous return, and the question of spinal or venous compliance issues is discussed. The question of increased blood flow and its relation to increased Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is raised. Most observed on-orbit papilledema does not progress, and this might be a function of plateau homeostasis for the higher level of intracranial pressure. There are seven cases of astronauts experiencing in flight and post flight symptoms, which are summarized and follow-up is reviewed along with a comparison of the treatment options. The question is "is there other involvement besides vision," and other Clinical implications are raised,

  20. Angioplasty and Stenting for Intracranial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    IZUMI, Takashi; IMAMURA, Hirotoshi; SAKAI, Nobuyuki; MIYACHI, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Of the patients enrolled in the Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy (JR-NET), a surveillance study in Japanese, 1133 patients who underwent intracranial percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA)/stenting for intracranial stenosis during the period from 2005 to 2009 were investigated. A technical success was achieved in 98.3% of the patients, and 70.5% and 7.5% had a residual stenosis of < 30% and ≥ 50%, respectively. The incidence of ischemic complications and hemorrhagic complications was as low as 7.7% and 2.5%, respectively, but tended to increase in patients who underwent stenting. While a significant correlation with ischemic complications was observed in previously untreated patients and patients who underwent stenting followed by post-dilatation, a significant correlation with hemorrhagic complications was observed in patients who received emergency treatment and those treated between 24 hours and 14 days of the onset. Flexible intracranial stents are expected to contribute to improvement in the treatment outcome. PMID:24390191

  1. Detection of increased intracranial pressure by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hightower, Stephanie; Chin, Eric J; Heiner, Jason D

    2012-01-01

    Increases in intracranial pressure (ICP) may damage the brain by compression of its structures or restriction of its blood flow, and medical providers my encounter elevated ICP in conventional and non-conventional medical settings. Early identification of elevated ICP is critical to ensuring timely and appropriate management. However, few diagnostic methods are available for detecting increased ICP in an acutely ill patient, which can be performed quickly and noninvasively at the bedside. The optic nerve sheath is a continuation of the dura mater of the central nervous system and can be viewed by ocular ultrasound. Pressure changes within the intracranial cavity affect the diameter of the optic nerve sheath. Data acquired from multiple clinical settings suggest that millimetric increases in the optic nerve sheath diameter detected via ocular ultrasound correlate with increasing levels of ICP. In this review, we discuss the use of ocular ultrasound to evaluate for the presence of elevated ICP via assessment of optic nerve sheath diameter, and describe critical aspects of this valuable diagnostic procedure. Ultrasound is increasingly becoming a medical fixture in the modern battlefield where other diagnostic modalities can be unavailable or impractical to employ. As Special Forces and other austere medical providers become increasingly familiar with ultrasound, ocular ultrasound for the assessment of increased intracranial pressure may help optimize their ability to provide the most effective medical management for their patients. PMID:23032316

  2. Feasibility and Safety of Transradial Arterial Approach for Simultaneous Right and Left Vertebral Artery Angiographic Studies and Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, H.-K.; Youssef, Ali A.; Chang, W.-N.; Lu, C.-H.; Yang, C.-H.; Chen, S.-M.; Wu, C.-J.

    2007-09-15

    Objectives. This study investigated whether the transradial artery (TRA) approach using a 6-French (F) Kimny guiding catheter for right vertebral artery (VA) angiographic study and stenting is safe and effective for patients with significant VA stenosis. Background. The TRA approach is commonly performed worldwide for both diagnostic cardiac catheterization and catheter-based coronary intervention. However, to our knowledge, the safety and feasibility of left and right VA angiographic study and stenting, in the same procedure, using the TRA approach for patients with brain ischemia have not been reported. Methods. The study included 24 consecutive patients (22 male, 2 female; age, 63-78 years). Indications for VA angiographic study and stenting were (1) prior stroke or symptoms related to vertebrobasilar ischemia and (2) an asymptomatic but vertebral angiographic finding of severe stenosis (>70%). A combination of the ipsilateral and retrograde-engagement technique, which involved a looping 6-F Kimny guiding catheter, was utilized for VA angiographic study. For VA stenting, an ipsilateral TRA approach with either a Kimny guiding catheter or a left internal mammary artery guiding catheter was utilized in 22 patients and retrograde-engagement technique in 2 patients. Results. A technically successful procedure was achieved in all patients, including left VA stenting in 15 patients and right VA stenting in 9 patients. The mean time for stenting (from engagement to stent deployment) was 12.7 min. There were no vascular complications or mortality. However, one patient suffered from a transient ischemic attack that resolved within 3 h. Conclusion. We conclude that TRA access for both VA angiographic study and VA stenting is safe and effective, and provides a simple and useful clinical tool for patients unsuited for femoral arterial access.

  3. Congenital Absence of the Internal Carotid Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Florio, Francesco; Balzano, Silverio; Nardella, Michele; Strizzi, Vincenzo; Cammisa, Mario; Bozzini, Vincenzo; Catapano, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Vincenzo

    1999-01-15

    We report three cases of congenital absence of an internal carotid artery (ICA), diagnosed incidentally by digital subtraction angiography. The analysis of the cases is based on the classification of segmental ICA agenesis proposed by Lasjaunias and Berenstein. Usually the patients with this rare vascular anomaly are asymptomatic; some may have symptoms related to cerebrovascular insufficiency, compression by enlarged intracranial collateral vessels, or complications associated with cerebral aneurysms. Diagnosis of congenital absence of ICA is made by skull base computed tomography (CT) scan, CT and magnetic resonance angiography, and conventional or digital subtraction angiography.

  4. [Intracranial volume reserve assessment based on ICP pulse wave analysis].

    PubMed

    Berdyga, J; Czernicki, Z; Jurkiewicz, J

    1994-01-01

    ICP waves were analysed in the situation of expanding intracranial mass. The aim of the study was to determine how big the intracranial added volume has to be in order to produce significant changes of harmonic disturbances index (HFC) of ICP pulse waves. The diagnostic value of HFC and other parameters was compared. The following other parameters were studied: intracranial pressure (ICP), CSF outflow resistance (R), volume pressure response (VPR) and visual evoked potentials (VEP). It was found that ICP wave analysis very clearly reflects the intracranial volume-pressure relation changes. PMID:8028705

  5. Imaging and interventions in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: A pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, Rajeev; Pant, Rochan; Indrajit, Inna K; Negi, Raj S; Sahu, Samresh; Hashim, P I; D'Souza, John

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is a syndrome of elevated intracranial pressure that can be primary or secondary. The primary form, now termed idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), was in the past a disease of exclusion and imaging played a limited role of excluding organic causes of raised intracranial pressure. However imaging markers have been described with patients with IIH at the orbit, sella and cerebral venous system. We wish to reiterate the characteristic imaging features of this poorly understood disease and also emphasise that stenting of the transverse sinus in select cases of IIH is an efficacious option. PMID:26752823

  6. Imaging and interventions in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Sivasankar, Rajeev; Pant, Rochan; Indrajit, Inna K; Negi, Raj S; Sahu, Samresh; Hashim, PI; D’Souza, John

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is a syndrome of elevated intracranial pressure that can be primary or secondary. The primary form, now termed idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), was in the past a disease of exclusion and imaging played a limited role of excluding organic causes of raised intracranial pressure. However imaging markers have been described with patients with IIH at the orbit, sella and cerebral venous system. We wish to reiterate the characteristic imaging features of this poorly understood disease and also emphasise that stenting of the transverse sinus in select cases of IIH is an efficacious option. PMID:26752823

  7. A segmentation algorithm of intracranial hemorrhage CT image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haibo; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Jianzhi

    2011-10-01

    To develop a computer aided detection (CAD) system that improves diagnostic accuracy of intracranial hemorrhage on cerebral CT. A method for CT image segmentation of brain is proposed, with which, several regions that are suspicious of hemorrhage can be segmented rapidly and effectively. Extracting intracranial area algorithm is introduced firstly to extract intracranial area. Secondly, FCM is employed twice, we named it with TFCM. FCM is first employed to identify areas of intracranial hemorrhage. Finally, FCM is employed to segment the lesions. Experimental results on real medical images demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness.

  8. Coronary Arteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... side of the heart is smaller because it pumps blood only to the lungs. The left coronary artery, ... heart is larger and more muscular because it pumps blood to the rest of the body. Updated August ...

  9. Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Avolio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Stiffness of large arteries has been long recognized as a significant determinant of pulse pressure. However, it is only in recent decades, with the accumulation of longitudinal data from large and varied epidemiological studies of morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease, that it has emerged as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. This has generated substantial interest in investigations related to intrinsic causative and associated factors responsible for the alteration of mechanical properties of the arterial wall, with the aim to uncover specific pathways that could be interrogated to prevent or reverse arterial stiffening. Much has been written on the haemodynamic relevance of arterial stiffness in terms of the quantification of pulsatile relationships of blood pressure and flow in conduit arteries. Indeed, much of this early work regarded blood vessels as passive elastic conduits, with the endothelial layer considered as an inactive lining of the lumen and as an interface to flowing blood. However, recent advances in molecular biology and increased technological sophistication for the detection of low concentrations of biochemical compounds have elucidated the highly important regulatory role of the endothelial cell affecting vascular function. These techniques have enabled research into the interaction of the underlying passive mechanical properties of the arterial wall with the active cellular and molecular processes that regulate the local environment of the load-bearing components. This review addresses these emerging concepts. PMID:26587425

  10. [Persistent primitive trigeminal artery: critical review of the clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, H A; Passos, J D; Barbosa, M B; Do Amorim, E A

    1991-09-01

    The authors report three cases of persistence of primitive trigeminal artery with no evidence of a relationship between its presence and any specific clinical syndrome. They discuss embryological aspects and establish the correlation between the presence of this malformation and other intracranial pathologies, such as "tic douloureux" and morphologic alteration of the circle of Willis. A critical review of the literature is also presented. PMID:1807233

  11. Posterior Circulation Stroke After Bronchial Artery Embolization. A Rare but Serious Complication

    SciTech Connect

    Laborda, Alicia; Tejero, Carlos; Fredes, Arturo; Cebrian, Luis; Guelbenzu, Santiago; Gregorio, Miguel Angel de

    2013-06-15

    Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) is the treatment of choice for massive hemoptysis with rare complications that generally are mild and transient. There are few references in the medical literature with acute cerebral embolization as a complication of BAE. We report a case of intracranial posterior territory infarctions as a complication BAE in a patient with hemoptysis due to bronchiectasis.

  12. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  13. China Angioplasty and Stenting for Symptomatic Intracranial Severe Stenosis (CASSISS): A new, prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial in China

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng; Zhao, Zhenwei; Wang, Daming; Wu, Jian; Cai, Yiling; Li, Tianxiao; Wu, Wei; Shi, Huaizhang; He, Weiwen; Zhu, Fengshui; Ling, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with symptomatic stenosis of intradural arteries are at high risk for subsequent stroke. Since the SAMMPRIS trial, stenting is no longer recommended as primary treatment; however, the results of this trial, its inclusion criteria and its center selection received significant criticism and did not appear to reflect our experience regarding natural history nor treatment complications rate. As intracranial atherosclerosis (ICAS) is the most common cause for stroke in Asian countries, we are hereby proposing a refined prospective, randomized, multicenter study in an Asian population with strictly defined patient and participating center inclusion criteria. Methods The China Angioplasty and Stenting for Symptomatic Intracranial Severe Stenosis (CASSISS) trial is an ongoing, government-funded, prospective, multicenter, randomized trial. It recruits patients with recent TIA or stroke caused by 70%–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery. Patients with previous stroke related to perforator ischemia will not be included. Only high-volume centers with a proven track record will enroll patients as determined by a lead-in phase. Patients will be randomized (1:1) to best medical therapy alone or medical therapy plus stenting. Primary endpoints are any stroke or death within 30 days after enrollment or after any revascularization procedure of the qualifying lesion during follow-up, or stroke in the territory of the symptomatic intracranial artery beyond 30 days. The CASSISS trial will be conducted in eight sites in China with core imaging lab review at a North American site and aims to have a sample size of 380 participants (stenting, 190; medical therapy, 190). Recruitment is expected to be finished by December 2016. Patients will be followed for at least three years. The trial is scheduled to complete in 2019. Conclusion In the proposed trial, certain shortcomings of SAMMPRIS including patient and participating center selection will be addressed. The

  14. Intracranial subdural hygroma after Le Fort I osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, William L; Lee, Michael; MacIntosh, Robert Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Various intra- and postoperative complications have been well-documented after Le Fort I osteotomies; however, an intracranial subdural hygroma has not yet been reported in oral and maxillofacial studies. We report a unique case of an intracranial subdural hygroma requiring neurosurgical intervention after Le Fort I advancement. PMID:25631863

  15. Intracranial hypertension secondary to a skull lesion without mass effect.

    PubMed

    Serlin, Yonatan; Benifla, Mony; Kesler, Anat; Cohen, Avi; Shelef, Ilan

    2016-09-01

    We report and discuss five patients with intracranial hypertension due to a skull lesion reducing cerebral sinus patency with a compressive, non-thrombotic mechanism. We illustrate the importance of a high level of suspicion for this condition in patients presenting with headache, papilledema and increased intracranial pressure in the absence of focal signs or radiological evidence of mass effect. PMID:27283387

  16. A Practical Approach to the Diagnosis of Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension.

    PubMed

    Steenerson, Kristen; Halker, Rashmi

    2015-08-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension can be difficult to diagnose as there are a number of tests available and knowing how to appropriately choose amongst them is not always easy. In this article, we will review the available diagnostic options and provide a practical approach to the workup of a patient with suspected intracranial hypotension. PMID:26077206

  17. [Intracranial tumors and epileptic seizures: treatment principles].

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Andrea O; Vulliémoz, Serge

    2016-04-27

    Epileptic seizures represent a relatively frequent issue in patients with intracranial neoplasms, and very frequently imply the start of an antiepileptic treatment as secondary prophylaxis. Even if the current level of evidence is relatively low, compounds with a limited risk of pharmacokinetic interactions are clearly preferred. Levetiracetam is probably the most prescribed agent in this setting, while pregabalin, valproate, lacosamide and lamotrigine are valuable alternatives. The treatment choice has to consider the different profiles of side effects and should be tailored to each patient. In this setting, a multidisciplinary approach including general practicioner, oncologist and neurologist is strongly advocated. PMID:27281943

  18. Clarithromycin Culprit of Benign Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Habib Rehman; Mason, Colin; Mulcahy, Riona

    2015-01-01

    Benign intracranial hypertension is characterized with increase in CSF opening pressure with no specific etiology. It is predominantly found in women of child bearing age and particularly in individuals with obesity. Visual disturbances or loss and associated headaches are common and can lead to blindness if left untreated. Diagnosis can be achieved once other causes of visual loss, headaches and high opening pressures are excluded. Management consists of serial optic disc assessments although no specific treatment is available despite recent trials using carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Diet modification and weight management can help in therapy. PMID:26713029

  19. Intracranial Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in Beta-Thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Bivek; Tamrakar, Karuna; Wu, Yuan-Kui

    2012-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) represents tumor-like proliferation of hemopoietic tissue which complicates chronic hemoglobinopathy. Intracranial EMH is an extremely rare occurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a precise diagnosis. It is essential to distinguish EMH from other extradural central nervous system tumors, because treatment and prognosis are totally different. Herein, we report the imaging findings of beta-thalassemia in a 13-year-old boy complaining of weakness of left side of the body and gait disturbance; CT and MRI revealed an extradural mass in the right temporoparietal region. PMID:22438693

  20. A Concealed Intracranial Aneurysm Detected after Recanalization of an Occluded Vessel: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Torikoshi, Sadaharu; Akiyama, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Background Based on the results of several randomized controlled trials, acute endovascular thrombectomy is strongly recommended for patients with acute ischemic stroke due to large artery occlusion (LAO). The incidence of an intracranial aneurysm has been reported to be approximately 5% in the general population. Therefore, the possibility of the coincidence of LAO and an intracranial aneurysm at the distal part of an occluded vessel should be considered. Summary A 74-year-old female patient presented with the sudden onset of consciousness disturbance and left-sided weakness. Neuroimages demonstrated an acute infarction due to right middle cerebral artery occlusion. The occlusion was successfully treated, and an aneurysm was incidentally detected at the occluded artery. We reviewed the literature and identified 11 cases in 8 reports, which were similar to our case. Among the 11 cases, aneurysms ruptured during endovascular therapy in 2 cases. In the present report, we discussed the prediction of concealed aneurysms and avoidance of their rupture during endovascular intervention. Key Message The presence of an aneurysm concealed behind an embolus should be carefully assessed on preoperative and intraoperative neuroimages. The important findings for suspecting such an aneurysm are a hyperdense nodular sign on preoperative computed tomography and unusual motion of the microwire during the endovascular intervention. Even if there is no finding indicative of an aneurysm, the catheter and thrombectomy devices should be more carefully advanced than usual, especially at the common sites of aneurysms, and the devices should be appropriately chosen. PMID:27051404

  1. Ultrasonic Apparatus and Technique to Measure Changes in Intracranial Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.

    2002-11-01

    Changes in intracranial pressure can be measured dynamically and non-invasively by monitoring one or more cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components. Pulsatile components such as systolic and diastolic blood pressures are partially transferred to the cerebrospinal fluid by way of blood vessels contained in the surrounding brain tissue and membrane. As intracranial pressure varies these cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components also vary. Thus, intracranial pressure can be dynamically measured. Furthermore, use of acoustics allows the measurement to be completely non-invasive. In the preferred embodiment, phase comparison of a reflected acoustic signal to a reference signal using a constant frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop ultrasonic device allows the pulsatile components to be monitored. Calibrating the device by inducing a known change in intracranial pressure allows conversion to changes in intracranial pressure.

  2. Spontaneous intracranial hypo and hypertensions: an imaging review.

    PubMed

    Vaghela, Viratsinh; Hingwala, Divyata Rajendra; Kapilamoorthy, Tirur Raman; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Thomas, Bejoy

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure changes can manifest as either intracranial hypertension or hypotension. The idiopathic forms are largely under or misdiagnosed. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension occurs due to reduced CSF pressure usually as a result of a spontaneous dural tear. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a syndrome of elevated intracranial tension without hydrocephalus or mass lesions and with normal CSF composition. Neuroimaging plays an important role in excluding secondary causes of raised intracranial tension. As the clinical presentation is varied, imaging may also help the clinician in arriving at the diagnosis of IIH with the help of a few specific signs. In this review, we attempt to compile the salient magnetic resonance imaging findings in these two conditions. Careful observation of these findings may help in early accurate diagnosis and to provide appropriate early treatment. PMID:21891924

  3. Ultrasonic Apparatus and Technique to Measure Changes in Intracranial Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Changes in intracranial pressure can be measured dynamically and non-invasively by monitoring one or more cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components. Pulsatile components such as systolic and diastolic blood pressures are partially transferred to the cerebrospinal fluid by way of blood vessels contained in the surrounding brain tissue and membrane. As intracranial pressure varies these cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components also vary. Thus, intracranial pressure can be dynamically measured. Furthermore, use of acoustics allows the measurement to be completely non-invasive. In the preferred embodiment, phase comparison of a reflected acoustic signal to a reference signal using a constant frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop ultrasonic device allows the pulsatile components to be monitored. Calibrating the device by inducing a known change in intracranial pressure allows conversion to changes in intracranial pressure.

  4. Vortex dynamics in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trylesinski, Gabriel

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are a potentially devastating pathological dilation of brain arteries that affect 1.5-5 % of the population. Causing around 500 000 deaths per year worldwide, their detection and treatment to prevent rupture is critical. Multiple recent studies have tried to find a hemodynamics predictor of aneurysm rupture, but concluded with distinct opposite trends using Wall Shear Stress (WSS) based parameters in different clinical datasets. Nevertheless, several research groups tend to converge for now on the fact that the flow patterns and flow dynamics of the ruptured aneurysms are complex and unstable. Following this idea, we investigated the vortex properties of both unruptured and ruptured cerebral aneurysms. A brief comparison of two Eulerian vortex visualization methods (Q-criterion and lambda 2 method) showed that these approaches gave similar results in our complex aneurysm geometries. We were then able to apply either one of them to a large dataset of 74 patient specific cases of intracranial aneurysms. Those real cases were obtained by 3D angiography, numerical reconstruction of the geometry, and then pulsatile CFD simulation before post-processing with the mentioned vortex visualization tools. First we tested the two Eulerian methods on a few cases to verify their implementation we made as well as compare them with each other. After that, the Q-criterion was selected as method of choice for its more obvious physical meaning (it shows the balance between two characteristics of the flow, its swirling and deformation). Using iso-surfaces of Q, we started by categorizing the patient-specific aneurysms based on the gross topology of the aneurysmal vortices. This approach being unfruitful, we found a new vortex-based characteristic property of ruptured aneurysms to stratify the rupture risk of IAs that we called the Wall-Kissing Vortices, or WKV. We observed that most ruptured aneurysms had a large amount of WKV, which appears to agree with

  5. The persistent trigeminal artery: development, imaging anatomy, variants, and associated vascular pathologies.

    PubMed

    Meckel, Stephan; Spittau, Bjoern; McAuliffe, William

    2013-01-01

    The persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most common and most cephalad-located embryological anastomosis between the developing carotid artery and vertebrobasilar system to persist into adulthood. As such, it is frequently reported as an incidental finding in computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance angiography studies. Here, we review the embryology, anatomy, and angiographic imaging findings, including important variants of this commonly encountered cerebrovascular anomaly (reported incidence of PTA/PTA variants ranges from 0.1% to 0.76%). Further, the aim is to present the range of associated arterial anomalies or syndromes, as well as pathologies that are associated with a PTA: aneurysms, trigeminal cavernous fistulas, and trigeminal nerve compression. Besides summarizing the risks and clinical presentation of such pathologies, their management is discussed with endovascular strategies mostly being the primary choice for aneurysms and trigeminal cavernous fistulas. Symptomatic trigeminal nerve compression can be treated with microvascular decompression surgery. As an illustrative example, a case of a trigeminal cavernous fistula on a PTA variant is included, mainly to emphasize the importance of understanding the variant anatomy for treatment planning in such pathologies. Finally, recommendations on how to manage patients with PTA-associated vascular pathologies are advanced. PMID:22170080

  6. Combined use of intraoperative indocyanine green and dynamic angiography in rotational vertebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Nauman S; Ambekar, Sudheer; Elhammady, Mohamed Samy; Riley, Jonathan P; Pradilla, Gustavo; Nogueira, Raul G; Ahmad, Faiz U

    2016-08-01

    Rotational vertebral artery occlusion, also known as bow hunter's syndrome, is a well-documented surgically amenable cause of vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Traditionally, patients have been imaged using dynamic rotational angiography. The authors sought to determine whether intraoperative indocyanine green (ICG) angiography could reliably assess the adequacy of surgical decompression of the vertebral artery (VA). The authors report two patients who presented with multiple transient episodes of syncope provoked by turning their head to the right. Rotational dynamic angiography revealed a dominant VA that became occluded with head rotation to the right side. The patients underwent successful surgical decompression of the VA via an anterior cervical approach. Intraoperative ICG angiography demonstrated patency of the VA with head rotation. This was further confirmed by intraoperative dynamic catheter angiography. To our knowledge, we present the first two cases of the use of ICG combined with intraoperative dynamic rotational angiography to document the adequacy of surgical decompression of the VA in a patient with rotational vertebral artery occlusion. Intraoperative ICG angiography is a useful adjunct and may potentially supplant the need for intraoperative catheter angiography. PMID:27041076

  7. Intracranial stenosis, cerebrovascular diseases, and cognitive impairment in chinese.

    PubMed

    Hilal, Saima; Saini, Monica; Tan, Chuen Seng; Catindig, Joseree A; Dong, Yan Hong; Holandez, Rachelle L; Niessen, Wiro J; Vrooman, Henri A; Ting, Eric; Wong, Tien Yin; Chen, Christopher; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Ikram, Mohammad K

    2015-01-01

    Extracranial carotid artery disease has been shown to be related to cognitive deficits. However, limited data are available on intracranial stenosis (ICS) and cognitive impairment. We investigate the association between ICS and cognitive impairment in Chinese. Subjects (n=278), recruited from the Epidemiology of Dementia in Singapore Study, underwent comprehensive clinical evaluation, neuropsychological testing, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including 3-dimensional-time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Cognitive function was expressed as composite and domain-specific Z-scores. Cognitive impairment no dementia and dementia were diagnosed according to internationally accepted diagnostic criteria. Linear and logistic regression models were adjusted for age, sex, education, vascular risk factors, and other MRI markers. A total of 29 (10.4%) persons had ICS on MRA, which was significantly associated with both composite cognitive Z-scores [mean difference in Z-score, presence vs. absence of ICS: -0.37 (95% confidence interval: -0.63, -0.12)] and specific domains including executive function, language, visuomotor speed, verbal memory, and visual memory. ICS was also related to significant cognitive impairment (odds ratio: 5.10 [1.24 to 21.02]). With respect to other MRI markers, adjusted for the presence of lacunar infarcts, the associations of ICS with both composite and domain-specific Z-scores, and significant cognitive impairment became nonsignificant; however, adjustment for other MRI markers did not alter these associations. In this Chinese population, presence of ICS was associated with cognitive impairment independent of vascular risk factors. These associations may be mediated through the presence of infarcts. PMID:24731981

  8. A dimensionless parameter for classifying hemodynamics in intracranial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-11-01

    Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm (IA) is a disease with high rates of mortality. Given the risk associated with the aneurysm surgery, quantifying the likelihood of aneurysm rupture is essential. There are many risk factors that could be implicated in the rupture of an aneurysm. However, the most important factors correlated to the IA rupture are hemodynamic factors such as wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI) which are affected by the IA flows. Here, we carry out three-dimensional high resolution simulations on representative IA models with simple geometries to test a dimensionless number (first proposed by Le et al., ASME J Biomech Eng, 2010), denoted as An number, to classify the flow mode. An number is defined as the ratio of the time takes the parent artery flow transports across the IA neck to the time required for vortex ring formation. Based on the definition, the flow mode is vortex if An>1 and it is cavity if An<1. We show that the specific definition of Le et al. works for sidewall but needs to be modified for bifurcation aneurysms. In addition, we show that this classification works on three-dimensional geometries reconstructed from three-dimensional rotational angiography of human subjects. Furthermore, we verify the correlation of IA flow mode and WSS/OSI on the human subject IA. This work was supported partly by the NIH grant R03EB014860, and the computational resources were partly provided by CCR at UB. We thank Prof. Hui Meng and Dr. Jianping Xiang for providing us the database of aneurysms and helpful discussions.

  9. Carcinoembryonic antigen in patients with intracranial tumors.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Tanaka, R

    1980-09-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and tumor cyst fluid obtained from patients with a variety of intracranial tumors was determined by radioimmunoassay Slightly elevated levels of plasma CEA, ranging from 2.6 to 3.8 ng/ml, were noted in six (4%) of 161 patients with primary brain tumors: in three gliomas, two pineal tumors, and one acoustic neurinoma, respectively. On the other hand, 17 (37%) of 46 patients with metastatic brain tumors showed a definite elevation, and most of them had values higher than 5.0 ng/ml. Of 37 patients with primary brain tumors, only one with a pineal germinoma showed a significant elevation of CEA in CSF, whereas eight (44%) of 18 patients with metastatic brain tumors showed high values of CEA in CSF. All six patients with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis showed elevated CEA in CSF. Levels of CEA in tumor cyst fluid were determined in 17 patients with intracranial tumors, including 12 gliomas, two craniopharyngiomas, two metastatic tumors, and one meningioma; elevation of CEA in tumor fluid was noted in two craniopharyngiomas and one metastatic tumor. Sequential determination of CEA of plasma or CSF revealed that the CEA levels were well correlated with the activity of brain tumors. Consequently, the determination of CEA in plasma or CSF is valuable for the differential diagnosis between primary and metastatic brain tumors and for the management of CEA-producing tumors. PMID:7420150

  10. Multiple intracranial abscesses: Heralding asymptomatic venosus ASD.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Praveen K; Marzook, Rehab Ali; Sulaibeekh, Leena

    2013-10-01

    A case of multiple intracranial abscesses in an immune-competent young girl is reported. She had chicken pox. Two weeks later, she presented with multiple intracranial abscesses. No significant cardiac abnormality was detected on transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE). The condition was treated medically. However, one of the abscesses adjacent to the CSF pathways enlarged on treatment and caused obstructive hydrocephalus that required stereotactic aspiration. Gram stain showed gram positive cocci in chain. Pus was sterile on culture. She was treated with broad spectrum IV antibiotics based on Gram staining report for 6 weeks followed by another 8 weeks of oral antibiotics. She made good recovery and had been leading a normal life. The abscess capsules took 30 months to resolve completely on MRI. A repeat TTE done in the follow up showed enlarged right heart chambers with a suggestion of a venosus ASD. A trans-esophageal echocardiogram (TEE) confirmed the presence of sinus venosus ASD from the SVC side with mainly left to right shunt. There was also partial anomalous drainage of the pulmonary veins. The patient underwent correction of the defect and has been doing well. PMID:24551007

  11. Intracranial cholesterol granuloma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Emanuele; Abbiati, Gianluca; Cantile, Carlo

    2010-11-01

    A case of intracranial cholesterol granuloma is described in a 4-year-old neutered European male cat presented with a 5-month history of progressive weakness, ataxia and depression. On clinical evaluation, haematological and biochemical profiles revealed only mild hypercholesterolemia and magnetic resonance imaging showed a large space-occupying extra-axial mass in the area of the falx, not homogeneous after contrast enhancement. At post-mortem examination, an orange-yellowish mass of 22 mm in diameter extended from the right frontal lobe to the temporo-parietal region, causing atrophy of the prosencephalic region of the brain. The site of origin of the mass was within the subarachnoid space of the supracallosum sulcus of the right cerebral hemisphere. Histological examination of the lesion revealed abundant deposits of cholesterol clefts, surrounded by clusters of macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Neither inflammatory lesions, nor cholesterol deposits were detected in other areas of the brain and in other organs. On the basis of the histological examination, a diagnosis of intracranial cholesterol granuloma was made. PMID:20543528

  12. The spectrum of intracranial aneurysms in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Kanaan, I; Lasjaunias, P; Coates, R

    1995-03-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are rare in children, accounting for merely 0.5-4.6% of all aneurysms. Several characteristics distinguish them from aneurysms in adults: male predominance; higher incidence of unusual location, such as peripheral or posterior circulation; and a greater number of large and giant aneurysms. These unique features can be attributed to the higher incidence of traumatic, infectious, developmental, and congenital lesions. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is not the exclusive mode of presentation; neuro-compressive signs and symptoms are also frequently seen. The treatment of intracranial aneurysms in pediatrics is dictated by their unusual pathology and liability to rehemorrhage. Although direct clipping has been the standard surgical technique, certain obsolete or innovative procedures should also be considered, such as entrapment, proximal occlusion, and endovascular embolisation, or even, in some cases, the non-invasive treatment of "watch and wait" for a spontaneous thrombosis. Six representative cases from King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre are reviewed. They reflect the diversity of the problem and the multi-disciplinary approach to the treatment. PMID:7627578

  13. The contemporary management of intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Leng, Xinyi; Wong, Ka Sing; Leung, Thomas W

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease is the most common cause of cerebral vasculopathy and an important stroke etiology worldwide, with a higher prevalence in Asian, Hispanic and African ethnicities. Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease portends a recurrent stroke risk as high as 18% at one year. The key to secondary prevention is an understanding of the underlying stroke mechanism and aggressive control of conventional cardiovascular risks. Contemporary treatment includes antiplatelet therapy, optimal glycemic and blood pressure control, statin therapy and lifestyle modifications. For patients with high-grade (70-99%) symptomatic steno-occlusion, short-term dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel followed by life-long single antiplatelet therapy may reduce the recurrent risk. Current evidence does not advocate percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting as an initial treatment. External counterpulsation, encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis and remote limb ischemic preconditioning are treatments under investigation. Future studies should aim at predicting patients prone to recurrence despite of medical therapies and testing the efficacy of emerging therapies. PMID:27082149

  14. [Intracranial arteriovenous malformations in pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Perquin, D A; Kloet, A; Tans, J T; Witte, G N; Dörr, P J

    1999-03-01

    Three women, aged 27, 32 and 30 years, respectively, suffered from headache, nausea and neurological abnormalities and were found to have an intracranial arteriovenous malformation (AVM). One of them after diagnosis had two pregnancies, both ended by caesarean section with good results. Another woman was 32 weeks pregnant when the AVM manifested itself with a haemorrhage; she recovered well and was delivered by caesarean section. After the AVM proved radiologically to have been obliterated, she delivered after her subsequent pregnancy by the vaginal route with vacuum extraction. The third woman was 15 weeks pregnant when major abnormalities developed. There was a large intracerebral haematoma with break-through to the ventricular system; this patient died. Intracranial haemorrhage during pregnancy is rate. It can result in maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. It appears that pregnancy does not increase the rate of first cerebral haemorrhage from an AVM. The management of AVM rupture during pregnancy should be based primarily on neurosurgical rather than on obstetric considerations. Close collaboration with a team of neurologists, neurosurgeons, obstetricians and anaesthesiologists is mandatory. PMID:10321255

  15. Primary Stenting of Subclavian and Innominate Artery Occlusive Disease: A Single Center's Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Brountzos, E. N. Petersen, B.; Binkert, C.; Panagiotou, I.; Kaufman, J. A.

    2004-11-15

    Purpose: To review immediate and midterm results of primary stenting for innominate and subclavian artery occlusive lesions. Methods: Retrospective data were collected from 48 consecutive symptomatic patients (27 men and 21 women, median age 64 years) having 49 subclavian and innominate artery lesions treated with stenting. Of the patients 52% had concomitant ischemic heart disease, and 30% had carotid and/or vertebral artery disease. Indication for treatment was vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) in 16.6% of the patients; upper limb ischemia (ULI) in 31.3%; VBI and ULI in 12.5%; transient ischemic attack in 16.7%; angina in 12.5% before or after left internal mammary artery-to-coronary artery bypass grafting; and leg claudication in 10.4% before or after axillofemoral bypass grafting. Balloon-expandable stents were used in 44 lesions and self-expandable stents in 5 lesions. In total, 53 stents were placed in 48 patients. Results: Technical success was 96%, and clinical success 94%. We encountered four complications (two puncture site hematomas, one distal hand embolization and one transient cerebral ischemia). Two patients died within 30 days from other causes, and seven patients were lost to follow-up. Mean follow-up time was 16.7 months (range 0.3 to 68.2). Five patients had recurrent lesions treated by surgical (n = 2) or endovascular (n = 3) means. Cumulative primary patency rate was 91.7% and 77% at 12 and 24 months, respectively. Cumulative secondary patency rate was 96.5% and 91.7% at 12 and 24 months, respectively. Conclusion: Stenting of subclavian and innominate artery lesions resulted in immediate resolution of patients' symptoms with durable midterm effect and few complications in a larger patient group with serious comorbid conditions.

  16. Molecular MRI of intracranial thrombus in a rat ischemic stroke model

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Ritika; Ay, Ilknur; Dai, Guangping; Kim, Young Ro; Sorensen, A. Gregory; Caravan, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Intracranial thrombus is a principal feature in most ischemic stroke, and thrombus location and size may correlate with outcome and response to thrombolytic therapy. EP-2104R, a fibrin-specific molecular MR agent, was previously shown to enhance extracranial thrombi in animal models and recently, in clinical trials. The purpose of this work was to determine if a fibrin-specific molecular MR probe could noninvasively characterize intracranial thrombi. Methods Embolic stroke was induced in adult rats by occlusion of the right internal carotid artery with an aged thrombus. Diffusion weighted imaging, time of flight angiography, and high resolution three dimensional T1-weighted MRI were performed at 4.7T prior to and following contrast agents EP-2104R (10 µmol/kg, n=6) or Gd-DTPA (200 µmol/kg, control, n=5). Gd levels in thrombus, brain, and blood were determined by ex vivo elemental analysis. Results In all animals, MR angiography revealed a flow deficit and diffusion-weighted imaging showed a hyperintensity consistent with ischemia. EP-2104R-enhanced MRI resulted in visualization of all occlusive thrombi (6/6) as well as vessel wall enhancement in all 6 animals with high contrast to noise relative to blood (10.7 post EP-2104R vs. 0.54 pre, p<0.0001). Gd-DTPA injected animals showed no occlusive thrombus or vessel wall enhancement (0/5). The concentration of Gd in the thrombus post-EP2104 was 18 times that in the blood pool. Conclusions EP-2104R enhanced MRI successfully identifies intracranial thrombus in a rat embolic stroke model. PMID:20395615

  17. Fusiform aneurysm of a persistent primitive trigeminal artery associated with cerebrovascular anatomic variations: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Pleş, Horia; Loukas, Marios; Andall, Rebecca G; Andall, Naomi R; Iacob, Nicoleta; Miclăuş, GraŢian Dragoslav; Matusz, Petru; Tubbs, R Shane

    2015-01-01

    There are four embryonic anastomoses that exist between the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the vertebrobasilar (VB) system, which may fail to regress postfetal life; one of which is the trigeminal artery. Other persistent anastomoses include those formed by the hypoglossal, otic and proatlantic intersegmental arteries. In addition, other cerebrovascular variations may accompany a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA); such as arteriovenous malformations, aneurysms, carotid-cavernous fistulas and stenotic cerebral vessels. We present two very rare cases of a left PPTA. In the first case, there was a past medical history significant for cervico-thoraco-lumbar spondylitis and in the second case of an operated occipital astrocytoma. In both cases, the PPTA was associated with a fusiform aneurysm located in the carotidian (lateral) aspect of the PPTA as well as other cerebrovascular anatomic variations. In the first case, the length of the PPTA was 26.0 mm and its endoluminal diameter, at its origin at the ICA, was 1.8 mm; the aneurysm has a length of 8.4 mm. In the second case, the length of the PPTA was 31.0 mm and its endoluminal diameter at its origin at the ICA was 3.0 mm; the aneurysm have a length of 7.6 mm. Identification of these variant vessels should not be ignored before planning and execution of neurosurgeries to prevent possible perioperative risks. PMID:26662153

  18. Intracranial post-embolization residual or recurrent aneurysms: Current management using surgical clipping.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Yuan, Yongjie; Guo, Yunbao; Yu, Jinlu

    2016-08-01

    Post-embolization residual or recurrent aneurysms (PERRAs) are not rare in patients with intracranial aneurysms treated by embolization. Their occurrence is mainly associated with an increased amount of interventional therapy. Repeated interventional embolization can be applied in some patients with PERRAs, whereas surgical clipping is preferred in other cases that are not suitable for repeated interventional embolization due to the difficulties inherent to this operation. The surgical clipping of PERRAs is very complicated and difficult to perform, and relevant reports are rare. This study offers a review of PERRA treatment using surgical clipping. Retrospective studies have shown that PERRAs are common aneurysms of the anterior and posterior communicating arteries. According to the recurrent characteristics of PERRAs, it is reasonable to categorize PERRAs into three types: type I-coils are compressed, and no embolic material fills the neck of the aneurysm; type II-coils are migrated, and very few coils fill the neck of the aneurysm or the parent artery; and type III-coils are migrated, and multiple coils fill the neck of the aneurysm or the parent artery. Direct clipping can be applied to types I and II PERRAs, whereas trapping, wrapping, or auxiliary revascularization is required in type III PERRAs. Most coils do not require removal unless they interfere with clipping. However, it is necessary to avoid damaging the surrounding adhesive tissue during coil removal. Satisfactory therapeutic outcomes can be achieved by selecting appropriate PERRA cases in which to perform surgical clipping. PMID:27177873

  19. Update on the natural history of intracranial atherosclerotic disease: A critical review

    PubMed Central

    Komotar, Ricardo J; Kellner, Christopher P; Raper, Daniel M; Strozyk, Dorothea; Higashida, Randall T; Meyers, Philip M

    2010-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) contributes to a significant number of ischemic strokes. There is debate in the recent literature concerning the impact of the location of stenosis in ICAD on outcome. Some reports have suggested that disease processes and outcomes vary by vessel location, potentially altering the natural history and indications for intervention. Here we have performed a comprehensive, critical review of the natural history of ICAD by vessel in an attempt to assess the differences in disease specific to each of the vascular territories. Our assessment concludes that only minor differences exist between patients with different vessels affected in vessel-specific ICAD. We have found that middle cerebral artery disease confers a lower mortality than vessel-specific ICAD in other intracranial vessels, asymptomatic disease follows a more benign course than symptomatic disease, and that plaque progression or the detection of microemboli on transcranial Doppler may predict poor outcome. Given the expanding indications for treatment of ICAD and rapidly developing endovascular techniques to confront this disease, a thorough understanding of the natural history of ICAD aids the interventional neuroradiologist in determining when to treat and how to predict outcome in this patient population. PMID:21161031

  20. Two pediatric cases of variant neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy after intracranial hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Wittekind, Samuel G; Yanay, Ofer; Johnson, Erin M; Gibbons, Edward F

    2014-10-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is an acquired form of left ventricular systolic dysfunction seen in the setting of physiologic stress and the absence of coronary artery disease. It is thought to be caused by excessive sympathetic stimulation. It is well described in the adult literature associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage where it is known as neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy (NSC), but few such pediatric cases have been reported. We describe our experience with 2 children (13- and 10-year-old girls) who presented with spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage followed by pulmonary edema and shock. Echocardiography revealed similar patterns of left ventricular wall motion abnormalities consistent with NSC, inverted Takotsubo variant. One child progressed to death, whereas the other made a remarkable recovery, including significant improvement in cardiac function over the course of 1 week. We argue that at least 1 of these cases represents true stress-induced cardiomyopathy. This report will alert pediatricians to this transient cardiomyopathy that is likely underdiagnosed in pediatric intensive care. We also highlight the challenges of managing both shock and elevated intracranial pressure in the setting of NSC. PMID:25201800

  1. Initial evaluation of the intracranial pressure in cases of traumatic brain injury without hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bekerman, Inessa; Sigal, Tal; Kimiagar, Itzhak; Vaiman, Michael

    2016-09-15

    Our objective was to apply the technique of measuring diameters of optic nerve sheath (ONSD) for the intracranial pressure assessment for the cases with traumatic head injury without hemorrhage. In a retrospective study, CT data of 720 adult patients were collected and analyzed. ONSDs were measured at the point where the ophthalmic artery crosses the optic nerve (anatomical landmark) together with the eyeball transverse diameter (ETD). The ONSD/ETD index was calculated. The correlation analysis was performed with gender, age, the Glasgow Coma Scale score, and the Glasgow Outcome Score. ONSD was enlarged in 82% cases (n=591). Enlarged right/left ONSDs were 6.7±1.0/6.7±0.9mm (cut-off value˃5.5mm). ONSD/ETD ratio was 0.28±0.05 against 0.19±0.02 in healthy adults (p=0.02). We did not find correlation between ONSD/ETD ratio with initial Glasgow Coma Scale score but there was an inverse correlation between ONSD/ETD ratio and the Glasgow Outcome Score (r=-0.64). We conclude that in majority of cases with traumatic head injury without hemorrhage the ONSD is significantly enlarged indicating elevated intracranial pressure even if CT scans are negative. PMID:27538650

  2. Seven patients diagnosed as intracranial hemorrhage combined with intracranial tumor: case description and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chun; Tang, Shuang; Jiang, Yongming; Xiong, Xuehua; Zhou, Shuai

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, 7 patients with brain hemorrhage combined with intracranial tumor were investigated for about 3 years. Furthermore, the previous reports related with such cases were also reviewed. In all of these patients, hemorrhage was a main characteristic of the diagnosed neoplasm. The clinical data were identified by computed tomography (CT) scanning in the present study. CT scanning results demonstrated that there was a neoplastic core with high or low density and multifocal clots generally at the borders of the tumors. Increase of tumor tissues with intravenous injection of approximate 70% hypaque was analyzed in all the 7 patients with brain hemorrhage. The parts that were increased showed peripheral distributions corresponding to the hemorrhage sites. In conclusion, the intracranial brain hemorrhage related with the several types of tumors, including hemangiopericytoma, metastatic carcinomas, oligodendroglioma, and glioblastoma multiforme, which may be helpful to these patients. PMID:26770623

  3. Unruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm presenting as depression: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Bunevicius, Adomas; Cikotas, Paulius; Steibliene, Vesta; Deltuva, Vytenis P.; Tamsauskas, Arimantas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intracranial aneurysms most commonly present following rupture causing subarachnoid hemorrhage. Mental disorders are common among patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms and in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage survivors. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no published report of unruptured intracranial aneurysm presenting as a mental disorder. Case Description: A 69-year-old male without a past history of mental disorders and neurological symptoms presented with a 2-month history of anxiety, sadness, lack of pleasure in usual activities, fatigue, difficulties falling asleep and waking up early in the morning, reduced appetite, and weight loss. The patient was diagnosed with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment was initiated. Subsequent non-contrast computed tomography (CT) of the head demonstrated hypointense oval-shaped lesion within the projection of the anterior communicating artery. CT angiography confirmed the diagnosis of a 0.8 × 0.6 cm saccular aneurysm originating from the anterior communicating artery and anterior cerebral artery. The patient underwent microsurgical clipping of the aneurysm. On psychiatric assessment 1 month after the surgery, there were no signs of depressive disorder and antidepressive treatment was discontinued. On follow-up visit 1 year after the surgery, the patient did not have any mood symptoms. Conclusions: The case indicates that organic brain lesions, including intracranial aneurysms, should be suspected in elderly patients presenting with their first episode of mental disorder. PMID:27583172

  4. CT Perfusion Dynamics of Intracranial Tuberculomas

    PubMed Central

    N., Jayakumar Peruvumba; Shivashankar, Ravishankar

    2015-01-01

    Aims To study perfusion characteristics of intracranial tuberculomas and analyze changes with anti tubercular treatment. Materials and Methods Nineteen patients of histologically proven intracranial tuberculomas were included in the study of which 9 were not on antitubercular treatment and ten were on antitubercular treatment (6 patients on treatment for less than 2 months and 4 were more than 6 months). All patients underwent CT perfusion (CTP) and CTP parameters like rCBV and rCBF were obtained from entire lesion, center and capsule of lesions and compared. Results CTP parameters like rCBF and rCBV were significantly low in all the three ROIs in the group not on treatment compared to that of on treatment ; rCBF and rCBV of entire lesion (p=0.018 and p=0.005 respectively), capsule (p=0.045 and p=0.010 respectively) and center of the lesion (p=0.020 and p=0.009) respectively). Tuberculomas on antitubercular treatment of more than six months showed reduced rCBF and rCBV in entire lesion (p=0.01 & p=0.01 respectively), capsule (p=0.04 & p=0.03 respectively) and center (p=0.08 & p=0.05 respectively) compared to those on treatment for less than two months. Similarly tuberculomas on treatment for six months did not show significant difference in rCBF and rCBV compared to tuberculomas who were not on treatment. Tuberculomas on treatment for less than two months showed statistically increased rCBF and rCBV in entire lesion (p=0.01 & p=0.04 respectively), capsule (p=0.03 & p=0.01 respectively) and center (p= 0.03 &=0.01) compared to those not on treatment. Conclusion Intracranial tuberculomas not on treatment and those on treatment for around six months show low perfusion and tuberculomas on treatment for less than two months show high perfusion. These findings suggest that serial perfusion profiles of tuberculomas on treatment could possibly be seen as surrogate markers of response to treatment. PMID:26155528

  5. The Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Michael; Kupersmith, Mark J.; Kieburtz, Karl D.; Corbett, James J.; Feldon, Steven E.; Friedman, Deborah I.; Katz, David M.; Keltner, John L.; Schron, Eleanor B.; McDermott, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE To our knowledge, there are no large prospective cohorts of untreated patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) to characterize the disease. OBJECTIVE To report the baseline clinical and laboratory features of patients enrolled in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We collected data at baseline from questionnaires, examinations, automated perimetry, and fundus photography grading. Patients (n = 165) were enrolled from March 17, 2010, to November 27, 2012, at 38 academic and private practice sites in North America. All participants met the modified Dandy criteria for IIH and had a perimetric mean deviation between −2 dB and −7 dB. All but 4 participants were women. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Baseline and laboratory characteristics. RESULTS The mean (SD) age of our patients was 29.0 (7.4) years and 4 (2.4%) were men. The average (SD) body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) was 39.9 (8.3). Headache was the most common symptom (84%). Transient visual obscurations occurred in 68% of patients, back pain in 53%, and pulse synchronous tinnitus in 52%. Only 32% reported visual loss. The average (SD) perimetric mean deviation in the worst eye was −3.5 (1.1) dB, (range, −2.0 to −6.4 dB) and in the best eye was −2.3 (1.1) dB (range, −5.2 to 0.8 dB). A partial arcuate visual field defect with an enlarged blind spot was the most common perimetric finding. Visual acuity was 85 letters or better (20/20) in 71% of the worst eyes and 77% of the best eyes. Quality of life measures, including the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire–25 and the Short Form–36 physical and mental health summary scales, were lower compared with population norms. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial represents the largest prospectively analyzed cohort of untreated patients with IIH. Our data show

  6. Angiogenesis in steno-occlusive vasculopathies as a common pathway for intracranial haemorrhage. A report of six cases.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, René; Rijssenbeek, Astrid L; Sprengers, Marieke E S; Bot, Joost C J; Majoie, Charles B L M; Roos, Yvo B W E M; Vandertop, William P

    2014-01-01

    Vasculopathies, including vasculitis of the central nervous system, can lead to stenosed, cicatrized vessels and the development of arterio-arteriolar collateral vessels. Bleeding due to these vascular changes, although rare, does occur. We describe six patients (all female, age range, 21-52 years; mean age, 42 years) with steno-occlusive lesions of intracranial vessels who presented with an acute intracranial haemorrhage. All had arterial steno-occlusive changes in conjunction with extensive leptomeningeal and arterio-arteriolar collaterals. Within the collaterals, focal dilatations could be identified, which were in close spatial relationship with the intracranial haemorrhage. Cause of bleeding was depicted on CT angiography in four out of six patients. One patient presented in childhood with acute stroke, one patient was diagnosed with Buerger's disease and one with sickle cell disease; the other three patients had no relevant history and the exact cause remained unclear. Outcome was favourable in all patients. Despite focal vascular weaknesses, no recurrent haemorrhage was seen during follow-up, supporting, at least in this small patient group, a conservative wait-and-see policy. PMID:24556309

  7. Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Draining into Spinal Perimedullary Veins: A Rare Cause of Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Atamaz, Funda; Oran, Ismail; Durmaz, Berrin

    2006-01-01

    We report a rare case of progressive myelopathy caused by intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula with venous drainage into the spinal perimedullary veins. A 45-yr-old man developed urinary and fecal incontinence and muscle weakness in the lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed brainstem edema and dilated veins of the brainstem and spinal cord. Cerebral angiography showed a dural arteriovenous fistula fed by the neuromeningeal branch of the left ascending pharyngeal artery. Occlusion of the fistula could be achieved by embolization after a diagnostic and subsequent therapeutic delay. There was no improvement in clinical condition. For the neurologic outcome of these patients it is important that fistula must be treated before ischemic and gliotic changes become irreversible. PMID:17043439

  8. The Use of Flow Diversion for the Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms: Expansion of Indications

    PubMed Central

    Brouillard, Adam M; Sun, Xingwen; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2016-01-01

    Flow diversion is a novel concept for treating anatomically challenging intracranial aneurysms and has gained increasing acceptance. Flow diverter stents, such as the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) (ev3-Covidien, Irvine, CA, USA), are approved for treating unruptured large and giant aneurysms from the internal carotid artery between the superior hypophyseal and cavernous segments. However, technological advances and recent clinical results suggest that flow diversion can be safely and effectively used in treating ruptured aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, and distal anterior circulation aneurysms. In this brief review, we aim to investigate the recent evidence on the utilization of PEDs in these controversial vascular territories and to discuss whether the indications for flow diversion can be expanded.   PMID:26973807

  9. Clinical-radiological evaluation of sequelae of stereotactic radiosurgery for intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Steinberg, G.K.; Marks, M.P.; DeLaPaz, R.L.; Chuang, F.Y.S.

    1989-12-01

    Stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery has been used to treat 322 patients with surgically-inaccessible intracranial vascular malformations. (The clinical results of this method for the treatment of angiographically demonstrable arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and angiographically occult vascular malformations (AOVMs) of the brain are described in separate reports of this symposium). The great majority of patients have had an uneventful post-treatment course with satisfactory health outcomes. However, several categories of delayed sequelae of stereotactic radiosurgery have been identified, involving the vascular structures essential for the integrity of the brain tissue and the brain parenchyma directly. These categories reflect both reaction to injury and to alterations in regional hemodynamic status, and include vasogenic edema, occlusion of functional vasculature, radiation necrosis, and local or remote effects on cerebral arterial aneurysms. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The case for angioplasty in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    McTaggart, Ryan A; Marks, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) is likely the most common cause of stroke worldwide and remains highly morbid even with highly monitored medical therapy. Recent results of the SAMMPRIS trial, which randomized patients to stenting plus aggressive medical management versus aggressive medical management alone have shown that additional treatment of intracranial atherosclerotic lesions with the Wingspan stent is inferior to aggressive medical management alone. In light of these results, there has been renewed interest in angioplasty alone to treat symptomatic ICAD. This article will briefly review the natural history of ICAD and discuss the possible future for endovascular treatment of ICAD with primary intracranial angioplasty in appropriately selected patients. PMID:24782816

  11. The Case for Angioplasty in Patients with Symptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    McTaggart, Ryan A.; Marks, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) is likely the most common cause of stroke worldwide and remains highly morbid even with highly monitored medical therapy. Recent results of the SAMMPRIS trial, which randomized patients to stenting plus aggressive medical management versus aggressive medical management alone have shown that additional treatment of intracranial atherosclerotic lesions with the Wingspan stent is inferior to aggressive medical management alone. In light of these results, there has been renewed interest in angioplasty alone to treat symptomatic ICAD. This article will briefly review the natural history of ICAD and discuss the possible future for endovascular treatment of ICAD with primary intracranial angioplasty in appropriately selected patients. PMID:24782816

  12. Intravenous digital subtraction angiography in the investigation of intracranial disease

    SciTech Connect

    DeFilipp, G.J.; Pinto, R.S.; Lin, J.P.; Kricheff, I.I.

    1983-07-01

    Eighty-six patients who presented with a variety of intracranial lesions were examined with intravenous digital subtraction angiogrphy (IV-DSA). A grading system was used to evaluate the ability IV-DSA to answer specific diagnostic questions regarding intracranial tumors, vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage, lesions of the sella, dural sinus occlusion, and post-therapeutic embolization. Eighty-four percent of the examinations provided clinically useful information. In 15% of the cases limited but useful information was obtained; only 1% of the examinations provided no useful information. We conclude that IV-DSA can routinely provide useful information in the evaluation of the variety of intracranial lesions described above.

  13. Importance of repeat angiography in the diagnosis of iatrogenic anterior cerebral artery territory pseudoaneurysm following endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Munich, Stephan A; Cress, Marshall C; Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo; Krishna, Chandan; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Snyder, Kenneth V

    2016-05-01

    Iatrogenic intracranial pseudoaneurysm formation and rupture are rare complications following endoscopic sinus surgery. Given the propensity for devastating neurologic injury after a relatively routine procedure, swift diagnosis and treatment is essential. The authors present a patient who experienced bifrontal intracranial hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured iatrogenic frontopolar artery pseudoaneurysm caused during routine endoscopic sinus surgery. The pseudoaneurysm was not present on initial angiograms but became apparent radiographically 19 days after the endoscopic procedure. Endovascular treatment consisted of coil and Onyx embolization for sacrifice of the parent vessel proximal to the lesion. Early recognition of iatrogenic intracranial vascular injury is important to allow for rapid treatment. Initial radiographic studies may be unreliable in excluding the presence of a pseudoaneurysm so delayed repeat angiographic assessment is necessary, particularly in the presence of a high index of clinical suspicion. Endovascular techniques may provide an effective and safe option for the treatment of iatrogenic anterior cerebral artery distribution pseudoaneurysms. PMID:25994943

  14. Primary intracranial choriocarcinoma: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Lv, X-F; Qiu, Y-W; Zhang, X-L; Han, L-J; Qiu, S-J; Xiong, W; Wen, G; Zhang, Y-Z; Zhang, J

    2010-11-01

    PICCC is the rarest, most malignant primary intracranial GCT. The purpose of this study was to describe and characterize the MR imaging findings in a series of 7 patients (6 males and 1 female; mean age, 11.9 years) with pathologically proved PICCC in our institution from 2004 to 2009. All tumors were located within the pineal (n = 6) or suprasellar (n = 1) regions. On T2-weighted MR imaging, the lesions appeared markedly heterogeneous with areas of both hypointensity and hyperintensity reflecting the histologic heterogeneity, including hemorrhage, fibrosis, cysts, or necrosis. Heterogeneous (n = 7), ringlike (n = 4), and/or intratumoral nodular (n = 3) enhancement was noted on T1-weighted images with gadolinium. These MR imaging findings, combined with patient age and serum β-HCG levels, may prove helpful in distinguishing PICCC from the more common primary brain tumors, thereby avoiding biopsy of this highly vascular tumor. PMID:20616180

  15. Recurrent spontaneous intracranial hypotension in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Emer; Monaghan, Thomas S; Alexander, Michael; Hennessy, Michal J

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an uncommon condition characterised by postural headache secondary to low cerebrospinal fluid pressure. Here we present a case of recurrence of SIH in early pregnancy in a 26-year-old woman. She first presented at the age of 21 years at 15 weeks' gestation with a history of headache, nausea, vomiting, neck stiffness and photophobia. Findings from a MRI brain scan led to a diagnosis of SIH. She was treated with autologous epidural blood patching and remained asymptomatic until her second pregnancy 5 years later, when she re-presented at 16 weeks' gestation with similar symptoms. She was again diagnosed with SIH and required a repeat treatment of autologous epidural blood patching. She subsequently remained symptom free and delivered a healthy boy at term. PMID:22791729

  16. Multiple Intracranial Arteriovenous Fistulas in Cowden Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prats-Sánchez, Luis A; Hervás-García, Jose V; Becerra, Juan L; Lozano, Manuel; Castaño, Carlos; Munuera, Josep; Escudero, Domingo; García-Esperón, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Cowden syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease. It is characterized by multiple noncancerous tumorlike growths called hamartomas, which typically are found in the skin, oral mucosa, thyroid, breast, and gastrointestinal tract. It carries with it a potential risk of malignant transformation, especially of the breast and thyroid. In 80% of the cases, the human tumor suppressor gene, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), is mutated in the germ line. We report a patient with Cowden syndrome who presented with generalized seizure and left anterior temporal hemorrhage and a nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage due to multiple intracranial arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs). We discuss previous reports about vascular malformations in patients with Cowden syndrome and PTEN mutations. Importantly, we hypothesize that the production of multiple AVFs in our patient was associated with PTEN mutation. PMID:27105569

  17. Rapid virtual stenting for intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Danyang; Chen, Zihe; Wang, Xiangyu; Paliwal, Nikhil; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Corso, Jason J.; Xu, Jinhui

    2016-03-01

    The rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms is the most severe form of stroke with high rates of mortality and disability. One of its primary treatments is to use stent or Flow Diverter to divert the blood flow away from the IA in a minimal invasive manner. To optimize such treatments, it is desirable to provide an automatic tool for virtual stenting before its actual implantation. In this paper, we propose a novel method, called ball-sweeping, for rapid virtual stenting. Our method sweeps a maximum inscribed sphere through the aneurysmal region of the vessel and directly generates a stent surface touching the vessel wall without needing to iteratively grow a deformable stent surface. Our resulting stent mesh has guaranteed smoothness and variable pore density to achieve an enhanced occlusion performance. Comparing to existing methods, our technique is computationally much more efficient.

  18. Intracranial meningioma: an exercise in differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, J G; Kothe, A C

    1990-04-01

    A 48-year-old man presented with a unilateral visual disturbance including reduced visual acuity and decreased sensitivity of the temporal visual field. He was initially diagnosed as having optic neuritis. Four months later the condition not only remained unresolved, but showed signs of progression. This presentation was atypical for optic neuritis and further detailed investigation was warranted. The patient's symptoms, along with multi-channel topographic visual evoked potentials and quantitative visual field analysis, were more indicative of a diagnosis of a space occupying lesion. A CT scan confirmed the presence of an intracranial tumour which was surgically excised. Pre- and post-operative visual function are described. The case report highlights the difficulty of differential diagnosis of optic neuritis and the clinical value of the appropriate and judicious use of multi-channel evoked potentials. PMID:2371068

  19. Intracranial meningeal chondrosarcoma--probable mesenchymal type.

    PubMed

    Rodda, R A; Franklin, C I

    1984-08-01

    A 12 year old girl with episodes of left hemiparesis for 9 months was found to have a large, partly calcified brain tumour which at craniotomy presented on the parasagittal and medial surfaces of the right frontal lobe. No dural or falx attachment could be found and naked eye removal of the tumour was achieved. At a second craniotomy 10 weeks later there was recurrent tumour attached to the falx and involving the sagittal sinus. She died 5 months later. Pathologically, almost all this malignant intracranial neoplasm comprised differentiated cartilaginous tumour. Although only a very small amount of undifferentiated mesenchymal tissue was found in the surgical material available for histological study, it is suggested the tumour can be regarded as a predominantly mature mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the meninges. PMID:6593035

  20. Converging Intracranial Markers of Conscious Access

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Raphaël; Dehaene, Stanislas; Adam, Claude; Clémenceau, Stéphane; Hasboun, Dominique; Baulac, Michel; Cohen, Laurent; Naccache, Lionel

    2009-01-01

    We compared conscious and nonconscious processing of briefly flashed words using a visual masking procedure while recording intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) in ten patients. Nonconscious processing of masked words was observed in multiple cortical areas, mostly within an early time window (<300 ms), accompanied by induced gamma-band activity, but without coherent long-distance neural activity, suggesting a quickly dissipating feedforward wave. In contrast, conscious processing of unmasked words was characterized by the convergence of four distinct neurophysiological markers: sustained voltage changes, particularly in prefrontal cortex, large increases in spectral power in the gamma band, increases in long-distance phase synchrony in the beta range, and increases in long-range Granger causality. We argue that all of those measures provide distinct windows into the same distributed state of conscious processing. These results have a direct impact on current theoretical discussions concerning the neural correlates of conscious access. PMID:19296722

  1. Benign Intracranial Hypertension: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Gary Y.; Million, Stephanie K.

    2012-01-01

    Benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) (also known as pseudotumor cerebri and empty sella syndrome) remains a diagnostic challenge to most physicians. The modified Dandy criteria consist of, the classic findings of headache, pulsatile tinnitus, papilledema, and elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, however, these are rarely collectively present in any one patient. Furthermore, these findings can wax and wane over time. Due to the nature of this disease, both signs and symptoms may be intermittent, making definitive diagnosis difficult. Newer imaging studies, particularly the magnetic resonance venogram (MRV) along with a constellation of correlative findings and associated diseases have given new impetus in the diagnosis, treatment, and pathophysiology of this disease. This has led the authors to offer modifications to the classic Dandy criteria. This report presents three representative cases of BIH highlighting many of the newer advances in both diagnosis and treatment of this perplexing disorder. PMID:22928139

  2. Computed tomography in intracranial supratentorial osteochondroma

    SciTech Connect

    Matz, S.; Israeli, Y.; Shalit, M.N.; Cohen, M.L.

    1981-02-01

    A case of a huge intracranial frontoparietal osteochondroma in a 20-year-old man is reported. The presenting symptoms were headache, vomiting, and blurred vision. Apart from papilledema, no other abnormal neurological signs were present. A specific preoperative diagnosis could not be reached from the information provided by plain skull films, angiography, and radionuclide scan. The findings on computed tomography were those of a high density mass interspersed with small foci of lower densities, producing a honeycomb appearance, and surrounded by deposits of nodular calcification. The postcontrast scan showed a moderate degree of enhancement with preservation of the precontrast honeycomb pattern. These particular features may enable a correct preoperative histological diagnosis to be offered with a high degree of probability.

  3. Rapid Virtual Stenting for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Danyang; Chen, Zihe; Wang, Xiangyu; Paliwal, Nikhil; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Corso, Jason J.; Xu, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    The rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms is the most severe form of stroke with high rates of mortality and disability. One of its primary treatments is to use stent or Flow Diverter to divert the blood flow away from the IA in a minimal invasive manner. To optimize such treatments, it is desirable to provide an automatic tool for virtual stenting before its actual implantation. In this paper, we propose a novel method, called ball-sweeping, for rapid virtual stenting. Our method sweeps a maximum inscribed sphere through the aneurysmal region of the vessel and directly generates a stent surface touching the vessel wall without needing to iteratively grow a deformable stent surface. Our resulting stent mesh has guaranteed smoothness and variable pore density to achieve an enhanced occlusion performance. Comparing to existing methods, our technique is computationally much more efficient. PMID:27346910

  4. [Neuroophthalmological aspects of benign intracranial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Eliseeva, N M; Serova, N K; Gasparian, S S; Shifrin, M A

    2008-01-01

    Benign intracranial hypertension (BICH) is characterized by elevated spinal fluid pressure in the absence of space-occupying lesion in the skull, dilated cerebral ventricles, significant neurological disorders, and altered spinal fluid composition. Forty-nine patients with a female predominance were examined. Their age ranged from 4 to 52 years (median 39 years). The most common predictors of BICH were overweight, endocrine disorders, and cerebral sinus thrombosis. Ophthalmoscopically, the patients were found to have early, moderate, and significant papilledema, and secondary optic atrophy. Examination of visual functions revealed these or those disturbances of visual acuity and/or field of vision in 43 of the 49 patients. The incidence and degree of visual disturbances depended on the stage of papilledema. Timely diagnosis and treatment in patients with BICH allows the development of visual disturbances to be prevented in them. PMID:18589651

  5. Intracranial venous thrombosis complicating oral contraception

    PubMed Central

    Dindar, F.; Platts, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    Four days after the onset of a severe headache a 22-year-old woman who had been taking oral contraceptives for less than three weeks had a convulsion, followed by right hemiparesis. Other focal neurologic signs and evidence of raised intracranial pressure appeared, and she became comatose on the seventh day. A left craniotomy revealed extensive cerebral venous thrombosis. She died the next day. On postmortem examination extensive thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus and draining cerebral veins, and multiple areas of cerebral hemorrhage and hemorrhagic infarction were seen. Some of the superficial cerebral veins showed focal necrosis of their walls, and the lateral lacunae of the superior sagittal sinus contained proliferating endothelial cells. The adrenal veins were also thrombosed. The significance of these findings is discussed. The literature on cerebrovascular complications of oral contraception, particularly cerebral venous thrombosis, is reviewed. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6 PMID:4413961

  6. Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Durham, T.; Otto, C.; Grounds, D.; Davis, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2006 there have been 6 reported cases of altered visual acuity and intracranial pressure (ICP) in long duration astronauts. In order to document this risk and develop an integrated approach to its mitigation, the NASA Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) and Human Research Program (HRP) have chosen to use the Human System Risk Board (HSRB) and the risk management analysis tool (RMAT). The HSRB is the venue in which the stakeholders and customers discuss and vet the evidence and the RMAT is the tool that facilitates documentation and comparison of the evidence across mission profiles as well as identification of risk factors, and documentation of mitigation strategies. This process allows for information to be brought forward and dispositioned so that it may be properly incorporated into the RMAT and contribute to the design of the research and mitigation plans. The evidence thus far has resulted in the identification of a visual impairment/intracranial pressure (VIIP) project team, updating of both short and long duration medical requirements designed to assess visual acuity, and a research plan to characterize this issue further. In order to understand this issue more completely, a plan to develop an Accelerated Research Collaboration (ARC) has been approved by the HSRB. The ARC is a novel research model pioneered by the Myelin Repair Foundation. It is a patient centered research model that brings together researchers and clinicians, under the guidance of a scientific advisory panel, to collaborate and produce results much quickly than accomplished through traditional research models. The data and evidence from the updated medical requirements and the VIIP ARC will be reviewed at the HSRB on a regular basis. Each review package presented to the HSRB will include an assessment and recommendation with respect to continuation of research, countermeasure development, occupational surveillance modalities, selection criteria, etc. This process will determine the

  7. Management of Intracranial Meningiomas Using Keyhole Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Joshua D; Conner, Andrew K; Bonney, Phillip A; Archer, Jacob B; Christensen, Blake; Smith, Jacqueline; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Keyhole craniotomies are increasingly being used for lesions of the skull base. Here we review our recent experience with these approaches for resection of intracranial meningiomas. Methods: Clinical and operative data were gathered on all patients treated with keyhole approaches by the senior author from January 2012 to June 2013. Thirty-one meningiomas were resected in 27 patients, including 9 supratentorial, 5 anterior fossa, 7 middle fossa, 6 posterior fossa, and 4 complex skull base tumors. Twenty-nine tumors were WHO Grade I, and 2 were Grade II.  Results: The mean operative time was 8 hours, 22 minutes (range, 2:55-16:14) for skull-base tumors, and 4 hours, 27 minutes (range, 1:45-7:13) for supratentorial tumors. Simpson Resection grades were as follows: Grade I = 8, II = 8, III = 1, IV = 15, V = 0. The median postoperative hospital stay was 4 days (range, 1-20 days). In the 9 patients presenting with some degree of visual loss, 7 saw improvement or complete resolution. In the 6 patients presenting with cranial nerve palsies, 4 experienced improvement or resolution of the deficit postoperatively. Four patients experienced new neurologic deficits, all of which were improved or resolved at the time of the last follow-up. Technical aspects and surgical nuances of these approaches for management of intracranial meningiomas are discussed.  Conclusions: With careful preoperative evaluation, keyhole approaches can be utilized singly or in combination to manage meningiomas in a wide variety of locations with satisfactory results. PMID:27284496

  8. Network-based gene expression analysis of intracranial aneurysm tissue reveals role of antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Krischek, B; Kasuya, H; Tajima, A; Akagawa, H; Sasaki, T; Yoneyama, T; Ujiie, H; Kubo, O; Bonin, M; Takakura, K; Hori, T; Inoue, I

    2008-07-17

    Little is known about the pathology and pathogenesis of the rupture of intracranial aneurysms. For a better understanding of the molecular processes involved in intracranial aneurysm (IA) formation we performed a gene expression analysis comparing ruptured and unruptured aneurysm tissue to a control artery. Tissue samples of six ruptured and four unruptured aneurysms, and four cerebral arteries serving as controls, were profiled using oligonucleotide microarrays. Gene ontology classification of the differentially expressed genes was analyzed and regulatory functional networks and canonical pathways were identified with a network-based computational pathway analysis tool. Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical staining were performed as confirmation. Analysis of aneurysmal and control tissue revealed 521 differentially expressed genes. The most significantly associated gene ontology term was antigen processing (P=1.64E-16). Further network-based analysis showed the top scoring regulatory functional network to be built around overexpressed major histocompatibility class (MHC) I and II complex related genes and confirmed the canonical pathway "Antigen Presentation" to have the highest upregulation in IA tissue (P=7.3E-10). Real time RT-PCR showed significant overexpression of MHC class II genes. Immunohistochemical staining showed strong positivity for MHC II molecule specific antibody (HLA II), for CD68 (macrophages, monocytes), for CD45RO (T-cells) and HLA I antibody. Our results offer strong evidence for MHC class II gene overexpression in human IA tissue and that antigen presenting cells (macrophages, monocytes) play a key role in IA formation. PMID:18538937

  9. Epidural Blood Patch Performed for Severe Intracranial Hypotension Following Lumbar Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage for Intracranial Aneurysm Surgery. Retrospective Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tanweer, Omar; Kalhorn, Stephen P.; Snell, Jamaal T.; Lieber, Bryan A.; Agarwal, Nitin; Huang, Paul P.; Sutin, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial hypotension (IH) can occur following lumbar drainage for clipping of an intracranial aneurysm. We observed 3 cases of IH, which were all successfully treated by epidural blood patch (EBP). Herein, the authors report our cases. PMID:27065093

  10. Epidural Blood Patch Performed for Severe Intracranial Hypotension Following Lumbar Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage for Intracranial Aneurysm Surgery. Retrospective Series and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Tanweer, Omar; Kalhorn, Stephen P; Snell, Jamaal T; Wilson, Taylor A; Lieber, Bryan A; Agarwal, Nitin; Huang, Paul P; Sutin, Kenneth M

    2015-12-01

    Intracranial hypotension (IH) can occur following lumbar drainage for clipping of an intracranial aneurysm. We observed 3 cases of IH, which were all successfully treated by epidural blood patch (EBP). Herein, the authors report our cases. PMID:27065093

  11. Extracranial to intracranial by-pass anastomosis: Review of our preliminary experience from a low volume center in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Arundhati; Samadoni, A. EL; Elbassiouny, Ahmed; Sobh, Khaled; Hegazy, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cerebral revascularization is a useful microsurgical technique for the treatment of steno-occlusive intracranial ischemic disease, complex intracranial aneurysms that require deliberate occlusion of a parent artery and invasive skull base tumors. We describe our preliminary experience with extracranial-to-intracranial by-passes at a low volume center; and discuss clinical indications and microsurgical techniques, challenges in comparison to large advanced referral centers. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven patients with hemodynamic ischemia or complex aneurysms or skull base tumors were operated at Cairo University Hospitals in the period between May 2009 and June 2014. All patients operated by a low flow by-pass were operated through a superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery (MCA) anastomosis. All patients chosen for a high flow by-pass were operated using a radial artery graft interposed between the MCAs distally and the common or the external carotid artery proximally. Patency was confirmed at the end of surgery using appearance on the table and confirmed after surgery by transcranial color-coded duplex or computed tomography angiography. All patient data were prospectively collected and retrospectively analyzed at the end of surgery. Results: Nineteen patients (70.4%) were operated upon for flow augmentation and eight patients (29.6%) were operated upon for flow replacement. A total of 30 anastomoses were performed. All except one were patent which gives a patency rate of 96.3%. There was one death in the present series resulting from a hyperperfusion syndrome. 89.5% of patients with hemodynamic ischemia stopped having symptoms after surgery. All but one patient operated for hemodynamic ischemia showed a considerable cognitive improvement after surgery. None of the patients operated upon for flow replacement showed improvement of oculomotor nerve function in spite of adequate intraoperative decompression. All patients treated for

  12. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in canine intracranial meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, J H; Robertson, J L; Zimmerman, K L; Higgins, M A; Geiger, D A

    2009-09-01

    Meningiomas are the most common canine intracranial tumour. Neurologic disability and death from treatment failure remain problematic despite current surgical and radiotherapeutic treatments for canine intracranial meningiomas. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) over-expression has been demonstrated in multiple canine malignancies, and COX-2 inhibitory treatment strategies have been shown to have both preventative and therapeutic effects in spontaneous and experimental models of cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate COX-2 expression in canine intracranial meningiomas. Immunohistochemical and Western blot (WB) analyses showed COX-2 expression in multiple tissues of the normal canine brain, and 87% (21/24) of intracranial meningiomas studied were immunoreactive to COX-2. No significant associations between COX-2 immunoreactivity and tumour grade were identified. Further studies are required to elucidate the physiologic roles of constitutive COX-2 expression in the central nervous system as well as its participation in meningioma tumourigenesis. PMID:19691646

  13. Raised intracranial pressure following abdominal closure in a polytrauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Liza; Wilson, Mark H

    2015-01-01

    Lesson We report a polytrauma case requiring simultaneous neurosurgery and laparotomy. Upon abdominal closure, raised intracranial pressure occurred. This illustrates the important physiological interplay between body compartments in critical care patients. PMID:25852954

  14. A case of direct intracranial extension of tuberculous otitis media.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Kee; Park, Shi-Nae; Park, Kyung-Ho; Yeo, Sang Won

    2014-02-01

    We describe a very rare case of tuberculous otitis media (TOM) with direct intracranial extension. The patient was a 55-year-old man who presented to our ENT clinic for evaluation of severe headaches and right-sided otorrhea. A biopsy of granulation tissue obtained from the right external auditory canal demonstrated chronic inflammation that was suggestive of mycobacterial infection. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain indicated intracranial extension of TOM through a destroyed tegmen mastoideum. After 2 months of antituberculous medication, the headaches and otorrhea were controlled, and the swelling in the external ear canal subsided greatly. Rarely does TOM spread intracranially. In most such cases, intracranial extension of tuberculosis occurs as the result of hematogenous or lymphogenous spread. In rare cases, direct spread through destroyed bone can occur, as it did in our patient. PMID:24526478

  15. Current Status of the Application of Intracranial Venous Sinus Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kan; Yu, Tiecheng; Yuan, Yongjie; Yu, Jinlu

    2015-01-01

    The intracranial venous sinus is an important component of vascular disease. Many diseases involve the venous sinus and are accompanied by venous sinus stenosis (VSS), which leads to increased venous pressure and high intracranial pressure. Recent research has focused on stenting as a treatment for VSS related to these diseases. However, a systematic understanding of venous sinus stenting (VS-Stenting) is lacking. Herein, the literature on idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), venous pulsatile tinnitus, sinus thrombosis, high draining venous pressure in dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and arteriovenous malformation (AVM), and tumor-caused VSS was reviewed and analyzed to summarize experiences with VS-Stenting as a treatment. The literature review showed that satisfactory therapeutic effects can be achieved through stent angioplasty. Thus, the present study suggests that selective stent release in the venous sinus can effectively treat these diseases and provide new possibilities for treating intracranial vascular disease. PMID:26516306

  16. Elevated Intracranial Pressure Diagnosis with Emergency Department Bedside Ocular Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Amin, D.; McCormick, T.; Mailhot, T.

    2015-01-01

    Bedside sonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter can aid in the diagnosis of elevated intracranial pressure in the emergency department. This case report describes a 21-year-old female presenting with 4 months of mild headache and 2 weeks of recurrent, transient binocular vision loss. Though limited by patient discomfort, fundoscopic examination suggested the presence of blurred optic disc margins. Bedside ocular ultrasound (BOUS) revealed wide optic nerve sheath diameters and bulging optic discs bilaterally. Lumbar puncture demonstrated a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) opening pressure of 54 cm H2O supporting the suspected diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Accurate fundoscopy can be vital to the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of patients with suspected elevated intracranial pressure, but it is often technically difficult or poorly tolerated by the photophobic patient. BOUS is a quick and easily learned tool to supplement the emergency physician's fundoscopic examination and help identify patients with elevated intracranial pressure. PMID:26587297

  17. The Management of Increased Intracranial Pressure in Children

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Gary C.; Stein, Fernando

    1983-01-01

    Ten children with acute increased intracranial pressure, documented by the Cheek screw technique, were treated for Reye's syndrome, other toxic/metabolic encephalopathies, encephalitis, and traumatic encephalopathies. The rationale for the use of hyperventilation, head position, maintenance of adequate cerebral perfusion pressure, hyperosmolar agents, steroids, adequate fluid balance, and barbiturates in the therapy of these patients is described. An analysis of these cases reveals that early monitoring of intracranial pressure, maintenance of adequate cerebral perfusion pressure, and aggressive treatment of increased intracranial pressure may reduce the mortality of patients with increased intracranial pressure. Of all patients studied, those who survived demonstrated some neurological deficit as determined by clinical examination or neuropsychological testing. PMID:6655720

  18. Elevated Intracranial Pressure Diagnosis with Emergency Department Bedside Ocular Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Amin, D; McCormick, T; Mailhot, T

    2015-01-01

    Bedside sonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter can aid in the diagnosis of elevated intracranial pressure in the emergency department. This case report describes a 21-year-old female presenting with 4 months of mild headache and 2 weeks of recurrent, transient binocular vision loss. Though limited by patient discomfort, fundoscopic examination suggested the presence of blurred optic disc margins. Bedside ocular ultrasound (BOUS) revealed wide optic nerve sheath diameters and bulging optic discs bilaterally. Lumbar puncture demonstrated a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) opening pressure of 54 cm H2O supporting the suspected diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Accurate fundoscopy can be vital to the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of patients with suspected elevated intracranial pressure, but it is often technically difficult or poorly tolerated by the photophobic patient. BOUS is a quick and easily learned tool to supplement the emergency physician's fundoscopic examination and help identify patients with elevated intracranial pressure. PMID:26587297

  19. WEB in Partially Thrombosed Intracranial Aneurysms: A Word of Caution.

    PubMed

    Anil, G; Goddard, A J P; Ross, S M; Deniz, K; Patankar, T

    2016-05-01

    Despite the proved safety and efficacy of Woven EndoBridge (WEB) flow disruption in conventional intracranial saccular aneurysms, the literature on its use in partially thrombosed intracranial aneurysms is scarce. We report a series of 4 patients in whom partially thrombosed intracranial aneurysms were treated with the WEB. The 2 patients who received additional intraluminal treatment with conventional stents made a good clinical recovery. Meanwhile, those patients who were treated with the WEB alone had fatal rupture of the aneurysm at short- to medium-term follow-up. This small, select case series demonstrates that WEB placement with adjunctive stent placement may be an effective treatment in the management of partially thrombosed intracranial aneurysms, which merits further validation. However, exclusive intrasaccular flow disruption may have an adverse influence on the natural history of this disease. PMID:26585255

  20. [Geometry and algebra of branches of the middle cerebral artery].

    PubMed

    Blinkov, S M

    1986-01-01

    A classification of the cortical branches of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) is suggested by means of which each branch in any hemisphere can be qualified and identified in any variant of MCA branching. The principle of the classification consists in grouping the branches into arteries and trunks of the second, third, etc. order. Branches supplying blood to a certain sector of the lateral surface of the hemisphere are designated arteries. Their number and zone of branching are constant. Branches giving rise to 2 and more arteries are named trunks. Branching of the trunks, the number of trunks of the second, third, etc. order, and the site and type of origin of the arteries are extremely variable. Each trunk can be designated by a formula stating its order and the name of the artery supplied by this trunk. The arrangement of the MCA branches on the surface of the gyri and deep in the sulci, represented on the map of the lateral surface of the hemisphere, is designated conditionally as geometry of MCA branches. The order of branching of the trunks and the type of origin of the arteries, represented on abstract maps of the lateral surface of the hemisphere, are designated conditionally as algebra of the MCA branches. The variability of the geometry and algebra of the MCA branches must be taken into consideration in operations for extra-intracranial microanastomosis and in endovasal intervention on the MCA. PMID:3811741

  1. Vertebral Artery Hypoplasia in a Black Kenyan Population

    PubMed Central

    Ogeng'o, Julius; Olabu, Beda; Sinkeet, Rankeet; Ogeng'o, Nafula M.; Elbusaid, Hemedi

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the characteristics of vertebral artery hypoplasia in 346 arteries of adult black Kenyans. The circumference was measured on haematoxylin/eosin stained microscopic sections of the distal one-third of the intracranial vertebral arteries using scion image analyser. Internal diameter was calculated in millimetre. Data were analysed using SPSS version 16.0. Vertebral artery hypoplasia (diameter < 2.0 mm) occurred in 100 (28.9%) arteries. Sixty of these (17.3%) were on the left and 40 (11.6%) on the right. Sixty (17.3%) were in females while 40 (11.6%) were in males. The side and gender differences were statistically significant at confidence interval of 95%. Frequency of vertebral artery hypoplasia was higher than in most other populations studied. The condition differs from that in other populations because it is more common on the left side and in females. We recommend ultrasound, angio-CT, or angio-MRI evaluation of vertebral arterial system before diagnostic or interventional procedures on posterior circulation.

  2. Association between changes in weight and cerebral arteries in rats.

    PubMed

    Divani, Afshin A; Patel, Ankur; Fredrickson, Vance L; Siljander, Blake; Vazquez, Gabriela

    2010-06-01

    The objective of the study was to gain a better understanding of brain artery diameters and anatomical variations for precise modification of cerebral blood supply in ischemic stroke models. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 35) were used for the experiment. Rats were perfused and resin replicas of cerebral arteries were created using a corrosion casting technique. Resin replicas were measured and analyzed for correlation of vessel lumen with animal sex and weight. A strong correlation between root of aorta diameter and weight was observed (p < 0.0001). We also observed a significant correlation between weight, internal carotid arteries, right external carotid artery, and pterygopalatine arteries. For the common carotid artery, a significant difference between the left and right branches was observed even though there was no association with weight. There was no significant association observed between animal sex and vessel size independent of weight. A better knowledge of vessel lumen in relation to animal sex and weight is essential for adequate blockage of an intracranial artery to induce cerebral ischemia in a rat model of stroke. This study provides a viable reference for choice of rat size in relation to the size of embolic agents such as filaments, microwires, or in vitro thrombus used in ischemic stroke experiments. PMID:24323492

  3. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Intracranial Hypertension and Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Shoykhet, Michael; Cadena, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    Sustained intracranial hypertension and acute brain herniation are “brain codes,” signifying catastrophic neurological events that require immediate recognition and treatment to prevent irreversible injury and death. As in cardiac arrest, a brain code mandates the organized implementation of a stepwise management algorithm. The goal of this emergency neurological life support protocol is to implement an evidence-based, standardized approach to the evaluation and management of patients with intracranial hypertension and/or herniation. PMID:26438459

  4. Imaging Modalities Relevant to Intracranial Pressure Assessment in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Kramer, Larry A.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Fogarty, Jennifer; Polk, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Learning Objectives of this slide presentation are: 1: To review the morphological changes in orbit structures caused by elevated Intracranial Pressure (ICP), and their imaging representation. 2: To learn about the similarities and differences between MRI and sonographic imaging of the eye and orbit. 3: To learn about the role of MRI and sonography in the noninvasive assessment of intracranial pressure in aerospace medicine, and the added benefits from their combined interpretation.

  5. Computerised tomographic detection of intracranial complications of paranasal sinus infections.

    PubMed

    Ogunseyinde, A O; Obajimi, M O; Agunloye, A M

    2004-01-01

    Ninety-four patients were referred for CT examination of the paranasal sinuses within a five year period. Only 11 (11.7%) of them had intracranial complications. These include cerebral, subdural and epidural abscesses, frontal bone osteomyelitis. The maxillary and ethmoidal sinuses were mostly involved and can be implicated as the sinogenic causes of intracranial infections. Sphenoidal sinus was not involved in any of the patients. PMID:15730085

  6. Pantopaque simulating thrombosed intracranial aneurysms on MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lidov, M.W.; Silvers, A.R.; Mosesson, R.E.; Stollman, A.L.; Som, P.M.

    1996-03-01

    A patient is presented in whom iophendylate (Pantopaque) within the basal cisterns closely resembled the appearance on MRI of thrombosed aneurysms of the middle cerebral arteries. The sometimes subtle differences between the appearances on MRI of Pantopaque and aneurysmal clot are discussed to permit accurate diagnosis without resorting to more invasive diagnostic tests, such as cerebral angiography. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Clinical significance of dynamic monitoring by transcranial doppler ultrasound and intracranial pressure monitor after surgery of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zaiming; Chen, Qianxue; Tian, Daofeng; Wang, Long; Liu, Baohui; Zhang, Shenqi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the surgical method of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage (HIH) and how to control the postoperative blood pressure. 96 HIH patients were performed the craniotomic hematoma dissection (CHD) and the hematoma-cavity drilling drainage (HCDD), respectively. Meanwhile, the intracranial pressure and mean arterial pressure of each patient were continuously monitored for 7 days, the postoperative 1st, 3rd, 7th and 14th-day average flow velocities and pulsatility indexes of the bilateral middle cerebral arteries were monitored. CHD exhibited the significant difference in the long-term quality of life (ADL classification 6 months later) of patients with hematoma >50 ml than HCDD; furthermore, the postoperative 1st, 3rd, 7th and 14th-day TCD parameter analysis revealed that CHD exhibited better results in relieving the intracranial pressure and improving the cerebral blood flow than HCDD, and the postoperative ICP and MAP monitoring towards all patients could effectively control the blood pressure and prevent the further bleeding. The patients with hematoma >50 ml should choose CHD, and all HIH patients should be routinely performed the ICP and MAP monitoring. PMID:26379963

  8. Elevations in Intra-cranial blood flow velocities following a SCUBA Dive and the Influence of Post-dive Exercise.

    PubMed

    Barak, O F; Caljkusic, K; Madden, D; Ainslie, P N; Slavic, D; Buca, A; Dujic, Z

    2016-07-01

    The effect that a SCUBA dive has on cerebral blood flow (CBF) at rest and during exercise is poorly understood. We examined the hypothesis that the altered hemodynamic parameters following a SCUBA dive will lead to differential changes in CBF at rest and during exercise. 16 divers completed a field-based study with a single dive at a depth of 18 m sea water with a 47-min bottom time. A follow-up laboratory based study was conducted - 1 week later. Intra-cranial velocities were measured with transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) pre-dive, post-dive at rest and throughout incremental exercise until exhaustion. Following the dive at rest, middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv) was elevated 15 and 30 min after surfacing (by 3.3±5.8 and 4.0±6.9 cm/s, respectively; p<0.05); posterior cerebral artery velocity (PCAv) was increased at 30 min after surfacing (by 3.0±4.5 cm/s; p<0.05). During exercise following the dive, both MCAv and PCAv increased up to 150W followed by a decrease towards baseline at 180W (p<0.05). We found no difference in CBV during exercise between field and laboratory studies (p<0.05). The novel finding of this study is the transient elevation in resting intra-cranial velocities within 30 min following a SCUBA dive. PMID:27176888

  9. Noninvasive intracranial pressure estimation by orbital subarachnoid space measurement: the Beijing Intracranial and Intraocular Pressure (iCOP) study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The orbital subarachnoid space surrounding the optic nerve is continuous with the circulation system for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and can be visualized by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We hypothesized that the orbital subarachnoid space width (OSASW) is correlated with and can serve as a surrogate for intracranial pressure (ICP). Our aim was to develop a method for a noninvasive measurement of the intracranial CSF-pressure (CSF-P) based on MRI-assisted OSASW. Methods The prospective observational comparative study included neurology patients who underwent lumbar CSF-P measurement and 3.0-Tesla orbital magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for other clinical reasons. The width of the orbital subarachnoid space (OSASW) around the optic nerve was measured with MRI at 3, 9, and 15 mm behind the globe. The study population was randomly divided into a training group and a test group. After adjusting for body mass index (BMI) and mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), algorithms for the associations between CSF-P and OSASW were calculated in the training group. The algorithms were subsequently verified in the test group. Main outcome measures were the width of the orbital subarachnoid space (OSASW) and the lumbar cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSF-P). Results Seventy-two patients were included in the study. In the training group, the algorithms for the associations between CSF-P and OSASW were as follows: (a) CSF-P = 9.31 × OSASW (at 3 mm) + 0.48 × BMI + 0.14 × MABP-19.94; (b) CSF-P = 16.95 × OSASW (at 9 mm) + 0.39 × BMI + 0.14 × MABP-20.90; and (c) CSF-P = 17.54 × OSASW (at 15 mm) + 0.47 × BMI + 0.13 × MABP-21.52. Applying these algorithms in the independent test group, the measured lumbar CSF-P (13.6 ± 5.1 mm Hg) did not differ significantly from the calculated MRI-derived CSF-P (OSASW at 3 mm: 12.7 ± 4.2 mm Hg (P = 0.07); at 9 mm: 13.4 ± 5.1 mm Hg (P = 0.35); and at 15 mm: 14.0 ± 4.9 mm Hg (P = 0.87)). Intraclass correlation coefficients

  10. Manual Therapy and Cervical Arterial Dysfunction, Directions for the Future: A Clinical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kerry, Roger; Taylor, Alan J; Mitchell, Jeanette; McCarthy, Chris; Brew, John

    2008-01-01

    This paper offers a contemporary, evidence-based perspective on the issue of adverse neurovascular events related to cervical spine manual therapy. The purpose of this perspective is to challenge traditional thought and practice and to recognize areas where practice and research should develop. By considering the themes presented in this paper, the clinician can broaden his or her approach to neurovascular assessment in line with contemporary evidence and thought. We present information based on clinically relevant questions. The nature of vertebrobasilar insufficiency and the utility of pre-treatment testing are examined in light of contemporary evidence. In addition, we report on internal carotid artery pathology, and the significance of appreciating atherosclerosis in clinical decision-making. These later two areas are not commonly recognized within manual therapy literature, and we suggest that their importance to differential diagnosis of head and neck pain, as well as estimating treatment related risk, is paramount. We propose that the term cervical arterial dysfunction is more appropriate than classically used nomenclature. This term refers more accurately and completely to the range of pathologies at different anatomical sites that manual therapists treating patients with head and neck pain are likely to encounter. Finally, we present a brief review of the medico-legal status pertaining to this area. Although this is English law-related, the themes derived from this section are of interest to all manual therapists. PMID:19119383

  11. Hardening of the arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Atherosclerosis; Arteriosclerosis; Plaque buildup - arteries; Hyperlipidemia - atherosclerosis; Cholesterol - atherosclerosis ... Hardening of the arteries often occurs with aging. As you grow older, ... narrows your arteries and makes them stiffer. These changes ...

  12. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... ischemia is often seen in people who have hardening of the arteries in other parts of the ... long-term (chronic) mesenteric artery ischemia caused by hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ): Abdominal pain after eating ...

  13. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. ... one of the causes of stroke. Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are ...

  14. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a ...

  15. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease is a disease in ... blood to your face, scalp, and neck. Carotid Arteries Figure A shows the location of the right ...

  16. A Case of Pulsatile Tinnitus from the Atherosclerosis and Atheroma in Superior Labial Artery and Facial Artery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Min; Kim, Choon Dong

    2012-01-01

    Tinnitus is one of the most common symptoms in an audiologic field. It can be classified as either as subjective or objective; former referring to the sensation heard by both patient and examiner. Pulsatile tinnitus is perceived as sounds that vary in frequency, intensity and duration. The cause of pulsatile tinnitus include high jugular bulb, benign intracranial hypertension, glomus tumors, carotid artery stenosis, vascular lesions of the temporal bone, arteriovenous malformation, aneurysms, and Arnold-Chiari malformation. Vascular tinnitus is most common (7.6%). Recently, the authors experienced one case of the pulsatile tinnitus caused by atherosclerosis and atheroma in superior labial artery & facial artery. After surgery, the symptom had disappeared. We report a unique case regarding the objective tinnitus with the literature review. PMID:24653894

  17. Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by an Intraneural Spiral Trigeminocerebellar Artery: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wakuta, Naoki; Abe, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Masani; Higashi, Toshio; Ueba, Tetsuya; Inoue, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminocerebellar artery (TCA) is a branch of the basilar artery that may have an intraneural course and may cause trigeminal neuralgia. We report a case of trigeminal neuralgia with right vertebral artery aneurysm caused by an intraneural TCA that compressed the trigeminal nerve in multiple places. We performed proximal trapping for the fusiform aneurysm with extra-intracranial bypass to preserve flow of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, followed by microvascular decompression that successfully changed the course of the TCA. This procedure provided relief from the neuralgia without direct bisection of the trigeminal nerve that may cause severe nerve injury. Reshaping of the course of the artery can achieve good pain relief. PMID:26251812

  18. Young Women with a Long Past of Resistant Hypertension Cured after Surgery of Severe Bilateral Ostial Renal Artery Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Simonnet, Blandine; Deharo, Pierre; Rouabah, Karim; Silhol, François; Soler, Raphael; Bartoli, Jean Michel; Lévrier, Olivier; Bartoli, Michel Alain; Magnan, Pierre Edouard; Sarlon-Bartoli, Gabrielle

    2016-07-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is an underdiagnosed disease which can affect young people and with poor prognosis such as dissection or aneurysm rupture if unknown. This case illustrates a multi-vessel FMD with symptomatic severe bilateral ostial renal artery stenosis and intracranial aneurysms. One of the original features is a very late delay to diagnosis with 23 years between onset of hypertension and renal stenosis diagnosis, particularly due to lower quality of initial CT scan with milder and uncommon abnormalities. The experiment neuroradiologist had suspected the diagnosis of renal FMD because she developed intracranial aneurysms and he confirmed this diagnosis with an artery renal contrast injection during an intracranial angiogram Because of very tight and short stenosis, surgery was chosen for treatment and permitted the cure of hypertension, with normal home blood pressure after 6 months. Several particularities of FMD were presented in this case: important delay diagnosis due to rare lesion and lower sensitivity of CT in this form, the possibility to perform an angiography in high suspicion of FMD, poor prognosis risk with intracranial aneurisms and premature birth child, and the choice for surgery with cure of hypertension. We thought that hypertension etiologic evaluation must be repeated in case of resistant hypertension in young patients, particularly when they developed intracranial aneurysms. PMID:27174348

  19. Intracranial nonthermal irreversible electroporation: in vivo analysis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo A; Rossmeisl, John H; Neal, Robert E; Ellis, Thomas L; Olson, John D; Henao-Guerrero, Natalia; Robertson, John; Davalos, Rafael V

    2010-07-01

    Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a new minimally invasive technique to treat cancer. It is unique because of its nonthermal mechanism of tumor ablation. Intracranial NTIRE procedures involve placing electrodes into the targeted area of the brain and delivering a series of short but intense electric pulses. The electric pulses induce irreversible structural changes in cell membranes, leading to cell death. We correlated NTIRE lesion volumes in normal brain tissue with electric field distributions from comprehensive numerical models. The electrical conductivity of brain tissue was extrapolated from the measured in vivo data and the numerical models. Using this, we present results on the electric field threshold necessary to induce NTIRE lesions (495-510 V/cm) in canine brain tissue using 90 50-mus pulses at 4 Hz. Furthermore, this preliminary study provides some of the necessary numerical tools for using NTIRE as a brain cancer treatment. We also computed the electrical conductivity of brain tissue from the in vivo data (0.12-0.30 S/m) and provide guidelines for treatment planning and execution. Knowledge of the dynamic electrical conductivity of the tissue and electric field that correlates to lesion volume is crucial to ensure predictable complete NTIRE treatment while minimizing damage to surrounding healthy tissue. PMID:20668843

  20. Non-invasive assessment of intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Robba, C; Bacigaluppi, S; Cardim, D; Donnelly, J; Bertuccio, A; Czosnyka, M

    2016-07-01

    Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) is invaluable in the management of neurosurgical and neurological critically ill patients. Invasive measurement of ventricular or parenchymal pressure is considered the gold standard for accurate measurement of ICP but is not always possible due to certain risks. Therefore, the availability of accurate methods to non-invasively estimate ICP has the potential to improve the management of these vulnerable patients. This review provides a comparative description of different methods for non-invasive ICP measurement. Current methods are based on changes associated with increased ICP, both morphological (assessed with magnetic resonance, computed tomography, ultrasound, and fundoscopy) and physiological (assessed with transcranial and ophthalmic Doppler, tympanometry, near-infrared spectroscopy, electroencephalography, visual-evoked potentials, and otoacoustic emissions assessment). At present, none of the non-invasive techniques alone seem suitable as a substitute for invasive monitoring. However, following the present analysis and considerations upon each technique, we propose a possible flowchart based on the combination of non-invasive techniques including those characterizing morphologic changes (e.g., repetitive US measurements of ONSD) and those characterizing physiological changes (e.g., continuous TCD). Such an integrated approach, which still needs to be validated in clinical practice, could aid in deciding whether to place an invasive monitor, or how to titrate therapy when invasive ICP measurement is contraindicated or unavailable. PMID:26515159

  1. The laboratory profile in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Lea; Zohar, Efrat; Glovinsky, Yoseph; Huna-Baron, Ruth

    2015-07-01

    While overweight and female gender play an undisputable role in the pathogenesis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), the contribution of other factors is still unclear. We have evaluated the laboratory findings of patients with IIH in an attempt to find the influence of abnormalities on the disease course. Included were 82 females after menarche and males older than 18 years who were followed up for at least 1 year. A wide range of laboratory parameters were examined at the time of presentation. The most frequent abnormal laboratory findings were elevated C reactive protein (CRP) (51 %), thrombophilia (31 %), increased plasma cortisol levels (29 %) and elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (20 %). Patients with elevated CRP and patients with thrombophilia had an unfavorable visual outcome. Increased cortisol levels and abnormal calcium correlated with a higher rate of recurrence. The visual outcome of patients with elevated LDH was better than those with normal LDH. It seems that certain metabolic, inflammatory and coagulation abnormalities may influence the course of IIH. If confirmed in further studies, these findings could contribute to elucidation of the etiology and prognosis of IIH. PMID:25596710

  2. Long-term intracranial pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    de Jong, D A; Maas, A I; den Ouden, A H; de Lange, S A

    Continuous or intermittent measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP) is important in patients at risk for raised ICP. Indications exist for short- and long-term measurements. The various methods used for short-term monitoring are discussed with their relative advantages and disadvantages. For long-term measurements of ICP use of a completely implantable telemetric epidural pressure transducer is indicated. No such device is commercially available. We have developed an inexpensive passive telemetric transducer for this purpose. Results obtained up till now have demonstrated its reliability for measurements of two to three months duration. The life span of the device is limited by degrading of the epoxy utilized for sealing of the titanium pressure sensing part to the radiolucent ceramic cap of the transducer, causing leakage of water into the transducer and false low measurements. Because of these problems new hermetic sealing techniques were tested. Both active metal brazing and glass bonding yielded good results and hermetic sealing could be obtained. The metal to ceramic bonding presented is generally applicable within the design of implants. Besides the technical progress reported, the experience with clinical use in 12 patients is presented. PMID:6674738

  3. Superficial temporal artery to proximal posterior cerebral artery bypass through the anterior temporal approach

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Tanikawa, Rokuya; Tsuboi, Toshiyuki; Noda, Kosumo; Oda, Junpei; Miyata, Shiro; Ota, Nakao; Yoshikane, Tsutomu; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    Background: The superficial temporal artery (STA) to proximal posterior cerebral artery (PCA) (P2 segment) bypass is one of the most difficult procedures to perform because the proximal PCA is located deep and high within the ambient cistern. STA to proximal PCA bypass is usually performed through a subtemporal approach or posterior transpetrosal approach, and rarely through a transsylvian approach. The aim of this study was to describe the operative technique of STA to proximal PCA bypass through a modified transsylvian approach (anterior temporal approach). Methods: STA to proximal PCA bypass was performed through an anterior temporal approach in three patients with intracranial aneurysm. We describe the details of the surgical technique. Results: The STA was successfully anastomosed to the proximal PCA in all cases. One patient suffered hemiparesis and aphasia due to infarction in the anterior thalamoperforating artery territory. Conclusions: STA to proximal PCA bypass can be performed through an anterior temporal approach in selected patients. We recommend that every precaution, including complete hemostasis, placement of cellulose sponges beneath the recipient artery to elevate the site of the anastomosis, and placement of a continuous drainage tube at the bottom of the operative field to avoid blood contamination during the anastomosis, should be taken to shorten the temporary occlusion time. PMID:26097774

  4. [The effects of increased intracranial pressure on respiratory functions in clinical setting].

    PubMed

    Kawahara, N; Ono, K; Sasaki, M; Tsutsumi, H; Aruga, T; Mii, K; Toyooka, H; Takakura, K

    1984-06-01

    Respiratory insufficiency following acutely elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may occur as a result of pulmonary edema which is supposed to be caused by increased sympathetic discharge from the central nervous system. Supporting experimental studies have been reported concerning this immediate respiratory consequence, while delayed respiratory consequences with an elevated ICP remain poorly characterized clinically. We studied delayed effects of an increased ICP on respiratory functions (pulmonary shunt ratio (Qs/Qt), respiratory index (A-aDO2/PaO2), oxygenation index (PaO2/FIO2) ), extravascular lung water (EVLW), and hemodynamics [cardiac index (CI), mean arterial pressure (MAP), mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR)] in 15 cases with head injury, 4 with cerebrovascular diseases, and one with hypoxic brain damage. Ten cases had either aspiration, long bone fractures (the syndrome of fat embolism), or pneumonia, and the 10 cases without these pulmonary insults were defined as the cases without pulmonary complications and studied further. Pulmonary functions deteriorated as the ICP rose in the total cases, but in the cases without pulmonary complications, the correlations between the pulmonary functions and the ICP were not significant. None of the hemodynamic parameters correlated with the ICP in both the total cases and the cases without pulmonary complications.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6466502

  5. [Trigeminal neuralgia in an elderly patient associated with a variant of persistent primitive trigeminal artery].

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Ichiro; Motokawa, Tetsufumi; Umeno, Tetsuya; Morofuji, Yoichi; Takahata, Hideaki; Toda, Keisuke; Tsutsumi, Keisuke; Baba, Hiroshi; Yonekura, Masahiro

    2011-09-01

    An 86-year-old woman presented with a 10-year history of right paroxysmal facial pain. The trigger zone was the right maxilla. Magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and MR cisternography sourse images showed an aberrant artery originating from the right internal carotid artery anastomosed to the anterior inferior cerebellar artery territory (AICA) of the cerebellum, and it was closed at the root entry zone of trigeminal nerve. The patient underwent microvascular decompression (MVD), and her pain resolved after the operation. Most of the offending vessels that cause trigeminal neuralgia are the superior cerebellar artery (75-80%) and AICA. Although persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most common type of persistent carotid-basilar anastomosis, trigeminal neuralgia associated with PTA or a PTA variant is very rare, and particularly, a PTA variant is an uncommon, anomalous, intracranial vessel. It is necessary to inspect MR imaging scans carefully prior to MVD surgery because they are frequently associated with intracranial aneurysms. During surgery, we must be careful not to injure the perforating arteries from the PTA variant. MVD for trigeminal neuralgia in elderly patients is effective if the patients can have a tolerate general anesthesia. However, when we plan surgery for elderly patients, we must take care that it does not to lead to unexpected complications. PMID:21878704

  6. Morphological characteristics of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Dodevski, A; Tosovska Lazarova, D; Zhivadinovik, J; Lazareska, M; Stojovska-Jovanovska, E

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of new techniques in diagnostic and interventional radiology and progress in micro neurosurgery, accurate knowledge of the brain blood vessels is essential for daily clinical work. The aim of this study was to describe the morphological characteristics of the superior cerebellar artery and to emphasize their clinical significance. In this study we examined radiographs of 109 patients who had CT angiography at the University Clinic for Radiology in Skopje, R. Macedonia. This study included 49 females and 60 males, ranging in age from 27 to 83 years; mean age 57.4 ± 11.8 years. In 105 patients SCA arose from the basilar artery on both sides as a single vessel. In two patients SCA arose as a duplicate trunk from the basilar artery. We found unilateral duplication on the right SCA in one patient, and bilateral duplication in one patient. In two patients was noticed origin of the SCA from PCA as a single trunk from adult type of the PCA. Through knowledge of the anatomy and variations of SCA is important for clinicians as well as basic scientists who deal with problems related to intracranial vasculature in daily basis for save performance of diagnostic and interventional procedures. PMID:26076777

  7. Tissue Kallikrein Prevents Restenosis After Stenting of Severe Atherosclerotic Stenosis of the Middle Cerebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ruifeng; Zhang, Renliang; Yang, Fang; Lin, Min; Li, Min; Liu, Ling; Yin, Qin; Lin, Hang; Xiong, Yunyun; Liu, Wenhua; Fan, Xiaobing; Dai, Qiliang; Zhou, Lizhi; Lan, Wenya; Cao, Qinqin; Chen, Xin; Xu, Gelin; Liu, Xinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In-stent restenosis (ISR) following intracranial artery stenting affects long-term clinical outcome. This randomized controlled trial sought to identify the long-term efficacy of exogenous tissue kallikrein (TK) for preventing ISR after intracranial stenting of symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) atherosclerotic stenosis. Sixty-one patients successfully treated with intracranial stenting for symptomatic MCA M1 segment stenosis (>70%) were enrolled and randomized into 2 groups: control group and TK group. Patients in the TK group received human urinary kallidinogenase for 7 days, followed by maintenance therapy of pancreatic kallikrein for 6 months. The primary end point was angiographically verified ISR at 6 months, and secondary end points included vascular events and death within 12 months. Endogenous TK plasma concentrations of patients were measured before stenting and at the 6-month follow-up time-point. Patients in the TK group had lower occurrence rates of ISR and vascular events than patients in the control group. There was no difference in endogenous TK levels in plasma at 6 months postoperatively between the TK and control groups. Further subgroup analysis revealed that patients without ISR had higher endogenous TK levels at baseline and lower concentrations at 6 months postoperatively compared with patients who underwent ISR. Exogenous TK is effective for the prevention of ISR after intracranial stenting. PMID:26871851

  8. Solving the Issue of Restenosis After Stenting of Intracranial Stenoses: Experience with Two Thin-Strut Drug-Eluting Stents (DES)—Taxus Element™ and Resolute Integrity™

    SciTech Connect

    Kurre, Wiebke Aguilar-Pérez, Marta; Fischer, Sebastian; Arnold, Guy; Schmid, Elisabeth; Bäzner, Hansjörg; Henkes, Hans

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThin-strut, flexible DES are suitable for intracranial stenting and may improve long-term vessel patency. The purpose of this study was to report our experience with two new-generation DES for the treatment of intracranial atherosclerotic disease.Patients and MethodsWe retrospectively reviewed all patients treated with Taxus Element™ or Resolute Integrity™ stent for an intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis between March 2011 and August 2013. Technical success was defined as the ability to deploy the device at the desired location and reduce the degree of stenosis below 50 %. All procedure-related strokes were recorded. Control angiography was scheduled after 6 weeks, 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. A luminal narrowing ≥50 % was regarded as a restenosis. Stroke recurrence in the territory of the treated artery was reported.ResultsIn the defined period we treated 101 patients harboring 117 intracranial stenoses. The procedure was successful in 100 (85.5 %) lesions. Procedure-related strokes occurred in 10 (9.9 %) patients with a permanent morbidity in 3 (3.0 %). Follow-up angiography was available for 83 of 100 (83.0 %) successfully treated lesions with an average of 355 days (IQR 153–482 days). Three (3.6 %) asymptomatic restenoses were detected. All occurred after treatment with Resolute Integrity™, none after Taxus Element™ (p = 0.059). New strokes in the territory of the treated artery were encountered in 2 (2.6 %) occasions.ConclusionThin-strut DES improve long-term patency and reduce the risk of subsequent stroke. Differences between devices may exist. Feasibility is comparable to bare-metal balloon-mounted stents and procedure-related strokes occurred within the expected range.

  9. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Young; Kim, Jin Bum; Nam, Taek Kyun; Kim, Young Baeg

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) usually results in various problems in the brain. But it can be presented as a myelopathy, which may make early diagnosis and management to be difficult. We recently experienced a case of cervical myelopathy caused by intracranial dAVF. A 60-year-old man presented with a 3-year history of gait disturbance due to a progressive weakness of both legs. Neurological examination revealed spastic paraparesis (grade IV) and Babinski sign on both sides. Magnetic resonance imaging showed serpentine vascular signal voids at C2-T1 on T2-weighted image with increased signal intensity and swelling of spinal cord at C1-C4. We performed a brain computed tomography angiography and found intracranial dAVF with multiple arteriovenous shunts. Venous drainages were noted at tentorial veins and cervical perimedullary veins. After Onyx embolization, the patient showed gradual improvement in motor power and gait disturbance. The venous drainage pattern is a well-known prognostic factor of dAVF. In our case, the intracranial dAVF drained to spinal perimedullary vein, which seemed to result in the ischemic myelopathy. Although it is rare condition, it sometimes can cause serious complications. Therefore, we should keep in mind the possibility of intracranial dAVF when a patient presents myelopathy. PMID:27437016

  10. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Young; Kim, Jin Bum; Nam, Taek Kyun; Kim, Young Baeg; Park, Seung Won

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) usually results in various problems in the brain. But it can be presented as a myelopathy, which may make early diagnosis and management to be difficult. We recently experienced a case of cervical myelopathy caused by intracranial dAVF. A 60-year-old man presented with a 3-year history of gait disturbance due to a progressive weakness of both legs. Neurological examination revealed spastic paraparesis (grade IV) and Babinski sign on both sides. Magnetic resonance imaging showed serpentine vascular signal voids at C2-T1 on T2-weighted image with increased signal intensity and swelling of spinal cord at C1-C4. We performed a brain computed tomography angiography and found intracranial dAVF with multiple arteriovenous shunts. Venous drainages were noted at tentorial veins and cervical perimedullary veins. After Onyx embolization, the patient showed gradual improvement in motor power and gait disturbance. The venous drainage pattern is a well-known prognostic factor of dAVF. In our case, the intracranial dAVF drained to spinal perimedullary vein, which seemed to result in the ischemic myelopathy. Although it is rare condition, it sometimes can cause serious complications. Therefore, we should keep in mind the possibility of intracranial dAVF when a patient presents myelopathy. PMID:27437016

  11. Micro packaged MEMS pressure sensor for intracranial pressure measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Liu; Yan, Yao; Jiahao, Ma; Yanhang, Zhang; Qian, Wang; Zhaohua, Zhang; Tianling, Ren

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a micro packaged MEMS pressure sensor for intracranial pressure measurement which belongs to BioMEMS. It can be used in lumbar puncture surgery to measure intracranial pressure. Miniaturization is key for lumbar puncture surgery because the sensor must be small enough to allow it be placed in the reagent chamber of the lumbar puncture needle. The size of the sensor is decided by the size of the sensor chip and package. Our sensor chip is based on silicon piezoresistive effect and the size is 400 × 400 μm2. It is much smaller than the reported polymer intracranial pressure sensors such as liquid crystal polymer sensors. In terms of package, the traditional dual in-line package obviously could not match the size need, the minimal size of recently reported MEMS-based intracranial pressure sensors after packaging is 10 × 10 mm2. In this work, we are the first to introduce a quad flat no-lead package as the package form of piezoresistive intracranial pressure sensors, the whole size of the sensor is minimized to only 3 × 3 mm2. Considering the liquid measurement environment, the sensor is gummed and waterproof performance is tested; the sensitivity of the sensor is 0.9 × 10-2 mV/kPa. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61025021, 61434001), and the ‘Thousands Talents’ Program for Pioneer Researchers and Its Innovation Team, China.

  12. Carotid artery anatomy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    There are four carotid arteries, two on each side of the neck: right and left internal carotid arteries, and right and left external carotid arteries. The carotid arteries deliver oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the head and brain.

  13. Endovascular Treatment of a Mycotic Intracavernous Carotid Artery Aneurysm Using a Stent Graft

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vivek; Jain, Vikash; Mathuria, SN; Khandelwal, N

    2013-01-01

    Summary Intracavernous carotid artery mycotic aneurysms are rare and management is determined by clinical presentation. We describe the first documented proximal intracranial mycotic aneurysm treated by a balloon expandable Aneugraft PCS covered stent. An 11-year-old female child presented with acute onset fever, headache, chemosis followed by diplopia, right-sided ptosis with ophthalmoplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral cavernous sinus thrombosis. Subsequent work-up included serial computed tomographic arteriography and digital subtraction angiography which revealed a progressively enlarging intracavernous carotid aneurysm. An Aneugraft PCS covered stent was successfully deployed endovascularly, and complete exclusion of the aneurysm was achieved while maintaining the patency of the parent artery. The use of covered stents in intracranial vasculature can be an effective and safe treatment modality for exclusion of the mycotic aneurysm in selected cases. PMID:24070080

  14. The unruptured intracranial aneurysm treatment score

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robert D.; Beseoglu, Kerim; Juvela, Seppo; Raymond, Jean; Morita, Akio; Torner, James C.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Raabe, Andreas; Mocco, J.; Korja, Miikka; Abdulazim, Amr; Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Barrow, Daniel L.; Bederson, Joshua; Bonafe, Alain; Dumont, Aaron S.; Fiorella, David J.; Gruber, Andreas; Hankey, Graeme J.; Hasan, David M.; Hoh, Brian L.; Jabbour, Pascal; Kasuya, Hidetoshi; Kelly, Michael E.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.; Knuckey, Neville; Koivisto, Timo; Krings, Timo; Lawton, Michael T.; Marotta, Thomas R.; Mayer, Stephan A.; Mee, Edward; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Molyneux, Andrew; Morgan, Michael K.; Mori, Kentaro; Murayama, Yuichi; Nagahiro, Shinji; Nakayama, Naoki; Niemelä, Mika; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Pierot, Laurent; Rabinstein, Alejandro A.; Roos, Yvo B.W.E.M.; Rinne, Jaakko; Rosenwasser, Robert H.; Ronkainen, Antti; Schaller, Karl; Seifert, Volker; Solomon, Robert A.; Spears, Julian; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Vergouwen, Mervyn D.I.; Wanke, Isabel; Wermer, Marieke J.H.; Wong, George K.C.; Wong, John H.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Connolly, E. Sander; Steinmetz, Helmuth; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Pasqualin, Alberto; Rüfenacht, Daniel; Vajkoczy, Peter; McDougall, Cameron; Hänggi, Daniel; LeRoux, Peter; Rinkel, Gabriel J.E.; Macdonald, R. Loch

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We endeavored to develop an unruptured intracranial aneurysm (UIA) treatment score (UIATS) model that includes and quantifies key factors involved in clinical decision-making in the management of UIAs and to assess agreement for this model among specialists in UIA management and research. Methods: An international multidisciplinary (neurosurgery, neuroradiology, neurology, clinical epidemiology) group of 69 specialists was convened to develop and validate the UIATS model using a Delphi consensus. For internal (39 panel members involved in identification of relevant features) and external validation (30 independent external reviewers), 30 selected UIA cases were used to analyze agreement with UIATS management recommendations based on a 5-point Likert scale (5 indicating strong agreement). Interrater agreement (IRA) was assessed with standardized coefficients of dispersion (vr*) (vr* = 0 indicating excellent agreement and vr* = 1 indicating poor agreement). Results: The UIATS accounts for 29 key factors in UIA management. Agreement with UIATS (mean Likert scores) was 4.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.1–4.3) per reviewer for both reviewer cohorts; agreement per case was 4.3 (95% CI 4.1–4.4) for panel members and 4.5 (95% CI 4.3–4.6) for external reviewers (p = 0.017). Mean Likert scores were 4.2 (95% CI 4.1–4.3) for interventional reviewers (n = 56) and 4.1 (95% CI 3.9–4.4) for noninterventional reviewers (n = 12) (p = 0.290). Overall IRA (vr*) for both cohorts was 0.026 (95% CI 0.019–0.033). Conclusions: This novel UIA decision guidance study captures an excellent consensus among highly informed individuals on UIA management, irrespective of their underlying specialty. Clinicians can use the UIATS as a comprehensive mechanism for indicating how a large group of specialists might manage an individual patient with a UIA. PMID:26276380

  15. Risk of intracranial hypertension with intrauterine levonorgestrel

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hao; Gustafson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to quantify the risk of intracranial hypertension (ICH) with the intrauterine levonorgestrel (IUL) device Mirena®. Methods: We used the United States Food and Drug Administration’s Adverse Events Reporting System (FAERS) database to quantify a reporting odds ratio (ROR) for ICH and Mirena®. We also conducted a retrospective cohort study using the IMS LifeLink® database, comparing the risk of two oral contraceptives ethinyl estradiol (EE) with Mirena®. A Bayesian sensitivity analysis was performed to account for the effect of body mass index (BMI). Results: The reported odds ratios (ORs) for ICH and papilledema with Mirena® were 1.78 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41–2.25) and 1.50 (95% CI 1.10–2.05), respectively. In the cohort study, the OR for ICH and EE-norgestimate and EE-norethindrone compared with Mirena® were 1.29 (95% CI 0.83–2.00) and 0.31 (95% CI 0.04–2.29), respectively. The presence of a strong confounder BMI did not affect the estimated OR (OR = 1.31, 95% CI 0.73–2.41 for EE-norgestimate; OR = 0.18, 95% CI 0.01–1.27 for EE-norethindrone). Conclusion: We found a higher than expected number of reports of ICH with Mirena® in the FAERS database. We also found a similar risk of ICH with Mirena® compared with the oral contraceptive EE-norgestimate. The higher risk of ICH with EE-norethindrone, another oral contraceptive should be further investigated. PMID:26240745

  16. Intracranial nonvestibular neurinomas: Young neurosurgeons’ experience

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Forhad Hossain; Haque, Mohammod R.; Kawsar, Khandkar A.; Sarker, Mainul H.; Hasan, Mahmudul; Goel, Atul H.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Neurinoma arising from other than nonvestibular cranial nerves is less prevalent. Here we present our experiences regarding the clinical profile, investigations, microneurosurgical management, and the outcome of nonvestibular cranial nerve neurinomas. Materials and Methods: From January 2005 to December 2011, the recorded documents of operated nonvestibular intracranial neurinomas were retrospectively studied for clinical profile, investigations, microneurosurgical management, complications, follow-up, and outcomes. Results: The average follow-up was 24.5 months. Total number of cases was 30, with age ranging from 9 to 60 years. Sixteen cases were males and 14 were females. Nonvestibular cranial nerve schwannomas most commonly originated from trigeminal nerve followed by glossopharyngeal+/vagus nerve. There were three abducent nerve schwannomas that are very rare. There was no trochlear nerve schwannoma. Two glossopharyngeal+/vagus nerve schwannomas extended into the neck through jugular foramen and one extended into the upper cervical spinal canal. Involved nerve dysfunction was a common clinical feature except in trigeminal neurinomas where facial pain was a common feature. Aiming for no new neurodeficit, total resection of the tumor was done in 24 cases, and near-total resection or gross total resection or subtotal resection was done in 6 cases. Preoperative symptoms improved or disappeared in 25 cases. New persistent deficit occurred in 3 cases. Two patients died postoperatively. There was no recurrence of tumor till the last follow-up. Conclusion: Nonvestibular schwannomas are far less common, but curable benign lesions. Surgical approach to the skull base and craniovertebral junction is a often complex and lengthy procedure associated with chances of significant morbidity. But early diagnosis, proper investigations, and evaluation, along with appropriate decision making and surgical planning with microsurgical techniques are the

  17. Vapor resistant arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor); Dussinger, Peter M. (Inventor); Buchko, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A vapor block resistant liquid artery structure for heat pipes. A solid tube artery with openings is encased in the sintered material of a heat pipe wick. The openings are limited to that side of the artery which is most remote from the heat source. The liquid in the artery can thus exit the artery through the openings and wet the sintered sheath, but vapor generated at the heat source is unlikely to move around the solid wall of the artery and reverse its direction in order to penetrate the artery through the openings. An alternate embodiment uses finer pore size wick material to resist vapor entry.

  18. Complete ophthalmoplegia: A rare presentation of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Irfan Yousuf; Verma, Sawan; Wani, Mushtaq; Asimi, Ravouf; Sheikh, Saleem; Wani, Maqbool; Sheikh, Nawaz; Shah, Irfan; Mushtaq, Mudasir

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder defined by clinical criteria that include signs and symptoms isolated to those produced by increased intracranial pressure (ICP; e. g., headache, papilledema, and vision loss), elevated ICP with normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition, and no other cause of intracranial hypertension evident on neuroimaging or other evaluations. The most common signs in IIH are papilledema, visual field loss, and unilateral or bilateral sixth cranial nerve palsy. Here we report a case of IIH presenting as headache with vision loss, papilledema, complete ophthalmoplegia with proptosis in one eye, and sixth cranial nerve palsy in the other eye. Patient was managed with acetazolamide, topiramate, and diuretics. Symptoms remained static and she was planned for urgent CSF diversion procedure. PMID:26713027

  19. Ten self-inflicted intracranial penetrating nail gun injuries

    PubMed Central

    Yuh, Sung-Joo; Alaqeel, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating craniocerebral injuries from nail gun use are rare. We describe a case of 10 self-inflicted nail gun injuries with intracranial penetrations. We also review the literature and discuss management strategies of such craniocerebral trauma. A 33-year-old male with a long-standing history of severe depression took a nail gun and sustained 10 penetrating intracranial injuries. Initial neuroimaging revealed 10 penetrating nails, all sparing the major cerebral vasculature. Immediate surgical removal was undertaken in the surgical suite using a combination of craniotomies, craniectomies, and blind removal. Intracranial injuries from self-inflicted nail gun misuse is becoming increasingly more frequent. Initial appropriate clinical decision-making are critical in preventing further cortical or vascular damage. PMID:26166596

  20. Intracranial granulocytic sarcoma: two cases and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huanyu; Wang, Hong; Ma, Quanfeng; Chen, Yiyang

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial granulocytic sarcoma was a relatively rare tumor composed of myeloid blasts and/or immature myeloid cells in an extramedullary site which is associated with acute/chronic myeloid leukemia. In this paper, two cases of intracranial granulocytic sarcoma, one male aged 36 and one 28-year-old female, were reported to improve the diagnosis and treatment of such diseases. Diagnostic and treatment procedures for them were retrospectively summarized and relevant literature reviews were combined. Pathological biopsy was conducted to validate the diagnosis. Surgical resections in combination with chemotherapy were performed. The differential diagnosis of intracranial granulocytic sarcoma from malignant lymphomas and alternative small round cell malignancy was confirmed by biopsy and immunohistochemistry. PMID:26770615

  1. Noninvasive Intracranial Volume and Pressure Measurements Using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Prevention of secondary brain injuries following head can be accomplished most easily when intracranial pressure (ICP) is monitored. However, current measurement techniques are invasive and thus not practical in the combat environment. The Pulsed Phase Lock Loop (PPLL) devise, which was developed and patented, uses a unique, noninvasive ultrasonic phase comparison method to measure slight changes in cranial volume which occur with changes in ICP. Year one studies involved instrument improvements and measurement of altered intracranial distance with altered ICP in fresh cadavera. Our software was improved to facilitate future studies of normal subjects and trauma patients. Our bench studies proved that PPLL output correlated highly with changes in path length across a model cranium. Cadaveric studies demonstrated excellent compact, noninvasive devise for monitoring changes in intracranial distance may aid in the early detection of elevated ICP, decreasing risk of secondary brain injury and infection, and returning head-injured patients to duty.

  2. Primary varicella infection presenting with headache and elevated intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Gilad, Oded; Shefer-Averbuch, Noa; Garty, Ben Zion

    2015-05-01

    Primary varicella infection may be associated with neurologic complications, such as cerebritis and meningoencephalitis. Several cases of varicella infection with elevated intracranial pressure have been reported. We describe a 13-year-old immunocompetent girl who presented with a clinical picture of headaches and elevated intracranial pressure as the only manifestation of primary varicella zoster infection. The working diagnosis at first was pseudotumor cerebri based on complaints of headache of 2 weeks' duration, in addition to vomiting and papilledema, without fever or skin eruption. On lumbar puncture, opening pressure was 420 mmH2O, but mild pleocytosis and mildly elevated protein level ruled out the diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri. Our patient had no history of previous varicella infection, and she did not receive the varicella zoster vaccine. Serology tests, done on admission and repeated 2 months later, suggested primary varicella infection. The literature on varicella infection associated with pseudotumor cerebri or elevated intracranial pressure is reviewed. PMID:24846901

  3. [Intracranial hemorrhage caused by neurosyphilis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Koh, Masaki; Kashiwazaki, Daina; Yamatani, Kazumasa; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    It is well known that neurosyphilis is a cause of stroke and its main subtype is ischemic stroke. In this report, we present a rare case with intracranial hemorrhage in left frontal lobe and subarachnoid hemorrhage due to neurosyphilis. A 56-year-old man developed conscious disturbance, right hemiparesis, and motor aphasia, and was admitted to our hospital. Rapid plasma reagin(RPR)and fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption(FTA-ABS)serology was positive in blood and cerebrospinal fluid. MR angiography and 3D-CT angiography demonstrated no vascular abnormalities. He responded well to penicillin treatment, followed by complete resolution of his neurological symptoms. Diagnosis of neurosyphilis is sometimes difficult, as patients usually present with non-specific symptoms such as intracranial hemorrhage. To our knowledge, only 3 cases of intracranial hemorrhage caused by neurosyphilis have been reported previously. This case is reported to raise the awareness of this uncommon but important manifestation of neurosyphilis. PMID:25087758

  4. Central retinal artery pressure and carotid artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    SUN, RAN; PENG, XIAO-YAN; YOU, QI-SHENG; JIAO, LI-QUN; JONAS, JOST B.

    2016-01-01

    The central retinal artery (CRA), which can be non-invasively examined with ophthalmoscopy, may be regarded as an extracranial part of the cerebrovascular system. Assessment of CRA pressure may be of help in assessing the impediment of the intracranial blood circulation in patients with a carotid artery stenosis (CAS). The aim of this study was to explore the potential associations between diastolic central retinal artery pressure (diastCRAP) and CAS. The prospective longitudinal clinical observational study included patients with CAS and a control group without CAS. diastCRAP was assessed using ophthalmodynamometry. The study group consisted of 95 patients with CAS (50 of whom had >75%CAS and underwent surgery; the surgical study group) and a control group of 64 individuals without CAS. In all study participants, a lower diastCRAP was significantly associated with a higher degree of CAS (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis indicated that a higher CAS degree was significantly (correlation coefficient: r=0.75) associated with a higher brachial diastolic blood pressure (P<0.001) and lower diastCRAP (P<0.001). Within the surgical study group at the baseline of the study, diastCRAP was significantly lower at the surgical side than at the contralateral side (P=0.02). The diastCRAP on the surgical side increased significantly (P<0.001) after surgery. In the surgical study group at baseline, diastCRAP on the surgical side was not significantly associated with brachial diastolic blood pressure (P=0.22), whereas after surgery, diastCRAP was significantly associated with brachial diastolic blood pressure (P=0.001). DiastCRAP was found to be significantly and linearly correlated with the degree of CAS in intra-individual inter-eye, inter-individual and intra-individual follow-up comparisons. The strong and linear association between diastCRAP and the degree of CAS suggest that diastCRAP should be explored further for use as an indicator of cerebrovascular status. PMID:26998005

  5. Hemodynamic Alterations after Stent Implantation in 15 Cases of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Tian, Zhongbin; Liu, Jian; Jing, Linkai; Paliwal, Nikhil; Wang, Shengzhang; Zhang, Ying; Xiang, Jianping; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Meng, Hui; Yang, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    Background Stent-assisted coiling technology has been widely used in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. In current study, we investigated the intra-aneurysmal hemodynamic alterations after stent implantation and its association with aneurysm location. Methods We first retrospectively studied 15 aneurysm cases (8 internal carotid artery-ophthalmic artery (ICA-OphA) aneurysms and 7 posterior communicating artery (PcoA) aneurysms) treated with Enterprise stents and coils. Then based on patient-specific geometries before and after stenting, we built virtual stenting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation models. Results Before and after stent deployment, the average Wall Shear Stress (WSS) on the aneurysmal sac at systolic peak changed from 7.04 Pa (4.14 Pa, 15.77 Pa) to 6.04 Pa (3.86 Pa, 11.13 Pa), P = 0.001; and the spatially averaged value of flow velocity in the perpendicular plane of aneurysm dropped from 0.5 m/s (0.28 m/s, 0.7 m/s) to 0.33 m/s (0.25 m/s, 0.49 m/s), P = 0.001, respectively. Post-stent implantation, WSS in ICA-OphA aneurysms and PcoA aneurysms decreased by 14.4% (P = 0.012) and 16.6% (P = 0.018) respectively, and flow velocity also reduced by 10.3% (P = 0.029) and 10.5% (P = 0.013), respectively. Changes in WSS, flow velocity, and pressure were not significantly different between ICA-OphA aneurysms and PcoA aneurysms (P > 0.05). Stent implantation did not significantly change the peak systolic pressure in both aneurysm types. Conclusion After stent implantation, intra-aneurysmal flow velocity and WSS decreased independent of aneurysm type (ICA-OphA and PcoA). Little change was observed on peak systolic pressure. PMID:26746828

  6. Correlation Between Aneurysm Size and Hemodynamics in One Individual with Multiple Small Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Britz, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Objective A large number of cases are needed in the patient-specific modeling of intracranial aneurysms to establish the statistical significance due to individual variation of risk factors that are difficult to account for. However, these risk factors are critical in hemorrhage risk as demonstrated in large clinical studies. Rupture risks for aneurysms in an individual are easier to compare because these aneurysms are under the same physiological environment, and their only differences are the local hemodynamic factors associated with their anatomic locations. Methods Eight small aneurysms (< 7 mm) from one individual were analyzed using patient-specific hemodynamic modeling. Four scenarios with different perfusion assumptions were performed to account for the flow rate at two smaller communicating arteries. Wall shear stresses (WSS) at these aneurysms were compared to determine their relationship with the aneurysm size. Results Each of the three largest aneurysms is either the most proximal or distal aneurysm in a given artery so that blood pressure does not have a direct influence on aneurysm size. No wall shear stress-derived hemodynamic variables are found to be related to aneurysm size. Discussion A study of multiple aneurysms from one individual offers a unique opportunity to examine various hemodynamic factors without selection biases. Aneurysms greater than 4 mm (Group 1) have a higher product of maximum WSS and area of low WSS; aneurysms smaller than 4 mm (Group 2) have a lower product of maximum WSS and area of low WSS. In addition, aneurysm size is linearly correlated with the flow rate at the parent artery in each group. PMID:27555981

  7. Correlation Between Aneurysm Size and Hemodynamics in One Individual with Multiple Small Intracranial Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Jou, Liangder; Britz, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Objective A large number of cases are needed in the patient-specific modeling of intracranial aneurysms to establish the statistical significance due to individual variation of risk factors that are difficult to account for. However, these risk factors are critical in hemorrhage risk as demonstrated in large clinical studies. Rupture risks for aneurysms in an individual are easier to compare because these aneurysms are under the same physiological environment, and their only differences are the local hemodynamic factors associated with their anatomic locations. Methods Eight small aneurysms (< 7 mm) from one individual were analyzed using patient-specific hemodynamic modeling. Four scenarios with different perfusion assumptions were performed to account for the flow rate at two smaller communicating arteries. Wall shear stresses (WSS) at these aneurysms were compared to determine their relationship with the aneurysm size. Results Each of the three largest aneurysms is either the most proximal or distal aneurysm in a given artery so that blood pressure does not have a direct influence on aneurysm size. No wall shear stress-derived hemodynamic variables are found to be related to aneurysm size. Discussion A study of multiple aneurysms from one individual offers a unique opportunity to examine various hemodynamic factors without selection biases. Aneurysms greater than 4 mm (Group 1) have a higher product of maximum WSS and area of low WSS; aneurysms smaller than 4 mm (Group 2) have a lower product of maximum WSS and area of low WSS. In addition, aneurysm size is linearly correlated with the flow rate at the parent artery in each group. PMID:27555981

  8. Optoacoustic detection and monitoring of blast-induced intracranial hematomas in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Wynne, Karon E.; Prough, Donald S.; Dewitt, Douglas S.; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Parsley, Margaret A.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2014-03-01

    Patients with acute intracranial hematomas often require surgical drainage within the first four hours after traumatic brain injury (TBI) to avoid death or severe neurologic disability. CT and MRI permit rapid, noninvasive diagnosis of hematomas, but can be used only at a major health-care facility. At present, there is no device for noninvasive detection and characterization of hematomas in pre-hospital settings. We proposed to use an optoacoustic technique for rapid, noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring of hematomas, including intracranial hematomas. Unlike bulky CT and MR equipment, an optoacoustic system can be small and easily transported in an emergency vehicle. In this study we used a specially-designed blast device to inflict TBI in rats. A near-infrared OPO-based optoacoustic system developed for hematoma diagnosis and for blood oxygenation monitoring in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) in small animals was used in the study. Optoacoustic signals recorded simultaneously from the SSS and hematomas allowed for measurements of their oxygenations. The presence of hematomas was confirmed after the experiment in gross pictures of the exposed brains. After blast the hematoma signal and oxygenation increased, while SSS oxygenation decreased due to the blastinduced TBI. The increase of the oxygenation in fresh hematomas may be explained by the leakage of blood from arteries which have higher blood pressure compared to that of veins. These results indicate that the optoacoustic technique can be used for early diagnosis of hematomas and may provide important information for improving outcomes in patients with TBI or stroke (both hemorrhagic and ischemic).

  9. A Prospective Study of Asymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerotic Stenosis in Neurologically Normal Volunteers in a Japanese Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Ryukichi; Nakagawa, Tomonori; Takayoshi, Hiroyuki; Onoda, Keiichi; Oguro, Hiroaki; Nagai, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic stenosis of major intracranial arteries is a leading cause of ischemic stroke in Asia. However, the long-term prognosis of asymptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS) in healthy volunteers has not been fully examined. Here, we conducted a longitudinal study to examine the prognosis of healthy volunteers with asymptomatic ICAS and to determine the risk factors for ICAS, including asymptomatic brain parenchymal lesions. We studied 2,807 healthy Japanese volunteers with no history of stroke (mean age, 62.0 years). They were followed for a mean interval of 64.5 months. The degree of ICAS and the presence of asymptomatic brain lesions were assessed by using magnetic resonance imaging. Asymptomatic ICAS was detected in 166 volunteers (5.9%) at the initial examination. Moderate and mild stenoses were observed in 1.5 and 4.4% of patients, respectively. Significant risk factors for ICAS were older age and a history of hypertension and/or dyslipidemia. During follow-up, ischemic stroke developed in 32 volunteers. Seven strokes occurred in the ICAS group, whose stroke incidence rate was higher than that in the non-ICAS group (0.78 vs. 0.18% per year). According to a Cox regression analysis, asymptomatic ICAS was an independent risk factor for future ischemic stroke after adjustment for age. Furthermore, after asymptomatic brain lesions were taken into account, ICAS was still a significant risk factor for stroke onset. In conclusion, even mild to moderate asymptomatic ICAS was a significant risk factor for future stroke, independent of asymptomatic brain lesions, in a healthy Japanese population. Mild to moderate ICAS might be a therapeutic target for stroke prevention. PMID:27047445

  10. Factors Influencing the Management of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Podraza, Katherine M; Luthra, Nijee; Origitano, Thomas C; Schneck, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Background Deciding how to manage an unruptured intracranial aneurysm can be difficult for patients and physicians due to controversies about management. The decision as to when and how to intervene may be variable depending on physicians’ interpretation of available data regarding natural history and morbidity and mortality of interventions. Another significant factor in the decision process is the patients’ conception of the risks of rupture and interventions and the psychological burden of harboring an unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Objective  To describe which factors are being considered when patients and their physicians decide how to manage unruptured intracranial aneurysms.  Materials & methods  In a retrospective chart review study, we identified patients seen for evaluation of an unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Data was collected regarding patient and aneurysm characteristics. The physician note pertaining to the management decision was reviewed for documented reasons for intervention. Results  Of 88 patients included, 36 (41%) decided to undergo open or endovascular surgery for at least one unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Multiple aneurysms were present in 14 (16%) patients. Younger patients and current smokers were more likely to undergo surgery, but gender and race did not affect management. Aneurysm size and location strongly influenced management. The most common documented reasons underlying the decision of whether to intervene were the risk of rupture, aneurysm size, and risks of the procedure. For 23 aneurysms (21%), there were no factors documented for the management decision.  Conclusion  The risk of rupture of unruptured intracranial aneurysms may be underestimated by currently available natural history data. Major factors weighed by physicians in management decisions include aneurysm size and location, the patient's age, and medical comorbidities along with the risk of procedural complications. Additional data is needed to

  11. Factors Influencing the Management of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Gillani, Rebecca L; Podraza, Katherine M; Luthra, Nijee; Origitano, Thomas C; Schneck, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Background Deciding how to manage an unruptured intracranial aneurysm can be difficult for patients and physicians due to controversies about management. The decision as to when and how to intervene may be variable depending on physicians' interpretation of available data regarding natural history and morbidity and mortality of interventions. Another significant factor in the decision process is the patients' conception of the risks of rupture and interventions and the psychological burden of harboring an unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Objective  To describe which factors are being considered when patients and their physicians decide how to manage unruptured intracranial aneurysms.  Materials & methods  In a retrospective chart review study, we identified patients seen for evaluation of an unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Data was collected regarding patient and aneurysm characteristics. The physician note pertaining to the management decision was reviewed for documented reasons for intervention. Results  Of 88 patients included, 36 (41%) decided to undergo open or endovascular surgery for at least one unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Multiple aneurysms were present in 14 (16%) patients. Younger patients and current smokers were more likely to undergo surgery, but gender and race did not affect management. Aneurysm size and location strongly influenced management. The most common documented reasons underlying the decision of whether to intervene were the risk of rupture, aneurysm size, and risks of the procedure. For 23 aneurysms (21%), there were no factors documented for the management decision.  Conclusion  The risk of rupture of unruptured intracranial aneurysms may be underestimated by currently available natural history data. Major factors weighed by physicians in management decisions include aneurysm size and location, the patient's age, and medical comorbidities along with the risk of procedural complications. Additional data is needed to define

  12. Unusual Radiologic Finding of Intracranial Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor Presenting a Cyst with Mural Nodule

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Heok; Chung, Dong-Sup

    2015-01-01

    An intracranial cyst tumor with a mural nodule can be representative of some types of brain tumors, but is a rare presentation of intracranial inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT). Herein, we report the case of an intracranial IMT in a 48-year-old woman presenting with the extremely unusual radiologic findings of a cyst with a mural nodule. PMID:26605272

  13. Impact of Nursing Educational Program on Reducing or Preventing Postoperative Complications for Patients after Intracranial Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmowla, Rasha Ali Ahmed Abd; El-Lateef, Zienab Abd; El-khayat, Roshdy

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial surgery means any surgery performed inside the skull to treat problems in the brain and surrounding structures. Aim: Evaluate the impact of nursing educational program on reducing or preventing postoperative complications for patients after intracranial surgery. Subjects and methods: Sixty adult patients had intracranial surgery (burr…

  14. Intracranial taser dart penetration: Literature review and surgical management

    PubMed Central

    Kaloostian, PE; Tran, H

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a fourteen-year-old female who obtained TASER dart penetration to her right parietal region. She was neurologically intact with headache. CT scan of the head demonstrated TASER penetration intracranially without hemorrhage. Attempts were made at sterile removal of TASER at bedside under sedation. This caused the TASER to break at multiple points leaving only an intracranial component. She was urgently taken to the operating room for craniectomy for TASER removal. After reviewing the literature of an additional two patients, we suggest patients should not have attempts at removing device at bedside and should be taken to the operating room for adequate removal and washout. PMID:24960679

  15. Intra-cranial Toxoplasmosis in an Immunocompetent Female.

    PubMed

    Hoti, Yaser Ud Din; Aziz, Amir; Ishaque, Khurram; Abbas, Sadia; Ud Din, Tariq Salah

    2016-06-01

    Intra-cranial toxoplasmosis is a rare entity occurring mostly in immunosuppressed individuals. It is extremely rare in an immune competent patient. Toxoplasmosis is the third leading cause of food borne illness. Depending upon the site, degree of inflammation and local damage, toxoplasmosis encephalitis and cranial abscess can cause long lasting neurologic sequel. With modern imaging techniques, toxoplasmosis antibody titers, slit lamp examination and brain biopsy, there is improvement in diagnosis along with reduction in the mortality rate. We present a case illustrating the radiological manifestations, complications, potential pitfalls in diagnosis and treatment of intra-cranial toxoplasmosis in immunocompetent patient. PMID:27376217

  16. Intracranial hypotension secondary to spinal pathology: Diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Sartip, Kamyar; McKenna, Gregory; Spina, Michael; Grahovac, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Spinal pathology resulting in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and intracranial hypotension is an infrequently reported and a potentially severe cause of headaches. We present a case of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak caused by a thoracic disk herniation successfully treated with two targeted epidural blood patches. Although patients typically present with orthostatic headaches, the imaging findings of intracranial hypotension should prompt investigation of the spine for site and cause of the CSF leakage. Treatment includes autologous blood patch and surgery in refractory cases. PMID:26914140

  17. [Headache can be caused by spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lasse Berg; Bjarkam, Carsten Reidies

    2014-06-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an uncommon condition associated with postural headache, nausea and dizziness. It is believed to be secondary to a dural tear with resultant cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. This is a case report of a pregnant woman (gestational age 31 weeks) who contacted an obstetric department because of severe headache. Pre-eclamp-sia was suspected, but not found. An MRI showed a CSF leak at C1-C2 level and intracranial signs of SIH. The woman was treated with an autologous blood patch and recovered quickly. Focus on subjective symptoms and MRI findings seem to be important in the diagnostic procedure of SIH. PMID:25352082

  18. Pediatric intracranial gunshot wounds: the Memphis experience.

    PubMed

    DeCuypere, Michael; Muhlbauer, Michael S; Boop, Frederick A; Klimo, Paul

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Penetrating brain injury in civilians is much less common than blunt brain injury but is more severe overall. Gunshot wounds (GSWs) cause high morbidity and mortality related to penetrating brain injury; however, there are few reports on the management and outcome of intracranial GSWs in children. The goals of this study were to identify clinical and radiological factors predictive for death in children and to externally validate a recently proposed pediatric prognostic scale. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective review of penetrating, isolated GSWs sustained in children whose ages ranged from birth to 18 years and who were treated at 2 major metropolitan Level 1 trauma centers from 1996 through 2013. Several standard clinical, laboratory, and radiological factors were analyzed for their ability to predict death in these patients. The authors then applied the St. Louis Scale for Pediatric Gunshot Wounds to the Head, a scoring algorithm that was designed to provide rapid prognostic information for emergency management decisions. The scale's sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictability were determined, with death as the primary outcome. RESULTS Seventy-one children (57 male, 14 female) had a mean age of 14 years (range 19 months to 18 years). Overall mortality among these children was 47.9%, with 81% of survivors attaining a favorable clinical outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale score ≥ 4). A number of predictors of mortality were identified (all p < 0.05): 1) bilateral fixed pupils; 2) deep nuclear injury; 3) transventricular projectile trajectory; 4) bihemispheric injury; 5) injury to ≥ 3 lobes; 6) systolic blood pressure < 100 mm Hg; 7) anemia (hematocrit < 30%); 8) Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤ 5; and 9) a blood base deficit < -5 mEq/L. Patient age, when converted to a categorical variable (0-9 or 10-18 years), was not predictive. Based on data from the 71 patients in this study, the positive predictive value of the St

  19. Stent-Assisted Endovascular Treatment of Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms – Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Kocur, Damian; Ślusarczyk, Wojciech; Przybyłko, Nikodem; Bażowski, Piotr; Właszczuk, Adam; Kwiek, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Summary The anterior cerebral artery is a common location of intracranial aneurysms. The standard coil embolization technique is limited by its inability to occlude wide-neck aneurysms. Stent deployment across the aneurysm neck supports the coil mass inside the aneurysmal sac, and furthermore, has an effect on local hemodynamic and biologic changes. In this article, various management strategies and techniques as well as angiographic outcomes and complications related to stent-assisted endovascular treatment of anterior communicating artery aneurysms are presented. This treatment method is safe and associated with low morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:27559426

  20. Stent-Assisted Endovascular Treatment of Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms - Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Kocur, Damian; Ślusarczyk, Wojciech; Przybyłko, Nikodem; Bażowski, Piotr; Właszczuk, Adam; Kwiek, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    The anterior cerebral artery is a common location of intracranial aneurysms. The standard coil embolization technique is limited by its inability to occlude wide-neck aneurysms. Stent deployment across the aneurysm neck supports the coil mass inside the aneurysmal sac, and furthermore, has an effect on local hemodynamic and biologic changes. In this article, various management strategies and techniques as well as angiographic outcomes and complications related to stent-assisted endovascular treatment of anterior communicating artery aneurysms are presented. This treatment method is safe and associated with low morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:27559426

  1. Qualitative Evaluation of a High-Resolution 3D Multi-Sequence Intracranial Vessel Wall Protocol at 3 Tesla MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenjie; van der Kolk, Anja G.; Abrigo, Jill; Lee, Ka Lok; Chu, Winnie Chiu Wing; Zwanenburg, Jaco J. M.; Siero, Jeroen C. W.; Wong, Ka Sing; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Chen, Fiona Xiang Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Intracranial vessel wall imaging using MRI has great potential as a clinical method for assessing intracranial atherosclerosis. The purpose of the current study was to compare three 3T MRI vessel wall sequences with different contrast weightings (T1w, PD, T2w) and dedicated sagittal orientation perpendicular to the middle cerebral artery, to the reconstructed sagittal image from a transverse 3D T1w volumetric isotropically reconstructed turbo spin-echo acquisition (VIRTA), and provide a clinical recommendation. Materials and Methods The above-mentioned sequences were acquired in 10 consecutive Chinese ischemic stroke or TIA patients (age: 68 years, sex: 4 females) with angiographic-confirmed MCA stenosis at 3T. Institutional review board approval was obtained. Two raters qualitatively scored all images on overall image quality, presence of artifacts, and visibility of plaques. Data were compared using Repeated measures ANOVA and Sidak’s adjusted post hoc tests. Results All sequences except the T2w sequence were able to depict the walls of the large vessels of the Circle of Willis (p<0.05). T1w sagittal oblique VIRTA showed significantly more artifacts (p<0.01). Peripherally located plaques were sometimes missed on the sagittal sequences, but could be appreciated on the transverse T1w VIRTA. Conclusion With the 3T multi-sequence vessel wall protocol we were able to assess the intracranial plaque with two different image contrast weightings. The sequence of preference to include in a clinical protocol would be the transverse 3D T1w VIRTA based on absence of artifacts, larger coverage including the whole Circle of Willis, and excellent lesion depiction. PMID:27532106

  2. Cooled artery extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artery vapor trap. A heat pipe artery is constructed with an extension protruding from the evaporator end of the heat pipe beyond the active area of the evaporator. The vapor migrates into the artery extension because of gravity or liquid displacement, and cooling the extension condenses the vapor to liquid, thus preventing vapor lock in the working portion of the artery by removing vapor from within the active artery. The condensed liquid is then transported back to the evaporator by the capillary action of the artery extension itself or by wick located within the extension.

  3. Endovascular Embolization of Visceral Artery Aneurysms with Ethylene-vinyl Alcohol (Onyx): A Case Series

    SciTech Connect

    Bratby, M.J.; Lehmann, E.D.; Bottomley, J.; Kessel, D.O.; Nicholson, A.A.; McPherson, S.J.; Morgan, R.A.; Belli, A.-M.

    2006-12-15

    We report the application of the liquid embolic agent ethylene-vinyl alcohol (Onyx; MicroTherapeutics, Irvine, CA, USA) in the management of visceral artery aneurysms. The technique and indications for using Onyx are discussed with emphasis on the management of wide-necked aneurysms and maintenance of patency of the parent vessel. None of the cases was considered suitable for stent-grafting or embolization with conventional agents. Two aneurysms of the renal artery bifurcation and one aneurysm of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery were treated. Following treatment there was complete exclusion of all aneurysms. There was no evidence of end-organ infarction. Follow-up with intervals up to 6 months has shown sustained aneurysm exclusion. Onyx is known to be effective in the management of intracranial aneurysms. Our experience demonstrates the efficacy and applicability of the use of Onyx in the treatment of complex visceral artery aneurysms.

  4. Endovascular glue embolization of dissecting aneurysm of type-3 accessory middle cerebral artery: A contralateral approach.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Rajsrinivas; Goel, Gaurav; Gupta, Vipul; Narang, Karanjit Singh; Anand, Saurabh; Jha, Ajaya Nand

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric intracranial aneurysms are rare with a reported prevalence of 0.5-4.6%. Likewise, anomalous arterial patterns are uncommon in the cerebral circulation. Recognition of these variations and knowledge of vascular territory forms the key to managing pathological conditions associated with these anomalous vessels. Ruptured dissecting aneurysm of type-3 accessory middle cerebral artery (aMCA) has not been reported in the pediatric age group. In addition to type-3 aMCA, the child in this case report had an ipsilateral type-1 aMCA with cortical supply. We describe the patterns of accessory MCA and their vascular territory, state the perplexity involved in deciding the best management strategy, and describe the technical approach we undertook to catheterize this small caliber recurrent artery (type-3 aMCA) originating at an acute angle from the anterior cerebral artery. PMID:26508091

  5. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome with multivessel cervical artery dissections and a double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Nouh, Amre; Ruland, Sean; Schneck, Michael J; Pasquale, David; Biller, José

    2014-02-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) has been associated with exposure to vasoactive substances and few reports with cervical arterial dissections (CADs). We evaluated a 32-year-old woman with history of depression, migraines without aura, and cannabis use who presented with a thunderclap headache unresponsive to triptans. She was found to have bilateral occipital infarcts, bilateral extracranial vertebral artery dissections, bilateral internal carotid artery dissecting aneurysms, and extensive distal multifocal segmental narrowing of the anterior and posterior intracranial circulation with a "sausage on a string-like appearance" suggestive of RCVS. Subsequently, she was found to have a distal thrombus of the basilar artery, was anticoagulated, and discharged home with no residual deficits. We highlight the potential association of CADs and RCVS. The association of RCVS and a double aortic arch has not been previously reported. PMID:24103665

  6. Sonographic prenatal diagnosis of intracranial fetus in fetu.

    PubMed

    Ianniruberto, A; Rossi, P; Ianniruberto, M; Rella, G; Ciminelli, V

    2001-07-01

    A case of sonographic prenatal diagnosis of a complex intracranial mass, with features of a fetus in fetu at 17 weeks' gestation, is reported. This diagnosis is reserved for a highly organized tumor containing a vertebral column and recognizable fetal parts and should be differentiated from a teratoma. PMID:11489229

  7. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620 Section 882.1620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1620...

  8. Intracranial abscesses associated with chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Seven, Huseyin; Coskun, Berna Uslu; Calis, Asli B; Sayin, Ibrahim; Turgut, Suat

    2005-10-01

    Intracranial abscesses are serious complications of chronic suppurative otitis media (COM). This study included 32 patients presenting with intracranial abscesses from 780 patients hospitalized for treatment of COM. The 32 patients had 59 intracranial complications. Perisinus abscess (13 of 32) was the most common intracranial abscess, followed by temporal lobe abscess (8 of 32), epidural abscess (7 of 32), cerebellar abscess (6 of 32) and subdural empyema (2 of 32). Headache (93%), fever (87%) and altered mental status (62%) were the most common presenting symptoms and signs, along with symptoms of COM. All patients were treated with intravenous antibiotics and canal wall down mastoidectomy. Cholesteatoma with granulation tissue and bony defects at the sinus plate and/or dural plate were seen in most of the patients. Gram negative bacilli and anaerobes were the most common organisms cultured from the abscesses. Three patients had neurological sequels. One patient died. The early diagnosis of these complications requires a high index of suspicion and imaging studies. A multidisciplinary and coordinated approach is important for the management of these patients. PMID:15959795

  9. Fluoroscopically-guided epidural blood patch for spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manish; Giampetro, David M; Kalapos, Paul; Caldwell, Julia C

    2015-01-01

    We present three patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension who failed conservative treatment and were treated with image-guided epidural blood patch close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak site. Each patient achieved significant long-term improvement of clinical symptoms and CSF leak related image findings. PMID:26702220

  10. Understanding idiopathic intracranial hypertension: mechanisms, management, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Markey, Keira A; Mollan, Susan P; Jensen, Rigmor H; Sinclair, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disorder characterised by raised intracranial pressure that predominantly affects young, obese women. Pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated, but several causal factors have been proposed. Symptoms can include headaches, visual loss, pulsatile tinnitus, and back and neck pain, but the clinical presentation is highly variable. Although few studies have been done to support evidence-based management, several recent advances have the potential to enhance understanding of the causes of the disease and to guide treatment decisions. Investigators of the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT) reported beneficial effects of acetazolamide in patients with mild visual loss. Studies have also established weight loss as an effective disease-modifying treatment, and further clinical trials to investigate new treatments are underway. The incidence of idiopathic intracranial hypertension is expected to increase as rates of obesity increase; efforts to reduce diagnostic delays and identify new, effective approaches to treatment will be key to meeting the needs of a growing number of patients. PMID:26700907

  11. Asymptomatic Intracranial Foreign Body: An Incidental Finding on Radiography

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoudi, Mohammadreza; Shahbazzadegan, Bita; Pezeshki, Arastoo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intracranial needles are rare entities. Intracranial foreign bodies due to non-missile intracranial penetrations are one of the most rarely encountered situations in neurosurgery. Sewing needles are among the more unusual foreign bodies that may be found in the brain. Although uncommon, foreign body cases are important and interesting. Foreign bodies enter the body through trauma or iatrogenic injuries. Needles are mostly inserted through fontanelles, cranial sutures, and more rarely through the orbits in infancy for the purpose of killing unwanted babies. Case Presentation This article presents a case of intracranial foreign body found upon radiography. A 24-year-old female, who two days prior to presentation suffered only once from dizziness, and was otherwise healthy. Conclusions Because this incident may have occurred during the patient’s neonatal period, it may be a case of child abuse. In spite of the very limited number of cases in the literature, having a stepmother, a stepfather, or a babysitter, being the youngest child, or having family members who suffer from psychiatric disorders, (especially if these relatives are responsible for child care), living in a society that allows homicide of children born from extramarital relationships, and being female have been suggested as possible risk factors. PMID:27626006

  12. A severe case of intracranial hemorrhage due to alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Cota, Francesco; Zuppa, Antonio Alberto; Luciano, Rita; Gallini, Francesca; Savarese, Immacolata; Alighieri, Giovanni; Orchi, Claudia; Romagnoli, Costantino

    2008-11-01

    Alloimmune thrombocytopenia (AIT) is an important cause of intrauterine hemorrhagic lesions that result from platelet-antigen incompatibility between mother and foetus. Foetal platelets are destroyed by cross-reactive maternal antibodies that cross the placenta. The most serious complication of AIT is foetal intracranial bleeding that may eventually result in intrauterine death or severe neurological impairments. PMID:19031280

  13. Invasive intracranial aspergillosis in an immunocompetent patient after dental extraction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bo; Wu, Xingtong; Zhou, Dong

    2011-02-01

    Invasive intracranial aspergillosis in immunocompetent patients remains a rarity. We report such a case in a male who developed symptoms after a dental extraction. Attention should be paid to atypical central nervous system symptoms after dental procedures; early diagnosis and management are of great importance to improve outcomes. PMID:21047191

  14. Treatment of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypotension With Tea: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Petramfar, Peyman; Mohammadi, S. Saeed; Hosseinzadeh, Farideh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The syndrome of spontaneous intracranial hypotension has been increasingly diagnosed since its discovery through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It is a rare syndrome that is due to the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from a tear in the dura and can occur at any age, even among adolescents, but is most frequently seen among females in late middle age. Case Presentation Here, we describe a 32-year-old woman with a two-month history of headaches and occasional nausea and vomiting (N/V). MRI without gadolinium was normal, but meningeal enhancement was seen in MRI with gadolinium. The lumbar puncture revealed a low opening pressure. Computed tomography myelography (CT myelography) showed no leakage; Therefore, idiopathic intracranial hypotension was diagnosed. Treatment was started using tea, and the patient’s headache got significantly better in about a day. Conclusions Conservative therapy, such as bed rest and caffeine treatment with eight cups of tea daily, yielded a significant improvement in our patient. Effectively, the patient constitutes a case of idiopathic intracranial hypotension due to undetectable CSF leakage or hyper-absorption, with good response to conservative management through tea-drinking. Further investigations with an appropriate sample size are needed in order to confirm this intervention in the treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypotension. PMID:27621920

  15. Sturge-Weber syndrome with bilateral intracranial calcification.

    PubMed Central

    Boltshauser, E; Wilson, J; Hoare, R D

    1976-01-01

    Four children affected by Sturge-Weber syndrome and demonstrating bilateral intracranial calcification are described, bringing up to 21 the number of similar reported cases. The frequency of bilateral hemisphere involvement in this syndrome is not known, but it might be as high as 15%. If present, neurosurgical intervention is, in our opinion, contraindicated. Images PMID:932761

  16. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hawthorne, Christopher; Piper, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Since Monro published his observations on the nature of the contents of the intracranial space in 1783, there has been investigation of the unique relationship between the contents of the skull and the intracranial pressure (ICP). This is particularly true following traumatic brain injury (TBI), where it is clear that elevated ICP due to the underlying pathological processes is associated with a poorer clinical outcome. Consequently, there is considerable interest in monitoring and manipulating ICP in patients with TBI. The two techniques most commonly used in clinical practice to monitor ICP are via an intraventricular or intraparenchymal catheter with a microtransducer system. Both of these techniques are invasive and are thus associated with complications such as hemorrhage and infection. For this reason, significant research effort has been directed toward development of a non-invasive method to measure ICP. The principle aims of ICP monitoring in TBI are to allow early detection of secondary hemorrhage and to guide therapies that limit intracranial hypertension (ICH) and optimize cerebral perfusion. However, information from the ICP value and the ICP waveform can also be used to assess the intracranial volume–pressure relationship, estimate cerebrovascular pressure reactivity, and attempt to forecast future episodes of ICH. PMID:25076934

  17. Orbital and Intracranial Effects of Microgravity: 3T MRI Findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, L. A.; Sargsyan, A.; Hasan, K. M.; Polk, J. D.; Hamilton, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Goals and Objectives of this presentation are: 1. To briefly describe a newly discovered clinical entity related to space flight. 2. To describe normal anatomy and pathologic changes of the optic nerve, posterior globe, optic nerve sheath and pituitary gland related to exposure to microgravity. 3. To correlate imaging findings with known signs of intracranial hypertension.

  18. Monitoring of intracranial pressure in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Christopher; Piper, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Since Monro published his observations on the nature of the contents of the intracranial space in 1783, there has been investigation of the unique relationship between the contents of the skull and the intracranial pressure (ICP). This is particularly true following traumatic brain injury (TBI), where it is clear that elevated ICP due to the underlying pathological processes is associated with a poorer clinical outcome. Consequently, there is considerable interest in monitoring and manipulating ICP in patients with TBI. The two techniques most commonly used in clinical practice to monitor ICP are via an intraventricular or intraparenchymal catheter with a microtransducer system. Both of these techniques are invasive and are thus associated with complications such as hemorrhage and infection. For this reason, significant research effort has been directed toward development of a non-invasive method to measure ICP. The principle aims of ICP monitoring in TBI are to allow early detection of secondary hemorrhage and to guide therapies that limit intracranial hypertension (ICH) and optimize cerebral perfusion. However, information from the ICP value and the ICP waveform can also be used to assess the intracranial volume-pressure relationship, estimate cerebrovascular pressure reactivity, and attempt to forecast future episodes of ICH. PMID:25076934

  19. Iatrogenic Dural Arteriovenous Fistula after Superficial Temporal Artery to Middle Cerebral Artery Anastomosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seng-Won; Shim, Jae-Hyon; Rho, Seung-Jin; Choi, Hak-Ki; Park, Hwa-Seung

    2015-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are uncommon, representing only 10% to 15% of all intracranial AVFs. Here we present the case of a patient with cerebral infarction who experienced a dural AVF after craniotomy for superficial temporal artery (STA) to middle cerebral artery (MCA) bypass surgery. A 48-year-old man presented with dysarthria and right side hemiparesis. A brain magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed multiple acute infarctions and severe stenosis of the left MCA. Therefore, STA-MCA bypass surgery was performed. A follow-up angiography performed 2 weeks after the surgery showed an abnormal vascular channel from the left middle meningeal artery (MMA) to the middle meningeal vein (MMV) just anterior to the border of the craniotomy margin. This fistula originated from a screw used for cranial fixation. The screw injured the MMA and MMV, and this resulted in the formation of a fistula. The fistula was successfully treated with transarterial embolization. Surgeons should be careful when fixing bones with screws and plates as fistulas can develop if vessels are injured. PMID:27169083

  20. Successful Treatment of Intracranial Germ Cell Tumor: Report of Two Unusual Cases and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hyun; Woo, In Sook; Cho, Young Yun; Lee, Won Jik; Han, Deok Jae; Han, Chi Wha; Jung, Yun Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Primary intracranial germ cell tumor (GCT) is a rare tumor that generally occurs due to developmental anomaly. Although intracranial GCT is sensitive to treatment, a high recurrence rate, treatment-related long-term complications and the heterogeneity of this tumor group make treatment complicated. Moreover, because of its location, hydrocephalus and visual field defect, functional disturbance of the pituitary gland can occur and require attention. Treatment primarily relies on chemotherapy and radiation therapy but the management of intracranial GCT remains unsettled, especially in the case of unusual circumstances such as multifocal tumor or nongerminomatous GCT. Here, we present two unusual cases of intracranial GCT: one case with a bifocal intracranial germinoma, and the other with an intracranial choriocarcinoma. Both cases were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by reduced-field radiation therapy without significant treatment-related complication. Further, we performed a PubMed search to investigate the appropriate treatment strategy for this unusual subtype of intracranial GCT. PMID:26668575

  1. Three-dimensional stereotactic atlas of the extracranial vasculature correlated with the intracranial vasculature, cranial nerves, skull and muscles

    PubMed Central

    Shoon Let Thaung, Thant; Choon Chua, Beng; Hnin Wut Yi, Su; Yang, Yili; Urbanik, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to construct a 3D, interactive, and reference atlas of the extracranial vasculature spatially correlated with the intracranial blood vessels, cranial nerves, skull, glands, and head muscles. The atlas has been constructed from multiple 3T and 7T magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) brain scans, and 3T phase contrast and inflow MRA neck scans of the same specimen in the following steps: vessel extraction from the scans, building 3D tubular models of the vessels, spatial registration of the extra- and intracranial vessels, vessel editing, vessel naming and color-coding, vessel simplification, and atlas validation. This new atlas contains 48 names of the extracranial vessels (25 arterial and 23 venous) and it has been integrated with the existing brain atlas. The atlas is valuable for medical students and residents to easily get familiarized with the extracranial vasculature with a few clicks; is useful for educators to prepare teaching materials; and potentially can serve as a reference in the diagnosis of vascular disease and treatment, including craniomaxillofacial surgeries and radiologic interventions of the face and neck. PMID:25923683

  2. [The Therapeutic Dilemma in Treatment of Intracranial Infectious Aneurysm in Patients with Infective Endocarditis: Proposal for a Patient-Centered, Interdisciplinary Treatment Concept].

    PubMed

    Leuenhagen, S; Burghaus, L; Kukolja, J; Rosenkranz, S; Kabbasch, C; Fink, G R; Onur, O A

    2016-07-01

    Intracranial infectious aneurysms are rare but hazardous complications of an infective endocarditis. To date, there are no evidence-based recommendations for the treatment of patients with this condition. Therefore, it remains an interdisciplinary challenge to decide which treatment steps are required and in which order they should be carried out. To illustrate the interdisciplinary dilemma in the treatment of these patients, we here present a case of a 23-year-old, drug-addicted woman with infectious endocarditis. While antibiotic treatment of the streptococcus-mitis-induced endocarditis stabilized the overall status of the patient, rupture of a basilar artery aneurysm caused her sudden death. We discuss the decision-making processes of the treatment, potential difficulties and dilemmas when dealing with patients suffering from infectious endocarditis and infectious intracranial aneurysm. Based upon case reports, studies and reviews, we present the options and risks of conservative, neurosurgical, endovascular, and cardiosurgical treatment of intracranial infectious aneurysms, and propose a patient-centered, interdisciplinary treatment concept. PMID:27471999

  3. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death ... both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened ...

  4. Occlusive Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... artery. Such people should seek medical care immediately. Did You Know... When people suddenly develop a painful, ... In This Article Animation 1 Peripheral Arterial Disease Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Figure 1 ...

  5. Retinal artery occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... These blockages are more likely if there is hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ) in the eye. Clots ... Blindness and vision loss Blood clots Diabetes Glaucoma Hardening of the arteries High blood cholesterol levels High ...

  6. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death in the United States in both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to ...

  7. Carotid artery surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000238.htm Carotid artery surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had carotid artery surgery to restore proper blood flow to your ...

  8. Carotid artery surgery - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100124.htm Carotid artery surgery - series To use the sharing features on ... 4 Normal anatomy Overview There are four carotid arteries, with a pair located on each side of ...

  9. Coronary artery fistula

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007315.htm Coronary artery fistula To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Coronary artery fistula is an abnormal connection between one of ...

  10. Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes and medication . View an animation of atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis and PAD Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up ... of an artery. PAD is usually caused by atherosclerosis in the peripheral arteries (or outer regions away ...

  11. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a process called atherosclerosis ...

  12. Intravenous thrombolysis, mechanical embolectomy, and intracranial stenting for hyperacute ischemic stroke in a patient with moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Argetsinger, Debora S; Miller, Jeffrey W; Fletcher, Jeffrey J

    2016-07-01

    The Japanese translation of moyamoya means "puff of smoke" and refers to the angiographic appearance of dilated collateral vessels seen during chronic progressive narrowing of the intracranial supraclinoid portions of the internal carotid arteries. Despite cerebral ischemia being the most common presenting symptom, 20% to 40% of adults suffer a hemorrhagic stroke. Due to the lack of evidence and histopathologic findings, intravenous and endovascular reperfusion therapy is typically avoided. This case study presents a patient with moyamoya disease in the hyperacute phase of ischemic stroke. The patient received full dose (0.9mg/kg) tissue plasminogen activator and subsequently underwent a mechanical clot extraction and Wingspan stent (Stryker, Kalamazoo, MI, USA) placement. The use of these options in the setting of moyamoya disease is novel. This demonstrates that moyamoya disease may not be an absolute contraindication to revascularization in hyperacute ischemic stroke and underscores that many perceived contraindications to thrombolytic and mechanical revascularization therapies are relative. PMID:26896911

  13. Combination of Rare Right Arterial Variation with Anomalous Origins of the Vertebral Artery, Aberrant Subclavian Artery and Persistent Trigeminal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, H.; San Millán Ruíz, D.; Abdo, G.; Asakura, F.; Yilmaz, H.; Lovblad, K.O.; Rüfenacht, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary A 32-year-old woman hospitalized for subarachnoid hemorrhage showed rare arterial variation on the right side with anomalous origins of the vertebral artery, aberrant subclavian artery and persistent trigeminal artery. Angiography showed the right vertebral artery to originate from the right common carotid artery, the right subclavian artery to arise separately from the descending aorta, and persistent trigeminal artery on the right side. The possible embryonic mechanism of this previously unreported variant combination is discussed. PMID:22005696

  14. Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization of a Mycotic Renal Artery Aneurysm by Use of a Self-Expanding Neurointerventional Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Rabellino, Martin; Garcia-Nielsen, Luis; Zander, Tobias Baldi, Sebastian; Llorens, Rafael; Maynar, Manuel

    2011-02-15

    Mycotic aneurysms are uncommon, especially those located in visceral arteries. We present a case of a patient with two visceral mycotic aneurysms due to bacterial endocarditis, one located in right upper pole renal artery and the second in the splenic artery. Both aneurysms were treated as endovascular embolization using microcoils. In the aneurysm located at the renal artery, the technique of stent-assisted coils embolization was preferred to avoid coils migration due to its wide neck. The stent used was the Solitaire AB, which was designed for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms and was used recently in acute stroke as a mechanical thrombectomy device. Complete embolization of the aneurysm was achieved, preserving all the arterial branches without nephrogram defects in the final angiogram.

  15. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and efficacy continues to be studied in several medical centers. This procedure involves the placement of a small flexible tube (catheter) into an artery from the groin. The catheter is then directed to the neck to reach the carotid artery blockage. A balloon pushes open the artery wall and a stent ( ...

  16. Stimulation of the middle meningeal artery leads to Fos expression in the trigeminocervical nucleus: a comparative study of monkey and cat

    PubMed Central

    HOSKIN, KAREN L.; ZAGAMI, ALESSANDRO S.; GOADSBY, PETER J.

    1999-01-01

    The pain of a migraine attack is often described as unilateral, with a throbbing or pulsating quality. The middle meningeal artery (MMA) is the largest artery supplying the dura mater, is paired, and pain-producing in humans. This artery, or its branches, and other large intracranial extracerebral vessels have been implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine by theories suggesting neurogenic inflammation or cranial vasodilatation, or both, as explanations for the pain of migraine. Having previously studied in detail the distribution of the second order neurons that are involved in the transmission of nociceptive signals from intracranial venous sinuses, we sought to compare the distribution of second order neurons from a pain-producing intracranial artery in both monkey and cat. By electrically stimulating the middle meningeal artery in these species and using immunohistochemical detection of the proto-oncogene Fos as a marker of neuronal activation, we have mapped the sites of the central trigeminal neurons which may be involved in transmission of nociception from intracranial extracerebral arteries. Ten cats and 3 monkeys were anaesthetised with α-chloralose and the middle meningeal artery was isolated following a temporal craniotomy. The animals were maintained under stable anaesthesia for 24 h to allow Fos expression due to the initial surgery to dissipate. Following the rest period, the vessel was carefully lifted onto hook electrodes, and then left alone in control animals (cat n = 3), or stimulated (cat n = 6, monkey n = 3). Stimulation of the left middle meningeal artery evoked Fos expression in the trigeminocervical nucleus, consisting of the dorsal horn of the caudal medulla and upper 2 divisions of the cervical spinal cord, on both the ipsilateral and contralateral sides. Cats had larger amounts of Fos expressed on the ipsilateral than on the contralateral side. Fos expression in the caudal nucleus tractus solitarius and its caudal extension in lamina

  17. Endothelial Injury Preceding Intracranial Aneurysm Formation in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Li, M-H; Li, P-G; Huang, Q-L; Ling, J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study investigates the change of endothelial cell morphology and function at the rabbit basilar bifurcations in response to sustained high blood flow after bilateral common carotid artery ligation. Methods: Fifteen adult female New Zealand white rabbits were divided into experimental and sham control groups. The experimental group was subjected to bilateral common carotid artery ligation to increase the compensatory basilar artery flow. Basilar artery flow was monitored by transcranial Doppler after surgery. The endothelial cells at the arterial bifurcations were studied morphologically by electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry using β-catenin antibodies. Basilar artery flow increased significantly following common carotid artery ligation. Results: Early-stage basilar artery bifurcation aneurysms were present in all rabbits at three months after ligation. The endothelial cells changed from a fusiform to column shape at the basilar artery bifurcation. Gaps between endothelial cells of the experimental group appeared wider in the electron microscopic photographs compared with those of the control group. The expression of endothelial β-catenin at the arterial bifurcations also decreased. Conclusion: This study is the first to present endothelial cell changes of basilar artery bifurcation in response to sustained high blood flow in rabbits. Endothelial cell impairment possibly initiates aneurysm formation. PMID:25303252

  18. Timing Treatment of a Giant Intracranial Aneurysm by the Use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the Determination of Intraluminal Clot Stability

    PubMed Central

    Jungreis, Charles A.; Jannetta, Peter J.; Yonas, Howard

    1993-01-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with a giant intracranial carotid artery aneurysm. Magnetic resonance (MR) images demonstrated a large amount of fresh intraluminal thrombus in the aneurysm. During test occlusion of the internal carotid artery using an endovascular balloon positioned in the cervical portion of the internal carotid, the patient sustained an apparent embolic episode. The patient was followed for several weeks with serial MR imaging until the thrombus had lysed. Repeat test occlusion followed by permanent carotid occlusion was uneventful. Serial MR evaluations of intraluminal thrombus in large aneurysms might help to determine an optimal time for institution of intervention. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3p34-bFigure 4Figure 5 PMID:17170887

  19. The arterial circle of the brain, its branches and connections in selected representatives of the Antilopinae.

    PubMed

    Frąckowiak, Hieronim; Dębiński, Dariusz; Komosa, Marcin; Zdun, Maciej

    2015-07-01

    The arterial circle of the brain, that is, the circle of Willis, and its branches in ruminants have been chiefly described in farm animals and only in selected wild species. In view of the deficit of information about this vascular region in numerous other species of the Ruminantia, the arteries of the encephalic base were analyzed in five antelope species representing different genera of the Bovidae, Antilopinae. Specimens of the following species were examined: springbuck (Antidorcas marsupialis), blackbuck (Antilope cervicapra), dik-dik (Madoqua kirkii), saiga (Saiga tatarica), and oribi (Ourebia ourebi). Post-autopsy material received from domestic zoological gardens was used to inject the bilateral common carotid arteries with a stained acetone solution of vinyl superchloride. When the material was polymerized, the specimens were macerated enzymatically. The process resulted in casts of arteries of the head and encephalic base on a skeletal scaffold. The investigations revealed that the bilateral components of the arterial circle of the brain, that is, the rostral cerebral artery and caudal communicating artery, arose from the division of the intracranial segment of the internal carotid artery, which emerges from the rostral epidural rete mirabile. The extracranial segment of the internal carotid artery was obliterated. In consequence of this process, the blood reaches the brain chiefly from the maxillary artery. The research proved that the arteries of the encephalic base in the Antilopinae are most similar to the vessels described in antelopes of Tragelaphus, Taurotragus, and Boselaphus genera and small domestic ruminants. However, they are different from the arterial pattern of the encephalic base in bovines and other species classified as the Bovini. PMID:25694115

  20. Tissue Kallikrein Prevents Restenosis After Stenting of Severe Atherosclerotic Stenosis of the Middle Cerebral Artery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ruifeng; Zhang, Renliang; Yang, Fang; Lin, Min; Li, Min; Liu, Ling; Yin, Qin; Lin, Hang; Xiong, Yunyun; Liu, Wenhua; Fan, Xiaobing; Dai, Qiliang; Zhou, Lizhi; Lan, Wenya; Cao, Qinqin; Chen, Xin; Xu, Gelin; Liu, Xinfeng

    2016-02-01

    In-stent restenosis (ISR) following intracranial artery stenting affects long-term clinical outcome. This randomized controlled trial sought to identify the long-term efficacy of exogenous tissue kallikrein (TK) for preventing ISR after intracranial stenting of symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) atherosclerotic stenosis.Sixty-one patients successfully treated with intracranial stenting for symptomatic MCA M1 segment stenosis (>70%) were enrolled and randomized into 2 groups: control group and TK group. Patients in the TK group received human urinary kallidinogenase for 7 days, followed by maintenance therapy of pancreatic kallikrein for 6 months. The primary end point was angiographically verified ISR at 6 months, and secondary end points included vascular events and death within 12 months. Endogenous TK plasma concentrations of patients were measured before stenting and at the 6-month follow-up time-point.Patients in the TK group had lower occurrence rates of ISR and vascular events than patients in the control group. There was no difference in endogenous TK levels in plasma at 6 months postoperatively between the TK and control groups. Further subgroup analysis revealed that patients without ISR had higher endogenous TK levels at baseline and lower concentrations at 6 months postoperatively compared with patients who underwent ISR.Exogenous TK is effective for the prevention of ISR after intracranial stenting. PMID:26871851